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Sample records for cytotoxic-t-lymphocyte memory induction

  1. A new theory of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte memory: implications for HIV treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, D; Page, K M; Arnaout, R A; Thomsen, A R; Lifson, J D; Nowak, M A

    2000-01-01

    We use simple mathematical models to examine the dynamics of primary and secondary cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to viral infections. In particular, we are interested in conditions required to resolve the infection and to protect the host upon secondary challenge. While protection against reinfection is only effective in a restricted set of circumstances, we find that resolution of the primary infection requires persistence of CTL precursors (GTLp), as well as a fast rate of activation of the CTLp. Since these are commonly the defining characteristics of CTL memory, we propose that CTL memory may have evolved in order to clear the virus during primary challenge. We show experimental data from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in mice, supporting our theory on CTL memory. We adapt our models to HIV and find that immune impairment during the primary phase of the infection may result in the failure to establish CTL memory which in turn leads to viral persistence. Based on our models we suggest conceptual treatment regimes which ensure establishment of CTL memory. This would allow the immune response to control HIV in the long term in the absence of continued therapy. PMID:10794051

  2. Induction of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes by electroporation-enhanced needle-free skin immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y L; Murthy, S N; Manjili, M H; Guan, L J; Sen, A; Hui, S W

    2006-02-27

    A needle-free method based on transcutaneous electroporation is described for delivering peptide vaccines. The K(b)-binding OVA-peptide SIINFEKL was used as an example to induce the peptide-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) response in mice. A saturated anionic lipid was added during electroporation, and post-pulse electro-osmosis was applied to enhance the vaccine delivery. Electroporation was found to stimulate the exodus of Langerhans cells (LC) from the skin. The peptide transported into and through murine skin was measured using a Franz diffusion apparatus. Most peptide was retained in the skin rather than passing through the skin in the process. The peptide was delivered to the dorsal skin of mice by in vivo electroporation. An electroporation-transportable oligonucleotide with CpG motif was used as adjuvant. The efficacy of peptide delivery was comparable to that of intradermally injected with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Peptide-specific CTL response to the vaccine delivered by needle-free electroporation/electro-osmosis was equivalent to that delivered by intradermal injection, as determined by production of the peptide-specific IFN-gamma in ELISPOT assay.

  3. Induction of murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite surface protein 2.

    PubMed

    Wizel, B; Rogers, W O; Houghten, R A; Lanar, D E; Tine, J A; Hoffman, S L

    1994-07-01

    Sporozoite surface protein 2 has been identified as a target of malaria vaccines designed to produce protective CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) because mice immunized with mastocytoma cells expressing a fragment of Plasmodium yoelii sporozoite surface protein 2 (PySSP2) are protected against malaria by an immune response that requires CD8+ CTL. To define CTL epitopes in the Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite surface protein 2 (PfSSP2), spleen cells (SC) from mice immunized with irradiated sporozoites (irr spz) were stimulated with synthetic peptides, and these effectors were tested for cytolytic activity against peptide-pulsed, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched targets. Two peptides containing CTL epitopes, A6 (Pf SSP2 3D7 214-233) and BH1 (Pf SSP2 3D7 3-11) were identified in bulk cultures of SC from immune C57BL/6 mice, and by production of CTL lines. Immunization with recombinant vaccinia expressing the full length PfSSP2 induced antigen specific, MHC-restricted, CD8+ T cell-dependent cytolytic activity against these two peptides. Finally, CTL were induced by immunization with a bacteria-derived recombinant fragment of PfSSP2 (rPfSSP2) mixed with a liposomal formulation containing a cationic lipid (Lipofectin Reagent, LPF). Induced CTL lysed target cells pulsed with peptide A6 or with LPF/rPfSSP2, but not targets pulsed with only rPfSSP2. These studies demonstrate that CTL specific to PfSSP2 are present in C57BL/6 mice and that immunization with purified rPfSSP2 delivered with LPF induces a cytotoxic T cell response.

  4. The Suppressed Induction of Human Mature Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Caused by Asbestos Is Not due to Interleukin-2 Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Yoshitome, Kei; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Otsuki, Takemi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that exposure to chrysotile B (CB) asbestos suppressed the induction of mature cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during mixed lymphocyte reaction assays (MLRs) with a decrease in the proliferation of immature CTLs. However, the mechanism responsible for the effect of asbestos fibers on the differentiation of CTLs remains unclear. Since interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a regulator of T lymphocyte proliferation, we examined the effect of IL-2 addition on suppressed CTL differentiation in CB-exposed cultures using flow cytometry (FCM). When IL-2 was added at 1 ng/mL on the second day of MLRs, the asbestos-caused decreases in the proliferation and percentages of CD25(+) and CD45RO(+) cells in CD8(+) lymphocytes were not recovered by IL-2 addition, although the decrease in percentage of granzyme B(+) cells was partially recovered. CD8(+) lymphocytes from the IL-2-treated culture with asbestos showed the same degree of cytotoxicity as those in cultures without IL-2 or asbestos. These findings indicate that IL-2 insufficiency is not the main cause for the suppressed induction of CTLs by asbestos exposure, although they suggest a potential for the improvement of such suppressed CTL functions. Secretory factors other than IL-2 in addition to membrane-bound stimulatory molecules may play a role in asbestos-caused suppressed CTL differentiation.

  5. The Suppressed Induction of Human Mature Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Caused by Asbestos Is Not due to Interleukin-2 Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Lee, Suni; Yoshitome, Kei; Hayashi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that exposure to chrysotile B (CB) asbestos suppressed the induction of mature cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during mixed lymphocyte reaction assays (MLRs) with a decrease in the proliferation of immature CTLs. However, the mechanism responsible for the effect of asbestos fibers on the differentiation of CTLs remains unclear. Since interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a regulator of T lymphocyte proliferation, we examined the effect of IL-2 addition on suppressed CTL differentiation in CB-exposed cultures using flow cytometry (FCM). When IL-2 was added at 1 ng/mL on the second day of MLRs, the asbestos-caused decreases in the proliferation and percentages of CD25+ and CD45RO+ cells in CD8+ lymphocytes were not recovered by IL-2 addition, although the decrease in percentage of granzyme B+ cells was partially recovered. CD8+ lymphocytes from the IL-2-treated culture with asbestos showed the same degree of cytotoxicity as those in cultures without IL-2 or asbestos. These findings indicate that IL-2 insufficiency is not the main cause for the suppressed induction of CTLs by asbestos exposure, although they suggest a potential for the improvement of such suppressed CTL functions. Secretory factors other than IL-2 in addition to membrane-bound stimulatory molecules may play a role in asbestos-caused suppressed CTL differentiation. PMID:27975069

  6. Synergistic role of type I interferons in the induction of protective cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    von Hoegen, P

    1995-09-01

    Differentiation of cytolytic T cells can be supported by type I and type II interferons (IFN). To characterize the role of type I interferons further we tested the role of recombinant IFN-alpha and IFN-beta on the induction of a weak immune response, against a low immunogenic tumor, which has been shown to be increased by IFN. Both type I interferons IFN-alpha and IFN-beta were able to support the differentiation of cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL). In case of IFN-alpha no correlation with the antiviral activity could be seen by comparison of IFN-alpha1 and IFN-alpha4. The maximal in vitro effects were achieved with very low concentrations in the range of 1-100 IU/ml. IFN-alpha showed the strongest effects, if added in the early phase of the mixed leukocyte culture, whereas IFN-beta was most effective when given at the last day the culture. In combination, both IFNs gave additional/synergistic effects, whereby addition of IFN-alpha at day 0 and IFN-beta at day 4 led to maximal specific CTL responses. In vivo augmentation of the anti-tumor immune response by both types of IFNs supported the in vitro findings and also the synergistic effect of both types of IFNs could be demonstrated. Therefore we propose that IFN-alpha is relevant in the induction of CTL responses, i.e., the conversion of precursor T cell into mature cells and growth promotion whereby IFN-beta might trigger the lytic machinery of the cells and promote differentiation. This synergistic efficacy is also operative in tumor rejection.

  7. Induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte response against Mycobacterial antigen using domain I of anthrax edema factor as antigen delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Gorantala, Jyotsna; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com

    2007-05-25

    We have investigated the efficiency of N-terminal 1-260 residues of Edema factor (EFn) as a delivery system for ESAT-6, an antigenic protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H{sub 37}R{sub v}, into the cytosol of mammalian cells. The EFn.ESAT-6 recombinant protein was obtained by genetic fusion of EFn and ESAT-6 DNA. Our data shows that in the presence of PA, EFn.ESAT-6 fusion protein is internalized into the cytosol of antigen presenting cells, and the splenocytes produced both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in vitro. Further, EFn.ESAT-6 elicited effective cytotoxicT lymphocyte (CTL) response in an in vitro CTL assay. This study for the first time demonstrates that EFn can be used as a vehicle to deliver heterologous proteins of therapeutic importance.

  8. Heteroclitic XBP1 peptides evoke tumor-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes against breast cancer, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Samur, Mehmet; Munshi, Aditya; Hideshima, Teru; Keskin, Derin; Kimmelman, Alec; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Dranoff, Glen; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2015-01-01

    XBP1 is a critical transcriptional activator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which increases tumor cell survival under prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and hypoxic conditions.This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity of heteroclitic XBP1 unspliced (US)184–192 (YISPWILAV) and heteroclictic XBP1 spliced (SP)367–375 (YLFPQLISV) HLA-A2 peptides, and to characterize the specific activities of XBP1 peptides-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (XBP1-CTL) against breast cancer, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer cells.The XBP1-CTL had upregulated expression of critical T cell markers and displayed HLA-A2-restricted and antigen-specific activities against breast cancer, colon cancer and pancreatic cancer cells. XBP1-CTL were enriched withCD45RO+ memory CTL, which showed high expression of critical T cell markers (CD28, ICOS, CD69, CD40L), cell proliferation and antitumor activities as compared to CD45RO− non-memory CTL. The effector memory (EM: CD45RO+CCR7−) subset had the highest level of cell proliferation while the central memory (CM: CD45RO+CCR7+) subset demonstrated enhanced functional activities (CD107a degranulation, IFNγ/IL-2 production) upon recognition of the respective tumor cells. Furthermore, both the EM and CM XBP1-CTL subsets expressed high levels of Th1 transcription regulators Tbet and Eomes. The highest frequencies of IFNγ or granzyme B producing cells were detected within CM XBP1-CTL subset that were either Tbet+ or Eomes+ in responding to the tumor cells.These results demonstrate the immunotherapeutic potential of a cocktail of immunogenic HLA-A2 specific heteroclitic XBP1 US184–192 and heteroclictic XBP1 SP367–375 peptides to induce CD3+CD8+ CTL enriched for CM and EM cells with specific antitumor activities against a variety of solid tumors. PMID:25941601

  9. In vivo induction of a high-avidity, high-frequency cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response is associated with antiviral protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, C; Dadaglio, G; Saron, M F; Deriaud, E; Rojas, M; Casal, S I; Leclerc, C

    2000-07-01

    Many approaches are currently being developed to deliver exogenous antigen into the major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted antigen pathway, leading to in vivo priming of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells. One attractive possibility consists of targeting the antigen to phagocytic or macropinocytic antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we demonstrate that strong CD8(+) class I-restricted cytotoxic responses are induced upon intraperitoneal immunization of mice with different peptides, characterized as CD8(+) T-cell epitopes, bound to 1-microm synthetic latex microspheres and injected in the absence of adjuvant. The cytotoxic response induced against a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) peptide linked to these microspheres was compared to the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response obtained upon immunization with the nonreplicative porcine parvovirus-like particles (PPV:VLP) carrying the same peptide (PPV:VLP-LCMV) previously described (C. Sedlik, M. F. Saron, J. Sarraseca, I. Casal, and C. Leclerc, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94:7503-7508, 1997). We show that the induction of specific CTL activity by peptides bound to microspheres requires CD4(+) T-cell help in contrast to the CTL response obtained with the peptide delivered by viral pseudoparticles. Furthermore, PPV:VLP are 100-fold more efficient than microspheres in generating a strong CTL response characterized by a high frequency of specific T cells of high avidity. Moreover, PPV:VLP-LCMV are able to protect mice against a lethal LCMV challenge whereas microspheres carrying the LCMV epitope fail to confer such protection. This study demonstrates the crucial involvement of the frequency and avidity of CTLs in conferring antiviral protective immunity and highlights the importance of considering these parameters when developing new vaccine strategies.

