Science.gov

Sample records for cytosolic calcium oscillations

  1. Circadian oscillations of cytosolic and chloroplastic free calcium in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Knight, M. R.; Kondo, T.; Masson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Haley, A.; Trewavas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco and Arabidopsis plants, expressing a transgene for the calcium-sensitive luminescent protein apoaequorin, revealed circadian oscillations in free cytosolic calcium that can be phase-shifted by light-dark signals. When apoaequorin was targeted to the chloroplast, circadian chloroplast calcium rhythms were likewise observed after transfer of the seedlings to constant darkness. Circadian oscillations in free calcium concentrations can be expected to control many calcium-dependent enzymes and processes accounting for circadian outputs. Regulation of calcium flux is therefore fundamental to the organization of circadian systems.

  2. Electric pulses: a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations and generate spontaneous-like calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Menorval, Marie-Amelie; Andre, Franck M; Silve, Aude; Dalmay, Claire; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Mir, Lluis M

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells of great interest in regenerative medicine or oncology. They present spontaneous calcium oscillations related to cell cycle progression or differentiation but the correlation between these events is still unclear. Indeed, it is difficult to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations with chemical means. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) can permeabilise plasma and/or organelles membranes depending on the applied pulses and therefore generate cytosolic calcium peaks by recruiting calcium from the external medium or from internal stores. We show that it is possible to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations (same amplitude, duration and shape) using 100 μs PEFs or 10 ns PEFs. We propose a model that explains the experimental situations reported. PEFs can therefore be a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations. This tool, that can be switched on and off instantaneously, contrary to chemicals agents, can be very useful to investigate the role of calcium oscillations in cell physiology and/or to manipulate cell fate. PMID:27561994

  3. Electric pulses: a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations and generate spontaneous-like calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    de Menorval, Marie-Amelie; Andre, Franck M.; Silve, Aude; Dalmay, Claire; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Mir, Lluis M.

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells of great interest in regenerative medicine or oncology. They present spontaneous calcium oscillations related to cell cycle progression or differentiation but the correlation between these events is still unclear. Indeed, it is difficult to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations with chemical means. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) can permeabilise plasma and/or organelles membranes depending on the applied pulses and therefore generate cytosolic calcium peaks by recruiting calcium from the external medium or from internal stores. We show that it is possible to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations (same amplitude, duration and shape) using 100 μs PEFs or 10 ns PEFs. We propose a model that explains the experimental situations reported. PEFs can therefore be a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations. This tool, that can be switched on and off instantaneously, contrary to chemicals agents, can be very useful to investigate the role of calcium oscillations in cell physiology and/or to manipulate cell fate. PMID:27561994

  4. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed.

  5. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca (2+) oscillations.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca (2+) oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca (2+) exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca (2+) changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca (2+) are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca (2+) oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca (2+) stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca (2+) oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca (2+) exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  6. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  7. Cytosolic Calcium Measurements in Renal Epithelial Cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wing-Kee; Dittmar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A variety of cellular processes, both physiological and pathophysiological, require or are governed by calcium, including exocytosis, mitochondrial function, cell death, cell metabolism and cell migration to name but a few. Cytosolic calcium is normally maintained at low nanomolar concentrations; rather it is found in high micromolar to millimolar concentrations in the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial matrix and the extracellular compartment. Upon stimulation, a transient increase in cytosolic calcium serves to signal downstream events. Detecting changes in cytosolic calcium is normally performed using a live cell imaging set up with calcium binding dyes that exhibit either an increase in fluorescence intensity or a shift in the emission wavelength upon calcium binding. However, a live cell imaging set up is not freely accessible to all researchers. Alternative detection methods have been optimized for immunological cells with flow cytometry and for non-immunological adherent cells with a fluorescence microplate reader. Here, we describe an optimized, simple method for detecting changes in epithelial cells with flow cytometry using a single wavelength calcium binding dye. Adherent renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, which are normally difficult to load with dyes, were loaded with a fluorescent cell permeable calcium binding dye in the presence of probenecid, brought into suspension and calcium signals were monitored before and after addition of thapsigargin, tunicamycin and ionomycin. PMID:25407650

  8. Regulation of cytosolic free calcium concentration by intrasynaptic mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Serrano, A; Satrústegui, J

    1992-01-01

    By the use of digitonin permeabilized presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes), we have found that intrasynaptic mitochondria, when studied "in situ," i.e., surrounded by their cytosolic environment, are able to buffer calcium in a range of calcium concentrations close to those usually present in the cytosol of resting synaptosomes. Adenine nucleotides and polyamines, which are usually lost during isolation of mitochondria, greatly improve the calcium-sequestering activity of mitochondria in permeabilized synaptosomes. The hypothesis that the mitochondria contributes to calcium homeostasis at low resting cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in synaptosomes has been tested; it has been found that in fact this is the case. Intrasynaptic mitochondria actively accumulates calcium at [Ca2+]i around 10(-7) M, and this activity is necessary for the regulation of [Ca2+]i. When compared with other membrane-limited calcium pools, it was found that depending on external concentration the calcium pool mobilized from mitochondria is similar or even greater than the IP3- or caffeine-sensitive calcium pools. In summary, the results presented argue in favor of a more prominent role of mitochondria in regulating [Ca2+]i in presynaptic nerve terminals, a role that should be reconsidered for other cellular types in light of the present evidence. PMID:1550964

  9. Wind-induced plant motion immediately increases cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, M R; Smith, S M; Trewavas, A J

    1992-01-01

    Wind is one of the most unusual and more dramatic of the environmental signals to modify plant development. Wind-stimulated crops are also known to experience considerable reductions in growth and subsequent yield. There is at present no experimental data to suggest how wind signals are perceived and transduced by plant cells. We have genetically transformed Nicotiana plumbaginifolia to express aequorin and thus produced luminous plants that directly report cytosolic calcium by emitting blue light. With these plants we have found wind stimulation to cause immediate increases in cytosolic calcium and our evidence, based on the use of specific inhibitors, suggests that this calcium is mobilized from organelle sources. Our data further suggest that wind-induced movement of tissues, by mechanically stimulating and stressing constituent plant cells, is responsible for the immediate elevation of cytosolic calcium; increases occur only when the plant tissue is actually in motion. Repeated wind stimulation renders the cells refractory to further calcium signaling but responsiveness is rapidly recovered when stimulation is subsequently diminished. Our data suggest that mechanoperception in plant cells may possibly be transduced through intracellular calcium. Since mechanoperception and transduction are considered crucial to plant morphogenesis, our observations suggest that calcium could be central in the control and generation of plant form. Images PMID:11536497

  10. A theoretical model of cytosolic calcium elevation following wounding in urothelial cell monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Peter A.; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2013-02-01

    Scratch wounding of a urothelial cell monolayer triggers a number of events including the release of soluble, diffusible signalling factors and mechanical stimulation of cells at the wound edge. These events cause a sustained elevation in cytosolic calcium concentration in the cells surrounding the wound and a transient rise in those further away. The precise form of this calcium transient is believed to play a central role in determining the subsequent response of individual cells and ultimately leads to a co-ordinated, population-level response that rapidly closes the wound. Here we present a framework for modelling the initial phases of this process. We combine a PDE model of diffusion in the extracellular medium and an ODE model of calcium signalling that has been tailored to represent urothelial cells. The ODE model is capable of generating a wide range of calcium transients, including spikes, bursts, oscillations and sustained elevations in the cytosolic calcium concentration. In multi-cell simulations of scratch wounding in a perfusion flow we find that the spatial position of the cells relative to the wound site leads to distinct classes of calcium response, with cells proximal to the wound exhibiting a sustained elevation and cells distal to the wound exhibiting a more transient elevation. We compare these results to existing experimental data and generate a number of novel predictions that could be used to test the model experimentally.

  11. Role of Cytosolic Calcium Diffusion in Murine Cardiac Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Limbu, Bijay; Shah, Kushal; Weinberg, Seth H.; Deo, Makarand

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Purkinje cells (PCs) are morphologically and electrophysiologically different from ventricular myocytes and, importantly, exhibit distinct calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that PCs are more susceptible to action potential (AP) abnormalities than ventricular myocytes; however, the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we utilized a detailed biophysical mathematical model of a murine PC to systematically examine the role of cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion in shaping the AP in PCs. A biphasic spatiotemporal Ca2+ diffusion process, as recorded experimentally, was implemented in the model. In this study, we investigated the role of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics on AP and ionic current properties by varying the effective Ca2+ diffusion rate. It was observed that AP morphology, specifically the plateau, was affected due to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. Elevated Ca2+ concentration in the sarcolemmal region activated inward sodium–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current, resulting in a prolongation of the AP plateau at faster diffusion rates. Artificially clamping the NCX current to control values completely reversed the alterations in the AP plateau, thus confirming the role of NCX in modifying the AP morphology. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion waves play a significant role in shaping APs of PCs and could provide mechanistic insights in the increased arrhythmogeneity of PCs. PMID:27478391

  12. Phototropism and geotropism in maize coleoptiles are spatially correlated with increases in cytosolic free calcium.

    PubMed

    Gehring, C A; Williams, D A; Cody, S H; Parish, R W

    1990-06-01

    Phototropism and gravitropism in the shoots and roots of higher plants are the result of asymmetric growth. This is explained by the redistribution of growth regulators following exposure to gravity or unilateral light (the Cholodny-Went hypothesis). The positive phototropism and the negative geotropism of grass seedling coleoptiles are believed to result from lateral movement of auxin from the irradiated to the shaded side and from the upper to the lower side, respectively. Many physiological processes in plants, including auxin-induced cell elongation, are reported to be under the control of calcium. Added auxin triggers oscillations in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) and cytosolic pH (pHcyt) in epidermal cells of maize coleoptiles. Until recently, it has not been possible to visualize these changes spatially with the commonly used fluorescent cation indicators. Using a scanning laser confocal microscope, a new visible wavelength Ca2+ probe fluo-3 and the fluorescent pH indicator BCECF, we have recorded rapid light-induced increases in [Ca2+]cyt and a lowering of pHcyt of cells on the shaded side of maize coleoptiles. In horizontally orientated coleoptiles, [Ca2+]cyt increases and pHcyt decreases in the more rapidly elongating cells on the lower side. For the first time, rapid changes in [Ca2+]cyt and pHcyt are correlated directly with increases in cell elongation stimulated by light and gravity.

  13. Cytosolic free calcium in platelets: relationships to blood pressure and indices of systemic calcium metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hvarfner, A; Larsson, R; Mörlin, C; Rastad, J; Wide, L; Akerström, G; Ljunghall, S

    1988-01-01

    Relationships between cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in platelets, indices of systemic calcium metabolism and blood pressure were examined in 86 subjects; 29 patients with untreated and 29 patients with treated essential hypertension, six patients with borderline hypertension and 22 healthy reference subjects. In order to analyse interactions between the variables, multivariate statistical analyses were employed. The patients with untreated hypertension had higher [Ca2+]i values in non-activated platelets (P = 0.04) and lower levels of plasma ionized calcium (P = 0.02) than the reference subjects. In multivariate models analysing platelet [Ca2+]i mean blood pressure (MBP), plasma ionized calcium, serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and body mass index (BMI), the relationship between platelet [Ca2+]i and blood pressure was attenuated (P = 0.13), whereas the inverse relationships between plasma ionized calcium and MBP (P = 0.01) and between platelet [Ca2+]i and serum PTH (P = 0.06) seen in univariate analyses persisted. According to the multivariate models the [Ca2+]i value explained only 5% of the MBP variability. Thus, the data from this investigation do not support a close relationship between basal platelet [Ca2+]i and blood pressure. The inverse relationship between plasma ionized calcium and blood pressure, independent of platelet [Ca2+]i and serum PTH, suggests a direct interaction between plasma ionized calcium and blood pressure regulation.

  14. INCREASES IN CYTOSOLIC CALCIUM ION LEVELS IN HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS IN RESPONSE TO BUTYLTIN EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Rhonda; Ghazi, Sabah O.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether exposures to butyltins (BTs), tributylin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) were able to alter cytosolic calcium levels in human natural killer (NK) cells. Additionally, the effects of cytosolic calcium ion increases on the activation state of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in NK cells were also investigated. NK cells are an intital immune defense against the development of tumors or viral infections. TBT and DBT are widespread environmental contaminants, due to their various industrial applications. Both TBT and DBT have been shown to decrease the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells (lytic function). TBT has also been shown to activate MAPKs in NK cells. The results of this study indicated that TBT increased cytosolic calcium levels by as much as 100% after a 60 min exposure to 500 nM TBT while DBT increased cytosolic calcium levels to a much smaller extent (and required higher concentrations). The results also indicated that increases in cytosolic calcium could activate MAPKs but only for a short period of time (5 min), while previous studies showed that activation of MAPKs by TBT last for at least 6 hours. Thus, it appears that TBT stimulated increases in cytosolic calcium may contribute to, but are not fully responsible for, TBT-induced activation of MAPKs. PMID:19365649

  15. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones.

  16. Cytosolic calcium homeostasis in fungi: Roles of plasma membrane transport and intracellular sequestration of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.J.; Vogg, G.; Sanders, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Cytosolic free calcium ((Ca{sup 2+}){sub c}) has been measured in the mycelial fungus Neurospora crassa with Ca{sup 2+} - selective microelectrodes. The mean value of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub c} is 92 {plus minus} 15 nM and it is insensitive to external pH values between 5.8 and 8.4. Simultaneous measurement of membrane potential enables the electrochemical potential difference for Ca{sup 2+} across the plasma membrane to be estimated as about {minus}60 kJmol{sup {minus}1} - a value that cannot be sustained either by a simple Ca{sup 2+} - ATPase, or, in alkaline conditions, by straightforward H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange with a stoichiometric ratio of {lt}5 H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}. The authors propose that the most likely alternative mechanism of Ca{sup 2+} efflux is ATP-driven H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange, with a stoichiometric ratio of at least 2 H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}. The increase in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub c} in the presence of CN{sup {minus}} at pH 8.4 is compared with {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} influx under the same conditions. The proportion of entering Ca{sup 2+} remaining free in the cytosol is only 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, and since the concentration of available chelation sites on Ca{sup 2+} binding proteins is unlikely to exceed 100 {mu}M, a major role for the fungal vacuole in short-term Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis is indicated. This notion is supported by the observation that cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis is disrupted by a protonophore, which rapidly abolishes the driving force for Ca{sup 2+} uptake into fungal vacuoles.

  17. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  18. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Shane M.; Chang, Che-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca2+ as it enters a cell, shaping Ca2+ signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca2+ entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in controlling pituitary Ca2+ signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca2+ after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca2+ increments grew larger as free Ca2+ rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca2+ binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5–4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca2+ signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  19. Poliovirus protein 2BC increases cytosolic free calcium concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, R; Irurzun, A; Carrasco, L

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus-infected cells undergo an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations from the 4th h postinfection. The protein responsible for this effect was identified by the expression of different poliovirus nonstructural proteins in HeLa cells by using a recombinant vaccinia virus system. Synthesis of protein 2BC enhances cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in a manner similar to that observed in poliovirus-infected cells. To identify the regions in 2BC involved in modifying cytoplasmic calcium levels, several 2BC variants were generated. Regions present in both 2B and 2C are necessary to augment cellular free calcium levels. Therefore, in addition to inducing proliferation of membranous vesicles, poliovirus protein 2BC also alters cellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:9223520

  20. Calcium-induced conidiation in Penicillium cyclopium: calcium triggers cytosolic alkalinization at the hyphal tip.

    PubMed Central

    Roncal, T; Ugalde, U O; Irastorza, A

    1993-01-01

    Addition of Ca2+ (1 to 10 mM) to submerged cultures of Penicillium cyclopium induces conidiation. Ca2+ induced an increase in cytosolic pH from approximately 7.00 to > 7.60 in less than 10 min, as determined with the fluorescent pH probe fluorescein. Measurement of the H(+)-ATPase activity in total membrane fractions did not show any stable activation in vivo as a result of Ca2+ treatment. By fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy, it was observed that vegetative hyphae exhibit a tip-to-base pH gradient, with the tip being more acidic. Ca2+ caused this gradient to dissipate within 10 min. The effect of several agents that are supposed to cause internal acidification, by different means, on conidiation was tested. Concentrations of these agents that did not significantly affect growth but inhibited Ca(2+)-induced conidiation also prevented the intracellular alkalinization observed after exposure to the cation. Calcium channel blockers (lanthanum, cobalt, verapamil, and nifedipine) were not able to inhibit Ca(2+)-induced conidiation, although their effect on calcium uptake was not evaluated. However, the combined results point towards externally bound Ca2+ as the primary agent of conidiation induction, causing changes in plasma membrane function which disrupt the pH gradient observed during apical growth. Images PMID:8380805

  1. Urocortin 3 elevates cytosolic calcium in nucleus ambiguus neurons.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A; Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2012-09-01

    Urocortin 3 (also known as stresscopin) is an endogenous ligand for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF(2)). Despite predominant G(s) coupling of CRF(2), promiscuous coupling with other G proteins has been also associated with the activation of this receptor. As urocortin 3 has been involved in central cardiovascular regulation at hypothalamic and medullary sites, we examined its cellular effects on cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus, a key area for the autonomic control of heart rate. Urocortin 3 (1 nM-1000 nM) induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration that was blocked by the CRF(2) antagonist K41498. In the case of two consecutive treatments with urocortin 3, the second urocortin 3-induced Ca(2+) response was reduced, indicating receptor desensitization. The effect of urocortin 3 was abolished by pre-treatment with pertussis toxin and by inhibition of phospolipase C with U-73122. Urocortin 3 activated Ca(2+) influx via voltage-gated P/Q-type channels as well as Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum. Urocortin 3 promoted Ca(2+) release via inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptors, but not ryanodine receptors. Our results indicate a novel Ca(2+) -mobilizing effect of urocortin 3 in vagal pre-ganglionic neurons of nucleus ambiguus, providing a cellular mechanism for a previously reported role for this peptide in parasympathetic cardiac regulation.

  2. Cytosolic calcium regulation in rat afferent vagal neurons during anoxia.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Michael; Buckler, Keith J

    2013-12-01

    Sensory neurons are able to detect tissue ischaemia and both transmit information to the brainstem as well as release local vasoactive mediators. Their ability to sense tissue ischaemia is assumed to be primarily mediated through proton sensing ion channels, lack of oxygen however may also affect sensory neuron function. In this study we investigated the effects of anoxia on isolated capsaicin sensitive neurons from rat nodose ganglion. Acute anoxia triggered a reversible increase in [Ca2+]i that was mainly due to Ca2+-efflux from FCCP sensitive stores and from caffeine and CPA sensitive ER stores. Prolonged anoxia resulted in complete depletion of ER Ca2+-stores. Mitochondria were partially depolarised by acute anoxia but mitochondrial Ca2+-uptake/buffering during voltage-gated Ca2+-influx was unaffected. The process of Ca2+-release from mitochondria and cytosolic Ca2+-clearance following Ca2+ influx was however significantly slowed. Anoxia was also found to inhibit SERCA activity and, to a lesser extent, PMCA activity. Hence, anoxia has multiple influences on [Ca2+]i homeostasis in vagal afferent neurons, including depression of ATP-driven Ca2+-pumps, modulation of the kinetics of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering/release and Ca2+-release from, and depletion of, internal Ca2+-stores. These effects are likely to influence sensory neuronal function during ischaemia. PMID:24189167

  3. Phosphocitrate inhibits mitochondrial and cytosolic accumulation of calcium in kidney cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tew, W P; Malis, C D; Howard, J E; Lehninger, A L

    1981-09-01

    Synthetic 3-phosphocitrate, an extremely potent inhibitor of calcium phosphate crystallization as determined in a nonbiological physical-chemical assay, has many similarities to a mitochondrial factor that inhibits crystallization of nondiffracting amorphous calcium phosphate. In order to determine whether phosphocitrate can prevent uptake and crystallization of calcium phosphate in mitochondria in vivo, it was administered intraperitoneally to animals given large daily doses of calcium gluconate or parathyroid hormone, a regimen that causes massive accumulation and crystallization of calcium phosphate in the mitochondria and cytosol of renal tubule cells in vivo. Administration of phosphocitrate greatly reduced the net uptake of Ca2+ by the kidneys and prevented the appearance of apatite-like crystalline structures within the mitochondrial matrix and cytosol of renal tubule cells. Phosphocitrate, which is a poor chelator of Ca2+, did not reduce the hypercalcemia induced by either agent. These in vivo observations therefore indicate that phosphocitrate acts primarily at the cellular level to prevent the extensive accumulation of calcium phosphate in kidney cells by inhibiting the mitochondrial accumulation or crystallization of calcium phosphate.

  4. Lithium prevents early cytosolic calcium increase and secondary injurious calcium overload in glycolytically inhibited endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bosche, Bert; Schäfer, Matthias; Graf, Rudolf; Härtel, Frauke V.; Schäfer, Ute; Noll, Thomas

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We investigate free calcium as a central signalling element in endothelial cells. •Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose reduces cellular ATP. •This manoeuvre leads to a biphasic increase and overload of free calcium. •Pre-treatment with lithium for 24 h abolishes both phases of the calcium increase. •This provides a new strategy to protect endothelial calcium homeostasis and barrier function. -- Abstract: Cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is a central signalling element for the maintenance of endothelial barrier function. Under physiological conditions, it is controlled within narrow limits. Metabolic inhibition during ischemia/reperfusion, however, induces [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload, which results in barrier failure. In a model of cultured porcine aortic endothelial monolayers (EC), we addressed the question of whether [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload can be prevented by lithium treatment. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ATP were analysed using Fura-2 and HPLC, respectively. The combined inhibition of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP synthesis by 2-desoxy-D-glucose (5 mM; 2-DG) plus sodium cyanide (5 mM; NaCN) caused a significant decrease in cellular ATP content (14 ± 1 nmol/mg protein vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg protein in the control, n = 6 culture dishes, P < 0.05), an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (278 ± 24 nM vs. 71 ± 2 nM in the control, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05), and the formation of gaps between adjacent EC. These observations indicate that there is impaired barrier function at an early state of metabolic inhibition. Glycolytic inhibition alone by 10 mM 2-DG led to a similar decrease in ATP content (14 ± 2 nmol/mg vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg in the control, P < 0.05) with a delay of 5 min. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} response of EC was biphasic with a peak after 1 min (183 ± 6 nM vs. 71 ± 1 nM, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05) followed by a sustained increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. A 24-h pre-treatment with 10 mM of lithium

  5. Cytosolic calcium rises and related events in ergosterol-treated Nicotiana cells.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Parul; Chiltz, Annick; Luini, Estelle; Vandelle, Elodie; Pugin, Alain; Roblin, Gabriel

    2011-07-01

    The typical fungal membrane component ergosterol was previously shown to trigger defence responses and protect plants against pathogens. Most of the elicitors mobilize the second messenger calcium, to trigger plant defences. We checked the involvement of calcium in response to ergosterol using Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi cells expressing apoaequorin in the cytosol. First, it was verified if ergosterol was efficient in these cells inducing modifications of proton fluxes and increased expression of defence-related genes. Then, it was shown that ergosterol induced a rapid and transient biphasic increase of free [Ca²⁺](cyt) which intensity depends on ergosterol concentration in the range 0.002-10 μM. Among sterols, this calcium mobilization was specific for ergosterol and, ergosterol-induced pH and [Ca²⁺](cyt) changes were specifically desensitized after two subsequent applications of ergosterol. Specific modulators allowed elucidating some events in the signalling pathway triggered by ergosterol. The action of BAPTA, LaCl₃, nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, U73122 and ruthenium red suggested that the first phase was linked to calcium influx from external medium which subsequently triggered the second phase linked to calcium release from internal stores. The calcium influx and the [Ca²⁺](cyt) increase depended on upstream protein phosphorylation. The extracellular alkalinization and ROS production depended on calcium influx but, the ergosterol-induced MAPK activation was calcium-independent. ROS were not involved in cytosolic calcium rise as described in other models, indicating that ROS do not systematically participate in the amplification of calcium signalling. Interestingly, ergosterol-induced ROS production is not linked to cell death and ergosterol does not induce any calcium elevation in the nucleus.

  6. Cytosolic calcium signals elicited by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flg22 in stomatal guard cells are of an oscillatory nature.

    PubMed

    Thor, Kathrin; Peiter, Edgar

    2014-12-01

    Changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) are an early and essential element of signalling networks activated by the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as flg22. The flg22-induced calcium signal has been described on whole-plant, but not on single-cell scale so far. Also, the Ca(2+) sources and channels contributing to its generation are still obscure. Ratiometric fluorescence imaging employing the calcium reporter Yellow Cameleon 3.6 was performed to analyse the flg22-induced calcium signature in single guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. Calcium stores and channel types involved in its generation were determined by a pharmacological approach. In contrast to the calcium signal determined on whole-plant level, the signature on single-cell level is not characterized by one sustained response, but by oscillations in [Ca(2+)]cyt. These oscillations were abolished by EGTA and lanthanum, as well as by U73122, neomycin and TMB-8, but only partially or not at all affected by inhibitors of glutamate receptor-like channels and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. Our analyses suggest that the response observed on whole-plant level is the summary of oscillations occurring in single cells. Parallel to external calcium, influx via channels located at internal stores contributes to the signal.

  7. Oxygen increases ductus arteriosus smooth muscle cytosolic calcium via release of calcium from inositol triphosphate-sensitive stores.

    PubMed

    Keck, Maggie; Resnik, Ernesto; Linden, Bradley; Anderson, Franklin; Sukovich, David J; Herron, Jean; Cornfield, David N

    2005-05-01

    In utero, blood shunts away from the lungs via the ductus arteriosus (DA) and the foramen ovale. After birth, the DA closes concomitant with increased oxygen tension. The present experimental series tests the hypothesis that oxygen directly increases DA smooth muscle cell (SMC) cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) through inactivation of a K(+) channel, membrane depolarization, and entry of extracellular calcium. To test the hypothesis, DA SMC were isolated from late-gestation fetal lambs and grown to subconfluence in primary culture in low oxygen tension (25 Torr). DA SMC were loaded with the calcium-sensitive fluorophore fura-2 under low oxygen tension conditions and studied using microfluorimetry while oxygen tension was acutely increased (120 Torr). An acute increase in oxygen tension progressively increased DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) by 11.7 +/- 1.4% over 40 min. The effect of acute normoxia on DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) was mimicked by pharmacological blockade of the voltage-sensitive K(+) channel. Neither removal of extracellular calcium nor voltage-operated calcium channel blockade prevented the initial increase in DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i). Manganese quenching experiments demonstrated that acute normoxia initially decreases the rate of extracellular calcium entry. Pharmacological blockade of inositol triphosphate-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, intracellular calcium stores prevented the oxygen-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Endothelin increased [Ca(2+)](i) in acutely normoxic, but not hypoxic, DA SMC. Thus acute normoxia 1) increases DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) via release of calcium from intracellular calcium stores, and subsequent entry of extracellular calcium, and 2) potentiates the effect of contractile agonists. Prolonged patency of the DA may result from disordered intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  8. Facilitation of cytosolic calcium wave propagation by local calcium uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Joshua T; Blatter, Lothar A

    2012-12-01

    The widely accepted paradigm for cytosolic Ca(2+) wave propagation postulates a 'fire-diffuse-fire' mechanism where local Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels diffuses towards and activates neighbouring release sites, resulting in a propagating Ca(2+) wave. A recent challenge to this paradigm proposed the requirement for an intra-SR 'sensitization' Ca(2+) wave that precedes the cytosolic Ca(2+) wave and primes RyRs from the luminal side to CICR. Here, we tested this hypothesis experimentally with direct simultaneous measurements of cytosolic ([Ca(2+)](i); rhod-2) and intra-SR ([Ca(2+)](SR); fluo-5N) calcium signals during wave propagation in rabbit ventricular myocytes, using high resolution fluorescence confocal imaging. The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) at the wave front preceded depletion of the SR at each point along the calcium wave front, while during this latency period a transient increase of [Ca(2+)](SR) was observed. This transient elevation of [Ca(2+)](SR) could be identified at individual release junctions and depended on the activity of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). Increased SERCA activity (β-adrenergic stimulation with 1 μM isoproterenol (isoprenaline)) decreased the latency period and increased the amplitude of the transient elevation of [Ca(2+)](SR), whereas inhibition of SERCA (3 μM cyclopiazonic acid) had the opposite effect. In conclusion, the data provide experimental evidence that local Ca(2+) uptake by SERCA into the SR facilitates the propagation of cytosolic Ca(2+) waves via luminal sensitization of the RyR, and supports a novel paradigm of a 'fire-diffuse-uptake-fire' mechanism for Ca(2+) wave propagation in cardiac myocytes.

  9. Nuclear membrane R-type calcium channels mediate cytosolic ET-1-induced increase of nuclear calcium in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bkaily, Ghassan; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Chamoun, Marc; Semaan, Rana; Jubinville-Leblanc, Cynthia; D'Orléans-Juste, Pedro; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this work was to verify whether, as in the case of the plasma membrane of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs), cytosolic ET-1-induced increase of nuclear calcium is mediated via the activation of calcium influx through the steady-state R-type calcium channel. Pharmacological tools to identify the R-type calcium channels, as well as real 3-D confocal microscopy imaging techniques coupled to calcium fluorescent probes, were used to study the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on nuclear calcium in isolated nuclei of human hepatocytes and plasma membrane perforated hVSMCs. Our results showed that pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) or cholera toxin (CTX) prevented cytosolic ET-1 (10(-9) mol/L) from inducing a sustained increase in nuclear calcium. Furthermore, the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine did not prevent cytosolic ET-1 from inducing an increase in nuclear calcium, as opposed to the dual L- and R-type calcium channel blocker isradipine (PN200-110) (in the presence of nifedipine). In conclusion, the preventative effect with PTX and CTX, and the absence of an effect with nifedipine, as well as the blockade by isradipine on cytosolic ET-1-induced increase in nuclear calcium, suggest that this nuclear calcium influx in hVSMCs is due to activation of the steady-state R-type calcium channel. The sarcolemmal and nuclear membrane R-type calcium channels in hVSMCs are involved in ET-1 modulation of vascular tone in physiology and pathology.

  10. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  11. Effects of adrenalectomy on the control and adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenrich, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of adrenalectomy on the control and ..cap alpha..-adrenergic regulation of the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca/sub i/) in hepatocytes. In hepatocytes isolated from adrenalectomized (adx) and sham-operated male rats 7-1 days after surgery, Ca/sub i/ at rest and in response to epinephrine (EPI) was measured with the calcium-sensitive photoprotein aequorin, /sup 45/Ca efflux was measured, and Ca/sup 2 +/ release from intracellular stores in response to inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) was measured in saponin-permeabilized cells. Liver calmodulin content was also assayed by radioimmunoassay. It was found in adx rats that the resting Ca/sub i/ was elevated, the rise in Ca/sub i/ during EPI stimulation was reduced at physiological EPI concentrations, and the rise in calcium efflux evoked by EPI was reduced. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca/sub i/ and calcium efflux was reduced 60% in adx. Adx did not alter the characteristics of Ca/sup 2 +/ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP/sub 3/ in permeabilized cells. Finally, the liver calmodulin contents were not significantly different between the 2 groups.

  12. Abscisic acid induces a cytosolic calcium decrease in barley aleurone protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Van Duijn, B; Schram, A W

    1991-01-14

    Cytosolic calcium concentrations (Cai) of barley aleurone protoplasts after stimulation with the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) were measured by using the calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye Indo-1. The measured basal Cai is about 200 nM. Stimulation with ABA induces a strong dose-dependent decrease in Cai to a minimal value of about 50 nM. This decrease occurs within 5 s. The Ca2+ antagonists La3+ and Cd2+ inhibit the ABA-induced Cai decrease in a dose-dependent manner, while the Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine give no inhibition. The induction of Cai decrease by ABA is consistent with activation of the plasma membrane Ca2(+)-ATPase by ABA. The possible role of this ABA-induced Cai decrease in ABA signal transduction and in counteracting the effects of gibberellic acid are discussed.

  13. Effects of adrenalectomy on the alpha-adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenrich, C.C.; Borle, A.B.

    1988-06-25

    We have previously published that bilateral adrenalectomy in the rat reduces the Ca2+-mediated alpha-adrenergic activation of hepatic glycogenolysis, while it increases the cellular calcium content of hepatocytes. In the experiments presented here, the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+i) at rest and in response to epinephrine was measured in aequorin-loaded hepatocytes isolated from sham and adrenalectomized male rats. We found that in adrenalectomized rats the resting Ca2+i was elevated, the rise in Ca2+i evoked by epinephrine was reduced, and the rise in /sup 45/Ca efflux that follows such stimulation was depressed. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca2+i and calcium efflux was decreased 60% in adrenalectomized. Adrenalectomy did not change Ca2+ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP3 in saponin-permeabilized hepatocytes. The EC50 for inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and the maximal Ca2+ released were similar in both sham and adrenalectomized animals. Finally, the liver calmodulin content determined by radioimmunoassay was not significantly different between sham and adrenalectomized rats. These results suggest that 1) adrenalectomy reduces calcium efflux from the hepatocyte, probably by an effect on the plasma membrane (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase-dependent Ca2+ pump and thus alters cellular calcium homeostasis; 2) adrenalectomy decreases the rise in Ca2+i in response to epinephrine; 3) this decreased rise in Ca2+i is not due to defects in the intracellular Ca2+ storage and mobilization processes; and 4) the effects of adrenalectomy on cellular calcium metabolism and on alpha-adrenergic activation of glycogenolysis are not caused by a reduction in soluble calmodulin.

  14. Optogenetic Control of Calcium Oscillation Waveform Defines NFAT as an Integrator of Calcium Load.

    PubMed

    Hannanta-Anan, Pimkhuan; Chow, Brian Y

    2016-04-27

    It is known that the calcium-dependent transcription factor NFAT initiates transcription in response to pulsatile loads of calcium signal. However, the relative contributions of calcium oscillation frequency, amplitude, and duty cycle to transcriptional activity remain unclear. Here, we engineer HeLa cells to permit optogenetic control of intracellular calcium concentration using programmable LED arrays. This approach allows us to generate calcium oscillations of constant peak amplitude, in which frequency is varied while holding duty cycle constant, or vice versa. Using this setup and mathematical modeling, we show that NFAT transcriptional activity depends more on duty cycle, defined as the proportion of the integrated calcium concentration over the oscillation period, than on frequency alone. This demonstrates that NFAT acts primarily as a signal integrator of cumulative load rather than a frequency-selective decoder. This approach resolves a fundamental question in calcium encoding and demonstrates the value of optogenetics for isolating individual dynamical components of larger signaling behaviors. PMID:27135540

  15. An overview of techniques for the measurement of calcium distribution, calcium fluxes, and cytosolic free calcium in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Borle, A.B. )

    1990-03-01

    An array of techniques can be used to study cell calcium metabolism that comprises several calcium compartments and many types of transport systems such as ion channels, ATP-dependent pumps, and antiporters. The measurement of total call calcium brings little information of value since 60 to 80% of total cell calcium is actually bound to the extracellular glycocalyx. Cell fractionation and differential centrifugation have been used to study intracellular Ca{sup 2+} compartmentalization, but the methods suffer from the possibility of Ca{sup 2+} loss or redistribution among cell fractions. Steady-state kinetic analyses of {sup 45}Ca uptake or desaturation curves have been used to study the distribution of Ca{sup 2+} among various kinetic pools in living cells and their rate of Ca{sup 2+} exchange, but the analyses are constrained by many limitations. Nonsteady-state tracer studies can provide information about rapid changes in calcium influx or efflux in and out of the cell. Zero-time kinetics of {sup 45}Ca uptake can detect instantaneous changes in calcium influx, while {sup 45}Ca fractional efflux ratio, can detect rapid stimulations or inhibitions of calcium efflux out of cells. The best strategy to study cell calcium metabolism is to use several different methods that focus on a specific problem from widely different angles.

  16. Protein kinase C modulates cytosolic free calcium by stimulating calcium pump activity in Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, M; Gardner, J P

    1995-12-01

    Although protein kinase C (PKC) activation has been shown to inhibit Ca2+ influx in T lymphocytes, the role of PKC on Ca2+ sequestration or extrusion processes has not been fully explored. We examined the effect of CD3 stimulation and PKC activators on cytosolic Ca2+ (Ca2+i) extrusion and 45Ca2+ efflux in human leukemic Jurkat T cells. Treatment of Fura-2 loaded cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or thymeleatoxin (THYM) resulted in a decrease in Ca2+i both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+, whereas inactive phorbol esters had no effect. PKC activators added at the peak of a Ca2+i transient induced by anti-CD3 mAb, ionomycin or thapsigargin (TG) stimulated the rate and extent of return of Ca2+i to basal levels by 17-53%. PKC stimulation of the Ca2+i decline was not enhanced by the presence of Na+, indicating that PKC activators increase Ca2+ pump activity rather than a Na+/Ca2+ exchange mechanism. As CD3 receptor activation enhanced the Ca2+i decline in TG-treated cells, antigen-mediated activation of phospholipase C (PLC) signaling includes enhanced Ca2+ extrusion at the plasma membrane. The effect of PKC activators on parameters of Ca2+i extrusion were further explored. PMA significantly increased the rate of Ca2+ extrusion in TG-treated cells from 0.28 +/- 0.02 to 0.35 +/- 0.03 s-1 (mean +/- SEM) and stimulated the initial rate of 45Ca2+ efflux by 69% compared to inactive phorbol ester treated cells. The effects of PKC activation on the Ca2+i decline were eliminated by PKC inhibitors, PKC down regulation (24 h PMA pretreatment), ATP-depletion and conditions that inhibited the Ca2+ pump. In contrast, pretreatment of cells with okadaic acid enhanced the PMA-stimulated response. We suggest that Jurkat T cells contain a PKC-sensitive Ca2+ extrusion mechanism likely to be the Ca2+ pump. In lymphocytes, receptor/PLC-linked PKC activation modulates Ca2+i not only by inhibiting Ca2+ influx but also by stimulating plasma membrane Ca2+i

  17. Transient elevations of cytosolic free calcium retard subsequent apoptosis in neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, M K; Hardwick, S J; Meagher, L C; Savill, J S; Haslett, C

    1993-01-01

    Elevation of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) has been reported to induce apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, in the neutrophil, which undergoes apoptosis constitutively during aging in vitro, activation by inflammatory mediators elevates [Ca2+]i and prolongs lifespan via inhibition of apoptosis. To examine this paradox, we investigated the effects of modulation of [Ca2+]i upon apoptosis of neutrophils in vitro. Calcium ionophores (A23187, ionomycin) retarded apoptosis in neutrophil populations after 20 h (P < 0.001). Conversely, intracellular Ca(2+)-chelation, using bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) acetoxymethyl ester (AM) promoted apoptosis (P < 0.02). W-7 (an inhibitor of calmodulin) also promoted apoptosis (P < 0.05). Measurements of [Ca2+]i, using fura-2, showed (a) increased apoptosis in neutrophil populations was not associated with elevated [Ca2+]i, (b) neutrophils cultured with ionophore at concentrations inhibiting apoptosis exhibited transient (< 1 h) elevations of [Ca2+]i, to levels previously reported with receptor-mediated stimuli, and (c) BAPTA was able to prevent the elevation of [Ca2+]i and the inhibition of apoptosis produced by ionophore. Modulation of apoptosis occurred without alterations in intracellular pH. Thus, in the neutrophil, unlike lymphoid cells, elevation of [Ca2+]i exerts an inhibitory effect upon apoptosis. Furthermore, these data suggest that transient elevation of [Ca2+]i elicits signaling events leading to prolonged inhibition of apoptosis. Images PMID:8392090

  18. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots. PMID:26720810

  19. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots.

  20. Despite Differences in Cytosolic Calcium Regulation, Lidocaine Toxicity Is Similar in Adult and Neonatal Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Lisa V.; Eydlin, Olga; Piskoun, Boris; Kline, Richard P; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Rosenberg, Andrew D; Blanck, Thomas JJ; Xu, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuraxial local anesthetics may have neurological complications thought to be due to neurotoxicity. A primary site of action for local anesthetics is the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron. Physiologic differences have been noted between young and adult DRG neurons; hence, we examined whether there were differences in lidocaine-induced changes in calcium and lidocaine toxicity in neonatal and adult rat DRG neurons. Methods DRG neurons were cultured from postnatal day 7 (P7) and adult rats. Lidocaine-induced changes in cytosolic calcium were examined with the calcium indicator Fluo-4. Cells were incubated with varying concentrations of lidocaine and examined for viability using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining. Live imaging of caspase-3/7 activation was performed after incubation with lidocaine. Results The mean KCl-induced calcium transient was greater in P7 neurons (p < 0.05), and lidocaine significantly inhibited KCl-induced calcium responses in both ages (p < 0.05). Frequency distribution histograms of KCl-evoked calcium increases were more heterogeneous in P7 than in adult neurons. With lidocaine, KCl-induced calcium transients in both ages became more homogeneous but remained different between the groups. Interestingly cell viability was decreased by lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Lidocaine treatment also activated caspase-3/7 in a dose- and time-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Conclusions Despite physiological differences in P7 and adult DRG neurons, lidocaine cytotoxicity is similar in P7 and adult DRG neurons in vitro. Differences in lidocaine- and KCl-evoked calcium responses suggest the similarity in lidocaine cytotoxicity involves other actions in addition to lidocaine-evoked effects on cytosolic calcium responses. PMID:23851347

  1. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Activates CaMMKβ to Initiate Autophagy in PK-15 Cells by Increasing Cytosolic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuanxing; Qi, Baozhu; Zhou, Yingshan; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) induces autophagy via the 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in pig kidney PK-15 cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of AMPK activation in autophagy induction remain unknown. With specific inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi), we show that PCV2 infection upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKβ) by increasing cytosolic Ca2+ via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Elevation of cytosolic calcium ion (Ca2+) did not seem to involve inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) release from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphoinositide phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-γ). CaMKKβ then activated both AMPK and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI). PCV2 employed CaMKI and Trp-Asp (WD) repeat domain phosphoinositide-interacting protein 1 (WIPI1) as another pathway additional to AMPK signaling in autophagy initiation. Our findings could help better understanding of the signaling pathways of autophagy induction as part of PCV2 pathogenesis. Further research is warranted to study if PCV2 interacts directly with IP3R or indirectly with the molecules that antagonize IP3R activity responsible for increased cytosolic Ca2+ both in PK-15 cells and PCV2-targeted primary cells from pigs. PMID:27213427

  2. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Activates CaMMKβ to Initiate Autophagy in PK-15 Cells by Increasing Cytosolic Calcium.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanxing; Qi, Baozhu; Zhou, Yingshan; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) induces autophagy via the 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in pig kidney PK-15 cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of AMPK activation in autophagy induction remain unknown. With specific inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi), we show that PCV2 infection upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKβ) by increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Elevation of cytosolic calcium ion (Ca(2+)) did not seem to involve inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) release from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphoinositide phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-γ). CaMKKβ then activated both AMPK and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI). PCV2 employed CaMKI and Trp-Asp (WD) repeat domain phosphoinositide-interacting protein 1 (WIPI1) as another pathway additional to AMPK signaling in autophagy initiation. Our findings could help better understanding of the signaling pathways of autophagy induction as part of PCV2 pathogenesis. Further research is warranted to study if PCV2 interacts directly with IP3R or indirectly with the molecules that antagonize IP3R activity responsible for increased cytosolic Ca(2+) both in PK-15 cells and PCV2-targeted primary cells from pigs. PMID:27213427

  3. Changes of cytosolic Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and plasma membrane calcium channels of maize root tip cells under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zihui; Ma, Zhenyu; Guo, Xiulin; Shao, Hongbo; Cui, Qiuhua; Song, Weiyi

    2010-01-01

    The changes of cytosolic Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and the activities of calcium channel of primary maize root tip cells induced by PEG6000 or abscisic acid (ABA) were studied by both confocal techniques and the whole-cell patch clamping in this study. The Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity increased while treated with PEG or ABA within 10 min, illuminating that Ca(2+) participated in the process of ABA signal transduction. For further proving the mechanism and origin of cytosolic Ca(2+) increase induced by PEG treatments, N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), Verapamil (VP) and Trifluoperazine (TFP) were added to the PEG solution in the experiments separately. The results showed that Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity induced by PEG was suppressed by both EGTA and VP obviously in the root tip cells. The Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity of plants changed after the addition of CaM inhibitor TFP while subjected to osmotic stress, which seemed to show that CaM participated in the process of signal transduction of osmotic stress too. The mechanism about it is unknown today. Further, a hyperpolarization-activated calcium permeable channel was recorded in plasma membrane of maize root tip cells. The Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) intensity increased remarkably after PEG treatment, and the open voltage of the calcium conductance increased. Similar changes could be observed after ABA treatment, but the channel opened earlier and the current intensity was stronger than that of PEG treatment. The activation of calcium channel initiated by PEG strongly was inhibited by EGTA, VP or TFP respectively. The results revealed that Ca(2+) participated in the signals transduction process of osmotic stress, and the cytosolic free Ca(2+) increase by osmotic stress mainly came from the extracellular, and some came from the release of cytoplasmic calcium pool.

  4. Possible role of cytosolic free calcium concentrations in mediating insulin resistance of obesity and hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Draznin, B; Sussman, K E; Eckel, R H; Kao, M; Yost, T; Sherman, N A

    1988-01-01

    Insulin- and glyburide-stimulated changes in cytosolic free calcium concentrations [( Ca2+]i) were studied in gluteal adipocytes obtained from six obese women (139 +/- 3% ideal body wt) and six healthy, normal weight age- and sex-matched controls. Biopsies were performed after an overnight fast and twice (at 3 and 6 h) during an insulin infusion (40 mU/m2 per min) (euglycemic clamp). In adipocytes obtained from normal subjects before insulin infusion, insulin (10 ng/ml) increased [Ca2+]i from 146 +/- 26 nM to 391 +/- 66 nM. Similar increases were evoked by 2 microM glyburide (329 +/- 41 nM). After 3 h of insulin infusion, basal [Ca2+]i rose to 234 +/- 21 nM, but the responses to insulin and glyburide were completely abolished. In vitro insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake was reduced by insulin and glucose infusion (25% stimulation before infusion, 5.4% at 3 h, and 0.85% at 6 h of infusion). In obese patients, basal adipocyte [Ca2+]i was increased (203 +/- 14 nM, P less than 0.05 vs. normals). The [Ca2+]i response demonstrated resistance to insulin (230 +/- 23 nM) and glyburide (249 +/- 19 nM) stimulation. Continuous insulin infusion increased basal [Ca2+]i (244 +/- 24 nM) and there was no response to either insulin or glyburide at 3 and 6 h of study. Rat adipocytes were preincubated with 1-10 mM glucose and 10 ng/ml insulin for 24 h. Measurements of 2-deoxyglucose uptake demonstrated insulin resistance in these cells. Under these experimental conditions, increased levels of [Ca2+]i that were no longer responsive to insulin were demonstrated. Verapamil in the preincubation medium prevented the development of insulin resistance. PMID:3143744

  5. Bradykinin and histamine-induced cytosolic calcium increase in capillary endothelial cells of bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Vinet, Raúl; Cortés, Magdalena P; Alvarez, Rocío; Delpiano, Marco A

    2014-09-01

    We have assessed the effect of bradykinin and histamine on the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i ) of bovine adrenal medulla capillary endothelial cells (BAMCECs). To measure [Ca(2+)]i changes in BAMCECs the intracellular fluorescent probe, fluo-3 AM, was used. Bradykinin (3 µM) produced a transient monophasic increase in [Ca(2+)]i , which was depressed by B1650 (0.1 µM), a B2-bradykinin receptor antagonist (D-Arg-[Hyp(3), Thi(5,8) , D-Phe(7)]-Bradykinin). Similarly, increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by histamine was also depressed by tripolidine (0.1 µM), an H1-histamine receptor antagonist. [Ca(2+)]i increase induced by both agonists was unaffected in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or presence of antagonists of voltage operated Ca(2+) channels (VOCCs). Thapsigargin (1 µM) did not abolish the increase of [Ca(2+)]i produced by bradykinin, but abolished that of histamine. In contrast, caffeine (100 µM), abolished the [Ca(2+)]i response induced by bradykinin (3 µM), but did not affect the [Ca(2+)]i increase induced by histamine (100 µM). The results indicate the presence of B2 bradykinin- and H1 histamine-receptors in BAMCECs. Liberation of Ca(2+) induced by both agonists occurs through 2 different intracellular mechanisms. While bradykinin activates a sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum (SER) containing a SER Ca(2+) -ATPase (SERCA) thapsigargin-insensitive, histamine activates a SER containing a SERCA thapsigargin-sensitive. We suggest that the increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by bradykinin and histamine could be of physiological relevance, modulating adrenal gland microcirculation.

  6. Endothelial cell cytosolic free calcium regulates neutrophil migration across monolayers of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) traverse an endothelial cell (EC) barrier by crawling between neighboring EC. Whether EC regulate the integrity of their intercellular adhesive and junctional contacts in response to chemotaxing PMN is unresolved. EC respond to the binding of soluble mediators such as histamine by increasing their cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca++]i) (Rotrosen, D., and J.I. Gallin. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:2379-2387) and undergoing shape changes (Majno, G., S. M. Shea, and M. Leventhal. 1969. J. Cell Biol. 42:617-672). Substances such as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and thrombin, which increased the permeability of EC monolayers to ions, as measured by the electrical resistance of the monolayers, transiently increased EC [Ca++]i. To determine whether chemotaxing PMN cause similar changes in EC [Ca++]i, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) maintained as monolayers were loaded with fura-2. [Ca++]i was measured in single EC during PMN adhesion to and migration across these monolayers. PMN-EC adhesion and transendothelial PMN migration in response to formyl- methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) as well as to interleukin 1 (IL- 1) treated EC induced a transient increase in EC [Ca++]i which temporally corresponded with the time course of PMN-EC interactions. When EC [Ca++]i was clamped at resting levels with a cell permeant calcium buffer, PMN migration across EC monolayers and PMN induced changes in EC monolayer permeability were inhibited. However, clamping of EC [Ca++]i did not inhibit PMN-EC adhesion. These studies provide evidence that EC respond to stimulated PMN by increasing their [Ca++]i and that this increase in [Ca++]i causes an increase in EC monolayer permeability. Such [Ca++]i increases are required for PMN transit across an EC barrier. We suggest EC [Ca++]i regulates transendothelial migration of PMN by participating in a signal cascade which stimulates EC to open their intercellular junctions to allow transendothelial

  7. Red blood cells of the lizards Ameiva ameiva (Squamata, Teiidae) display multiple mechanisms to control cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Beraldo, F H; Sartorello, R; Gazarini, M L; Caldeira, W; Garcia, C R S

    2002-02-01

    We have previously reported that lizard red blood cells control their cytosolic calcium concentration by sequestering calcium ions in pools, which could be discharged by thapsigargin, by the Na+/H+ ionophore, monensin, by the K+/H+ ionophore, nigericin and by the proton pump inhibitor, bafilomycin A1 [1]. We have now demonstrated, with the aid of confocal microscopy, the presence in these cells of organelles, which accumulate the dye acridine orange and are thus by inference the sites of proton pools. We have found, moreover, that monensin, nigericin and bafilomycin all act to discharge these pools. We further show that calcium release ensues when the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, is added after thapsigargin and monensin; this implies the existence of a third pool, besides the acidic pool and the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER), which participates in calcium homeostasis. The ER calcium pool can de discharged by the addition of the second messenger, IP3, and we present evidence, based on confocal microscopy, that the IP3 receptors are located in or close to the nucleus. PMID:11969248

  8. Calcium oscillations in pituitary gonadotrophs: comparison of experiment and theory.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y X; Rinzel, J; Keizer, J; Stojilković, S S

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a mathematical model that describes several aspects of agonist-induced Ca2+ signaling in single pituitary gonadotrophs. Our model is based on fast activation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor Ca2+ channels at low free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and slow inactivation at high [Ca2+]i. Previous work has shown that these gating properties, when combined with a Ca(2+)-ATPase, are sufficient to generate simulated Ca2+ oscillations. The Hodgkin-Huxley-like description we formulate here incorporates these different gating properties explicitly and renders their effects transparent and easy to modulate. We introduce regulatory mechanisms of channel opening which enable the model, both in the absence and in the presence of Ca2+ entry, to give responses to a wide range of agonist doses that are in good agreement with experimental findings, including subthreshold responses, superthreshold oscillations with frequency determined by [InsP3], and nonoscillatory "biphasic" responses followed occasionally by small-amplitude oscillations. A particular added feature of our model, enhanced channel opening by reduced concentration of Ca2+ in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, allows oscillations to continue during pool depletion. The model predicts that ionomycin and thapsigargin can induce oscillations with basal [InsP3] and zero Ca2+ entry, while Ca2+ injection cannot. Responses to specific pairings of sub- or superthreshold stimuli of agonist, ionomycin, and thapsigargin are also correctly predicted. Since this model encompasses a wide range of observed dynamic behaviors within a single framework, based on well-established mechanisms, its relevance should not be restricted to gonadotrophs. PMID:8278407

  9. Perturbation of cytosolic calcium by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and caffeine affects zebrafish myofibril alignment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Ju; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Chen, Shen-Liang; Wei, Jen-Cheng; Wang, I-Jong; Wen, Chi-Chung; Chang, Chao-Yuan; Chen, Xing-Guang; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Hui-Min; Horng, Juin-Lin; Wang, Yun-Hsin; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of Ca(2+) levels on myofibril alignment during zebrafish embryogenesis. To investigate how altered cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels affect myofibril alignment, we exposed zebrafish embryos to 2-aminothoxyldiphenyl borate (2-APB; an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor that reduces cytosolic Ca(2+) levels) and caffeine (a ryanodine receptor activator that enhances cytosolic Ca(2+) levels). The results demonstrated that the most evident changes in zebrafish embryos treated with 2-APB were shorter body length, curved trunk and malformed somite boundary. In contrast, such malformed phenotypes were evident neither in untreated controls nor in caffeine-treated embryos. Subtle morphological changes, including changes in muscle fibers, F-actin and ultrastructures were easily observed by staining with specific monoclonal antibodies (F59 and α-laminin), fluorescent probes (phalloidin) and by transmission electron microscopy. Our data suggested that: (1) the exposure to 2-APB and/or caffeine led to myofibril misalignment; (2) 2-APB-treated embryos displayed split and short myofibril phenotypes, whereas muscle fibers from caffeine-treated embryos were twisted and wavy; and (3) zebrafish embryos co-exposed to 2-APB and caffeine resulted in normal myofibril alignment. In conclusion, we proposed that cytosolic Ca(2+) is important for myogenesis, particularly for myofibril alignment.

  10. Perturbation of cytosolic calcium by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and caffeine affects zebrafish myofibril alignment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Ju; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Chen, Shen-Liang; Wei, Jen-Cheng; Wang, I-Jong; Wen, Chi-Chung; Chang, Chao-Yuan; Chen, Xing-Guang; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Hui-Min; Horng, Juin-Lin; Wang, Yun-Hsin; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of Ca(2+) levels on myofibril alignment during zebrafish embryogenesis. To investigate how altered cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels affect myofibril alignment, we exposed zebrafish embryos to 2-aminothoxyldiphenyl borate (2-APB; an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor that reduces cytosolic Ca(2+) levels) and caffeine (a ryanodine receptor activator that enhances cytosolic Ca(2+) levels). The results demonstrated that the most evident changes in zebrafish embryos treated with 2-APB were shorter body length, curved trunk and malformed somite boundary. In contrast, such malformed phenotypes were evident neither in untreated controls nor in caffeine-treated embryos. Subtle morphological changes, including changes in muscle fibers, F-actin and ultrastructures were easily observed by staining with specific monoclonal antibodies (F59 and α-laminin), fluorescent probes (phalloidin) and by transmission electron microscopy. Our data suggested that: (1) the exposure to 2-APB and/or caffeine led to myofibril misalignment; (2) 2-APB-treated embryos displayed split and short myofibril phenotypes, whereas muscle fibers from caffeine-treated embryos were twisted and wavy; and (3) zebrafish embryos co-exposed to 2-APB and caffeine resulted in normal myofibril alignment. In conclusion, we proposed that cytosolic Ca(2+) is important for myogenesis, particularly for myofibril alignment. PMID:25186829

  11. Glucose-stimulated oscillations in free cytosolic ATP concentration imaged in single islet beta-cells: evidence for a Ca2+-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-02-01

    Normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is pulsatile, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this pulsatility are poorly understood. Oscillations in the intracellular free [ATP]/[ADP] ratio represent one possible mechanism because they would be expected to cause fluctuations in ATP-sensitive K(+) channel activity and hence oscillatory Ca(2+) influx. After imaging recombinant firefly luciferase, expressed via an adenoviral vector in single human or mouse islet beta-cells, we report here that cytosolic free ATP concentrations oscillate and that these oscillations are affected by glucose. In human beta-cells, oscillations were observed at both 3 and 15 mmol/l glucose, but the oscillations were of a longer wavelength at the higher glucose concentration (167 vs. 66 s). Mouse beta-cells displayed oscillations in both cytosolic free [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] only at elevated glucose concentrations, both with a period of 120 s. To explore the causal relationship between [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] oscillations, the regulation of each was further investigated in populations of MIN6 beta-cells. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free medium lowered cytosolic [Ca(2+)] but increased [ATP] in MIN6 cells at both 3 and 30 mmol/l glucose. Removal of external Ca(2+) increased [ATP], possibly by decreasing ATP consumption by endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases. These results allow a model to be constructed of the beta-cell metabolic oscillator that drives nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

  12. Trolox-Sensitive Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Mitochondrial Morphology, Oxidative Phosphorylation and Cytosolic Calcium Handling in Healthy Cells

    PubMed Central

    Distelmaier, Felix; Valsecchi, Federica; Forkink, Marleen; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet; Swarts, Herman G.; Rodenburg, Richard J.T.; Verwiel, Eugène T.P.; Smeitink, Jan A.M.; Willems, Peter H.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Cell regulation by signaling reactive oxygen species (sROS) is often incorrectly studied through extracellular oxidant addition. Here, we used the membrane-permeable antioxidant Trolox to examine the role of sROS in mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) handling in healthy human skin fibroblasts. Results and Innovation: Trolox treatment reduced the levels of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein (CM-H2DCF) oxidizing ROS, lowered cellular lipid peroxidation, and induced a less oxidized mitochondrial thiol redox state. This was paralleled by increased glutathione- and mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial filamentation, increased expression of fully assembled mitochondrial complex I, elevated activity of citrate synthase and OXPHOS enzymes, and a higher cellular O2 consumption. In contrast, Trolox did not alter hydroethidium oxidation, cytosolic thiol redox state, mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels, or mitochondrial membrane potential. Whole genome expression profiling revealed that Trolox did not trigger significant changes in gene expression, suggesting that Trolox acts downstream of this process. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients, induced by the hormone bradykinin, were of a higher amplitude and decayed faster in Trolox-treated cells. These effects were dose-dependently antagonized by hydrogen peroxide. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that Trolox-sensitive sROS are upstream regulators of mitochondrial mitofusin levels, morphology, and function in healthy human skin fibroblasts. This information not only facilitates the interpretation of antioxidant effects in cell models (of oxidative-stress), but also contributes to a better understanding of ROS-related human pathologies, including mitochondrial disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1657–1669. PMID:22559215

  13. Indole-3-acetic acid-induced oxidative burst and an increase in cytosolic calcium ion concentration in rice suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T H; Umemura, Kenji; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-08-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the major natural auxin involved in the regulation of a variety of growth and developmental processes such as division, elongation, and polarity determination in growing plant cells. It has been shown that dividing and/or elongating plant cells accompanies the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a number of reports have suggested that hormonal actions can be mediated by ROS through ROS-mediated opening of ion channels. Here, we surveyed the link between the action of IAA, oxidative burst, and calcium channel activation in a transgenic cells of rice expressing aequorin in the cytosol. Application of IAA to the cells induced a rapid and transient generation of superoxide which was followed by a transient increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). The IAA-induced [Ca(2+)]c elevation was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockers and a Ca(2+) chelator. Furthermore, ROS scavengers effectively blocked the action of IAA on [Ca(2+)]c elevation.

  14. Indole-3-acetic acid-induced oxidative burst and an increase in cytosolic calcium ion concentration in rice suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T H; Umemura, Kenji; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-08-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the major natural auxin involved in the regulation of a variety of growth and developmental processes such as division, elongation, and polarity determination in growing plant cells. It has been shown that dividing and/or elongating plant cells accompanies the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a number of reports have suggested that hormonal actions can be mediated by ROS through ROS-mediated opening of ion channels. Here, we surveyed the link between the action of IAA, oxidative burst, and calcium channel activation in a transgenic cells of rice expressing aequorin in the cytosol. Application of IAA to the cells induced a rapid and transient generation of superoxide which was followed by a transient increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). The IAA-induced [Ca(2+)]c elevation was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockers and a Ca(2+) chelator. Furthermore, ROS scavengers effectively blocked the action of IAA on [Ca(2+)]c elevation. PMID:27149194

  15. By Releasing ADP, Acanthamoeba castellanii Causes an Increase in the Cytosolic Free Calcium Concentration and Apoptosis in Wish Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, A.; Tozzi, M. G.; Costa, M.; Delogu, G.; Fiori, P. L.; Cappuccinelli, P.

    2001-01-01

    The role played by soluble molecules that may participate in acanthamoebal cytopathogenicity has yet to be fully characterized. We demonstrate here that Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites constitutively release ADP in the medium. Cell-free supernatants prepared from A. castellanii, by interaction with specific P2y2 purinoceptors expressed on the Wish cell membrane, caused a biphasic rise in [Ca2+]i, extensive cell membrane blebbing, cytoskeletal disorganization, and the breakdown of nuclei. Cell damage induced by amoebic supernatants was blocked by the P2y2 inhibitor Suramin. The same results were found in Wish cells exposed to purified ADP. These findings suggest that pathogenic free-living A. castellanii may have a cytopathic effect on human epithelial cells through ADP release, by a process that begins with a rise of cytosolic free-calcium concentration, and culminates in apoptosis. PMID:11349088

  16. Low-frequency calcium oscillations accompany deoxyhemoglobin oscillations in rat somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Du, Congwu; Volkow, Nora D.; Koretsky, Alan P.; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals are used to map brain functional connectivity with functional MRI, but their source is not well understood. Here we used optical imaging to assess whether LFOs from vascular signals covary with oscillatory intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) and with local field potentials in the rat’s somatosensory cortex. We observed that the frequency of Ca2+i oscillations in tissue (∼0.07 Hz) was similar to the LFOs of deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) in both large blood vessels and capillaries. The HbR and HbO2 fluctuations within tissue correlated with Ca2+i oscillations with a lag time of ∼5–6 s. The Ca2+i and hemoglobin oscillations were insensitive to hypercapnia. In contrast, cerebral-blood-flow velocity (CBFv) in arteries and veins fluctuated at a higher frequency (∼0.12 Hz) and was sensitive to hypercapnia. However, in parenchymal tissue, CBFv oscillated with peaks at both ∼0.06 Hz and ∼0.12 Hz. Although the higher-frequency CBFv oscillation (∼0.12 Hz) was decreased by hypercapnia, its lower-frequency component (∼0.06 Hz) was not. The sensitivity of the higher CBFV oscillations to hypercapnia, which triggers blood vessel vasodilation, suggests its dependence on vascular effects that are distinct from the LFOs detected in HbR, HbO2, Ca2+i, and the lower-frequency tissue CBFv, which were insensitive to hypercapnia. Hemodynamic LFOs correlated both with Ca2+i and neuronal firing (local field potentials), indicating that they directly reflect neuronal activity (perhaps also glial). These findings show that HbR fluctuations (basis of BOLD oscillations) are linked to oscillatory cellular activity and detectable throughout the vascular tree (arteries, capillaries, and veins). PMID:25313035

  17. Cytosolic and nuclear calcium signaling in atrial myocytes: IP3-mediated calcium release and the role of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hohendanner, Felix; Maxwell, Joshua T; Blatter, Lothar A

    2015-01-01

    In rabbit atrial myocytes Ca signaling has unique features due to the lack of transverse (t) tubules, the spatial arrangement of mitochondria and the contribution of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor-induced Ca release (IICR). During excitation-contraction coupling action potential-induced elevation of cytosolic [Ca] originates in the cell periphery from Ca released from the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR) and then propagates by Ca-induced Ca release from non-junctional (nj-) SR toward the cell center. The subsarcolemmal region between j-SR and the first array of nj-SR Ca release sites is devoid of mitochondria which results in a rapid propagation of activation through this domain, whereas the subsequent propagation through the nj-SR network occurs at a velocity typical for a propagating Ca wave. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca uptake with the Ca uniporter blocker Ru360 accelerates propagation and increases the amplitude of Ca transients (CaTs) originating from nj-SR. Elevation of cytosolic IP3 levels by rapid photolysis of caged IP3 has profound effects on the magnitude of subcellular CaTs with increased Ca release from nj-SR and enhanced CaTs in the nuclear compartment. IP3 uncaging restricted to the nucleus elicites 'mini'-Ca waves that remain confined to this compartment. Elementary IICR events (Ca puffs) preferentially originate in the nucleus in close physical association with membrane structures of the nuclear envelope and the nucleoplasmic reticulum. The data suggest that in atrial myocytes the nucleus is an autonomous Ca signaling domain where Ca dynamics are primarily governed by IICR. PMID:25891132

  18. Local dissipation and coupling properties of cellular oscillators: a case study on calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Perc, Matjaz; Marhl, Marko

    2004-04-01

    Synchronised signal transduction between cells is crucial, since it assures fast and immutable information processing, which is vital for flawless functioning of living organisms. The question arises how to recognise the ability of a cell to be easily coupled with other cells. In the present paper, we investigate the system properties that determine best coupling abilities and assure the most efficient signal transduction between cells. A case study is done for intercellular calcium oscillations. For a particular diffusion-like coupled system of cellular oscillators, we determined the minimal gap-junctional permeability that is necessary for synchronisation of initially asynchronous oscillators. Our results show that dissipation is a crucial system property that determines the coupling ability of cellular oscillators. We found that low dissipation assures synchronisation of coupled cells already at very low gap-junctional permeability, whereas highly dissipative oscillators require much higher gap-junctional permeability in order to synchronise. The results are discussed in the sense of their biological importance for systems where the synchronous responses of cells were recognised to be indispensable for appropriate physiological functioning of the tissue.

  19. The control of brain mitochondrial energization by cytosolic calcium: the mitochondrial gas pedal.

    PubMed

    Gellerich, Frank Norbert; Gizatullina, Zemfira; Gainutdinov, Timur; Muth, Katharina; Seppet, Enn; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vielhaber, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    This review focuses on problems of the intracellular regulation of mitochondrial function in the brain via the (i) supply of mitochondria with ADP by means of ADP shuttles and channels and (ii) the Ca(2+) control of mitochondrial substrate supply. The permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane for adenine nucleotides is low. Therefore rate dependent concentration gradients exist between the mitochondrial intermembrane space and the cytosol. The existence of dynamic ADP gradients is an important precondition for the functioning of ADP shuttles, for example CrP-shuttle. Cr at mM concentrations instead of ADP diffuses from the cytosol through the porin pores into the intermembrane space. The CrP-shuttle isoenzymes work in different directions which requires different metabolite concentrations mainly caused by dynamic ADP compartmentation. The ADP shuttle mechanisms alone cannot explain the load dependent changes in mitochondrial energization, and a complete model of mitochondrial regulation have to account the Ca(2+) -dependent substrate supply too. According to the old paradigmatic view, Ca(2+) (cyt) taken up by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter activates dehydrogenases within the matrix. However, recently it was found that Ca(2+) (cyt) at low nM concentrations exclusively activates the state 3 respiration via aralar, the mitochondrial glutamate/aspartate carrier. At higher Ca(2+) (cyt) (> 500 nM), brain mitochondria take up Ca(2+) for activation of substrate oxidation rates. Since brain mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation is only slightly influenced by Ca(2+) (cyt) , it was proposed that the cytosolic formation of pyruvate from its precursors is tightly controlled by the Ca(2+) dependent malate/aspartate shuttle. At low (50-100 nM) Ca(2+) (cyt) the pyruvate formation is suppressed, providing a substrate limitation control in neurons. This so called "gas pedal" mechanism explains why the energy metabolism of neurons in the nucleus suprachiasmaticus could be down

  20. Evaluation of Cisplatin Neurotoxicity in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia via Cytosolic Calcium Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Kevser; Yiğitaslan, Semra; Ünel, Çiğdem; Kaygısız, Bilgin; Yıldırım, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Calcium homeostasis is considered to be important in antineoplastic as well as in neurotoxic adverse effects of cisplatin. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the role of Ca2+ in cisplatin neurotoxicity in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Study Design: Cell culture study. Methods: DRG cells prepared from 1-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were used to determine the role of Ca2+ in the cisplatin (10–600 μM) neurotoxicity. The cells were incubated with cisplatin plus nimodipine (1–3 μM), dizocilpine (MK-801) (1–3 μM) or thapsigargin (100–300 nM). Toxicity of cisplatinon DRG cells was determined by the MTT assay. Results: The neurotoxicity of cisplatin was significant when used in high concentrations (100–600 μM). Nimodipine (1 μM) but not MK-801 or thapsigargin prevented the neurotoxic effects of 200 μM of cisplatin. Conclusion: Voltage-dependent calcium channels may play a role in cisplatin neurotoxicity. PMID:27403382

  1. Changes in Stomatal Behavior and Guard Cell Cytosolic Free Calcium in Response to Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed Central

    McAinsh, M. R.; Clayton, H.; Mansfield, T. A.; Hetherington, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the cellular basis for the effects of oxidative stress on stomatal behavior using stomatal bioassay and ratio photometric techniques. Two oxidative treatments were employed in this study: (a) methyl viologen, which generates superoxide radicals, and (b) H2O2. Both methyl viologen and H2O2 inhibited stomatal opening and promoted stomatal closure. At concentrations [less than or equal to]10-5 M, the effects of methyl viologen and H2O2 on stomatal behavior were reversible and were abolished by 2 mM EGTA or 10 [mu]M verapamil. In addition, at 10-5 M, i.e. the maximum concentration at which the effects of the treatments were prevented by EGTA or verapamil, methyl viologen and H2O2 caused an increase in guard cell cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), which was abolished in the presence of EGTA. Therefore, at low concentrations of methyl viologen and H2O2, removal of extracellular Ca2+ prevented both the oxidative stress-induced changes in stomatal aperture and the associated increases in [Ca2+]i. This suggests that in this concentration range the effects of the treatments are Ca2+-dependent and are mediated by changes in [Ca2+]i. In contrast, at concentrations of methyl viologan and H2O2 > 10-5 M, EGTA and verapamil had no effect. However, in this concentration range the effects of the treatments were irreversible and correlated with a marked reduction in membrane integrity and guard cell viability. This suggests that at high concentrations the effects of methyl viologen and H2O2 may be due to changes in membrane integrity. The implications of oxidative stress-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and the possible disruption of guard-cell Ca2+ homeostasis are discussed in relation to the processes of Ca2+-based signal transduction in stomatal guard cells and the control of stomatal aperture. PMID:12226345

  2. Elevation of cytosolic calcium precedes anoxic gene expression in maize suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Subbaiah, C C; Bush, D S; Sachs, M M

    1994-01-01

    Based on pharmacological evidence, we previously proposed that intracellular Ca2+ mediates the perception of O2 deprivation in maize seedlings. Herein, using fluorescence imaging and photometry of Ca2+ in maize suspension-cultured cells, the proposal was further investigated. Two complementary approaches were taken: (1) real time analysis of anoxia-induced changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]i) and (2) experimental manipulation of [Ca]i and then assay of the resultant anoxia-specific responses. O2 depletion caused an immediate increase in [Ca2+]i, and this was reversible within a few seconds of reoxygenation. The [Ca]i elevation proceeded independent of extracellular Ca2+. The kinetics of the Ca2+ response showed that it occurred much earlier than any detectable changes in gene expression. Ruthenium red blocked the anoxic [Ca]i elevation and also the induction of adh1 (encoding alcohol dehydrogenase) and sh1 (encoding sucrose synthase) mRNA. Ca2+, when added along with ruthenium red, prevented the effects of the antagonist on the anoxic responses. Verapamil and bepridil failed to block the [Ca]i rise induced by anoxia and were equally ineffective on anoxic gene expression. Caffeine induced an elevation of [Ca]i as well as ADH activity under normoxia. The data provide direct evidence for [Ca]i elevation in maize cells as a result of anoxia-induced mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Furthermore, any manipulation that modified the [Ca]i rise brought about a parallel change in the expression of two anoxia-inducible genes. Thus, these results corroborate our proposal that [Ca]i is a physiological transducer of anoxia signals in plants. PMID:7866021

  3. Histamine H1 receptor induces cytosolic calcium increase and aquaporin translocation in human salivary gland cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Park, Seong-Hae; Moon, Young Wha; Hwang, Sungmin; Kim, Donghoon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Oh, Seog Bae; Kim, Joong Soo; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Sung Joong; Choi, Se-Young; Park, Kyungpyo

    2009-08-01

    One of the common side effects of antihistamine medicines is xerostomia (dry mouth). The current consensus is that antihistamine-induced xerostomia comes from an antimuscarinic effect. Although the effect of antihistamines on salivary secretion is both obvious and significant, the cellular mechanism whereby this happens is still unclear because of the lack of knowledge of histamine signaling in human salivary glands. Here, we have studied histamine receptors and the effect of antihistamines on human submandibular acinar cells. In primary cultured human submandibular gland and a HSG cell line, histamine increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The histamine-induced cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) increase was inhibited by histamine H1 receptor-specific antagonists, and the expression of the functional histamine H1 receptor was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, histamine pretreatment did not inhibit a subsequent carbachol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise without "heterologous desensitization." Chlorpheniramine inhibited a carbachol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase at a 100-fold greater concentration than histamine receptor antagonism, whereas astemizole and cetrizine showed more than 1000-fold difference, which in part explains the xerostomia-inducing potency among the antihistamines. Notably, histamine resulted in translocation of aquaporin-5 to the plasma membrane in human submandibular gland cells and green fluorescent protein-tagged aquaporin-5 expressing HSG cells. We found that histidine decarboxylase and the histamine H1 receptor are broadly distributed in submandibular gland cells, whereas choline acetyltransferase is localized only at the parasympathetic terminals. Our results suggest that human salivary gland cells express histamine H1 receptors and histamine-synthesizing enzymes, revealing the cellular mechanism of antihistamine-induced xerostomia. PMID:19443731

  4. Fura-2 measurement of cytosolic calcium in HgCl/sub 2/-treated rabbit renal turbular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, B.F.; Smith, M.W.

    1986-05-01

    This abstract reports the effect of HgCl/sub 2/ on cytosolic ionized calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/, measured by the fluorescent chelator Fura-2, in trypsinized rabbit renal tubular cells at 37/sup 0/C in Hanks salt solution, pH 7.2, containing 1.37 mM CaCl/sub 2/. Viability measured fluorometrically with propidium iodide correlated well with that determined using trypan blue. HgCl/sub 2/ (1-10 ..mu..M) induced rapid and dose-dependent increases up to 5-fold normal (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/. After 1-3 min the rate of increase slowed or stopped. At higher doses of HgCl/sub 2/ (20-100 ..mu..M) an unexpected pattern of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ changes occurred. After an initial 5-6-fold increase by 1 min, (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ decreased in the next 2-3 min to 2-3-fold normal levels. This change was followed by a second increase of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ at a much slower rate which did appear to be dose-related. Calcium channel blockers and calmodulin inhibitors had little or no effect. Inhibitors of mitochondrial function, antimycin and 2,4-dinitrophenol, interfered with the fluorescent assay; KCN totally inhibited HgCl/sub 2/-induced (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ changes while hypoxia had no apparent effect. The -SH group binding compound N-ethyl maleimide increased (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ 4-5 fold; addition of 25 ..mu..M Hg caused faster peaking and recovery of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/. The mechanism of Ca/sup 2 +/ buffering triggered by higher HgCl/sub 2/ concentrations is as yet unknown.

  5. Nicotinic receptors on rat alveolar macrophages dampen ATP-induced increase in cytosolic calcium concentration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) have been identified on a variety of cells of the immune system and are generally considered to trigger anti-inflammatory events. In the present study, we determine the nAChR inventory of rat alveolar macrophages (AM), and investigate the cellular events evoked by stimulation with nicotine. Methods Rat AM were isolated freshly by bronchoalveolar lavage. The expression of nAChR subunits was analyzed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. To evaluate function of nAChR subunits, electrophysiological recordings and measurements of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were conducted. Results Positive RT-PCR results were obtained for nAChR subunits α3, α5, α9, α10, β1, and β2, with most stable expression being noted for subunits α9, α10, β1, and β2. Notably, mRNA coding for subunit α7 which is proposed to convey the nicotinic anti-inflammatory response of macrophages from other sources than the lung was not detected. RT-PCR data were supported by immunohistochemistry on AM isolated by lavage, as well as in lung tissue sections and by Western blotting. Neither whole-cell patch clamp recordings nor measurements of [Ca2+]i revealed changes in membrane current in response to ACh and in [Ca2+]i in response to nicotine, respectively. However, nicotine (100 μM), given 2 min prior to ATP, significantly reduced the ATP-induced rise in [Ca2+]i by 30%. This effect was blocked by α-bungarotoxin and did not depend on the presence of extracellular calcium. Conclusions Rat AM are equipped with modulatory nAChR with properties distinct from ionotropic nAChR mediating synaptic transmission in the nervous system. Their stimulation with nicotine dampens ATP-induced Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Thus, the present study identifies the first acute receptor-mediated nicotinic effect on AM with anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:20920278

  6. Stimulation-dependent recruitment of cytosolic phospholipase A2-alpha to EA.hy.926 endothelial cell membranes leads to calcium-independent association.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Seema; Smith, Jennifer; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Walker, John

    2004-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2-alpha (cPLA2-alpha) is a calcium-activated enzyme involved in agonist-induced arachidonic acid release. In endothelial cells, free arachidonic acid is predominantly converted into prostacyclin, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet activation. As the rate-limiting step in prostacyclin production is the generation of free arachidonic acid by cPLA2-alpha, this enzyme has become an attractive pharmacological target and the focus of many studies. Following stimulation with calcium-mobilizing agonists, cPLA2-alpha translocates to intracellular phospholipid membranes via its C2 domain. In this study, the calcium-induced association of cPLA2-alpha with EA.hy.926 endothelial cell membranes was investigated. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies showed that following stimulation with histamine, thrombin or the calcium ionophore A23187, cPLA2-alpha relocated to intracellular membranes. Treatment of A23187-stimulated cells with EGTA or BAPTA-AM demonstrated that a substantial pool of cPLA2-alpha remained associated with membrane fractions in a calcium-independent manner. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that cells stimulated for periods of greater than 10 min showed a high proportion of calcium-independent membrane-associated cPLA2-alpha. Calcium-independent membrane association of cPLA2-alpha was not due to hydrophobic or cytoskeletal interactions. Finally, the recombinant C2 domain of cPLA2-alpha exhibited calcium-independent membrane binding to membranes isolated from A23187-stimulated cells but not those isolated from nonstimulated cells. These findings suggest that novel mechanisms involving accessory proteins at the target membrane play a role in the regulation of cPLA2-alpha. Such regulatory associations could enable the cell to discriminate between the varying levels of cytosolic calcium induced by different stimuli.

  7. Quantitative analysis of the cytosolic free calcium dependency of exocytosis from three subcellular compartments in intact human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Cytosolic free calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, and exocytosis of azurophil granules (beta-glucuronidase), specific granules (vitamin B12- binding protein), and secretory vesicles (gelatinase) were measured concomitantly in intact human neutrophils under steady state [Ca2+]i. The cells were loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator quin2 in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, and steady state [Ca2+]i levels ranging from 20 to greater than 2,000 nM were obtained by adding the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin at various concentrations of extracellular calcium. The extent of exocytosis from the three granule populations was found to be a function of [Ca2+]i. The minimal [Ca2+]i that caused significant release (threshold [Ca2+]i) was approximately 200-300 nM and was similar for all three compartments. Marked differences, however, were found when the [Ca2+]i for half-maximal exocytosis (EC50) was determined. In the absence of cytochalasin B the EC50 was 1,100 +/- 220 nM and 1,600 +/- 510 nM for specific granules and secretory vesicles, respectively, and approximately 6,000 nM for azurophil granules. Cytochalasin B did not affect the threshold [Ca2+]i but decreased the EC50 and enhanced the rate of exocytosis. In the presence of cytochalasin B the EC50 was approximately 600 nM both for secretory vesicles and specific granules, and approximately 2,600 nM for azurophil granules. The addition of the chemotactic peptide N-formyl- methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine dramatically changed the [Ca2+]i dependency of granule secretion: It decreased the threshold [Ca2+]i to less than 20 and less than 50 nM, and the EC50 to 50 and 200 nM for specific and azurophil granules, respectively, and it significantly increased the rate of exocytosis. Thus, the additional signal(s) provided by receptor activation markedly lower(s) the Ca2+ requirement of the exocytotic process. Furthermore, these results indicate that the secretion from three different granule populations within the same

  8. Prostaglandin F2 alpha-induced calcium transient in ovine large luteal cells: II. Modulation of the transient and resting cytosolic free calcium alters progesterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Wegner, J A; Martinez-Zaguilan, R; Gillies, R J; Hoyer, P B

    1991-02-01

    A previous study demonstrated that prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) stimulates a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels [( Ca2+]i) in ovine large luteal cells. In the present study, the magnitude of the PGF2 alpha (0.5 microM)-induced calcium transient in Hanks' medium (87 +/- 2 nM increase above resting levels) was reduced (P less than 0.05) but not completely eliminated in fura-2 loaded large luteal cells incubated in Ca2(+)-free or phosphate- and carbonate-free medium (10 +/- 1 nM, 32 +/- 6 nM, above resting levels; respectively). Preincubation for 2 min with 1 mM LaCl3 (calcium antagonist) eliminated the PGF2 alpha-induced calcium transient. The inhibitory effect of PGF2 alpha on secretion of progesterone was reduced in Ca2(+)-free medium or medium plus LaCl3. Resting [Ca2+]i levels and basal secretion of progesterone were both reduced (P less than 0.05) in large cells incubated in Ca2(+)-free medium (27 +/- 4 nM; 70 +/- 6% control, respectively) or with 5 microM 5,5'-dimethyl bis-(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (40 +/- 2 nM; 49 +/- 1% control; respectively). In addition, secretion of progesterone was inhibited (P less than 0.05) by conditions that increased (P less than 0.05) [Ca2+]i; that is LaCl3 ([Ca2+]i, 120 +/- 17 nM; progesterone, 82 +/- 8% control) and PGF2 alpha ([Ca2+]i, 102 +/- 10 nM; progesterone, 82 +/- 3% control). In small luteal cells, resting [Ca2+]i levels and secretion of progesterone were reduced by incubation in Ca2(+)-free Hanks ([Ca2+]i, 28 +/- 2 nM; progesterone, 71 +/- 6% control), however, neither LaCl3 nor PGF2 alpha increased [Ca2+]i levels or inhibited secretion of progesterone. The findings presented here provide evidence that extracellular as well as intracellular calcium contribute to the PGF2 alpha-induced [Ca2+]i transient in large cells. Furthermore, whereas an adequate level of [Ca2+]i is required to support progesterone production in both small and large cells, optimal progesterone production in

  9. Magnesium Sensitizes Slow Vacuolar Channels to Physiological Cytosolic Calcium and Inhibits Fast Vacuolar Channels in Fava Bean Guard Cell Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Pei; Ward; Schroeder

    1999-11-01

    Vacuolar ion channels in guard cells play important roles during stomatal movement and are regulated by many factors including Ca(2+), calmodulin, protein kinases, and phosphatases. We report that physiological cytosolic and luminal Mg(2+) levels strongly regulate vacuolar ion channels in fava bean (Vicia faba) guard cells. Luminal Mg(2+) inhibited fast vacuolar (FV) currents with a K(i) of approximately 0.23 mM in a voltage-dependent manner at positive potentials on the cytoplasmic side. Cytosolic Mg(2+) at 1 mM also inhibited FV currents. Furthermore, in the absence of cytosolic Mg(2+), cytosolic Ca(2+) at less than 10 µM did not activate slow vacuolar (SV) currents. However, when cytosolic Mg(2+) was present, submicromolar concentrations of cytosolic Ca(2+) activated SV currents with a K(d) of approximately 227 nM, suggesting a synergistic Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) effect. The activation potential of SV currents was shifted toward physiological potentials in the presence of cytosolic Mg(2+) concentrations. The direction of SV currents could also be changed from outward to both outward and inward currents. Our data predict a model for SV channel regulation, including a cytosolic binding site for Ca(2+) with an affinity in the submicromolar range and a cytosolic low-affinity Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) binding site. SV channels are predicted to contain a third binding site on the vacuolar luminal side, which binds Ca(2+) and is inhibitory. In conclusion, cytosolic Mg(2+) sensitizes SV channels to physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Furthermore, we propose that cytosolic and vacuolar Mg(2+) concentrations ensure that FV channels do not function as a continuous vacuolar K(+) leak, which would prohibit stomatal opening.

  10. Magnesium Sensitizes Slow Vacuolar Channels to Physiological Cytosolic Calcium and Inhibits Fast Vacuolar Channels in Fava Bean Guard Cell Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Pei; Ward; Schroeder

    1999-11-01

    Vacuolar ion channels in guard cells play important roles during stomatal movement and are regulated by many factors including Ca(2+), calmodulin, protein kinases, and phosphatases. We report that physiological cytosolic and luminal Mg(2+) levels strongly regulate vacuolar ion channels in fava bean (Vicia faba) guard cells. Luminal Mg(2+) inhibited fast vacuolar (FV) currents with a K(i) of approximately 0.23 mM in a voltage-dependent manner at positive potentials on the cytoplasmic side. Cytosolic Mg(2+) at 1 mM also inhibited FV currents. Furthermore, in the absence of cytosolic Mg(2+), cytosolic Ca(2+) at less than 10 µM did not activate slow vacuolar (SV) currents. However, when cytosolic Mg(2+) was present, submicromolar concentrations of cytosolic Ca(2+) activated SV currents with a K(d) of approximately 227 nM, suggesting a synergistic Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) effect. The activation potential of SV currents was shifted toward physiological potentials in the presence of cytosolic Mg(2+) concentrations. The direction of SV currents could also be changed from outward to both outward and inward currents. Our data predict a model for SV channel regulation, including a cytosolic binding site for Ca(2+) with an affinity in the submicromolar range and a cytosolic low-affinity Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) binding site. SV channels are predicted to contain a third binding site on the vacuolar luminal side, which binds Ca(2+) and is inhibitory. In conclusion, cytosolic Mg(2+) sensitizes SV channels to physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Furthermore, we propose that cytosolic and vacuolar Mg(2+) concentrations ensure that FV channels do not function as a continuous vacuolar K(+) leak, which would prohibit stomatal opening. PMID:10557247

  11. [Interaction of Membrane and Calcium Oscillators in Cardiac Pacemaker Cells: Mathematical Modeling].

    PubMed

    Ryvkin, A M; Zorin, N M; Moskvin, A S; Solovyova, O E; Markhasin, V S

    2015-01-01

    An integrative model of the calcium dynamics in cardiac pacemaker cells is developed taking into account a synergetic effect of the interaction between an outer membrane oscillator and an intracellular calcium oscillator ("membrane and Ca(2+)-clock"). The main feature of the model is a description of the stochastic dynamics of Ca2+ release units within the electron-conformational mechanism of the functioning of ryanodine-sensitive calcium channels. It is shown that interaction of two cellular oscillators provides a stable action potential generation in the cardiac pacemaker cells even in the case of the stochastic Ca2+ dynamics. We studied in detail the effect of ryanodine channels sensitivity to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration in sarcoplasmic reticulum and in the dyadic space on the behavior of calcium-release system. A parametric analysis of the integrative model of pacemaker cells is performed. PMID:26841508

  12. Attachment to fibronectin or vitronectin makes human neutrophil migration sensitive to alterations in cytosolic free calcium concentration

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Transient increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, appear to be required for the migration of human neutrophils on poly-D- lysine-coated glass in the presence of dilute serum (Marks, P. W., and F. R. Maxfield. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 110:43-52). In contrast, no requirement for [Ca2+]i transients exists when neutrophils migrate on albumin-coated glass in the absence of serum. To determine the mechanism that necessitates [Ca2+]i transients on poly-D-lysine in the presence of serum, migration was examined on substrates consisting of purified adhesive glycoproteins. In the absence of external Ca2+, a treatment which causes the cessation of [Ca2+]i transients, migration on fibronectin (fn) and vitronectin (vn) was significantly inhibited. Migration was also inhibited in Ca2(+)-buffered cells on these substrates, indicating that this effect was the result of an alteration of [Ca2+]i. In the absence of external Ca2+, the inhibition of migration on fn or vn was more pronounced when soluble fn or vn was added to cells migrating on these substrates. This effect of soluble adhesive glycoprotein was specific: in the absence of external Ca2+, soluble fn did not affect the migration of cells on vn, and soluble vn did not affect the migration on fn. No additional inhibition of migration was observed in Ca2(+)-buffered cells with the addition of soluble adhesive glycoprotein. These data indicate that [Ca2+]i transients are involved in continued migration of human neutrophils on fn or vn, proteins which are part of the extracellular matrix that neutrophils encounter in vivo. PMID:1702443

  13. Hormone-induced calcium oscillations depend on cross-coupling with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate oscillations.

    PubMed

    Gaspers, Lawrence D; Bartlett, Paula J; Politi, Antonio; Burnett, Paul; Metzger, Walson; Johnston, Jane; Joseph, Suresh K; Höfer, Thomas; Thomas, Andrew P

    2014-11-20

    Receptor-mediated oscillations in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) could originate either directly from an autonomous Ca(2+) feedback oscillator at the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor or as a secondary consequence of IP3 oscillations driven by Ca(2+) feedback on IP3 metabolism. It is challenging to discriminate these alternatives, because IP3 fluctuations could drive Ca(2+) oscillations or could just be a secondary response to the [Ca(2+)]i spikes. To investigate this problem, we constructed a recombinant IP3 buffer using type-I IP3 receptor ligand-binding domain fused to GFP (GFP-LBD), which buffers IP3 in the physiological range. This IP3 buffer slows hormone-induced [IP3] dynamics without changing steady-state [IP3]. GFP-LBD perturbed [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in a dose-dependent manner: it decreased both the rate of [Ca(2+)]i rise and the speed of Ca(2+) wave propagation and, at high levels, abolished [Ca(2+)]i oscillations completely. These data, together with computational modeling, demonstrate that IP3 dynamics play a fundamental role in generating [Ca(2+)]i oscillations and waves.

  14. Cooperative effects of inherent stochasticity and random long-range connections on synchronization and coherence resonance in diffusively coupled calcium oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Maosheng; Sun, Runzhi

    2014-03-01

    The cooperative effects of inherent stochasticity and random long-range connections (RLRCs) on synchronization and coherence resonance in networks of calcium oscillators have been investigated. Two different types of collective behaviors, coherence resonance (CR) and synchronization, have been studied numerically in the context of chemical Langevin equations (CLEs). In the CLEs, the reaction steps are all stochastic, including the exchange of calcium ions between adjacent and non-adjacent cells through the gap junctions. The calcium oscillators’ synchronization was characterized by the standard deviation of the cytosolic calcium concentrations. Meanwhile, the temporal coherence of the calcium spike train was characterized by the reciprocal coefficient of variance (RCV). Synchronization induced by RLRCs was observed, namely, the exchange of calcium ions between non-adjacent cells can promote the synchronization of the cells. Moreover, it was found that the RCV shows a clear peak when both inherent stochasticity and RLRCs are optimal, indicating the existence of CR. Since inherent stochasticity and RLRCs are two essential ingredients of cellular processes, synchronization and CR are also important for cells’ functions. The results reported in this paper are expected to be useful for understanding the dynamics of intercellular calcium signaling processes in vivo.

  15. Correlation of blood pressure in end-stage renal disease with platelet cytosolic free calcium concentration during treatment of renal anemia with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Schiffl, H

    1992-06-01

    The hemodynamic hallmark of hypertension complicating the treatment of renal anemia with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHu-EPO) is increased total peripheral vascular resistance, but the mechanisms underlying the arteriolar vasoconstriction are still an enigma. We studied body fluid volumes, plasma renin activity, plasma norepinephrine, and calcium metabolism in platelets in 40 previously normotensive hemodialysis patients before and after 12 weeks of rHu-EPO treatment. Partial correction of anemia caused a rise in arterial pressure (94 +/- 6 mmHg vs 124 +/- 7 mmHg, p less than 0.05) and in platelet cytosolic calcium concentration (113 +/- 5 nM vs 171 +/- 18 nM, p less than 0.05) in eight patients. Hypertensive patients had significantly higher plasma noradrenaline concentrations, but they did not differ significantly in body fluid volumes and plasma renin activities. There was a close correlation between free calcium concentration in platelets and mean arterial pressure in patients developing rHu-EPO-induced-hypertension (r = 0.95). Short-term antihypertensive treatment resulted in a reduction of free calcium concentrations in platelets and a concomitant fall in blood pressure. The main results of the present studies suggest that rHu-EPO-induced hypertension might be associated with altered cellular calcium homeostasis and hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. If rHu-EPO therapy induces alterations of pressor factors or the hormone itself raises the cytosolic calcium not only in platelets but also in vascular smooth muscle cells, altered cellular calcium influx may contribute to the arteriolar vasoconstriction. PMID:1639525

  16. Routes of Ca2+ Shuttling during Ca2+ Oscillations: FOCUS ON THE ROLE OF MITOCHONDRIAL Ca2+ HANDLING AND CYTOSOLIC Ca2+ BUFFERS.

    PubMed

    Pecze, László; Blum, Walter; Schwaller, Beat

    2015-11-20

    In some cell types, Ca(2+) oscillations are strictly dependent on Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane, whereas in others, oscillations also persist in the absence of Ca(2+) influx. We observed that, in primary mesothelial cells, the plasmalemmal Ca(2+) influx played a pivotal role. However, when the Ca(2+) transport across the plasma membrane by the "lanthanum insulation method" was blocked prior to the induction of the serum-induced Ca(2+) oscillations, mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport was found to be able to substitute for the plasmalemmal Ca(2+) exchange function, thus rendering the oscillations independent of extracellular Ca(2+). However, in a physiological situation, the Ca(2+)-buffering capacity of mitochondria was found not to be essential for Ca(2+) oscillations. Moreover, brief spontaneous Ca(2+) changes were observed in the mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration without apparent changes in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, indicating the presence of a mitochondrial autonomous Ca(2+) signaling mechanism. In the presence of calretinin, a Ca(2+)-buffering protein, the amplitude of cytosolic spikes during oscillations was decreased, and the amount of Ca(2+) ions taken up by mitochondria was reduced. Thus, the increased calretinin expression observed in mesothelioma cells and in certain colon cancer might be correlated to the increased resistance of these tumor cells to proapoptotic/pronecrotic signals. We identified and characterized (experimentally and by modeling) three Ca(2+) shuttling pathways in primary mesothelial cells during Ca(2+) oscillations: Ca(2+) shuttled between (i) the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, (ii) the ER and the extracellular space, and (iii) the ER and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) buffers.

  17. Oscillations in cytosolic free Ca2+ induced by ADP and ATP in single rat hepatocytes display differential sensitivity to application of phorbol ester.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, C J; Cobbold, P H; Green, A K

    1995-01-01

    We have previously described differences in the oscillatory responses of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in hepatocytes to ADP and ATP, which we have interpreted as evidence that these two nucleotides are acting at distinct receptors. We show here that ADP- and ATP-induced oscillations are differentially sensitive to application of the phorbol ester 4 beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB). ADP-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations are abolished by low concentrations of PDB (5-10 nM), whereas ATP-induced oscillations of long duration are refractory to PDB, even at greatly elevated concentrations (100 nM). The data illustrate a further difference in the actions of ADP and ATP, strengthening the argument that these agonists are not acting at the same receptor on rat hepatocytes. PMID:7619050

  18. Spatiotemporal properties of high-speed calcium oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, James; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a component of the reticular activating system (RAS), and is involved in the activated states of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Gamma oscillations (approximately 30–80 Hz) are evident in all PPN neurons and are mediated by high-threshold voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels. We tested the hypothesis that high-speed calcium imaging would reveal calcium-mediated oscillations in dendritic compartments in synchrony with patch-clamp recorded oscillations during depolarizing current ramps. Patch-clamped 8- to 16-day-old rat PPN neurons (n = 67 out of 121) were filled with Fura 2, Bis Fura, or OGB1/CHR. This study also characterized a novel ratiometric technique using Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB1) with coinjections of a new long-stokes-shift dye, Chromeo 494 (CHR). Fluorescent calcium transients were blocked with the nonspecific calcium channel blocker cadmium, or by the combination of ω-agatoxin-IVA, a specific P/Q-type calcium channel blocker, and ω-conotoxin-GVIA, a specific N-type calcium channel blocker. The calcium transients were evident in different dendrites (suggesting channels are present throughout the dendritic tree) along the sampled length without interruption (suggesting channels are evenly distributed), and appeared to represent a summation of oscillations present in the soma. We confirm that PPN calcium channel-mediated oscillations are due to P/Q- and N-type channels, and reveal that these channels are distributed along the dendrites of PPN cells. PMID:23990242

  19. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  20. Mechanisms underlying angiotensin II-induced calcium oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms that underlie angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]cyt) oscillations in medullary pericytes, we expanded a prior model of ion fluxes. ANG II stimulation was simulated by doubling maximal inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production and imposing a 90% blockade of K+ channels. We investigated two configurations, one in which ryanodine receptors (RyR) and IP3 receptors (IP3R) occupy a common store and a second in which they reside on separate stores. Our results suggest that Ca2+ release from stores and import from the extracellular space are key determinants of oscillations because both raise [Ca] in subplasmalemmal spaces near RyR. When the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) threshold of RyR is exceeded, the ensuing Ca2+ release is limited by Ca2+ reuptake into stores and export across the plasmalemma. If sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pumps do not remain saturated and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores are replenished, that phase is followed by a resumption of leak from internal stores that leads either to [Ca]cyt elevation below the CICR threshold (no oscillations) or to elevation above it (oscillations). Our model predicts that oscillations are more prone to occur when IP3R and RyR stores are separate because, in that case, Ca2+ released by RyR during CICR can enhance filling of adjacent IP3 stores to favor a high subsequent leak that generates further CICR events. Moreover, the existence or absence of oscillations depends on the set points of several parameters, so that biological variation might well explain the presence or absence of oscillations in individual pericytes. PMID:18562632

  1. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A.; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V.; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release–activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca2+ entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. Results GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca2+ currents after Ca2+ release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Conclusions Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed

  2. Cytosolic calcium transients are a determinant of contraction-induced HSP72 transcription in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Stary, Creed M; Hogan, Michael C

    2016-05-15

    The intrinsic activating factors that induce transcription of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle following exercise remain unclear. We hypothesized that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with depolarization is a determinant. We utilized intact, single skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus laevis to test the role of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient and several other exercise-related factors (fatigue, hypoxia, AMP kinase, and cross-bridge cycling) on the activation of HSP72 transcription. HSP72 and HSP60 mRNA levels were assessed with real-time quantitative PCR; cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was assessed with fura-2. Both fatiguing and nonfatiguing contractions resulted in a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. As expected, peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained tightly coupled with peak developed tension in contracting fibers. Pretreatment with N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) resulted in depressed peak developed tension with stimulation, while peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained largely unchanged from control values. Despite excitation-contraction uncoupling, BTS-treated fibers displayed a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. Treatment of fibers with hypoxia (Po2: <3 mmHg) or AMP kinase activation had no effect on HSP72 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the intermittent cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with skeletal muscle depolarization provides a sufficient activating stimulus for HSP72 transcription. Metabolic or mechanical factors associated with fatigue development and cross-bridge cycling likely play a more limited role. PMID:26869714

  3. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis and increased cytosolic calcium are both necessary but not sufficient for activity-dependent bulk endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Andrew; Marland, Jamie R K; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. By definition this mode is triggered by neuronal activity; however, key questions regarding its mechanism of activation remain unaddressed. To determine the basic requirements for ADBE triggering in central nerve terminals, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. ADBE was monitored both optically and morphologically by observing uptake of the fluid phase markers tetramethylrhodamine-dextran and horse radish peroxidase respectively. Ablation of SV fusion with tetanus toxin resulted in the arrest of ADBE, but had no effect on other calcium-dependent events such as activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation, indicating that SV exocytosis is necessary for triggering. Furthermore, the calcium chelator EGTA abolished ADBE while leaving SV exocytosis intact, demonstrating that ADBE is triggered by intracellular free calcium increases outside the active zone. Activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation was also arrested in EGTA-treated neurons, consistent with its proposed role in triggering ADBE. Thus, SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient individually to trigger ADBE. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. To determine the minimal requirements for ADBE triggering, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. We found that SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient to trigger ADBE.

  4. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis and increased cytosolic calcium are both necessary but not sufficient for activity-dependent bulk endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Andrew; Marland, Jamie R K; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. By definition this mode is triggered by neuronal activity; however, key questions regarding its mechanism of activation remain unaddressed. To determine the basic requirements for ADBE triggering in central nerve terminals, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. ADBE was monitored both optically and morphologically by observing uptake of the fluid phase markers tetramethylrhodamine-dextran and horse radish peroxidase respectively. Ablation of SV fusion with tetanus toxin resulted in the arrest of ADBE, but had no effect on other calcium-dependent events such as activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation, indicating that SV exocytosis is necessary for triggering. Furthermore, the calcium chelator EGTA abolished ADBE while leaving SV exocytosis intact, demonstrating that ADBE is triggered by intracellular free calcium increases outside the active zone. Activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation was also arrested in EGTA-treated neurons, consistent with its proposed role in triggering ADBE. Thus, SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient individually to trigger ADBE. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. To determine the minimal requirements for ADBE triggering, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. We found that SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient to trigger ADBE. PMID:25913068

  5. Using Jensen's inequality to explain the role of regular calcium oscillations in protein activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Knoke, B.; Marhl, M.; Perc, M.; Schuster, S.

    2010-09-01

    Oscillations of cytosolic Ca2 + are very important for cellular signalling in excitable and non-excitable cells. The information of various extracellular stimuli is encoded into oscillating patterns of Ca2 + that subsequently lead to the activation of different Ca2 +-sensitive target proteins in the cell. The question remains, however, why this information is transmitted by means of an oscillating rather than a constant signal. Here we show that, in fact, Ca2 + oscillations can achieve a better activation of target proteins than a comparable constant signal with the same amount of Ca2 + used. For this we use Jensen's inequality that describes the relation between the function value of the average of a set of argument values and the average of the function values of the arguments from that set. We analyse the role of the cooperativity of the binding of Ca2 + and of zero-order ultrasensitivity, which are two properties that are often observed in experiments on the activation of Ca2 +-sensitive target proteins. Our results apply to arbitrary oscillation shapes and a very general decoding model, thus generalizing the observations of several previous studies. We compare our results with data from experimental studies investigating the activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and Ras by oscillatory and constant signals. Although we are restricted to specific approximations due to the lack of detailed kinetic data, we find good qualitative agreement with our theoretical predictions.

  6. Calcium oscillations encoding neuron-to-astrocyte communication.

    PubMed

    Zonta, Micaela; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2002-01-01

    The observation that the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate released from presynaptic terminals can activate, beside the post-synaptic neuron, the glial cell astrocyte, stimulated glial cell research like no other event since the recognition in the 1980s that astrocytes can express on their membrane many receptors for classical neurotransmitters. The properties and the functional role(s) of such a neuron-to-astrocyte signaling have now become the focus of intense research in neurobiology. Indeed, a growing body of evidence has recently highlighted the ability of astrocytes to work as sophisticated detectors of synaptic activity: by changing the frequency of [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations evoked by the synaptic release of glutamate, these cells display the remarkable capacity to discriminate between different levels and patterns of synaptic activity. Furthermore, the observation that astrocytes increase the frequency of [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in response to repetitive episodes of high neuronal activity challenges the common concept that memory function in the brain is an exclusive property of neuronal cells. Glutamate-mediated [Ca(2+)](i) elevations can also trigger in astrocytes the release of glutamate that can ultimately affect neuronal transmission. Given the wide role played by glutamate in brain physiology, our view on how the brain operates needs now to be revised taking into account the bi-directional, glutamatergic communication between neurons and astrocytes.

  7. Diffusion of calcium and metabolites in pancreatic islets: killing oscillations with a pitchfork.

    PubMed

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Zimliki, Charles L; Bertram, Richard; Sherman, Arthur

    2006-05-15

    Cell coupling is important for the normal function of the beta-cells of the pancreatic islet of Langerhans, which secrete insulin in response to elevated plasma glucose. In the islets, electrical and metabolic communications are mediated by gap junctions. Although electrical coupling is believed to account for synchronization of the islets, the role and significance of diffusion of calcium and metabolites are not clear. To address these questions we analyze two different mathematical models of islet calcium and electrical dynamics. To study diffusion of calcium, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model. Based on our analysis, we conclude that intercellular diffusion of calcium is not necessary for islet synchronization, at most supplementing electrical coupling. Metabolic coupling is investigated with a recent mathematical model incorporating glycolytic oscillations. Bifurcation analysis of the coupled system reveals several modes of behavior, depending on the relative strength of electrical and metabolic coupling. We find that whereas electrical coupling always produces synchrony, metabolic coupling can abolish both oscillations and synchrony, explaining some puzzling experimental observations. We suggest that these modes are generic features of square-wave bursters and relaxation oscillators coupled through either the activation or recovery variable.

  8. Diffusion of Calcium and Metabolites in Pancreatic Islets: Killing Oscillations with a Pitchfork

    PubMed Central

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Zimliki, Charles L.; Bertram, Richard; Sherman, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Cell coupling is important for the normal function of the β-cells of the pancreatic islet of Langerhans, which secrete insulin in response to elevated plasma glucose. In the islets, electrical and metabolic communications are mediated by gap junctions. Although electrical coupling is believed to account for synchronization of the islets, the role and significance of diffusion of calcium and metabolites are not clear. To address these questions we analyze two different mathematical models of islet calcium and electrical dynamics. To study diffusion of calcium, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model. Based on our analysis, we conclude that intercellular diffusion of calcium is not necessary for islet synchronization, at most supplementing electrical coupling. Metabolic coupling is investigated with a recent mathematical model incorporating glycolytic oscillations. Bifurcation analysis of the coupled system reveals several modes of behavior, depending on the relative strength of electrical and metabolic coupling. We find that whereas electrical coupling always produces synchrony, metabolic coupling can abolish both oscillations and synchrony, explaining some puzzling experimental observations. We suggest that these modes are generic features of square-wave bursters and relaxation oscillators coupled through either the activation or recovery variable. PMID:16500973

  9. Evidence that cytosolic calcium increases are not sufficient to stimulate phospholipid scrambling in human T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wurth, Georjeana A; Zweifach, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Phospholipid scrambling, the disruption of normal plasma-membrane asymmetry, occurs during apoptotic and necrotic cell death and during the activation of platelets and neutrophils. It is currently believed that phospholipid scrambling is triggered simply by increases in bulk cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. We have presented evidence previously that the styryl dye FM1-43 is sensitive to phospholipid scrambling in Jurkat human leukaemic T-lymphocytes. Here we have used FM1-43, in combination with fura 2 and the Ca(2+)-elevating agents ionomycin and thapsigargin, in imaging experiments to test the idea that increases in bulk cytosolic [Ca(2+)] stimulate scrambling. Intracellular Ca(2+) increases of approximately 2 microM accompanied ionomycin-stimulated scrambling in approximately 50% of cells, and scrambling occurred in >99% of cells in which intracellular Ca(2+) rose to 4 microM. Chelating intracellular Ca(2+) with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid or EGTA suppressed both ionomycin-stimulated intra cellular Ca(2+) increases and scrambling, demonstrating that intracellular Ca(2+) increases are necessary for ionomycin-stimulated scrambling. However, elevating intracellular Ca(2+) to 2-4 microM with thapsigargin, a drug that depletes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and triggers Ca(2+) entry via Ca(2+)-release-activated Ca(2+) channels, did not trigger scrambling, as assessed with either FM1-43 or FITC-labelled annexin V. These results suggest that increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] are necessary but not sufficient to stimulate scrambling in lymphoyctes, and indicate that ionomycin has an additional effect that is required to stimulate scrambling. PMID:11879198

  10. Kisspeptin-10 elicits triphasic cytosolic calcium responses in immortalized GT1-7 GnRH neurones.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Alcin, Ergul; Ayar, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Bayram; Sandal, Suleyman; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2011-03-29

    Kisspeptins, which are alternatively called as metastin since they were originally identified as products of metastasis suppressor gene KiSS-1, are the natural ligands for the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54). Kisspeptins are the most potent activators of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis reported to date. The pulsatile pattern of GnRH release, which results in the intermittent release of gonadotropic hormones from the pituitary, has a critical importance for reproductive function but the factors responsible from this release pattern are not known. Therefore, the pattern of kisspeptin-induced intracellular signaling and the role of PKC in the intracellular signaling cascade were investigated by fluorescence calcium imaging using the immortalized GnRH-secreting GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. Kisspeptin-10 caused a triphasic change characterized by an initial small increase followed by a significant decrease and increase in intracellular free calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)). The changes in [Ca(2+)](i) were significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor. The compatibility of appeared mirrored-patterns of kisspeptin-10-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) concentrations in these neurons and GnRH secretion confirm the importance of intracellular calcium flux downstream from GPR54 through PKC signaling pathway.

  11. Mammalian freeze-dried sperm can maintain their calcium oscillation-inducing ability when microinjected into mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi-Cai; Chen, Tian-e; Huang, Xiu-Ying; Sun, Fang-Zhen

    2005-03-25

    Mammalian freeze-dried sperm can maintain their genetic integrity and event support full development to term when microinjected into mature oocytes. However, it is unknown whether freeze-dried sperm can still maintain their calcium oscillation-inducing capability. Here, we microinjected mouse and bovine freeze-dried sperm into mouse MII oocytes and examined their calcium oscillation-inducing ability following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Two pieces of information are revealed. First, nearly all oocytes injected with a freeze-dried mouse sperm head or a bovine sperm showed fertilization-like calcium oscillations, indicating that freeze-drying treatment does not affect the activity of the sperm factor responsible for calcium oscillations. Second, freeze-dried sperm exhibited high resistance to external temperature increase. This is shown by the finding that the freeze-dried sperm can maintain their calcium oscillation-inducing capacity even following exposure to 100 degrees C for 3 h. We therefore conclude that mammalian sperm can maintain their calcium oscillation-inducing capability following freeze-drying, rehydration, and ICSI treatments.

  12. Diospyrin derivative, an anticancer quinonoid, regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondria by modulating cytosolic calcium in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Binod; Kumar, Amit; Ghosh, Subhalakshmi; Pandey, Badri N.; Mishra, Kaushala P.; Hazra, Banasri

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diospyrin diethylether (D7) caused oxidative stress-dependent activation of PC-PLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated PC-PLC induced a sustained-release of Ca{sup 2+} from endoplasmic reticulum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The elevated cytosolic Ca{sup +2} led to the calpain-caspase12 dependent apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D7-Induced Ca{sup +2} also found to accentuate the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Diospyrin diethylether (D7), a bisnaphthoquinonoid derivative, exhibited an oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis in several human cancer cells and tumor models. The present study was aimed at evaluation of the increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} leading to the apoptotic cell death triggered by D7 in MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. A phosphotidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, viz. U73122, and an antioxidant, viz. N-acetylcysteine, could significantly prevent the D7-induced rise in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} and PC-PLC activity. Using an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Ca{sup 2+} mobilizer (thapsigargin) and an ER-IP3R antagonist (heparin), results revealed ER as a major source of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} which led to the activation of calpain and caspase12, and cleavage of fodrin. These effects including apoptosis were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of Bapta-AM (a cell permeable Ca{sup 2+}-specific chelator), or calpeptin (a calpain inhibitor). Furthermore, D7-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} was found to alter mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by either Bapta-AM or ruthenium red (an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter). Thus, these results provided a deeper insight into the D7-induced redox signaling which eventually integrated the calcium-dependent calpain/caspase12 activation and mitochondrial alterations to accentuate the induction of apoptotic cell death.

  13. Leptin activates cytosolic calcium responses through protein kinase-C dependent mechanism in immortalized RFamide-related peptide-3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Saatci, Tugrul; Ayar, Ahmet; Canpolat, Sinan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2015-03-19

    RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3), a mammalian ortholog of avian gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), seems to be an important regulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) reproductive axis. Leptin, a permissive hormonal regulator of fertility, provides energy signal to brain. According to current view, leptin does not act directly on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. RFRP-3 neurons have been shown to express leptin receptors. The goal of the present study was to examine whether leptin acts through RFRP-3 neurons to modulate activity of the GnRH neurons. For this aim, the effects of leptin on intracellular free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in RFRP-3 neurons were investigated by using in vitro calcium imaging system. In the present study, rHypoE-7 cell line was used as a model to explore the effects of leptin on RFRP-3 neurons. rHypoE-7 cells were placed on glass coverslip and loaded with 1 μM Fura-2 AM. [Ca(2+)]i responses were quantified by the changes in 340/380 ratio. Leptin (0.1-10 μM) caused increases in [Ca(2+)]i in a dose-dependent manner. The changes in [Ca(2+)]i were significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor. These results demonstrate that leptin activates intracellular calcium signaling in RFRP-3 neurons through PKC-dependent pathway, and thus leptin may exert its effect on GnRH neurons by means of RFRP-3 cells.

  14. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  15. Hormone-induced calcium oscillations in liver cells can be explained by a simple one pool model.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, R; Stucki, J W

    1991-06-15

    Hormone-induced oscillations of the free intracellular calcium concentration are thought to be relevant for frequency encoding of hormone signals. In liver cells, such Ca2+ oscillations occur in response to stimulation by hormones acting via phosphoinositide breakdown. This observation may be explained by cooperative, positive feedback of Ca2+ on its own release from one inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive pool, obviating oscillations of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The kinetic rate laws of the associated model have a mathematical structure reminiscent of the Brusselator, a hypothetical chemical model involving a rather improbable trimolecular reaction step, thus giving a realistic biological interpretation to this hallmark of dissipative structures. We propose that calmodulin is involved in mediating this cooperativity and positive feedback, as suggested by the presented experiments. For one, hormone-induced calcium oscillations can be inhibited by the (nonphenothiazine) calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium or CGS 9343 B. Alternatively, in cells overstimulated by hormone, as characterized by a non-oscillatory elevated Ca2+ concentration, these antagonists could again restore sustained calcium oscillations. The experimental observations, including modulation of the oscillations by extracellular calcium, were in qualitative agreement with the predictions of our mathematical model. PMID:1904060

  16. BKCa channel regulates calcium oscillations induced by alpha-2-macroglobulin in human myometrial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wakle-Prabagaran, Monali; Lorca, Ramón A; Ma, Xiaofeng; Stamnes, Susan J; Amazu, Chinwendu; Hsiao, Jordy J; Karch, Celeste M; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Wright, Michael E; England, Sarah K

    2016-04-19

    The large-conductance, voltage-gated, calcium (Ca(2+))-activated potassium channel (BKCa) plays an important role in regulating Ca(2+)signaling and is implicated in the maintenance of uterine quiescence during pregnancy. We used immunopurification and mass spectrometry to identify proteins that interact with BKCain myometrium samples from term pregnant (≥37 wk gestation) women. From this screen, we identified alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2M). We then used immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot and the proximity ligation assay to confirm the interaction between BKCaand both α2M and its receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), in cultured primary human myometrial smooth muscle cells (hMSMCs). Single-channel electrophysiological recordings in the cell-attached configuration demonstrated that activated α2M (α2M*) increased the open probability of BKCain an oscillatory pattern in hMSMCs. Furthermore, α2M* caused intracellular levels of Ca(2+)to oscillate in oxytocin-primed hMSMCs. The initiation of oscillations required an interaction between α2M* and LRP1. By using Ca(2+)-free medium and inhibitors of various Ca(2+)signaling pathways, we demonstrated that the oscillations required entry of extracellular Ca(2+)through store-operated Ca(2+)channels. Finally, we found that the specific BKCablocker paxilline inhibited the oscillations, whereas the channel opener NS11021 increased the rate of these oscillations. These data demonstrate that α2M* and LRP1 modulate the BKCachannel in human myometrium and that BKCaand its immunomodulatory interacting partners regulate Ca(2+)dynamics in hMSMCs during pregnancy. PMID:27044074

  17. Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, M.S.; Lim, Priscilla L.K.; Gupta, Rashi; Boelsterli, Urs A. . E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg

    2006-12-15

    Diclofenac is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been associated with rare but serious hepatotoxicity. Experimental evidence indicates that diclofenac targets mitochondria and induces the permeability transition (mPT) which leads to apoptotic cell death in hepatocytes. While the downstream effector mechanisms have been well characterized, the more proximal pathways leading to the mPT are not known. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of free cytosolic calcium (Ca{sup 2+} {sub c}) in diclofenac-induced cell injury in immortalized human hepatocytes. We show that exposure to diclofenac caused time- and concentration-dependent cell injury, which was prevented by the specific mPT inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, 5 {mu}M). At 8 h, diclofenac caused increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} (Fluo-4 fluorescence), which was unaffected by CsA. Combined exposure to diclofenac/BAPTA (Ca{sup 2+} chelator) inhibited cell injury, indicating that Ca{sup 2+} plays a critical role in precipitating mPT. Diclofenac decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, {delta}{psi}{sub m} (JC-1 fluorescence), even in the presence of CsA or BAPTA, indicating that mitochondrial depolarization was not a consequence of the mPT or elevated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. The CYP2C9 inhibitor sulphaphenazole (10 {mu}M) protected from diclofenac-induced cell injury and prevented increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, while it had no effect on the dissipation of the {delta}{psi}{sub m}. Finally, diclofenac exposure greatly increased the mitochondria-selective superoxide levels secondary to the increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that diclofenac has direct depolarizing effects on mitochondria which does not lead to cell injury, while CYP2C9-mediated bioactivation causes increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, triggering the mPT and precipitating cell death.

  18. Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-mediated shuttling between intracellular stores and the cytosol contributes to the sustained elevation in cytosolic calcium in FMLP-activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ronald; Steel, Helen C; Tintinger, Gregory R

    2005-06-01

    The current study was designed to probe Ca2+ shuttling between intracellular stores and the cytosol as a potential mechanism contributing to the prolongation of elevated Ca2+ transients in N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated human neutrophils. Cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations and transmembrane fluxes of the cation were measured using spectrofluorimetric and radiometric procedures, respectively, while inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) was measured using a radioreceptor assay. The Ca2+-chelating agent, ethylene glycol-bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA; 10mM), was used to exclude store-operated influx of Ca2+ into neutrophils, while the IP3 receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB, 100 microM), added to the cells 10s after FMLP (0.01 and 1 microM), at which time the increases in IP3 and cytosolic Ca2+ were maximal, was used to eliminate both sustained release from stores and influx of Ca2+. Addition of FMLP at 0.01 or 1 microM resulted in equivalent peak increases in cytosolic Ca2+, while the increase in IP3 was greater and the rate of clearance of Ca2+ from the cytosol slower, in cells activated with 1 microM FMLP. Treatment of the cells with either EGTA or 2-APB following addition of 1 microM FMLP, completely (EGTA) or almost completely (2-APB) abolished the influx of Ca2+ and accelerated the rate of clearance of the cation from the cytosol. Post-peak cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations were lower, and the Ca2+ content of the stores higher, in cells treated with 2-APB. The involvement of IP3 was confirmed by similar findings in cells treated with U-73122 (1 microM), a selective inhibitor of phospholipase C. Taken together, these observations are compatible with IP3-mediated Ca2+ shuttling in neutrophils activated with FMLP.