  10. In Vivo Induction of a High-Avidity, High-Frequency Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Response Is Associated with Antiviral Protective Immunity†

    PubMed Central

    Sedlik, C.; Dadaglio, G.; Saron, M. F.; Deriaud, E.; Rojas, M.; Casal, S. I.; Leclerc, C.

    2000-01-01

    Many approaches are currently being developed to deliver exogenous antigen into the major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted antigen pathway, leading to in vivo priming of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. One attractive possibility consists of targeting the antigen to phagocytic or macropinocytic antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we demonstrate that strong CD8+ class I-restricted cytotoxic responses are induced upon intraperitoneal immunization of mice with different peptides, characterized as CD8+ T-cell epitopes, bound to 1-μm synthetic latex microspheres and injected in the absence of adjuvant. The cytotoxic response induced against a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) peptide linked to these microspheres was compared to the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response obtained upon immunization with the nonreplicative porcine parvovirus-like particles (PPV:VLP) carrying the same peptide (PPV:VLP-LCMV) previously described (C. Sedlik, M. F. Saron, J. Sarraseca, I. Casal, and C. Leclerc, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94:7503–7508, 1997). We show that the induction of specific CTL activity by peptides bound to microspheres requires CD4+ T-cell help in contrast to the CTL response obtained with the peptide delivered by viral pseudoparticles. Furthermore, PPV:VLP are 100-fold more efficient than microspheres in generating a strong CTL response characterized by a high frequency of specific T cells of high avidity. Moreover, PPV:VLP-LCMV are able to protect mice against a lethal LCMV challenge whereas microspheres carrying the LCMV epitope fail to confer such protection. This study demonstrates the crucial involvement of the frequency and avidity of CTLs in conferring antiviral protective immunity and highlights the importance of considering these parameters when developing new vaccine strategies. PMID:10846055

  11. The Memory Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte (CTL) Response to Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Contains Individual Peptide-Specific CTL Clones That Have Undergone Extensive Expansion In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Michael P.; Wills, Mark R.; Mynard, Kim; Carmichael, Andrew J.; Sissons, J. G. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) appear to play an important role in the control of virus replication and in protection against HCMV-related disease. We have previously reported high frequencies of memory CTL precursors (CTLp) specific to the HCMV tegument protein pp65 in the peripheral blood of healthy virus carriers. In some individuals, the CTL response to this protein is focused on only a single epitope, whereas in other virus carriers CTL recognized multiple epitopes which we identified by using synthetic peptides. We have analyzed the clonal composition of the memory CTL response to four of these pp65 epitopes by sequencing the T-cell receptors (TCR) of multiple independently derived epitope-specific CTL clones, which were derived by formal single-cell cloning or from clonal CTL microcultures. In all cases, we have observed a high degree of clonal focusing: the majority of CTL clones specific to a defined pp65 peptide from any one virus carrier use only one or two different TCRs at the level of the nucleotide sequence. Among virus carriers who have the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allele, we observed that CTL from different donors that recognize the same peptide-MHC complex often used the same Vβ segment, although other TCR gene segments and CDR3 length were not in general conserved. We have also examined the clonal composition of CTL specific to pp65 peptides in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals. We have observed a similarly focused peptide-specific CTL response. Thus, the large population of circulating HCMV peptide-specific memory CTLp in virus carriers in fact contains individual CTL clones that have undergone extensive clonal expansion in vivo. PMID:9971792

  12. [Cytotoxic T lymphocytes in cancer and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Prado-García, Heriberto; Avila-Moreno, Federico; López-González, José Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are cells of the immune system that recognize and kill cells that have been infected with intracellular pathogens, allogenic cells or tumor cells. It has been reported that CTLs participate in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. After stimulation with the antigen, CTLs undergo an activation process highly regulated, which leads to the cell to acquire an effector or memory function. In this review, we indicate the cellular markers associated with the different stages of CTL-differentiation (naive, memory and effector); we indicate the distinct models of CTLs differentiation; also, the mechanisms of CTLs cytotoxicity are mentioned. Furthermore, we describe the participation of CTLs in cancer and autoimmunity; the implications of CTLs in the progression of these diseases are discussed.

  13. Human Memory Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte (CTL) Responses to Hantaan Virus Infection: Identification of Virus-Specific and Cross-Reactive CD8+ CTL Epitopes on Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Van Epps, Heather L.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Ennis, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    Hantaan virus, the prototypic member of the Hantavirus genus, causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. We examined the human memory T-lymphocyte responses of three donors who had previous laboratory-acquired infections with Hantaan virus. We demonstrated virus-specific responses in bulk cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from all donors. Bulk T-cell responses were directed against either Hantaan virus nucleocapsid (N) or G1 protein, and these responses varied between donors. We established both CD4+ and CD8+ N-specific cell lines from two donors and CD4+ G1-specific cell lines from a third donor. All CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lines recognized one of two epitopes on the nucleocapsid protein: one epitope spanning amino acids 12 to 20 and the other spanning amino acids 421 to 429. The CTL lines specific for amino acids 12 to 20 were restricted by HLA B51, and those specific for amino acids 421 to 429 were restricted by HLA A1. The N-specific CTL lines isolated from these two donors included both Hantaan virus-specific CTLs and hantavirus cross-reactive CTLs. Responses to both epitopes are detectable in short-term bulk cultures of PBMC from one donor, and precursor frequency analysis confirms that CTLs specific for these epitopes are present at relatively high precursor frequencies in the peripheral T-cell pool. These data suggest that infection with Hantaan virus results in the generation of CTL to limited epitopes on the nucleocapsid protein and that infection also results in the generation of cross-reactive T-cell responses to distantly related hantaviruses which cause the distinct hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. This is the first demonstration of human T-lymphocyte responses to Hantaan virus. PMID:10364276

  14. Prevention of the induction of allospecific cytotoxic T lymphocyte and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses by ultraviolet irradiation of corneal allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Niederkorn, J.Y.; Callanan, D.; Ross, J.R. )

    1990-08-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on the immunogenicity of corneal allografts was examined in a mouse model. Corneal allografts differing from the host at the entire MHC and multiple minor H loci were subjected to 200 mJ/cm2 of UVB irradiation immediately prior to heterotropic transplantation. Analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses revealed that UVR treated corneal grafts failed to induce either CTL or DTH responses in C57BL/6 recipients. UVB treatment abolished the immunogenicity of highly immunogenic corneal grafts containing either resident or infiltrating donor-specific Langerhans cells. Sequential grafting experiments demonstrated that UVB-treated grafts rendered the hosts anergic to subsequent immunization with highly immunogenic corneal limbus grafts that contained dense concentrations of Ia+ Langerhans cells of donor origin. The results indicate that UV treatment not only reduces the immunogenicity of the corneal allograft but may also render it tolerogenic.

  15. Helper T cells against tumor-associated antigens (TAA): preferential induction of helper T cell activities involved in anti-TAA cytotoxic T lymphocyte and antibody responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Shima, J.; Kosugi, A.; Itoh, K.; Hamaoka, T.

    1986-04-01

    This study establishes assay systems for helper T cell activities assisting cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antibody responses to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and demonstrates the existence of TAA that induce preferentially anti-TAA CTL helper and B cell helper T cell activities in two syngeneic tumor models. C3H/HeN mice were immunized to the syngeneic X5563 plasmacytoma or MH135 hepatoma. Spleen cells from these mice were tested for anti-TAA helper T cell activity capable of augmenting anti-trinitrophenyl(TNP) CTL and anti-TNP antibody responses from anti-TNP CTL and B cell precursors (responding cells) by stimulation with TNP-modified X5563 or MH134 tumor cells. The results demonstrate that cultures of responding cells plus 850R X-irradiated tumor-immunized spleen cells (helper cells) failed to enhance anti-TNP CTL or antibody responses when in vitro stimulation was provided by either unmodified tumor cells or TNP-modified syngeneic spleen cells (TNP-self). In contrast, these cultures resulted in appreciable augmentation of anti-TNP CTL or antibody response when stimulated by TNP-modified tumor cells. The results are discussed in the light of cellular mechanisms underlying the preferential anti-TAA immune responses, and the interrelationship between various types of cell functions including CTL- and B cell-help.

  16. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte lysis of HTLV-1 infected cells is limited by weak HBZ protein expression, but non-specifically enhanced on induction of Tax expression.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Aileen G; Suemori, Koichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2014-12-14

    Immunogenetic evidence indicates that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for the weak CTL antigen HBZ limit HTLV-1 proviral load in vivo, whereas there is no clear relationship between the proviral load and the frequency of CTLs specific for the immunodominant antigen Tax. In vivo, circulating HTLV-1-infected cells express HBZ mRNA in contrast, Tax expression is typically low or undetectable. To elucidate the virus-suppressing potential of CTLs targeting HBZ, we compared the ability of HBZ- and Tax-specific CTLs to lyse naturally-infected cells, by co-incubating HBZ- and Tax-specific CTL clones with primary CD4(+) T cells from HLA-matched HTLV-1-infected donors. We quantified lysis of infected cells, and tested whether specific virus-induced host cell surface molecules determine the susceptibility of infected cells to CTL-mediated lysis. Primary infected cells upregulated HLA-A*02, ICAM-1, Fas and TRAIL-R1/2 in concert with Tax expression, forming efficient targets for both HTLV-1-specific CTLs and CTLs specific for an unrelated virus. We detected expression of HBZ mRNA (spliced isoform) in both Tax-expressing and non-expressing infected cells, and the HBZ26-34 epitope was processed and presented by cells transfected with an HBZ expression plasmid. However, when coincubated with primary cells, a high-avidity HBZ-specific CTL clone killed significantly fewer infected cells than were killed by a Tax-specific CTL clone. Finally, incubation with Tax- or HBZ-specific CTLs resulted in a significant decrease in the frequency of cells expressing high levels of HLA-A*02. HTLV-1 gene expression in primary CD4(+) T cells non-specifically increases susceptibility to CTL lysis. Despite the presence of HBZ spliced-isoform mRNA, HBZ epitope presentation by primary cells is significantly less efficient than that of Tax.

  17. Detection and Induction of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses by Use of Recombinant Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lonning, S. M.; Zhang, W.; Leib, S. R.; McGuire, T. C.

    1999-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) appear to be critical in resolving or reducing the severity of lentivirus infections. Retroviral vectors expressing the Gag/Pr or SU protein of the lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) were constructed and used to evaluate EIAV-specific CTL responses in horses. Three promoters, cytomegalovirus, simian virus SV40, and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MoMSV) long terminal repeat (LTR), were used, and there was considerable variation in their ability to direct expression of Gag/Pr and SU. Vectors expressing EIAV proteins under the direction of MoMSV LTR and using the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) Env for internalization were efficient at transducing equine kidney (EK) target cells and were effective targets for EIAV-specific CTL lysis. CTL from EIAV-infected horses caused lysis of retroviral vector-transduced EK cells expressing either Gag/Pr or SU in an ELA-A-restricted manner. In contrast, lysis of recombinant vaccinia virus-infected EK cells expressing Gag/Pr and SU/TM was often non-LA-A restricted. Five horses were immunized by direct intramuscular injection with a mixture of retroviral vectors expressing Gag/Pr or SU, and one responded with EIAV-specific CTL. This result indicates that retroviral vector stimulation of CTL in horses needs to be optimized, perhaps by inclusion of appropriate cytokine genes in the constructs. However, the studies demonstrated that retroviral vector-transduced target cells were very effective for in vitro dissection of EIAV-specific CTL responses. PMID:10074123

  18. Studies on in vivo induction of HIV-1 envelope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by synthetic peptides from the V3 loop region of HIV-1 IIIB gp 120.