  19. Computational biology analysis of platelet signaling reveals roles of feedbacks through phospholipase C and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase in controlling amplitude and duration of calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Balabin, Fedor A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N

    2016-06-01

    Blood platelet activation is required to allow their participation in hemostasis and thrombosis. It is regulated by a complicated signaling network, whose functioning has been recently attracting attention for basic research and pharmacological purposes. Phospholipase С (PLC) is an enzyme playing an important role in platelet calcium signaling and responsible for release of inositol triphosphate (IP3) into platelet cytoplasm thus controlling intracellular calcium concentration. Using a comprehensive computational model of platelet calcium signaling, we studied the influence of the positive feedback executed by cytosolic calcium on the PLC isoform β2 during platelet activation. With the positive feedback, the model predicted hyperintensive response to platelet activation by thrombin, where non-physiologically high calcium concentrations arose. However, if one took into account a negative feedback determined by IP3 3-kinase (IP3K), combination of the feedback resulted in the formation of a stepped response (with a stable oscillation amplitude and activation-dependent duration). Stochastic simulations confirmed that PLC and IP3K should act in pair to ensure platelet's "all-or-none" response to activation, when the activation level sets the probability of platelet activation, but not its intensity.

  20. Bacterial-induced calcium oscillations are common to nitrogen-fixing associations of nodulating legumes and nonlegumes.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Emma; Sun, Jongho; Op den Camp, Rik; Pujic, Petar; Hill, Lionel; Normand, Philippe; Morris, Richard J; Downie, J Allan; Geurts, Rene; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2015-08-01

    Plants that form root-nodule symbioses are within a monophyletic 'nitrogen-fixing' clade and associated signalling processes are shared with the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Central to symbiotic signalling are nuclear-associated oscillations in calcium ions (Ca(2+) ), occurring in the root hairs of several legume species in response to the rhizobial Nod factor signal. In this study we expanded the species analysed for activation of Ca(2+) oscillations, including nonleguminous species within the nitrogen-fixing clade. We showed that Ca(2+) oscillations are a common feature of legumes in their association with rhizobia, while Cercis, a non-nodulating legume, does not show Ca(2+) oscillations in response to Nod factors from Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234. Parasponia andersonii, a nonlegume that can associate with rhizobia, showed Nod factor-induced calcium oscillations to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors, but its non-nodulating sister species, Trema tomentosa, did not. Also within the nitrogen-fixing clade are actinorhizal species that associate with Frankia bacteria and we showed that Alnus glutinosa induces Ca(2+) oscillations in root hairs in response to exudates from Frankia alni, but not to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors. We conclude that the ability to mount Ca(2+) oscillations in response to symbiotic bacteria is a common feature of nodulating species within the nitrogen-fixing clade. PMID:26010117

  1. Transient increases in cytosolic free calcium appear to be required for the migration of adherent human neutrophils [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1990 Mar;110(3):861

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Human neutrophils exhibit multiple increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration [( Ca2+]i) spontaneously and in response to the chemoattractant N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (Jaconi, M. E. E., R. W. Rivest, W. Schlegel, C. B. Wollheim, D. Pittet, and P. D. Lew. 1988. J. Biol. Chem. 263:10557-10560). The function of these repetitive increases in [Ca2+]i, as well as the role of Ca2+ in human neutrophil migration, remain unresolved. We have used microspectrofluorometry to measure [Ca2+]i in single fura-2-loaded human neutrophils as they moved on poly-D-lysine-coated glass in the presence of serum. To investigate the role of Ca2+ in human neutrophil migration, we examined cells in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+, as well as intracellular Ca2(+)-buffered and Ca2(+)- depleted cells. In the presence of extracellular Ca2+, multiple increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i were frequently observed, and at least one such transient increase in [Ca2+]i occurred in every moving cell during chemokinesis, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. In addition, neutrophils that extended pseudopodia and assumed a polarized morphology after plating onto a surface were always observed to exhibit [Ca2+]i transients even in the absence of chemoattractant. In contrast, a [Ca2+]i transient was observed in only one of the nonpolarized stationary cells that were examined (n = 15). Although some cells exhibited relatively periodic increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i, resembling the regular oscillations that have been observed in some cell types, many others exhibited increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i that varied in their timing, magnitude, and duration. Buffering of [Ca2+]i or removal of extracellular Ca2+ damped out or blocked transient increases in [Ca2+]i and reduced or inhibited the migration of neutrophils. Under these conditions, polarized cells were often observed to make repeated attempts at migration, but they remained anchored at their rear. These data suggest

  2. Melatonin prevents cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial damage and cell death due to toxically high doses of dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Abramov, Andrey Y; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-07-01

    Stressor exposure activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes elevations in the levels of glucocorticoids (GC) from the adrenal glands. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that prolonged exposure to high GC levels can lead to oxidative stress, calcium deregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, melatonin, via its antioxidant activity, exhibits a neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the protective effect of melatonin in GC-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cellular treatment with the toxically high doses of the synthetic GC receptor agonist, dexamethasone (DEX) elicited marked decreases in the levels of glutathione and increases in ROS production, lipid peroxidation and cell death. DEX toxicity also induced increases in the levels of cytosolic calcium and mitochondrial fusion proteins (Mfn1 and Opa1) but decreases in the levels of mitochondrial fission proteins (Fis1 and Drp1). Mitochondrial damage was observed in large proportions of the DEX-treated cells. Pretreatment of the cells with melatonin substantially prevented the DEX-induced toxicity. These results suggest that melatonin might exert protective effects against oxidative stress, cytosolic calcium overload and mitochondrial damage in DEX-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27155536

  3. Paclitaxel accelerates spontaneous calcium oscillations in cardiomyocytes by interacting with NCS-1 and the InsP3R

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Heidrich, Felix M.; DeGray, Brenda; Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol) is a microtubule-stabilizing compound that is used for cancer chemotherapy. However, Taxol administration is limited by serious side effects including cardiac arrhythmia, which cannot be explained by its microtubule-stabilizing effect. Recently, neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS-1), a calcium binding protein that modulates the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R), was described as a binding partner of Taxol and as a substrate of calpain. We examined calcium signaling processes in cardiomyocytes after treatment with Taxol to investigate the basis of Taxol-induced cardiac arrhythmia. After treating isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with a therapeutic concentration of Taxol for several hours live cell imaging experiments showed that the frequency of spontaneous calcium oscillations significantly increased. This effect was not mimicked by other tubulin-stabilizing agents. However, it was prevented by inhibiting the InsP3R. Taxol treated cells had increased expression of NCS-1, an effect also detectable after Taxol administration in vivo. Short hairpin RNA mediated knock down of NCS-1 decreased InsP3R dependent intracellular calcium release, whereas Taxol treatment, that increased NCS-1 levels, increased InsP3R dependent calcium release. The effects of Taxol were ryanodine receptor independent. At the single channel level Taxol and NCS-1 mediated an increase in InsP3R activity. Calpain activity was not affected by Taxol in cardiomyocytes suggesting a calpain independent signaling pathway. In short, our study shows that Taxol impacts calcium signaling and calcium oscillations in cardiomyocytes through NCS-1 and the InsP3R. PMID:20801127

  4. Glutamate regulation of calcium and IP3 oscillating and pulsating dynamics in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    De Pittà, Maurizio; Goldberg, Mati; Volman, Vladislav; Berry, Hugues

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increasing interest in neuron–glia communication. This interest stems from the realization that glia participate in cognitive functions and information processing and are involved in many brain disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. An important process in neuron–glia communications is astrocyte encoding of synaptic information transfer—the modulation of intracellular calcium (Ca2 + ) dynamics in astrocytes in response to synaptic activity. Here, we derive and investigate a concise mathematical model for glutamate-induced astrocytic intracellular Ca2 +  dynamics that captures the essential biochemical features of the regulatory pathway of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). Starting from the well-known two-variable (intracellular Ca2 +  and inactive IP3 receptors) Li–Rinzel model for calcium-induced calcium release, we incorporate the regulation of IP3 production and phosphorylation. Doing so, we extend it to a three-variable model (which we refer to as the ChI model) that could account for Ca2 +  oscillations with endogenous IP3 metabolism. This ChI model is then further extended into the G-ChI model to include regulation of IP3 production by external glutamate signals. Compared with previous similar models, our three-variable models include a more realistic description of IP3 production and degradation pathways, lumping together their essential nonlinearities within a concise formulation. Using bifurcation analysis and time simulations, we demonstrate the existence of new putative dynamical features. The cross-couplings between IP3 and Ca2 +  pathways endow the system with self-consistent oscillatory properties and favor mixed frequency–amplitude encoding modes over pure amplitude–modulation ones. These and additional results of our model are in general agreement with available experimental data and may have important implications for the role of astrocytes in the synaptic transfer of information

  5. Hypertension secondary to early-stage kidney disease: the pathogenetic role of altered cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Schiffl, H; Fricke, H; Sitter, T

    1993-05-01

    We have examined cardiovascular pressor responsiveness to infused norepinephrine (NE) as related to endogenous plasma NE and plasma renin and to platelet free cytosolic (Ca2+) in 36 patients with early-stage kidney disease and 27 matched normal subjects. The 27 hypertensive patients and the normal subjects did not differ in blood volume, plasma renin, and NE; however, the hypertensive patients had a higher exchangeable body sodium content. Basal plasma NE levels, the relationship between plasma NE measured during NE infusion and the corresponding NE infusion rate, as well as the total plasma clearance for NE did also not differ significantly between the two study groups. In contrast, the threshold or pressor doses of infused NE significantly decreased in the patients with kidney disease. Antihypertensive pharmacotherapy with (Ca2+) channel blockers and/or loop diuretics normalized blood pressure and cardiovascular NE hyperresponsiveness and reduced blood volume, exchangeable body sodium, and platelet free cytosolic (Ca2+). In contrast, experimental digitalisation as a model for in vivo sodium/potassium adenosine triphosphatase inhibition augmented NE responsiveness and raised platelet free cytosolic (Ca2+). Incubation of platelets from normal subjects with plasma ultrafiltrate from hypertensive patients gave evidence for an endogenous factor capable to raise free cytosolic (Ca2+) and to act synergistically with digoxin. Hypertension secondary to early-stage kidney disease is related to an impairment of sodium excretion leading to an expansion of blood volume and exchangeable body sodium. This may result in increased secretion of endogenous factors, leading to alterations of cytosolic (Ca2+) homeostasis of vascular smooth muscle cells followed by elevated peripheral resistance and thus blood pressure. PMID:8494019

  6. Amyloid β Peptide Enhances RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Activation through NF-κB, ERK, and Calcium Oscillation Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangfu; Yang, Bu; Teguh, Dian; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Jiake; Rong, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are common chronic degenerative disorders which are strongly associated with advanced age. We have previously demonstrated that amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, accumulated abnormally in osteoporotic bone specimens in addition to having an activation effect on osteoclast (Bone 2014,61:164-75). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Activation of NF-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylates, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways by receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays a pivotal role in osteoclast activation. Targeting this signaling to modulate osteoclast function has been a promising strategy for osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ on RANKL-induced osteoclast signaling pathways in vitro. In mouse bone marrow monocytes (BMMs), Aβ exerted no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis but promoted osteoclastic bone resorption. In molecular levels, Aβ enhanced NF-κB activity and IκB-α degradation, activated ERK phosphorylation and stimulated calcium oscillation, thus leading to upregulation of NFAT-c1 expression during osteoclast activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Aβ enhances RANKL-induced osteoclast activation through IκB-α degradation, ERK phosphorylation, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways and that Aβ may be a promising agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related disease such as osteoporosis. PMID:27735865

  7. Investigation of the effects of distance from sources on apoptosis, oxidative stress and cytosolic calcium accumulation via TRPV1 channels induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Çiğ, Bilal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+ permeable channel and gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). Some reports have indicated that non-ionized electromagnetic radiation (EMR)-induces heat and oxidative stress effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of distance from sources on calcium signaling, cytosolic ROS production, cell viability, apoptosis, plus caspase-3 and -9 values induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines were divided into A, B, C and D groups as control, 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz groups, respectively. Cells in Group A were used as control and were kept in cell culture conditions without EMR exposure. Groups B, C and D were exposed to the EMR frequencies at different distances (0 cm, 1 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm) for 1h before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic ROS production, Ca2+ concentrations, apoptosis, caspase-3 and caspase-9 values were higher in groups B, C and D than in A group at 0 cm, 1 cm and 5 cm distances although cell viability (MTT) values were increased by the distances. There was no statistically significant difference in the values between control, 20 and 25 cm. Wi-Fi and mobile phone EMR placed within 10 cm of the cells induced excessive oxidative responses and apoptosis via TRPV1-induced cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in the cancer cells. Using cell phones and Wi-Fi sources which are farther away than 10 cm may provide useful protection against oxidative stress, apoptosis and overload of intracellular Ca2+. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  8. Investigation of the effects of distance from sources on apoptosis, oxidative stress and cytosolic calcium accumulation via TRPV1 channels induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Çiğ, Bilal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+ permeable channel and gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). Some reports have indicated that non-ionized electromagnetic radiation (EMR)-induces heat and oxidative stress effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of distance from sources on calcium signaling, cytosolic ROS production, cell viability, apoptosis, plus caspase-3 and -9 values induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines were divided into A, B, C and D groups as control, 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz groups, respectively. Cells in Group A were used as control and were kept in cell culture conditions without EMR exposure. Groups B, C and D were exposed to the EMR frequencies at different distances (0 cm, 1 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm) for 1h before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic ROS production, Ca2+ concentrations, apoptosis, caspase-3 and caspase-9 values were higher in groups B, C and D than in A group at 0 cm, 1 cm and 5 cm distances although cell viability (MTT) values were increased by the distances. There was no statistically significant difference in the values between control, 20 and 25 cm. Wi-Fi and mobile phone EMR placed within 10 cm of the cells induced excessive oxidative responses and apoptosis via TRPV1-induced cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in the cancer cells. Using cell phones and Wi-Fi sources which are farther away than 10 cm may provide useful protection against oxidative stress, apoptosis and overload of intracellular Ca2+. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25703814

  9. Pharmacological characterization of the involvement of protein kinase C in oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Morita, Mitsuhiro; Nakane, Akira; Maekawa, Shohei; Kudo, Yoshihisa

    2015-09-01

    Evidence increasingly shows that astrocytes play a pivotal role in brain physiology and pathology via calcium dependent processes, thus the characterization of the calcium dynamics in astrocytes is of growing importance. We have previously reported that the epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor up-regulate the oscillation of the calcium releases that are induced by stimuli, including glutamate in cultured astrocytes. This calcium oscillation is assumed to involve protein kinase C (PKC), which is activated together with the calcium releases as a consequence of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis. In the present study, this issue has been investigated pharmacologically by using astrocytes cultured with and without the growth factors. The pharmacological activation of PKC largely reduced the glutamate-induced oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases. Meanwhile, PKC inhibitors increased the total amounts of both calcium increases without affecting the peak amplitudes and converted the calcium oscillations to non-oscillatory sustained calcium increases by abolishing the falling phases of the repetitive calcium increases. Furthermore, the pharmacological effects were consistent between both glutamate- and histamine-induced calcium oscillations. These results suggest that PKC up-regulates the removal of cytosolic calcium in astrocytes, and this up-regulation is essential for calcium oscillation in astrocytes cultured with growth factors.

  10. Modulation of gamma oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus by neuronal calcium sensor protein-1: relevance to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Onofrio, Stasia; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James R.; Luster, Brennon; Messias, Erick; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced levels of gamma-band activity are present in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. In the same disorders, increased neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1) expression was reported in a series of postmortem studies. These disorders are also characterized by sleep dysregulation, suggesting a role for the reticular activating system (RAS). The discovery of gamma-band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the cholinergic arm of the RAS, revealed that such activity was mediated by high-threshold calcium channels that are regulated by NCS-1. We hypothesized that NCS-1 normally regulates gamma-band oscillations through these calcium channels and that excessive levels of NCS-1, such as would be expected with overexpression, decrease gamma-band activity. We found that PPN neurons in rat brain slices manifested gamma-band oscillations that were increased by low levels of NCS-1 but suppressed by high levels of NCS-1. Our results suggest that NCS-1 overexpression may be responsible for the decrease in gamma-band activity present in at least some schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. PMID:25376789

  11. Mouse neuroblastoma cell based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhwan; Baek, Juyeong; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Mouse neuroblastoma cells are considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and intensively used as a model system in different areas. Among those areas, differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor mediated ion current, and glutamate induced physiological response are actively investigated. The reason for the interest to mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells is that they have a fast growing rate than other cells in neural origin with a few another advantages. This study evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spikes recording of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in mouse N2A cell with our proposed imaging modality, we report that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells can be an important model related to epileptic activity studies. It is concluded that the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce the epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as produced by the neurons or the astrocytes. This evidence advocates the increased and strong level of neurotransmitters release by enhancement in free calcium using the 4-aminopyridine which causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce the epileptic spikes and calcium oscillation.

  12. Mouse neuroblastoma cell-based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhwan; Jung, Unsang; Baek, Juyoung; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mouse neuroblastoma cells have been considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and they have been intensively used as a model system in different areas. For example, the differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor-mediated ion current, and glutamate-induced physiological responses have been actively investigated with these cells. These mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells are of interest because they grow faster than other cells of neural origin and have a number of other advantages. The calcium oscillations and neural spikes of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in epileptic conditions are evaluated. Based on our observations of neural spikes in these cells with our proposed imaging modality, we reported that they can be an important model in epileptic activity studies. We concluded that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as those produced by neurons or astrocytes. This evidence suggests that increased levels of neurotransmitter release due to the enhancement of free calcium from 4-aminopyridine causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce epileptic spikes and calcium oscillations.

  13. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  14. Glutamate Receptor-Like Channel3.3 Is Involved in Mediating Glutathione-Triggered Cytosolic Calcium Transients, Transcriptional Changes, and Innate Immunity Responses in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Wang, Jing; Ma, Chunli; Zhao, Yongxiu; Wang, Yingchun; Hasi, Agula; Qi, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The tripeptide reduced glutathione (GSH; γ-glutamate [Glu]-cysteine [Cys]-glycine) is a major endogenous antioxidant in both animal and plant cells. It also functions as a neurotransmitter mediating communication among neurons in the central nervous system of animals through modulating specific ionotropic Glu receptors (GLRs) in the membrane. Little is known about such signaling roles in plant cells. Here, we report that transient rises in cytosolic calcium triggered by exogenous GSH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves were sensitive to GLR antagonists and abolished in loss-of-function atglr3.3 mutants. Like the GSH biosynthesis-defective mutant PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT2, atglr3.3 showed enhanced susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Pathogen-induced defense marker gene expression was also decreased in atglr3.3 mutants. Twenty-seven percent of genes that were rapidly responsive to GSH treatment of seedlings were defense genes, most of which were dependent on functional AtGLR3.3, while GSH suppressed pathogen propagation through the AtGLR3.3-dependent pathway. Eight previously identified putative AtGLR3.3 ligands, GSH, oxidized glutathione, alanine, asparagine, Cys, Glu, glycine, and serine, all elicited the AtGLR3.3-dependent cytosolic calcium transients, but only GSH and Cys induced the defense response, with the Glu-induced AtGLR3.3-dependent transcription response being much less apparent than that triggered by GSH. Together, these observations suggest that AtGLR3.3 is required for several signaling effects mediated by extracellular GSH, even though these effects may not be causally related. PMID:23656893

  15. Effect of aspartame on circadian oscillations of calcium and inorganic phosphorus in rats.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, P; Manivasagam, T; Subramanian, P

    2004-08-01

    The effect of aspartame on circadian rhythms of calcium and inorganic phosphorus levels was studied in rats. Acrophase delays in calcium rhythms and advances in inorganic phosphorus rhythms and alteration in mesor values in both rhythms were observed in aspartame-treated rats. However, no change in amplitude values was observed. Oral administration of aspartame leads to increased levels of aspartate in the brain, which could alter the characteristics of calcium and inorganic phosphorus rhythms, possibly by modulating transmission in several areas/nuclei in brain, including retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) and suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN).

  16. Cell-type-specific modelling of intracellular calcium signalling: a urothelial cell model.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Peter A; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2013-09-01

    Calcium signalling plays a central role in regulating a wide variety of cell processes. A number of calcium signalling models exist in the literature that are capable of reproducing a variety of experimentally observed calcium transients. These models have been used to examine in more detail the mechanisms underlying calcium transients, but very rarely has a model been directly linked to a particular cell type and experimentally verified. It is important to show that this can be achieved within the general theoretical framework adopted by these models. Here, we develop a framework designed specifically for modelling cytosolic calcium transients in urothelial cells. Where possible, we draw upon existing calcium signalling models, integrating descriptions of components known to be important in this cell type from a number of studies in the literature. We then add descriptions of several additional pathways that play a specific role in urothelial cell signalling, including an explicit ionic influx term and an active pumping mechanism that drives the cytosolic calcium concentration to a target equilibrium. The resulting one-pool model of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-dependent calcium signalling relates the cytosolic, extracellular and ER calcium concentrations and can generate a wide range of calcium transients, including spikes, bursts, oscillations and sustained elevations in the cytosolic calcium concentration. Using single-variate robustness and multivariate sensitivity analyses, we quantify how varying each of the parameters of the model leads to changes in key features of the calcium transient, such as initial peak amplitude and the frequency of bursting or spiking, and in the transitions between bursting- and plateau-dominated modes. We also show that, novel to our urothelial cell model, the ionic and purinergic P2Y pathways make distinct contributions to the calcium transient. We then validate the model using human bladder epithelial cells grown in monolayer cell

  17. Flavonoid galetin 3,6-dimethyl ether attenuates guinea pig ileum contraction through K(+) channel activation and decrease in cytosolic calcium concentration.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Luiz H C; Correia, Ana C de C; de Souza, Iara L L; Silva, Maria da C C; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Santos, Bárbara V de O; Cavalcante, Fabiana de A; da Silva, Bagnólia A

    2015-11-15

    Flavonoid galetin 3,6-dimethyl ether (FGAL) has been isolated from the aerial parts of Piptadenia stipulaceae and has shown a spasmolytic effect in guinea pig ileum. Thus, we aimed to characterize its relaxant mechanism of action. FGAL exhibited a higher relaxant effect on ileum pre-contracted by histamine (EC50=1.9±0.4×10(-7) M) than by KCl (EC50=2.6±0.5×10(-6) M) or carbachol (EC50=1.8±0.4×10(-6) M). The flavonoid inhibited the cumulative contractions to histamine, as well as to CaCl2 in depolarizing medium nominally Ca(2+)-free. The flavonoid relaxed the ileum pre-contracted by S-(-)-Bay K8644 (EC50=9.5±1.9×10(-6) M) but less potently pre-contracted by KCl or histamine. CsCl attenuated the relaxant effect of FGAL (EC50=1.1±0.3×10(-6) M), but apamin or tetraethylammonium (1mM) had no effect (EC50=2.6±0.2×10(-7) and 1.6±0.3×10(-7) M, respectively), ruling out the involvement of small and big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SKCa and BKCa, respectively). Either 4-aminopyridine or glibenclamide attenuated the relaxant effect of FGAL (EC50=1.8±0.2×10(-6) and 1.5±0.5×10(-6) M, respectively), indicating the involvement of voltage- and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (KV and KATP, respectively). FGAL did not alter the viability of intestinal myocytes in the MTT assay and decreased (88%) Fluo-4 fluorescence, indicating a decrease in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Therefore, the relaxant mechanism of FGAL involves pseudo-irreversible noncompetitive antagonism of histaminergic receptors, KV and KATP activation and blockade of CaV1, thus leading to a reduction in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels.

  18. Ent-7α-acetoxytrachyloban-18-oic acid and ent-7α-hydroxytrachyloban-18-oic acid from Xylopia langsdorfiana A. St-Hil. & Tul. modulate K(+) and Ca(2+) channels to reduce cytosolic calcium concentration on guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rosimeire F; Martins, Italo R R; Travassos, Rafael A; Tavares, Josean F; Silva, Marcelo S; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Ferreira, Alice T; Nouailhetas, Viviane L A; Aboulafia, Jeannine; Rigoni, Vera L S; da Silva, Bagnólia A

    2012-03-01

    In this study we investigated the mechanism underlying the spasmolytic action of ent-7α-acetoxytrachyloban-18-oic acid (trachylobane-360) and ent-7α-hydroxytrachyloban-18-oic acid (trachylobane-318), diterpenes obtained from Xylopia langsdorfiana, on guinea pig ileum. Both compounds inhibited histamine-induced cumulative contractions (slope=3.5±0.9 and 4.4±0.7) that suggests a noncompetitive antagonism to histaminergic receptors. CaCl(2)-induced contractions were nonparallelly and concentration-dependently reduced by both diterpenes, indicating blockade of calcium influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (Ca(v)). The Ca(v) participation was confirmed since both trachylobanes equipotently relaxed ileum pre-contracted with S-(-)-Bay K8644 (EC(50)=3.5±0.7×10-(5) and 1.1±0.2×10-(5)M) and KCl (EC(50)=5.5±0.3×10-(5) and 1.4±0.2×10-(5)M). K(+) channels participation was confirmed since diterpene-induced relaxation curves were significantly shifted to right in the presence of 5mM tetraethylammonium (TEA(+)) (EC(50)=0.5±0.04×10-(4) and 2.0±0.5×10-(5)M). ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(ATP)), voltage activated K(+) channels (K(V)), small conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels (SK(Ca)) or big conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) did not seem to participate of trachylobane-360 spasmolytic action. However trachylobane-318 modulated positively K(ATP), K(V) and SK(Ca) (EC(50)=1.1±0.3×10-(5), 0.7±0.2×10-(5) and 0.7±0.2×10-(5)M), but not BK(Ca). A fluorescence analysis technique confirmed the decrease of cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) induced by both trachylobanes in ileal myocytes. In conclusion, trachylobane-360 and trachylobane-318 induced spasmolytic activity by K(+) channel positive modulation and Ca(2+) channel blockade, which results in [Ca(2+)](c) reduction at cellular level leading to smooth muscle relaxation.

  19. Lasting inhibition of receptor-mediated calcium oscillations in pancreatic acini by neutrophil respiratory burst--a novel mechanism for secretory blockade in acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui Yuan; Song, Zhi Min; Cui, Zong Jie

    2013-08-01

    Although overwhelming evidence indicates that neutrophil infiltration is an early event in acute pancreatitis, the effect of neutrophil respiratory burst on pancreatic acini has not been investigated. In the present work, effect of fMLP-induced neutrophil respiratory burst on pancreatic acini was examined. It was found that neutrophil respiratory burst blocked calcium oscillations induced by cholecystokinin or by acetylcholine. Such lasting inhibition was dependent on the density of bursting neutrophils and could be overcome by increased agonist concentration. Inhibition of cholecystokinin stimulation was also observed in AR4-2J cells. In sharp contrast, neutrophil respiratory burst had no effect on calcium oscillations induced by phenylephrine (PE), vasopressin, or by ATP in rat hepatocytes. These data together suggest that inhibition of receptor-mediated calcium oscillations in pancreatic acini by neutrophil respiratory burst would lead to secretory blockade, which is a hallmark of acute pancreatitis. The present work has important implications for clinical treatment and management of acute pancreatitis.

  20. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  1. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements and fortified foods include gluconate, lactate, and phosphate. Calcium absorption is best when a person consumes ... also interfere with the body's ability to absorb iron and zinc, but this effect is not well ...

  2. Proton and calcium flux oscillations in the elongation region correlate with root nutation.

    PubMed

    Shabala, S N; Newman, I A

    1997-08-01

    The involvement of Ca2+ and H+ flux oscillations in root nutation was studied for decapped roots of corn (Zea mays L. cv. Aussie Gold) placed horizontally. Net ion fluxes were measured around the elongation and meristematic regions using a microelectrode ion flux measuring system. High correlation between H+ flux oscillations and root nutations was found in the elongation region. Two oscillatory components of H+ flux, with periods of about 90 min and 7 min, correlated with root circumnutations and micronutations, respectively. The periods of H+ flux oscillations and rhythmical root movements in this region could be modified similarly by external factors including pH. In the meristematic region no association between ion flux behaviour and nutation was apparent. Ion flux oscillations and nutations both decreased in amplitude as the growth rate at the measured location decreased. Possible involvement of ion flux oscillations in root circumnutation is discussed. It is concluded that a model involving an internal oscillator must be developed to explain the H+ flux involvement in root nutations. PMID:11540486

  3. Cytosolic Calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and related gene expression and protein modulation in Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures respond immediately to altered gravitation: Parabolic flight data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Hausmann, Niklas; Neef, Maren; Fengler, Svenja

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights in order to assess molecular short-term responses to altered gravity fields. Using transgenic cell lines, hydrogen peroxide and cytosolic Ca2+ were continuously monitored. In parallel, the metabolism of samples was chemically quenched (RNAlater, Ambion, for RNA; acid/base for NADPH, NADP) at typical stages of a parabola (1g before pull up; end of pull up (1.8 g), end of microgravity (µg, 20 sec), and end of pull out (1.8 g)). Cells exhibited an increase of both Ca2+ and hydrogen peroxide with the onset of µg, and a decline thereafter. This behaviour was accompanied by a decrease of the NADPH/NADP redox ratio, indicating a Ca2+-dependent activation of a NADPH oxidase. Microarray analyses revealed concomitant expression profiles. At the end of the microgravity phase, 396 transcripts were specifically up-, while 485 were down-regulated. Up-regulation was dominated by Ca2+- and ROS(reactive oxygen species)-related gene products. The same material was also used for the analysis of phosphopeptides by 2D SDS PAGE. Relevant spots were identified by liquid chromatography-MS. With the exception of a chaperone (HSP 70-3), hypergravity (1.8 g) and microgravity modified different sets of proteins. These are partly involved in primary metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citrate cycle) and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these data show that both gene expression and protein modulation jointly respond within seconds to alterations in the gravity field, with a focus on metabolic adaptation, signalling and control of ROS.

  4. Cytosolic calcium, hydrogen peroxide and related gene expression and protein modulation in Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures respond immediately to altered gravitation: parabolic flight data.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, N; Fengler, S; Hennig, A; Franz-Wachtel, M; Hampp, R; Neef, M

    2014-01-01

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights in order to assess molecular, short-term responses to altered gravity fields. Using transgenic cell lines, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and cytosolic Ca(2+) were continuously monitored. In parallel, the metabolism of samples was chemically quenched (RNAlater, Ambion for RNA; acid/base for NADPH, NADP) at typical stages of a parabola [1 g before pull up; end of pull up (1.8 g), end of microgravity (20 s) and end of pull out (1.8 g)]. Cells exhibited an increase in both Ca(2+) and H2 O2 with the onset of microgravity, and a decline thereafter. This behaviour was accompanied by a decrease of the NADPH/NADP redox ratio, indicating Ca(2+) -dependent activation of a NADPH oxidase. Microarray analyses revealed concomitant expression profiles. At the end of the microgravity phase, 396 transcripts were specifically up-, while 485 were down-regulated. Up-regulation was dominated by Ca(2+) - and ROS-related gene products. The same material was also used for analysis of phosphopeptides with 2-D SDS PAGE. Relevant spots were identified by liquid chromatography-MS. With the exception of a chaperone (HSP 70-3), hypergravity (1.8 g) and microgravity modified different sets of proteins. These are partly involved in primary metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citrate cycle) and detoxification of ROS. Taken together, these data show that both gene expression and protein modulation jointly respond within seconds to alterations in the gravity field, with a focus on metabolic adaptation, signalling and control of ROS.

  5. Sperm-induced calcium oscillations of human oocytes show distinct features in oocyte center and periphery.

    PubMed

    Tesarik, J; Sousa, M; Mendoza, C

    1995-06-01

    Temporal and spatial characteristics of explosive periodic increases (spikes) of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) induced by sperm in human oocytes (Ca2+ oscillations) were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and compared to Ca2+ oscillations induced in oocytes by the thiol reagent thimerosal. During the steady-state period of sperm-induced Ca2+ oscillations, each individual [Ca2+]i spike invariably began from a focus in oocyte periphery and spread throughout the entire peripheral region before propagating to the central ooplasm. This peripheral Ca2+ wave was immediately followed by an explosive [Ca2+]i increase in the central ooplasm. However, this central [Ca2+]i rise only peaked when [Ca2+]i in the peripheral ooplasm was already on the decline. Moreover, the peak [Ca2+]i values were always considerably higher in the oocyte center than in the periphery. In contrast, thimerosal-induced Ca2+ oscillations did not show this particular form of propagation. These data show that sperm-induced Ca2+ oscillations have a unique pattern of spatial dynamics and suggest that the bulk of Ca2+ mobilized during each spike is released from stores that have a relatively high threshold for Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). These stores are poorly developed, if not absent, in the oocyte cortex, and CICR from them is triggered by previous CICR from another type of store with a lower threshold that are preferentially located in the oocyte cortex and act as a detonator.

  6. Calcium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert J P

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes the chemical and biological value of the calcium ion. In calcium chemistry, our main interest is in equilibria within static, nonflowing systems. Hence, we examined the way calcium formed precipitates and complex ions in solution. We observed thereafter its uses by humankind in a vast number of materials such as minerals, e.g., marble, concrete, mortars, which parallel the biological use in shells and bones. In complex formation, we noted that many combinations were of anion interaction with calcium for example in the uses of detergents and medicines. The rates of exchange of calcium from bound states were noted but they had little application. Calcium ions do not act as catalysts of organic reactions. In biological systems, interest is in the above chemistry, but extends to the fact that Ca2+ ions can carry information by flowing in one solution or from one solution to another through membranes. Hence, we became interested in the details of rates of calcium exchange. The fast exchange of this divalent ion from most organic binding sites has allowed it to develop as the dominant second messenger. Now the flow can be examined in vitro as calcium binds particular isolated proteins, which it activates as seen in physical mechanical changes or chemical changes and this piece-by-piece study of cells is common. Here, however, we have chosen to stress the whole circuit of Ca2+ action indicating that the cell is organized both at a basal and an activated state kinetic level by the steady state flow of the ion (see Fig. 11). Different time constants of exchange utilizing very similar binding constants lead to: 1) fast responses as in the muscle of an animal; or 2) slower change as in differentiation of an egg or seed. Many other changes of state may relate to Ca2+ steady-state levels of flow in the circuitry and here we point to two: 1) dormancy in reptiles and animals; and 2) sporulation in both bacteria and lower plants. In the other chapters of

  7. Switch of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Expression in the Plasma Membrane of Chondrogenic Cells Affects Cytosolic Ca2+-Oscillations and Cartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Fodor, János; Katona, Éva; Bartok, Adam; Oláh, Tamás; Sebe, Attila; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Zákány, Róza

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the key elements of signaling of chondroprogenitor cells at the earliest steps of differentiation may substantially improve our opportunities for the application of mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering, which is a promising approach of regenerative therapy of joint diseases. Ion channels, membrane potential and Ca2+-signaling are important regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. Our aim was to identify such plasma membrane ion channels involved in signaling during chondrogenesis, which may serve as specific molecular targets for influencing chondrogenic differentiation and ultimately cartilage formation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using patch-clamp, RT-PCR and Western-blot experiments, we found that chondrogenic cells in primary micromass cell cultures obtained from embryonic chicken limb buds expressed voltage-gated NaV1.4, KV1.1, KV1.3 and KV4.1 channels, although KV1.3 was not detectable in the plasma membrane. Tetrodotoxin (TTX), the inhibitor of NaV1.4 channels, had no effect on cartilage formation. In contrast, presence of 20 mM of the K+ channel blocker tetraethyl-ammonium (TEA) during the time-window of the final commitment of chondrogenic cells reduced KV currents (to 27±3% of control), cell proliferation (thymidine incorporation: to 39±4.4% of control), expression of cartilage-specific genes and consequently, cartilage formation (metachromasia: to 18.0±6.4% of control) and also depolarized the membrane potential (by 9.3±2.1 mV). High-frequency Ca2+-oscillations were also suppressed by 10 mM TEA (confocal microscopy: frequency to 8.5±2.6% of the control). Peak expression of TEA-sensitive KV1.1 in the plasma membrane overlapped with this period. Application of TEA to differentiated chondrocytes, mainly expressing the TEA-insensitive KV4.1 did not affect cartilage formation. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that the differentiation and proliferation of chondrogenic cells depend

  8. Multiple cellular roles of Neurospora crassa plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 in regulation of cytosolic free calcium, carotenoid accumulation, stress responses, and acquisition of thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Barman, Ananya; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase C1 (PLC1), secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) and Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger proteins regulate calcium signaling and homeostasis in eukaryotes. In this study, we investigate functions for phospholipase C1 (plc-1), sPLA2 (splA2) and a Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger (cpe-1) in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. The Δplc-1, ΔsplA2, and Δcpe-1 mutants exhibited a growth defect on medium supplemented with the divalent ionophore A23187, suggesting that these genes might play a role in regulation of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in N. crassa. The strains lacking plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 possessed higher carotenoid content than wild type at 8°C, 22°C, and 30°C, and showed increased ultraviolet (UV)-survival under conditions that induced carotenoid accumulation. Moreover, Δplc-1, ΔsplA2, and Δcpe-1 mutants showed reduced survival rate under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and induced thermotolerance after exposure to heat shock temperatures. Thus, this study revealed multiple cellular roles for plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 genes in regulation of [Ca(2+)](c), carotenoid accumulation, survival under stress conditions, and acquisition of thermotolerance induced by heat shock.

  9. The mechanism of injury-induced intracellular calcium concentration oscillations in the endothelium of excised rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Berra-Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Torres-Jácome, Julián; Guzman-Silva, Alejandro; Guerra, Germano; Tanzi, Franco; Moccia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial injury is the primary event that leads to a variety of severe vascular disorders. Mechanical injury elicits a Ca(2+) response in the endothelium of excised rat aorta, which comprises an initial Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3))-sensitive stores followed by a long-lasting decay phase due to Ca(2+) entry through uncoupled connexons. The Ca(2+) signal may also adopt an oscillatory pattern, the molecular underpinnings of which are unclear. In the light of the role played by Ca(2+) spiking in tissue regeneration, this study aimed to unveil the mechanisms underlying injury-induced Ca(2+) oscillations. The latter reversibly ceased upon removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or addition of the gap junction blockers heptanol, 18 α,β-glycyrrhetinic acid, La(3+) and Ni(2+), but were insensitive to BTP-2 and SKF 96365. The spiking response was abolished by inhibiting the Ca(2+) entry mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). The InsP(3)-producing agonist ATP resumed Ca(2+) oscillations in silent cells, while the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 suppressed them. Injury-induced Ca(2+) transients were prevented by the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) blockers thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, while they were unaffected by suramin and genistein. These data show for the first time that the coordinated interplay between NCX-mediated Ca(2+) entry and InsP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release contributes to injury-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration oscillations.

  10. Sensitivity of calcium binding in cerebral tissue to weak environmental electric fields oscillating at low frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Bawin, S M; Adey, W R

    1976-01-01

    Weak sinusoidal electric fields modify the calcium efflux from freshly isolated chick and cat cerebral tissues bathed in Ringer's solution, at 36 degrees. Following incubation (30 min) with radioactive calcium (45Ca2+), each sample, immersed in fresh solution, was exposed for 20 min to fields at 1, 6, 16, 32, or 75 Hz, with electric gradients of 5, 10, 56, and 100 V/m in air. 45Ca2+ efflux in the solution was then measured in 0.2 ml aliquots and compared with efflux from unexposed control samples. Field exposures resulted in a general trend toward a reduction in the release of the preincubated 45Ca2+. Both frequency and amplitude sensitivities were observed. Maximum decreases occurred at 6 and 16 Hz (12-15%). Thresholds were around 10 and 56 V/m for chick and cat tissues, respectively. Similar but nonsignificant trends occurred during other field exposures. All results were statistically compared with matched samples of controls. Tissue gradients could not be measured, but estimates were of the order of 0.1 muV/cm. The susceptibility of the electrochemical equilibrium in the neuronal membrane to small extracellular perturbations is discussed and a possible role for weak intrinsic cerebral fields in neuronal excitability is suggested. Images PMID:1064869

  11. Cytosolic and Calcium-Independent Phospholipases A2 Activation and Prostaglandins E2 Are Associated with Escherichia coli-Induced Reduction of Insulin Secretion in INS-1E Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scalia, Marina; Motta, Carla; Parrino, Cristina; Frittitta, Lucia; Olivieri, Melania; Cristaldi, Martina; Avola, Roberto; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Toscano, Maria Antonietta; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Lupo, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    It is suspected that microbial infections take part in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM). Glucose-induced insulin secretion is accompanied by the release of free arachidonic acid (AA) mainly by cytosolic- and calcium independent phospholipases A2 (cPLA2 and iPLA2). Insulinoma cell line (INS-1E) was infected with E. coli isolated from the blood culture of a patient with sepsis. Invasion assay, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy demonstrated the capacity of E. coli to enter cells, which was reduced by PLA2 inhibitors. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was significantly increased after acute infection (8h) but significantly decreased after chronic infection (72h). PLA2 activities, cPLA2, iPLA2, phospho-cPLA2, and COX-2 expressions were increased after acute and, even more, after chronic E. coli infection. The silencing of the two isoforms of PLA2s, with specific cPLA2- or iPLA2-siRNAs, reduced insulin secretion after acute infection and determined a rise in insulin release after chronic infection. Prostaglandins E2 (PGE2) production was significantly elevated in INS-1E after long-term E. coli infection and the restored insulin secretion in presence of L798106, a specific EP3 antagonist, and NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor, and the reduction of insulin secretion in presence of sulprostone, a specific EP3 agonist, revealed their involvement in the effects triggered by bacterial infection. The results obtained demonstrated that cPLA2 and iPLA2 play a key role in insulin secretion process after E. coli infection. The high concentration of AA released is transformed into PGE2, which could be responsible for the reduced insulin secretion. PMID:27631977

  12. Cytosolic and Calcium-Independent Phospholipases A2 Activation and Prostaglandins E2 Are Associated with Escherichia coli-Induced Reduction of Insulin Secretion in INS-1E Cells.

    PubMed

    Caporarello, Nunzia; Salmeri, Mario; Scalia, Marina; Motta, Carla; Parrino, Cristina; Frittitta, Lucia; Olivieri, Melania; Cristaldi, Martina; Avola, Roberto; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Toscano, Maria Antonietta; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Lupo, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    It is suspected that microbial infections take part in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM). Glucose-induced insulin secretion is accompanied by the release of free arachidonic acid (AA) mainly by cytosolic- and calcium independent phospholipases A2 (cPLA2 and iPLA2). Insulinoma cell line (INS-1E) was infected with E. coli isolated from the blood culture of a patient with sepsis. Invasion assay, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy demonstrated the capacity of E. coli to enter cells, which was reduced by PLA2 inhibitors. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was significantly increased after acute infection (8h) but significantly decreased after chronic infection (72h). PLA2 activities, cPLA2, iPLA2, phospho-cPLA2, and COX-2 expressions were increased after acute and, even more, after chronic E. coli infection. The silencing of the two isoforms of PLA2s, with specific cPLA2- or iPLA2-siRNAs, reduced insulin secretion after acute infection and determined a rise in insulin release after chronic infection. Prostaglandins E2 (PGE2) production was significantly elevated in INS-1E after long-term E. coli infection and the restored insulin secretion in presence of L798106, a specific EP3 antagonist, and NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor, and the reduction of insulin secretion in presence of sulprostone, a specific EP3 agonist, revealed their involvement in the effects triggered by bacterial infection. The results obtained demonstrated that cPLA2 and iPLA2 play a key role in insulin secretion process after E. coli infection. The high concentration of AA released is transformed into PGE2, which could be responsible for the reduced insulin secretion. PMID:27631977

  13. Calcium Signaling throughout the Toxoplasma gondii Lytic Cycle: A STUDY USING GENETICALLY ENCODED CALCIUM INDICATORS.

    PubMed

    Borges-Pereira, Lucas; Budu, Alexandre; McKnight, Ciara A; Moore, Christina A; Vella, Stephen A; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Liu, Jing; Garcia, Celia R S; Pace, Douglas A; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that invades host cells, creating a parasitophorous vacuole where it communicates with the host cell cytosol through the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. The lytic cycle of the parasite starts with its exit from the host cell followed by gliding motility, conoid extrusion, attachment, and invasion of another host cell. Here, we report that Ca(2+) oscillations occur in the cytosol of the parasite during egress, gliding, and invasion, which are critical steps of the lytic cycle. Extracellular Ca(2+) enhances each one of these processes. We used tachyzoite clonal lines expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators combined with host cells expressing transiently expressed calcium indicators of different colors, and we measured Ca(2+) changes in both parasites and host simultaneously during egress. We demonstrated a link between cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in the host and in the parasite. Our approach also allowed us to measure two new features of motile parasites, which were enhanced by Ca(2+) influx. This is the first study showing, in real time, Ca(2+) signals preceding egress and their direct link with motility, an essential virulence trait.

  14. Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in inferior olive neurons are dynamically regulated by P/Q- and T-type calcium channels: a study in mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Daesoo; Urbano, Francisco J; Makarenko, Vladimir; Shin, Hee-Sup; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2010-01-01

    The role of P/Q- and T-type calcium channels in the rhythmic oscillatory behaviour of inferior olive (IO) neurons was investigated in mutant mice. Mice lacking either the CaV2.1 gene of the pore-forming α1A subunit for P/Q-type calcium channel, or the CaV3.1 gene of the pore-forming α1G subunit for T-type calcium channel were used. In vitro intracellular recording from IO neurons reveals that the amplitude and frequency of sinusoidal subthreshold oscillations (SSTOs) were reduced in the CaV2.1−/− mice. In the CaV3.1−/− mice, IO neurons also showed altered patterns of SSTOs and the probability of SSTO generation was significantly lower (15%, 5 of 34 neurons) than that of wild-type (78%, 31 of 40 neurons) or CaV2.1−/− mice (73%, 22 of 30 neurons). In addition, the low-threshold calcium spike and the sustained endogenous oscillation following rebound potentials were absent in IO neurons from CaV3.1−/− mice. Moreover, the phase-reset dynamics of oscillatory properties of single neurons and neuronal clusters in IO were remarkably altered in both CaV2.1−/− and CaV3.1−/− mice. These results suggest that both α1A P/Q- and α1G T-type calcium channels are required for the dynamic control of neuronal oscillations in the IO. These findings were supported by results from a mathematical IO neuronal model that incorporated T and P/Q channel kinetics. PMID:20547676

  15. An age-dependent feedback control model of calcium dynamics in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fusheng; Liu, Weijiu

    2010-06-01

    The functional decline of selected proteins or organelles leads to aging at the intracellular level. Identification of these proteins or organelles is usually challenging to traditional single-factor approaches since these factors are inter-connected via feedback or feedforward controls. Establishing a feedback control model to simulate the interactions of multiple factors is an insightful approach to guide the search for proteins involved in aging. However, there are only a few mathematical models describing the age-dependent accumulation of DNA mutations, which are directly or indirectly induced by deterioration of the intracellular environment including alteration of calcium homeostasis, a contributor of aging. Thus, based on Cui and Kaandorp's model, we develop an age-dependent mathematical model for the calcium homeostasis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our model contains cell cycle-dependent aging factors and can qualitatively reproduce calcium shocks and calcium accumulations in cells observed in experiments. Using this model, we predict calcium oscillations in wild type, pmc1 Delta, and pmr1 Delta cells. This prediction suggests that Pmr1p plays a major role in regulating cytosolic calcium. Combining the model with our experimental lifespan data, we predict an upper-limit of cytosolic calcium tolerance for cell survival. This prediction indicates that, for aged cells (>35 generations), no pmr1 Delta can tolerate the cytosolic calcium concentration of 0.1 microM while a very small fraction (1%) of aged wild type cells (>50 generations) can tolerate a high cytosolic calcium concentration of 0.5 microM.

  16. Stimulus-dependent control of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca(2+) oscillation frequency by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Visegrády, A; Lakos, Z; Czimbalek, L; Somogyi, B

    2001-01-01

    In many cell types, receptor stimulation evokes cytosolic calcium oscillations with a frequency that depends on agonist dose. Previous studies demonstrated controversial effects of changing the activity of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase upon the frequency of oscillations. By numerical simulations, we found that the model of De Young and Keizer (J. Keizer and G.W. De Young, 1994, J. Theor. Biol. 166: 431-442), unlike other models, can explain the observed discrepancies, assuming that the different experiments were performed at different stimulus levels. According to model predictions, partial inhibition of internal calcium pumps is expected to increase frequency at low stimulus strength and should have an opposite effect at strong stimuli. Similar results were obtained using an analytical estimation of oscillation period, based on calcium-dependent channel activation and inactivation. In experiments on HeLa cells, 4 nM thapsigargin increased the frequency of calcium oscillations induced by 1 and 2.5 microM histamine but had no effect on supramaximally stimulated cells. In HEp-2 cells, 2 nM thapsigargin slowed down the rapid, ATP-induced oscillations. Our results suggest that in the investigated cell types, the De Young-Keizer model based on inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent calcium-induced calcium release can properly describe intracellular calcium oscillations. PMID:11509354

  17. Calcium store-mediated signaling in sustentacular cells of the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hegg, Colleen Cosgrove; Irwin, Mavis; Lucero, Mary T

    2009-04-15

    Sustentacular cells have structural features that allude to functions of secretion, absorption, phagocytosis, maintenance of extracellular ionic gradients, metabolism of noxious chemicals, and regulation of cell turnover. We present data detailing their dynamic activity. We show, using a mouse olfactory epithelium slice model, that sustentacular cells are capable of generating two types of calcium signals: intercellular calcium waves where elevations in intracellular calcium propagate between neighboring cells, and intracellular calcium oscillations consisting of repetitive elevations in intracellular calcium confined to single cells. Sustentacular cells exhibited rapid, robust increases in intracellular calcium in response to G-protein coupled muscarinic and purinergic receptor stimulation. In a subpopulation of sustentacular cells, oscillatory calcium transients were evoked. We pharmacologically characterized the properties of purinergic-evoked increases in intracellular calcium. Calcium transients were elicited by release from intracellular stores and were not dependent on extracellular calcium. BAPTA-AM, a cytosolic calcium chelator, and cyclopiazonic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor irreversibly blocked the purinergic-induced calcium transient. Phospholipase C antagonist U73122 inhibited the purinergic-evoked calcium transient. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, an inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor antagonist, and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists tetracaine and ryanodine, inhibited the UTP-induced calcium transients. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of the phospholipase C pathway, IP(3)-mediated calcium release, and subsequent calcium-induced-calcium release is involved in ATP-elicited increases in intracellular calcium. Our findings indicate that sustentacular cells are not static support cells, and, like glia in the central nervous system, have complex calcium signaling.

  18. High-power continuous-wave tunable 544- and 272-nm beams based on a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier for calcium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Kim, Yonghee; Park, Hyunmin; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Lim, Gwon; Han, Jaemin; Ko, Kwang-Hee; Jeong, Do-Young

    2015-08-01

    Continuous-wave single-frequency tunable 544- and 272-nm beams have been demonstrated by the second- and fourth-harmonic conversions of a 1088-nm fundamental beam from a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier. The single-pass second-harmonic generation with a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and the external-cavity frequency-doubling technique with a bulk BBO crystal were employed to achieve an approximately 6-W 544-nm beam and a 1.5-W 272-nm beam, respectively. We characterized the second- and fourth-harmonic generations and discussed their applications to calcium spectroscopy.

  19. Extrinsic periodic information interpolates between monostable and bistable states in intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Duan, Wei-Long

    2015-06-01

    Extrinsic periodic information including physiological cyclical and circadian replacement would affect inevitably a real cell, in this paper we investigate the effect of extrinsic periodic information on intracellular calcium dynamics by means of second-order algorithm for stochastic simulation colored noises. By simulating time evolutions and stationary probability distribution of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, the results show: (i) intracellular calcium oscillation between cytosol and calcium store shows synchronous and anti-synchronous oscillation as intensity and frequency of extrinsic periodic information vary; (ii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from bistable state → monostable state → bistable state → monostable state as frequency of extrinsic periodic information increases; (iii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from monostable state → bistable state as intensity of extrinsic periodic information increases.

  20. Theta-Burst Stimulation of Hippocampal Slices Induces Network-Level Calcium Oscillations and Activates Analogous Gene Transcription to Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, John J.; Murphy, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3–12 Hz) hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS) to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to spatial learning

  1. Genetically targeted single-channel optical recording reveals multiple Orai1 gating states and oscillations in calcium influx

    PubMed Central

    Dynes, Joseph L.; Amcheslavsky, Anna; Cahalan, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Orai1 comprises the pore-forming subunit of the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel. When bound and activated by stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium sensor, Orai1 channels possess high selectivity for calcium but extremely small conductance that has precluded direct recording of single-channel currents. We have developed an approach to visualize Orai1 activity by fusing Orai1 to fluorescent, genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). The GECI–Orai1 probes reveal local Ca2+ influx at STIM1–Orai1 puncta. By whole cell recording, these fusions are fully functional as CRAC channels. When GECI–Orai1 and the CRAC-activating domain (CAD) of STIM1 were coexpressed at low levels and imaged using a total internal reflectance fluorescence microscope, cells exhibited sporadic fluorescence transients the size of diffraction-limited spots and the brightness of a few activated GECI proteins. Transients typically rose rapidly and fell into two classes according to duration: briefer “flickers” lasting only a few hundred milliseconds, and longer “pulses” lasting one to several seconds. The size, intensity, trace shape, frequency, distribution, physiological characteristics, and association with CAD binding together demonstrate that GECI–Orai1 fluorescence transients correspond to single-channel Orai1 responses. Single Orai1 channels gated by CAD, and small Orai1 puncta gated by STIM1, exhibit repetitive fluctuations in single-channel output. CAD binding supports a role in open state maintenance and reveals a second phase of CAD/STIM1 binding after channel opening. These first recordings of single-channel Orai1 currents reveal unexpected dynamics, and when paired with CAD association, support multiple single-channel states. PMID:26712003

  2. Aphanomyces euteiches Cell Wall Fractions Containing Novel Glucan-Chitosaccharides Induce Defense Genes and Nuclear Calcium Oscillations in the Plant Host Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nars, Amaury; Lafitte, Claude; Chabaud, Mireille; Drouillard, Sophie; Mélida, Hugo; Danoun, Saïda; Le Costaouëc, Tinaig; Rey, Thomas; Benedetti, Julie; Bulone, Vincent; Barker, David George; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Dumas, Bernard; Jacquet, Christophe; Heux, Laurent; Fliegmann, Judith; Bottin, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine-based saccharides (chitosaccharides) are components of microbial cell walls and act as molecular signals during host-microbe interactions. In the legume plant Medicago truncatula, the perception of lipochitooligosaccharide signals produced by symbiotic rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi involves the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) lysin motif receptor-like protein and leads to the activation of the so-called common symbiotic pathway. In rice and Arabidopsis, lysin motif receptors are involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides released by pathogenic fungi, resulting in the activation of plant immunity. Here we report the structural characterization of atypical chitosaccharides from the oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, and their biological activity on the host Medicago truncatula. Using a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these chitosaccharides are linked to β-1,6-glucans, and contain a β-(1,3;1,4)-glucan backbone whose β-1,3-linked glucose units are substituted on their C-6 carbon by either glucose or N-acetylglucosamine residues. This is the first description of this type of structural motif in eukaryotic cell walls. Glucan-chitosaccharide fractions of A. euteiches induced the expression of defense marker genes in Medicago truncatula seedlings independently from the presence of a functional Nod Factor Perception protein. Furthermore, one of the glucan-chitosaccharide fractions elicited calcium oscillations in the nucleus of root cells. In contrast to the asymmetric oscillatory calcium spiking induced by symbiotic lipochitooligosaccharides, this response depends neither on the Nod Factor Perception protein nor on the common symbiotic pathway. These findings open new perspectives in oomycete cell wall biology and elicitor recognition and signaling in legumes. PMID:24086432

  3. Modulation of membrane phospholipids, the cytosolic calcium influx and cell proliferation following treatment of B16-F10 cells with recombinant phospholipase-D from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Magnoni, Mariana Gabriel; Boia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Gremski, Waldemiro; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism through which brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) cause dermonecrosis, dysregulated inflammatory responses, hemolysis and platelet aggregation, which are effects reported following spider bites, is currently attributed to the presence of phospholipase-D in the venom. In the present investigation, through two-dimensional immunoblotting, we observed immunological cross-reactivity for at least 25 spots in crude Loxosceles intermedia venom, indicating high expression levels for different isoforms of phospholipase-D. Using a recombinant phospholipase-D from the venom gland of L. intermedia (LiRecDT1) in phospholipid-degrading kinetic experiments, we determined that this phospholipase-D mainly hydrolyzes synthetic sphingomyelin in a time-dependent manner, generating ceramide 1-phosphate plus choline, as well as lysophosphatidylcholine, generating lysophosphatidic acid plus choline, but exhibits little activity against phosphatidylcholine. Through immunofluorescence assays with antibodies against LiRecDT1 and using a recombinant GFP-LiRecDT1 fusion protein, we observed direct binding of LiRecDT1 to the membrane of B16-F10 cells. We determined that LiRecDT1 hydrolyzes phospholipids in detergent extracts and from ghosts of B16-F10 cells, generating choline, indicating that the enzyme can access and modulate and has activity against membrane phospholipids. Additionally, using Fluo-4, a calcium-sensitive fluorophore, it was shown that treatment of cells with phospholipase-D induced an increase in the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, but without altering viability or causing damage to cells. Finally, based on the known endogenous activity of phospholipase-D as an inducer of cell proliferation and the fact that LiRecDT1 binds to the cell surface, hydrolyzing phospholipids to generate bioactive lipids, we employed LiRecDT1 as an exogenous source of phospholipase-D in B16-F10 cells. Treatment of the cells was effective in increasing their proliferation in a

  4. Monthly Strontium/Calcium oscillations in symbiotic coral aragonite: Biological effects limiting the precision of the paleotemperature proxy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meibom, A.; Stage, M.; Wooden, J.; Constantz, B.R.; Dunbar, R.B.; Owen, A.; Grumet, N.; Bacon, C.R.; Chamberlain, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    In thermodynamic equilibrium with sea water the Sr/Ca ratio of aragonite varies predictably with temperature and the Sr/Ca ratio in coral have thus become a frequently used proxy for past Sea Surface Temperature (SST). However, biological effects can offset the Sr/Ca ratio from its equilibrium value. We report high spatial resolution ion microprobe analyses of well defined skeletal elements in the reef-building coral Porites lutea that reveal distinct monthly oscillations in the Sr/Ca ratio, with an amplitude in excess of ten percent. The extreme Sr/Ca variations, which we propose result from metabolic changes synchronous with the lunar cycle, introduce variability in Sr/Ca measurements based on conventional sampling techniques well beyond the analytical precision. These variations can limit the accuracy of Sr/Ca paleothermometry by conventional sampling techniques to about 2??C. Our results may help explain the notorious difficulties involved in obtaining an accurate and consistent calibration of the Sr/Ca vs. SST relationship.

  5. Census of cytosolic aminopeptidase activity reveals two novel cytosolic aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Akkad, Nadja; Schatz, Mark; Dengjel, Jörn; Tenzer, Stefan; Schild, Hansjörg

    2012-11-01

    Activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells is crucial for the adaptive immune response against viral infections and the control of malignant transformed cells. Together with activation of costimulatory molecules like CD3 and CD28, CD8(+) T cells need activation of their unique T cell receptor via recognition of foreign peptide epitopes in combination with major histocompatibility complexes class I on the cell surface of professional antigen-presenting cells. Presentation of pathogen-associated proteins is the result of a complex proteolytic process. It starts with the breakdown of proteins by a cytosolic endopeptidase, the proteasome, and is continued by subsequent N-terminal trimming events in the cytosol and/or the endoplasmic reticulum. Analysis of the proteolytic aminopeptidase activity in the former cellular compartment showed that the cytosol harbors a multitude of aminopeptidases that have singular specificities, but on the other hand also show redundancy in the trimming of N-terminal residues. The observed pattern of the overall trimming in the cytosol is reflected by the activity of the four identified aminopeptidases, and the administration of protease inhibitors made it possible to assign specificity of cleaving of proteinogenic amino acids to one or more identified aminopeptidase. The only exception was the cleavage of aspartic acid, which is performed by one yet unidentified enzyme.

  6. Store-operated calcium entry compensates fast ER calcium loss in resting hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Samtleben, Samira; Wachter, Britta; Blum, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) acts as a dynamic calcium store and is involved in the generation of specific patterns of calcium signals in neurons. Calcium is mobilized from the ER store by multiple signaling cascades, and neuronal activity is known to regulate ER calcium levels. We asked how neurons regulate ER calcium levels in the resting state. Direct ER calcium imaging showed that ER calcium was lost quite rapidly from the somatic and dendritic ER when resting neurons were transiently kept under calcium-free conditions. Interestingly, free ER and free cytosolic calcium was lost continuously across the plasma membrane and was not held back in the cytosol, implying the presence of a prominent calcium influx mechanism to maintain ER calcium levels at rest. When neurons were treated acutely with inhibitors of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), an immediate decline in ER calcium levels was observed. This continuous SOCE-like calcium entry did not require the activation of a signaling cascade, but was rather a steady-state phenomenon. The SOCE-like mechanism maintains medium-high ER calcium levels at rest and is essential for balanced resting calcium levels in the ER and cytosol.

  7. Mitochondria: the calcium connection.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Laura; Drago, Ilaria; Zampese, Enrico; Pozzan, Tullio

    2010-01-01

    Calcium handling by mitochondria is a key feature in cell life. It is involved in energy production for cell activity, in buffering and shaping cytosolic calcium rises and also in determining cell fate by triggering or preventing apoptosis. Both mitochondria and the mechanisms involved in the control of calcium homeostasis have been extensively studied, but they still provide researchers with long-standing or even new challenges. Technical improvements in the tools employed for the investigation of calcium dynamics have been-and are still-opening new perspectives in this field, and more prominently for mitochondria. In this review we present a state-of-the-art toolkit for calcium measurements, with major emphasis on the advantages of genetically encoded indicators. These indicators can be efficiently and selectively targeted to specific cellular sub-compartments, allowing previously unavailable high-definition calcium dynamic studies. We also summarize the main features of cellular and, in more detail, mitochondrial calcium handling, especially focusing on the latest breakthroughs in the field, such as the recent direct characterization of the calcium microdomains that occur on the mitochondrial surface upon cellular stimulation. Additionally, we provide a major example of the key role played by calcium in patho-physiology by briefly describing the extensively reported-albeit highly controversial-alterations of calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease, casting lights on the possible alterations in mitochondrial calcium handling in this pathology.

  8. Compartmentalized calcium signaling triggers subpopulation formation upon platelet activation through PAR1.

    PubMed

    Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2015-04-01

    Blood platelets need to undergo activation to carry out their function of stopping bleeding. Different activation degrees lead to a stepped hierarchy of responses: ability to aggregate, granule release, and, in a fraction of platelets, phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. This suggests the existence of decision-making mechanisms in the platelet intracellular signaling network. To identify and investigate them, we developed a computational model of PAR1-stimulated platelet signal transduction that included a minimal set of major players in the calcium signaling network. The model comprised three intracellular compartments: cytosol, dense tubular system (DTS) and mitochondria and extracellular space. Computer simulations showed that the stable resting state of platelets is maintained via a balance between calcium pumps and leaks through the DTS and plasma membranes. Stimulation of PAR1 induced oscillations in the cytosolic calcium concentrations, in good agreement with experimental observations. Further increase in the agonist level activated the mitochondrial uniporter leading to calcium uptake by mitochondria, which caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential in a fraction of platelets leading to the PS exposure. The formation of this subpopulation was shown to be a stochastic process determined by the small number of activated PAR1 receptors and by heterogeneity in the number of ion pumps. These results demonstrate how a gradual increase of the activation degree can be converted into a stepped response hierarchy ultimately leading to formation of two distinct subpopulations from an initially homogeneous population. PMID:25627921

  9. Calcium-mediated mechanisms of cystic expansion

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Majeed, Shakila; Nauli, Surya M.

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we will discuss several well-accepted signaling pathways toward calcium-mediated mechanisms of cystic expansion. The second messenger calcium ion has contributed to a vast diversity of signal transduction pathways. We will dissect calcium signaling as a possible mechanism that contributes to renal cyst formation. Because cytosolic calcium also regulates an array of signaling pathways, we will first discuss cilia-induced calcium fluxes, followed by Wnt signaling that has attributed to much-discussed planar cell polarity. We will then look at the relationship between cytosolic calcium and cAMP as one of the most important aspects of cyst progression. The signaling of cAMP on MAPK and mTOR will also be discussed. We infer that while cilia-induced calcium fluxes may be the initial signaling messenger for various cellular pathways, no single signaling mediator or pathway is implicated exclusively in the progression of the cystic expansion. PMID:20932898

  10. Life cycle of cytosolic prions.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Julia; Vorberg, Ina

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-templating protein aggregates that were originally identified as the causative agent of prion diseases in mammals, but have since been discovered in other kingdoms. Mammalian prions represent a unique class of infectious agents that are composed of misfolded prion protein. Prion proteins usually exist as soluble proteins but can refold and assemble into highly ordered, self-propagating prion polymers. The prion concept is also applicable to a growing number of non-Mendelian elements of inheritance in lower eukaryotes. While prions identified in mammals are clearly pathogens, prions in lower eukaryotes can be either detrimental or beneficial to the host. Prion phenotypes in fungi are transmitted vertically from mother to daughter cells during cell division and horizontally during mating or abortive mating, but extracellular phases have not been reported. Recent findings now demonstrate that in a mammalian cell environment, protein aggregates derived from yeast prion domains exhibit a prion life cycle similar to mammalian prions propagated ex vivo. This life cycle includes a soluble state of the protein, an induction phase by exogenous prion fibrils, stable replication of prion entities, vertical transmission to progeny and natural horizontal transmission to neighboring cells. Our data reveal that mammalian cells contain all co-factors required for cytosolic prion propagation and dissemination. This has important implications for understanding prion-like properties of disease-related protein aggregates. In light of the growing number of identified functional amyloids, cell-to-cell propagation of cytosolic protein conformers might not only be relevant for the spreading of disease-associated proteins, but might also be of more general relevance under non-disease conditions.

  11. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  12. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katie A; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Davies, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium's other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  13. The Frequency of Calcium Oscillations Induced by 5-HT, ACH, and KCl Determine the Contraction of Smooth Muscle Cells of Intrapulmonary Bronchioles

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose F.; Sanderson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Increased resistance of airways or blood vessels within the lung is associated with asthma or pulmonary hypertension and results from contraction of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To study the mechanisms regulating these contractions, we developed a mouse lung slice preparation containing bronchioles and arterioles and used phase-contrast and confocal microscopy to correlate the contractile responses with changes in [Ca2+]i of the SMCs. The airways are the focus of this study. The agonists, 5-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT) and acetylcholine (ACH) induced a concentration-dependent contraction of the airways. High concentrations of KCl induced twitching of the airway SMCs but had little effect on airway size. 5-HT and ACH induced asynchronous oscillations in [Ca2+]i that propagated as Ca2+ waves within the airway SMCs. The frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations was dependent on the agonist concentration and correlated with the extent of sustained airway contraction. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or in the presence of Ni2+, the frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations declined and the airway relaxed. By contrast, KCl induced low frequency Ca2+ oscillations that were associated with SMC twitching. Each KCl-induced Ca2+ oscillation consisted of a large Ca2+ wave that was preceded by multiple localized Ca2+ transients. KCl-induced responses were resistant to neurotransmitter blockers but were abolished by Ni2+ or nifedipine and the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Caffeine abolished the contractile effects of 5-HT, ACH, and KCl. These results indicate that (a) 5-HT and ACH induce airway SMC contraction by initiating Ca2+ oscillations, (b) KCl induces Ca2+ transients and twitching by overloading and releasing Ca2+ from intracellular stores, (c) a sustained, Ni2+-sensitive, influx of Ca2+ mediates the refilling of stores to maintain Ca2+ oscillations and, in turn, SMC contraction, and (d) the magnitude of sustained airway SMC contraction is regulated by the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations

  14. Sodium-calcium exchanger and R-type Ca(2+) channels mediate spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in magnocellular neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kortus, Stepan; Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Forostyak, Oksana; Zapotocky, Martin; Ueta, Yoichi; Sykova, Eva; Chvatal, Alexandr; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2016-06-01

    Isolated supraoptic neurones generate spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in isolated conditions. Here we report in depth analysis of the contribution of plasmalemmal ion channels (Ca(2+), Na(+)), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), intracellular Ca(2+) release channels (InsP3Rs and RyRs), Ca(2+) storage organelles, plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump and intracellular signal transduction cascades into spontaneous Ca(2+) activity. While removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or incubation with non-specific voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) blocker Cd(2+) suppressed the oscillations, neither Ni(2+) nor TTA-P2, the T-type VGCC blockers, had an effect. Inhibitors of VGCC nicardipine, ω-conotoxin GVIA, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, ω-agatoxin IVA (for L-, N-, P and P/Q-type channels, respectively) did not affect [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. In contrast, a specific R-type VGCC blocker SNX-482 attenuated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. Incubation with TTX had no effect, whereas removal of the extracellular Na(+) or application of an inhibitor of the reverse operation mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger KB-R7943 blocked the oscillations. The mitochondrial uncoupler CCCP irreversibly blocked spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i activity. Exposure of neurones to Ca(2+) mobilisers (thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, caffeine and ryanodine); 4-aminopyridine (A-type K(+) current blocker); phospholipase C and adenylyl cyclase pathways blockers U-73122, Rp-cAMP, SQ-22536 and H-89 had no effect. Oscillations were blocked by GABA, but not by glutamate, apamin or dynorphin. In conclusion, spontaneous oscillations in magnocellular neurones are mediated by a concerted action of R-type Ca(2+) channels and the NCX fluctuating between forward and reverse modes. PMID:27052156

  15. Source of nuclear calcium signals.

    PubMed Central

    Allbritton, N L; Oancea, E; Kuhn, M A; Meyer, T

    1994-01-01

    Transient increases of Ca2+ concentration in the nucleus regulate gene expression and other nuclear processes. We investigated whether nuclear Ca2+ signals could be regulated independently of the cytoplasm or were controlled by cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. A fluorescent Ca2+ indicator that is targeted to the nucleus was synthesized by coupling a nuclear localization peptide to Calcium Green dextran, a 70-kDa Ca2+ indicator. Stimulation of rat basophilic leukemia cells by antigen or by photolytic uncaging of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate induced transient increases in nuclear and cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. Elevations in the nuclear Ca2+ concentration followed those in the nearby perinuclear cytosol within 200 ms. Heparin-dextran, an inhibitor of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor that is excluded from the nucleus, was synthesized to specifically block the release of Ca2+ from cytosolic stores. Addition of this inhibitor suppressed Ca2+ transients in the nucleus and the cytosol. We conclude that the Ca2+ level in the nucleus is not independently controlled. Rather, nuclear Ca2+ increases follow cytosolic Ca2+ increases with a short delay most likely due to Ca2+ diffusion from the cytosol through the nuclear pores. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7809059

  16. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katie A.; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M.; Davies, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium’s other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  17. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katie A.; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M.; Davies, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium’s other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response.

  18. Detection of cytosolic bacteria by inflammatory caspases.

    PubMed

    Hagar, Jon A; Miao, Edward A

    2014-02-01

    The sanctity of the cytosolic compartment is rigorously maintained by a number of innate immune mechanisms. Inflammasomes detect signatures of microbial infection and trigger caspase-1 or caspase-11 activation, culminating in cytokine secretion and obliteration of the replicative niche via pyroptosis. Recent studies have examined inflammatory caspase responses to cytosolic bacteria, including Burkholderia, Shigella, Listeria, Francisella, and Mycobacterium species. For example, caspase-11 responds to LPS introduced into the cytosol after Gram-negative bacteria escape the vacuole. Not surprisingly, bacteria antagonize these responses; for example, Shigella delivers OspC3 to inhibit caspase-4, a potential human homolog of murine caspase-11. These findings underscore bacterial coevolution with the innate immune system, which has resulted in few, but highly specialized cytosolic pathogens.

  19. Detection of cytosolic bacteria by inflammatory caspases

    PubMed Central

    Hagar, Jon A.; Miao, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    The sanctity of the cytosolic compartment is rigorously maintained by a number of innate immune mechanisms. Inflammasomes detect signatures of microbial infection and trigger caspase-1 or caspase-11 activation, culminating in cytokine secretion and obliteration of the replicative niche via pyroptosis. Recent studies have examined inflammatory caspase responses to cytosolic bacteria, including Burkholderia, Shigella, Listeria, Francisella, and Mycobacterium species. For example, caspase-11 responds to LPS introduced into the cytosol after Gram-negative bacteria escape the vacuole. Not surprisingly, bacteria antagonize these responses; for example, Shigella delivers OspC3 to inhibit caspase-4. These findings underscore bacterial coevolution with the innate immune system, which has resulted in few, but highly specialized cytosolic pathogens. PMID:24581694

  20. The Relationship between Membrane Potential and Calcium Dynamics in Glucose-Stimulated Beta Cell Syncytium in Acute Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Evan W.; Slak Rupnik, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Oscillatory electrical activity is regarded as a hallmark of the pancreatic beta cell glucose-dependent excitability pattern. Electrophysiologically recorded membrane potential oscillations in beta cells are associated with in-phase oscillatory cytosolic calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) measured with fluorescent probes. Recent high spatial and temporal resolution confocal imaging revealed that glucose stimulation of beta cells in intact islets within acute tissue slices produces a [Ca2+]i change with initial transient phase followed by a plateau phase with highly synchronized [Ca2+]i oscillations. Here, we aimed to correlate the plateau [Ca2+]i oscillations with the oscillations of membrane potential using patch-clamp and for the first time high resolution voltage-sensitive dye based confocal imaging. Our results demonstrated that the glucose-evoked membrane potential oscillations spread over the islet in a wave-like manner, their durations and wave velocities being comparable to the ones for [Ca2+]i oscillations and waves. High temporal resolution simultaneous records of membrane potential and [Ca2+]i confirmed tight but nevertheless limited coupling of the two processes, with membrane depolarization preceding the [Ca2+]i increase. The potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium increased the velocity at which oscillations advanced over the islet by several-fold while, at the same time, emphasized differences in kinetics of the membrane potential and the [Ca2+]i. The combination of both imaging techniques provides a powerful tool that will help us attain deeper knowledge of the beta cell network. PMID:24324777

  1. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU supports cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations, store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-dependent gene expression in response to receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Krishna; Douglas, Sophie; Parekh, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ flux into mitochondria is an important regulator of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, energy production and cell death pathways. Ca2+ uptake can occur through the recently discovered mitochondrial uniporter channel (MCU) but whether the MCU is involved in shaping Ca2+ signals and downstream responses to physiological levels of receptor stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that modest stimulation of leukotriene receptors with the pro-inflammatory signal LTC4 evokes a series of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that are rapidly and faithfully propagated into mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of MCU or mitochondrial depolarisation, to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry into the matrix, prevents the mitochondrial Ca2+ rise and accelerates run down of the oscillations. The loss of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations appeared to be a consequence of enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation of InsP3 receptors, which arose from the loss of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Ca2+ dependent gene expression in response to leukotriene receptor activation was suppressed following knockdown of the MCU. In addition to buffering Ca2+ release, mitochondria also sequestrated Ca2+ entry through store-operated Ca2+ channels and this too was prevented following loss of MCU. MCU is therefore an important regulator of physiological pulses of cytoplasmic Ca2+.

  2. Calcium-Dependent Signaling and Kinases in Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Billker, Oliver; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David

    2009-01-01

    Summary Calcium controls many critical events in the complex life cycles of apicomplexan parasites including protein secretion, motility, and development. Calcium levels are normally tightly regulated and rapid release of calcium into the cytosol activates a family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), which are normally characteristic of plants. CDPKs present in apicomplexans have acquired a number of unique domain structures likely reflecting their diverse functions. Calcium regulation in parasites is closely linked to signaling by cyclic nucleotides and their associated kinases. This review summarizes the pivotal roles that calcium-and cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases play in unique aspects of parasite biology. PMID:19527888

  3. Extracellular Calcium Has Multiple Targets to Control Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capiod, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channels and the two G-protein coupled receptors sensing extracellular calcium, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and GPRC6a, are the two main means by which extracellular calcium can signal to cells and regulate many cellular processes including cell proliferation, migration and invasion of tumoral cells. Many intracellular signaling pathways are sensitive to cytosolic calcium rises and conversely intracellular signaling pathways can modulate calcium channel expression and activity. Calcium channels are undoubtedly involved in the former while the CaSR and GPRC6a are most likely to interfere with the latter. As for neurotransmitters, calcium ions use plasma membrane channels and GPCR to trigger cytosolic free calcium concentration rises and intracellular signaling and regulatory pathways activation. Calcium sensing GPCR, CaSR and GPRC6a, allow a supplemental degree of control and as for metabotropic receptors, they not only modulate calcium channel expression but they may also control calcium-dependent K+ channels. The multiplicity of intracellular signaling pathways involved, their sensitivity to local and global intracellular calcium increase and to CaSR and GPRC6a stimulation, the presence of membrane signalplex, all this confers the cells the plasticity they need to convert the effects of extracellular calcium into complex physiological responses and therefore determine their fate.

  4. Extracellular Calcium Has Multiple Targets to Control Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capiod, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channels and the two G-protein coupled receptors sensing extracellular calcium, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and GPRC6a, are the two main means by which extracellular calcium can signal to cells and regulate many cellular processes including cell proliferation, migration and invasion of tumoral cells. Many intracellular signaling pathways are sensitive to cytosolic calcium rises and conversely intracellular signaling pathways can modulate calcium channel expression and activity. Calcium channels are undoubtedly involved in the former while the CaSR and GPRC6a are most likely to interfere with the latter. As for neurotransmitters, calcium ions use plasma membrane channels and GPCR to trigger cytosolic free calcium concentration rises and intracellular signaling and regulatory pathways activation. Calcium sensing GPCR, CaSR and GPRC6a, allow a supplemental degree of control and as for metabotropic receptors, they not only modulate calcium channel expression but they may also control calcium-dependent K+ channels. The multiplicity of intracellular signaling pathways involved, their sensitivity to local and global intracellular calcium increase and to CaSR and GPRC6a stimulation, the presence of membrane signalplex, all this confers the cells the plasticity they need to convert the effects of extracellular calcium into complex physiological responses and therefore determine their fate. PMID:27161228

  5. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  6. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    High levels of urine calcium (above 300 mg/day) may be due to: Chronic kidney disease High vitamin D levels Leaking of calcium from the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking ...

  7. A Novel Calcium Binding Site in the Slow Vacuolar Cation Channel TPC1 Senses Luminal Calcium Levels[W

    PubMed Central

    Dadacz-Narloch, Beata; Beyhl, Diana; Larisch, Christina; López-Sanjurjo, Enrique J.; Reski, Ralf; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Müller, Thomas D.; Becker, Dirk; Schönknecht, Gerald; Hedrich, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Cytosolic calcium homeostasis is pivotal for intracellular signaling and requires sensing of calcium concentrations in the cytosol and accessible stores. Numerous Ca2+ binding sites have been characterized in cytosolic proteins. However, little is known about Ca2+ binding inside organelles, like the vacuole. The slow vacuolar (SV) channel, encoded by Arabidopsis thaliana TPC1, is regulated by luminal Ca2+. However, the D454/fou2 mutation in TPC1 eliminates vacuolar calcium sensitivity and increases store calcium content. In a search for the luminal calcium binding site, structure modeling indicated a possible coordination site formed by residues Glu-450, Asp-454, Glu-456, and Glu-457 on the luminal side of TPC1. Each Glu residue was replaced by Gln, the modified genes were transiently expressed in loss-of-TPC1-function protoplasts, and SV channel responses to luminal calcium were recorded by patch clamp. SV channels lacking any of the four negatively charged residues appeared altered in calcium sensitivity of channel gating. Our results indicate that Glu-450 and Asp-454 are directly involved in Ca2+ binding, whereas Glu-456 and Glu-457 are probably involved in connecting the luminal Ca2+ binding site to the channel gate. This novel vacuolar calcium binding site represents a potential tool to address calcium storage in plants. PMID:21764990

  8. Braided oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, A.

    2002-03-01

    A generalized oscillator algebra is proposed and the braided Hopf algebra structure for this generalized oscillator is investigated. Using the solutions for the braided Hopf algebra structure, two types of braided Fibonacci oscillators are introduced. This leads to two types of braided Biedenharn-Macfarlane oscillators as special cases of the Fibonacci oscillators. We also find the braided Hopf algebra solutions for the three dimensional braided space. One of these, as a special case, gives the Hopf algebra given in the literature.

  9. Impact of reconstituted cytosol on protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Mohona; Smith, Austin E.; Pielak, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein stability is usually studied in simple buffered solutions, but most proteins function inside cells, where the heterogeneous and crowded environment presents a complex, nonideal system. Proteins are expected to behave differently under cellular crowding owing to two types of contacts: hard-core repulsions and weak, chemical interactions. The effect of hard-core repulsions is purely entropic, resulting in volume exclusion owing to the mere presence of the crowders. The weak interactions can be repulsive or attractive, thus enhancing or diminishing the excluded volume, respectively. We used a reductionist approach to assess the effects of intracellular crowding. Escherichia coli cytoplasm was dialyzed, lyophilized, and resuspended at two concentrations. NMR-detected amide proton exchange was then used to quantify the stability of the globular protein chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) in these crowded solutions. The cytosol destabilizes CI2, and the destabilization increases with increasing cytosol concentration. This observation shows that the cytoplasm interacts favorably, but nonspecifically, with CI2, and these interactions overcome the stabilizing hard-core repulsions. The effects of the cytosol are even stronger than those of homogeneous protein crowders, reinforcing the biological significance of weak, nonspecific interactions. PMID:24218610

  10. Cilioplasm is a cellular compartment for calcium signaling in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xingjian; Mohieldin, Ashraf M; Muntean, Brian S; Green, Jill A; Shah, Jagesh V; Mykytyn, Kirk; Nauli, Surya M

    2014-06-01

    Primary cilia with a diameter of ~200 nm have been implicated in development and disease. Calcium signaling within a primary cilium has never been directly visualized and has therefore remained a speculation. Fluid-shear stress and dopamine receptor type-5 (DR5) agonist are among the few stimuli that require cilia for intracellular calcium signal transduction. However, it is not known if these stimuli initiate calcium signaling within the cilium or if the calcium signal originates in the cytoplasm. Using an integrated single-cell imaging technique, we demonstrate for the first time that calcium signaling triggered by fluid-shear stress initiates in the primary cilium and can be distinguished from the subsequent cytosolic calcium response through the ryanodine receptor. Importantly, this flow-induced calcium signaling depends on the ciliary polycystin-2 calcium channel. While DR5-specific agonist induces calcium signaling mainly in the cilioplasm via ciliary CaV1.2, thrombin specifically induces cytosolic calcium signaling through the IP3 receptor. Furthermore, a non-specific calcium ionophore triggers both ciliary and cytosolic calcium responses. We suggest that cilia not only act as sensory organelles but also function as calcium signaling compartments. Cilium-dependent signaling can spread to the cytoplasm or be contained within the cilioplasm. Our study thus provides the first model to understand signaling within the cilioplasm of a living cell.

  11. Protein ligand-tethered synthetic calcium indicator for localization control and spatiotemporal calcium imaging in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Yousuke; Shigenaga, Miyuki; Imai, Masaki; Nukadzuka, Yuuki; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Saito, Kei; Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Nishitani, Kazuhiko; Ueda, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    In plant biology, calcium ions are involved in a variety of intriguing biological phenomena as a secondary messenger. However, most conventional calcium indicators are not applicable for plant cells because of the difficulty with their localization control in plant cells. We here introduce a method to monitor spatiotemporal Ca(2+) dynamics in living plant cells based on linking the synthetic calcium indicator Calcium Green-1 to a natural product-based protein ligand. In a proof-of-concept study using cultured BY-2 cells overexpressing the target protein for the ligand, the ligand-tethered probe accumulated in the cytosol and nucleus, and enabled real-time monitoring of the cytosolic and nucleus Ca(2+) dynamics under the physiological condition. The present strategy using ligand-tethered fluorescent sensors may be successfully applied to reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium ions in living plant cells.

  12. Interplay of channels, pumps and organelle location in calcium microdomain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peglow, Martin; Niemeyer, Barbara A.; Hoth, Markus; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the influence of Ca2+ microdomains on the global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, we consider the polarization and activation of T-cells after the formation of an immunological synapse as a model system. For T-cell proliferation and activation, a high and robust Ca2+ signal lasting from minutes up to hours is needed. This raises the intriguing question of how T-cells overcome all those mechanisms which normally remove an increased Ca2+ level as fast as possible from the cytosol. With the help of theoretical models we predict that, after the formation of a local Ca2+ influx pathway via STIM1 and Orai1, mitochondria relocation toward and accumulation of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase and sarcoplasmic/ endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pumps at the immunological synapse are sufficient to achieve a long-lasting increased global Ca2+ concentration. In addition, we also uncover new mechanisms to generate Ca2+ oscillations, which are important for efficient T-cell activation. Experimental tests and the implications of our predictions are discussed.

  13. Do calcium buffers always slow down the propagation of calcium waves?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2013-12-01

    Calcium buffers are large proteins that act as binding sites for free cytosolic calcium. Since a large fraction of cytosolic calcium is bound to calcium buffers, calcium waves are widely observed under the condition that free cytosolic calcium is heavily buffered. In addition, all physiological buffered excitable systems contain multiple buffers with different affinities. It is thus important to understand the properties of waves in excitable systems with the inclusion of buffers. There is an ongoing controversy about whether or not the addition of calcium buffers into the system always slows down the propagation of calcium waves. To solve this controversy, we incorporate the buffering effect into the generic excitable system, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, to get the buffered FitzHugh-Nagumo model, and then to study the effect of the added buffer with large diffusivity on traveling waves of such a model in one spatial dimension. We can find a critical dissociation constant (K = K(a)) characterized by system excitability parameter a such that calcium buffers can be classified into two types: weak buffers (K ∈ (K(a), ∞)) and strong buffers (K ∈ (0, K(a))). We analytically show that the addition of weak buffers or strong buffers but with its total concentration b(0)(1) below some critical total concentration b(0,c)(1) into the system can generate a traveling wave of the resulting system which propagates faster than that of the origin system, provided that the diffusivity D1 of the added buffers is sufficiently large. Further, the magnitude of the wave speed of traveling waves of the resulting system is proportional to √D1 as D1 --> ∞. In contrast, the addition of strong buffers with the total concentration b(0)(1) > b(0,c)(1) into the system may not be able to support the formation of a biologically acceptable wave provided that the diffusivity D1 of the added buffers is sufficiently large.

  14. Cytosolic phospholipase A2: physiological function and role in disease

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Christina C.

    2015-01-01

    The group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family is comprised of six intracellular enzymes (GIVA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F) commonly referred to as cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2)α, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε, and -ζ. They contain a Ser-Asp catalytic dyad and all except cPLA2γ have a C2 domain, but differences in their catalytic activities and subcellular localization suggest unique regulation and function. With the exception of cPLA2α, the focus of this review, little is known about the in vivo function of group IV enzymes. cPLA2α catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are precursors of numerous bioactive lipids. The regulation of cPLA2α is complex, involving transcriptional and posttranslational processes, particularly increases in calcium and phosphorylation. cPLA2α is a highly conserved widely expressed enzyme that promotes lipid mediator production in human and rodent cells from a variety of tissues. The diverse bioactive lipids produced as a result of cPLA2α activation regulate normal physiological processes and disease pathogenesis in many organ systems, as shown using cPLA2α KO mice. However, humans recently identified with cPLA2α deficiency exhibit more pronounced effects on health than observed in mice lacking cPLA2α, indicating that much remains to be learned about this interesting enzyme. PMID:25838312

  15. Calcium in Plants

    PubMed Central

    WHITE, PHILIP J.; BROADLEY, MARTIN R.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient. It is required for various structural roles in the cell wall and membranes, it is a counter‐cation for inorganic and organic anions in the vacuole, and the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) is an obligate intracellular messenger coordinating responses to numerous developmental cues and environmental challenges. This article provides an overview of the nutritional requirements of different plants for Ca, and how this impacts on natural flora and the Ca content of crops. It also reviews recent work on (a) the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport across cellular membranes, (b) understanding the origins and specificity of [Ca2+]cyt signals and (c) characterizing the cellular [Ca2+]cyt‐sensors (such as calmodulin, calcineurin B‐like proteins and calcium‐dependent protein kinases) that allow plant cells to respond appropriately to [Ca2+]cyt signals. PMID:12933363

  16. Rapid transcriptome changes induced by cytosolic Ca2+ transients reveal ABRE-related sequences as Ca2+-responsive cis elements in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Boaz; Davydov, Olga; Knight, Heather; Galon, Yael; Knight, Marc R; Fluhr, Robert; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression by cellular calcium is crucial for plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the number of genes known to respond to specific transient calcium signals is limited, and as yet there is no definition of a calcium-responsive cis element in plants. Here, we generated specific cytosolic calcium transients in intact Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and linked them to early transcriptome changes, followed by bioinformatic analysis of the responsive genes. A cytosolic calcium transient induced by calmodulin antagonists and blocked by lanthanides was characterized using aequorin-based luminometry and photon imaging. Analysis of transcriptome changes revealed 230 calcium-responsive genes, of which 162 were upregulated and 68 were downregulated. These include known early stress-responsive genes as well as genes of unknown function. Analysis of their upstream regions revealed, exclusively in the upregulated genes, a highly significant occurrence of a consensus sequence (P < 10(-13)) comprising two abscisic acid-specific cis elements: the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE; CACGTG[T/C/G]) and its coupling element ([C/A]ACGCG[T/C/G]) [corrected] Finally, we show that a tetramer of the ABRE cis element is sufficient to confer transcriptional activation in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. Thus, at least for some specific Ca(2+) transients and motif combinations, ABREs function as Ca(2+)-responsive cis elements. PMID:16980540

  17. Rapid transcriptome changes induced by cytosolic Ca2+ transients reveal ABRE-related sequences as Ca2+-responsive cis elements in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Boaz; Davydov, Olga; Knight, Heather; Galon, Yael; Knight, Marc R; Fluhr, Robert; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression by cellular calcium is crucial for plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the number of genes known to respond to specific transient calcium signals is limited, and as yet there is no definition of a calcium-responsive cis element in plants. Here, we generated specific cytosolic calcium transients in intact Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and linked them to early transcriptome changes, followed by bioinformatic analysis of the responsive genes. A cytosolic calcium transient induced by calmodulin antagonists and blocked by lanthanides was characterized using aequorin-based luminometry and photon imaging. Analysis of transcriptome changes revealed 230 calcium-responsive genes, of which 162 were upregulated and 68 were downregulated. These include known early stress-responsive genes as well as genes of unknown function. Analysis of their upstream regions revealed, exclusively in the upregulated genes, a highly significant occurrence of a consensus sequence (P < 10(-13)) comprising two abscisic acid-specific cis elements: the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE; CACGTG[T/C/G]) and its coupling element ([C/A]ACGCG[T/C/G]) [corrected] Finally, we show that a tetramer of the ABRE cis element is sufficient to confer transcriptional activation in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. Thus, at least for some specific Ca(2+) transients and motif combinations, ABREs function as Ca(2+)-responsive cis elements.

  18. Calcium wave propagation by calcium-induced calcium release: an unusual excitable system.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, J; Girard, S; Clapham, D

    1993-03-01

    We discuss in detail the behaviour of a model, proposed by Goldbeter et al. (1990. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. 87, 1461-1465), for intracellular calcium wave propagation by calcium-induced calcium release, focusing our attention on excitability and the propagation of waves in one spatial dimension. The model with no diffusion behaves like a generic excitable system, and threshold behaviour, excitability and oscillations can be understood within this general framework. However, when diffusion is included, the model no longer behaves like a generic excitable system; the fast and slow variables are not distinct and previous results on excitable systems do not necessarily apply. We consider a piecewise linear simplification of the model, and construct travelling pulse and periodic plane wave solutions to the simplified model. The analogous behaviour in the full model is studied numerically. Goldbeter's model for calcium-induced calcium release is an excitable system of a type not previously studied in detail.

  19. Cytosolic Selection Systems To Study Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Mueller-Schickert, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe biosensors that provide readouts for protein stability in the cytosolic compartment of prokaryotes. These biosensors consist of tripartite sandwich fusions that link the in vitro stability or aggregation susceptibility of guest proteins to the in vivo resistance of host cells to the antibiotics kanamycin, spectinomycin, and nourseothricin. These selectable markers confer antibiotic resistance in a wide range of hosts and are easily quantifiable. We show that mutations within guest proteins that affect their stability alter the antibiotic resistances of the cells expressing the biosensors in a manner that is related to the in vitro stabilities of the mutant guest proteins. In addition, we find that polyglutamine tracts of increasing length are associated with an increased tendency to form amyloids in vivo and, in our sandwich fusion system, with decreased resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that our approach allows the in vivo analysis of protein stability in the cytosolic compartment without the need for prior structural and functional knowledge. PMID:25266385

  20. Neurodynamic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  1. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus. PMID:12717445

  2. Cytosolic delivery of materials with endosome-disrupting colloids

    DOEpatents

    Helms, Brett A.; Bayles, Andrea R.

    2016-03-15

    A facile procedure to deliver nanocrystals to the cytosol of live cells that is both rapid and general. The technique employs a unique cationic core-shell polymer colloid that directs nanocrystals to the cytosol of living cells within a few hours of incubation. The present methods and compositions enable a host of advanced applications arising from efficient cytosolic delivery of nanocrystal imaging probes: from single particle tracking experiments to monitoring protein-protein interactions in live cells for extended periods.

  3. Dissecting calcium oscillators in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Harper, J F

    2001-09-01

    To understand Ca2+ signaling, we need to identify all the Ca2+ transporters and their regulatory components. The first Ca2+ transporters to be cloned from plants and shown to have regulated activity were calmodulin-dependent Ca2+ -pumps. The regulation of these pumps suggests that being able to change the rate of Ca2+ efflux is important for Ca2+ signaling. The identification of pumps and antiporters in different subcellular locations is helping to dissect the complexities of Ca2+ signaling in plants.

  4. Oscillations in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Stark, Jaroslav; Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J T

    2007-04-01

    Oscillations are surprisingly common in the immune system, both in its healthy state and in disease. The most famous example is that of periodic fevers caused by the malaria parasite. A number of hereditary disorders, which also cause periodic fevers, have also been known for a long time. Various reports of oscillations in cytokine concentrations following antigen challenge have been published over at least the past three decades. Oscillations can also occur at the intracellular level. Calcium oscillations following T-cell activation are familiar to all immunologists, and metabolic and reactive oxygen species oscillations in neutrophils have been well documented. More recently, oscillations in nuclear factor kappaB activity following stimulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha have received considerable publicity. However, despite all of these examples, oscillations in the immune system still tend to be considered mainly as pathological aberrations, and their causes and significance remained largely unknown. This is partly because of a lack of awareness within the immunological community of the appropriate theoretical frameworks for describing and analyzing such behavior. We provide an introduction to these frameworks and give a survey of the currently known oscillations that occur within the immune system. PMID:17367345

  5. Decoding of calcium signal through calmodulin: calmodulin-binding proteins in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many abiotic and biotic stimuli such as heat, cold, drought, salt, light, wind, touch, wounding, symbionts and pathogens as well as growth, developmental and hormonal cues can quickly induce cytosolic calcium increases. Calmodulin, the most thoroughly studied calcium sensor, mediates interpretation...

  6. Systemic cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation is activated upon wounding and herbivory in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kiep, Victoria; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Lattke, Justus; Maaß, Jan-Peter; Boland, Wilhelm; Peiter, Edgar; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-09-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+) ) signalling triggered by insect herbivory is an intricate network with multiple components, involving positive and negative regulators. Real-time, noninvasive imaging of entire Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes was employed to monitor cytosolic free calcium ([Ca(2+) ]cyt ) elevations in local and systemic leaves in response to wounding and Spodoptera littoralis feeding. Luminescence emitted by the cytosol-localized Ca(2+) reporter aequorin was imaged using a high-resolution photon-counting camera system. Spodoptera littoralis feeding on Arabidopsis induced both local and systemic [Ca(2+) ]cyt elevations. Systemic [Ca(2+) ]cyt signals were found predominantly in adjacent leaves with direct vascular connections to the treated leaf and appeared with a delay of 1 to 2 min. Simulated herbivory by wounding always induced a local [Ca(2+) ]cyt response, but a systemic one only when the midrib was wounded. This systemic [Ca(2+) ]cyt response was suppressed by the presence of insect-derived oral secretions as well as in a mutant of the vacuolar cation channel, Two Pore Channel 1 (TPC1). Our results provide evidence that in Arabidopsis insect herbivory induces both local and systemic [Ca(2+) ]cyt signals that distribute within the vascular system. The systemic [Ca(2+) ]cyt signal could play an important signalling role in systemic plant defence.

  7. Effect of insulin on renal calcium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gollaher, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author has investigated both the indirect effect of insulin parathyroid hormone (PTH) activity, and the direct effect of insulin on renal calcium transport. The indirect study was performed by comparing calcium excretion in sham-operated and parathyroidectomized rats infused with the insulin secretagogue, arginine. Arginine infusion increased urinary calcium excretion in both groups. Therefore, it is concluded that neither PTH activity nor secretion is involved in this response. The direct effects of insulin were investigated by exposing rat kidney slices in vitro to varying concentrations of insulin and performing a kinetic analysis to interpret insulin's effect on calcium transport through cellular compartments. Steady state calcium transport through the plasma membrane, cytosol and mitochondria were compared in the presence and absence of insulin. Insulin had no effect on any calcium pool size or exchange rate. The direct effect of insulin was also studied in an acute experiment, which simulates conditions where insulin levels are raised rapidly as in the case with protein or glucose consumption. Under these conditions insulin treatment caused a rapid, but transient increase in /sup 45/Ca efflux from rat kidney slices. This pattern is usually indicative of a stimulation of calcium efflux across the plasma membrane. Finally, insulin caused a slight decrease in slice chemical calcium concentration.

  8. Combined use of UV-labile calcium chelators and calcium-sensitive dyes in a microscope with two light sources influencing different regions in a group of coordinated contracting cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarczyk, Goetz; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1997-12-01

    The coordination of excitation in a biological system of cells such as cardiac myocytes in heart tissue has crucial influence on the function of the entire organ. This coordinated behavior can be visualized in a small group of embryonic cardiac myocytes derived from the hearts of unborn chicken. Loaded with a calcium sensitive dye the excitation can be imaged via the occurring transient rise in cytosolic calcium concentration. It can be shown that in regions with physiological or morphological restrictions the transient rise in cytosolic calcium occurs with a temporal delay compared to the ordinary array of coupled myocytes. The height of the transient rise of cytosolic calcium is related to the ability of the individual cell to participate in the coordinated contraction. The free cytosolic calcium concentration is decreased with the UV-labile calcium, chelator diazo-2. Our setup allows to decrease the free cytosolic calcium in a single cell of the contracting array of cells. This allows us to introduce mismatches in selected regions of the coordinated contraction and to visualize the effects simultaneously.

  9. Mitochondrial calcium uptake.

    PubMed

    Williams, George S B; Boyman, Liron; Chikando, Aristide C; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Lederer, W J

    2013-06-25

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix is critically important to cellular function. As a regulator of matrix Ca(2+) levels, this flux influences energy production and can initiate cell death. If large, this flux could potentially alter intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Despite years of study, fundamental disagreements on the extent and speed of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake still exist. Here, we review and quantitatively analyze mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake fluxes from different tissues and interpret the results with respect to the recently proposed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) candidate. This quantitative analysis yields four clear results: (i) under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) influx into the mitochondria via the MCU is small relative to other cytosolic Ca(2+) extrusion pathways; (ii) single MCU conductance is ∼6-7 pS (105 mM [Ca(2+)]), and MCU flux appears to be modulated by [Ca(2+)]i, suggesting Ca(2+) regulation of MCU open probability (P(O)); (iii) in the heart, two features are clear: the number of MCU channels per mitochondrion can be calculated, and MCU probability is low under normal conditions; and (iv) in skeletal muscle and liver cells, uptake per mitochondrion varies in magnitude but total uptake per cell still appears to be modest. Based on our analysis of available quantitative data, we conclude that although Ca(2+) critically regulates mitochondrial function, the mitochondria do not act as a significant dynamic buffer of cytosolic Ca(2+) under physiological conditions. Nevertheless, with prolonged (superphysiological) elevations of [Ca(2+)]i, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake can increase 10- to 1,000-fold and begin to shape [Ca(2+)]i dynamics.

  10. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  11. Yeast respond to hypotonic shock with a calcium pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batiza, A. F.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the transgenic AEQUORIN calcium reporter system to monitor the cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypotonic shock. Such a shock generates an almost immediate and transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt which is eliminated by gadolinium, a blocker of stretch-activated channels. In addition, this transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt is initially insensitive to 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), an extracellular calcium chelator. However, BAPTA abruptly attenuates the maintenance of that transient rise. These data show that hypotonic shock generates a stretch-activated channel-dependent calcium pulse in yeast. They also suggest that the immediate calcium influx is primarily generated from intracellular stores, and that a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt depends upon extracellular calcium.

  12. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations.

  13. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  14. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, T R; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content ([Ca](SRT)) and free SR [Ca] ([Ca](SR)) on the fraction of SR calcium released during voltage clamp steps in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. [Ca](SRT), as measured by caffeine application, was progressively increased by conditioning pulses. Sodium was absent in both the intracellular and in the extracellular solutions to block sodium/calcium exchange. Total cytosolic calcium flux during the transient was inferred from I(Ca), [Ca](SRT), [Ca](i), and cellular buffering characteristics. Fluxes via the calcium current (I(Ca)), the SR calcium pump, and passive leak from the SR were evaluated to determine SR calcium release flux (J(rel)). Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling was characterized with respect to both gain (integral J(rel)/integral I(Ca)) and fractional SR calcium release. Both parameters were virtually zero for a small, but measurable [Ca](SRT). Gain and fractional SR calcium release increased steeply and nonlinearly with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). We conclude that potentiation of EC coupling can be correlated with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). While fractional SR calcium release was not linearly dependent upon [Ca](SR), intra-SR calcium may play a crucial role in regulating the SR calcium release process. PMID:10620297

  15. Quantitative assessment of cytosolic Salmonella in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Knodler, Leigh A; Nair, Vinod; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    Within mammalian cells, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) inhabits a membrane-bound vacuole known as the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). We have recently shown that wild type S. Typhimurium also colonizes the cytosol of epithelial cells. Here we sought to quantify the contribution of cytosolic Salmonella to the total population over a time course of infection in different epithelial cell lines and under conditions of altered vacuolar escape. We found that the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, acts on vacuolar, but not cytosolic, Salmonella. After chloroquine treatment, vacuolar bacteria are not transcriptionally active or replicative and appear degraded. Using a chloroquine resistance assay, in addition to digitonin permeabilization, we found that S. Typhimurium lyses its nascent vacuole in numerous epithelial cell lines, albeit with different frequencies, and hyper-replication in the cytosol is also widespread. At later times post-infection, cytosolic bacteria account for half of the total population in some epithelial cell lines, namely HeLa and Caco-2 C2Bbe1. Both techniques accurately measured increased vacuole lysis in epithelial cells upon treatment with wortmannin. By chloroquine resistance assay, we also determined that Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1), but not SPI-2, the virulence plasmid nor the flagellar apparatus, was required for vacuolar escape and cytosolic replication in epithelial cells. Together, digitonin permeabilization and the chloroquine resistance assay will be useful, complementary tools for deciphering the mechanisms of SCV lysis and Salmonella replication in the epithelial cell cytosol.

  16. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  17. Raindrop oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the change in shape of a raindrop is presented. Raindrops measured by two orthogonal cameras were classified by shape and orientation to determine the nature of the oscillation. A physical model based on potential energy was then developed to study the amplitude variation of oscillating drops. The model results show that oscillations occur about the equilibrium axis ratio, but the time average axis ratio if significantly more spherical for large amplitudes because of asymmetry in the surface potential energy. A generalization of the model to oscillations produced by turbulence yields average axis ratios that are consistent with the camera measurements. The model results for average axis ratios were applied to rainfall studies with a dual polarized radar.

  18. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  19. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  20. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables.

  1. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  2. Mechanism and evolution of cytosolic Hedgehog signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher W.; Chuang, Pao-Tien

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is required for embryonic patterning and postnatal physiology in invertebrates and vertebrates. With the revelation that the primary cilium is crucial for mammalian Hh signaling, the prevailing view that Hh signal transduction mechanisms are conserved across species has been challenged. However, more recent progress on elucidating the function of core Hh pathway cytosolic regulators in Drosophila, zebrafish and mice has confirmed that the essential logic of Hh transduction is similar between species. Here, we review Hh signaling events at the membrane and in the cytosol, and focus on parallel and divergent functions of cytosolic Hh regulators in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:20530542

  3. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium pumps and cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Papp, Béla; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Arbabian, Atousa; Gélébart, Pascal; Kovács, Tünde; Bobe, Régis; Enouf, Jocelyne; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Apáti, Agota

    2012-03-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major intracellular calcium storage pool and a multifunctional organelle that accomplishes several calcium-dependent functions involved in many homeostatic and signaling mechanisms. Calcium is accumulated in the ER by Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase (SERCA)-type calcium pumps. SERCA activity can determine ER calcium content available for intra-ER functions and for calcium release into the cytosol, and can shape the spatiotemporal characteristics of calcium signals. SERCA function therefore constitutes an important nodal point in the regulation of cellular calcium homeostasis and signaling, and can exert important effects on cell growth, differentiation and survival. In several cell types such as cells of hematopoietic origin, mammary, gastric and colonic epithelium, SERCA2 and SERCA3-type calcium pumps are simultaneously expressed, and SERCA3 expression levels undergo significant changes during cell differentiation, activation or immortalization. In addition, SERCA3 expression is decreased or lost in several tumor types when compared to the corresponding normal tissue. These observations indicate that ER calcium homeostasis is remodeled during cell differentiation, and may present defects due to decreased SERCA3 expression in tumors. Modulation of the state of differentiation of the ER reflected by SERCA3 expression constitutes an interesting new aspect of cell differentiation and tumor biology.

  5. Cytosolic Innate Immune Sensing and Signaling upon Infection

    PubMed Central

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Dussurget, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic sensing of pathogens is essential to a productive immune response. Recent reports have emphasized the importance of signaling platforms emanating from organelles and cytosolic sensors, particularly during the response to intracellular pathogens. Here, we highlight recent discoveries identifying the key mediators of nucleic acid and cyclic nucleotide sensing and discuss their importance in host defense. This review will also cover strategies evolved by pathogens to manipulate these pathways. PMID:27014235

  6. Arabidopsis Histone Methylase CAU1/PRMT5/SKB1 Acts as an Epigenetic Suppressor of the Calcium Signaling Gene CAS to Mediate Stomatal Closure in Response to Extracellular Calcium[W

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Lv, Xin-Fang; Guan, Yuan; Yi, Hong-Ying; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Elevations in extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o) are known to stimulate cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) oscillations to close stomata. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating this process remain largely to be determined. Here, through the functional characterization of the calcium underaccumulation mutant cau1, we report that the epigenetic regulation of CAS, a putative Ca2+ binding protein proposed to be an external Ca2+ sensor, is involved in this process. cau1 mutant plants display increased drought tolerance and stomatal closure. A mutation in CAU1 significantly increased the expression level of the calcium signaling gene CAS, and functional disruption of CAS abolished the enhanced drought tolerance and stomatal [Ca2+]o signaling in cau1. Map-based cloning revealed that CAU1 encodes the H4R3sme2 (for histone H4 Arg 3 with symmetric dimethylation)-type histone methylase protein arginine methytransferase5/Shk1 binding protein1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CAU1 binds to the CAS promoter and modulates the H4R3sme2-type histone methylation of the CAS chromatin. When exposed to elevated [Ca2+]o, the protein levels of CAU1 decreased and less CAU1 bound to the CAS promoter. In addition, the methylation level of H4R3sme2 decreased in the CAS chromatin. Together, these data suggest that in response to increases in [Ca2+]o, fewer CAU1 protein molecules bind to the CAS promoter, leading to decreased H4R3sme2 methylation and consequent derepression of the expression of CAS to mediate stomatal closure and drought tolerance. PMID:23943859

  7. Prevention of bone mineral changes induced by bed rest: Modification by static compression simulating weight bearing, combined supplementation of oral calcium and phosphate, calcitonin injections, oscillating compression, the oral diophosphonatedisodium etidronate, and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, V. S.; Hulley, S. B.; Donaldson, C. L.; Vogel, J. M.; Rosen, S. N.; Hantman, D. A.; Lockwood, D. R.; Seid, D.; Hyatt, K. H.; Jacobson, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    The phenomenon of calcium loss during bed rest was found to be analogous to the loss of bone material which occurs in the hypogravic environment of space flight. Ways of preventing this occurrence are investigated. A group of healthy adult males underwent 24-30 weeks of continuous bed rest. Some of them were given an exercise program designed to resemble normal ambulatory activity; another subgroup was fed supplemental potassium phosphate. The results from a 12-week period of treatment were compared with those untreated bed rest periods. The potassium phosphate supplements prevented the hypercalciuria of bed rest, but fecal calcium tended to increase. The exercise program did not diminish the negative calcium balance. Neither treatment affected the heavy loss of mineral from the calcaneus. Several additional studies are developed to examine the problem further.

  8. Programmable Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Lee, Clement G.; Nguyen, Huy

    2011-01-01

    A programmable oscillator is a frequency synthesizer with an output phase that tracks an arbitrary function. An offset, phase-locked loop circuit is used in combination with an error control feedback loop to precisely control the output phase of the oscillator. To down-convert the received signal, several stages of mixing may be employed with the compensation for the time-base distortion of the carrier occurring at any one of those stages. In the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), the compensation occurs in the mixing from an intermediate frequency (IF), whose value is dependent on the station and band, to a common IF used in the final stage of down-conversion to baseband. The programmable oscillator (PO) is used in the final stage of down-conversion to generate the IF, along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier, thus removing it from the final down-converted signal.

  9. Rearrangement of MICU1 multimers for activation of MCU is solely controlled by cytosolic Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Malli, Roland; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Madreiter-Sokolowski, Corina T; Klec, Christiane; Rost, Rene; Graier, Wolfgang F

    2015-10-22

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is a vital process that controls distinct cell and organelle functions. Mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1) was identified as key regulator of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) that together with the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) forms the mitochondrial Ca(2+) channel. However, mechanisms by which MICU1 controls MCU/EMRE activity to tune mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals remain ambiguous. Here we established a live-cell FRET approach and demonstrate that elevations of cytosolic Ca(2+) rearranges MICU1 multimers with an EC50 of 4.4 μM, resulting in activation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. MICU1 rearrangement essentially requires the EF-hand motifs and strictly correlates with the shape of cytosolic Ca(2+) rises. We further show that rearrangements of MICU1 multimers were independent of matrix Ca(2+) concentration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression levels of MCU and EMRE. Our experiments provide novel details about how MCU/EMRE is regulated by MICU1 and an original approach to investigate MCU/EMRE activation in intact cells.

  10. Effects of trimebutine on cytosolic Ca2+ and force transitions in intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Kobayashi, T; Tamaki, H

    1991-04-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on cytosolic free Ca2+ and force transitions in the guinea-pig taenia cecum were studied by fura-2 fluorometry and tension recording. The addition of 80 mM K+ induced a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension, followed by a sustained increase. Trimebutine (10 microM) suppressed both [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development. The tonic responses were more potently inhibited than the phasic responses. Phasic components gradually increased as the added K+ increased (10-40 mM). The relationship between the peak increases in [Ca2+]i and tension was not affected by trimebutine (10 microM). This means that trimebutine does not affect the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile elements. In a high K+ and Ca(2+)-free medium, carbachol (10 microM) or caffeine (30 mM) caused transient [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development in the smooth muscle. Trimebutine (10 microM) decreased the amplitude of both responses. Trimebutine (10 microM) inhibited the spontaneous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and motility of taenia cecum in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.3 microM). These results suggest that trimebutine has two types of inhibitory actions on intestinal smooth muscle; one, the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels, and the other, the inhibition of Ca2+ release from intracellular storage sites. PMID:1868878

  11. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  12. Doxorubicin Regulates Autophagy Signals via Accumulation of Cytosolic Ca2+ in Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hye; Choi, Sung Hyun; Kim, Hyungtae; Ji, Seung Taek; Jang, Woong Bi; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang Mo

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOXO) is widely used to treat solid tumors. However, its clinical use is limited by side effects including serious cardiotoxicity due to cardiomyocyte damage. Resident cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) act as key regulators of homeostasis in myocardial cells. However, little is known about the function of hCPCs in DOXO-induced cardiotoxicity. In this study, we found that DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is closely related to calcium-related autophagy signaling and was significantly attenuated by blocking mTOR signaling in human hCPCs. DOXO induced hCPC apoptosis with reduction of SMP30 (regucalcin) and autophagosome marker LC3, as well as remarkable induction of the autophagy-related markers, Beclin-1, APG7, and P62/SQSTM1 and induction of calcium-related molecules, CaM (Calmodulin) and CaMKII (Calmodulin kinase II). The results of an LC3 puncta assay further indicated that DOXO reduced autophagosome formation via accumulation of cytosolic Ca2+. Additionally, DOXO significantly induced mTOR expression in hCPCs, and inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin, a specific inhibitor, rescued DOXO-mediated autophagosome depletion in hCPCs with significant reduction of DOXO-mediated cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in hCPCs, and restored SMP30 and mTOR expression. Thus, DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is linked to Ca2+-related autophagy signaling, and inhibition of mTOR signaling may provide a cardio-protective effect against DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity. PMID:27735842

  13. Cytosolic triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathway in oilseeds. Molecular cloning and expression of peanut cytosolic diacylglycerol acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Saha, Saikat; Enugutti, Balaji; Rajakumari, Sona; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2006-08-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are the most important storage form of energy for eukaryotic cells. TAG biosynthetic activity was identified in the cytosolic fraction of developing peanut (Arachis hypogaea) cotyledons. This activity was NaF insensitive and acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dependent. Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyzes the final step in TAG biosynthesis that acylates diacylglycerol to TAG. Soluble DGAT was identified from immature peanuts and purified by conventional column chromatographic procedures. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 41 +/- 1.0 kD. Based on the partial peptide sequence, a degenerate probe was used to obtain the full-length cDNA. The isolated gene shared less than 10% identity with the previously identified DGAT1 and 2 families, but has 13% identity with the bacterial bifunctional wax ester/DGAT. To differentiate the unrelated families, we designate the peanut gene as AhDGAT. Expression of peanut cDNA in Escherichia coli resulted in the formation of labeled TAG and wax ester from [14C]acetate. The recombinant E. coli showed high levels of DGAT activity but no wax ester synthase activity. TAGs were localized in transformed cells with Nile blue A and oil red O staining. The recombinant and native DGAT was specific for 1,2-diacylglycerol and did not utilize hexadecanol, glycerol-3-phosphate, monoacylglycerol, lysophosphatidic acid, and lysophosphatidylcholine. Oleoyl-CoA was the preferred acyl donor as compared to palmitoyl- and stearoyl-CoAs. These data suggest that the cytosol is one of the sites for TAG biosynthesis in oilseeds. The identified pathway may present opportunities of bioengineering oil-yielding plants for increased oil production.

  14. Calcium homeostasis in barley aleurone

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.

    1990-02-21

    Under the auspices of the Department of Energy we investigated calcium homeostasis in aleurone cells of barley. This investigation was initiated to explore the role played by extracellular Ca{sup 2+} in gibberellic acid (GA)-induced synthesis and secretion of hydrolases in the aleurone layer. We have focused our attention on four topics that relate to the role of Ca{sup 2+} in regulating the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase. First, we determined the stoichiometry of Ca{sup 2+} binding to the two principal classes of barley {alpha}-amylase and examined some of the biochemical and physical properties of the native and Ca{sup 2+}-depleted forms of the enzyme. Second, since {alpha}-amylase is a Ca{sup 2+} containing metalloenzyme that binds one atom of Ca{sup 2+} per molecule, we developed methods to determine the concentration of Ca{sup 2+} in the cytosol of the aleurone cell. We developed a technique for introducing Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive dyes into aleurone protoplasts that allows the measurement of Ca{sup 2+} in both cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Third, because the results of our Ca{sup 2+} measurements showed higher levels of Ca{sup 2+} in the ER than in the cytosol, we examined Ca{sup 2+} transport into the ER of control and GA-treated aleurone tissue. And fourth, we applied the technique of patch-clamping to the barley aleurone protoplast to examine ion transport at the plasma membrane. Our results with the patch-clamp technique established the presence of K{sup +} channels in the plasma membrane of the aleurone protoplast, and they showed that this cell is ideally suited for the application of this methodology for studying ion transport. 34 refs.

  15. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture.

    PubMed

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-09-18

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines.

  16. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  17. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  18. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  19. Agonist activation of cytosolic Ca2+ in subfornical organ cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. F.; Beltz, T. G.; Sharma, R. V.; Xu, Z.; Bhatty, R. A.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is sensitive to both ANG II and ACh, and local application of these agents produces dipsogenic responses and vasopressin release. The present study examined the effects of cholinergic drugs, ANG II, and increased extracellular osmolarity on dissociated, cultured cells of the SFO that were retrogradely labeled from the supraoptic nucleus. The effects were measured as changes in cytosolic calcium in fura 2-loaded cells by using a calcium imaging system. Both ACh and carbachol increased intracellular ionic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). However, in contrast to the effects of muscarinic receptor agonists on SFO neurons, manipulation of the extracellular osmolality produced no effects, and application of ANG II produced only moderate effects on [Ca2+]i in a few retrogradely labeled cells. The cholinergic effects on [Ca2+]i could be blocked with the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and with the more selective muscarinic receptor antagonists pirenzepine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperdine methiodide (4-DAMP). In addition, the calcium in the extracellular fluid was required for the cholinergic-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These findings indicate that ACh acts to induce a functional cellular response in SFO neurons through action on a muscarinic receptor, probably of the M1 subtype and that the increase of [Ca2+]i, at least initially, requires the entry of extracellular Ca2+. Also, consistent with a functional role of M1 receptors in the SFO are the results of immunohistochemical preparations demonstrating M1 muscarinic receptor-like protein present within this forebrain circumventricular organ.