    PubMed

    Nehete, P N; Casement, K S; Arlinghaus, R B; Sastry, K J

    1995-02-01

    We have previously reported the induction of MHC class I-restricted, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in mice by a 15-amino acid peptide (R15K) from the V3 loop in gp120. We now present evidence showing that CTL activity induced by R15K was stable for 8-10 weeks after a single injection and that as little as 20 micrograms peptide was sufficient for efficient CTL induction in vivo. While induction of CTLs was efficient with R15K emulsified in either complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvant, only a low-level CTL response was observed in mice immunized with R15K in either alum or saline. We analyzed a series of carrier-free synthetic peptides ranging in length from 8 to 24 amino acids from the V3 loop region and observed that peptide R10I consisting of 10 amino acids from the middle portion of R15K was more efficient for CTL induction. Additionally, lymph node cells from mice immunized with 24 and 15 amino acid peptides (N24G and R15K, respectively) when restimulated in vitro with R10I exhibited greater HIV-1 env-specific CTL activity than when either of the longer peptides was used for restimulation. A peptide consisting of only 8 amino acids (R8K) was sufficient neither for inducing primary CTLs nor for in vitro restimulation of lymph node CTL precursors. These results establish that a carrier-free 10-amino acid synthetic peptide from the V3 loop region in HIV-1 gp120 has the optimal sequence for efficient induction of HIV env-specific CTLs in mice.

  19. Protective Role of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Filovirus Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warfield, Kelly Lyn; Olinger, Gene Garrard

    2011-01-01

    Infection with many emerging viruses, such as the hemorrhagic fever disease caused by the filoviruses, Marburg (MARV), and Ebola virus (EBOV), leaves the host with a short timeframe in which to mouse a protective immune response. In lethal cases, uncontrolled viral replication and virus-induced immune dysregulation are too severe to overcome, and mortality is generally associated with a lack of notable immune responses. Vaccination studies in animals have demonstrated an association of IgG and neutralizing antibody responses against the protective glycoprotein antigen with survival from lethal challenge. More recently, studies in animal models of filovirus hemorrhagic fever have established that induction of a strong filovirus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response can facilitate complete viral clearance. In this review, we describe assays used to discover CTL responses after vaccination or live filovirus infection in both animal models and human clinical trials. Unfortunately, little data regarding CTL responses have been collected from infected human survivors, primarily due to the low frequency of disease and the inability to perform these studies in the field. Advancements in assays and technologies may allow these studies to occur during future outbreaks. PMID:22253531

  20. Resistance of cytotoxic T lymphocytes to lysis by a clone of cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kranz, D.M.; Eisen, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    To investigate how cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) avoid killing themselves when they destroy target cells, the authors compared 20 different cell lines as target cells, including several CTL cell lines, for their susceptibility to lysis by CTL, measured by a standard /sup 51/Cr-release assay. Variations in recognition of this diverse set of target cells was circumvented by attaching to all of them a monoclonal antibody to the antigen-specific receptor of a cloned CTL cell line (clone 2C) and using the 2C cell line as the standard aggressor or effector cell. All of the nine tumor cell lines and the four noncytolytic T-helper cell lines tested as targets were highly susceptible to lysis by the aggressor CTL, but seven cytotoxic T-cell lines (six CTL and one T-helper cell line with cytotoxic activity) were largely resistant. These results, and the use of the lectin Con A as an alternative means for triggering CTL activity, point clearly to a level of resistance that could enable CTL to avoid their own destruction when they lyse target cells. The resistance of the cytolytic T cells did not appear to be accompanied by a similar resistance to complement-mediated lysis, indicating that mechanisms of CTL-mediated and complement-mediated lysis are not identical.

  1. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte immune synapse at a glance.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, Nele M G; Frazer, Gordon L; Asano, Yukako; Stinchcombe, Jane C; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2016-08-01

    The immune synapse provides an important structure for communication with immune cells. Studies on immune synapses formed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) highlight the dynamic changes and specialised mechanisms required to facilitate focal signalling and polarised secretion in immune cells. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we illustrate the different steps that reveal the specialised mechanisms used to focus secretion at the CTL immune synapse and allow CTLs to be such efficient and precise serial killers. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Role of vitamin D in cytotoxic T lymphocyte immunity to pathogens and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Surojit; Hewison, Martin; Studzinski, George P; Li, Yan Chun; Kalia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression in immune cells has opened up a new area of research into immunoregulation by vitamin D, a niche that is distinct from its classical role in skeletal health. Today, about three decades since this discovery, numerous cellular and molecular targets of vitamin D in the immune system have been delineated. Moreover, strong clinical associations between vitamin D status and the incidence/severity of many immune-regulated disorders (e.g. infectious diseases, cancers and autoimmunity) have prompted the idea of using vitamin D supplementation to manipulate disease outcome. While much is known about the effects of vitamin D on innate immune responses and helper T (T(H)) cell immunity, there has been relatively limited progress on the frontier of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity--an arm of host cellular adaptive immunity that is crucial for the control of such intracellular pathogens as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), malaria, and hepatitis C virus (HCV). In this review, we discuss the strong historical and clinical link between vitamin D and infectious diseases that involves cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity, present our current understanding as well as critical knowledge gaps in the realm of vitamin D regulation of host CTL responses, and highlight potential regulatory connections between vitamin D and effector and memory CD8 T cell differentiation events during infections.

  3. Protection Against Lethal Sendai Virus Infection by in vivo Priming of Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with a Free Synthetic Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kast, W. Martin; Roux, Laurent; Curren, Joseph; Blom, Hendrika J. J.; Voordouw, Arie C.; Meloen, Rob H.; Kolakofsky, Daniel; Melief, Cornelis J. M.

    1991-03-01

    The only peptide of Sendai virus that is recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in B6 mice was found with (i) the use of recombinant vaccinia virus constructs containing separate genes of Sendai virus and (ii) a set of overlapping peptides completely spanning the identified nucleoprotein (NP) gene product. This immunodominant NP peptide is recognized by Sendai virus-specific CTL that are known to have therapeutic effects in vivo. By subcutaneous immunization, this peptide induced Sendai virus and NP peptide-specific CTL memory responses in vivo. Most importantly, mice that had been immunized with this peptide were protected against a lethal virus dose, indicating that viral peptides can be used as antiviral T-cell vaccines. The induction of T-cell memory by free peptide immunization potentially has wide applicability in biology and medicine, including protection against infectious disease.

  4. Protection against lethal Sendai virus infection by in vivo priming of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes with a free synthetic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Kast, W M; Roux, L; Curren, J; Blom, H J; Voordouw, A C; Meloen, R H; Kolakofsky, D; Melief, C J

    1991-01-01

    The only peptide of Sendai virus that is recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in B6 mice was found with (i) the use of recombinant vaccinia virus constructs containing separate genes of Sendai virus and (ii) a set of overlapping peptides completely spanning the identified nucleoprotein (NP) gene product. This immunodominant NP peptide is recognized by Sendai virus-specific CTL that are known to have therapeutic effects in vivo. By subcutaneous immunization, this peptide induced Sendai virus and NP peptide-specific CTL memory responses in vivo. Most importantly, mice that had been immunized with this peptide were protected against a lethal virus dose, indicating that viral peptides can be used as antiviral T-cell vaccines. The induction of T-cell memory by free peptide immunization potentially has wide applicability in biology and medicine, including protection against infectious disease. PMID:1848698

  5. Immune Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and Possibility of Vaccine Development for Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hiroishi, Kazumasa; Eguchi, Junichi; Ishii, Shigeaki; Hiraide, Ayako; Sakaki, Masashi; Doi, Hiroyoshi; Omori, Risa; Imawari, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Immune responses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are implicated in viral eradication and the pathogenesis of hepatitis C. Weak CTL response against hepatitis C virus (HCV) may lead to a persistent infection. HCV infection impairs the function of HCV-specific CTLs; HCV proteins are thought to actively suppress host immune responses, including CTLs. Induction of a strong HCV-specific CTL response in HCV-infected patients can facilitate complete HCV clearance. Thus, the development of a vaccine that can induce potent CTL response against HCV is strongly expected. We investigated HCV-specific CTL responses by enzyme-linked immuno-spot assay and/or synthetic peptides and identified over 40 novel CTL epitopes in the HCV protein. Our findings may contribute to the development of the HCV vaccine. In this paper, we describe the CTL responses in HCV infection and the attempts at vaccine development based on recent scientific articles. PMID:20508848

  6. Cross reactive antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes from avian influenza H9N2 infected chickens against homologous and heterologous avian influenza isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunity against avian influenza (AI) is largely based on the induction of neutralizing antibodies produced against the hemagglutinin, although cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL’s) have been reported as critical for clearance of virus from infected cells. Antibody production against a particular virus ...

  7. Physiological changes induced in cardiac myocytes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hassin, D.; Fixler, R.; Shimoni, Y.; Rubinstein, E.; Raz, S.; Gotsman, M.S.; Hasin, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The lethal hit induced by viral specific, sensitized, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) attacking virus-infected heart cells is important in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis and reflects the key role of CTL in this immune response. The mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Studies of the physiological changes induced in mengovirus-infected, cultured, neonatal, rat heart cells by CTL that had been previously sensitized by the same virus are presented. The CTL were obtained from spleens of mengovirus-infected, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matched adult rats. Cell wall motion was measured by an optical method, action potentials with intracellular microelectrodes, and total exchangeable calcium content by /sup 45/Ca tracer measurements after loading the myocytes with /sup 45/Ca and then exposing them to CTL. After 50 min (mean time) of exposing mengovirus-infected myocytes to the CTL, the mechanical relaxation of the myocyte was slowed, with a subsequent slowing of beating rate and a reduced amplitude of contraction. Impaired relaxation progressed, and prolonged oscillatory contractions lasting up to several seconds appeared, with accompanying oscillations in the prolonged plateau phase of the action potentials. Arrest of the myocyte contractions appeared 98 min (mean time) after exposure to CTL. It is concluded that infection of cultured myocytes with mengovirus predisposes them to attack by mengovirus specific CTL, and that persistent dysfunction of the myocyte is preceded by reversible changes in membrane potential and contraction. This is suggestive of an altered calcium handling by the myocytes possibly resulting in the cytotoxic effect.

  8. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for the simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Letvin, N L; Schmitz, J E; Jordan, H L; Seth, A; Hirsch, V M; Reimann, K A; Kuroda, M J

    1999-08-01

    A non-human primate model for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkey, was used to explore the role of the AIDS virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in disease pathogenesis. This CTL response was measured using the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/peptide tetramer technology. Large numbers of tetramer-binding CD8+ T lymphocytes were demonstrable not only in the peripheral blood, but in lymph nodes and even in semen of chronically SIV-infected monkeys. The central role of these effector T lymphocytes in containing SIV spread during primary infection was demonstrated by showing that early SIV clearance during primary infection correlated with the emergence of the tetramer binding CD8+ T lymphocytes and that in vivo depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes eliminated the ability of the infected monkeys to contain SIV replication. These observations suggest that an effective AIDS vaccine should elicit a potent virus-specific CTL response. In fact, a live, recombinant SIV vaccine constructed using the attenuated pox virus vector modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) elicited a high-frequency CTL response, comparable in magnitude to that elicited by SIV infection itself. This suggests that vaccine modalities such as MVA may prove useful in creating an effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine. These studies also indicate the power of both the SIV/macaque model and MHC class I/peptide tetramers for assessing AIDS vaccine strategies.