  20. Calcium calmodulin and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, B L; Walker, S W; Tomlinson, S

    1985-08-01

    influence the activity of calmodulin itself in membranes and in cytosol. Berridge (1982) and Rasmussen (1980) give detailed accounts and review current hypotheses regarding relationships between the cyclic nucleotide and calcium second messenger systems. The various possible interrelationships of the putative messengers have been encompassed by the term 'Synarchic regulation' (Rasmussen, 1980). These concepts and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which cyclic AMP and calcium are involved in the control of secretion from particular cell types will make fascinating reading over the next few years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2996810

  1. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  2. Antiperiodic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Joana G.; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of regular and irregular patterns in nonlinear oscillators is an outstanding problem in physics and in all natural sciences. In general, regularity is understood as tantamount to periodicity. However, there is now a flurry of works proving the existence of “antiperiodicity”, an unfamiliar type of regularity. Here we report the experimental observation and numerical corroboration of antiperiodic oscillations. In contrast to the isolated solutions presently known, we report infinite hierarchies of antiperiodic waveforms that can be tuned continuously and that form wide spiral-shaped stability phases in the control parameter plane. The waveform complexity increases towards the focal point common to all spirals, a key hub interconnecting them all. PMID:23739041

  3. FEL Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2003-05-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. More than 30 FEL oscillators are presently operating around the world spanning a wavelength range from the mm region to the ultraviolet using DC and rf linear accelerators and storage rings as electron sources. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high micropulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. Substantial user programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few.

  4. Neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mark

    2002-05-15

    The wave theory of light, and in particular the principle of interference, was formulated by Thomas Young in 1801. In the 20th century, the principle of interference was extended to the quantum mechanical wave functions describing matter. The phenomenon of quantum mechanical interference of different neutrino states, neutrino oscillations, has provided one of the most exciting developments in high energy particle physics of the last decade. Observations of the flavour oscillations of neutrinos produced by distant sources, such as from the core of the Sun, provide compelling evidence that neutrinos have mass. This article describes the main features and the most significant experimental observations of this unusual application of the principle of interference.

  5. Spike oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzle, J. Mark; Uggla, Claes; Lim, Woei Chet

    2012-11-01

    According to Belinskiǐ, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz (BKL), a generic spacelike singularity is characterized by asymptotic locality: Asymptotically, toward the singularity, each spatial point evolves independently from its neighbors, in an oscillatory manner that is represented by a sequence of Bianchi type I and II vacuum models. Recent investigations support this conjecture but with a modification: Apart from local BKL behavior there also exists formation of spatial structures (“spikes”) at, and in the neighborhood of, certain spatial surfaces that break asymptotic locality; the complete description of a generic spacelike singularity involves spike oscillations, which are described by sequences of Bianchi type I and certain inhomogeneous vacuum models. In this paper we describe how BKL and spike oscillations arise from concatenations of exact solutions in a Hubble-normalized state space setting, suggesting the existence of hidden symmetries and showing that the results of BKL are part of a greater picture.

  6. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  7. The Arabidopsis Cytosolic Ribosomal Proteome: From form to Function

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic ribosomal proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana has been studied intensively by a range of proteomics approaches and is now one of the most well characterized eukaryotic ribosomal proteomes. Plant cytosolic ribosomes are distinguished from other eukaryotic ribosomes by unique proteins, unique post-translational modifications and an abundance of ribosomal proteins for which multiple divergent paralogs are expressed and incorporated. Study of the A. thaliana ribosome has now progressed well beyond a simple cataloging of protein parts and is focused strongly on elucidating the functions of specific ribosomal proteins, their paralogous isoforms and covalent modifications. This review summarises current knowledge concerning the Arabidopsis cytosolic ribosomal proteome and highlights potentially fruitful areas of future research in this fast moving and important area. PMID:23459595

  8. Lipid Biosynthesis Coordinates a Mitochondrial-to-Cytosolic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Eui; Grant, Ana Rodrigues; Simic, Milos S; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Nomura, Daniel K; Durieux, Jenni; Riera, Celine E; Sanchez, Melissa; Kapernick, Erik; Wolff, Suzanne; Dillin, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Defects in mitochondrial metabolism have been increasingly linked with age-onset protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's. In response to protein-folding stress, compartment-specific unfolded protein responses (UPRs) within the ER, mitochondria, and cytosol work in parallel to ensure cellular protein homeostasis. While perturbation of individual compartments can make other compartments more susceptible to protein stress, the cellular conditions that trigger cross-communication between the individual UPRs remain poorly understood. We have uncovered a conserved, robust mechanism linking mitochondrial protein homeostasis and the cytosolic folding environment through changes in lipid homeostasis. Metabolic restructuring caused by mitochondrial stress or small-molecule activators trigger changes in gene expression coordinated uniquely by both the mitochondrial and cytosolic UPRs, protecting the cell from disease-associated proteins. Our data suggest an intricate and unique system of communication between UPRs in response to metabolic changes that could unveil new targets for diseases of protein misfolding. PMID:27610574

  9. Control of cytosolic free calcium in rat and chicken osteoclasts. The role of extracellular calcium and calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Malgaroli, A; Meldolesi, J; Zallone, A Z; Teti, A

    1989-08-25

    Single cell [Ca2+], studies were performed in chicken and rat osteoclasts loaded with fura-2 and exposed to a variety of treatments. Under resting conditions, basal [Ca2+]i, was 79.2 +/- 47.3 and 84.3 +/- 65.7 nM (averages +/- S.D.; n = 141 and 126) in the osteoclasts of the two species, respectively. Basal [Ca2+]i was stable in all rat and in approximately 80% of chicken osteoclasts. In the remaining 20%, spontaneous, irregular [Ca2+], fluctuations were observed (amplitude range: 50-200 nm over basal values). Increase of [Ca2+]o over the concentration of the Krebs-Ringer incubation medium (2 mM) induced rises of [Ca2+] in almost all cells investigated. [Ca2+] rises were already appreciable with 0.5 mM [Ca2+]o additions and reached high values with 4 mM additions: 390 +/- 113 and 364 +/- 214 nM [Ca2+], in rat and chicken osteoclasts, respectively (n = 122 and 101). Qualitatively, the responses to [Ca2+]o additions consisted of discrete [Ca2+]i transients, biphasic (an initial spike followed by a plateau), or monophasic (either the spike or the plateau). In a few chicken osteoclasts, the [Ca2+]i increase occurring after [Ca2+]o addition consisted of multiple, irregular fluctuations, similar to those observed in 20% of these cells under resting conditions. In individual osteoclasts subsequently exposed to multiple [Ca2+]o increase pulses, the type of the [Ca2+]i transient (mono- or biphasic) was maintained, and the size was dependent on the magnitude of the [Ca2+]o additions. Effects similar to those of [Ca2+]o were induced by the addition of Cd2+ or Ba2+ (but not La3+ or Mg2+) into the medium. The Cd2+ effect was maintained in part even in a Ca2+-free medium. Of various hormones and factors, parathormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and prostaglandin E2 were inactive. In contrast, calcitonin was active in rat osteoclasts (which express numerous receptors). [Ca2+]i increases were small (19 +/- 17.9 nM; n = 21) when the hormone was administered alone; they were synergistic (severalfold potentiation) when the hormone was administered before or after [Ca2+]o. The [Ca2+]i effects of calcitonin were mimicked by 8Br-cAMP (31 +/- 26 nM; n = 12) when the nucleotide was administered alone; marked synergism when it was administered in combination with [Ca2+]o. This paper demonstrates for the first time that changes of [Ca2+]i are induced in osteoclasts by treatments with [Ca2+]o and calcitonin and can therefore be involved in intracellular mediation of the physiological effects of these two extracellular signals.

  10. Calmidazolium evokes high calcium fluctuations in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Budu, Alexandre; Gomes, Mayrim M; Melo, Pollyana M; El Chamy Maluf, Sarah; Bagnaresi, Piero; Azevedo, Mauro F; Carmona, Adriana K; Gazarini, Marcos L

    2016-03-01

    Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) are important players in eukaryote cell signaling. In the present study, by using a knockin approach, we demonstrated the expression and localization of CaM in all erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Under extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions, calmidazolium (CZ), a potent CaM inhibitor, promoted a transient cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase in isolated trophozoites, indicating that CZ mobilizes intracellular sources of calcium. In the same extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions, the [Ca(2+)]cyt rise elicited by CZ treatment was ~3.5 fold higher when the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store was previously depleted ruling out the mobilization of calcium from the ER by CZ. The effects of the Ca(2+)/H(+) ionophore ionomycin (ION) and the Na(+)/H(+) ionophore monensin (MON) suggest that the [Ca(2+)]cyt-increasing effect of CZ is driven by the removal of Ca(2+) from at least one Ca(2+)-CaM-related (CaMR) protein as well as by the mobilization of Ca(2+) from intracellular acidic calcium stores. Moreover, we showed that the mitochondrion participates in the sequestration of the cytosolic Ca(2+) elicited by CZ. Finally, the modulation of membrane Ca(2+) channels by CZ and thapsigargin (THG) was demonstrated. The opened channels were blocked by the unspecific calcium channel blocker Co(2+) but not by 2-APB (capacitative calcium entry inhibitor) or nifedipine (L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor). Taken together, the results suggested that one CaMR protein is an important modulator of calcium signaling and homeostasis during the Plasmodium intraerythrocytic cell cycle, working as a relevant intracellular Ca(2+) reservoir in the parasite.

  11. Understanding anomalous delays in a model of intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Emily; Kirk, Vivien; Osinga, Hinke M.; Sneyd, James; Wechselberger, Martin

    2010-12-01

    In many cell types, oscillations in the concentration of free intracellular calcium ions are used to control a variety of cellular functions. It has been suggested [J. Sneyd et al., "A method for determining the dependence of calcium oscillations on inositol trisphosphate oscillations," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 1675-1680 (2006)] that the mechanisms underlying the generation and control of such oscillations can be determined by means of a simple experiment, whereby a single exogenous pulse of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) is applied to the cell. However, more detailed mathematical investigations [M. Domijan et al., "Dynamical probing of the mechanisms underlying calcium oscillations," J. Nonlinear Sci. 16, 483-506 (2006)] have shown that this is not necessarily always true, and that the experimental data are more difficult to interpret than first thought. Here, we use geometric singular perturbation techniques to study the dynamics of models that make different assumptions about the mechanisms underlying the calcium oscillations. In particular, we show how recently developed canard theory for singularly perturbed systems with three or more slow variables [M. Wechselberger, "A propos de canards (Apropos canards)," Preprint, 2010] applies to these calcium models and how the presence of a curve of folded singularities and corresponding canards can result in anomalous delays in the response of these models to a pulse of IP3.

  12. Hypoxia promotes relaxation of bovine coronary arteries through lowering cytosolic NADPH.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Sachin A; Wolin, Michael S

    2006-06-01

    Hypoxia relaxes endothelium-denuded bovine coronary arteries (BCA) through mechanisms that do not appear to involve reactive oxygen species, prostaglandins, or nitric oxide. Because of similarities in the relaxation of BCA to hypoxia (Po(2) = 8-10 Torr) and inhibitors of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) including 6-aminonicotinamide and epiandrosterone, we measured NADPH and NADP and found that hypoxia caused NADPH oxidation (decreased NADPH/NADP). The relaxation to hypoxia was similar to previously reported properties of relaxation to PPP inhibitors in that both responses were associated with glutathione oxidation and depressed intracellular calcium release and calcium influx-mediated contractile responses. Inhibitors of potassium channels had minimal effects on these relaxation responses. Relaxation to hypoxia and PPP inhibitors were attenuated by a thiol reductant (3 mM dithiothreitol) and by eliciting contraction with an activator of protein kinase C (phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate). In the presence of contraction to U-46619, relaxation to hypoxia and PPP inhibitors were attenuated by the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump inhibitor 200 microM cyclopiazonic acid and by 10 mM pyruvate. Hypoxia decreased BCA levels of glucose-6-phosphate but not ATP. Pyruvate prevented the hypoxia-elicited decrease in glucose-6-phosphate and glutathione oxidation, and it increased NADPH levels under hypoxia to levels observed under normoxia. Thus hypoxia causes a metabolic stress on the PPP that promotes BCA relaxation through processes controlled by lowering the levels of cytosolic NADPH.

  13. Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 are activated during TNF priming of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Seeds, M C; Jones, D F; Chilton, F H; Bass, D A

    1998-01-23

    Cytokines alter neutrophil (PMN) function during inflammation, and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) in vitro primes PMN such that receptor-mediated stimulation causes markedly enhanced release of arachidonic acid. We hypothesized that two Ca(2+)-dependent PLA2's in PMN might be activated during priming of the cell, thus affecting arachidonate release. A low molecular weight, secretory PLA2 was identified by enzymatic activity in the cell free supernates of primed or stimulated PMN, and in PMN disrupted by nitrogen cavitation. The enzymatic activity was calcium-dependent, acid stable, destroyed by dithiothreitol, and blocked by anti-sPLA2 antibodies. TNF caused secretion of sPLA2 and also caused an increase in cell-associated sPLA2 enzymatic activity. Activation and release were maximal with fMLP stimulation of TNF-primed PMN. Neutrophils also contained a cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2) characterized by enzymatic activity which was calcium dependent, enhanced by dithiothreitol, and blocked by anti-cPLA2 antibody. TNF caused a doubling of cPLA2 enzymatic activity which was associated with phosphorylation of the enzyme as judged by a migration shift on Western blots. Thus, TNF priming of human PMN caused marked increase in fMLP stimulated AA release in parallel to enhanced activity of two different PLA2's.

  14. Increased cytosolic calcium stimulates exocytosis in bovine lactotrophs. Direct evidence from changes in membrane capacitance

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique has been used to measure changes in membrane capacitance (Cm) of bovine lactotrophs in order to monitor fluctuations in cell surface area associated with exo- and endocytosis. Cells were prepared by an enrichment procedure and cultured for up to 14 d before use. Under whole-cell recording, cell cytoplasm was dialyzed with various Ca2(+)-containing solutions. The resting Cm of 6.05 +/- 1.68 pF was found to correlate well with squared cell radius, suggesting a specific Cm of 0.8 microF/cm2. Discrete Cm steps of 2-10 fF were recorded, which most likely reflect single fusion and retrieval events of prolactin-containing granules (0.2-0.6 microns in diameter). High Ca2+ resulted in a Cm increase of 20-50% from the resting value, demonstrating a role for [Ca2+]i in stimulus-secretion coupling. Spontaneous Cm changes have also been recorded, which presumably reflect prolactin secretion supported by a tonic influx of Ca2+ through the membrane. This is supported by the following findings: addition of Co2+ diminished or reversed the spontaneous Cm changes and decreased resting [Ca2+]i; and membrane depolarization increased Cm, indicating the role of voltage-activated channels in stimulus-secretion coupling. As bovine lactotrophs have been found to be largely devoid of spontaneous electrical activity, a mechanism involving modulation of a tonic Ca2+ influx is proposed; this is shown to provide adequate control of basal and triggered secretion monitored by Cm. PMID:2037838

  15. Potential mechanisms of cytosolic calcium modulation in interferon-gamma treated U937 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Jon B.; Mcleish, Kenneth R.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Dean, William L.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) to alter cytoplasmic Ca(2+) content in the monocytelike cell line U937 was investigated, using a slow Ca-channel blocker, diltiazem. In addition, the Ca-ATPase and the Ca-uptake activities were measured in isolated U937 membranes, together with the effect of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) upon the Ca(2+) release from Ca-loaded membranes. The addition of 50 U/ml INF-gamma to U937 cultures was found to increase internal Ca(2+) by about 100 percent within 3 min. The increase was significantly reduced by incubation in Ca-free buffer or by the addition of diltiazem. A crude membrane preparation from U937 cells was found to contain significant amounts of Ca-ATPase activity and to sequester Ca(2+) to a level of 8 nmol/mg in 30 sec; the addition of IP3 induced release of a portion of the sequestered Ca(2+) which was then resequestered. The results suggest that IFN-gamma causes an increase of cytoplasmic Ca(2+), in part, by the IP3-induced release from the internal storage sites and, in part, from the entry of extracellular Ca through slow channels.

  16. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Amoroso, Salvatore; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  17. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  18. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  20. Male–female communication triggers calcium signatures during fertilization in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Philipp; Bleckmann, Andrea; Lausser, Andreas; Vogler, Frank; Ott, Thomas; Ehrhardt, David W.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Sprunck, Stefanie; Dresselhaus, Thomas; Grossmann, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Cell–cell communication and interaction is critical during fertilization and triggers free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyto) as a key signal for egg activation and a polyspermy block in animal oocytes. Fertilization in flowering plants is more complex, involving interaction of a pollen tube with egg adjoining synergid cells, culminating in release of two sperm cells and their fusion with the egg and central cell, respectively. Here, we report the occurrence and role of [Ca2+]cyto signals during the entire double fertilization process in Arabidopsis. [Ca2+]cyto oscillations are initiated in synergid cells after physical contact with the pollen tube apex. In egg and central cells, a short [Ca2+]cyto transient is associated with pollen tube burst and sperm cell arrival. A second extended [Ca2+]cyto transient solely in the egg cell is correlated with successful fertilization. Thus, each female cell type involved in double fertilization displays a characteristic [Ca2+]cyto signature differing by timing and behaviour from [Ca2+]cyto waves reported in mammals. PMID:25145880

  1. The Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter: Mice can live and die without it

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Josephine L; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is of critical importance to mitochondrial and cell function, and calcium signaling is highly localized in the cell. When stimulated, mitochondria are capable of rapidly taking up calcium, affecting both matrix energetics within mitochondria and shaping the amplitude and frequency of cytosolic calcium “waves”. During pathological conditions a large increase in mitochondrial calcium levels is thought to activate the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, resulting in cell death. The protein responsible for mitochondrial calcium uptake, the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), was identified in 2011 and its molecular elucidation has stimulated and invigorated research in this area. MCU knockout mice have been created, a variety of other regulators have been identified, and a disease phenotype in humans has been attributed to the loss of a uniporter regulator. In the three years since its molecular elucidation, further research into the MCU has revealed a complex uniporter, and raised many questions about its physiologic and pathologic cell roles. PMID:25451167

  2. Calcium signaling and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kass, G E; Orrenius, S

    1999-01-01

    The divalent calcium cation Ca(2+) is used as a major signaling molecule during cell signal transduction to regulate energy output, cellular metabolism, and phenotype. The basis to the signaling role of Ca(2+) is an intricate network of cellular channels and transporters that allow a low resting concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol of the cell ([Ca(2+)]i) but that are also coupled to major dynamic and rapidly exchanging stores. This enables extracellular signals from hormones and growth factors to be transduced as [Ca(2+)]i spikes that are amplitude and frequency encoded. There is considerable evidence that a number of toxic environmental chemicals target these Ca(2+) signaling processes, alter them, and induce cell death by apoptosis. Two major pathways for apoptosis will be considered. The first one involves Ca(2+)-mediated expression of ligands that bind to and activate death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1). In the second pathway, Ca(2+) has a direct toxic effect and its primary targets include the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mitochondria may respond to an apoptotic Ca(2+) signal by the selective release of cytochrome c or through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and opening of an inner mitochondrial membrane pore. Toxic agents such as the environmental pollutant tributyltin or the natural plant product thapsigargin, which deplete the ER Ca(2+) stores, will induce as a direct result of this effect the opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and an ER stress response. In contrast, under some conditions, Ca(2+) signals may be cytoprotective and antagonize the apoptotic machinery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10229704

  3. The origin of cytosolic ATP in photosynthetic cells.

    PubMed

    Gardeström, Per; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-07-01

    In photosynthetically active cells, both chloroplasts and mitochondria have the capacity to produce ATP via photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. Thus, theoretically, both organelles could provide ATP for the cytosol, but the extent, to which they actually do this, and how the process is regulated, both remain unclear. Most of the evidence discussed comes from experiments with rapid fractionation of isolated protoplasts subjected to different treatments in combination with application of specific inhibitors. The results obtained indicate that, under conditions where ATP demand for photosynthetic CO2 fixation is sufficiently high, the mitochondria supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. In contrast, under stress conditions where CO2 fixation is severely limited, ATP will build up in chloroplasts and it can then be exported to the cytosol, by metabolite shuttle mechanisms. Thus, depending on the conditions, either mitochondria or chloroplasts can supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. This supply of ATP is discussed in relation to the idea that mitochondrial functions may be tuned to provide an optimal environment for the chloroplast. By balancing cellular redox states, mitochondria can contribute to an optimal photosynthetic capacity. PMID:27087668

  4. Shared and Distinct Mechanisms of Compartmentalized and Cytosolic Ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Leroux, Michel R

    2015-12-01

    Most motile and all non-motile (also known as primary) eukaryotic cilia possess microtubule-based axonemes that are assembled at the cell surface to form hair-like or more elaborate compartments endowed with motility and/or signaling functions. Such compartmentalized ciliogenesis depends on the core intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery and the associated Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) for dynamic delivery of ciliary components. The transition zone (TZ), an ultrastructurally complex barrier or 'gate' at the base of cilia, also contributes to the formation of compartmentalized cilia. Yet, some ciliated protists do not have IFT components and, like some metazoan spermatozoa, use IFT-independent mechanisms to build axonemes exposed to the cytosol. Moreover, various ciliated protists lack TZ components, whereas Drosophila sperm surprisingly requires the activity of dynamically localized TZ proteins for cytosolic ciliogenesis. Here, we discuss the various ways eukaryotes use IFT and/or TZ proteins to generate the wide assortment of compartmentalized and cytosolic cilia observed in nature. Consideration of the different ciliogenesis pathways allows us to propose how three types of cytosol-exposed cilia (primary, secondary and tertiary), including cilia found in the human sperm proximal segment, are likely generated by evolutionary derivations of compartmentalized ciliogenesis.

  5. Further progress in cytosolic cellular delivery of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeneman Gemmill, Kelly; Delehanty, James B.; Stewart, Michael H.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Huston, Alan; Medintz, Igor

    2012-03-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in using bioconjugated nanoparticles for in vivo imaging, biosensing and theranostics. Luminescent CdSe/ZnS core shell semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have unique optical properties and bioconjugation capabilities that make them ideal prototypes for these purposes. We have previously described the metal-affinity association between the imidazole groups of terminal hexahistidine residues of peptides and proteins and the ZnS shell of quantum dots as a useful bioconjugation technique. We have also demonstrated that QDs labeled with an oligohistidine-tagged cell penetrating peptide (CPP) derived from the HIV TAT-protein could undergo specific endocytosis-mediated cellular uptake in both HEK293T/17 and COS-1 cells. However, the QDs were predominantly sequestered in the endosomes. This remains a significant hindrance to future potential cellular imaging applications which require the QDs to access other subcellular organelles. Here we describe the testing of several cytosolic QD delivery modalities including microinjection, the commercial cytosolic delivery agent PULSin, and the cytosolic delivery peptide Palm-1. Palm-1, a palmitylated peptide that is capable of both cellular uptake and rapid endosomal escape in multiple cell lines without concomitant toxicity, is shown to be the superior method for cytosolic delivery of QDs. Potential intracellular applications for this peptide are discussed.

  6. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  7. Calcium in the regulation of gravitropism by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; LaFavre, A. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    The red light requirement for positive gravitropism in roots of corn (Zea mays cv "Merit") provides an entry for examining the participation of calcium in gravitropism. Applications of calcium chelators inhibit the light response. Calcium channel blockers (verapamil, lanthanum) can also inhibit the light response, and a calcium ionophore, A23187, can substitute for light. One can substitute for red light by treatments which have elsewhere been shown to trigger Ca2+ influx into the cytosol, e.g. heat or cold shock. Agents which are known to be agonists of the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system (serotonin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, deoxycholate) can each partially substitute for the red light, and Li+ can inhibit the light effect. These experiments suggest that the induction of positive gravitropism by red light involves a rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and that a contribution to this end may be made by the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system.

  8. Ryanodine receptor gating controls generation of diastolic calcium waves in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Petrovič, Pavol; Valent, Ivan; Cocherová, Elena; Pavelková, Jana; Zahradníková, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    The role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating in the initiation and propagation of calcium waves was investigated using a mathematical model comprising a stochastic description of RyR gating and a deterministic description of calcium diffusion and sequestration. We used a one-dimensional array of equidistantly spaced RyR clusters, representing the confocal scanning line, to simulate the formation of calcium sparks. Our model provided an excellent description of the calcium dependence of the frequency of diastolic calcium sparks and of the increased tendency for the production of calcium waves after a decrease in cytosolic calcium buffering. We developed a hypothesis relating changes in the propensity to form calcium waves to changes of RyR gating and tested it by simulation. With a realistic RyR gating model, increased ability of RyR to be activated by Ca2+ strongly increased the propensity for generation of calcium waves at low (0.05-0.1-µM) calcium concentrations but only slightly at high (0.2-0.4-µM) calcium concentrations. Changes in RyR gating altered calcium wave formation by changing the calcium sensitivity of spontaneous calcium spark activation and/or the average number of open RyRs in spontaneous calcium sparks. Gating changes that did not affect RyR activation by Ca2+ had only a weak effect on the propensity to form calcium waves, even if they strongly increased calcium spark frequency. Calcium waves induced by modulating the properties of the RyR activation site could be suppressed by inhibiting the spontaneous opening of the RyR. These data can explain the increased tendency for production of calcium waves under conditions when RyR gating is altered in cardiac diseases.

  9. PMCA4 (ATP2B4) mutation in familial spastic paraplegia causes delay in intracellular calcium extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Pang, Shirley Yin-Yu; Li, Miaoxin; Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2015-01-01

    Background Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized primarily by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. More than 50 disease loci have been described with different modes of inheritance. Recently, we described a novel missense mutation (c.803G>A, p.R268Q) in the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA4, or ATP2B4) gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant FSP. Further to this finding, here we describe the functional effect of this mutation. Methods As PMCA4 removes cytosolic calcium, we measured transient changes and the time-dependent decay of cytosolic calcium level as visualized by using fura-2 fluorescent dye with confocal microscopy in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells overexpressing either wild-type or R268Q mutant PMCA4. Results Overexpressing both wild-type and R268Q PMCA4 significantly reduced maximum calcium surge after KCl-induced depolarization as compared with vector control cells. However, cells overexpressing mutant PMCA4 protein demonstrated significantly higher level of calcium surge when compared with wild-type. Furthermore, the steady-state cytosolic calcium concentration in these mutant cells remained markedly higher than the wild-type after SERCA inhibition by thapsigargin. Conclusion Our result showed that p.R268Q mutation in PMCA4 resulted in functional changes in calcium homeostasis in human neuronal cells. This suggests that calcium dysregulation may be associated with the pathogenesis of FSP. PMID:25798335

  10. Reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage underlies the reduced vulnerability of excitotoxicity-tolerant hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Watts, Charlotte A; Brantner, Christine A; Smith, Carolyn L; Andrews, S Brian

    2008-03-01

    In central neurons, over-stimulation of NMDA receptors leads to excessive mitochondrial calcium accumulation and damage, which is a critical step in excitotoxic death. This raises the possibility that low susceptibility to calcium overload-induced mitochondrial damage might characterize excitotoxicity-resistant neurons. In this study, we have exploited two complementary models of preconditioning-induced excitotoxicity resistance to demonstrate reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage in NMDA-tolerant hippocampal neurons. We have further identified adaptations in mitochondrial calcium handling that account for enhanced mitochondrial integrity. In both models, enhanced tolerance was associated with improved preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential and structure. In the first model, which exhibited modest neuroprotection, mitochondria-dependent calcium deregulation was delayed, even though cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium loads were quantitatively unchanged, indicating that enhanced mitochondrial calcium capacity accounts for reduced injury. In contrast, the second model, which exhibited strong neuroprotection, displayed further delayed calcium deregulation and reduced mitochondrial damage because downregulation of NMDA receptor surface expression depressed calcium loading. Reducing calcium entry also modified the chemical composition of the calcium-buffering precipitates that form in calcium-loaded mitochondria. It thus appears that reduced mitochondrial calcium loading is a major factor underlying the robust neuroprotection seen in highly tolerant cells. PMID:18036152

  11. Structure and functions of plant calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Klimecka, Maria; Muszyńska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    Calcium ions as second messengers play an essential role in many important cellular processes. In plants, transient changes in calcium content in the cytosol (calcium signatures) have been observed during growth, development and under stress conditions. Such diverse functions require many different calcium sensors. One of the largest and most differentiated group of calcium sensors are protein kinases, among them calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) which were identified only in plants and protists. CDPKs have a regulatory domain which is able to bind calcium ions. For regulation of CDPKs activities not only calcium ions but also specific phospholipids and autophosphorylation are responsible. CDPKs have many different substrates, which reflects the diversity of their functions. Potential protein substrates of CDPK are involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, phospholipid synthesis, defense responses, ion and water transport, cytoskeleton organization, transcription and hormone responses. Presently, participation of CDPKs in stress signal transduction pathways (e.g., cold, drought, high salinity, wounding) is intensively studied in many laboratories. An intriguing, but still not fully clarified problem is the cross-talk via CDPKs among different signaling pathways that enables signal integration at different levels and ensure appropriate downstream responses.

  12. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  13. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  14. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  15. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  16. Mechanism and evolution of calcium transport across the plant plasma membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient, thus the influx of Ca(2+) into plant cells is a critical process. In addition, the efflux of Ca(2+) out of a cell is important to prevent toxicity resulting from Ca(2+) excess, and to modulate levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) required for signaling functions. Bioc...

  17. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  18. Interfacial membrane docking of cytosolic phospholipase A2 C2 domain using electrostatic potential-modulated spin relaxation magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Andy; Nielsen, Robert; Gelb, Michael H.; Robinson, Bruce H.

    1999-01-01

    The C2 domain of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (C2cPLA2) plays an important role in calcium-dependent transfer of the protein from the cytosol to internal cellular membranes as a prelude for arachidonate release from membrane phospholipids. By using a recently developed electron paramagnetic resonance approach together with 13 site-specifically nitroxide spin labeled C2cPLA2s and membrane-permeant and -impermeant spin relaxants, we have determined the orientation of C2cPLA2 with respect to the surface of vesicles of the phospholipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphomethanol. The structure reveals that the two calcium-binding regions on C2cPLA2 that display hydrophobic residues, CBR1 and CBR3, are partially inserted into the core of the membrane. CBR2 that contains predominantly hydrophilic residues is close to the membrane but not inserted. The long axis of the cylindrical C2cPLA2 molecule is tilted with respect to the bilayer normal, which brings a cluster of basic protein residues close to the phospholipid headgroups. Such an orientation places the two bound calcium ions close to the membrane surface. All together, the results provide structural support for previous proposals that binding of C2cPLA2 to the membrane interface is driven in part by insertion of hydrophobic surface loops into the membrane core. The results are contrasted with previous studies of the interfacial binding of the first C2 domain of synaptotagmin I, which has shorter surface loops that display basic residues for electrostatic interaction with the bilayer surface. PMID:10359764

  19. Stapled endosome disrupting alginate particles for cytosolic delivery of cations.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Abhinav P; Little, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Divalent cations, the most prevalent minerals in the body, are responsible for a wide variety of cellular functions including signaling, proliferation, differentiation and cell death, and therefore their transmembrane transportation is tightly regulated. Despite the importance of divalent cations in cell activity, there are currently no intracellular delivery methods for divalent cations or modulation of intracellular levels of minerals. Here, we describe endosome disrupting alginate nanoparticles termed Alginoketals, which can deliver divalent cations to the cytosol of the cells. Alginoketals are generated by crosslinking alginic acid with endosome disrupting ketals, and using divalent cations as the stapling or binding agent. We show that Alginoketals were able to deliver copper (II) in the cytosol of the cancer cells thereby disrupting copper homeostasis and inducing cell death via accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. Alginoketal-copper (II)-based particles act as superoxide dismutase mimics and are the first class of divalent cation delivery vehicles, with potential application in cancer therapy, regenerative medicine and drug delivery.

  20. [Chronic kidney disease and cellular calcium homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Lajdová, I; Okša, A; Spustová, A; Dzúrik, R

    2012-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium represents a critical signaling mediator in a number of biological systems. Calcium cations (Ca2+) are an important ubiquitous messenger, controlling a broad range of cellular processes. Free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is controlled by mechanisms that regulate Ca2+ entry from the extracellular space and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, and by the activity of ATP-dependent Ca2+ pumps and antiporters that move Ca2+ back into stores or out of cells. Chronic kidney disease is associated with a significant elevation in [Ca2+]i which is toxic to the cells and may be responsible for a multiple organ dysfunction. Disturbances in cellular calcium homeostasis in patients with chronic kidney disease represent a complex process. Our studies elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms of altered cellular calcium homeostasis in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells which represent the model of nonexcitable cells in patients with chronic kidney disease. The results demonstrate that [Ca2+]i is significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells already in early stages of chronic kidney disease. The calcium concentration of intracellular stores and the capacitative calcium entry into the cells of these patients are significantly higher in comparison with healthy volunteers. Also the pore-forming P2X7 receptors participate in increased [Ca2+]i in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with chronic kidney disease. An altered P2X7 receptor function and increased P2X7 receptor expression may contribute to the complex disturbances in intracellular calcium homeostasis in chronic kidney disease. On the other hand, the activity of plasmatic membrane Ca2+-ATPases which is responsible for removing excessive calcium out of the cell, was found to be decreased by 25 % when compared to healthy subjects. It means that not only the mechanisms of entry, but also of the removal are impaired by the disease. All these alterations in

  1. Signaling in the plant cytosol: cysteine or sulfide?

    PubMed

    Gotor, Cecilia; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Aroca, Ángeles; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C

    2015-10-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is the first organic compound containing reduced sulfur that is synthesized in the last stage of plant photosynthetic assimilation of sulfate. It is a very important metabolite not only because it is crucial for the structure, function and regulation of proteins but also because it is the precursor molecule of an enormous number of sulfur-containing metabolites essential for plant health and development. The biosynthesis of Cys is accomplished by the sequential reaction of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)synthase (OASTL). In Arabidopsis thaliana, the analysis of specific mutants of members of the SAT and OASTL families has demonstrated that the cytosol is the compartment where the bulk of Cys synthesis takes place and that the cytosolic OASTL enzyme OAS-A1 is the responsible enzyme. Another member of the OASTL family is DES1, a novel L-cysteine desulfhydrase that catalyzes the desulfuration of Cys to produce sulfide, thus acting in a manner opposite to that of OAS-A1. Detailed studies of the oas-a1 and des1 null mutants have revealed the involvement of the DES1 and OAS-A1 proteins in coordinate regulation of Cys homeostasis and the generation of sulfide in the cytosol for signaling purposes. Thus, the levels of Cys in the cytosol strongly affect plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress conditions, while sulfide specifically generated from the degradation of Cys negatively regulates autophagy induced in different situations. In conclusion, modulation of the levels of Cys and sulfide is likely critical for plant performance.

  2. Labeling Cytosolic Targets in Live Cells with Blinking Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianmin; Chang, Jason; Yan, Qi; Dertinger, Thomas; Bruchez, Marcel; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of superresolution imaging methods, fast dynamic imaging of biological processes in live cells remains a challenge. A subset of these methods requires the cellular targets to be labeled with spontaneously blinking probes. The delivery and specific targeting of cytosolic targets and the control of the probes’ blinking properties are reviewed for three types of blinking probes: quantum dots, synthetic dyes, and fluorescent proteins. PMID:23930154

  3. Purification and characterization of protein Z from rabbit liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Vincent, S H; Holeman, B; Muller-Eberhard, U

    1985-10-30

    Protein Z was purified from rabbit liver cytosol by affinity chromatography on oleic acid-agarose and preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After removal of sodium dodecyl sulfate, the renatured protein was found to bind heme and bilirubin with a Kd of approximately 1 microM which produced large red shifts in their absorption spectra. On isoelectric focusing, rabbit protein Z exhibited two main bands with pI around 6.0.

  4. Inhibition of phospholipid methylation by a cytosolic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Chiva, V; Mato, J M

    1984-01-01

    Rat liver cytosol contains a heat-stable factor which inhibits phospholipid methylation by rat liver microsomes. The effect of this factor on lipid methylation was dose- and pH-dependent. This factor has an Mr of approx. 3200 as estimated by gel filtration. It could not be extracted by chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v), and its action was inhibited by incubation with subtilisin. PMID:6712636

  5. Light induced cytosolic drug delivery from liposomes with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Viitala, Lauri; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Laaksonen, Timo; Liang, Huamin; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Viitala, Tapani; Le Guével, Xavier; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2015-04-10

    Externally triggered drug release at defined targets allows site- and time-controlled drug treatment regimens. We have developed liposomal drug carriers with encapsulated gold nanoparticles for triggered drug release. Light energy is converted to heat in the gold nanoparticles and released to the lipid bilayers. Localized temperature increase renders liposomal bilayers to be leaky and triggers drug release. The aim of this study was to develop a drug releasing system capable of releasing its cargo to cell cytosol upon triggering with visible and near infrared light signals. The liposomes were formulated using either heat-sensitive or heat- and pH-sensitive lipid compositions with star or rod shaped gold nanoparticles. Encapsulated fluorescent probe, calcein, was released from the liposomes after exposure to the light. In addition, the pH-sensitive formulations showed a faster drug release in acidic conditions than in neutral conditions. The liposomes were internalized into human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and did not show any cellular toxicity. The light induced cytosolic delivery of calcein from the gold nanoparticle containing liposomes was shown, whereas no cytosolic release was seen without light induction or without gold nanoparticles in the liposomes. The light activated liposome formulations showed a controlled content release to the cellular cytosol at a specific location and time. Triggering with visual and near infrared light allows good tissue penetration and safety, and the pH-sensitive liposomes may enable selective drug release in the intracellular acidic compartments (endosomes, lysosomes). Thus, light activated liposomes with gold nanoparticles are an attractive option for time- and site-specific drug delivery into the target cells.

  6. Signaling in the plant cytosol: cysteine or sulfide?

    PubMed

    Gotor, Cecilia; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Aroca, Ángeles; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C

    2015-10-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is the first organic compound containing reduced sulfur that is synthesized in the last stage of plant photosynthetic assimilation of sulfate. It is a very important metabolite not only because it is crucial for the structure, function and regulation of proteins but also because it is the precursor molecule of an enormous number of sulfur-containing metabolites essential for plant health and development. The biosynthesis of Cys is accomplished by the sequential reaction of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)synthase (OASTL). In Arabidopsis thaliana, the analysis of specific mutants of members of the SAT and OASTL families has demonstrated that the cytosol is the compartment where the bulk of Cys synthesis takes place and that the cytosolic OASTL enzyme OAS-A1 is the responsible enzyme. Another member of the OASTL family is DES1, a novel L-cysteine desulfhydrase that catalyzes the desulfuration of Cys to produce sulfide, thus acting in a manner opposite to that of OAS-A1. Detailed studies of the oas-a1 and des1 null mutants have revealed the involvement of the DES1 and OAS-A1 proteins in coordinate regulation of Cys homeostasis and the generation of sulfide in the cytosol for signaling purposes. Thus, the levels of Cys in the cytosol strongly affect plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress conditions, while sulfide specifically generated from the degradation of Cys negatively regulates autophagy induced in different situations. In conclusion, modulation of the levels of Cys and sulfide is likely critical for plant performance. PMID:24990521

  7. Cytosolic Replication of Group A Streptococcus in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Alan M.; Thurston, Teresa L. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As key components of innate immune defense, macrophages are essential in controlling bacterial pathogens, including group A Streptococcus (GAS). Despite this, only a limited number of studies have analyzed the recovery of GAS from within human neutrophils and macrophages. Here, we determined the intracellular fate of GAS in human macrophages by using several quantitative approaches. In both U937 and primary human macrophages, the appearance over time of long GAS chains revealed that despite GAS-mediated cytotoxicity, replication occurred in viable, propidium iodide-negative macrophages. Whereas the major virulence factor M1 did not contribute to bacterial growth, a GAS mutant strain deficient in streptolysin O (SLO) was impaired for intracellular replication. SLO promoted bacterial escape from the GAS-containing vacuole (GCV) into the macrophage cytosol. Up to half of the cytosolic GAS colocalized with ubiquitin and p62, suggesting that the bacteria were targeted by the autophagy machinery. Despite this, live imaging of U937 macrophages revealed proficient replication of GAS after GCV rupture, indicating that escape from the GCV is important for growth of GAS in macrophages. Our results reveal that GAS can replicate within viable human macrophages, with SLO promoting GCV escape and cytosolic growth, despite the recruitment of autophagy receptors to bacteria. PMID:27073088

  8. A reaction-diffusion model of cytosolic hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joseph B; Langford, Troy F; Huang, Beijing K; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-01-01

    As a signaling molecule in mammalian cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determines the thiol/disulfide oxidation state of several key proteins in the cytosol. Localization is a key concept in redox signaling; the concentrations of signaling molecules within the cell are expected to vary in time and in space in manner that is essential for function. However, as a simplification, all theoretical studies of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and many experimental studies to date have treated the cytosol as a well-mixed compartment. In this work, we incorporate our previously reported reduced kinetic model of the network of reactions that metabolize hydrogen peroxide in the cytosol into a model that explicitly treats diffusion along with reaction. We modeled a bolus addition experiment, solved the model analytically, and used the resulting equations to quantify the spatiotemporal variations in intracellular H2O2 that result from this kind of perturbation to the extracellular H2O2 concentration. We predict that micromolar bolus additions of H2O2 to suspensions of HeLa cells (0.8 × 10(9)cells/l) result in increases in the intracellular concentration that are localized near the membrane. These findings challenge the assumption that intracellular concentrations of H2O2 are increased uniformly throughout the cell during bolus addition experiments and provide a theoretical basis for differing phenotypic responses of cells to intracellular versus extracellular perturbations to H2O2 levels.

  9. Diacylglycerol kinase activity in brain cytosol and microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, J.A.; Sun, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The ATP-dependent diacylglycerol (DG) kinase phosphorylated DG to form phosphatidic acids (PA). This enzymic conversion is particularly important in the receptor-mediated polyphosphoinositide metabolism. Controlling the DG level in synaptic membranes can also modulate the protein kinase activity within the cell. Using /sup 32/P-ATP, MgCl/sub 2/, NaF and heat treated membranes as substrate, DG-kinase activity was found in both cytosolic and microsomal fractions. Similarities in properties between the two kinase activities were noted. For example, activities in both fractions were stimulated by deoxycholate, and were inhibited by dibucaine and propranol. These results suggest that the microsomal and cytosolic DG-kinase(s) may belong to the same enzyme and that some intracellular factors may be responsible for regulation of the enzyme for interaction with membrane substrate. One of the factors tested was free fatty acid (FFA) which appeared to promote translocation of the cytosolic enzyme to the microsomes. Another factor for regulation is the availability of DG, which is formed via the poly-PI phosphodiesterase in synaptosomes and PA-phosphohydrolase in the microsomes (for de novo biosynthesis of phospholipids). Possible physiological significance of these regulatory mechanisms will be addressed.

  10. Acanthamoeba castellanii metabolites increase the intracellular calcium level and cause cytotoxicity in wish cells.

    PubMed

    Mattana, A; Bennardini, F; Usai, S; Fiori, P L; Franconi, F; Cappuccinelli, P

    1997-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that trophozoites of the pathogenic free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii rapidly lyse a variety of cells in vitro. However, the role played by cytolitic molecules that may participate in Acanthamoebal cytopathogenicity has yet to be completely elucidated. The aim of this work was to study whether soluble molecules released by A. castellanii trophozoites could induce cytopathic effect in human epithelial cells in vitro. The results obtained indicate that A. castellanii trophozoites constitutively elaborate and release soluble factors that immediately elicit a cytosolic free-calcium increase in target cells. This phenomenon is induced by low molecular weight amoebic metabolites and depends on a transmembrane influx of extracellular calcium. Morphological changes, cytoskeletal damage, cell death and cytolysis followed the elevation of cytosolic free-calcium levels. Calcium ions are very important for cell homeostasis, in fact, they control the functions of a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our results suggest that the substained elevation of the cytosolic free-calcium in response to A. castellanii metabolites might play a fundamental role in target cell damage during Acanthamoeba infections. PMID:9245619

  11. Regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 phosphorylation and eicosanoid production by colony-stimulating factor 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, X X; Rock, C O; Qiu, Z H; Leslie, C C; Jackowski, S

    1994-12-16

    A colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-dependent murine macrophage cell line (BAC1.2F5) and peritoneal macrophages were used to investigate the relationship between growth factor-dependent phosphorylation/activation of the 85-kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and arachidonic acid metabolism. The addition of CSF-1 to quiescent BAC1.2F5 cells was followed by the rapid phosphorylation, electrophoretic gel retardation, and stable increase in the specific activity of cPLA2 that correlated with the activation of ERK kinases. cPLA2 phosphorylation depended on the presence of growth factor and persisted throughout the cell cycle. CSF-1 inhibited prostaglandin E2 production and did not enhance arachidonic acid release or increase the levels of lysophosphatidylcholine or glycerophosphocholine. Treatment of BAC1.2F5 cells with the calcium ionophore A23187 plus CSF-1 did not stimulate eicosanoid release. Instead, CSF-1 enhanced the rate of exogenous arachidonic acid incorporation into phosphatidylcholine and its subsequent transfer to phosphatidylethanolamine suggesting that higher rates of arachidonic acid acylation may contribute to the suppression of prostaglandin production. In peritoneal macrophages, ERK kinase activity was stimulated and cPLA2 was phosphorylated and activated in response to CSF-1. However, CSF-1 did not trigger eicosanoid release but did augment arachidonic acid mobilization and prostaglandin E2 production elicited by zymosan and A23187. Thus, cPLA2 phosphorylation/activation and calcium mobilization are not the only determinants for eicosanoid release, and additional components in differentiated tissue macrophages are also required.

  12. Block of L-type calcium channels by charged dihydropyridines. Sensitivity to side of application and calcium

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have studied block of L-type calcium channels by intracellular and extracellular application of the ionized dihydropyridine derivatives amlodipine and SDZ 207-180. We find that extracellular application of either drug causes voltage-dependent block of calcium channels. However, neither drug is effective when applied intracellularly. The insensitivity of calcium channels to intracellular drug is not due to the low concentrations of cytosolic calcium, because voltage-dependent block by ionized amlodipine, SDZ 207-180, and the neutral drug nisoldipine persists under conditions in which Ca0 is buffered by EGTA. In fact, the time course of the development of block by the ionized but not neutral drug molecules studied, is slower in the presence than in the absence of calcium. Our results indicate that the DHP binding site of the L-type calcium channel is close to the extracellular surface of the cell membrane and that ionized DHP molecules may interact with the receptor in a manner that is uniquely affected by calcium. PMID:1658191

  13. Calcium dependence of eugenol tolerance and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen K; McAinsh, Martin; Cantopher, Hanna; Sandison, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Eugenol is a plant-derived phenolic compound which has recognised therapeutical potential as an antifungal agent. However little is known of either its fungicidal activity or the mechanisms employed by fungi to tolerate eugenol toxicity. A better exploitation of eugenol as a therapeutic agent will therefore depend on addressing this knowledge gap. Eugenol initiates increases in cytosolic Ca2+ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae which is partly dependent on the plasma membrane calcium channel, Cch1p. However, it is unclear whether a toxic cytosolic Ca2+elevation mediates the fungicidal activity of eugenol. In the present study, no significant difference in yeast survival was observed following transient eugenol treatment in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, using yeast expressing apoaequorin to report cytosolic Ca2+ and a range of eugenol derivatives, antifungal activity did not appear to be coupled to Ca2+ influx or cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. Taken together, these results suggest that eugenol toxicity is not dependent on a toxic influx of Ca2+. In contrast, careful control of extracellular Ca2+ (using EGTA or BAPTA) revealed that tolerance of yeast to eugenol depended on Ca2+ influx via Cch1p. These findings expose significant differences between the antifungal activity of eugenol and that of azoles, amiodarone and carvacrol. This study highlights the potential to use eugenol in combination with other antifungal agents that exhibit differing modes of action as antifungal agents to combat drug resistant infections.

  14. Stochastic Modeling of Calcium in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Mazel, Tomáš; Raymond, Rebecca; Raymond-Stintz, Mary; Jett, Stephen; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2009-01-01

    Release of inflammatory mediators by mast cells in type 1 immediate-hypersensitivity allergic reactions relies on antigen-dependent increases in cytosolic calcium. Here, we used a series of electron microscopy images to build a 3D reconstruction representing a slice through a rat tumor mast cell, which then served as a basis for stochastic modeling of inositol-trisphosphate-mediated calcium responses. The stochastic approach was verified by reaction-diffusion modeling within the same geometry. Local proximity of the endoplasmic reticulum to either the plasma membrane or mitochondria is predicted to differentially impact local inositol trisphosphate receptor transport. The explicit consideration of organelle spatial relationships represents an important step toward building a comprehensive, realistic model of cellular calcium dynamics. PMID:19254531

  15. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  16. One Dimensional Finite Element Method Approach to Study Effect of Ryanodine Receptor and Serca Pump on Calcium Distribution in Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Parvaiz Ahmad; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2013-11-01

    Oocyte is a female gametocyte or germ cell involved in reproduction. Calcium ions (Ca2+) impact nearly all aspects of cellular life as they play an important role in a variety of cellular functions. Calcium ions contributes to egg activation upon fertilization. Since it is the internal stores which provide most of the calcium signal, much attention has been focused on the intracellular channels. There are mainly two types of calcium channels which release calcium from the internal stores to the cytoplasm in many cell types. These channels are IP3-Receptor and Ryanodine Receptor (RyR). Further it is essential to maintain low cytosolic calcium concentration, the cell engages the Serco/Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases (SERCA) present on the ER or SR membrane for the re-uptake of cytosolic calcium at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. In view of above an attempt has been made to study the effect of the Ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the SERCA pump on the calcium distribution in oocytes. The main aim of this paper is to study the calcium concentration in absence and presence of these parameters. The FEM is used to solve the proposed Mathematical model under appreciate initial and boundary conditions. The program has been developed in MATLAB 7.10 for the entire problem to get numerical results.

  17. Cellular Architecture Regulates Collective Calcium Signaling and Cell Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Hoying, James B.; Deymier, Pierre A.; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    A key feature of multicellular systems is the ability of cells to function collectively in response to external stimuli. However, the mechanisms of intercellular cell signaling and their functional implications in diverse vascular structures are poorly understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and plasma lithography micropatterning, we investigate the roles of structural arrangement of endothelial cells in collective calcium signaling and cell contractility. Under histamine stimulation, endothelial cells in self-assembled and microengineered networks, but not individual cells and monolayers, exhibit calcium oscillations. Micropatterning, pharmacological inhibition, and computational modeling reveal that the calcium oscillation depends on the number of neighboring cells coupled via gap junctional intercellular communication, providing a mechanistic basis of the architecture-dependent calcium signaling. Furthermore, the calcium oscillation attenuates the histamine-induced cytoskeletal reorganization and cell contraction, resulting in differential cell responses in an architecture-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endothelial cells can sense and respond to chemical stimuli according to the vascular architecture via collective calcium signaling. PMID:27196735

  18. Multielement analysis of metal-binding proteins in cytosol fractions.

    PubMed

    Bray, J T; Webb, L A; Reilly, F J

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of 24 elements among the cytosol protein fractions was determined for specimens of the bivalve mollusc Macoma balthica obtained from three estuarine locations subject to varying levels of metal pollution and on specimens of Rangia cuneata from three areas subject to varying degrees of thermal pollution. Of the 24 elements examined 15 occurred at levels above detection limits and in association with one or more of four distinct protein fractions. Levels of Ag and Cu associated with high molecular weight proteins and with "metallothionein-like" proteins permitted identification of those Macoma balthica specimens exposed to the greatest degree of metal stress.

  19. Calcium signaling in neocortical development.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Per; Fritz, Nicolas; Smedler, Erik; Malmersjö, Seth; Kanatani, Shigeaki

    2015-04-01

    The calcium ion (Ca(2+) ) is an essential second messenger that plays a pivotal role in neurogenesis. In the ventricular zone (VZ) of the neocortex, neural stem cells linger to produce progenitor cells and subsequently neurons and glial cells, which together build up the entire adult brain. The radial glial cells, with their characteristic radial fibers that stretch from the inner ventricular wall to the outer cortex, are known to be the neural stem cells of the neocortex. Migrating neurons use these radial fibers to climb from the proliferative VZ in the inner part of the brain to the outer layers of the cortex, where differentiation processes continue. To establish the complex structures that constitute the adult cerebral cortex, proliferation, migration, and differentiation must be tightly controlled by various signaling events, including cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling. During development, cells regularly exhibit spontaneous Ca(2+) activity that stimulates downstream effectors, which can elicit these fundamental cell processes. Spontaneous Ca(2+) activity during early neocortical development depends heavily on gap junctions and voltage dependent Ca(2+) channels, whereas later in development neurotransmitters and synapses exert an influence. Here, we provide an overview of the literature on Ca(2+) signaling and its impact on cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in the neocortex. We point out important historical studies and review recent progress in determining the role of Ca(2+) signaling in neocortical development.

  20. Oxysterols and calcium signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Mackrill, John J

    2011-09-01

    Ionised calcium (Ca(2+)) is a key second messenger, regulating almost every cellular process from cell death to muscle contraction. Cytosolic levels of this ion can be increased via gating of channel proteins located in the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum and other membrane-delimited organelles. Ca(2+) can be removed from cells by extrusion across the plasma membrane, uptake into organelles and buffering by anionic components. Ca(2+) channels and extrusion mechanisms work in concert to generate diverse spatiotemporal patterns of this second messenger, the distinct profiles of which determine different cellular outcomes. Increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration are one of the most rapid cellular responses upon exposure to certain oxysterol congeners or to oxidised low-density lipoprotein, occurring within seconds of addition and preceding increases in levels of reactive oxygen species, or changes in gene expression. Furthermore, exposure of cells to oxysterols for periods of hours to days modulates Ca(2+) signal transduction, with these longer-term alterations in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis potentially underlying pathological events within atherosclerotic lesions, such as hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors observed in vascular smooth muscle, or ER stress-induced cell death in macrophages. Despite their candidate roles in physiology and disease, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that couple changes in oxysterol concentrations to alterations in Ca(2+) signalling. This review examines the ways in which oxysterols could influence Ca(2+) signal transduction and the potential roles of this in health and disease. PMID:21513705

  1. Calcium signaling in trypanosomatid parasites.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Roberto; Huang, Guozhong

    2015-03-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is an important second messenger in trypanosomatids and essential for their survival although prolonged high intracellular Ca(2+) levels lead to cell death. As other eukaryotic cells, trypanosomes use two sources of Ca(2+) for generating signals: Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and Ca(2+) entry across the plasma membrane. Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores is controlled by the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) that is located in acidocalcisomes, acidic organelles that are the primary Ca(2+) reservoir in these cells. A plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase controls the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and a number of pumps and exchangers are responsible for Ca(2+) uptake and release from intracellular compartments. The trypanosomatid genomes contain a wide variety of signaling and regulatory proteins that bind Ca(2+) as well as many Ca(2+)-binding proteins that await further characterization. The mitochondrial Ca(2+) transporters of trypanosomatids have an important role in the regulation of cell bioenergetics and flagellar Ca(2+) appears to have roles in sensing the environment. In trypanosomatids in which an intracellular life cycle is present, Ca(2+) signaling is important for host cell invasion. PMID:25468729

  2. Architecture of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter

    PubMed Central

    Oxenoid, Kirill; Dong, Ying; Cao, Chan; Cui, Tanxing; Sancak, Yasemin; Markhard, Andrew L.; Grabarek, Zenon; Kong, Liangliang; Liu, Zhijun; Ouyang, Bo; Cong, Yao; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Chou, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria from multiple, eukaryotic clades uptake and buffer large amounts of calcium (Ca2+) via an inner membrane transporter called the uniporter. Early studies demonstrated that this transport requires a mitochondrial membrane potential and that the uniporter is itself Ca2+ activated, and blocked by ruthenium red or Ru3601. Later, electrophysiological studies demonstrated that the uniporter is an ion channel with remarkably high conductance and selectivity2. Ca2+ entry into mitochondria is also known to activate the TCA cycle and appears to be critical for matching ATP production in mitochondria with its cytosolic demand3. MCU (mitochondrial calcium uniporter) is the pore forming and Ca2+ conducting subunit of the uniporter, but its primary sequence does not resemble any calcium channel known to date. Here, we report the structure of the core region of MCU, determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron microscopy (EM). MCU is a homo-oligomer with the second transmembrane helix forming a hydrophilic pore across the membrane. The channel assembly represents a new solution of ion channel architecture and is stabilized by a coiled coil motif protruding in the mitochondrial matrix. The critical DxxE motif forms the pore entrance featuring two carboxylate rings, which appear to be the selectivity filter based on the ring dimensions and functional mutagenesis. To our knowledge, this is one of the largest structures characterized by NMR, which provides a structural blueprint for understanding the function of this channel. PMID:27135929

  3. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  4. Calcium ions affect the hepatitis B virus core assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongwook; Gyoo Park, Sung; Yoo, Jun-hi; Jung, Guhung . E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2005-02-05

    Previous report showed that cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} induced by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) promotes HBV replication. In this study, in vitro experiments showed that (i) HBV core assembly in vitro was promoted by Ca{sup 2+} through the sucrose density gradient and the analytical ultracentrifuge analysis. Also (ii) transmission electron microscope analysis demonstrated these assembled HBV core particles were the capsids. Ex vivo experiments showed that the treatment of BAPTA-AM and cyclosporine A (CsA) reduced HBV capsids in the transfected HepG2 cells. In addition to that, the treatment of Thapsigargin (TG) increased HBV capsids in the transfected HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we investigated the increased HBV core assembly by HBx. The results show that the increased cytosolic calcium ions by HBx promote the HBV core assembly.

  5. Effects of differentiation on purinergic and neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling in human HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Mohammad A; Peters, Amelia A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-09-13

    Calcium signaling is a key regulator of processes important in differentiation. In colon cancer cells differentiation is associated with altered expression of specific isoforms of calcium pumps of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane, suggesting that differentiation of colon cancer cells is associated with a major remodeling of calcium homeostasis. Purinergic and neurotensin receptor activation are known regulators of cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in colon cancer cells. This study aimed to assess changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP and neurotensin with differentiation induced by sodium butyrate or culturing post-confluence. Parameters assessed included peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) level after activation; time to reach peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) and the EC50 of dose response curves. Our results demonstrate that differentiation of HT-29 colon cancer cells is associated with a remodeling of both ATP and neurotensin mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling appeared more sensitive to differentiation than ATP-mediated Ca(2+) signaling.

  6. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M N; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen

    2014-09-01

    There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcɛRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signaling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcɛRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signaling pathway and its downstream targets.

  7. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M N; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen

    2014-09-01

    There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcɛRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signaling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcɛRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signaling pathway and its downstream targets. PMID:25016314

  8. Calcium sensitive ring-like oligomers formed by synaptotagmin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Bello, Oscar; Auclair, Sarah M.; Wang, Jing; Coleman, Jeff; Pincet, Frederic; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; Sindelar, Charles V.; Rothman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin-1 (SYT) is required to couple calcium influx to the membrane fusion machinery. However, the structural mechanism underlying this process is unclear. Here we report an unexpected circular arrangement (ring) of SYT’s cytosolic domain (C2AB) formed on lipid monolayers in the absence of free calcium ions as revealed by electron microscopy. Rings vary in diameter from 18–43 nm, corresponding to 11–26 molecules of SYT. Continuous stacking of the SYT rings occasionally converts both lipid monolayers and bilayers into protein-coated tubes. Helical reconstruction of the SYT tubes shows that one of the C2 domains (most likely C2B, based on its biochemical properties) interacts with the membrane and is involved in ring formation, and the other C2 domain points radially outward. SYT rings are disrupted rapidly by physiological concentrations of free calcium but not by magnesium. Assuming that calcium-free SYT rings are physiologically relevant, these results suggest a simple and novel mechanism by which SYT regulates neurotransmitter release: The ring acts as a spacer to prevent the completion of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor activating protein receptor (SNARE) complex assembly, thereby clamping fusion in the absence of calcium. When the ring disassembles in the presence of calcium, fusion proceeds unimpeded. PMID:25201968

  9. Sulfation of ractopamine and salbutamol by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Ko, KyoungA; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Davidson, Garrett; Liu, Ming-Yih; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2012-01-01

    Feed additives such as ractopamine and salbutamol are pharmacologically active compounds, acting primarily as β-adrenergic agonists. This study was designed to investigate whether the sulfation of ractopamine and salbutamol may occur under the metabolic conditions and to identify the human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) that are capable of sulfating two major feed additive compounds, ractopamine and salbutamol. A metabolic labelling study showed the generation and release of [35S]sulfated ractopamine and salbutamol by HepG2 human hepatoma cells labelled with [35S]sulfate in the presence of these two compounds. A systematic analysis using 11 purified human SULTs revealed SULT1A3 as the major SULT responsible for the sulfation of ractopamine and salbutamol. The pH dependence and kinetic parameters were analyzed. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of ractopamine and salbutamol on SULT1A3-mediated dopamine sulfation were investigated. Cytosol or S9 fractions of human lung, liver, kidney and small intestine were examined to verify the presence of ractopamine-/salbutamol-sulfating activity in vivo. Of the four human organs, the small intestine displayed the highest activity towards both compounds. Collectively, these results imply that the sulfation mediated by SULT1A3 may play an important role in the metabolism and detoxification of ractopamine and salbutamol. PMID:22763752

  10. Cell-to-cell propagation of infectious cytosolic protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Julia P.; Denner, Philip; Nussbaum-Krammer, Carmen; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Suhre, Michael H.; Scheibel, Thomas; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Schätzl, Hermann M.; Bano, Daniele; Vorberg, Ina M.

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-templating protein conformers that replicate by recruitment and conversion of homotypic proteins into growing protein aggregates. Originally identified as causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, increasing evidence now suggests that prion-like phenomena are more common in nature than previously anticipated. In contrast to fungal prions that replicate in the cytoplasm, propagation of mammalian prions derived from the precursor protein PrP is confined to the cell membrane or endocytic vesicles. Here we demonstrate that cytosolic protein aggregates can also behave as infectious entities in mammalian cells. When expressed in the mammalian cytosol, protein aggregates derived from the prion domain NM of yeast translation termination factor Sup35 persistently propagate and invade neighboring cells, thereby inducing a self-perpetuating aggregation state of NM. Cell contact is required for efficient infection. Aggregates can also be induced in primary astrocytes, neurons, and organotypic cultures, demonstrating that this phenomenon is not specific to immortalized cells. Our data have important implications for understanding prion-like phenomena of protein aggregates associated with human diseases and for the growing number of amyloidogenic proteins discovered in mammals. PMID:23509289

  11. Novel cytosolic allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus identified from germinating conidia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bharat; Sharma, Gainda L; Oellerich, Michael; Kumar, Ram; Singh, Seema; Bhadoria, Dharam P; Katyal, Anju; Reichard, Utz; Asif, Abdul R

    2010-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the common cause of allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and most of the allergens have been described from its secreted fraction. In the present investigation, germinating conidial cytosolic proteins of A. fumigatus were extracted from a 16 h culture. The proteome from this fraction was developed, and immuno-blots were generated using pooled ABPA patients' sera. Well separated Immunoglobulin-E (IgE) and Immunoglobulin-G (IgG) reactive spots were picked from corresponding 2DE gels and subjected to mass spectrometric analysis. As a result, 66 immuno-reactive proteins were identified from two geographically different strains (190/96 and DAYA) of A. fumigatus. Only 3 out of 66 proteins reacted with IgG, and the remaining 63 proteins were found to be IgE reactive. These 63 IgE-reactive cytosolic proteins from germinating conidia included 2 already known (Asp f12 and Asp f22) and 4 predicted allergens (Hsp88, Hsp70, malate dehydrogenase, and alcohol dehydrogenase) based on their homology with other known fungal allergens. In view of this, the panel of presently identified IgE-reactive novel proteins holds the potential of providing a basis for the wider diagnostic application in assay for allergic aspergillosis. We could demonstrate that recombinantly expressed proteins from this panel showed consistent reactivity with IgE of individual sera of ABPA patients. The recombinantly expressed proteins may also be useful in desensitization therapy of allergic disorders including ABPA.

  12. Coupled ER to Golgi Transport Reconstituted with Purified Cytosolic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barlowe, Charles

    1997-01-01

    A cell-free vesicle fusion assay that reproduces a subreaction in transport of pro-α-factor from the ER to the Golgi complex has been used to fractionate yeast cytosol. Purified Sec18p, Uso1p, and LMA1 in the presence of ATP and GTP satisfies the requirement for cytosol in fusion of ER-derived vesicles with Golgi membranes. Although these purified factors are sufficient for vesicle docking and fusion, overall ER to Golgi transport in yeast semi-intact cells depends on COPII proteins (components of a membrane coat that drive vesicle budding from the ER). Thus, membrane fusion is coupled to vesicle formation in ER to Golgi transport even in the presence of saturating levels of purified fusion factors. Manipulation of the semi-intact cell assay is used to distinguish freely diffusible ER- derived vesicles containing pro-α-factor from docked vesicles and from fused vesicles. Uso1p mediates vesicle docking and produces a dilution resistant intermediate. Sec18p and LMA1 are not required for the docking phase, but are required for efficient fusion of ER- derived vesicles with the Golgi complex. Surprisingly, elevated levels of Sec23p complex (a subunit of the COPII coat) prevent vesicle fusion in a reversible manner, but do not interfere with vesicle docking. Ordering experiments using the dilution resistant intermediate and reversible Sec23p complex inhibition indicate Sec18p action is required before LMA1 function. PMID:9382859

  13. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your weekly shopping list. Produce Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Collard greens, frozen 8 oz 360 mg ... Oranges 1 whole 55 mg Seafood Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Sardines, canned with bones 3 oz 325 ...

  14. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  15. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... only gets the calcium it needs through the food you eat, or from supplements. If you do ... materials it needs to build bones. High-calcium foods include: Milk Cheese Ice cream Leafy green vegetables, ...

  16. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  17. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  18. Voltage-controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Oscillator generates symmetrical triangular waveform when inverting and noninverting inputs are equal. Oscillator portion of circuit has integrated circuit, high-performance operational amplifier wired as differential integrator, and two silicon controlled rectifiers.

  19. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  20. Impaired Cellular Bioenergetics Causes Mitochondrial Calcium Handling Defects in MT-ND5 Mutant Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease, a group of metabolic disorders that affect both children and adults. Interestingly, individual mtDNA mutations can cause very different clinical symptoms, however the factors that determine these phenotypes remain obscure. Defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation can disrupt cell signaling pathways, which may shape these disease phenotypes. In particular, mitochondria participate closely in cellular calcium signaling, with profound impact on cell function. Here, we examined the effects of a homoplasmic m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 on cellular calcium handling using transmitochondrial cybrids (ND5 mutant cybrids). We found that the oxidation of NADH and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were significantly reduced in ND5 mutant cybrids. These metabolic defects were associated with a significant decrease in calcium uptake by ND5 mutant mitochondria in response to a calcium transient. Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not affect cytosolic calcium levels in control cybrids, but caused an increase in cytosolic calcium in ND5 mutant cybrids. This suggests that glycolytically-generated ATP is required not only to maintain Δψm in ND5 mutant mitochondria but is also critical for regulating cellular calcium homeostasis. We conclude that the m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 causes defects in both mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial calcium sequestration. This disruption of mitochondrial calcium handling, which leads to defects in cellular calcium homeostasis, may be an important contributor to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:27110715

  1. Numerical Study of the Complex Temporal Pattern of Spontaneous Oscillation in Bullfrog Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Kao, Albert; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    Hair bundles of the bullfrog sacculus display spontaneous oscillations that show complex temporal profiles. Quiescent intervals are typically interspersed with oscillations, analogous to bursting behavior observed in neural systems. By introducing slow calcium dynamics into the theoretical model of bundle mechanics, we reproduce numerically the multi-mode oscillations and explore the effects of internal parameters on the temporal profiles and the frequency tuning of their linear response functions. We also study the effects of mechanical overstimulation on the oscillatory behavior.

  2. Effects of calcium buffering on glucose-induced insulin release in mouse pancreatic islets: an approximation to the calcium sensor

    PubMed Central

    Pertusa, José A G; Sanchez-Andrés, Juan V; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat

    1999-01-01

    The properties of the calcium sensor for glucose-induced insulin secretion have been studied using cell-permeant Ca2+ buffers with distinct kinetics and affinities. In addition, submembrane cytosolic Ca2+ distribution has been modelled after trains of glucose-induced action potential-like depolarizations. Slow Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l−1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (EGTA and Calcium Orange-5N) did not significantly affect glucose-induced insulin release. Modelling showed no effect on cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations at the outermost shell (0.05 μm), their effects being observed in the innermost shells dependent on Ca2+ affinity. In contrast, fast Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l−1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (BAPTA and Calcium Green-5N) caused a 50% inhibition of early insulin response and completely blocked the late phase of glucose-induced insulin response, their simulations showing a decrease of [Ca2+]i at both the inner and outermost shells. These data are consistent with the existence in pancreatic β-cells of a higher affinity Ca2+ sensor than that proposed for neurons. Moreover, these data are consistent with the proposed existence of two distinct pools of granules: (i) ‘primed’ vesicles, colocalized with Ca2+ channels and responsible of the first phase of insulin release; and (ii) ‘reserved pool’ vesicles, not colocalized and responsible for the second phase. PMID:10523416

  3. [Measurement of the concentration of free cytoplasmic calcium in the process of platelet aggregation using a fluorescent method].

    PubMed

    Popov, E G; Gavrilov, I Iu; Pozin, E Ia; Gabbasov, Z A

    1989-01-01

    A multiwavelength method for measuring free cytosolic calcium concentration is proposed. It is based on the registration of the fluorescent spectrum of calcium--sensitive probe indo-1 and deconvolution of the spectrum into components corresponding to free and bound forms of the probe. Calcium concentration is calculated as a product of calcium-probe dissociation constant by calcium-bound to free form concentration ratio. The obtained values are independent of variations in light-scattering properties of the medium and total dye concentration in the optical channel. It is shown that during ADP-induced platelet aggregation calcium concentration rises without measurable delay after the addition of the inducer and significantly decreases by the time the aggregation begins.

  4. Left-right asymmetry: cilia and calcium revisited.

    PubMed

    Blum, Martin; Vick, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    Leftward flow generated by motile cilia is known to underlie left-right asymmetry in vertebrate embryos. A new study now links intraciliary calcium oscillations to cilia motility and the downstream nodal signaling cascade that drives left-sided development. PMID:25734272

  5. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  6. Stereoselective sulphate conjugation of racemic terbutaline by human liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Walle, T; Walle, U K

    1990-07-01

    1. The enantioselectivity of the sulphation of racemic terbutaline by phenolsulphotransferases was examined in vitro using cytosol from human livers (n = 3) and [35S]-3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (PAP35S) as the sulphate donor. 2. The radioactive sulphate conjugate formed was isolated by h.p.l.c. and its enantiomers were separated intact by h.p.l.c. after chiral derivatization. 3. Sulphation of racemic terbutaline occurred with the same apparent Km value for both enantiomers (270 microM). The extent of sulphation of the (+)-enantiomer was double that of the (-)-enantiomer, solely due to a difference in their apparent Vmax values. 4. Sulphation of racemic prenalterol, a structural analogue of terbutaline, also showed a two-fold preference for the (+)-enantiomer. 5. These findings suggest that enantioselective sulphate conjugation of chiral phenolic sympathomimetic amine drugs may lead to enantioselective pharmacokinetics that should be considered in the clinical use of these drugs. PMID:2390423

  7. Response of transgenic poplar overexpressing cytosolic glutamine synthetase to phosphinothricin.

    PubMed

    Pascual, María Belén; Jing, Zhong Ping; Kirby, Edward G; Cánovas, Francisco M; Gallardo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the main enzyme involved in ammonia assimilation in plants and is the target of phosphinothricin (PPT), an herbicide commonly used for weed control in agriculture. As a result of the inhibition of GS, PPT also blocks photorespiration, resulting in the depletion of leaf amino acid pools leading to the plant death. Hybrid transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba INRA clone 7171-B4) overexpressing cytosolic GS is characterized by enhanced vegetative growth [Gallardo, F., Fu, J., Cantón, F.R., García-Gutiérrez, A., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 1999. Expression of a conifer glutamine synthetase gene in transgenic poplar. Planta 210, 19-26; Fu, J., Sampalo, R., Gallardo, F., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 2003. Assembly of a cytosolic pine glutamine synthetase holoenzyme in leaves of transgenic poplar leads to enhanced vegetative growth in young plants. Plant Cell Environ. 26, 411-418; Jing, Z.P., Gallardo, F., Pascual, M.B., Sampalo, R., Romero, J., Torres de Navarra, A., Cánovas, F.M., 2004. Improved growth in a field trial of transgenic hybrid poplar overexpressing glutamine synthetase. New Phytol. 164, 137-145], increased photosynthetic and photorespiratory capacities [El-Khatib, R.T., Hamerlynck, E.P., Gallardo, F., Kirby, E.G., 2004. Transgenic poplar characterized by ectopic expression of a pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene exhibits enhanced tolerance to water stress. Tree Physiol. 24, 729-736], enhanced tolerance to water stress (El-Khatib et al., 2004), and enhanced nitrogen use efficiency [Man, H.-M., Boriel, R., El-Khatib, R.T., Kirby, E.G., 2005. Characterization of transgenic poplar with ectopic expression of pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase under conditions of varying nitrogen availability. New Phytol. 167, 31-39]. In vitro plantlets of GS transgenic poplar exhibited enhanced resistance to PPT when compared with non-transgenic controls. After 30 days exposure to PPT at an equivalent dose of 275 g ha(-1), growth

  8. Cytosolic insulin-binding proteins of mouse liver cells.

    PubMed

    Lokhov, Petr G; Moshkovskii, Sergei A; Ipatova, Olga M; Prozorovskii, Vladimir N

    2004-02-01

    It has been recently shown that insulin retains its biological activity after receptor-directed internalization and it may affect the cell metabolism by interaction with cytosolic insulin-binding proteins (CIBPs). Using affinity chromatography combined with SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry we have identified 7 proteins from mouse liver cells that specifically bind to the insulin, including adenylate kinase 2 (25.6 kD), kinesin superfamily protein 20B (26.0 kD), hepatic arginase 1 (34.8 kD), fructose-bisphosphate aldolase B (39.5 kD), 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (45.1 kD), betaine-homocysteine methyl-transferase (45.0 kD) and KRIT1 (83.4 kD).

  9. Nod-Like Receptors: Cytosolic Watchdogs for Immunity against Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sirard, Jean-Claude; Vignal, Cécile; Dessein, Rodrigue; Chamaillard, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, tissue-specific sets of pattern-recognition molecules, including Nod-like receptors (NLR), enable concomitant and sequential detection of microbial-associated molecular patterns from both the extracellular and intracellular microenvironment. Repressing and de-repressing the cytosolic surveillance machinery contributes to vital immune homeostasis and protective responses within specific tissues. Conversely, defective biology of NLR drives the development of recurrent infectious, autoimmune and/or inflammatory diseases by failing to mount barrier functions against pathogens, to tolerate commensals, and/or to instruct the adaptive immune response against microbes. Better decoding microbial strategies that are evolved to circumvent NLR sensing will provide clues for the development of rational therapies aimed at curing and/or preventing common and emerging immunopathologies. PMID:18166077

  10. Structural characterization of coatomer in its cytosolic state.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengliu; Zhai, Yujia; Pang, Xiaoyun; Niu, Tongxin; Ding, Yue-He; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Hsu, Victor W; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Fei

    2016-08-01

    Studies on coat protein I (COPI) have contributed to a basic understanding of how coat proteins generate vesicles to initiate intracellular transport. The core component of the COPI complex is coatomer, which is a multimeric complex that needs to be recruited from the cytosol to membrane in order to function in membrane bending and cargo sorting. Previous structural studies on the clathrin adaptors have found that membrane recruitment induces a large conformational change in promoting their role in cargo sorting. Here, pursuing negative-stain electron microscopy coupled with single-particle analyses, and also performing CXMS (chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry) for validation, we have reconstructed the structure of coatomer in its soluble form. When compared to the previously elucidated structure of coatomer in its membrane-bound form we do not observe a large conformational change. Thus, the result uncovers a key difference between how COPI versus clathrin coats are regulated by membrane recruitment. PMID:27472951

  11. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  12. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  13. Discrete monotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Haynes, W.B.

    1996-08-01

    The authors theoretically and numerically investigate the operation and behavior of the discrete monotron oscillator, a novel high-power microwave source. The discrete monotron differs from conventional monotrons and transit time oscillators by shielding the electron beam from the monotron cavity`s RF fields except at two distinct locations. This makes the discrete monotron act more like a klystron than a distributed traveling wave device. As a result, the oscillator has higher efficiency and can operate with higher beam powers than other single cavity oscillators and has more stable operation without requiring a seed input signal than mildly relativistic, intense-beam klystron oscillators.

  14. From excitability to oscillations: A case study in vasomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, D. E.; Neganova, A. Y.; Jacobsen, J. C. B.; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.; Sosnovtseva, O.

    2013-10-01

    One consequence of cell-to-cell communication is the appearance of synchronized behavior, where many cells cooperate to generate new dynamical patterns. We present a simple functional model of vasomotion based on the concept of a two-mode oscillator with dual interactions: via relatively slow diffusive coupling that gives rise to wave dynamics and via fast changes in membrane potential that propagate almost instantly over significant distances. The model reproduces the basic calcium dynamics of the vascular smooth muscle cell: calcium waves which upon increased activity of cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channels in the plasma membrane may synchronize into whole-cell oscillations which subsequently may spread across a large population of cells. We show how heterogeneity of the system can induce new patterns.

  15. Regulation of expression of the rodent cytosolic sulfotransferases.

    PubMed

    Runge-Morris, M A

    1997-02-01

    Understanding the molecular regulation of the sulfotransferases is important because these enzymes are essential to a number of critical biological processes. Sulfotransferase expression clearly plays a role in xenobiotic detoxication, carcinogen activation, prodrug processing, cellular signaling pathways, and the regulation of intratissue active androgen and estrogen levels. Although cytosolic sulfotransferases are present in the gut, adrenal, kidney, lung, skin, brain, and other extrahepatic tissues, the basis for the molecular regulation of this complicated gene family has been best characterized in the rat liver, where sulfotransferase levels are relatively abundant. Advances in genomic cloning and in the molecular characterization of individual sulfotransferase cDNAs have inspired new insights into the mechanisms involved in sulfotransferase gene regulation. In particular, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal-adrenocortical axis appears to play a significant role in the regulation of individual sulfotransferase genes. The molecular signals that fluctuate with developmental age, gender, and the occurrence of systemic endocrinopathies also influence sulfotransferase gene expression. For example, diabetes, which disrupts glucose and ketone homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, gonadal and neuroendocrine hormone balance, protein kinase C isoform expression, and P450 metabolism, also disturbs hepatic sulfotransferase gene expression. What role does sulfotransferase expression play in target organ toxicity? Do xenobiotic-mediated changes in sulfotransferase expression compromise detoxication? Does deregulated sulfotransferase expression during development lead to birth defects by perturbing the delicate balance of active hormone levels in fetal tissues? Do conditions of glucocorticoid excess, such as stress or high-dose glucocorticoid therapy induce sulfotransferase expression and place toxicant and carcinogen bioactivation systems in overdrive? This review will summarize

  16. Inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy improves health in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Min; Ostrovsky, Julian; Kwon, Young Joon; Polyak, Erzsebet; Licata, Joseph; Tsukikawa, Mai; Marty, Eric; Thomas, Jeffrey; Felix, Carolyn A.; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Gasser, David L.; Argon, Yair; Falk, Marni J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease therapies directed at intra-mitochondrial pathology are largely ineffective. Recognizing that RC dysfunction invokes pronounced extra-mitochondrial transcriptional adaptations, particularly involving dysregulated translation, we hypothesized that translational dysregulation is itself contributing to the pathophysiology of RC disease. Here, we investigated the activities, and effects from direct inhibition, of a central translational regulator (mTORC1) and its downstream biological processes in diverse genetic and pharmacological models of RC disease. Our data identify novel mechanisms underlying the cellular pathogenesis of RC dysfunction, including the combined induction of proteotoxic stress, the ER stress response and autophagy. mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin partially ameliorated renal disease in B6.Pdss2kd/kd mice with complexes I–III/II–III deficiencies, improved viability and mitochondrial physiology in gas-1(fc21) nematodes with complex I deficiency, and rescued viability across a variety of RC-inhibited human cells. Even more effective was probucol, a PPAR-activating anti-lipid drug that we show also inhibits mTORC1. However, directly inhibiting mTORC1-regulated downstream activities yielded the most pronounced and sustained benefit. Partial inhibition of translation by cycloheximide, or of autophagy by lithium chloride, rescued viability, preserved cellular respiratory capacity and induced mitochondrial translation and biogenesis. Cycloheximide also ameliorated proteotoxic stress via a uniquely selective reduction of cytosolic protein translation. RNAseq-based transcriptome profiling of treatment effects in gas-1(fc21) mutants provide further evidence that these therapies effectively restored altered translation and autophagy pathways toward that of wild-type animals. Overall, partially inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy offer novel treatment strategies to improve health across the diverse

  17. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  18. Expression of the high capacity calcium-binding domain of calreticulin increases bioavailable calcium stores in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Tsou, Pei-Lan; Robertson, Dominique; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of cytosolic calcium levels in both plants and animals is achieved by a system of Ca2+-transport and storage pathways that include Ca2+ buffering proteins in the lumen of intracellular compartments. To date, most research has focused on the role of transporters in regulating cytosolic calcium. We used a reverse genetics approach to modulate calcium stores in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our goals were two-fold: to use the low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ binding characteristics of the C-domain of calreticulin to selectively increase Ca2+ storage in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to determine if those alterations affected plant physiological responses to stress. The C-domain of calreticulin is a highly acidic region that binds 20-50 moles of Ca2+ per mole of protein and has been shown to be the major site of Ca2+ storage within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. A 377-bp fragment encoding the C-domain and ER retention signal from the maize calreticulin gene was fused to a gene for the green fluorescent protein and expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of a heat shock promoter. Following induction on normal medium, the C-domain transformants showed delayed loss of chlorophyll after transfer to calcium depleted medium when compared to seedlings transformed with green fluorescent protein alone. Total calcium measurements showed a 9-35% increase for induced C-domain transformants compared to controls. The data suggest that ectopic expression of the calreticulin C-domain increases Ca2+ stores, and that this Ca2+ reserve can be used by the plant in times of stress.

  19. Effects of photoreleased cADP-ribose on calcium transients and calcium sparks in myocytes isolated from guinea-pig and rat ventricle.

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Y; Galione, A; Terrar, D A

    1999-01-01

    Actions of photoreleased cADP-ribose (cADPR), a novel regulator of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) from ryanodine-sensitive stores, were investigated in cardiac myocytes. Photoreleased cADPR caused an increase in the magnitude of whole-cell calcium transients studied in mammalian cardiac ventricular myocytes (both guinea-pig and rat) using confocal microscopy). Approx. 15 s was required following photorelease of cADPR for the development of its maximal effect. Photoreleased cADPR also increased the frequency of calcium 'sparks', which are thought to be elementary events which make up the whole-cell calcium transient, and were studied in rat myocytes, but had little or no effect on spark characteristics (amplitude, rise time, decay time and distance to half amplitude). The potentiating effects of photoreleased cADPR on both whole-cell transients and the frequency of calcium sparks were prevented by cytosolic application of the antagonist 8-amino-cADPR (5 microM). These experiments, therefore, provide the first evidence in any cell type for an effect of cADPR on calcium sparks, and are the first to show the actions of photoreleased cADPR on whole-cell calcium transients in mammalian cells. The observations are consistent with the effects of cADPR in enhancing the calcium sensitivity of CICR from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac ventricular myocytes, leading to an increase in the probability of occurrence of calcium sparks and to an increase in whole-cell calcium transients. The slow time-course for development of the full effect on whole-cell calcium transients might be taken to indicate that the influence of cADPR on CICR may involve complex molecular interactions rather than a simple direct action of cADPR on the ryanodine-receptor channels. PMID:10455010

  20. Evidence for inositol triphosphate as a second messenger for glucose-induced calcium signalling in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Tisi, Renata; Belotti, Fiorella; Wera, Stefaan; Winderickx, Joris; Thevelein, Johan M; Martegani, Enzo

    2004-02-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae phospholipase C Plc1 is involved in cytosolic transient glucose-induced calcium increase, which also requires the Gpr1/Gpa2 receptor/G protein complex and glucose hexokinases. Differing from mammalian cells, this increase in cytosolic calcium concentration is mainly due to an influx from the external medium. No inositol triphosphate receptor homologue has been identified in the S. cerevisiae genome; and, therefore, the transduction mechanism from Plc1 activation to calcium flux generation still has to be identified. Inositol triphosphate (IP(3)) in yeast is rapidly transformed into IP(4) and IP(5) by a dual kinase, Arg82. Then another kinase, Ipk1, phosphorylates the IP(5) into IP(6). In mutant cells that do not express either of these kinases, the glucose-induced calcium signal was not only detectable but was even wider than in the wild-type strain. IP(3) accumulation upon glucose addition was completely absent in the plc1Delta strain and was amplified both by deletion of either ARG82 or IPK1 genes and by overexpression of PLC1. These results taken together suggest that Plc1p activation by glucose, leading to cleavage of PIP(2) and generation of IP(3), seems to be sufficient for raising the calcium level in the cytosol. This is the first indication for a physiological role of IP(3) signalling in S. cerevisiae. Many aspects about the signal transduction mechanism and the final effectors require further study.

  1. Amyloid-β peptide induces temporal membrane biphasic changes in astrocytes through cytosolic phospholipase A2

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Jacob B.; Lai, Yinzhi; Sheng, Wenwen; Yang, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Donghui; Sun, Grace Y.; Lee, James C-M

    2008-01-01

    Oligomeric amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is known to induce cytotoxic effects and to damage cell functions in Alzheimer’s disease. However, mechanisms underlying the effects of Aβ on cell membranes have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, Aβ 1–42 (Aβ42) was shown to cause a temporal biphasic change in membranes of astrocytic DITNC cells using fluorescence microscopy of Laurdan. Aβ42 made astrocyte cell membranes became more molecularly-disordered within the first 30 minutes to 1 hour, but gradually changed to more molecularly-ordered after 3 hours. However, Aβ42 caused artificial membranes of vesicles made of rat whole brain lipid extract to become more disordered only. The trend for more molecularly-ordered membranes in astrocytes induced by Aβ42 was abrogated by either an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, or an inhibitor of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), but not by an inhibitor of calcium-independent PLA2 (iPLA2). Apocynin also suppressed the increased production of superoxide anions (O2.−) and phosphorylation of cPLA2 induced by Aβ42. In addition, hydrolyzed products of cPLA2, arachidonic acid (AA), but not lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) caused astrocyte membranes to become more molecularly-ordered. These results suggest (1) a direct interaction of Aβ42 with cell membranes making them more molecularly-disordered, and (2) Aβ42 also indirectly makes membranes become more molecularly-ordered by triggering the signaling pathway involving NADPH oxidase and cPLA2 in astrocytes. PMID:18725190

  2. Characterization of the cytosolic distribution of priority pollutant metals and metalloids in the digestive gland cytosol of marine mussels: seasonal and spatial variability.

    PubMed

    Strižak, Zeljka; Ivanković, Dušica; Pröfrock, Daniel; Helmholz, Heike; Cindrić, Ana-Marija; Erk, Marijana; Prange, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Cytosolic profiles of several priority pollutant metals (Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb) and metalloid As were analyzed in the digestive gland of the mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) sampled at locations with different environmental pollution levels along the Croatian coast in the spring and summer season. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) connected to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to determine selected elements bound to cytosolic biomolecules separated based on their molecular size. Copper, cadmium and zinc eluted mostly associated with high molecular weight (HMW) and medium molecular weight (MMW) biomolecules, but with a more prominent elution in the MMW peak at polluted locations which were probably associated with the 20 kDa metallothionein (MT). Elution of all three metals within this peak was also strongly correlated with cytosolic Cd as strong inducer of MT. Lead mostly eluted in HMW biomolecule range, but in elevated cytosolic Pb concentrations, significant amount eluted in low molecular weight (LMW) biomolecules. Arsenic, on the other hand eluted almost completely in LMW range, but we could not distinguish specific molecular weight biomolecules which would be predominant in detoxification mechanism. Seasonal variability in element abundance within specific peaks was present, although not in the same extent, for all elements and locations, especially for As. The results confirm the suitability of the distribution of selected metals/metalloids among different cytosolic ligands as potential indicator for metal exposure. Obtained findings can also serve as guidelines for further separation and characterization of specific cytosolic metal-binding biomolecules.

  3. Requirement for nuclear calcium signaling in Drosophila long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Weislogel, Jan-Marek; Bengtson, C Peter; Müller, Michaela K; Hörtzsch, Jan N; Bujard, Martina; Schuster, Christoph M; Bading, Hilmar

    2013-05-07

    Calcium is used throughout evolution as an intracellular signal transducer. In the mammalian central nervous system, calcium mediates the dialogue between the synapse and the nucleus that is required for transcription-dependent persistent neuronal adaptations. A role for nuclear calcium signaling in similar processes in the invertebrate brain has yet to be investigated. Here, we show by in vivo calcium imaging of adult brain neurons of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, that electrical foot shocks used in olfactory avoidance conditioning evoked transient increases in cytosolic and nuclear calcium concentrations in neurons. These calcium signals were detected in Kenyon cells of the flies' mushroom bodies, which are sites of learning and memory related to smell. Acute blockade of nuclear calcium signaling during conditioning selectively and reversibly abolished the formation of long-term olfactory avoidance memory, whereas short-term, middle-term, or anesthesia-resistant olfactory memory remained unaffected. Thus, nuclear calcium signaling is required in flies for the progression of memories from labile to transcription-dependent long-lasting forms. These results identify nuclear calcium as an evolutionarily conserved signal needed in both invertebrate and vertebrate brains for transcription-dependent memory consolidation.

  4. Two Dimensional Finite Element Model to Study Calcium Distribution in Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Parvaiz Ahmad; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2015-06-01

    Cytosolic free calcium concentration is a key regulatory factor and perhaps the most widely used means of controlling cellular function. Calcium can enter cells through different pathways which are activated by specific stimuli including membrane depolarization, chemical signals and calcium depletion of intracellular stores. One of the important components of oocyte maturation is differentiation of the Ca2+ signaling machinery which is essential for egg activation after fertilization. Eggs acquire the ability to produce the fertilization-specific calcium signal during oocyte maturation. The calcium concentration patterns required during different stages of oocyte maturation are still not completely known. Also the mechanisms involved in calcium dynamics in oocyte cell are still not well understood. In view of above a two dimensional FEM model has been proposed to study calcium distribution in an oocyte cell. The parameters such as buffers, ryanodine receptor, SERCA pump and voltage gated calcium channel are incorporated in the model. Based on the biophysical conditions the initial and boundary conditions have been framed. The model is transformed into variational form and Ritz finite element method has been employed to obtain the solution. A program has been developed in MATLAB 7.10 for the entire problem and executed to obtain numerical results. The numerical results have been used to study the effect of buffers, RyR, SERCA pump and VGCC on calcium distribution in an oocyte cell.

  5. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  6. Focal but reversible diastolic sheet dysfunction reflects regional calcium mishandling in dystrophic mdx mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ya-Jian; Lang, Di; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Efimov, Igor R.; Chen, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is a primary cause of patient mortality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, potentially related to elevated cytosolic calcium. However, the regional versus global functional consequences of cellular calcium mishandling have not been defined in the whole heart. Here we sought for the first time to elucidate potential regional dependencies between calcium mishandling and myocardial fiber/sheet function as a manifestation of dystrophin-deficient (mdx) cardiomyopathy. Isolated-perfused hearts from 16-mo-old mdx (N = 10) and wild-type (WT; N = 10) were arrested sequentially in diastole and systole for diffusion tensor MRI quantification of myocardial sheet architecture and function. When compared with WT hearts, mdx hearts exhibited normal systolic sheet architecture but a lower diastolic sheet angle magnitude (|β|) in the basal region. The regional diastolic sheet dysfunction was normalized by reducing perfusate calcium concentrations. Optical mapping of calcium transients in isolated hearts (3 mdx and 4 WT) revealed a stretch-inducible regional defect of intracellular calcium reuptake, reflected by a 25% increase of decay times (T50) and decay constants, at the base of mdx hearts. The basal region of mdx hearts also exhibited greater fibrosis than did the apex, which matched the regional sheet dysfunction. We conclude that myocardial diastolic sheet dysfunction is observed initially in basal segments along with calcium mishandling, ultimately culminating in increased fibrosis. The preservation of relatively normal calcium reuptake and diastolic/systolic sheet mechanics throughout the rest of the heart, together with the rapid reversibility of functional defects by reducing cytosolic calcium, points to the significance of regional mechanical factors in the progression of the disease. PMID:22777417

  7. Smoking, calcium, calcium antagonists, and aging.

    PubMed

    Nicita-Mauro, V

    1990-01-01

    Aging is characterized, besides other changes, by a progressive increase in calcium content in the arterial wall, which is enhanced by diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, arterial hypertension, and tabagism. As to tabagism, experiments in animals have shown that nicotine can increase calcium content of the arterial wall, and clinical studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking induces peripheral vasoconstriction, with consequent increase in blood pressure levels. In order to study the role of calcium ions in the pathogenesis of the vasoconstrictive lesions caused by "acute" smoking, the author has studied the peripheral vascular effects of the calcium-channel antagonist nifedipine, a dihydropyridine derivative, and calcitonin, a hypocalcemizing hormone which possess vasoactive actions on 12 elderly regular smokers (mean age 65.8 years). The results demonstrated that both nifedipine (10 mg sublingually 20 min before smoking) and salmon calcitonin (100 MRC U/daily intramuscularly for three days) are able to prevent peripheral vasoconstriction evaluated by Doppler velocimetry, as well as the increase of blood pressure induced by smoking. On the basis of our results, the author proposes that cigarette smoking-induced vasoconstriction is a calcium-mediated process, which can be hindered by drugs with calcium antagonist action. PMID:2226675

  8. Current Injection Provokes Rapid Expansion of the Guard Cell Cytosolic Volume and Triggers Ca(2+) Signals.

    PubMed

    Voss, Lena J; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M Rob G

    2016-03-01

    High-resolution microscopy opens the door for detailed single-cell studies with fluorescent reporter dyes and proteins. We used a confocal spinning disc microscope to monitor fluorescent dyes and the fluorescent protein Venus in tobacco and Arabidopsis guard cells. Multi-barreled microelectrodes were used to inject dyes and apply voltage pulses, which provoke transient rises in the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. Voltage pulses also caused changes in the distribution of Lucifer Yellow and Venus, which pointed to a reversible increase of guard cell cytosolic volume. The dynamic cytosolic volume changes turned out to be provoked by current injection of ions. A reduction of the clamp current, by blocking K(+) uptake channels with Cs(+), strongly suppressed the cytosolic volume changes. Cs(+) not only inhibited the expansion of the cytosol, but also inhibited hyperpolarization-induced elevations of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. A complete loss of voltage-induced Ca(2+) signals occurred when Ca(2+)-permeable plasma membrane channels were simultaneously blocked with La(3+). This shows that two mechanisms cause hyperpolarization-induced elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+)-concentration: (i) activation of voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-permeable channels, (ii) osmotically induced expansion of the cytosol, which leads to a release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores.

  9. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells. Progress report, May 1986--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-12-31

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic [Ca{sup 2+}] is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}] and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}]. The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  10. Depletion of calcium stores regulates calcium influx and signal transmission in rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Szikra, Tamas; Cusato, Karen; Thoreson, Wallace B; Barabas, Peter; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Krizaj, David

    2008-01-01

    Tonic synapses are specialized for sustained calcium entry and transmitter release, allowing them to operate in a graded fashion over a wide dynamic range. We identified a novel plasma membrane calcium entry mechanism that extends the range of rod photoreceptor signalling into light-adapted conditions. The mechanism, which shares molecular and physiological characteristics with store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), is required to maintain baseline [Ca2+]i in rod inner segments and synaptic terminals. Sustained Ca2+ entry into rod cytosol is augmented by store depletion, blocked by La3+ and Gd3+ and suppressed by organic antagonists MRS-1845 and SKF-96365. Store depletion and the subsequent Ca2+ influx directly stimulated exocytosis in terminals of light-adapted rods loaded with the activity-dependent dye FM1–43. Moreover, SOCE blockers suppressed rod-mediated synaptic inputs to horizontal cells without affecting presynaptic voltage-operated Ca2+ entry. Silencing of TRPC1 expression with small interference RNA disrupted SOCE in rods, but had no effect on cone Ca2+ signalling. Rods were immunopositive for TRPC1 whereas cone inner segments immunostained with TRPC6 channel antibodies. Thus, SOCE modulates Ca2+ homeostasis and light-evoked neurotransmission at the rod photoreceptor synapse mediated by TRPC1. PMID:18755743

  11. Changes in the distribution of lens calcium during development of x-ray cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, K.R.; Giblin, F.J.; Reddy, V.N.

    1983-09-01

    The present study was designed to examine the possible role of calcium in the opacification of x-ray-induced cataract in rabbit. The results demonstrate that the concentration of calcium in x-rayed lenses, just prior to lens hydration (7.5 weeks postirradiation), was twice that present in contralateral control lenses. At this stage of immature cataract, the lens nucleus remained transparent and maintained a normal level of calcium, but the lens cortex, containing regions of subcapsular opacification, accumulated a level of calcium that was twice that of the control. In the completely opaque mature cataract, (8-9 weeks post x-ray), both the cortex and nucleus had gained significant amounts of calcium. As the concentration of total calcium increased in the immature x-ray cataract, the amount of the cation bound to membranes and insoluble proteins of the cytosol also increased comparably. However, the relative proportion of calcium in the various fractions remained unaltered in the immature cataract; in both control lenses and immature cataracts, 20% of the total calcium remained in the membrane pellet and 70% was located in the soluble protein fraction. Only in the mature stage of cataract was a shift in the distribution of calcium apparent, as the proportion of calcium in the soluble protein fraction increased to 90%. Although only 7% of the total calcium in a mature cataract was bound to membrane, the amount represented a fivefold increase over the control. The results of this study demonstrate that an elevation in lens calcium accompanies the opacification process in x-ray cataract. The work also suggests that changes in calcium levels are not likely to result from inactivation of Ca-ATPase.

  12. Multiple retinoid dehydrogenases in testes cytosol from alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice.

    PubMed

    Posch, K C; Napoli, J L

    1992-05-28

    Retinoic acid syntheses from retinol by cytosol from testes of alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice were similar in specific activity and in their insensitivity to 1 M ethanol or 100 mM 4-methylpyrazole. Anion-exchange followed by size-exclusion chromatography revealed multiple and similarly migrating peaks in each cytosol that had both retinol and retinal dehydrogenase activities. Thus, the effects of ethanol on testes cannot be caused by direct inhibition of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis because retinoid dehydrogenases distinct from mouse class A2 alcohol dehydrogenases, which corresponds to human class I, occurred in testes and they were not inhibited by ethanol. These data also demonstrate the occurrence of multiple cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis activities and indicate that the two reactions of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis, retinol and retinal dehydrogenation, may be catalyzed by enzymes that occur as complexes. PMID:1599517

  13. Cells die with increased cytosolic ATP during apoptosis: a bioluminescence study with intracellular luciferase.

    PubMed

    Zamaraeva, M V; Sabirov, R Z; Maeno, E; Ando-Akatsuka, Y; Bessonova, S V; Okada, Y

    2005-11-01

    Apoptosis is a distinct form of cell death, which requires energy. Here, we made real-time continuous measurements of the cytosolic ATP level throughout the apoptotic process in intact HeLa, PC12 and U937 cells transfected with the firefly luciferase gene. Apoptotic stimuli (staurosporine (STS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), etoposide) induced significant elevation of the cytosolic ATP level. The cytosolic ATP level remained at a higher level than in the control for up to 6 h during which activation of caspase-3 and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation took place. When the STS-induced ATP response was abolished by glucose deprivation-induced inhibition of glycolysis, both caspase activation and DNA laddering were completely inhibited. Annexin V-binding induced by STS or TNFalpha was largely suppressed by glycolysis inhibition. Thus, it is suggested that the cells die with increased cytosolic ATP, and elevation of cytosolic ATP level is a requisite to the apoptotic cell death process.

  14. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1

    PubMed Central

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  15. Simulations of intracellular calcium release dynamics in response to a high-intensity, ultrashort electric pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. P.; Nguyen, A.; Sridhara, V.; Hu, Q.; Nuccitelli, R.; Beebe, S. J.; Kolb, J.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2007-04-01

    Numerical simulations for electrically induced, intracellular calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum are reported. A two-step model is used for self-consistency. Distributed electrical circuit representation coupled with the Smoluchowski equation yields the ER membrane nanoporation for calcium outflow based on a numerical simulation. This is combined with the continuum Li-Rinzel model and drift diffusion for calcium dynamics. Our results are shown to be in agreement with reported calcium release data. A modest increase (rough doubling) of the cellular calcium is predicted in the absence of extra-cellular calcium. In particular, the applied field of 15kV/cm with 60ns pulse duration makes for a strong comparison. No oscillations are predicted and the net recovery period of about 5min are both in agreement with published experimental results. A quantitative explanation for the lack of such oscillatory behavior, based on the density dependent calcium fluxes, is also provided.

  16. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  17. A minimal generic model of bacteria-induced intracellular Ca2+ oscillations in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oxhamre, Camilla; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Kasemo, Bengt

    2005-04-01

    The toxin alpha-hemolysin expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria was recently shown as the first pathophysiologically relevant protein to induce oscillations of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in target cells. Here, we propose a generic three-variable kinetic model describing the Ca(2+) oscillations induced in single rat renal epithelial cells by this toxin. Specifically, we take into account the interplay between 1), the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration; 2), IP(3)-sensitive Ca(2+) channels located in the membrane separating the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum; and 3), toxin-related activation of production of IP(3) by phospholipase C. With these ingredients, the predicted response of cells exposed to the toxin is in good agreement with the results of experiments.

  18. Measurement of cytosolic Ca2+ in isolated contractile lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M; Kurtz, Kristine M; Breslin, Jerome W

    2011-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels comprise a multifunctional transport system that maintains fluid homeostasis, delivers lipids to the central circulation, and acts as a surveillance system for potentially harmful antigens, optimizing mucosal immunity and adaptive immune responses. Lymph is formed from interstitial fluid that enters blind-ended initial lymphatics, and then is transported against a pressure gradient in larger collecting lymphatics. Each collecting lymphatic is made up of a series of segments called lymphangions, separated by bicuspid valves that prevent backflow. Each lymphangion possesses a contractile cycle that propels lymph against a pressure gradient toward the central circulation. This phasic contractile pattern is analogous to the cardiac cycle, with systolic and diastolic phases, and with a lower contraction frequency. In addition, lymphatic smooth muscle generates tone and displays myogenic constriction and dilation in response to increases and decreases in luminal pressure, respectively. A hybrid of molecular mechanisms that support both the phasic and tonic contractility of lymphatics are thus proposed. Contraction of smooth muscle is generally regulated by the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) plus sensitivity to Ca(2+) of the contractile elements in response to changes in the environment surrounding the cell. [Ca(2+)](i) is determined by the combination of the movement of Ca(2+) through plasma membrane ligand or voltage gated Ca(2+) channels and the release and uptake of Ca(2+) from internal stores. Cytosolic Ca(2+) binds to calmodulin and activates enzymes such as myosin light chain (MLC) kinase (MLCK), which in turn phosphorylates MLC leading to actin-myosin-mediated contraction. However, the sensitivity of this pathway to Ca(2+) can be regulated by the MLC phosphatase (MLCP). MLCP activity is regulated by Rho kinase (ROCK) and the myosin phosphatase inhibitor protein CPI-17. Here, we present a method to evaluate changes in [Ca(2+)](i

  19. Anoxia-induced elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration depends on different Ca2+ sources in rice and wheat protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Yemelyanov, Vladislav V; Shishova, Maria F; Chirkova, Tamara V; Lindberg, Sylvia M

    2011-08-01

    The anoxia-dependent elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, [Ca(2+)](cyt), was investigated in plants differing in tolerance to hypoxia. The [Ca(2+)](cyt) was measured by fluorescence microscopy in single protoplasts loaded with the calcium-fluoroprobe Fura 2-AM. Imposition of anoxia led to a fast (within 3 min) significant elevation of [Ca(2+)](cyt) in rice leaf protoplasts. A tenfold drop in the external Ca(2+) concentration (to 0.1 mM) resulted in considerable decrease of the [Ca(2+)](cyt) shift. Rice root protoplasts reacted upon anoxia with higher amplitude. Addition of plasma membrane (verapamil, La(3+) and EGTA) and intracellular membrane Ca(2+)-channel antagonists (Li(+), ruthenium red and cyclosporine A) reduced the anoxic Ca(2+)-accumulation in rice. Wheat protoplasts responded to anoxia by smaller changes of [Ca(2+)](cyt). In wheat leaf protoplasts, the amplitude of the Ca(2+)-shift little depended on the external level of Ca(2+). Wheat root protoplasts were characterized by a small shift of [Ca(2+)](cyt) under anoxia. Plasmalemma Ca(2+)-channel blockers had little effect on the elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) in wheat protoplasts. Intact rice seedlings absorbed Ca(2+) from the external medium under anoxic treatment. On the contrary, wheat seedlings were characterized by leakage of Ca(2+). Verapamil abolished the Ca(2+) influx in rice roots and Ca(2+) efflux from wheat roots. Anoxia-induced [Ca(2+)](cyt) elevation was high particularly in rice, a hypoxia-tolerant species. In conclusion, both external and internal Ca(2+) stores are important for anoxic [Ca(2+)](cyt) elevation in rice, whereas the hypoxia-intolerant wheat does not require external sources for [Ca(2+)](cyt) rise. Leaf and root protoplasts similarly responded to anoxia, independent of their organ origin.

  20. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  1. Self-oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain dynamical systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy into the vibration: no external rate needs to be adjusted to the resonant frequency. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the swaying of the London Millennium Footbridge in 2000. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments. The heart is a “relaxation oscillator”, i.e., a non-sinusoidal self-oscillator whose period is determined by sudden, nonlinear switching at thresholds. We review the general criterion that determines whether a linear system can self-oscillate. We then describe the limiting cycles of the simplest nonlinear self-oscillators, as well as the ability of two or more coupled self-oscillators to become spontaneously synchronized (“entrained”). We characterize the operation of motors as self-oscillation and prove a theorem about their limit efficiency, of which Carnot’s theorem for heat engines appears as a special case. We briefly discuss how self-oscillation applies to servomechanisms, Cepheid variable stars, lasers, and the macroeconomic business cycle, among other applications. Our emphasis throughout is on the energetics of self-oscillation, often neglected by the literature on nonlinear dynamical systems.

  2. Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Zachary, W. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of a workshop on Harmonic Oscillators held at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland on March 25 - 28, 1992 are presented. The harmonic oscillator formalism is playing an important role in many branches of physics. This is the simplest mathematical device which can connect the basic principle of physics with what is observed in the real world. The harmonic oscillator is the bridge between pure and applied physics.

  3. Caveolin-rich lipid rafts of the plasma membrane of mature cerebellar granule neurons are microcompartments for calcium/reactive oxygen and nitrogen species cross-talk signaling.

    PubMed

    Marques-da-Silva, D; Gutierrez-Merino, C

    2014-08-01

    In previous works, we have shown that L-type voltage-operated calcium channels, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAr), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and cytochrome b5 reductase (Cb5R) co-localize within the same lipid rafts-associated nanodomains in mature cerebellar granule neurons (CGN). In this work, we show that the calcium transport systems of the plasma membrane extruding calcium from the cytosol, plasma membrane calcium pumps (PMCA) and sodium-calcium exchangers (NCX), are also associated with these nanodomains. All these proteins were found to co-immunoprecipitate with caveolin-1 after treatment with 25mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin, a lipid rafts solubilizing agent. However, the treatment of CGN with methyl-β-cyclodextrin largely attenuated the rise of cytosolic calcium induced by l-glutamate through NMDAr. Fluorescence energy transfer imaging revealed that all of them are present in sub-microdomains of a size smaller than 200nm, with a peripheral distribution of the calcium extrusion systems PMCA and NCX. Fluorescence microscopy images analysis revealed high calcium dynamic sub-microcompartments near the plasma membrane in fura-2-loaded CGN at short times after addition of l-glutamate. In addition, the close proximity between sources of nitric oxide (nNOS) and superoxide anion (Cb5R) suggests that these nanodomains are involved in the fast and efficient cross-talk between calcium and redox signaling in neurons. PMID:24996880

  4. Localization of calcium in the pericarp cells of tomato fruits during the development of blossom-end rot.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Shono, M; Egawa, Y

    2003-01-01

    Blossom-end rot (BER) of tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits is considered to be a physiological disorder caused by calcium deficiency. We attempted to clarify the localization of calcium in the pericarp cells and the ultrastructural changes during the development of BER. Calcium precipitates were observed as electron-dense deposits by an antimonate precipitation method. Some calcium precipitates were localized in the cytosol, nucleus, plastids, and vacuoles at an early developmental stage of normal fruits. Calcium precipitates were increased markedly on the plasma membrane during the rapid-fruit-growth stage compared with their level at the early stage. Cell collapse occurred in the water-soaked region at the rapid-fruit-growth stage in BER fruits. There were no visible calcium precipitates on the traces of plasma membrane near the cell wall of the collapsed cells. The amount of calcium precipitates on plasma membranes near collapsed cells was smaller than that in the cells of normal fruits and normal parts of BER fruits, and the amount on cells near collapsed cells was small. The amount of calcium precipitates on the plasma membranes increased as the distance from collapsed cells increased. On the other hand, calcium precipitates were visible normally in the cytosol, organelles, and vacuoles and even traces of them in collapsed cells. The distribution pattern of the calcium precipitates on the plasma membrane was thus considerably different between normal and BER fruits. On the basis of these observations, we concluded that calcium deficiency in plasma membranes caused cell collapses in BER tomato fruits.

  5. On the origin of rhythmic calcium transients in the ICC-MP of the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lowie, Bobbi-Jo; Wang, Xuan-Yu; White, Elizabeth J; Huizinga, Jan D

    2011-11-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) are pacemaker cells of the small intestine, producing the characteristic omnipresent electrical slow waves, which orchestrate peristaltic motor activity and are associated with rhythmic intracellular calcium oscillations. Our objective was to elucidate the origins of the calcium transients. We hypothesized that calcium oscillations in the ICC-MP are primarily regulated by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release system. With the use of calcium imaging, study of the effect of T-type calcium channel blocker mibefradil revealed that T-type channels did not play a major role in generating the calcium transients. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, an inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) inhibitor, and U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, both drastically decreased the frequency of calcium oscillations, suggesting a major role of IP(3) and IP(3)-induced calcium release from the SR. Immunohistochemistry proved the expression of IP(3)R type I (IP(3)R-I), but not type II (IP(3)R-II) and type III (IP(3)R-III) in ICC-MP, indicating the involvement of the IP(3)R-I subtype in calcium release from the SR. Cyclopiazonic acid, a SR/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pump inhibitor, strongly reduced or abolished calcium oscillations. The Na-Ca exchanger (NCX) in reverse mode is likely involved in refilling the SR because the NCX inhibitor KB-R7943 markedly reduced the frequency of calcium oscillations. Immunohistochemistry revealed 100% colocalization of NCX and c-Kit in ICC-MP. Testing a mitochondrial NCX inhibitor, we were unable to show an essential role for mitochondria in regulating calcium oscillations in the ICC-MP. In summary, ongoing IP(3) synthesis and IP(3)-induced calcium release from the SR, via the IP(3)R-I, are the major drivers of the calcium transients associated with ICC pacemaker activity. This suggests that a biochemical clock intrinsic to ICC determines the pacemaker

  6. Calmodulin-binding domains in Alzheimer's disease proteins: extending the calcium hypothesis.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Myre, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    The calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) invokes the disruption of calcium signaling as the underlying cause of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately apoptosis. As a primary calcium signal transducer, calmodulin (CaM) responds to cytosolic calcium fluxes by binding to and regulating the activity of target CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Ca(2+)-dependent CaMBPs primarily contain domains (CaMBDs) that can be classified into motifs based upon variations on the basic amphiphilic alpha-helix domain involving conserved hydrophobic residues at positions 1-10, 1-14 or 1-16. In contrast, an IQ or IQ-like domain often mediates Ca(2+)-independent CaM-binding. Based on these attributes, a search for CaMBDs reveals that many of the proteins intimately linked to AD may be calmodulin-binding proteins, opening new avenues for research on this devastating disease. PMID:15249195

  7. Overexpression of Sly41 suppresses COPII vesicle–tethering deficiencies by elevating intracellular calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Barlowe, Charles

    2016-01-01

    SLY41 was identified as a multicopy suppressor of loss of Ypt1, a Rab GTPase essential for COPII vesicle tethering at the Golgi complex. SLY41 encodes a polytopic membrane protein with homology to a class of solute transporter proteins, but how overexpression suppresses vesicle-tethering deficiencies is not known. Here we show that Sly41 is efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and actively cycles between the ER and Golgi compartments. SLY41 displays synthetic negative genetic interactions with PMR1, which encodes the major Golgi-localized Ca2+/Mn2+ transporter and suggests that Sly41 influences cellular Ca2+ and Mn2+ homeostasis. Experiments using the calcium probe aequorin to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in live cells reveal that Sly41 overexpression significantly increases cytosolic calcium levels. Although specific substrates of the Sly41 transporter were not identified, our findings indicate that localized overexpression of Sly41 to the early secretory pathway elevates cytosolic calcium levels to suppress vesicle-tethering mutants. In vitro SNARE cross-linking assays were used to directly monitor the influence of Ca2+ on tethering and fusion of COPII vesicles with Golgi membranes. Strikingly, calcium at suppressive concentrations stimulated SNARE-dependent membrane fusion when vesicle-tethering activity was reduced. These results show that calcium positively regulates the SNARE-dependent fusion stage of ER–Golgi transport. PMID:27030673

  8. Cytosolic rat brain synapsin I is a diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, D W; Besterman, J M

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG), a reaction catalyzed by DG kinase, may be critical in the termination of effector-induced signals mediated by protein kinase C. Synapsin I is a principal target of intracellular protein kinases and is thought to be involved in the release of neurotransmitter from axon terminals. We present several lines of evidence which indicate that rat brain synapsin, in addition to this role, may function as a DG kinase. Purified rat brain DG kinase was digested with trypsin, which produced three major fragments whose sequence was identical to three regions in synapsin I. Using a rabbit anti-synapsin polyclonal antiserum, the elution profile of synapsin immunoreactivity coincided exactly with that of DG kinase activity in column fractions from the final step in the DG kinase purification procedure. As is the case with synapsin, the purified enzyme was a strongly basic protein with an isoelectric point greater than 10.0. Finally, incubating the DG kinase with highly purified bacterial collagenase, an enzyme that partially degrades the proline- and glycine-rich synapsin, resulted in the simultaneous loss of DG kinase activity and synapsin immunoreactivity. We conclude that cytosolic rat brain synapsin is capable of functioning as a DG kinase. Images PMID:1648730

  9. Horizontal Transmission of Cytosolic Sup35 Prions by Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu; Hossinger, André; Hofmann, Julia P.; Denner, Philip

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prions are infectious protein particles that replicate by templating their aggregated state onto soluble protein of the same type. Originally identified as the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, prions in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) are epigenetic elements of inheritance that induce phenotypic changes of their host cells. The prototype yeast prion is the translation termination factor Sup35. Prions composed of Sup35 or its modular prion domain NM are heritable and are transmitted vertically to progeny or horizontally during mating. Interestingly, in mammalian cells, protein aggregates derived from yeast Sup35 NM behave as true infectious entities that employ dissemination strategies similar to those of mammalian prions. While transmission is most efficient when cells are in direct contact, we demonstrate here that cytosolic Sup35 NM prions are also released into the extracellular space in association with nanometer-sized membrane vesicles. Importantly, extracellular vesicles are biologically active and are taken up by recipient cells, where they induce self-sustained Sup35 NM protein aggregation. Thus, in mammalian cells, extracellular vesicles can serve as dissemination vehicles for protein-based epigenetic information transfer. PMID:27406566

  10. Cytosolic Access of Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens: The Shigella Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Mellouk, Nora; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it. PMID:27092296

  11. Structural and Chemical Profiling of the Human Cytosolic Sulfotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Pan, Patricia W; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Najmanovich, Rafael; Tempel, Wolfram; Dong, Aiping; Loppnau, Peter; Martin, Fernando; Thonton, Janet; Edwards, Aled M; Bochkarev, Alexey; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2007-01-01

    The human cytosolic sulfotransfases (hSULTs) comprise a family of 12 phase II enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs and hormones, the bioactivation of carcinogens, and the detoxification of xenobiotics. Knowledge of the structural and mechanistic basis of substrate specificity and activity is crucial for understanding steroid and hormone metabolism, drug sensitivity, pharmacogenomics, and response to environmental toxins. We have determined the crystal structures of five hSULTs for which structural information was lacking, and screened nine of the 12 hSULTs for binding and activity toward a panel of potential substrates and inhibitors, revealing unique “chemical fingerprints” for each protein. The family-wide analysis of the screening and structural data provides a comprehensive, high-level view of the determinants of substrate binding, the mechanisms of inhibition by substrates and environmental toxins, and the functions of the orphan family members SULT1C3 and SULT4A1. Evidence is provided for structural “priming” of the enzyme active site by cofactor binding, which influences the spectrum of small molecules that can bind to each enzyme. The data help explain substrate promiscuity in this family and, at the same time, reveal new similarities between hSULT family members that were previously unrecognized by sequence or structure comparison alone. PMID:17425406

  12. Cytosolic Access of Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens: The Shigella Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Mellouk, Nora; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it. PMID:27092296

  13. Regulation of the cytosolic sulfotransferases by nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Runge-Morris, Melissa; Kocarek, Thomas A.; Falany, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) are a multigene family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sulfonate group from the physiologic sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, to a nucleophilic substrate to generate a polar product that is more amenable to elimination from the body. As catalysts of both xenobiotic and endogenous metabolism, the SULTs are major points of contact between the external and physiological environments, and modulation of SULT-catalyzed metabolism can not only affect xenobiotic disposition, but it can also alter endogenous metabolic processes. Therefore, it is not surprising that SULT expression is regulated by numerous members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that function as sensors of xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules, such as fatty acids, bile acids, and oxysterols. These NRs include the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, liver X receptors, farnesoid X receptor, retinoid-related orphan receptors, and estrogen-related receptors. This review summarizes current information about NR regulation of SULT expression. Because species differences in SULT subfamily composition and tissue-, sex-, development-, and inducer-dependent regulation are prominent, these differences will be emphasized throughout the review. In addition, because of the central role of the SULTs in cellular physiology, the effect of NR-mediated SULT regulation on physiological and pathophysiological processes will be discussed. Gaps in current knowledge that require further investigation are also highlighted. PMID:23330539

  14. Towards the Physics of Calcium Signalling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Martins, Teresa; Evans, Matthew J.; Woolfenden, Hugh C.; Morris, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is an abundant element with a wide variety of important roles within cells. Calcium ions are inter- and intra-cellular messengers that are involved in numerous signalling pathways. Fluctuating compartment-specific calcium ion concentrations can lead to localised and even plant-wide oscillations that can regulate downstream events. Understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these complex patterns that vary both in space and time can be challenging, even in cases for which individual components have been identified. Taking a systems biology approach, mathematical and computational techniques can be employed to produce models that recapitulate experimental observations and capture our current understanding of the system. Useful models make novel predictions that can be investigated and falsified experimentally. This review brings together recent work on the modelling of calcium signalling in plants, from the scale of ion channels through to plant-wide responses to external stimuli. Some in silico results that have informed later experiments are highlighted. PMID:27137393

  15. Phytoplankton calcification as an effective mechanism to alleviate cellular calcium poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. N.; Ramos, J. Barcelos e.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.; Kaźmierczak, J.; Gallo, F.; Mackinder, L.; Li, Y.; Nesterenko, P. N.; Trull, T. W.; Hallegraeff, G. M.