  9. Antigen receptor-regulated exocytosis in cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We demonstrate here that T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)-triggered exocytosis in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) is not constitutive and is regulated through crosslinking of the TCR by antigen or monoclonal anti- TCR antibodies. Morphological and biochemical data using three different biochemical markers of granules and Percoll gradient fractionation analysis are presented, suggesting that TCR-triggered exocytosis is accompanied by the loss of granules from CTL and appearance of intragranular proteins and enzymatic activities in the incubation medium. The strict requirement for crosslinking of the TCR in exocytosis triggering could be bypassed by protein kinase C activators (phorbol esters or bryostatin I and II) acting in synergy with Ca2+ ionophores. It is shown that external Ca2+ is obligatory for both the TCR-triggered and for the PMA/A23187-triggered exocytosis, since Ca2+ chelators and divalent cations that compete with Ca2+ for A23187 can inhibit exocytosis of granules. These data suggest that Ca2+ from intracellular stores is not sufficient to support exocytosis in CTL. Ca2+ channel blockers and calmodulin antagonists significantly inhibited TCR-triggered exocytosis without affecting the basal level of secretion. The described results are consistent with a model in which exocytosis of granules in CTL is triggered by the crosslinking of TCR, transmembrane protein kinase C activation, and external Ca2+ translocation through CTL plasma membrane Ca2+ channels and modulation of activity of Ca2+, calmodulin-dependent enzymes, and cytoskeletal proteins. PMID:2442289

  10. Genetic modification of cytotoxic T lymphocytes to express cytokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Perna, Serena K; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) is safe and can be effective in cancer patients. Achievement of clinical responses in these patients is associated with the in vivo expansion and persistence of the transferred T lymphocytes. For this reason, recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2) is frequently used to support the in vivo survival of T lymphocytes infused into patients. However, IL-2 also causes important side effects. Thus, alternative strategies are highly demanded to limit cytokine-related off-target effects and to redirect the responsiveness of specific T-cell subsets to selected cytokines. Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a promising alternative cytokine as it possesses the above mentioned properties. However, because its receptor is downregulated in ex vivo-expanded T cells, methods are required to restore their responsiveness to this homeostatic cytokine. In this chapter, we describe the methodology to obtain the ectopic expression of IL-7 receptor alpha (IL-7Rα) in antigen-specific CTL, using Epstein-Barr virus-specific CTL (EBV-CTL), as a model.

  11. Clonotype Analysis of Cytomegalovirus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Babel, Nina; Brestrich, Gordon; Gondek, Lukasz P.; Sattler, Arne; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Poliak, Nina; Bethke, Nicole; Thiel, Andreas; Hammer, Markus H.; Reinke, Petra; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) control the replication of human cytomegalovirus (CMV). Previous studies assessed the clonotypic composition of CTL specific for individual immunodominant peptides within a certain HLA context. Such an approach has inherent limitations and may not assess the true clonal CTL response in vivo. Here, the clonotypic composition of CMV-specific CTL was determined in HLA-A2, CMV-seropositive kidney transplant recipients and healthy blood donors after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with either a pp65 whole-peptide pool or a single immunodominant peptide. Even after stimulation with the whole peptide pool, CMV-specific CTL remained monoclonal or oligoclonal. Regarding intraindividual variation, the CDR3 motifs of the dominant clones were identical to those observed in CTL generated by the single immunodominant peptide. Sequencing of the CDR3 regions demonstrated significant interindividual variation; however, structural homology was observed for immunodominant clonotypes in three individuals. In conclusion, the highly focused T cell receptor repertoire found after stimulation with either a single immunodominant peptide or a peptide pool demonstrates a pivotal role for immunodominant epitopes in the generation of a clonal repertoire. These results provide new insights into the regulation of CMV clonal dominance and may contribute to the design and monitoring of adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:18799721

  12. Clonotype analysis of cytomegalovirus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Babel, Nina; Brestrich, Gordon; Gondek, Lukasz P; Sattler, Arne; Wlodarski, Marcin W; Poliak, Nina; Bethke, Nicole; Thiel, Andreas; Hammer, Markus H; Reinke, Petra; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2009-02-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) control the replication of human cytomegalovirus (CMV). Previous studies assessed the clonotypic composition of CTL specific for individual immunodominant peptides within a certain HLA context. Such an approach has inherent limitations and may not assess the true clonal CTL response in vivo. Here, the clonotypic composition of CMV-specific CTL was determined in HLA-A2, CMV-seropositive kidney transplant recipients and healthy blood donors after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with either a pp65 whole-peptide pool or a single immunodominant peptide. Even after stimulation with the whole peptide pool, CMV-specific CTL remained monoclonal or oligoclonal. Regarding intraindividual variation, the CDR3 motifs of the dominant clones were identical to those observed in CTL generated by the single immunodominant peptide. Sequencing of the CDR3 regions demonstrated significant interindividual variation; however, structural homology was observed for immunodominant clonotypes in three individuals. In conclusion, the highly focused T cell receptor repertoire found after stimulation with either a single immunodominant peptide or a peptide pool demonstrates a pivotal role for immunodominant epitopes in the generation of a clonal repertoire. These results provide new insights into the regulation of CMV clonal dominance and may contribute to the design and monitoring of adoptive immunotherapy.

  13. Common Antiviral Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Epitope for Diverse Arenaviruses†

    PubMed Central

    Oldstone, Michael B. A.; Lewicki, Hanna; Homann, Dirk; Nguyen, Christophe; Julien, Sylvianne; Gairin, Jean Edouard

    2001-01-01

    Members of the Arenaviridae family have been isolated from mammalian hosts in disparate geographic locations, leading to their grouping as Old World types (i.e., lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV], Lassa fever virus [LFV], Mopeia virus, and Mobala virus) and New World types (i.e., Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, and Sabia viruses) (C. J. Peters, M. J. Buchmeier, P. E. Rollin, and T. G. Ksiazek, p. 1521–1551, in B. N. Fields, D. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley [ed.], Fields virology, 3rd ed., 1996; P. J. Southern, p. 1505–1519, in B. N. Fields, D. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley [ed.], Fields virology, 3rd ed., 1996). Several types in both groups—LFV, Junin, Machupo, and Sabia viruses—cause severe and often lethal human diseases. By sequence comparison, we noted that eight Old World and New World arenaviruses share several amino acids with the nucleoprotein (NP) that consists of amino acids (aa) 118 to 126 (NP 118–126) (RPQASGVYM) of LCMV that comprise the immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope for H-2d mice (32). This Ld-restricted epitope constituted >97% of the total bulk CTLs produced in the specific antiviral or clonal responses of H-2d BALB mice. NP 118–126 of the Old World arenaviruses LFV, Mopeia virus, and LCMV and the New World arenavirus Sabia virus bound at high affinity to Ld. The primary H-2d CTL anti-LCMV response as well as that of a CTL clone responsive to LCMV NP 118–126 recognized target cells coated with NP 118–126 peptides derived from LCMV, LFV, and Mopeia virus but not Sabia virus, indicating that a common functional NP epitope exists among Old World arenaviruses. Use of site-specific amino acid exchanges in the NP CTL epitope among these arenaviruses identified amino acids involved in major histocompatibility complex binding and CTL recognition. PMID:11413293

  14. Common antiviral cytotoxic t-lymphocyte epitope for diverse arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, M B; Lewicki, H; Homann, D; Nguyen, C; Julien, S; Gairin, J E

    2001-07-01

    Members of the Arenaviridae family have been isolated from mammalian hosts in disparate geographic locations, leading to their grouping as Old World types (i.e., lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV], Lassa fever virus [LFV], Mopeia virus, and Mobala virus) and New World types (i.e., Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, and Sabia viruses) (C. J. Peters, M. J. Buchmeier, P. E. Rollin, and T. G. Ksiazek, p. 1521-1551, in B. N. Fields, D. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley [ed.], Fields virology, 3rd ed., 1996; P. J. Southern, p. 1505-1519, in B. N. Fields, D. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley [ed.], Fields virology, 3rd ed., 1996). Several types in both groups-LFV, Junin, Machupo, and Sabia viruses-cause severe and often lethal human diseases. By sequence comparison, we noted that eight Old World and New World arenaviruses share several amino acids with the nucleoprotein (NP) that consists of amino acids (aa) 118 to 126 (NP 118-126) (RPQASGVYM) of LCMV that comprise the immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope for H-2(d) mice (32). This L(d)-restricted epitope constituted >97% of the total bulk CTLs produced in the specific antiviral or clonal responses of H-2(d) BALB mice. NP 118-126 of the Old World arenaviruses LFV, Mopeia virus, and LCMV and the New World arenavirus Sabia virus bound at high affinity to L(d). The primary H-2(d) CTL anti-LCMV response as well as that of a CTL clone responsive to LCMV NP 118-126 recognized target cells coated with NP 118-126 peptides derived from LCMV, LFV, and Mopeia virus but not Sabia virus, indicating that a common functional NP epitope exists among Old World arenaviruses. Use of site-specific amino acid exchanges in the NP CTL epitope among these arenaviruses identified amino acids involved in major histocompatibility complex binding and CTL recognition.

  15. Clinical Trials Using Adenovirus/Cytomegalovirus/Epstein-Barr Virus-specific Allogeneic Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Cancer.gov

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying adenovirus/cytomegalovirus/epstein-barr virus-specific allogeneic cytotoxic t lymphocytes.

  16. Characterization of cytotoxic T lymphocyte function after foot-and-mouth disease virus infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Patch, Jared R; Kenney, Mary; Pacheco, Juan M; Grubman, Marvin J; Golde, William T

    2013-08-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies specific for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been the central goal of vaccination efforts against this economically important disease of cloven-hoofed animals. Although these efforts have yielded much success, challenges remain, including little cross-serotype protection and inadequate duration of immunity. Commonly, viral infections are characterized by induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), yet the function of CTL in FMDV immunity is poorly defined. We developed an assay for detection of CTL specific for FMDV and reported that a modified adenovirus-vectored FMDV vaccine could induce CTL activity. This allowed us to determine whether FMDV-specific CTL responses are induced during infection and to test further whether vaccine-induced CTL could protect against challenge with FMDV. We now show the induction of antigen-specific CTL responses after infection of swine with FMDV strain A24 Cruizero. In addition, we developed a vaccination strategy that induces FMDV-specific CTL in the absence of significant neutralizing antibody. Animals vaccinated using this protocol showed delayed clinical disease and significantly suppressed viremia compared to control animals, suggesting a role for CTLs in the control of virus shedding. These results provide new insights showing induction of CTL responses to FMDV following infection or vaccination, and create the potential for improving vaccine performance by targeting cellular immunity.

  17. High frequency of cross-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes elicited during the virus-induced polyclonal cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Polyclonal stimulation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) occurs during infection with many viruses including those not known to transform CTL or encode superantigens. This polyclonal CTL response includes the generation of high levels of allospecific CTL directed against many class I haplotypes. In this report we investigated whether the allospecific CTL generated during an acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of C57BL/6 mice were stimulated specifically by antigen recognition or nonspecifically by polyclonal mechanisms possibly involving lymphokines or superantigens. An examination of the ability of different strains of mice to induce high levels of CTL specific for a given alloantigen showed that most, but not all, strains generated high levels of allospecific CTL, and that their abilities to generate them mapped genetically to the major histocompatibility complex locus, exclusive of the class II region. This indicated that the virus-induced allospecific CTL generation was independent of the class II allotype, and mice depleted of CD4+ cells generated allospecific CTL, indicating independence of class II-CD4+ cell interactions and resulting CD4+ cell-secreted lymphokines. FACS staining with a variety of V beta-binding antibodies did not show a superantigen-like depletion or enrichment of any tested V beta + subset during infection. Several experiments provided evidence in support of direct stimulation of CD8+ cells via the T cell receptor: (a) both virus- and allo-specific killing were enriched within a given V beta subpopulation; (b) relative CTL precursor frequencies against different class I alloantigens changed during the course of virus infection; (c) the relative levels of virus-induced, allospecific CTL-mediated lysis at day 8 after infection did not parallel the CTL precursor frequencies before infection; and (d) limiting dilution analyses of day 8 LCMV- infected spleen cells stimulated by virus-infected syngeneic peritoneal

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in HIV-exposed seronegative persons.

    PubMed

    Bernard, N F; Yannakis, C M; Lee, J S; Tsoukas, C M

    1999-03-01

    Repeated exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not always result in seroconversion. Understanding the conditions that permit or protect against progressive infection with HIV is important for vaccine development. Nineteen subjects at risk for HIV infection were CCR-5 genotyped and screened for virus-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). None had the Delta32CCR-5/Delta32CCR-5 genotype associated with HIV resistance. HIV-specific CTL were detected in 7 (41.1%) of 17 exposed uninfected subjects versus 0 of 14 seronegative subjects with no HIV risk factors (P=.006, chi2 test). Recognition of virus by CTL in exposed uninfected subjects was major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted and multispecific, and specificity could change with time. Activity could persist up to 34 months after the last virus exposure. The presence of HIV-specific CTL in a greater proportion of seronegative HIV-exposed versus unexposed subjects supports the notion that in some cases, virus exposure induces HIV immunity without seroconversion or disease progression.

  19. CD4+ T cells disarm or delete cytotoxic T lymphocytes under IL-17-polarizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jy-Ping; Lee, Meng-Hua; Hsu, Shu-Ching; Chen, Mei-Yu; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chang, Joseph T; Liao, Chun-Ta; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Chong, Pele; Chu, Ching-Liang; Shen, Chia-Rui; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2012-08-15

    Previous studies have shown that TGF-β acts cooperatively with IL-6 to elicit a high frequency of IL-17-secreting CD4(+) T cells (termed Th17) and an elevated CD8(+)IL-17(+) T cell population (termed Tc17). These CD8(+) cells fail to behave like most cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express IFN-γ and granzyme B, but they exhibit a noncytotoxic phenotype. Although a significant increase in the number of these Tc17 cells was found in tumors, their role and interaction with other cell types remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the presence of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, but not the CD4(+)CD25(+) (regulatory T [Treg]) cell population, significantly reduced the elicitation of Tc17 cells, possibly as a result of the induction of apoptotic signals. Importantly, these signals may be derived from soluble mediators, and the addition of anti-IL-2 restored the reduction of Tc17 cells in the presence of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. Finally, the elicited Tc17 and Treg cells exhibited a close association in patients with head and neck cancer, indicating that the surrounding Treg cells might maintain the survival of the Tc17 cells. Taken together, these results reveal an intriguing mechanism in which Tc17 cells are controlled by a finely tuned collaboration between the different types of CD4(+) T cells in distinct tumor microenvironments.

  20. CrmA, a poxvirus-encoded serpin, inhibits cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tewari, M; Telford, W G; Miller, R A; Dixit, V M

    1995-09-29

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), by virtue of their ability to recognize and induce apoptotic death of virus-infected cells, comprise a major antiviral defense mechanism. The induction of apoptosis by CTLs can be completely accounted for by two mechanisms: (i) a Ca(2+)-dependent component that involves the exocytotic release of serine proteases known as granzymes from CTL granules and their subsequent insertion into the target cell to induce apoptosis and (ii) a Ca(2+)-independent component that involves the activation of Fas, a receptor on the target cell membrane that triggers apoptosis. Although viruses have evolved several indirect mechanisms for evading the CTL response, direct inhibition of the apoptotic cascade has never been described. We now show for the first time that the cowpox virus protein CrmA, a protease inhibitor of the serpin family, is capable of inhibiting CTL-mediated cytolysis. The inhibitory effect is largely the result of blockade of the Ca(2+)-independent (i.e. Fas-mediated) component of CTL killing. CrmA thus represents the first example of a viral gene product capable of directly blocking CTL-mediated cell death.

  1. Correlates of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated virus control: implications for immunosuppressive infections and their treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, D; Nowak, M A

    2000-01-01

    A very important question in immunology is to determine which factors decide whether an immune response can efficiently clear or control a viral infection, and under what circumstances we observe persistent viral replication and pathology. This paper summarizes how mathematical models help us gain new insights into these questions, and explores the relationship between antiviral therapy and long-term immunological control in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We find that cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) memory, defined as antigen-independent persistence of CTL precursors, is necessary for the CTL response to clear an infection. The presence of such a memory response is associated with the coexistence of many CTL clones directed against multiple epitopes. If CTL memory is inefficient, then persistent replication can be established. This outcome is associated with a narrow CTL response directed against only one or a few viral epitopes. If the virus replicates persistently, occurrence of pathology depends on the level of virus load at equilibrium, and this can be determined by the overall efficacy of the CTL response. Mathematical models suggest that controlled replication is reflected by a positive correlation between CTLs and virus load. On the other hand, uncontrolled viral replication results in higher loads and the absence of a correlation between CTLs and virus load. A negative correlation between CTLs and virus load indicates that the virus actively impairs immunity, as observed with HIV. Mathematical models and experimental data suggest that HIV persistence and pathology are caused by the absence of sufficient CTL memory. We show how mathematical models can help us devise therapy regimens that can restore CTL memory in HIV patients and result in long-term immunological control of the virus in the absence of life-long treatment. PMID:11186307

  2. An antigenic threshold for maintaining human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, X.; Ogg, G.; Bonhoeffer, S.; Safrit, J.; Vesanen, M.; Bauer, D.; Chen, D.; Cao, Y.; Demoitie, M. A.; Zhang, L.; Markowitz, M.; Nixon, D.; McMichael, A.; Ho, D. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model in mice, a number of studies show that memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses are maintained in the presence of continuous antigenic stimulation. Yet, other groups found that memory CTL specific for LCMV could last for a lifetime in mice without viral antigens. Thus, the extent to which an antigen is required for the maintenance of virus-specific CTL remains controversial. In humans, very few studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between the quantity of antigen and the magnitude of CTL responses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We quantified CTL precursors (CTLp) using a limiting-dilution analysis (LDA) and CTL effectors (CTLe) using a new Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I tetramer technology in six long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, as well as in eight patients whose viral loads were well suppressed by antiretroviral therapy. The viremia levels in these patients were measured using an reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The proviral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) was also measured by PCR in four LTNPs. RESULTS: The LTNPs had high levels of HIV-1-specific memory CTLp and CTLe, while maintaining a low plasma viral load. Despite also having low viral loads, patients whose plasma viremia was well-suppressed by effective therapy had low levels of CTLe. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a complex, rather than a monotonic, relationship exists between CTL levels and HIV-1 viremia, including what appears to be an antigenic threshold for the maintenance of CTL at a measurable level. Under conditions of "antigen excess,", CTLe levels correlate inversely with viral load. On the other hand, under conditions that are "antigen limited," the correlation appears to be direct. PMID:11071274

  3. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis: an example of programmed cell death in the immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Target cells are programmed to die following interaction with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Within minutes of exposure to CTL the target cell's nuclear DNA is fragmented. Target cell lysis, as measured by /sup 51/Cr release, occurs about 60 minutes after induction of DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation results from the action of an endonuclease which cleaves DNA in the linker region between nucleosomes. The origin of this nuclease, whether transferred to the target by the CTL or endogenous to the target cell, has not been resolved. DNA fragmentation occurs only when appropriately sensitized CTL are used and is not merely the result of cell death because killing of target cells by extreme deviation from homeostasis, by interruption of energy production, or by lysis with antibody and complement does not induce DNA cleavage. When Triton X-100 is added to target cells which have interacted with CTL, the DNA fragments do not remain in association with the nucleus. This observation suggests that breakdown of overall nuclear structure is induced concomitantly with DNA fragmentation. Morphologically, disruption of nuclear structure and DNA fragmentation are observed as widespread chromatin condensation (apoptosis). Apoptosis is observed in metabolically active target cells and is not a consequence of cell death. A cell whose DNA is extensively fragmented is condemmed to die. Induction of oligonucleosome-sized DNA is also an early event in glucocorticoid-induced thymocyte death and death of T cells upon removal of growth factor. Several similarities exist between these systems and CTL-mediated cytolysis suggesting a final common biochemical pathway for all three types of cell death.

  4. Thymic influence on the T-lymphocyte self MHC repertoire. II. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Jenski, L J; Miller, B A

    1988-01-01

    We measured the frequency and specificity of thymic alloantigen-reactive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors in spleens of allogeneic thymus-grafted nude mice tolerant to thymic alloantigens. Under our conditions of limiting dilution analysis we found no selective loss of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors in allogeneic thymus-grafted mice. Upon analysis of individual cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones, we found that lysis of specific and third party targets was mediated by distinct clones specific for H-2 antigens. Precursors from allogeneic thymus-grafted nudes stimulated at limiting dilutions with thymic alloantigens tended to lyse fewer targets than were lysed by normal cytotoxic T-lymphocytes or allogeneic thymus-grafted nude precursors stimulated with third party alloantigens, but the reduction in lytic activity was not statistically significant. Specific suppression was not demonstrated, but could not be ruled out unequivocally. We conclude that intrathymic deletion of thymic alloantigen-reactive pCTL is not necessary to achieve specific tolerance to thymic alloantigens.

  5. In vitro generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte response using dendritic cell immunotherapy in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Ye-Teng; Zhang, Qing-Min; Kou, Quan-Chun; Tang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy with tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) is one of the breakthrough strategies used in the treatment of cancer. However, DC-based immunotherapies for osteosarcoma are limited. In the present study, preclinical studies of a C3H osteosarcoma mouse model (produced by subcutaneous injection of LM8 murine osteosarcoma cells) validated the concept that LM8 cell lysate-pulsed bone marrow-derived DCs may evoke a more potent immune response compared with DCs that have been matured using polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). A cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was established using two groups of C3H mice (n=9) with osteosarcoma; the treatment group consisted of LM8 cell lysate-pulsed DCs and the control group consisted of DCs matured using poly I:C. Each group was immunized with doses of 1×106 cells twice per week for 3 weeks. No difference in the expression of cluster of differentiation markers was identified in the two groups. DCs pulsed with LM8 cell lysate were associated with the increased induction of CTL activity. Serum interferon-γ levels were increased in mice that received DCs pulsed with LM8 cell lysate compared with that in the poly I:C-matured DC group (P<0.041). Serum interleukin-4 was decreased in the treatment group vs. the control group (P<0.033). A mixed lymphocyte reaction assay confirmed that LM8-DC immunotherapy may evoke a significant antigen-specific immune response in a mouse model. The present study reveals promising data on efficacy of a DC-based immunotherapy in the treatment of osteosarcoma; however, further clinical studies are warranted. PMID:27446401

  6. Effector cytotoxic T lymphocyte numbers induced by vaccination should exceed levels in chronic infection for protection from HIV.

    PubMed

    Altes, H K; Price, D A; Jansen, V A

    2001-10-12

    Recent technological advances have revolutionised our capacity to induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses with a variety of vaccine formulations and delivery systems. However, the conditions required for a CTL-inducing vaccine to provide protection from infection or disease are poorly understood, and the results of challenge experiments have not been consistent. Here we use a mathematical model to examine the requirements necessary for successful vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through cellular immunity. We describe the interaction between cytotoxic T cells and infected lymphocytes, capturing the essence of a persistent infection of immune cells. We conclude that to protect from infection, the cellular immune response should be boosted to levels exceeding those in chronic infection. This requires either that effector CTL exceed this threshold before infection, or that a memory CTL population is established that can yield this level of effector CTL very quickly upon infection.

  7. Effect of ultraviolet B irradiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity, and skin graft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, K.; Iijima, M.

    1989-02-01

    The influence of ultraviolet B irradiation on the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to alloantigens by epidermal cells (EC), on the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to alloantigens, and on skin graft rejection was studied. After the skin was irradiated with UVB in vitro, EC were obtained. The EC were injected subcutaneously, and the DTH reaction was compared with that induced by non-UVB-irradiated EC. A reduction in the DTH reaction was observed (from 62% to 99.1%). CTL activity in these mice was assessed after in vitro stimulation. CTL activity in mice sensitized with UVB-irradiated EC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, mice sensitized with UVB-irradiated EC did not reject a subsequent skin allograft in an accelerated fashion, whereas mice sensitized with non-UVB-irradiated EC did. The mechanism(s) of these reactions and the clinical application of the UVB irradiation prior to grafting are discussed.