    2015-11-01

    Marine phytoplankton have developed the remarkable ability to tightly regulate the concentration of free calcium ions in the intracellular cytosol at a level of ~ 0.1 μmol L-1 in the presence of seawater Ca2+ concentrations of 10 mmol L-1. The low cytosolic calcium ion concentration is of utmost importance for proper cell signalling function. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the tight control of intracellular Ca2+ concentration are not completely understood, phytoplankton taxonomic groups appear to have evolved different strategies, which may affect their ability to cope with changes in seawater Ca2+ concentrations in their environment on geological timescales. For example, the Cretaceous (145 to 66 Ma), an era known for the high abundance of coccolithophores and the production of enormous calcium carbonate deposits, exhibited seawater calcium concentrations up to 4 times present-day levels. We show that calcifying coccolithophore species (Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Coccolithus braarudii) are able to maintain their relative fitness (in terms of growth rate and photosynthesis) at simulated Cretaceous seawater calcium concentrations, whereas these rates are severely reduced under these conditions in some non-calcareous phytoplankton species (Chaetoceros sp., Ceratoneis closterium and Heterosigma akashiwo). Most notably, this also applies to a non-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi which displays a calcium sensitivity similar to the non-calcareous species. We hypothesize that the process of calcification in coccolithophores provides an efficient mechanism to alleviate cellular calcium poisoning and thereby offered a potential key evolutionary advantage, responsible for the proliferation of coccolithophores during times of high seawater calcium concentrations. The exact function of calcification and the reason behind the highly ornate physical structures of coccoliths remain elusive.

  16. Copurification of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and cytosolic aldolase from endosperm of germinating castor oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Moorhead, G B; Hodgson, R J; Plaxton, W C

    1994-08-01

    The cytosolic isozymes of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPasec) and aldolase (ALDc) from germinating castor oil seed endosperm (COS) (Ricinus communis L.; cv Hale) were purified to homogeneity and final specific activities 49 and 2.8 (mumol product produced/min)/mg protein, respectively. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final FBPasec preparation resolved a single protein-staining band which comigrated with FBPase activity. Two protein-staining bands of 41 and 39 kDa that occurred in an approximate 1:1 ratio were observed following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final FBPasec preparation. Rabbit anti-(FBPasec) immune serum immunoprecipitated the activities of FBPasec, but not that of the plastidic isozyme of FBPase from germinated COS. Immunoblot analysis utilizing affinity purified anti-(COS FBPasec) immunoglobulin G established that the 39-kDa subunit of FBP-asec did not arise via proteolytic cleavage of the 41-kDa subunit during tissue extraction and enzyme purification. However, FBPasec was susceptible to degradation by endogenous protease(s) during incubation of an acidic (pH 5.9) clarified COS extract at 25 degrees C. This proteolysis caused the production of a 32-kDa antigenic polypeptide and resulted in FBPase inactivation. Gel filtration indicated that purified FBPasec exists in at least 8 different oligomeric forms ranging in size from > 2 million to < 34 kDa. The majority of FBPasec, however, eluted as a 143-kDa heterotetramer. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the final ALDc preparation yielded a single 40-kDa protein-staining polypeptide that cross-reacted with anti-(carrot ALDc) IgG. FBPasec copurified with ALDc through polyethylene glycol fractionation, Q-Sepharose, and phosphocellulose chromatographies, and the intensity of the fluorescence emission spectrum of ALDc was greatly reduced in the presence of COS FBPasec, but not rabbit muscle FBPase. These findings suggest that these

  17. Simultaneous recording of calcium transients in skeletal muscle using high- and low-affinity calcium indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M G; Simon, B J; Szucs, G; Schneider, M F

    1988-01-01

    To monitor cytosolic [Ca2+] over a wide range of concentrations in functioning skeletal muscle cells, we have used simultaneously the rapid but relatively low affinity calcium indicator antipyrylazo III (AP III) and the slower but higher affinity indicator fura-2 in single frog twitch fibers cut at both ends and voltage clamped with a double vaseline gap system. When both dyes were added to the end pool solution the cytosolic fura-2 concentration reached a steady level equal to the end pool concentration within approximately 2.5 h, a time when the AP III concentration was still increasing. For depolarizing pulses of increasing amplitude, the fura-2 fluorescence signal approached saturation when the simultaneously recorded AP III absorbance change was far from saturation. Comparison of simultaneously recorded fura-2 and AP III signals indicated that the mean values of the on and off rate constants for calcium binding to fura-2 in 18 muscle fibers were 1.49 x 10(8) M-1 s-1 and 11.9 s-1, respectively (mean KD = 89 nM), if all AP III in the fiber is assumed to behave as in calibrating solution and to be in instantaneous equilibrium with [Ca2+]. [Ca2+] transients calculated from the fura-2 signals using these rate constants were consistent with the [Ca2+] transients calculated from the AP III signals. Resting [Ca2+] or small changes in [Ca2+] which could not be reliably monitored with AP III could be monitored with fura-2 with little or no interference from changes in [Mg2+] or from intrinsic signals. The fura-2 signal was also less sensitive to movement artifacts than the AP III signal. After a [Ca2+] transient the fura-2 signal demonstrated a relatively small elevation of [Ca2+] that was maintained for many seconds. PMID:3395664

  18. Calcium signaling and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during fertilization in marine protostome worms belonging to the phylum Nemertea.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Stephen A

    2014-08-01

    Metaphase-I-arrested eggs of marine protostome worms in the phylum Nemertea generate a series of point-source calcium waves during fertilization. Such calcium oscillations depend on inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores that undergo structural reorganizations prior to and after fertilization. This article reviews fertilization-induced calcium transients and ER dynamics in nemertean eggs and compares these topics to what has been reported for other animals in order to identify unifying characteristics and distinguishing features of calcium responses during fertilization across the animal kingdom.

  19. Francisella Inflammasomes: Integrated Responses to a Cytosolic Stealth Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Pierre; Lagrange, Brice; Henry, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium causing tularemia, a zoonotic disease. Francisella replicates in the macrophage cytosol and eventually triggers cytosolic immune responses. In murine macrophages, Francisella novicida and Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain lyse in the host cytosol and activate the cytosolic DNA receptor Aim2. Here, we review the mechanisms leading or contributing to Aim2 inflammasome activation, including the role of TLRs and of IFN signaling and the implication of the guanylate-binding proteins 2 and 5 in triggering cytosolic bacteriolysis. Furthermore, we present how this cytosolic Gram-negative bacterium escapes recognition by caspase-11 but can trigger a non-canonical caspase-8 inflammasome. In addition, we highlight the differences in inflammasome activation in murine and human cells with pyrin, NLRP3, and AIM2 involved in sensing Francisella in human phagocytes. From a bacterial prospective, we describe the hiding strategy of Francisella to escape recognition by innate sensors and to resist to bacteriolysis in the host cytosol. Finally, we discuss the inability of the inflammasome sensors to detect F. tularensis subspecies tularensis strains, making them highly pathogenic stealth microbes.

  20. The cytosolic tail of the tumor marker protein Trop2 - a structural switch triggered by phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Vidmar, Tilen; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2015-05-01

    Trop2 is a transmembrane signaling glycoprotein upregulated in stem and carcinoma cells. Proliferation-enhancing signaling involves regulated intramembrane proteolytic release of a short cytoplasmic fragment, which is later engaged in a cytosolic signaling complex. We propose that Trop2 function is modulated by phosphorylation of a specific serine residue within this cytosolic region (Ser303), and by proximity effects exerted on the cytosolic tail by Trop2 dimerization. Structural characterization of both the transmembrane (Trop2TM) and cytosolic regions (Trop2IC) support this hypothesis, and shows that the central region of Trop2IC forms an α-helix. Comparison of NMR structures of non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated forms suggest that phosphorylation of Trop2IC triggers salt bridge reshuffling, resulting in significant conformational changes including ordering of the C-terminal tail. In addition, we demonstrate that the cytosolic regions of two Trop2 subunits can be brought into close proximity via transmembrane part dimerization. Finally, we show that Ser303-phosphorylation significantly affects the structure and accessibility of functionally important regions of the cytosolic tail. These observed structural features of Trop2 at the membrane-cytosol interface could be important for regulation of Trop2 signaling activity.

  1. Genetic evidence in the mouse solidifies the calcium hypothesis of myofiber death in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Burr, A R; Molkentin, J D

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of degenerative muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and often premature death. Although the primary defect underlying most forms of MD typically results from a loss of sarcolemmal integrity, the secondary molecular mechanisms leading to muscle degeneration and myofiber necrosis is debated. One hypothesis suggests that elevated or dysregulated cytosolic calcium is the common transducing event, resulting in myofiber necrosis in MD. Previous measurements of resting calcium levels in myofibers from dystrophic animal models or humans produced equivocal results. However, recent studies in genetically altered mouse models have largely solidified the calcium hypothesis of MD, such that models with artificially elevated calcium in skeletal muscle manifest fulminant dystrophic-like disease, whereas models with enhanced calcium clearance or inhibited calcium influx are resistant to myofiber death and MD. Here, we will review the field and the recent cadre of data from genetically altered mouse models, which we propose have collectively mostly proven the hypothesis that calcium is the primary effector of myofiber necrosis in MD. This new consensus on calcium should guide future selection of drugs to be evaluated in clinical trials as well as gene therapy-based approaches. PMID:26088163

  2. Disruption of the vacuolar calcium-ATPases in arabidopsis results in the activation of a salicylic acid-dependent programmed cell death pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals regulate many aspects of plant development, including the Hypersensitive Response (HR) that triggers a programmed cell death response to protect a plant from a pathogen. A transient increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt ) results from Ca2+ entry from the apoplast or release fr...

  3. Collective Calcium Dynamics in Networks of Communicating Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Tommy; Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo; Mugler, Andrew

    Cells can sense and encode information about their environment with remarkable precision. These properties have been studied extensively for single cells, but intercellular communication is known to be important for both single- and multicellular organisms. Here, we examine calcium dynamics of fibroblast cells exposed to external ATP stimuli, and the effects of communication and stimulus strength on cells' response. Experimental results show that increasing communication strength induces a greater fraction of cells to exhibit oscillatory calcium dynamics, but the frequencies of oscillation do not systematically shift with ATP strength. We developed a model of calcium signaling by adding noise, communication, and cell-to-cell variability to the model of Tang and Othmer. This model reproduces cells' increased tendency to oscillate as a function of communication strength, and frequency encoding is nearly removed at the global level. Our model therefore suggests that the propensity of cells to oscillate, rather than frequency encoding, determines the response to external ATP. These results suggest that the system lies near a critical boundary separating non-oscillatory and oscillatory calcium dynamics.

  4. Calcium hydroxyapatite fillers.

    PubMed

    Tansavatdi, Kristina; Mangat, Devinder S

    2011-12-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite fillers have unique advantages over other fillers in regards to duration of action and volume of product required for augmentation, especially in the midface and lower face. In this article, we describe our experience with calcium hydroxyapatite fillers and compare them with other available filler products.

  5. Involvement of cytosolic Cl- in osmoregulation of alpha-ENaC gene expression.

    PubMed

    Niisato, Naomi; Eaton, Douglas C; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2004-11-01

    Hypotonicity stimulates transepithelial Na(+) reabsorption in renal A6 cells, but the mechanism for this stimulation is not fully understood. In the present study, we found that hypotonicity stimulated Na(+) reabsorption through increases in mRNA expression of the alpha-subunit of the epithelial Na(+) channel (alpha-ENaC). Hypotonicity decreases cytosolic Cl(-) concentration; therefore, we hypothesized that hypotonicity-induced decreases in cytosolic Cl(-) concentration could act as a signal to regulate Na(+) reabsorption through changes in alpha-ENaC mRNA expression. Treatment with the flavone apigenin, which activates the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter and increases cytosolic Cl(-) concentration, markedly suppressed the hypotonicity-induced increase in alpha-ENaC mRNA expression. On the other hand, blockade of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter decreases cytosolic Cl(-) concentration and increased alpha-ENaC mRNA expression and Na(+) reabsorption. Blocking Cl(-) channels with 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) inhibited the hypotonicity-induced decrease in cytosolic Cl(-) concentration and suppressed the hypotonicity-induced increase in alpha-ENaC mRNA expression. Coapplication of NPPB and apigenin synergistically suppressed alpha-ENaC mRNA expression. Thus, in every case, changes in cytosolic Cl(-) concentration were associated with changes in alpha-ENaC mRNA expression and changes in Na(+) reabsorption: decreases in cytosolic Cl(-) concentration increased alpha-ENaC mRNA and increased Na(+) reabsorption, whereas increases in cytosolic Cl(-) concentration decreased alpha-ENaC mRNA and decreased Na(+) reabsorption. These findings support the hypothesis that changes in cytosolic Cl(-) concentration are an important and novel signal in hypotonicity-induced regulation of alpha-ENaC expression and Na(+) reabsorption. PMID:15292045

  6. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  7. Investigating Magnetic Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brueningsen, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies magnetic oscillation using an air track. Ceramic magnets are attached to the cart and also are used as dampeners in place of the springs. The resulting oscillations are fairly sinusoidal and is a good example of simple harmonic motion. (MVL)

  8. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  9. Cytosolic PrP Can Participate in Prion-Mediated Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Alana M.; Zhang, Chang; Arndt, Tina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion diseases are characterized by a conformational change in the normal host protein PrPC. While the majority of mature PrPC is tethered to the plasma membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, topological variants of this protein can arise during its biosynthesis. Here we have generated Drosophila transgenic for cytosolic ovine PrP in order to investigate its toxic potential in flies in the absence or presence of exogenous ovine prions. While cytosolic ovine PrP expressed in Drosophila was predominantly detergent insoluble and showed resistance to low concentrations of proteinase K, it was not overtly detrimental to the flies. However, Drosophila transgenic for cytosolic PrP expression exposed to classical or atypical scrapie prion inocula showed a faster decrease in locomotor activity than similar flies exposed to scrapie-free material. The susceptibility to classical scrapie inocula could be assessed in Drosophila transgenic for panneuronal expression of cytosolic PrP, whereas susceptibility to atypical scrapie required ubiquitous PrP expression. Significantly, the toxic phenotype induced by ovine scrapie in cytosolic PrP transgenic Drosophila was transmissible to recipient PrP transgenic flies. These data show that while cytosolic PrP expression does not adversely affect Drosophila, this topological PrP variant can participate in the generation of transmissible scrapie-induced toxicity. These observations also show that PrP transgenic Drosophila are susceptible to classical and atypical scrapie prion strains and highlight the utility of this invertebrate host as a model of mammalian prion disease. IMPORTANCE During prion diseases, the host protein PrPC converts into an abnormal conformer, PrPSc, a process coupled to the generation of transmissible prions and neurotoxicity. While PrPC is principally a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein, the role of topological variants, such as cytosolic PrP, in prion-mediated toxicity and

  10. The cytosolic domain of human Tom22 modulates human Bax mitochondrial translocation and conformation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Grandier-Vazeille, Xavier; Arokium, Hubert; Velours, Gisèle; Camougrand, Nadine; Priault, Muriel; Teijido, Oscar; Dejean, Laurent M; Manon, Stéphen

    2012-01-20

    The role of the mitochondrial protein receptor Tom22p in the interaction of pro-apoptotic protein Bax with yeast mitochondria was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that human Bax interacted with different TOM subunits, including Tom22p. Expression of the cytosolic receptor domain of human Tom22 increased Bax mitochondrial localization, but decreased the proportion of active Bax. BN-PAGE showed that the cytosolic domain of Tom22 interfered with the oligomerization of Bax. These data suggest that the interaction with the cytosolic domain of Tom22 helps Bax to acquire a conformation able to interact with the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:22198199

  11. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  12. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  13. Human cytosolic extracts stabilize the HIV-1 core.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Thomas; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Wang, Xiaozhao; Smith, Amos B; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-10-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects on HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. The assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core. Interestingly, stabilization of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes is not due solely to macromolecular crowding, suggesting the presence of specific cellular factors that stabilize the HIV-1 core. By using our novel assay, we measured the abilities of different drugs, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine, Bi2 (also known as BI-2), and the peptide CAI, to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Interestingly, we found that PF74 and Bi2 strongly stabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. On the other hand, the peptide CAI destabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. We also found that purified cyclophilin A destabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes in the presence of cellular extracts in a cyclosporine-sensitive manner. In agreement with previous observations using the fate-of-the-capsid assay, we also demonstrated the ability of recombinant CPSF6 to stabilize HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Overall, our findings suggested that cellular extracts specifically stabilize the HIV-1 core. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 core stability in vitro.

  14. Propionate induces the bovine cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Donkin, Shawn S

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) is a critical enzyme within the metabolic networks for gluconeogenesis, hepatic energy metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle function, and is controlled by several transcription factors including hepatic nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). The primary objective of the present study was to determine whether propionate regulates bovine PCK1 transcription. The second objective was to determine the action of cyclic AMP (cAMP), glucocorticoids, and insulin, hormonal cues known to modulate glucose metabolism, on bovine PCK1 transcriptional activity. The proximal promoter of the bovine PCK1 gene was ligated to a Firefly luciferase reporter and transfected into H4IIE hepatoma cells. Cells were exposed to treatments for 23 h and luciferase activity was determined in cell lysates. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was linearly induced by propionate, and maximally increased 7-fold with 2.5 mM propionate, which was not muted by 100 nM insulin. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was increased 1-fold by either 1.0 mM cAMP or 5.0µM dexamethasone, and 2.2-fold by their combination. Induction by cAMP and dexamethasone was repressed 50% by 100 nM insulin. Propionate, cAMP, and dexamethasone acted synergistically to induce the PCK1 promoter activity. Propionate-responsive regions, identified by 5' deletion analysis, were located between -1,238 and -409 bp and between -85 and +221 bp. Deletions of the core sequences of the 2 putative HNF4α sites decreased the responsiveness to propionate by approximately 40%. These data indicate that propionate regulates its own metabolism through transcriptional stimulation of the bovine PCK1 gene. This induction is mediated, in part, by the 2 putative HNF4α binding sites in the bovine PCK1 promoter. PMID:27289145

  15. Cytosolic superoxide dismutase can provide protection against Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Jaikua, Wipaphorn; Kueakhai, Pornanan; Chaithirayanon, Kulathida; Tanomrat, Rataya; Wongwairot, Sirima; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Sobhon, Prasert; Changklungmoa, Narin

    2016-10-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SOD), antioxidant metallo-enzymes, are a part of the first line of defense in the trematode parasites which act as the chief scavengers for reactive oxygen species (ROS). A recombinant Fasciola gigantica cytosolic SOD (FgSOD) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and used for immunizing rabbits to obtain polyclonal antibodies (anti-rFgSOD). This rabbit anti-rFgSOD reacted with the native FgSOD at a molecular weight of 17.5kDa. The FgSOD protein was expressed at high level in parenchyma, caecal epithelium and egg of the parasite. The rFgSOD reacted with antisera from rabbits infected with F. gigantica metacercariae collected at 2, 5, and 7 weeks after infection, and reacted with sera of infected mice. Anti-rFgSOD exhibited cross reactivity with the other parasites' antigens, including Eurytrema pancreaticum, Cotylophoron cotylophorum, Fischoederius cobboldi, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Paramphistomum cervi, and Setaria labiato papillosa. A vaccination was performed in imprinting control region (ICR) mice by subcutaneous injection with 50μg of rFgSOD combined with Freund's adjuvant. At 2 weeks after the second boost, mice were infected with 15 metacercariae by oral route. IgG1 and IgG2a in the immune sera were determined to indicate Th2 and Th1 immune responses. It was found that the parasite burden was reduced by 45%, and both IgG1 and IgG2a levels showed correlation with the numbers of worm recoveries. PMID:27338185

  16. Calcium and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nordin, B E

    1997-01-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient that is involved in most metabolic processes and the phosphate salts of which provide mechanical rigidity to the bones and teeth, where 99% of the body's calcium resides. The calcium in the skeleton has the additional role of acting as a reserve supply of calcium to meet the body's metabolic needs in states of calcium deficiency. Calcium deficiency is easily induced because of the obligatory losses of calcium via the bowel, kidneys, and skin. In growing animals, it may impair growth, delay consolidation of the skeleton, and in certain circumstances give rise to rickets but the latter is more often due to deficiency of vitamin D. In adult animals, calcium deficiency causes mobilization of bone and leads sooner or later to osteoporosis, i.e., a reduction in the "amount of bone in the bone" or apparent bone density. The effects of calcium deficiency and oophorectomy (ovariectomy) are additive. In humans, osteoporosis is a common feature of aging. Loss of bone starts in women at the time of the menopause and in men at about age 55 and leads to an increase in fracture rates in both sexes. Individual fracture risk is inversely related to bone density, which in turn is determined by the density achieved at maturity (peak bone density) and the subsequent rate of bone loss. At issue is whether either or both of these variables is related to calcium intake. The calcium requirement of adults may be defined as the mean calcium intake needed to preserve calcium balance, i.e., to meet the significant obligatory losses of calcium through the gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, and skin. The calcium allowance is the higher intake recommended for a population to allow for individual variation in the requirement. The mean requirement defined in this way, calculated from balance studies, is about 20 mmol (800 mg) a day on Western diets, implying an allowance of 25 mmol (1000 mg) or more. Corresponding requirements and allowances have been calculated for

  17. Ultrastable Cryogenic Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Anthony G.

    Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are secondary frequency standards in the microwave domain. The best of these oscillators have demonstrated a short term frequency stability in the range 10-14 to a few times 10-16. The main application for these oscillators is as flywheel oscillators for the next generation of passive atomic frequency standards, and as local oscillators in space telemetry ground stations to clean up the transmitter close in phase noise. Fractional frequency stabilities of passive atomic frequency standards are now approaching 3 x10^-14 /τ where τ is the measurement time, limited only by the number of atoms that are being interrogated. This requires an interrogation oscillator whose short-term stability is of the order of 10-14 or better, which cannot be provided by present-day quartz technology. Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are based on resonators which have very high electrical Q-factors. The resolution of the resonator's linewidth is typically limited by electronics noise to about 1ppm and hence Q-factors in excess of 108 are required. As these are only attained in superconducting cavities or sapphire resonators at low temperatures, use of liquid helium cooling is mandatory, which has so far restricted these oscillators to the research or metrology laboratory. Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make compact flywheel oscillators for the new generation of primary frequency standards. Work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The best cryogenic oscillators developed to date are the ``whispering gallery'' (WG) mode sapphire resonator-oscillators of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Western Australia (UWA), as well as Stanford University's superconducting cavity stabilized oscillator (SCSO). All of these oscillators have demonstrated frequency

  18. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis.

  19. [Calcium and health].

    PubMed

    Ortega Anta, Rosa M; Jiménez Ortega, Ana I; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-04-07

    An adequate intake of calcium is only not limited to avoid the risk of osteoporosis and its benefits in longterm bone health, but also it has been linked to protection against various major diseases, such as hypertension, cancer, kidney stones, insulin resistance, diabetes... and several investigations suggest its importance in preventing and controlling obesity. Studies conducted in Spanish representative samples show that a high percentage of adults and children (> 75%) don't achieve the recommended intake of calcium. Moreover, are growing trends among the population suggesting that calcium intake and dairy consumption (main food source of the mineral) are high, and even excessive, in many individuals. This misconception results in that the calcium intake is increasingly far from the recommended one. The maximum tolerable intake of the mineral is fixed at 2.500 mg/day, but this intake is unusual, and it's more disturbing and frequent, to find intakes below the recommended calcium intakes (1.000 and 1.200 mg/day in adults, men and women, respectively). Data from different studies highlight the risk of an inadequate calcium intake and the damages that may affect the health in a long term. It is not about transmitting indiscriminate guidelines in order to increase the intake of calcium / dairy, but the recommended intakes must be met to achieve both the nutritional and health benefits. Also activities for demystification of misconceptions are need, increasingly frequent, that may impair health population.

  20. Mechanics regulates ATP-stimulated collective calcium response in fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Lembong, Josephine; Sabass, Benedikt; Sun, Bo; Rogers, Matthew E.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells constantly sense their chemical and mechanical environments. We study the effect of mechanics on the ATP-induced collective calcium response of fibroblast cells in experiments that mimic various tissue environments. We find that closely packed two-dimensional cell cultures on a soft polyacrylamide gel (Young's modulus E = 690 Pa) contain more cells exhibiting calcium oscillations than cultures on a rigid substrate (E = 36 000 Pa). Calcium responses of cells on soft substrates show a slower decay of calcium level relative to those on rigid substrates. Actin enhancement and disruption experiments for the cell cultures allow us to conclude that actin filaments determine the collective Ca2+ oscillatory behaviour in the culture. Inhibition of gap junctions results in a decrease of the oscillation period and reduced correlation of calcium responses, which suggests additional complexity of signalling upon cell–cell contact. Moreover, the frequency of calcium oscillations is independent of the rigidity of the substrate but depends on ATP concentration. We compare our results with those from similar experiments on individual cells. Overall, our observations show that collective chemical signalling in cell cultures via calcium depends critically on the mechanical environment. PMID:26063818

  1. Listeria monocytogenes triggers AIM2-mediated pyroptosis upon infrequent bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol.

    PubMed

    Sauer, John-Demian; Witte, Chelsea E; Zemansky, Jason; Hanson, Bill; Lauer, Peter; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2010-05-20

    A host defense strategy against pathogens is the induction of cell death, thereby eliminating the pathogen's intracellular niche. Pyroptosis, one such form of cell death, is dependent on inflammasome activation. In a genetic screen to identify Listeria monocytogenes mutants that induced altered levels of host cell death, we identified a mutation in lmo2473 that caused hyperstimulation of IL-1beta secretion and pyroptosis following bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol. In addition, strains engineered to lyse in the cytosol by expression of both bacteriophage holin and lysin or induced to lyse by treatment with ampicillin stimulated pyroptosis. Pyroptosis was independent of the Nlrp3 and Nlrc4 inflammasome receptors but dependent on the inflammasome adaptor ASC and the cytosolic DNA sensor AIM2. Importantly, wild-type L. monocytogenes were also found to lyse, albeit at low levels, and trigger AIM2-dependent pyroptosis. These data suggested that pyroptosis is triggered by bacterial DNA released during cytosolic lysis.

  2. Live-cell observation of cytosolic HIV-1 assembly onset reveals RNA-interacting Gag oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Baumgärtel, Viola; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the Gag polyprotein into new viral particles in infected cells is a crucial step in the retroviral replication cycle. Currently, little is known about the onset of assembly in the cytosol. In this paper, we analyzed the cytosolic HIV-1 Gag fraction in real time in live cells using advanced fluctuation imaging methods and thereby provide detailed insights into the complex relationship between cytosolic Gag mobility, stoichiometry, and interactions. We show that Gag diffuses as a monomer on the subsecond timescale with severely reduced mobility. Reduction of mobility is associated with basic residues in its nucleocapsid (NC) domain, whereas capsid (CA) and matrix (MA) domains do not contribute significantly. Strikingly, another diffusive Gag species was observed on the seconds timescale that oligomerized in a concentration-dependent manner. Both NC- and CA-mediated interactions strongly assist this process. Our results reveal potential nucleation steps of cytosolic Gag fractions before membrane-assisted Gag assembly. PMID:26283800

  3. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  4. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  8. PGC-1{alpha} accelerates cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance without disturbing Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Min; Wang, Yanru; Qu, Aijuan

    2010-06-11

    Energy metabolism and Ca{sup 2+} handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1{alpha} in cardiac Ca{sup 2+} signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1{alpha} via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca{sup 2+} transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca{sup 2+} transients and Ca{sup 2+} waves accelerated in PGC-1{alpha}-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca{sup 2+} transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1{alpha}-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1{alpha} induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} did not disturb cardiac Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, because SR Ca{sup 2+} load and the propensity for Ca{sup 2+} waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1{alpha} can ameliorate cardiac Ca{sup 2+} cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1{alpha}-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1{alpha} in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  9. Extracellular ATP triggers proteolysis and cytosolic Ca2+ rise in Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium yoelii malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasmodium has a complex cell biology and it is essential to dissect the cell-signalling pathways underlying its survival within the host. Methods Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptide substrate Abz-AIKFFARQ-EDDnp and Fluo4/AM, the effects of extracellular ATP on triggering proteolysis and Ca2+ signalling in Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium yoelii malaria parasites were investigated. Results The protease activity was blocked in the presence of the purinergic receptor blockers suramin (50 μM) and PPADS (50 μM) or the extracellular and intracellular calcium chelators EGTA (5 mM) and BAPTA/AM (25, 100, 200 and 500 μM), respectively for P. yoelii and P. berghei. Addition of ATP (50, 70, 200 and 250 μM) to isolated parasites previously loaded with Fluo4/AM in a Ca2+-containing medium led to an increase in cytosolic calcium. This rise was blocked by pre-incubating the parasites with either purinergic antagonists PPADS (50 μM), TNP-ATP (50 μM) or the purinergic blockers KN-62 (10 μM) and Ip5I (10 μM). Incubating P. berghei infected cells with KN-62 (200 μM) resulted in a changed profile of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) processing as revealed by western blot assays. Moreover incubating P. berghei for 17 h with KN-62 (10 μM) led to an increase in rings forms (82% ± 4, n = 11) and a decrease in trophozoite forms (18% ± 4, n = 11). Conclusions The data clearly show that purinergic signalling modulates P. berghei protease(s) activity and that MSP1 is one target in this pathway. PMID:22420332

  10. Biochemical Issues in Estimation of Cytosolic Free NAD/NADH Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansheng; Hu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio is fundamentally important in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis but current techniques cannot distinguish between protein-bound and free NAD/NADH. Williamson et al reported a method to estimate this ratio by cytosolic lactate/pyruvate (L/P) based on the principle of chemical equilibrium. Numerous studies used L/P ratio to estimate the cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio by assuming that the conversion in cells was at near-equilibrium but not verifying how near it was. In addition, it seems accepted that cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio was a dependent variable responding to the change of L/P ratio. In this study, we show (1) that the change of lactate/glucose (percentage of glucose that converts to lactate by cells) and L/P ratio could measure the status of conversion between pyruvate + NADH and lactate + NAD that tends to or gets away from equilibrium; (2) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH could be accurately estimated by L/P only when the conversion is at or very close to equilibrium otherwise a calculation error by one order of magnitude could be introduced; (3) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is stable and L/P is highly labile, that the highly labile L/P is crucial to maintain the homeostasis of NAD/NADH; (4) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is dependent on oxygen levels. Our study resolved the key issues regarding accurate estimation of cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio and the relationship between NAD/NADH and L/P. PMID:22570687

  11. Cytosolic activation of aromatic and heterocyclic amines. Inhibition by dicoumarol and enhancement in viral hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    De Flora, S; Bennicelli, C; D'Agostini, F; Izzotti, A; Camoirano, A

    1994-01-01

    The aromatic amines 2-aminofluorene (2AF), 2-acetylaminofluorene, and 2-aminoanthracene, and the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, and 3-amino-1-methyl-SH-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2) were activated by rat liver cytosolic fractions to form mutagenic metabolites in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA98NR, and TA98/1,8-DNP6. In the case of the Trp-P-2, the cytosolic activation was even more potent than the microsomal activation, which is classically ascribed to N-hydroxylation and subsequent esterification. The cytosolic activation was a) NADPH-dependent, b) induced by pretreatment of rats with 3-methylcholanthrene and especially Aroclor 1254 but not by phenobarbital, and c) inhibited by dicoumarol. The hypothesis is that, following a preliminary oxidative step in the cytosol (pure cytosolic activation) or in microsomes via prostaglandin H synthase (mixed microsomal-cytosolic activation), an oxidized intermediate of amino compounds may serve as substrate for DT diaphorase activity and bielectronically reduced to the corresponding N-hydroxyamino derivative. Purified DT diaphorase, in the presence of either NADPH or NADH as electron donor, produced mutagenic derivatives from IQ and Trp-P-2. An NADPH-dependent activation of Trp-P-2 also occurred in the liver cytosol of woodchucks (Marmota monax), but was not inhibited by dicoumarol. As previously demonstrated with liver S-12 fractions in both humans and woodchucks, the cytosolic activation of Trp-P-2 was enhanced in animals affected by hepatitis B virus infection. This enhanced metabolism, which persisted even after appearance of primary hepatocellular carcinoma in virus carriers, is likely to be ascribed to mechanisms other than DT diaphorase induction, such as glutathione depletion. PMID:7534225

  12. Stimulus-evoked high frequency oscillations are present in neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Chadwick M.; Zeller-Townson, Riley; Newman, Jonathan P.; Shoemaker, James T.; Killian, Nathan J.; Potter, Steve M.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (250–600 Hz) are present in the brains of epileptic animals and humans. The etiology of these oscillations and how they contribute to the diseased state remains unclear. This work identifies the presence of microstimulation-evoked high frequency oscillations (250–400 Hz) in dissociated neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Oscillations are more apparent with higher stimulus voltages. As with in vivo studies, activity is isolated to a single electrode, however, the MEA provides improved spatial resolution with no spread of the oscillation to adjacent electrodes 200 μm away. Oscillations develop across four weeks in vitro. Oscillations still occur in the presence of tetrodotoxin and synaptic blockers, and they cause no apparent disruption in the ability of oscillation-presenting electrodes to elicit directly evoked action potentials (dAPs) or promote the spread of synaptic activity throughout the culture. Chelating calcium with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) causes a temporal prolongation of the oscillation. Finally, carbenoxolone significantly reduces or eliminates the high frequency oscillations. Gap junctions may play a significant role in maintaining the oscillation given the inhibitory effect of carbenoxolone, the propagating effect of reduced calcium conditions and the isolated nature of the activity as demonstrated in previous studies. This is the first demonstration of stimulus-evoked high frequency oscillations in dissociated cultures. Unlike current models that rely on complex in vivo recording conditions, this work presents a simple controllable model in neuronal cultures on MEAs to further investigate how the oscillations occur at the molecular level and how they may contribute to the pathophysiology of disease. PMID:22615686

  13. Characterization of the histidine-rich loop of Arabidopsis vacuolar membrane zinc transporter AtMTP1 as a sensor of zinc level in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Natsuki; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tomioka, Rie; Krämer, Ute; Kawachi, Miki; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    The vacuolar Zn(2+)/H(+) antiporter of Arabidopsis thaliana, AtMTP1, has a long cytosolic histidine-rich loop. A mutated AtMTP1 in which the first half of the loop (His-half) was deleted exhibited a 11-fold higher transport velocity in yeast cells. Transgenic lines overexpressing the His-half-deleted AtMTP1 in the loss-of-function mutant were evaluated for growth and metal content in the presence of various zinc concentrations. These overexpressing lines (35S-AtMTP1 and 35S-His-half lines) showed high tolerance to excess concentrations of zinc at 150 µM, as did the wild type, compared with the loss-of-function line. The His-half AtMTP1 transported cobalt in a heterologous expression assay in yeast, but the cumulative amount of cobalt in 35S-His-half plants was not increased. Moreover, the accumulation of calcium and iron was not changed in plants. Under zinc-deficient conditions, growth of 35S-His-half lines was markedly suppressed. Under the same conditions, the 35S-His-half lines accumulated larger amounts of zinc in roots and smaller amounts of zinc in shoots compared with the other lines, suggesting an abnormal accumulation of zinc in the roots of 35S-His-half lines. As a result, the shoots may exhibit zinc deficiency. Taken together, these results suggest that the His-loop acts as a sensor of cytosolic zinc to maintain an essential level in the cytosol and that the dysfunction of the loop results in an uncontrolled accumulation of zinc in the vacuoles of root cells.

  14. Biochemical and molecular characterization of RcSUS1, a cytosolic sucrose synthase phosphorylated in vivo at serine 11 in developing castor oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Fedosejevs, Eric T; Ying, Sheng; Park, Joonho; Anderson, Erin M; Mullen, Robert T; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William C

    2014-11-28

    Sucrose synthase (SUS) catalyzes the UDP-dependent cleavage of sucrose into UDP-glucose and fructose and has become an important target for improving seed crops via metabolic engineering. A UDP-specific SUS homotetramer composed of 93-kDa subunits was purified to homogeneity from the triacylglyceride-rich endosperm of developing castor oil seeds (COS) and identified as RcSUS1 by mass spectrometry. RcSUS1 transcripts peaked during early development, whereas levels of SUS activity and immunoreactive 93-kDa SUS polypeptides maximized during mid-development, becoming undetectable in fully mature COS. The cytosolic location of the enzyme was established following transient expression of RcSUS1-enhanced YFP in tobacco suspension cells and fluorescence microscopy. Immunological studies using anti-phosphosite-specific antibodies revealed dynamic and high stoichiometric in vivo phosphorylation of RcSUS1 at its conserved Ser-11 residue during COS development. Incorporation of (32)P(i) from [γ-(32)P]ATP into a RcSUS1 peptide substrate, alongside a phosphosite-specific ELISA assay, established the presence of calcium-dependent RcSUS1 (Ser-11) kinase activity. Approximately 10% of RcSUS1 was associated with COS microsomal membranes and was hypophosphorylated relative to the remainder of RcSUS1 that partitioned into the soluble, cytosolic fraction. Elimination of sucrose supply caused by excision of intact pods of developing COS abolished RcSUS1 transcription while triggering the progressive dephosphorylation of RcSUS1 in planta. This did not influence the proportion of RcSUS1 associated with microsomal membranes but instead correlated with a subsequent marked decline in SUS activity and immunoreactive RcSUS1 polypeptides. Phosphorylation at Ser-11 appears to protect RcSUS1 from proteolysis, rather than influence its kinetic properties or partitioning between the soluble cytosol and microsomal membranes.

  15. Overexpression of mitochondrial ferritin causes cytosolic iron depletion and changes cellular iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nie, Guangjun; Sheftel, Alex D; Kim, Sangwon F; Ponka, Prem

    2005-03-01

    Cytosolic ferritin sequesters and stores iron and, consequently, protects cells against iron-mediated free radical damage. However, the function of the newly discovered mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) is unknown. To examine the role of MtFt in cellular iron metabolism, we established a cell line that stably overexpresses mouse MtFt under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. The overexpression of MtFt caused a dose-dependent iron deficiency in the cytosol that was revealed by increased RNA-binding activity of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) along with an increase in transferrin receptor levels and decrease in cytosolic ferritin. Consequently, the induction of MtFt resulted in a dramatic increase in cellular iron uptake from transferrin, most of which was incorporated into MtFt. The induction of MtFt caused a shift of iron from cytosolic ferritin to MtFt. In addition, iron inserted into MtFt was less available for chelation than that in cytosolic ferritin and the expression of MtFt was associated with decreased mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase activities, the latter being consistent with the increase in IRP-binding activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that overexpression of MtFt causes a dramatic change in intracellular iron homeostasis and that shunting iron to MtFt likely limits its availability for active iron proteins.

  16. Cotransin induces accumulation of a cytotoxic clusterin variant that cotranslationally rerouted to the cytosol

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ilho; Kim, Jiyeon; Park, Joong-Yeol; Kang, Sang-Wook

    2013-05-01

    Although clusterin (CLU) was originally identified as a secreted glycoprotein that plays cytoprotective role, several intracellular CLU variants have been recently identified in the diverse pathological conditions. The mechanistic basis of these variants is now believed to be alternative splicing and retrotranslocation. Here, we uncovered, an unglycosylated and signal sequence-unprocessed, CLU variant in the cytosol. This variant proved to be a product that cotranslationally rerouted to the cytosol during translocation. Cytosolic CLU was prone to aggregation at peri-nuclear region of cells and induced cell death. Signal sequence is shown to be an important determinant for cytosolic CLU generation and aggregation. These results provide not only a new mechanistic insight into the cytosolic CLU generation but also an idea for therapeutic mislocalization of CLU as a strategy for cancer treatment. - Highlights: ► Intracellular CLU variants have been recently identified in the diverse pathological conditions. ► Translocation of clusterin is less efficient than that of Prl. ► We identified a new cytotoxic clusterin variant whose signal sequence was unprocessed. ► This variant proved to be a product that cotranslationally rerouted to cytosol.

  17. Requirements of the cytosolic iron–sulfur cluster assembly pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Delphine G.; Netz, Daili J. A.; Lagny, Thibaut J.; Pierik, Antonio J.; Balk, Janneke

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters requires dedicated protein factors inside the living cell. Striking similarities between prokaryotic and eukaryotic assembly proteins suggest that plant cells inherited two different pathways through endosymbiosis: the ISC pathway in mitochondria and the SUF pathway in plastids. Fe–S proteins are also found in the cytosol and nucleus, but little is known about how they are assembled in plant cells. Here, we show that neither plastid assembly proteins nor the cytosolic cysteine desulfurase ABA3 are required for the activity of cytosolic aconitase, which depends on a [4Fe–4S] cluster. In contrast, cytosolic aconitase activity depended on the mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase NFS1 and the mitochondrial transporter ATM3. In addition, we were able to complement a yeast mutant in the cytosolic Fe–S cluster assembly pathway, dre2, with the Arabidopsis homologue AtDRE2, but only when expressed together with the diflavin reductase AtTAH18. Spectroscopic characterization showed that purified AtDRE2 could bind up to two Fe–S clusters. Purified AtTAH18 bound one flavin per molecule and was able to accept electrons from NAD(P)H. These results suggest that the proteins involved in cytosolic Fe–S cluster assembly are highly conserved, and that dependence on the mitochondria arose before the second endosymbiosis event leading to plastids. PMID:23754812

  18. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor of cerebellum. Mn2+ permeability and regulation by cytosolic Mn2+

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R), an intracellular calcium release channel, is found in virtually all cells and is abundant in the cerebellum. We used Mn2+ as a tool to study two aspects of the cerebellar InsP3R. First, to investigate the structure of the ion pore, Mn2+ permeation through the channel was determined. We found that Mn2+ can pass through the InsP3R; the selectivity sequence for divalent cations is Ba2+ > Sr2+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Mn2+. Second, to begin characterization of the cytosolic regulatory sites responsible for the Ca(2+)-dependent modulation of InsP3R function, the ability of Mn2+ to replace Ca2+ was investigated. We show that Mn2+, as Ca2+, modulates InsP3R activity with a bell-shaped dependence where the affinity of the activation site of the InsP3R is similar for both ions, but higher concentrations of Mn2+ were necessary to inhibit the channel. These results suggest that the two regulatory sites are structurally distinct. Our findings are also important for the understanding of cellular responses when Mn2+ is used to quench the intracellular fluorescence of Ca2+ indicator dyes. PMID:8854341

  19. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  20. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Goldschlager N. Cardiovascular toxicology. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management ... SD. Calcium channel antagonists. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management ...

  1. Calcium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure Low blood level of albumin Liver disease Magnesium deficiency Pancreatitis Vitamin D deficiency ... PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 66. Leone KA. Calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine: ...

  2. Oscillations of Quasars.

    PubMed

    McVittie, G C

    1964-10-01

    Rotation in addition to free gravitational motion can produce oscillations in a large spherical mass of gas. The theory may provide an explanation of the variations of brightness in such objects as 3C273.

  3. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  4. Entraining synthetic genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; de Luis, Oscar; Izquierdo, Adriana; Coloma, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new approach for synchronizing a population of synthetic genetic oscillators, which consists in the entrainment of a colony of repressilators by external modulation. We present a model where the repressilator dynamics is affected by periodic changes in temperature. We introduce an additional plasmid in the bacteria in order to correlate the temperature variations with the enhancement of the transcription rate of a certain gene. This can be done by introducing a promoter that is related to the heat shock response. This way, the expression of that gene results in a protein that enhances the overall oscillations. Numerical results show coherent oscillations of the population for a certain range of the external frequency, which is in turn related to the natural oscillation frequency of the modified repressilator. Finally we study the transient times related with the loss of synchronization and we discuss possible applications in biotechnology of large-scale production coupled to synchronization events induced by heat shock.

  5. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  6. A nonlinear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlin, R.

    1990-01-27

    A nonlinear oscillator design was imported from Cornell modified, and built for the purpose of simulating the chaotic states of a forced pendulum. Similar circuits have been investigated in the recent nonlinear explosion.

  7. Oscillating fluid power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  8. Membrane depolarization increases ryanodine sensitivity to Ca2+ release to the cytosol in L6 skeletal muscle cells: Implications for excitation–contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    Pitake, Saumitra

    2015-01-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor in the plasma membrane and the ryanodine receptor in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are known to physically interact in the process of excitation–contraction coupling. However, the mechanism for subsequent Ca2+ release through the ryanodine receptor is unknown. Our lab has previously presented evidence that the dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor combine as a channel for the entry of Ca2+ under resting conditions, known as store operated calcium entry. Here, we provide evidence that depolarization during excitation–contraction coupling causes the dihydropyridine receptor to disengage from the ryanodine receptor. The newly freed ryanodine receptor can then transport Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol. Experimentally, this should more greatly expose the ryanodine receptor to exogenous ryanodine. To examine this hypothesis, we titrated L6 skeletal muscle cells with ryanodine in resting and excited (depolarized) states. When L6 muscle cells were depolarized with high potassium or exposed to the dihydropyridine receptor agonist BAYK-8644, known to induce dihydropyridine receptor movement within the membrane, ryanodine sensitivity was enhanced. However, ryanodine sensitivity was unaffected when Ca2+ was elevated without depolarization by the ryanodine receptor agonist chloromethylcresol, or by increasing Ca2+ concentration in the media. Ca2+ entry currents (from the extracellular space) during excitation were strongly inhibited by ryanodine, but Ca2+ entry currents in the resting state were not. We conclude that excitation releases the ryanodine receptor from occlusion by the dihydropyridine receptor, enabling Ca2+ release from the ryanodine receptor to the cytosol. PMID:26643865

  9. Membrane depolarization increases ryanodine sensitivity to Ca2+ release to the cytosol in L6 skeletal muscle cells: Implications for excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Pitake, Saumitra; Ochs, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor in the plasma membrane and the ryanodine receptor in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are known to physically interact in the process of excitation-contraction coupling. However, the mechanism for subsequent Ca(2+) release through the ryanodine receptor is unknown. Our lab has previously presented evidence that the dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor combine as a channel for the entry of Ca(2+) under resting conditions, known as store operated calcium entry. Here, we provide evidence that depolarization during excitation-contraction coupling causes the dihydropyridine receptor to disengage from the ryanodine receptor. The newly freed ryanodine receptor can then transport Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol. Experimentally, this should more greatly expose the ryanodine receptor to exogenous ryanodine. To examine this hypothesis, we titrated L6 skeletal muscle cells with ryanodine in resting and excited (depolarized) states. When L6 muscle cells were depolarized with high potassium or exposed to the dihydropyridine receptor agonist BAYK-8644, known to induce dihydropyridine receptor movement within the membrane, ryanodine sensitivity was enhanced. However, ryanodine sensitivity was unaffected when Ca(2+) was elevated without depolarization by the ryanodine receptor agonist chloromethylcresol, or by increasing Ca(2+) concentration in the media. Ca(2+) entry currents (from the extracellular space) during excitation were strongly inhibited by ryanodine, but Ca(2+) entry currents in the resting state were not. We conclude that excitation releases the ryanodine receptor from occlusion by the dihydropyridine receptor, enabling Ca(2+) release from the ryanodine receptor to the cytosol. PMID:26643865

  10. Membrane depolarization increases ryanodine sensitivity to Ca2+ release to the cytosol in L6 skeletal muscle cells: Implications for excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Pitake, Saumitra; Ochs, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor in the plasma membrane and the ryanodine receptor in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are known to physically interact in the process of excitation-contraction coupling. However, the mechanism for subsequent Ca(2+) release through the ryanodine receptor is unknown. Our lab has previously presented evidence that the dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor combine as a channel for the entry of Ca(2+) under resting conditions, known as store operated calcium entry. Here, we provide evidence that depolarization during excitation-contraction coupling causes the dihydropyridine receptor to disengage from the ryanodine receptor. The newly freed ryanodine receptor can then transport Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol. Experimentally, this should more greatly expose the ryanodine receptor to exogenous ryanodine. To examine this hypothesis, we titrated L6 skeletal muscle cells with ryanodine in resting and excited (depolarized) states. When L6 muscle cells were depolarized with high potassium or exposed to the dihydropyridine receptor agonist BAYK-8644, known to induce dihydropyridine receptor movement within the membrane, ryanodine sensitivity was enhanced. However, ryanodine sensitivity was unaffected when Ca(2+) was elevated without depolarization by the ryanodine receptor agonist chloromethylcresol, or by increasing Ca(2+) concentration in the media. Ca(2+) entry currents (from the extracellular space) during excitation were strongly inhibited by ryanodine, but Ca(2+) entry currents in the resting state were not. We conclude that excitation releases the ryanodine receptor from occlusion by the dihydropyridine receptor, enabling Ca(2+) release from the ryanodine receptor to the cytosol.

  11. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  12. Current oscillations in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Brittany

    We develop a simple phenomenological model to describe current oscillations in single, conically shaped nanopores. The model utilizes aspects of reaction rate theory, electrochemical oscillators, and nonlinear dynamical systems. Time series of experimental data were analyzed and compared to time series simulated using the model equations. There is good qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation, though the model needs to be improved in order to obtain better quantitative agreement.

  13. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  14. Periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-05-15

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through observation that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been observed in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.

  15. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M. E-mail: haiboyu@umich.edu

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations 'interpolate' between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle 'flavor' effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. 'Flavor-sensitive' DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while 'flavor-blind' interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  16. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  17. Measurement and analysis of calcium signaling in heterogeneous cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gillian R; Jack, Andrew D; Platts, Amy; Simpson, Peter B

    2006-01-01

    High-content imaging platforms capable of studying kinetic responses at a single-cell level have elevated kinetic recording techniques from labor-intensive low-throughput experiments to potential high-throughput screening assays. We have applied this technology to the investigation of heterogeneous cell cultures derived from primary neural tissue. The neuronal cultures mature into a coupled network and display spontaneous oscillations in intracellular calcium, which can be modified by the addition of pharmacological agents. We have developed algorithms to perform Fourier analysis and quantify both the degree of synchronization and the effects of modulators on the oscillations. Functional and phenotypic experiments can be combined using this approach. We have used post-hoc immunolabeling to identify subpopulations of cells in cocultures and to dissect the calcium responses of these cells from the population response. The combination of these techniques represents a powerful tool for drug discovery.

  18. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  19. Collective Calcium Signaling of Defective Multicellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A communicating multicellular network processes environmental cues into collective cellular dynamics. We have previously demonstrated that, when excited by extracellular ATP, fibroblast monolayers generate correlated calcium dynamics modulated by both the stimuli and gap junction communication between the cells. However, just as a well-connected neural network may be compromised by abnormal neurons, a tissue monolayer can also be defective with cancer cells, which typically have down regulated gap junctions. To understand the collective cellular dynamics in a defective multicellular network we have studied the calcium signaling of co-cultured breast cancer cells and fibroblast cells in various concentrations of ATP delivered through microfluidic devices. Our results demonstrate that cancer cells respond faster, generate singular spikes, and are more synchronous across all stimuli concentrations. Additionally, fibroblast cells exhibit persistent calcium oscillations that increase in regularity with greater stimuli. To interpret these results we quantitatively analyzed the immunostaining of purigenic receptors and gap junction channels. The results confirm our hypothesis that collective dynamics are mainly determined by the availability of gap junction communications.

  20. The active-bridge oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the Active-Bridge Oscillator (ABO), a new concept in high-stability oscillator design. The ABO is ab ridge-type oscillator design that is easly to design and overcomes many of the operational and design difficulties associated with standard bridge oscillator designs. The ABO will oscillate with a very stable output amplitude over a wide range of operating conditions without the use of an automatic-level-control (ALC). A standard bridge oscillator design requires an ALC to maintain the desired amplitude of oscillation. for this and other reasons, bridge oscilaltors are not used in mainstream designs. Bridge oscillators are generally relegated to relatively low-volume, high-performance applications. The Colpitts and Pierce designs are the most popular oscillators but are typically less stable than a bridge-type oscillator.

  1. High-frequency voltage oscillations in cultured astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Wiebke; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Holland, Christine; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Because of their close interaction with neuronal physiology, astrocytes can modulate brain function in multiple ways. Here, we demonstrate a yet unknown astrocytic phenomenon: Astrocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) exhibited extracellular voltage fluctuations in a broad frequency spectrum (100–600 Hz) after electrical stimulation. These aperiodic high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) could last several seconds and did not spread across the MEA. The voltage-gated calcium channel antagonist cilnidipine dose-dependently decreased the power of the oscillations. While intracellular calcium was pivotal, incubation with bafilomycin A1 showed that vesicular release of transmitters played only a minor role in the emergence of HFOs. Gap junctions and volume-regulated anionic channels had just as little functional impact, which was demonstrated by the addition of carbenoxolone (100 μmol/L) and NPPB (100 μmol/L). Hyperpolarization with low potassium in the extracellular solution (2 mmol/L) dramatically raised oscillation power. A similar effect was seen when we added extra sodium (+50 mmol/L) or if we replaced it with NMDG+ (50 mmol/L). The purinergic receptor antagonist PPADS suppressed the oscillation power, while the agonist ATP (100 μmol/L) had only an increasing effect when the bath solution pH was slightly lowered to pH 7.2. From these observations, we conclude that astrocytic voltage oscillations are triggered by activation of voltage-gated calcium channels and driven by a downstream influx of cations through channels that are permeable for large ions such as NMDG+. Most likely candidates are subtypes of pore-forming P2X channels with a low affinity for ATP. PMID:25969464

  2. Monitoring cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) in stimulated breast cancer cells using genetically encoded FRET sensors.

    PubMed

    Hessels, Anne M; Taylor, Kathryn M; Merkx, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    The Zn(2+)-specific ion channel ZIP7 has been implicated to play an important role in releasing Zn(2+) from the ER. External stimulation of breast cancer cells has been proposed to induce phosphorylation of ZIP7 by CK2α, resulting in ZIP7-mediated Zn(2+) release from the ER into the cytosol. Here, we examined whether changes in cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) concentrations can be detected upon such external stimuli. Two previously developed FRET sensors for Zn(2+), eZinCh-2 (Kd = 1 nM at pH 7.1) and eCALWY-4 (Kd = 0.63 nM at pH 7.1), were expressed in both the cytosol and the ER of wild-type MCF-7 and TamR cells. Treatment of MCF-7 and TamR cells with external Zn(2+) and pyrithione, one of the previously used triggers, resulted in an immediate increase in free Zn(2+) in both cytosol and ER, suggesting that Zn(2+) was directly transferred across the cellular membranes by pyrithione. Cells treated with a second trigger, EGF/ionomycin, showed no changes in intracellular Zn(2+) levels, neither in multicolor imaging experiments that allowed simultaneous imaging of cytosolic and ER Zn(2+), nor in experiments in which cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) were monitored separately. In contrast to previous work using small-molecule fluorescent dyes, these results indicate that EGF-ionomycin treatment does not result in significant changes in cytosolic Zn(2+) levels as a result from Zn(2+) release from the ER. These results underline the importance of using genetically encoded fluorescent sensors to complement and verify intracellular imaging experiments with synthetic fluorescent Zn(2+) dyes. PMID:26739447

  3. Non-coplanar PCBs induce calcium mobilization in bottlenose dolphin and beluga whale, but not in mouse leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Levin, Milton; Morsey, Brenda; De Guise, Sylvain

    2007-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been demonstrated to modulate marine mammal immune functions; however, the underlying mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) is an important second messenger involved in numerous leukocyte functions. The direct effects of in vitro exposure to PCBs on Ca2+ mobilization were evaluated in leukocytes isolated from bottlenose dolphins, beluga whales, and B6C3F1 mice. Concentration- and time-response experiments with three non-coplanar PCBs (138, 153, 180), one coplanar PCB (169), and TCDD were tested. Exposure to the three non-coplanar PCBs significantly increased cytosolic Ca2+ in dolphin neutrophils, while PCB 180 significantly increased cytosolic Ca2+ in beluga neutrophils. Two non-coplanar PCBs (138 and 153) significantly increased Ca2+ in beluga monocytes, yet the response was delayed compared to that in neutrophils. Neither PCBs nor TCDD increased cytosolic Ca2+ in mouse neutrophils or monocytes. In experiments with Ca2+-free medium, only PCB 153 increased cytosolic Ca2+ in dolphin neutrophils, though the increase was less than that observed with Ca2+-supplemented medium, suggesting that extracellular Ca2+ was the predominant source for the rise in cytosolic Ca2+. Furthermore, in cells incubated with Ca2+-free medium, a significant increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was induced by thapsigargin following PCB exposure, indicating that intracellular Ca2+ was available, yet not mobilized by the PCBs, and further suggesting that PCBs mobilize extracellular Ca2+. These results demonstrate for the first time the direct effects of non-coplanar PCBs on Ca2+ mobilization in marine mammals, which may be involved in the modulation of phagocytosis previously observed in these species.

  4. Glucose-Stimulated Calcium Dynamics in Islets of Langerhans in Acute Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Stožer, Andraž; Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak

    2013-01-01

    In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types of calcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidence that even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and that metabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future. PMID:23358454

  5. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  6. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    PubMed

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  7. Artemisinin Induces Calcium-Dependent Protein Secretion in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nagamune, Kisaburo; Beatty, Wandy L.; Sibley, L. David

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular calcium controls several crucial cellular events in apicomplexan parasites, including protein secretion, motility, and invasion into and egress from host cells. The plant compound thapsigargin inhibits the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), resulting in elevated calcium and induction of protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. Artemisinins are natural products that show potent and selective activity against parasites, making them useful for the treatment of malaria. While the mechanism of action is uncertain, previous studies have suggested that artemisinin may inhibit SERCA, thus disrupting calcium homeostasis. We cloned the single-copy gene encoding SERCA in T. gondii (TgSERCA) and demonstrate that the protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum in the parasite. In extracellular parasites, TgSERCA partially relocalized to the apical pole, a highly active site for regulated secretion of micronemes. TgSERCA complemented a calcium ATPase-defective yeast mutant, and this activity was inhibited by either thapsigargin or artemisinin. Treatment of T. gondii with artemisinin triggered calcium-dependent secretion of microneme proteins, similar to the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin. Artemisinin treatment also altered intracellular calcium in parasites by increasing the periodicity of calcium oscillations and inducing recurrent, strong calcium spikes, as imaged using Fluo-4 labeling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that artemisinin perturbs calcium homeostasis in T. gondii, supporting the idea that Ca2+-ATPases are potential drug targets in parasites. PMID:17766463

  8. Altered Calcium Handling in Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Bompotis, Georgios C; Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Choidis, Efthymios; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Kaoukis, Andreas; Vassilikos, Vassilios P; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is the major mortality cause in the Western Hemisphere. Reinstituting blood flow in the acutely occluded coronary vessel became the standard intervention to prevent Myocardial Infarct (MI) progression. Ever since their conception, thrombolysis, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) and Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) have been at the forefront of CHD treatment, limiting MI size. However, it quickly became apparent that after a period of ischemia, reperfusion itself sets off a cascade of events leading to cell injury. It seems that cellular changes in the ischemic period, prime the cell for a loss of homeostasis once blood flow returns. Loss of calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation has been found to be a main culprit in both ischemia and reperfusion. Indeed, sarcoplasmic Ca(2+) overload during reperfusion is related to hypercontracture, proteolysis and mitochondrial failure--the so-called Reperfusion Injury (RI). Ca(2+) channels of the sarcolemma (SL) (L-Type Ca((2+)) Channels, Sodium / Calcium Exchanger) initiate Ca(2+) flux and those of the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum (SR) (Ca(2+) ATPase, Ca(2+) release channel) sustain the rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Ensuing interplay between Ca(2+), SR, mitochondria, myofilaments and proteolytic cascades i.e. calpain activation, results in cell injury. Novel insight about this interplay and details about the extent by which each of these players contributes to the RI, may allow scientists to devise and design proper interventions that ultimately reduce RI in clinical practice. The present article reviews the literature about key subcellular players participating in the sustained rise of cardiac myocyte cytosolic Ca(2+) during ischemia and reperfusion.