  8. Role of interferon-γ and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in intraocular tumor rejection

    PubMed Central

    Ligocki, Ann J.; Brown, Joseph R.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2015-01-01

    The eye is normally an immunosuppressive environment. This condition is better known as immune privilege and protects the eye from immune-mediated inflammation of tissues that cannot regenerate. However, immune privilege creates a dilemma for the eye when intraocular neoplasms arise. In some cases, immune privilege is suspended, resulting in the immune rejection of intraocular tumors. This study employed a mouse model in which interferon-γ–dependent intraocular tumor rejection occurs. We tested the hypothesis that this rejection requires interferon-γ for the generation and functional capacity of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–mediated rejection of intraocular tumors. Tumors grew progressively in the eyes of interferon-γ knockout mice, even though the mice generated tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in the periphery. However, interferon-γ knockout mice rejected tumors that were introduced into extraocular sites. Subcutaneous tumor immunization before intraocular challenge led to tumor rejection and preservation of the eye in wild-type mice. By contrast, tumors grew progressively in the eyes of interferon-γ knockout mice despite their ability to generate peripheral tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes as well as the capacity of CD8+ T cells to enter the eye as shown by the presence of CD8 and perforin message and CD3+CD8+ leukocytes within the tumor-bearing eye. We found that cytotoxic T lymphocytes generated in wild-type mice and adoptively transferred into interferon-γ knockout mice mediated the rejection of intraocular tumors in interferon-γ knockout hosts. The results indicate that interferon-γ is critical for the initial priming and differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes residing in the periphery to produce the most effect antitumor function within the eye. PMID:26578649

  9. CD40 triggering induces strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus immunization in mice: a new vaccine strategy for staphylococcal mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wallemacq, Hugues; Bedoret, Denis; Pujol, Julien; Desmet, Christophe; Drion, Pierre-Vincent; Farnir, Frédéric; Mainil, Jacques; Lekeux, Pierre; Bureau, Fabrice; Fiévez, Laurence

    2012-03-09

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a major pathogen involved in chronic bovine mastitis. Staphylococcal mastitis is difficult to control due to the ability of S. aureus to invade and survive within host cells. We therefore postulated that induction of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses leading to destruction of infected cells could help in the control of S. aureus mastitis. We demonstrate that immunization of mice with heat-killed S. aureus together with agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies elicits strong CTL responses capable of reducing the severity of subsequent staphylococcal mastitis. Our study shows promise for CTL-dependent vaccination against S. aureus mastitis.

  10. Variant antigenic peptide promotes cytotoxic T lymphocyte adhesion to target cells without cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shotton, David M.; Attaran, Amir

    1998-01-01

    Timelapse video microscopy has been used to record the motility and dynamic interactions between an H-2Db-restricted murine cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone (F5) and Db-transfected L929 mouse fibroblasts (LDb) presenting normal or variant antigenic peptides from human influenza nucleoprotein. F5 cells will kill LDb target cells presenting specific antigen (peptide NP68: ASNENMDAM) after “browsing” their surfaces for between 8 min and many hours. Cell death is characterized by abrupt cellular rounding followed by zeiosis (vigorous “boiling” of the cytoplasm and blebbing of the plasma membrane) for 10–20 min, with subsequent cessation of all activity. Departure of cytotoxic T lymphocytes from unkilled target cells is rare, whereas serial killing is sometimes observed. In the absence of antigenic peptide, cytotoxic T lymphocytes browse target cells for much shorter periods, and readily leave to encounter other targets, while never causing target cell death. Two variant antigenic peptides, differing in nonamer position 7 or 8, also act as antigens, albeit with lower efficiency. A third variant peptide NP34 (ASNENMETM), which differs from NP68 in both positions and yet still binds Db, does not stimulate F5 cytotoxicity. Nevertheless, timelapse video analysis shows that NP34 leads to a significant modification of cell behavior, by up-regulating F5–LDb adhesive interactions. These data extend recent studies showing that partial agonists may elicit a subset of the T cell responses associated with full antigen stimulation, by demonstrating that TCR interaction with variant peptide antigens can trigger target cell adhesion and surface exploration without activating the signaling pathway that results in cytotoxicity. PMID:9861010

  11. Partial Escape of HIV-1 from Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dagarag, Mirabelle; Khan, Basim; Ali, Ayub; Yang, Otto O.

    2012-01-01

    Viral mutational escape from CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is typically considered to be a dichotomous process and uncommon during chronic HIV-1 infection. Ex vivo passaging of HIV-1 from persons with chronic infection, however, revealed the evolution of many fixed substitutions within and around CTL-targeted regions, with an associated increase in replicative capacity. This indicates an evolution of mutations during chronic HIV-1 infection that trade replicative fitness for incomplete evasion of CTLs, or “partial escape.” PMID:22553321

  12. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and cytostatic acting cells in T. annulata-immune cattle.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, J S; Wiegers, P; Ritz, H; Hartwig, H; Schein, E; Schnittger, L

    2000-01-01

    Cattle immunized against Theileria annulata with schizont containing autologous cell lines are immune to challenge with a homologous parasite strain. Two cell types have been detected in the peripheral blood of the immunized animals: cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and cytostatic acting cells (CAC). Killing the target cells by CTL is infection associated and is MHC class I restricted. Hence, no cytotoxicity was observed against target cells that were treated with the theilericidal drug buparvaquone or autologous Con A-blasts. The growth inhibition of CAC is MHC unrestricted, and not mediated by cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma).

  13. Clinical-Grade Human Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells Block CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Plessers, Jeroen; Dekimpe, Emily; Van Woensel, Matthias; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Bullens, Dominique M; Pinxteren, Jef; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2016-12-01

    : MultiStem cells are clinical-grade multipotent adult bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (MAPCs), with extensive replication potential and broader differentiation capacity compared with mesenchymal stem cells. Human MAPCs suppress T-cell proliferation induced by alloantigens and mutually interact with allogeneic natural killer cells. In this study, the interaction between MultiStem and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was addressed for the first time. In an in vitro setting, the immunogenicity of MultiStem, the susceptibility of MultiStem toward CTL-mediated lysis, and its effects on CTL function were investigated. MultiStem was nonimmunogenic for alloreactive CTL induction and was-even after major histocompatibility complex class I upregulation-insensitive to alloantigen-specific CTL-mediated lysis. Furthermore, MultiStem reduced CTL proliferation and significantly decreased perforin expression during the T-cell activation phase. As a consequence, MultiStem dose-dependently impaired the induction of CTL function. These effects of MultiStem were mediated predominantly through contact-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, MultiStem cells considerably influenced the expression of T-cell activation markers CD25, CD69, and human leukocyte antigen-DR. The MultiStem-induced CD8(-)CD69(+) T-cell population displayed a suppressive effect on the induction of CTL function during a subsequent mixed-lymphocyte culture. Finally, the killer activity of activated antigen-specific CTLs during their cytolytic effector phase was also diminished in the presence of MultiStem. This study confirms that these clinical-grade MAPCs are an immune-modulating population that inhibits CTL activation and effector responses and are, consequently, a highly valuable cell population for adoptive immunosuppressive therapy in diseases where damage is induced by CTLs. Because multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) are among the noteworthy adult mesenchymal stem cell populations for immune

  14. Ex vivo analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocytes to measles antigens during infection and after vaccination in Gambian children.

    PubMed Central

    Jaye, A; Magnusen, A F; Sadiq, A D; Corrah, T; Whittle, H C

    1998-01-01

    The study of cytotoxic T cell responses to measles antigens during infection and after vaccination may provide insight into the immunopathology of the infection. It will also provide a knowledge of the immunity conferred by wild or attenuated virus, which will help in the design of new vaccines. Direct cytotoxic T cell responses, which did not require in vitro restimulation, were measured from peripheral blood by a standard 51Cr-release assay in 35 patients with acute measles, using HLA class I matched allogeneic B cells as targets. 77% showed specific responses to measles fusion protein, 69% to the hemagglutinin, and 50% to the nucleoprotein. These responses, which were related to severity of disease and history of previous vaccination, had waned by 14-24 wk after measles when memory responses to the same antigens could be elicited by restimulation in 71% of the 13 patients tested. A similar pattern followed vaccination: direct cytotoxic responses to fusion and hemagglutinin proteins were shown in 70% of the 20 children tested while 50% responded to the nucleoprotein. These responses, which were mediated by both CD8(+) and CD4(+) cells, faded over 6 wk when memory responses could be restimulated. Thus, a vigorous cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to fusion, hemagglutinin, and nucleoproteins is important in both natural and vaccine-induced immunity to measles. PMID:9835622

  15. Polymer nanoparticles for cross-presentation of exogenous antigens and enhanced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune response

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chanyoung; Noh, Young-Woock; Lim, Yong Taik

    2016-01-01

    Effective induction of an antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immune response is one of the key goals of cancer immunotherapy. We report the design and fabrication of polyethylenimine (PEI)-coated polymer nanoparticles (NPs) as efficient antigen-delivery carriers that can induce antigen cross-presentation and a strong CTL response. After synthesis of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs containing ovalbumin (OVA) by the double-emulsion solvent-evaporation method, cationic-charged PLGA NPs were generated by coating them with PEI. In a methyl tetrazolium salt assay, no discernible cytotoxic effect of PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs was observed. The capacity and mechanism of PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs for antigen delivery and cross-presentation on dendritic cells (DCs) were determined by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs were internalized efficiently via phagocytosis or macropinocytosis in DCs and induced efficient cross-presentation of the antigen on MHC class I molecules via both endosome escape and a lysosomal processing mechanism. The DCs treated with PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs induced a release of IL-2 cytokine from OVA-specific CD8-OVA1.3 T cells more efficiently than DCs treated with PLGA (OVA) NPs. Therefore, the PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs can induce antigen cross-presentation and are expected to be used for induction of a strong CTL immune response and for efficient anticancer immunotherapy. PMID:27540289

  16. CRISPR knock out CTLA-4 enhances the anti-tumor activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Long; Meng, Tongyu; Zhao, Zhilong; Han, Jinsheng; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Fei; Cai, Jianhui

    2017-09-06

    T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity plays a pivotal role in cancer immune surveillance. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) is a protein receptor mainly expressed in activated T cells and regulatory T cells. CTLA-4 competes with CD28 for ligand binding and generates inhibitory signals to attenuate T cell activation. The blockade of CTLA-4 mediated immune inhibitory checkpoint has been associated with enhanced anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we use CRISPR-Cas9 system to knock out (KO) CTLA-4 from cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and evaluate its effect on the anti-tumor activity of the CTLs. CTLA-4 KO CTLs robustly enhanced tumor cell death by 40% compared to the control and facilitated apoptosis and caspase activities in tumor cells. The knockout of CTLA-4 also increased TNF-α and IFN-γ secretion of the CTLs by approximately 2-fold. The effectiveness of CTLA-4 KO in enhancing anti-tumor activity of the CTLs was verified in vivo using mouse xenograft model. The xenografted mice treated with CTLA-4 KO CTLs demonstrated repressed tumor growth and prolonged survival compared to the control group. Our data suggest that CRISPR targeting CTLA-4 immune checkpoint could significantly improve the anti-tumor activity of CTLs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. HIV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in immunologically normal HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Bernard, N F; Pederson, K; Chung, F; Ouellet, L; Wainberg, M A; Tsoukas, C M

    1998-11-12

    CD8+ T-cell counts usually increase soon after infection with HIV, whereas CD4+ cell counts decrease. The result of these changes in T-cell subpopulation subsets in most HIV-infected subjects is inversion of the CD4 : CD8 ratio from greater than 1.0 typical of uninfected persons to less than 1.0 after infection. Six HIV-infected individuals were identified in whom the CD4 : CD8 ratio remained normal throughout follow-up (4.0-11.25 years). They all maintained levels of CD4+ cells above 500 x 10(6)/l and had never received antiretroviral therapy. Because HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been implicated in control of HIV during the asymptomatic phase of disease, we screened these individuals for the presence of HIV-specific CTL activity. CTL activity was assessed in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and in phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated interleukin-2 expanded cell lines established from PBMC. Cytotoxicity to HIV-1 env, gag, pol and nef gene products was surveyed in a 4 h 51Cr-release assay using autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed B cells infected with vaccinia constructs expressing each of these HIV genes. The immunodominant CTL epitope and MHC class I antigen restriction specificity of HIV-specific CTL was mapped when present. Plasma viral load was assessed by branched DNA assay. Attempts were made to isolate virus from these individuals by the PBMC coculture assay. None of the six immunologically normal HIV-infected (INHI) subjects exhibited direct HIV-specific CTL activity in their freshly isolated PBMC compared with 16 (47%) out of 34 HIV disease progressors (P = 0.03, chi2 test) and one out of 10 seronegative subjects. Three of the six INHI subjects had detectable memory HIV-specific precursor CTL (pCTL) activity in in vitro-activated T-cell lines compared with 25 (73.5%) out of 34 HIV-1 disease progressors and in none out of 10 seronegative individuals. All three INHI subjects had Gag-specific pCTL, and none

  18. Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Vector Delivers Protective Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses to Disease-Relevant Foreign Epitopes†

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Wai-Ping; Doan, Tracy; Herd, Karen A.; Netter, Hans-Jürgen; Tindle, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Although hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) per se is highly immunogenic, its use as a vector for the delivery of foreign cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes has met with little success because of constraints on HBsAg stability and secretion imposed by the insertion of foreign sequence into critical hydrophobic/amphipathic regions. Using a strategy entailing deletion of DNA encoding HBsAg-specific CTL epitopes and replacement with DNA encoding foreign CTL epitopes, we have derived chimeric HBsAg DNA immunogens which elicited effector and memory CTL responses in vitro, and pathogen- and tumor-protective responses in vivo, when the chimeric HBsAg DNAs were used to immunize mice. We further show that HBsAg DNA recombinant for both respiratory syncytial virus and human papillomavirus CTL epitopes elicited simultaneous responses to both pathogens. These data demonstrate the efficacy of HBsAg DNA as a vector for the delivery of disease-relevant protective CTL responses. They also suggest the applicability of the approach of deriving chimeric HBsAg DNA immunogens simultaneously encoding protective CTL epitopes for multiple diseases. The DNAs we tested formed chimeric HBsAg virus-like particles (VLPs). Thus, our results have implications for the development of vaccination strategies using either chimeric HBsAg DNA or VLP vaccines. HBsAg is the globally administered vaccine for hepatitis B virus infection, inviting its usage as a vector for the delivery of immunogens from other diseases. PMID:16571814

  19. Novel epitope evoking CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting CD138 antigen could potentially represent a new treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM). This study evaluated the immune function of CD138 peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), generated ex vivo using an HLA-A2-specific CD138 epitope against MM cells. A novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide was identified from the full-length protein sequence of the CD138 antigen, which induced CTL specific to primary CD138+ MM cells. The peptide-induced CD138-CTL contained a high percentage of CD8+ activated/memory T cells with a low percentage of CD4+ T cell and naive CD8+ T cell subsets. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxicity against MM cell lines. In addition, CD138-CTL demonstrated increased degranulation, proliferation and γ–interferon secretion to HLA-A2+/CD138+ myeloma cells, but not HLA-A2−/CD138+ or HLA-A2+/CD138− cells. The immune functional properties of the CD138-CTL were also demonstrated using primary HLA-A2+/CD138+ cells isolated from myeloma patients. In conclusion, a novel immunogenic CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide can induce antigen-specific CTL, which might be useful for the treatment of MM patients with peptide-based vaccine or cellular immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21902685

  20. Hepatitis B surface antigen vector delivers protective cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses to disease-relevant foreign epitopes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Wai-Ping; Doan, Tracy; Herd, Karen A; Netter, Hans-Jürgen; Tindle, Robert W

    2006-04-01

    Although hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) per se is highly immunogenic, its use as a vector for the delivery of foreign cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes has met with little success because of constraints on HBsAg stability and secretion imposed by the insertion of foreign sequence into critical hydrophobic/amphipathic regions. Using a strategy entailing deletion of DNA encoding HBsAg-specific CTL epitopes and replacement with DNA encoding foreign CTL epitopes, we have derived chimeric HBsAg DNA immunogens which elicited effector and memory CTL responses in vitro, and pathogen- and tumor-protective responses in vivo, when the chimeric HBsAg DNAs were used to immunize mice. We further show that HBsAg DNA recombinant for both respiratory syncytial virus and human papillomavirus CTL epitopes elicited simultaneous responses to both pathogens. These data demonstrate the efficacy of HBsAg DNA as a vector for the delivery of disease-relevant protective CTL responses. They also suggest the applicability of the approach of deriving chimeric HBsAg DNA immunogens simultaneously encoding protective CTL epitopes for multiple diseases. The DNAs we tested formed chimeric HBsAg virus-like particles (VLPs). Thus, our results have implications for the development of vaccination strategies using either chimeric HBsAg DNA or VLP vaccines. HBsAg is the globally administered vaccine for hepatitis B virus infection, inviting its usage as a vector for the delivery of immunogens from other diseases.

  1. Functional Alteration of Natural Killer Cells and Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes upon Asbestos Exposure and in Malignant Mesothelioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Maeda, Megumi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Fukuoka, Kazuya; Nakano, Takashi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is caused by exposure to asbestos, which is known to have carcinogenic effects. However, the development of mesothelioma takes a long period and results from a low or intermediate dose of exposure. These findings have motivated us to investigate the immunological effects of asbestos exposure and analyze immune functions of patients with mesothelioma and pleural plaque, a sign of exposure to asbestos. Here, we review our knowledge concerning natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). NK cells showed impaired cytotoxicity with altered expression of activating receptors upon exposure to asbestos, while induction of granzyme+ cells in CD8+ lymphocytes was suppressed by asbestos exposure. It is interesting that a decrease in NKp46, a representative activating receptor, is common between NK cells in PBMC culture with asbestos and those of mesothelioma patients. Moreover, it was observed that CD8+ lymphocytes may be stimulated by some kind of “nonself” cells in plaque-positive individuals and in mesothelioma patients, whereas CTL in mesothelioma is impaired by poststimulation maintenance of cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that analysis of immunological parameters might contribute to the evaluation of health conditions of asbestos-exposed individuals and to a greater understanding of the pathology of malignant mesothelioma. PMID:26161391

  2. Functional Alteration of Natural Killer Cells and Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes upon Asbestos Exposure and in Malignant Mesothelioma Patients.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Maeda, Megumi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Fukuoka, Kazuya; Nakano, Takashi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is caused by exposure to asbestos, which is known to have carcinogenic effects. However, the development of mesothelioma takes a long period and results from a low or intermediate dose of exposure. These findings have motivated us to investigate the immunological effects of asbestos exposure and analyze immune functions of patients with mesothelioma and pleural plaque, a sign of exposure to asbestos. Here, we review our knowledge concerning natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). NK cells showed impaired cytotoxicity with altered expression of activating receptors upon exposure to asbestos, while induction of granzyme(+) cells in CD8(+) lymphocytes was suppressed by asbestos exposure. It is interesting that a decrease in NKp46, a representative activating receptor, is common between NK cells in PBMC culture with asbestos and those of mesothelioma patients. Moreover, it was observed that CD8(+) lymphocytes may be stimulated by some kind of "nonself" cells in plaque-positive individuals and in mesothelioma patients, whereas CTL in mesothelioma is impaired by poststimulation maintenance of cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that analysis of immunological parameters might contribute to the evaluation of health conditions of asbestos-exposed individuals and to a greater understanding of the pathology of malignant mesothelioma.

  3. Inhibitory effects of various oxygenated sterols on the differentiation and function of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Spangrude, G.J.; Sherris, D.; Daynes, R.A.

    1982-05-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light (UVL) is capable of causing many biological and biochemical changes in this complex organ. One early consequence is the oxidation of epidermal plasma membrane cholesterol, causing the induction of a wide variety of photoproducts. It is well recognized that some oxygenated sterols possess potent biological activity on mammalian cells by their ability to inhibit endogeneous mevalonate and cholesterol biosynthesis. In the few immunological systems that have been studied, there is general agreement that lymphocyte function is altered in the presence of certain oxygenated sterols. Insight into the biochemical basis for altered lymphocyte function is lacking, as both afferent and efferent blockades have been suggested. These studies were undertaken to determine the effect of various oxygenated sterols (representing a number of known cholesterol-derived photoproducts) on the generation (afferent) and function (efferent) of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Cell-mediated immune responses which result in the generation of both alloantigen-specific and syngeneic tumor-specific CTLs were evaluated. (JMT)

  4. Dexamethasone induces apoptosis in mouse natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Migliorati, G; Nicoletti, I; D'Adamio, F; Spreca, A; Pagliacci, C; Riccardi, C

    1994-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones (GCH) induce apoptotic cell death in immature thymocytes through an active mechanism, characterized by extensive DNA fragmentation into oligonucleosomal subunits. This requires macromolecular synthesis and is inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, interleukin-4 (IL-4) and heat shock (hs). We performed experiments to analyse the possible effect of GCH on more differentiated lymphocytes, i.e. mouse natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+ alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The results show that dexamethasone (DEX) induces DNA fragmentation and cell death in NK cells and CTL in vitro. In both NK cells and CTL, DEX-induced apoptosis is inhibited by IL-2 and IL-4 but, unlike that induced in thymocytes, is augmented by mRNA and protein synthesis inhibitors, PKC inhibitors and HS. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8132215

  5. Elicitation from virus-naive individuals of cytotoxic T lymphocytes directed against conserved HIV-1 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Reche, Pedro A; Keskin, Derin B; Hussey, Rebecca E; Ancuta, Petronela; Gabuzda, Dana; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2006-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) protect against viruses including HIV-1. To avoid viral escape mutants that thwart immunity, we chose 25 CTL epitopes defined in the context of natural infection with functional and/or structural constraints that maintain sequence conservation. By combining HLA binding predictions with knowledge concerning HLA allele frequencies, a metric estimating population protection coverage (PPC) was computed and epitope pools assembled. Strikingly, only a minority of immunocompetent HIV-1 infected individuals responds to pools with PPC >95%. In contrast, virus-naive individuals uniformly expand IFNγ producing cells and mount anti-HIV-1 cytolytic activity. This disparity suggests a vaccine design paradigm shift from infected to normal subjects. PMID:16674822

  6. Aloe QDM complex enhances specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing in vivo in metabolic disease mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjoo; Kim, Jiyeon; An, Jinho; Lee, Heetae; Kong, Hyunseok; Song, Youngcheon; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Kim, Kyungjae

    2017-03-01

    We developed spontaneous diet-induced metabolic disease in mice by feeding them a high-fat diet for 23 weeks and administered Aloe QDM complex for 16 weeks to examine its restorative effect on immune disorders and metabolic syndrome. A series of immune functional assays indicated Aloe QDM complex enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and antigen-specific immunity as determined by the restored functions of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and IgG production. The elevated serum TNF-α level was also regulated by Aloe QDM complex treatment, which suggested its complex therapeutic potential. As for metabolic phenotypes, oral administration of Aloe QDM complex significantly improved diabetic symptoms, including high fasting glucose levels and glucose tolerance, and distinctly alleviated lipid accumulation in adipose and hepatic tissue. The simultaneous restoration of Aloe QDM complex on metabolic syndrome and host immune dysfunction, especially on the specific CTL killing was first elucidated in our study.

  7. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes against disease-associated determinant(s) in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes, induced by stimulating the PBMC of an HLA-B27+ normal individual (B27+, AS-) with the PBMC of an HLA-identical sibling suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (B27+, AS+), specifically lyse B27+, AS+ PBMC but not PBMC from HLA-27+ or B27-, AS- normal controls, or from HLA-B27- AS patients (B27-,AS+). CTL of similar specificity can also be raised by immunizing in vitro B27+,AS- cells with autologous cells modified by cross-reactive bacterial antigens. These results suggest that CTL can recognize certain bacterial antigens in association with HLA-B27 and that this interaction may lead to an inflammatory episode during the initial stages of the disease. PMID:3528379

  8. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Xin; Mei, Zhen-Yang; Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+), but not CD4(+) T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Cathepsin L coexists with Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte Antigen-2 alpha in distinct regions of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Luziga, Claudius; Nga, Bui Thi To; Mbassa, Gabriel; Yamamoto, Yoshimi

    2016-09-01

    Cathepsins B and L are two prominent members of cystein proteases with broad substrate specificity and are known to be involved in the process of intra- and extra-cellular protein degradation and turnover. The propeptide region of cathepsin L is identical to Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-2α (CTLA-2α) discovered in mouse activated T-cells and mast cells. CTLA-2α exhibits selective inhibitory activities against papain and cathepsin L. We previously demonstrated the distribution pattern of the CTLA-2α protein in mouse brain by immunohistochemistry, describing that it is preferentially localized within nerve fibre bundles than neuronal cell bodies. In the present study we report colocalization of cathepsin L and CTLA-2α by double labeling immunofluorescence analysis in the mouse brain. In the telencephalon, immunoreactivity was identified in cerebral cortex and subcortical structures, hippocampus and amygdala. Within the diencephalon intense colocalization was detected in stria medullaris of thalamus, mammillothalamic tract, medial habenular nucleus and choroid plexus. Colocalization signals in the mesencephalon were strong in the hypothalamus within supramammillary nucleus and lateroanterior hypothalamic nucleus while in the cerebellum was in the deep white matter, granule cell layer and Purkinje neurons but moderately in stellate, and basket cells of cerebellar cortex. The distribution pattern indicates that the fine equilibrium between synthesis and secretion of cathespin L and CTLA-2α is part of the brain processes to maintain normal growth and development. The functional implication of cathespin L coexistence with CTLA-2α in relation to learning, memory and disease mechanisms is discussed.