  9. Finite q-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Klimyk, Anatoliy U.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2004-05-01

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra suq(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x_s={\\case12}[2s]_q, s\\in\\{-j,-j+1,\\ldots,j\\} , and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schrödinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q rarr 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j rarr infin limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  10. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  11. Intrinsic oscillations of neocortex generated by layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Silva, L R; Amitai, Y; Connors, B W

    1991-01-25

    Rhythmic activity in the neocortex varies with different behavioral and pathological states and in some cases may encode sensory information. However, the neural mechanisms of these oscillations are largely unknown. Many pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the neocortex showed prolonged, 5- to 12-hertz rhythmic firing patterns at threshold. Rhythmic firing was due to intrinsic membrane properties, sodium conductances were essential for rhythmicity, and calcium-dependent conductances strongly modified rhythmicity. Isolated slices of neocortex generated epochs of 4- to 10-hertz synchronized activity when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated channels were facilitated. Layer 5 was both necessary and sufficient to produce these synchronized oscillations. Thus, synaptic networks of intrinsically rhythmic neurons in layer 5 may generate or promote certain synchronized oscillations of the neocortex.

  12. Hsp90 is involved in the regulation of cytosolic precursor protein abundance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Bodo; Röth, Sascha; Bublak, Daniela; Sommer, Manuel; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Cytosolic chaperones are involved in the regulation of cellular protein homeostasis in general. Members of the families of heat stress proteins 70 (Hsp70) and 90 (Hsp90) assist the transport of preproteins to organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. In addition, Hsp70 was described to be involved in the degradation of chloroplast preproteins that accumulate in the cytosol. Because a similar function has not been established for Hsp90, we analyzed the influences of Hsp90 and Hsp70 on the protein abundance in the cellular context using an in vivo system based on mesophyll protoplasts. We observed a differential behavior of preproteins with respect to the cytosolic chaperone-dependent regulation. Some preproteins such as pOE33 show a high dependence on Hsp90, whereas the abundance of preproteins such as pSSU is more strongly dependent on Hsp70. The E3 ligase, C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (Chip), appears to have a more general role in the control of cytosolic protein abundance. We discuss why the different reaction modes are comparable with the cytosolic unfolded protein response. PMID:25619681

  13. Reversal of Cytosolic One-Carbon Flux Compensates for Loss of the Mitochondrial Folate Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ducker, Gregory S; Chen, Li; Morscher, Raphael J; Ghergurovich, Jonathan M; Esposito, Mark; Teng, Xin; Kang, Yibin; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2016-06-14

    One-carbon (1C) units for purine and thymidine synthesis can be generated from serine by cytosolic or mitochondrial folate metabolism. The mitochondrial 1C pathway is consistently overexpressed in cancer. Here, we show that most but not all proliferating mammalian cell lines use the mitochondrial pathway as the default for making 1C units. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-mediated mitochondrial pathway knockout activates cytosolic 1C-unit production. This reversal in cytosolic flux is triggered by depletion of a single metabolite, 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (10-formyl-THF), and enables rapid cell growth in nutrient-replete conditions. Loss of the mitochondrial pathway, however, renders cells dependent on extracellular serine to make 1C units and on extracellular glycine to make glutathione. HCT-116 colon cancer xenografts lacking mitochondrial 1C pathway activity generate the 1C units required for growth by cytosolic serine catabolism. Loss of both pathways precludes xenograft formation. Thus, either mitochondrial or cytosolic 1C metabolism can support tumorigenesis, with the mitochondrial pathway required in nutrient-poor conditions. PMID:27211901

  14. Stimulation of hormone-responsive adenylate cyclase activity by a factor present in the cell cytosol.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S; Crawford, A; Amirrasooli, H; Johnson, S; Pollock, A; Ollis, C; Tomlinson, S

    1980-01-01

    1. Homogenates of whole tissues were shown to contain both intracellular and extracellular factors that affected particulate adenylate cyclase activity in vitro. Factors present in the extracellular fluids produced an inhibition of basal, hormone- and fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity but factors present in the cell cytosol increased hormone-stimulated activity with relatively little effect on basal or fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity. 2. The existence of this cytosol factor or factors was investigated using freshly isolated human platelets, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, and cultured cells derived from rat osteogenic sarcoma, rat calvaria, mouse melanoma, pig aortic endothelium, human articular cartilage chondrocytes and human bronchial carcinoma (BEN) cells. 3. The stimulation of the hormone response by the cytosol factor ranged from 60 to 890% depending on the tissue of origin of the adenylate cyclase. 4. In each case the behaviour of the factor was similar to the action of GTP on that particular adenylate cyclase preparation. 5. No evidence of tissue or species specificity was found, as cytosols stimulated adenylate cyclase from their own and unrelated tissues to the same degree. 6. In the human platelet, the inclusion of the cytosol in the assay of adenylate cyclase increased the rate of enzyme activity in response to stimulation by prostaglandin E1 without affecting the amount of prostaglandin E1 required for half-maximal stimulation or the characteristics of enzyme activation by prostaglandin E. PMID:7396869

  15. Differential effects of polyamine on the cytosolic and mitochondrial NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Haneda, Miyako; Iwata, Shouko; Yoshino, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    Two isozymes of NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.42) exist in mammalian tissues: mitochondrial (ICD1) and cytosolic (ICD2). Effects of polyamines such as spermine, spermidine, and putrescine on the cytosolic and mitochondrial NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenases were analyzed kinetically. Spermine activated ICD2, the cytosolic NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase from rat liver with the increase in the maximal velocity and the decrease in the affinity for the substrates isocitrate and NADP. The activating action of spermine can be explained by "the uncompetitive effect," and the dissociation constant of spermine for the enzyme-substrate complex was determined to be 1.68 mM. Spermidine and putrescine showed little or no effect. ICD1, the mitochondrial form of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase from rat and porcine heart was inhibited by spermine effectively, and by spermidine and putrescine to a lesser extent. Spermine inhibited the enzyme competitively with respect to NADP, and noncompetitively with respect to isocitrate. K(i) value of the enzyme for spermine was 1.3 mM. These results suggest that activation by spermine of cytosolic NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase can enhance the antioxidant activity by regeneration of GSH, and further is responsible for the stimulation of lipid biosynthesis in cytosol. Spermine may contribute to NADPH supply by enhancing transhydrogenase (EC1.6.1.2) activity through the spermine-dependent activation of Ca(2+) -incorporation to mitochondria.

  16. Cytosolic Ca(2+) Signals Enhance the Vacuolar Ion Conductivity of Bulging Arabidopsis Root Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Dindas, Julian; Rienmüller, Florian; Krebs, Melanie; Waadt, Rainer; Schumacher, Karin; Wu, Wei-Hua; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M Rob G

    2015-11-01

    Plant cell expansion depends on the uptake of solutes across the plasma membrane and their storage within the vacuole. In contrast to the well-studied plasma membrane, little is known about the regulation of ion transport at the vacuolar membrane. We therefore established an experimental approach to study vacuolar ion transport in intact Arabidopsis root cells, with multi-barreled microelectrodes. The subcellular position of electrodes was detected by imaging current-injected fluorescent dyes. Comparison of measurements with electrodes in the cytosol and vacuole revealed an average vacuolar membrane potential of -31 mV. Voltage clamp recordings of single vacuoles resolved the activity of voltage-independent and slowly deactivating channels. In bulging root hairs that express the Ca(2+) sensor R-GECO1, rapid elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was observed, after impalement with microelectrodes, or injection of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA. Elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level stimulated the activity of voltage-independent channels in the vacuolar membrane. Likewise, the vacuolar ion conductance was enhanced during a sudden increase of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level in cells injected with fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator FURA-2. These data thus show that cytosolic Ca(2+) signals can rapidly activate vacuolar ion channels, which may prevent rupture of the vacuolar membrane, when facing mechanical forces. PMID:26232520

  17. TRIM21: a cytosolic Fc receptor with broad antibody isotype specificity

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Stian; Watkinson, Ruth; Sandlie, Inger; James, Leo C; Andersen, Jan Terje

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are key molecules in the fight against infections. Although previously thought to mediate protection solely in the extracellular environment, recent research has revealed that antibody-mediated protection extends to the cytosolic compartment of cells. This postentry viral defense mechanism requires binding of the antibody to a cytosolic Fc receptor named tripartite motif containing 21 (TRIM21). In contrast to other Fc receptors, TRIM21 shows remarkably broad isotype specificity as it does not only bind IgG but also IgM and IgA. When viral pathogens coated with these antibody isotypes enter the cytosol, TRIM21 is rapidly recruited and efficient neutralization occurs before the virus has had the time to replicate. In addition, inflammatory signaling is induced. As such, TRIM21 acts as a cytosolic sensor that engages antibodies that have failed to protect against infection in the extracellular environment. Here, we summarize our current understanding of how TRIM21 orchestrates humoral immunity in the cytosolic environment. PMID:26497531

  18. Role of cytosol in the stimulation of RNA transport in vitro during cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, A; Thirunavukkarasu, M; Rajamanickam, C

    1990-01-01

    The 100,000 g supernatant isolated from hypertrophic hearts on fractionation by (NH4)2SO4 and DEAE-cellulose chromatography showed an enhanced RNA-transport activity when incubated with isolated nuclei from sham-operated hearts in vitro. Proteins of Mr 73,000, 68,000, 43,000 and 32,000 are enriched in the DEAE-cellulose fractions exhibiting maximal transport activity, and they are phosphorylatable. Pretreatment of the cytosol with antibodies to the Mr-68,000 and -32,000 proteins decreases the transport activity of the cytosol from 14% to 4.25%. Proteins of Mr 73,000, 68,000, 43,000 and 32,000 are translocated from the cytosol to the nuclear envelope under conditions of RNA transport in vitro. Our results here suggest that at least two of these proteins, those of Mr 68,000 and 32,000, play an indispensible role in the nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport in vitro. By making use of a specific myosin heavy-chain B-gene probe and hybridization, we have also shown the effect of cytosol on the transport of myosin heavy-chain mRNA from nucleus to cytosol. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:1691634

  19. Efficient cytosolic delivery mediated by polymersomes facilely prepared from a degradable, amphiphilic, and amphoteric copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhonghui; Teng, Wei; Liu, Longshan; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Qinmei; Dong, Yugang

    2013-07-01

    To solve problems in polymersome preparation caused by liposolubility of copolymers and to improve the cytosolic delivery efficiency of polymersomes to drugs, a lipopolysaccharide-amine (LPSA) copolymer with amphotericity and amphiphilicity is developed. LPSA contains two hydrophilic oppositely charged blocks (anionic oxidized alginate (OA), cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI 1.8k)) and one hydrophobic block (cholesteryl), where OA is the backbone and cholesteryl-grafted PEI is the side chain. The two hydrophilic blocks first guarantee that LPSA will dissolve in water, and then help polymersome formation via electrostatic interactions to generate water insoluble interpolyelectrolyte complexes, which supplement the hydrophobic part to reach the right hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity ratio, and thus realize a one-step self-assembly of polymersomes in water. Our results show LPSA nanopolymersomes (LNPs) have low cytotoxicity and degradability, and an excellent ability to enter cells. TEM observation demonstrates that LNPs are entrapped in endosomes after endocytosis, and are then released to cytosols because of their strong endosomal escape capacity. As an example of cytosolic delivery to bioactive molecules, pDNA is delivered in mesenchymal stem cells, and more than 95% of cells express a large target protein, indicating that LNPs have high cytosolic delivery efficiency. Our study provides a novel, easy, and universal method to design copolymers for the preparation of polymersomes as efficient cytosolic delivery nanocarriers.

  20. Periportal zonation of the cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase of male rat liver.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, C T; Immerdal, L; Grunnet, N; Quistorff, B

    1992-02-15

    Several important metabolic functions of the mammalian liver have been shown to be located in zones with respect to the complex microcirculation of the organ. The zonal distribution of the cytosolic component of the acetyl-CoA synthetase activity has been investigated using the dual-digitonin-pulse-perfusion technique, which allows highly zone-selective sampling of cytosol from the periportal and perivenous zone of rat liver. Approximately 80% of the cytosolic enzymes are eluted from the hepatocytes in the periportal and perivenous sub-zones affected by digitonin, while less than 1% of the glutamate dehydrogenase activity (a marker enzyme of the mitochondrial compartment) is eluted. A twofold higher activity of the cytosolic form of acetyl-CoA synthetase is found in the periportal zone compared to the perivenous zone in fed male rats. Following a fasting/refeeding transition, this activity gradient is abolished in a manner similar to that observed for the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Since the latter enzyme is utilizing the product of acetyl-CoA synthetase, acetyl-CoA, the similarity in the observed regulation suggests a functional coupling between cytosolic acetate activation and fatty-acid synthesis.

  1. Regulation of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System–mediated Degradation by Cytosolic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sean M.; VanSlyke, Judy K.

    2007-01-01

    ER-associated, ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS)-mediated degradation of the wild-type (WT) gap junction protein connexin32 (Cx32) is inhibited by mild forms of cytosolic stress at a step before its dislocation into the cytosol. We show that the same conditions (a 30-min, 42°C heat shock or oxidative stress induced by arsenite) also reduce the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated turnover of disease-causing mutants of Cx32 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), as well as that of WT CFTR and unassembled Ig light chain. Stress-stabilized WT Cx32 and CFTR, but not the mutant/unassembled proteins examined, could traverse the secretory pathway. Heat shock also slowed the otherwise rapid UPS-mediated turnover of the cytosolic proteins myoD and GFPu, but not the degradation of an ubiquitination-independent construct (GFP-ODC) closely related to the latter. Analysis of mutant Cx32 from cells exposed to proteasome inhibitors and/or cytosolic stress indicated that stress reduces degradation at the level of substrate polyubiquitination. These findings reveal a new link between the cytosolic stress-induced heat shock response, ER-associated degradation, and polyubiquitination. Stress-denatured proteins may titer a limiting component of the ubiquitination machinery away from pre-existing UPS substrates, thereby sparing the latter from degradation. PMID:17699585

  2. Binding proteins for growth hormone and prolactin in rabbit kidney cytosol

    SciTech Connect

    Herington, A.C.; Stevenson, J.L.; Ymer, S.I. )

    1988-09-01

    Two soluble, receptor-like binding proteins with apparent somatotrophic (growth hormone (GH)) and lactogenic (prolactin (PRL)) specificities, respectively, and that are present in rabbit kidney cytosol have now been examined in more detail using specific GH receptor and PRL receptor monoclonal antibodies (MAb). Gel chromatography of {sup 125}I-labeled human GH ({sup 125}I-hGH) kidney cytosol complexes in the absence of these MAbs revealed two specifically bound regions of radioactivity at molecular weights (MW) of {approximately}120,000 and {approximately}60,000, which are similar in size to complexes formed by the native GH receptor of rabbit liver cytosol and the PRL receptor of mammary gland. Co-incubation with GH-receptor MAb inhibited {sup 125}I-hGH binding only to the higher MW (120,000) species, whereas the PRL-receptor MAb inhibited only the lower MW (60,000) species, thus establishing definitively the hormonal specificities of the two binding proteins. The presence of both GH- and PRL-specific binding subunits in cytosol was confirmed using covalent cross-linking techniques. No GH binding protein was detected in kidney membranes. The presence of naturally soluble, receptor-like binding proteins for GH and PRL in kidney cytosol preparations raises the possibility of their playing a role in the intracellular regulation of kidney function and/or metabolism.

  3. Cytosolic Ca(2+) Signals Enhance the Vacuolar Ion Conductivity of Bulging Arabidopsis Root Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Dindas, Julian; Rienmüller, Florian; Krebs, Melanie; Waadt, Rainer; Schumacher, Karin; Wu, Wei-Hua; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M Rob G

    2015-11-01

    Plant cell expansion depends on the uptake of solutes across the plasma membrane and their storage within the vacuole. In contrast to the well-studied plasma membrane, little is known about the regulation of ion transport at the vacuolar membrane. We therefore established an experimental approach to study vacuolar ion transport in intact Arabidopsis root cells, with multi-barreled microelectrodes. The subcellular position of electrodes was detected by imaging current-injected fluorescent dyes. Comparison of measurements with electrodes in the cytosol and vacuole revealed an average vacuolar membrane potential of -31 mV. Voltage clamp recordings of single vacuoles resolved the activity of voltage-independent and slowly deactivating channels. In bulging root hairs that express the Ca(2+) sensor R-GECO1, rapid elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was observed, after impalement with microelectrodes, or injection of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA. Elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level stimulated the activity of voltage-independent channels in the vacuolar membrane. Likewise, the vacuolar ion conductance was enhanced during a sudden increase of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level in cells injected with fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator FURA-2. These data thus show that cytosolic Ca(2+) signals can rapidly activate vacuolar ion channels, which may prevent rupture of the vacuolar membrane, when facing mechanical forces.

  4. A fragment of anthrax lethal factor delivers proteins to the cytosol without requiring protective antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Nicholas; Zhang, Dong; Touzjian, Neal; Essex, Max; Lieberman, Judy; Lu, Yichen

    2003-01-01

    Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is a 735-aa polypeptide that facilitates the exit of anthrax lethal factor (LF) from the endosome to the cytosol where the toxin acts. We recently found, however, that a fusion protein of the detoxified N-terminal domain of lethal factor (LFn) with a foreign peptide could induce CD8 T cell immune responses in the absence of PA. Because CD8 T cells recognize peptides derived from proteins degraded in the cytosol, this result suggests that lethal factor may be capable of entering the cytosol independently of PA. To investigate this further, the intracellular trafficking of an LFn-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion protein (LFn-GFP) in the presence or absence of PA was examined by using confocal microscopy. LFn-GFP is able to enter the cytosol without PA. Moreover, it efficiently colocalizes with the proteosome 20s subunit, which degrades proteins into peptides for presentation to CD8 T cells by the MHC class I pathway. We further demonstrate that in the presence of an immune adjuvant LFn fusion protein without PA is able to effectively elicit anti-HIV cytotoxic T lymphocyte in inbred mice. These results indicate that LFn may be used without PA in a protein vaccine as a carrier to deliver antigens into the cytosol for efficient induction of T lymphocyte responses. Furthermore, these results enable us to propose a modified molecular mechanism of anthrax lethal toxin. PMID:12740437

  5. The role of cytosolic proteins in the insertion of tail-anchored proteins into phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sara F; Longhi, Renato; Borgese, Nica

    2009-07-15

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are membrane proteins that contain an N-terminal domain exposed to the cytosol and a single transmembrane segment near the C-terminus followed by few or no polar residues. TA proteins with a mildly hydrophobic transmembrane domain, such as cytochrome b5 (b5), are able to insert post-translationally into pure lipid vesicles without assistance from membrane proteins. Here, we investigated whether any cytosolic proteins are needed to maintain b5 in a competent state for transmembrane integration. Using b5 constructs translated in vitro or produced in bacteria, we demonstrate that cytosolic proteins are neither necessary nor facilitatory for the unassisted translocation of b5. Furthermore, we demonstrate that no cytosolic protein is involved in the translocation of a C-terminal domain of 85 residues appended to the transmembrane domain of b5. Nevertheless, b5 does bind cytosolic proteins, and in their presence but not in their absence, its insertion into liposomes is inhibited by the thiol oxidant diamide and the alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide. The effect of diamide is also observed in living cells. Thus, the specific in vivo targeting of b5 might be achieved by interaction with redox-sensitive targeting factors that hinder its nonspecific insertion into any permissive bilayer.

  6. The size and curvature of anionic covesicle substrate affects the catalytic action of cytosolic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Burke, J R; Witmer, M R; Tredup, J A

    1999-05-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is normally located in the cytosol, but in response to cellular activation the enzyme binds to the membrane at the lipid/water interface where it catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 ester of arachidonate-containing phospholipids. Synthetic phospholipid vesicle systems have been used in kinetic and mechanistic analyses of cPLA2, but these systems result in a rapid loss of enzyme activity. In the present research, covesicles of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphomethanol (DMPM) containing

  7. Digital numerically controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Huey, D. C.; Ma, L. N. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and phase of an output signal from an oscillator circuit are controlled with accuracy by a digital input word. Positive and negative alterations in output frequency are both provided for by translating all values of input words so that they are positive. The oscillator reference frequency is corrected only in one direction, by adding phase to the output frequency of the oscillator. The input control word is translated to a single algebraic sign and the digital 1 is added thereto. The translated input control word is then accumulated. A reference clock signal having a frequency at an integer multiple of the desired frequency of the output signal is generated. The accumulated control word is then compared with a threshold level. The output signal is adjusted in a single direction by dividing the frequency of the reference clock signal by a first integer or by an integer different from the first integer.

  8. The Fastest Quasiperiodic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at frequencies near 1000 Hz have been detected from a umber of neutron star x-ray binaries using RXTE. These fast oscillations are likely associated with rbital motion very close to the neutron star and and, thus, give us information about the behavior of the accretion disk in the strong gravitational field near the neutron star. The oscillation frequencies can also be used to place constraints on the properties of the neutron stars with the highest detected frequencies being the most constraining. We propose TOOs observations of selected neutron star x-ray binaries when found to be in states likely to produce kHz QPOs with frequencies exceeding 1200 Hz.

  9. The calcium-signaling toolkit: Updates needed.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Charlotte; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Vanden Abeele, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Here, we review the role of Ca(2+) in apoptosis, namely that ER Ca(2+) depletion or a sustained elevation of cytosolic or mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration are sufficient to trigger apoptosis. These concepts have emerged by the use of ER stressor agents that decrease the ER Ca(2+) pool by inhibiting SERCA pumps. However, aside from their well-known actions on Ca(2+) homeostasis disruption leading to apoptosis, new evidence show that some ER Ca(2+) modulators have significant implications in other Ca(2+)-mediated or Ca(2+)-independent pathways determining cell fate suggesting a more complex regulation of apoptosis by intracellular Ca(2+). Here, we discuss the crucial interplay between Ca(2+) mediated apoptosis, the Unfold Protein Response and autophagy determining cell fate, and the molecular compounds that have been used to depict these pathways. This review of the literature clearly shows the need for new inhibitors that do not interfere concomitantly with autophagy and Ca(2+) signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen.

  10. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  11. ER-Dependent Ca++-mediated Cytosolic ROS as an Effector for Induction of Mitochondrial Apoptotic and ATM-JNK Signal Pathways in Gallic Acid-treated Human Oral Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Liang; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2016-02-01

    Release of calcium (Ca(++)) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been proposed to be involved in induction of apoptosis by oxidative stress. Using inhibitor of ER Ca(++) release dantrolene and inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(++) uptake Ru-360, we demonstrated that Ca(++) release from the ER was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis of human oral cancer (OC) cells induced by gallic acid (GA). Small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase inhibited tunicamycin-induced induction of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, C/EBP homologous protein, pro-caspase-12 cleavage, cytosolic Ca(++) increase and apoptosis, but did not attenuate the increase in cytosolic Ca(++) level and apoptosis induced by GA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and apoptosis by GA was blocked by dantrolene. The specificity of ROS-mediated ATM-JNK activation was confirmed by treatment with N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger. Blockade of ATM activation by specific inhibitor KU55933, short hairpin RNA, or kinase-dead ATM overexpression suppressed JNK phosphorylation but did not completely inhibit cytosolic ROS production, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, pro-caspase-3 cleavage, and apoptosis induced by GA. Taken together, these results indicate that GA induces OC cell apoptosis by inducing the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic and ATM-JNK signal pathways, likely through ER Ca(++)-mediated ROS production. PMID:26851027

  12. ER-Dependent Ca++-mediated Cytosolic ROS as an Effector for Induction of Mitochondrial Apoptotic and ATM-JNK Signal Pathways in Gallic Acid-treated Human Oral Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Liang; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2016-02-01

    Release of calcium (Ca(++)) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been proposed to be involved in induction of apoptosis by oxidative stress. Using inhibitor of ER Ca(++) release dantrolene and inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(++) uptake Ru-360, we demonstrated that Ca(++) release from the ER was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis of human oral cancer (OC) cells induced by gallic acid (GA). Small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase inhibited tunicamycin-induced induction of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, C/EBP homologous protein, pro-caspase-12 cleavage, cytosolic Ca(++) increase and apoptosis, but did not attenuate the increase in cytosolic Ca(++) level and apoptosis induced by GA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and apoptosis by GA was blocked by dantrolene. The specificity of ROS-mediated ATM-JNK activation was confirmed by treatment with N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger. Blockade of ATM activation by specific inhibitor KU55933, short hairpin RNA, or kinase-dead ATM overexpression suppressed JNK phosphorylation but did not completely inhibit cytosolic ROS production, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, pro-caspase-3 cleavage, and apoptosis induced by GA. Taken together, these results indicate that GA induces OC cell apoptosis by inducing the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic and ATM-JNK signal pathways, likely through ER Ca(++)-mediated ROS production.

  13. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  14. Gamma Oscillation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Brian F.; Youn, Soyoung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional neural circuitry has been found to be involved in abnormalities of perception and cognition in patients with schizophrenia. Gamma oscillations are essential for integrating information within neural circuits and have therefore been associated with many perceptual and cognitive processes in healthy human subjects and animals. This review presents an overview of the neural basis of gamma oscillations and the abnormalities in the GABAergic interneuronal system thought to be responsible for gamma-range deficits in schizophrenia. We also review studies of gamma activity in sensory and cognitive processes, including auditory steady state response, attention, object representation, and working memory, in animals, healthy humans and patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22216037

  15. Advances in optoelectronic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguimdo, Romain M.; Saleh, Khaldoun; Lin, Guoping; Matinenghi, Romain; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-02-01

    Optoelectronic oscillators are used for a wide variety of applications in microwave photonics. We here report the latest advances in this technology from our research group, with emphasis on the analysis of phase noise performance. We present a stochastic modelling approach for phase noise performance analysis of optoelectronic oscillators based on whispering gallery mode resonators and/or optical fiber delay lines, and the theory is complemented with experimental measurements. We provide a detailed theoretical analysis which enables us to find the stationary states of the system as well as their stability. Our calculations also permit to find explicit formulas for the phase noise spectra, thereby allowing for their optimization.

  16. Micromechanical Oscillating Mass Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, David A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A micromechanical oscillating mass balance and method adapted for measuring minute quantities of material deposited at a selected location, such as during a vapor deposition process. The invention comprises a vibratory composite beam which includes a dielectric layer sandwiched between two conductive layers. The beam is positioned in a magnetic field. An alternating current passes through one conductive layers, the beam oscillates, inducing an output current in the second conductive layer, which is analyzed to determine the resonant frequency of the beam. As material is deposited on the beam, the mass of the beam increases and the resonant frequency of the beam shifts, and the mass added is determined.

  17. The Cytosolic pH of Individual Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Is a Key Factor in Acetic Acid Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Niño, Miguel; Marquina, Maribel; Swinnen, Steve; Rodríguez-Porrata, Boris; Nevoigt, Elke; Ariño, Joaquín

    2015-11-01

    It was shown recently that individual cells of an isogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae population show variability in acetic acid tolerance, and this variability affects the quantitative manifestation of the trait at the population level. In the current study, we investigated whether cell-to-cell variability in acetic acid tolerance could be explained by the observed differences in the cytosolic pHs of individual cells immediately before exposure to the acid. Results obtained with cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D in synthetic medium containing 96 mM acetic acid (pH 4.5) showed a direct correlation between the initial cytosolic pH and the cytosolic pH drop after exposure to the acid. Moreover, only cells with a low initial cytosolic pH, which experienced a less severe drop in cytosolic pH, were able to proliferate. A similar correlation between initial cytosolic pH and cytosolic pH drop was also observed in the more acid-tolerant strain MUCL 11987-9. Interestingly, a fraction of cells in the MUCL 11987-9 population showed initial cytosolic pH values below the minimal cytosolic pH detected in cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D; consequently, these cells experienced less severe drops in cytosolic pH. Although this might explain in part the difference between the two strains with regard to the number of cells that resumed proliferation, it was observed that all cells from strain MUCL 11987-9 were able to proliferate, independently of their initial cytosolic pH. Therefore, other factors must also be involved in the greater ability of MUCL 11987-9 cells to endure strong drops in cytosolic pH.

  18. Metal exposures to native populations of the caddisfly Hydropsyche (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) determined from cytosolic and whole body metal concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, D.J.; Luoma, S.N.

    1998-01-01

    Metal concentrations of the soluble fraction of the cytoplasm (cytosol) and the whole body were determined in the caddisfly Hydropsyche spp. (Trichoptera). Metal accumulation in the cytosol and the whole body were compared in samples collected along 380 kms of a contamination gradient in the Clark Fork river in four consecutive years (1992-1995), and from a contaminated tributary (Flint Creek). Samples from the contaminated sites were compared to an uncontaminated tributary (Blackfoot River). Relations between cytosolic metal concentration and cytosolic protein (used as a general biomarker of protein metabolism) also were examined in 1994 and 1995. Relative to whole body concentrations, cytosolic metal concentrations varied among metals and years. Spatial patterns in whole body and cytosolic Cd, Cu and Pb concentrations were qualitatively similar each year, and these concentrations generally corresponded to contamination levels measured in bed sediments. The proportions of metals recovered in the cytosol of ranged from 12 to 64% for Cd and Cu and from 2 to 38% for Pb. Zinc in the whole body also was consistent with contamination levels, but cytosolic Zn concentrations increased only at the highest whole body Zn concentrations. As a result, the proportion of Zn recovered in the cytosol ranged from 16 to 63% and tended to be inversely related to whole body Zn concentrations. The proportions of cytosolic metals varied significantly among years and, as a result, interannual differences in metal concentrations were greater in the cytosol than in the whole body. The results demonstrated that Hydropsyche in the river were chronically exposed to biologically available metals. Some features of this exposure were not evident from whole body concentrations. In general, protein levels did not correspond to cytosolic metal concentrations. A variety of environmental factors could interact with metal exposures to produce complex responses in protein metabolism. Systematic study

  19. Calcium uptake and release by isolated cortices and microsomes from the unfertilized egg of the sea urchin strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Oberdorf, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Two subcellular fractions of the sea urchin egg were studied for their potential role in regulating the transient rise in cytosolic calcium that accompanies fertilization. Isolated cortices from unfertilized sea urchin eggs sequester calcium in an ATP dependent manner when incubated in a medium containing free calcium levels characteristic of the resting cell. This ATP dependent calcium uptake activity, measured in the presence of 5mM Na Azide to prevent mitochondrial accumulation, was increased by oxalate, and was blocked by 150 ..mu..M quercetin and 50 ..mu..M vanadate. Cortices preloaded with /sup 45/Ca in the presence of ATP dramatically increased their rate of calcium efflux upon the addition of (1) the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ..mu..M), (2) trifluoperazine (200 ..mu..M), (3) concentrations of free calcium that activated cortical granule exocytosis, and (4) the calcium mobilizing agent inositol trisphosphate (IP3). This pool of calcium is most likely sequestered in the portion of the egg's endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that remains associated with the cortical region during its isolation. They have developed a method for obtaining a high yield of purified microsomal vesicles from whole eggs. This preparation also demonstrates ATP dependent calcium sequestering activity which increases in the presence of oxalate and has similar sensitivities to calcium transport inhibitors, however the isolated microsomal vesicles did not show any detectable release of calcium when exposed to IP3. Procedures originally developed for purifying calsequestrin were used to partially purify a 58,000 MW protein from the egg's microsomal vesicles.

  20. Coupled opto-electronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A coupled opto-electronic oscillator that directly couples a laser oscillation with an electronic oscillation to simultaneously achieve a stable RF oscillation at a high frequency and ultra-short optical pulsation by mode locking with a high repetition rate and stability. Single-mode selection can be achieved even with a very long opto-electronic loop. A multimode laser can be used to pump the electronic oscillation, resulting in a high operation efficiency. The optical and the RF oscillations are correlated to each other.

  1. Calcium Dynamics in Root Cells of Arabidopsis thaliana Visualized with Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alex; Candeo, Alessia; Fieramonti, Luca; Valentini, Gianluca; Bassi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM) is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized. PMID:24146766

  2. Comparing the Calcium Binding Abilities of Two Soybean Calmodulins: Towards Understanding the Divergent Nature of Plant Calmodulins[W

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Jessica L.; Jamshidiha, Mostafa; Mo, Jeffrey; Ishida, Hiroaki; Vogel, Hans J.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that plants contain multiple calmodulin (CaM) isoforms of variable sequence identity to animal CaM suggested an additional level of sophistication in the intracellular role of calcium regulation in plants. Past research has focused on the ability of conserved or divergent plant CaM isoforms to activate both mammalian and plant protein targets. At present, however, not much is known about how these isoforms respond to the signal of an increased cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy, we investigated the calcium binding properties of a conserved (CaM1) and a divergent (CaM4) CaM isoform from soybean (Glycine max). Both isoforms bind calcium with a semisequential pathway that favors the calcium binding EF-hands of the C-terminal lobe over those of the N-terminal lobe. From the measured dissociation constants, CaM4 binds calcium with a threefold greater affinity than CaM1 (Kd,Ca,mean of 5.0 versus 14.9 μM) but has a significantly reduced selectivity against the chemically similar magnesium cation that binds preferentially to EF-hand I of both isoforms. The implications of a potential magnesium/calcium competition on the activation of CaM1 and CaM4 are discussed in context with their ability to respond to stimulus-specific calcium signatures and their known physiological roles. PMID:24254124

  3. Identification of the Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin Domain Active in the Cell Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    de Bernard, Marina; Burroni, Daniela; Papini, Emanuele; Rappuoli, Rino; Telford, John; Montecucco, Cesare

    1998-01-01

    Cells exposed to Helicobacter pylori toxin VacA develop large vacuoles which originate from massive swelling of membranous compartments at late stages of the endocytic pathway. When expressed in the cytosol, VacA induces vacuolization as it does when added from outside. This and other evidence indicate that VacA is a toxin capable of entering the cell cytosol, where it displays its activity. In this study, we have used cytosolic expression to identify the portion of the toxin molecule responsible for the vacuolating activity. VacA mutants with deletions at the C and N termini were generated, and their activity was analyzed upon expression in HeLa cells. We found that the vacuolating activity of VacA resides in the amino-terminal region, the whole of which is required for its intracellular activity. PMID:9826387

  4. Modulation of the cytosolic androgen receptor in striated muscle by sex steroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rance, N. E.; Max, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of orchiectomy (GDX) and steroid administration on the level of the cytosolic androgen receptor in the rat levator ani muscle and in rat skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus) was studied. Androgen receptor binding to muscle cytosol was measured using H-3 methyltrienolone (R1881) as ligand, 100 fold molar excess unlabeled R1881 to assess nonspecific binding, and 500 fold molar excess of triamcinolone acetonide to prevent binding to glucocorticoid and progestin receptors. Results demonstrate that modification of the levels of sex steroids can alter the content of androgen receptors of rat striated muscle. Data suggest that: (1) cytosolic androgen receptor levels increase after orchiectomy in both levator ani muscle and skeletal muscle; (2) the acute increase in receptor levels is blocked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis; and (3) administration of estradiol-17 beta to castrated animals increases receptor binding in levator ani muscle but not in skeletal muscle.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes that lyse in the macrophage cytosol trigger AIM2-mediated pyroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, John-Demian; Witte, Chelsea E.; Zemansky, Jason; Hanson, Bill; Lauer, Peter; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary To gain insight into the mechanisms by which host cells detect cytosolic invasion by intracellular pathogens, a genetic screen was performed to identify Listeria monocytogenes mutants that induced altered levels of host cell death. A mutation in lmo2473 resulted in hyper-stimulation of host cell death and IL-1β secretion (pyroptosis) following bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol. In addition, strains engineered to lyse in the cytosol by expression of both bacteriophage holin and lysin or induced to lyse by treatment with ampicillin stimulated pyroptosis. Pyroptosis was independent of the Nlrp3 and Nlrc4 receptors, but dependent on ASC and AIM2. Importantly, wild type L. monocytogenes were also found to lyse, albeit at low levels, and trigger AIM2-dependent pyroptosis. Since AIM2 is activated by DNA, these data suggested that pyroptosis is triggered by bacterial DNA released during lysis. PMID:20417169

  6. Bcl-xL retrotranslocates Bax from the mitochondria into the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Edlich, Frank; Banerjee, Soojay; Suzuki, Motoshi; Cleland, Megan M.; Arnoult, Damien; Wang, Chunxin; Neutzner, Albert; Tjandra, Nico; Youle, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Bcl-2 family member Bax translocates from the cytosol to mitochondria where it oligomerizes and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane to promote apoptosis. Bax activity is counteracted by pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins, but how they inhibit Bax remains controversial, because they neither co-localize nor form stable complexes with Bax. We constrained Bax in its native cytosolic conformation within cells using intramolecular disulfide tethers. Bax tethers disrupt interaction with Bcl-xL in detergents and cell free MOMP activity, but unexpectedly induce Bax accumulation on mitochondria. Fluorescence Loss in Photobleaching (FLIP) reveals constant retrotranslocation of wt Bax, but not tethered Bax, from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm of healthy cells. Bax retrotranslocation depends on pro-survival Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibition of retrotranslocation correlates with Bax accumulation on the mitochondria. We propose that Bcl-xL inhibits and maintains Bax in the cytosol by constant retrotranslocation of mitochondrial Bax. PMID:21458670

  7. L-Cysteine Desulfhydrase 1 modulates the generation of the signaling molecule sulfide in plant cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis C.; García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Consistent with data in animal systems, experimental evidence highlights sulfide as a signaling molecule of equal importance to NO and H2O2 in plant systems. In mammals, two cytosolic enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), have been shown to be responsible for the endogenous production of sulfide. L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 (DES1) has been recently established as the only enzyme that is involved in the generation of hydrogen sulfide in plant cytosol. Although plants have an available source of sulfide within chloroplasts, the basic stromal pH prevents sulfide release into the cytosol. Therefore, DES1 is essential for the production of sulfide for signaling purposes. PMID:23428891

  8. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    PubMed

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  9. Calcium-activated butyrylcholinesterase in human skin protects acetylcholinesterase against suicide inhibition by neurotoxic organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; University of Bradford ). E-mail: K.Schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, Nicholas C.J.; Elwary, Souna M.; Parkin, Susan M.; Wood, John M.

    2007-04-20

    The human epidermis holds an autocrine acetylcholine production and degradation including functioning membrane integrated and cytosolic butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE). Here we show that BuchE activities increase 9-fold in the presence of calcium (0.5 x 10{sup -3}M) via a specific EF-hand calcium binding site, whereas acetylcholinesterase (AchE) is not affected. {sup 45}Calcium labelling and computer simulation confirmed the presence of one EF-hand binding site per subunit which is disrupted by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation. Moreover, we confirmed the faster hydrolysis by calcium-activated BuchE using the neurotoxic organophosphate O-ethyl-O-(4-nitrophenyl)-phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). Considering the large size of the human skin with 1.8 m{sup 2} surface area with its calcium gradient in the 10{sup -3}M range, our results implicate calcium-activated BuchE as a major protective mechanism against suicide inhibition of AchE by organophosphates in this non-neuronal tissue.

  10. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  11. Influence of external calcium and thapsigargin on the uptake of polystyrene beads by the macrophage-like cell lines U937 and MH-S

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Macrophages are equipped with several receptors for the recognition of foreign particles and pathogens. Upon binding to these receptors, particles become internalized. An interaction of particles with macrophage surface receptors is accompanied by an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration. This calcium is provided by intracellular stores and also by an influx of external calcium upon activation of the calcium channels. Nevertheless, the role of calcium in phagocytosis remains controversial. Some researchers postulate the necessity of calcium in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and a calcium-independent phagocytosis of complement opsonized particles. Others refute the need for calcium in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages. Methods In this study, the influence of external calcium concentrations and thapsigargin on the phagocytosis of polystyrene latex beads by the macrophage-like cell lines MH-S (murine) and differentiated U937 (human) was analyzed. The phagocytosis efficiency was determined by flow cytometry and was evaluated statistically by ANOVA test and Dunett’s significance test, or ANOVA and Bonferroni’s Multiple Comparison. Results Acquired data revealed an external calcium-independent way of internalization of non-functionalized polystyrene latex beads at free calcium concentrations ranging from 0 mM to 3 mM. The phagocytosis efficiency of the cells is not significantly decreased by a complete lack of external calcium. Furthermore, the presence of thapsigargin, known to lead to an increase of cytosolic calcium levels, did not have a significant enhancing influence on bead uptake by MH-S cells and only an enhancing effect on bead uptake by macrophage-like U937 cells at an external calcium concentration of 4 mM. Conclusion The calcium-independent phagocytosis process and the decrease of phagocytosis efficiency in the presence of complement receptor inhibitor staurosporine lead to the assumption that besides other calcium

  12. Calcium-sensing receptor regulates stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in response to extracellular calcium in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Yi, Xiao-Qian; Han, Ai-Dong; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis calcium-sensing receptor CAS is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure. Free cytosolic Ca2+ (Ca2+i) increases in response to a high extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) level through a CAS signalling pathway and finally leads to stomatal closure. Multidisciplinary approaches including histochemical, pharmacological, fluorescent, electrochemical, and molecular biological methods were used to discuss the relationship of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) signalling in the CAS signalling pathway in guard cells in response to Ca2+o. Here it is shown that Ca2+o could induce H2O2 and NO production from guard cells but only H2O2 from chloroplasts, leading to stomatal closure. In addition, the CASas mutant, the atrbohD/F double mutant, and the Atnoa1 mutant were all insensitive to Ca2+o-stimulated stomatal closure, as well as H2O2 and NO elevation in the case of CASas. Furthermore, it was found that the antioxidant system might function as a mediator in Ca2+o and H2O2 signalling in guard cells. The results suggest a hypothetical model whereby Ca2+o induces H2O2 and NO accumulation in guard cells through the CAS signalling pathway, which further triggers Ca2+i transients and finally stomatal closure. The possible cross-talk of Ca2+o and abscisic acid signalling as well as the antioxidant system are discussed. PMID:21940718

  13. Glutaredoxin GRXS17 Associates with the Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Astrid Nagels; Ritter, Andrés; Klassen, Roland; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Leidel, Sebastian A.; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (GRXs) are required in iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster delivery and iron sensing in yeast and mammals. In plants, it is unclear whether they have similar functions. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has a sole class II cytosolic monothiol GRX encoded by GRXS17. Here, we used tandem affinity purification to establish that Arabidopsis GRXS17 associates with most known cytosolic Fe-S assembly (CIA) components. Similar to mutant plants with defective CIA components, grxs17 loss-of-function mutants showed some degree of hypersensitivity to DNA damage and elevated expression of DNA damage marker genes. We also found that several putative Fe-S client proteins directly bind to GRXS17, such as XANTHINE DEHYDROGENASE1 (XDH1), involved in the purine salvage pathway, and CYTOSOLIC THIOURIDYLASE SUBUNIT1 and CYTOSOLIC THIOURIDYLASE SUBUNIT2, both essential for the 2-thiolation step of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U) modification of tRNAs. Correspondingly, profiling of the grxs17-1 mutant pointed to a perturbed flux through the purine degradation pathway and revealed that it phenocopied mutants in the elongator subunit ELO3, essential for the mcm5 tRNA modification step, although we did not find XDH1 activity or tRNA thiolation to be markedly reduced in the grxs17-1 mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that plant cytosolic monothiol GRXs associate with the CIA complex, as in other eukaryotes, and contribute to, but are not essential for, the correct functioning of client Fe-S proteins in unchallenged conditions. PMID:27503603

  14. Distinction between Cytosol and Chloroplast Fructose-Bisphosphate Aldolases from Pea, Wheat, and Corn Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Krüger, Ingo

    1986-01-01

    A reinvestigation of cytosol and chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) aldolases from pea (Pisum sativum L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and corn leaves (Zea mays L.) revealed that the two isoenzymes can be separated by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose although the separation was often less clear-cut than for the two aldolases from spinach leaves. Definite distinction was achieved by immunoprecipitation of the two isoenzymes with antisera raised against the respective isoenzymes from spinach leaves. The proportion of cytosol aldolase as part of total aldolase activity was 8, 9, 14, and 4.5% in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), pea, wheat, and corn leaves, respectively. For corn leaves we also obtained values of up to 15%. The Km (FBP) values were about 5-fold lower for the cytosol (1.1-2.3 micromolar concentration) than for the chloroplast enzymes (8.0-10.5 micromolar concentration). The respective Km (fructose-1-phosphate, F1P) values were about equal for the cytosol (1.0-2.3 millimolar concentration) and for the chloroplast aldolase (0.6-1.7 millimolar concentration). The ratio V (FIP)/V (FBP) was 0.20 to 0.27 for the cytosol and 0.07 to 0.145 for the chloroplast aldolase. Thus, cytosol and chloroplast aldolases from spinach, pea, wheat, and corn leaves differ quite considerably in the elution pattern from DEAE-cellulose, in immunoprecipitability with antisera against the respective isoenzymes from spinach leaves, and in the affinity to FBP. PMID:16664617

  15. Human Nbp35 is essential for both cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stehling, Oliver; Netz, Daili J A; Niggemeyer, Brigitte; Rösser, Ralf; Eisenstein, Richard S; Puccio, Helene; Pierik, Antonio J; Lill, Roland

    2008-09-01

    The maturation of cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins in mammalian cells requires components of the mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly and export machineries. Little is known about the cytosolic components that may facilitate the assembly process. Here, we identified the cytosolic soluble P-loop NTPase termed huNbp35 (also known as Nubp1) as an Fe/S protein, and we defined its role in the maturation of Fe/S proteins in HeLa cells. Depletion of huNbp35 by RNA interference decreased cell growth considerably, indicating its essential function. The deficiency in huNbp35 was associated with an impaired maturation of the cytosolic Fe/S proteins glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase and iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), while mitochondrial Fe/S proteins remained intact. Consequently, huNbp35 is specifically involved in the formation of extramitochondrial Fe/S proteins. The impaired maturation of IRP1 upon huNbp35 depletion had profound consequences for cellular iron metabolism, leading to decreased cellular H-ferritin, increased transferrin receptor levels, and higher transferrin uptake. These properties clearly distinguished huNbp35 from its yeast counterpart Nbp35, which is essential for cytosolic-nuclear Fe/S protein assembly but plays no role in iron regulation. huNbp35 formed a complex with its close homologue huCfd1 (also known as Nubp2) in vivo, suggesting the existence of a heteromeric P-loop NTPase complex that is required for both cytosolic Fe/S protein assembly and cellular iron homeostasis.

  16. Human Nbp35 Is Essential for both Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Protein Assembly and Iron Homeostasis▿

    PubMed Central

    Stehling, Oliver; Netz, Daili J. A.; Niggemeyer, Brigitte; Rösser, Ralf; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Puccio, Helene; Pierik, Antonio J.; Lill, Roland

    2008-01-01

    The maturation of cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins in mammalian cells requires components of the mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly and export machineries. Little is known about the cytosolic components that may facilitate the assembly process. Here, we identified the cytosolic soluble P-loop NTPase termed huNbp35 (also known as Nubp1) as an Fe/S protein, and we defined its role in the maturation of Fe/S proteins in HeLa cells. Depletion of huNbp35 by RNA interference decreased cell growth considerably, indicating its essential function. The deficiency in huNbp35 was associated with an impaired maturation of the cytosolic Fe/S proteins glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase and iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), while mitochondrial Fe/S proteins remained intact. Consequently, huNbp35 is specifically involved in the formation of extramitochondrial Fe/S proteins. The impaired maturation of IRP1 upon huNbp35 depletion had profound consequences for cellular iron metabolism, leading to decreased cellular H-ferritin, increased transferrin receptor levels, and higher transferrin uptake. These properties clearly distinguished huNbp35 from its yeast counterpart Nbp35, which is essential for cytosolic-nuclear Fe/S protein assembly but plays no role in iron regulation. huNbp35 formed a complex with its close homologue huCfd1 (also known as Nubp2) in vivo, suggesting the existence of a heteromeric P-loop NTPase complex that is required for both cytosolic Fe/S protein assembly and cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:18573874

  17. Multiple-timescale dynamics underlying spontaneous oscillations of saccular hair bundles.

    PubMed

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Kao, Albert; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-08-01

    Spontaneous oscillations displayed by hair bundles of the bullfrog sacculus have complex temporal profiles, not fully captured by single limit-cycle descriptions. Quiescent intervals are typically interspersed with oscillations, leading to a bursting-type behavior. Temporal characteristics of the oscillation are strongly affected by imposing a mechanical load or by the application of a steady-state deflection to the resting position of the bundle. Separate spectral components of the spontaneous motility are differently affected by increases in the external calcium concentration. We use numerical modeling to explore the effects of internal parameters on the oscillatory profiles, and to reproduce the experimental modulation induced by mechanical or ionic manipulation. PMID:21806928

  18. Multiple-Timescale Dynamics Underlying Spontaneous Oscillations of Saccular Hair Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Kao, Albert; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous oscillations displayed by hair bundles of the bullfrog sacculus have complex temporal profiles, not fully captured by single limit-cycle descriptions. Quiescent intervals are typically interspersed with oscillations, leading to a bursting-type behavior. Temporal characteristics of the oscillation are strongly affected by imposing a mechanical load or by the application of a steady-state deflection to the resting position of the bundle. Separate spectral components of the spontaneous motility are differently affected by increases in the external calcium concentration. We use numerical modeling to explore the effects of internal parameters on the oscillatory profiles, and to reproduce the experimental modulation induced by mechanical or ionic manipulation. PMID:21806928

  19. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... 130 Waffle 80 g 47 Meat, fish and eggs Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Egg 50 g 27 Red meat 120 g 7 ... foods Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Quiche (cheese, eggs) 200 g 212 Omelette with cheese 120 g ...

  20. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  1. Intestinal Stem Cells: Got Calcium?

    PubMed

    Nászai, Máté; Cordero, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    Calcium ions are well-known intracellular signalling molecules. A new study identifies local cytoplasmic calcium as a central integrator of metabolic and proliferative signals in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. PMID:26859268

  2. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  3. An intercellular regenerative calcium wave in porcine coronary artery endothelial cells in primary culture

    PubMed Central

    Domenighetti, Andrea Alberto; Bény, Jean-Louis; Chabaud, Fabienne; Frieden, Maud

    1998-01-01

    A regenerative calcium wave is an increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) which extends beyond the stimulated cells without decrement of amplitude, kinetics of [Ca2+]i increase and speed of propagation. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that such a wave could be evoked by bradykinin stimulation and by scraping cultured endothelial cells from porcine coronary arteries. Calcium imaging was performed using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-2. A wound or a delivery of bradykinin to two to three cells on growing clusters of ≈300 cells caused an increase in [Ca2+]i which was propagated throughout the cluster in a regenerative manner over distances up to 400 μm. This wave spread through gap junctions since it was inhibited by the cell uncoupler palmitoleic acid. The same experiments performed in confluent cultures caused a rise in [Ca2+]i which failed to propagate in a regenerative way. The wave propagation probably failed because the confluent cells were less dye coupled than the growing cells. This was confirmed by immunohistology which detected a dramatic decrease in the number of connexin 40 gap junctions in the confluent cultures. The regenerative propagation of the wave was blocked by inhibitors of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) and phospholipase C (PLC), and by suppression of extracellular calcium, but not by clamping the membrane potential with high-potassium solution. We conclude that regenerative intercellular calcium waves exist in cultured islets but not in confluent cultures of endothelial cells. An increase in [Ca2+]i is not sufficient to trigger a regenerative propagation. The PLC pathway, CICR and extracellular calcium are all necessary for a fully regenerated propagation. PMID:9782162

  4. Combining modelling and experimental approaches to explain how calcium signatures are decoded by calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) to produce specific gene expression responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junli; Whalley, Helen J; Knight, Marc R

    2015-10-01

    Experimental data show that Arabidopsis thaliana is able to decode different calcium signatures to produce specific gene expression responses. It is also known that calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) have calmodulin (CaM)-binding domains. Therefore, the gene expression responses regulated by CAMTAs respond to calcium signals. However, little is known about how different calcium signatures are decoded by CAMTAs to produce specific gene expression responses. A dynamic model of Ca(2+) -CaM-CAMTA binding and gene expression responses is developed following thermodynamic and kinetic principles. The model is parameterized using experimental data. Then it is used to analyse how different calcium signatures are decoded by CAMTAs to produce specific gene expression responses. Modelling analysis reveals that: calcium signals in the form of cytosolic calcium concentration elevations are nonlinearly amplified by binding of Ca(2+) , CaM and CAMTAs; amplification of Ca(2+) signals enables calcium signatures to be decoded to give specific CAMTA-regulated gene expression responses; gene expression responses to a calcium signature depend upon its history and accumulate all the information during the lifetime of the calcium signature. Information flow from calcium signatures to CAMTA-regulated gene expression responses has been established by combining experimental data with mathematical modelling.

  5. Combining modelling and experimental approaches to explain how calcium signatures are decoded by calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) to produce specific gene expression responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junli; Whalley, Helen J; Knight, Marc R

    2015-10-01

    Experimental data show that Arabidopsis thaliana is able to decode different calcium signatures to produce specific gene expression responses. It is also known that calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) have calmodulin (CaM)-binding domains. Therefore, the gene expression responses regulated by CAMTAs respond to calcium signals. However, little is known about how different calcium signatures are decoded by CAMTAs to produce specific gene expression responses. A dynamic model of Ca(2+) -CaM-CAMTA binding and gene expression responses is developed following thermodynamic and kinetic principles. The model is parameterized using experimental data. Then it is used to analyse how different calcium signatures are decoded by CAMTAs to produce specific gene expression responses. Modelling analysis reveals that: calcium signals in the form of cytosolic calcium concentration elevations are nonlinearly amplified by binding of Ca(2+) , CaM and CAMTAs; amplification of Ca(2+) signals enables calcium signatures to be decoded to give specific CAMTA-regulated gene expression responses; gene expression responses to a calcium signature depend upon its history and accumulate all the information during the lifetime of the calcium signature. Information flow from calcium signatures to CAMTA-regulated gene expression responses has been established by combining experimental data with mathematical modelling. PMID:25917109

  6. Wein bridge oscillator circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipoma, P. C.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit with minimum number of components provides stable outputs of 2 to 8 volts at frequencies of .001 to 100 kHz. Oscillator exhibits low power consumption, portability, simplicity, and drive capability, it has application as loudspeaker tester and audible alarm, as well as in laboratory and test generators.

  7. Coupled Oscillators with Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoji

    1998-08-01

    A simple coupled oscillator system with chemotaxis is introducedto study morphogenesis of cellular slime molds. The modelsuccessfuly explains the migration of pseudoplasmodium which hasbeen experimentally predicted to be lead by cells with higherintrinsic frequencies. Results obtained predict that its velocityattains its maximum value in the interface region between totallocking and partial locking and also suggest possible rolesplayed by partial synchrony during multicellular development.

  8. Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Integrated Component Systems, Inc. incorporated information from a NASA Tech Briefs article into a voltage-controlled oscillator it designed for a customer. The company then applied the technology to its series of phase-locked loop synthesizers, which offer superior phase noise performance.

  9. Frequency modulated oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A frequency modulated push-pull oscillator in which the non-linear characteristic of varactors producing frequency modulation is compensated for by an opposite non-linear characteristic of a field effect transistor providing modulating bias to the varactors is described.

  10. A simple violin oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    For acoustic tests the violin is driven laterally at the bridge by a small speaker of the type commonly found in pocket transistor radios. An audio oscillator excites the tone which is picked up by a sound level meter. Gross patterns of vibration modes are obtained by the Chladni method.

  11. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  12. Relativistic harmonic oscillator revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak

    2009-02-15

    The familiar Fock space commonly used to describe the relativistic harmonic oscillator, for example, as part of string theory, is insufficient to describe all the states of the relativistic oscillator. We find that there are three different vacua leading to three disconnected Fock sectors, all constructed with the same creation-annihilation operators. These have different spacetime geometric properties as well as different algebraic symmetry properties or different quantum numbers. Two of these Fock spaces include negative norm ghosts (as in string theory), while the third one is completely free of ghosts. We discuss a gauge symmetry in a worldline theory approach that supplies appropriate constraints to remove all the ghosts from all Fock sectors of the single oscillator. The resulting ghost-free quantum spectrum in d+1 dimensions is then classified in unitary representations of the Lorentz group SO(d,1). Moreover, all states of the single oscillator put together make up a single infinite dimensional unitary representation of a hidden global symmetry SU(d,1), whose Casimir eigenvalues are computed. Possible applications of these new results in string theory and other areas of physics and mathematics are briefly mentioned.

  13. Nanoparticle Oscillations and Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wang, Dawei; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-09-30

    Chemical oscillations can be coupled to the dynamic self-assembly of nanoparticles. Periodic pH changes translate into protonation and deprotonation of the ligands that stabilize the nanoparticles, thus altering repulsive and attractive interparticle forces. In a continuous stirred-tank reactor, rhythmic aggregation and dispersion is observed; in spatially distributed media, propagation of particle aggregation fronts is seen.

  14. [Oscillating physiotherapy for secretolysis].

    PubMed

    Brückner, U

    2008-03-01

    Assisted coughing and mechanical cough aids compensate for the weak cough flow in patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). In cases with preserved respiratory muscles also breathing techniques and special devices, e. g., flutter or acapella can be used for secretion mobilisation during infections of the airways. These means are summarised as oscillating physiotherapy. Their mechanisms are believed to depend on separation of the mucus from the bronchial wall by vibration, thus facilitating mucus transport from the peripheral to the central airways. In mucoviscidosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease their application is established, but there is a paucity of data regarding the commitment in patients with neuromuscular diseases. The effective adoption of simple oscillation physiotherapeutic interventions demands usually a sufficient force of the respiratory muscles--exceptions are the application of the percussionaire (intrapulmonary percussive ventilator, IPV) or high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). In daily practice there is evidence that patients with weak respiratory muscles are overstrained with the use of these physiotherapeutic means, or get exhausted. A general recommendation for the adoption of simple oscillating physiotherapeutic interventions cannot be made in patients with NMDs. Perhaps in the future devices such as IPV or HFCWO will prove to be more effective in NMD patients.

  15. Calcium and phosphorus fluxes during hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate.

    PubMed

    Hou, S H; Zhao, J; Ellman, C F; Hu, J; Griffin, Z; Spiegel, D M; Bourdeau, J E

    1991-08-01

    We evaluated the acute effects of varying dialysate calcium concentration on plasma concentrations and dialyzer fluxes of calcium and phosphorus in adult hemodialysis patients. Seven individuals with stable end-stage renal failure were dialyzed 4 hours, three times weekly. The effects of dialysates containing 1.75, 1.25, or 0.75 mmol/L (70.1, 50.1, or 30.1 mg/L) of calcium were compared. Each patient was studied once at each bath calcium concentration. Compared with the predialysis mean value of 2.27 mmol/L (9.1 mg/dL), plasma total calcium concentration increased, remained constant, or decreased with the 1.75-, 1.25-, or 0.75-mmol/L calcium dialysates, respectively. The 0.75-mmol/L calcium dialysate did not cause signs or symptoms of hypocalcemia (and the plasma calcium concentration did not fall below 1.80 mmol/L [7.2 mg/dL]). Plasma phosphorus concentrations decreased equally from a predialysis mean value of 2.16 mmol/L (6.7 mg/dL), regardless of the dialysate calcium concentration. After 4 hours of treatment with the three different dialysates, the cumulative calcium fluxes were significantly different. With 1.75 mmol/L calcium, mean bodily calcium accumulation was 21.9 mmol (879 mg). With 1.25 mmol/L, there was no net calcium flux. With 0.75 mmol/L, mean patient calcium loss was 5.8 mmol (231 mg). Mean phosphorus removal after 4 hours was 32.5 mmol (1,006 mg) and was unaffected by dialysate calcium concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1867178

  16. Calcium biofortification of crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than half of the world's population is deficient in calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), or zinc (Zn). The consumption of plants, directly or via livestock, containing inadequate concentrations of particular minerals causes these deficiencies. Agronomic and geneti...

  17. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  18. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.