  10. Autoimmunity Correlates With Tumor Regression in Patients With Metastatic Melanoma Treated With Anti–Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen-4

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Peter; Phan, Giao Q.; Maker, Ajay V.; Robinson, Michael R.; Quezado, Martha M.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Kammula, Udai S.; Royal, Richard E.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Haworth, Leah R.; Levy, Catherine; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Nichol, Geoff; Yellin, Michael J.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Previously, we reported our experience treating 14 patients with metastatic melanoma using a fully human antibody to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (anti–CTLA-4) in conjunction with peptide vaccination. We have now treated 56 patients to evaluate two different dose schedules of anti–CTLA-4 and to explore the relationship between autoimmunity and tumor regression. Patients and Methods A total of 56 patients with progressive stage IV melanoma were enrolled onto the study. All had Karnofsky performance status ≥60% with no prior history of autoimmunity. Twenty-nine patients received 3 mg/kg anti–CTLA-4 every 3 weeks, whereas 27 received 3 mg/kg as their initial dose with subsequent doses reduced to 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks. In both cohorts patients received concomitant vaccination with two modified HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides from the gp100 melanoma-associated antigen, gp100:209-217(210M) and gp100:280-288(288V). Results Two patients achieved a complete response (ongoing at 30 and 31 months, respectively) and five patients achieved a partial response (durations of 4, 6, 25+, 26+, and 34+ months, respectively), for an overall objective response rate of 13%. Tumor regression was seen in lung, liver, brain, lymph nodes, and subcutaneous sites. Of 14 patients with grade 3/4 autoimmune toxicity, five (36%) experienced a clinical response compared with only two responses in the 42 patients (5%) with no autoimmune toxicity (P = .008). There were no significant differences in response rate or toxicity between the two dose schedules. Conclusion Administration of anti–CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody plus peptide vaccination can cause durable objective responses, which correlate with the induction of autoimmunity, in patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:16087944

  11. A General Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Beltman, Joost B.; de Boer, Rob J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) kill virus-infected cells and tumor cells, and play a critical role in immune protection. Our knowledge of how the CTL killing efficiency varies with CTL and target cell numbers is limited. Here, we simulate a region of lymphoid tissue using a cellular Potts model to characterize the functional response of CTL killing of target cells, and find that the total killing rate saturates both with the CTL and the target cell densities. The relative saturation in CTL and target cell densities is determined by whether a CTL can kill multiple target cells at the same time, and whether a target cell can be killed by many CTLs together. We find that all the studied regimes can be well described by a double-saturation (DS) function with two different saturation constants. We show that this DS model can be mechanistically derived for the cases where target cells are killed by a single CTL. For the other cases, a biological interpretation of the parameters is still possible. Our results imply that this DS function can be used as a tool to predict the cellular interactions in cytotoxicity data. PMID:24739177

  12. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets.

    PubMed

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a "flat" 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL-target encounter rates.

  13. A general functional response of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated killing of target cells.

    PubMed

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2014-04-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) kill virus-infected cells and tumor cells, and play a critical role in immune protection. Our knowledge of how the CTL killing efficiency varies with CTL and target cell numbers is limited. Here, we simulate a region of lymphoid tissue using a cellular Potts model to characterize the functional response of CTL killing of target cells, and find that the total killing rate saturates both with the CTL and the target cell densities. The relative saturation in CTL and target cell densities is determined by whether a CTL can kill multiple target cells at the same time, and whether a target cell can be killed by many CTLs together. We find that all the studied regimes can be well described by a double-saturation (DS) function with two different saturation constants. We show that this DS model can be mechanistically derived for the cases where target cells are killed by a single CTL. For the other cases, a biological interpretation of the parameters is still possible. Our results imply that this DS function can be used as a tool to predict the cellular interactions in cytotoxicity data.

  14. Peptide microarrays for the profiling of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity using minimum numbers of cells.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Antje; Bagû, Ana-Cristina; André, Thomas; Roth, Günter; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Gückel, Brigitte; Brock, Roland

    2010-09-01

    The identification of epitopes that elicit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity is a prerequisite for the development of cancer-specific immunotherapies. However, especially the parallel characterization of several epitopes is limited by the availability of T cells. Microarrays have enabled an unprecedented miniaturization and parallelization in biological assays. Here, we developed peptide microarrays for the detection of CTL activity. MHC class I-binding peptide epitopes were pipetted onto polymer-coated glass slides. Target cells, loaded with the cell-impermeant dye calcein, were incubated on these arrays, followed by incubation with antigen-expanded CTLs. Cytotoxic activity was detected by release of calcein and detachment of target cells. With only 200,000 cells per microarray, CTLs could be detected at a frequency of 0.5% corresponding to 1,000 antigen-specific T cells. Target cells and CTLs only settled on peptide spots enabling a clear separation of individual epitopes. Even though no physical boundaries were present between the individual spots, peptide loading only occurred locally and cytolytic activity was confined to the spots carrying the specific epitope. The peptide microarrays provide a robust platform that implements the whole process from antigen presentation to the detection of CTL activity in a miniaturized format. The method surpasses all established methods in the minimum numbers of cells required. With antigen uptake occurring on the microarray, further applications are foreseen in the testing of antigen precursors that require uptake and processing prior to presentation.

  15. A High Throughput Phenotypic Screen of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Lytic Granule Exocytosis Reveals Candidate Immunosuppressants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ziyan; Haynes, Mark K.; Ursu, Oleg; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Zweifach, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We screened the NIH’s Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository for inhibitors of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lytic granule exocytosis by measuring binding of an antibody in the extracellular solution to a lysosomal membrane protein (LAMP-1) that is transferred to the plasma membrane by exocytosis. We used TALL-104 human leukemic CTLs stimulated with soluble chemicals. Using high-throughput cluster cytometry to screen 364202 compounds in 1536-well plate format, identifying 2404 initial hits. 161 were confirmed on retesting, and dose-response measurements were performed. 75 of those compounds were obtained, and 48 were confirmed active. Experiments were conducted to determine the molecular mechanism of action (MMOA) of the active compounds. Fifteen blocked increases in intracellular calcium >50%. Seven blocked phosphorylation of ERK by upstream MAP kinase kinases >50%. One completely blocked the activity of the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. None blocked ERK catalytic activity. Eight blocked more than one pathway. For eight compounds, we were unable to determine an MMOA. The activity of one of these compounds was confirmed from powder resupply. We conclude that a screen based on antibody binding to CTLs is a good means of identifying novel candidate immunosuppressants with either known or unknown MMOA. PMID:25381253

  16. Evolution of viral life-cycle in response to cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Louzoun, Yoram; Ganusov, Vitaly V

    2012-10-07

    Viruses in mammals are constantly faced with the problem of elimination by the host immunity. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses are thought to play a major role in the control and clearance of several viral infections in mice and humans. It is therefore expected that over evolutionary time, viruses would be forced to evolve to avoid recognition by CTLs. Indeed, a number of studies have documented the accumulation of viral variants with escape mutations. These mutations allow viruses to hide from CTL responses common in the host population. CTLs recognize viruses by short protein sequences, named epitopes, derived from viral proteins. The efficiency of viral recognition by epitope-specific CTL responses depends on the expression pattern of the proteins carrying these epitopes, and the total amount of that protein (and thus epitopes) in the cell. When a virus replicates in a cell, some viral genes are expressed early in the life cycle of the virus, while other proteins are expressed late. For example, HIV infected cells first express Rev and Tat proteins, and the Gag proteins are expressed late. Here we propose a dynamical model of the viral life cycle to study how expression level of early vs. late genes may affect viral dynamics within the host and virus transmission over the course of infection. We find that for acute and chronic viral infections lower expression of early genes than that of the late genes is expected to give selective advantage and higher transmission to viruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Polyomavirus DNA is damaged in target cells during cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing

    SciTech Connect

    Sellins, K.S.; Cohen, J.J.

    1989-02-01

    Target cell DNA damage is an early event in cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTS)-mediated killing. It has been hypothesized that this DNA damage may serve as one mechanism of destroying viral genetic material inside infected cells. The authors directly examined the fate of viral DNA in target cells during CTL-mediated lysis. Polyomavirus DNA in transfected murine P815 mastocytoma targets was digested along with cellular DNA into oligonucleosome-sized fragments, although intact forms, possibly virion-associated DNA, were also present. In infected BALB/3T3 murine fibroblasts, which normally undergo single-stranded nicks when killed by CTL, polyomavirus DNA was converted to relaxed forms in the presence of CTL. These results suggest that the fate of the viral DNA depends on the stage of the viral life cycle and corresponds to the fate of the host cell DNA. Cleavage of the viral genome prior to assembly may thus be an important mechanism in specific antiviral immunity.

  18. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of human pancreatic islet cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter D; Estella, Eugene; Dudek, Nadine L; Jhala, Gaurang; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H; Mannering, Stuart I

    2008-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are believed to play an essential role in beta-cell destruction leading to development of type 1 diabetes and allogeneic islet graft failure. We aimed to identify the mechanisms used by CTL to kill human beta cells. CTL clones that recognize epitopes from influenza virus and Epstein-Barr virus restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A0201 and -B0801, respectively, were used to investigate the susceptibility of human beta cells to CTL. In a short-term (5-hour) assay, CTL killed human islet cells of the appropriate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I type that had been pulsed with viral peptides. Killing was increased by pretreating islets with interferon gamma that increases MHC class I on target cells. Killing was abolished by incubation of CTL with the perforin inhibitor concanamycin A. The Fas pathway did not contribute to killing because blocking with neutralizing anti-Fas ligand antibody did not significantly reduce beta-cell killing. In conclusion, we report a novel way of investigating the interaction between CTL and human islets. Human islets were rapidly killed in vitro by MHC class I-restricted CTL predominantly by the granule exocytosis pathway.

  19. Tumor vessel-injuring ability improves antitumor effect of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kanagawa, N; Yanagawa, T; Nakagawa, T; Okada, N; Nakagawa, S

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is required for normal physiologic processes, but it is also involved in tumor growth, progression and metastasis. Here, we report the development of an immune-based antiangiogenic strategy based on the generation of T lymphocytes that possess killing specificity for cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). To target VEGFR2-expressing cells, we engineered cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (cTCR–CTL) comprised of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against VEGFR2 linked to an intracellular signaling sequence derived from the CD3ζ chain of the TCR and CD28 by retroviral gene transduction methods. The cTCR–CTL exhibited efficient killing specificity against VEGFR2 and a tumor-targeting function in vitro and in vivo. Reflecting such abilities, we confirmed that the cTCR–CTL strongly inhibited the growth of a variety of syngeneic tumors after adoptive transfer into tumor-bearing mice without consequent damage to normal tissue. In addition, CTL expressing both cTCR and tumor-specific TCR induced complete tumor regression due to enhanced tumor infiltration by the CTL and long-term antigen-specific function. These findings provide evidence that the tumor vessel-injuring ability improved the antitumor effect of CTLs in adoptive immunotherapy for a broad range of cancers by inducing immune-mediated destruction of the tumor neovasculature. PMID:23175243

  20. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets

    PubMed Central

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a “flat” 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL–target encounter rates. PMID:28123385

  1. Human heat shock protein-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes display potent antitumour immunity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong; Qian, Jianfei; Zhang, Wenhao; Fu, Weijun; Du, Juan; Jiang, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chunyang; Xi, Hao; Yi, Qing; Hou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Tumour cell–derived heat shock proteins (HSPs) are used as vaccines for immunotherapy of cancer patients. However, it is proposed that the peptide chaperoned on HSPs, not HSPs themselves, elicited a potent immune response. Given that HSPs are highly expressed by most myeloma cells and vital to myeloma cell survival, we reasoned that HSPs themselves might be an ideal myeloma antigen. In the present study, we explored the feasibility of targeting HSPs themselves for treating multiple myeloma. We identified and chose HLA-A*0201-binding peptides from human HSPB1 (HSP27) and HSP90AA1 (HSP90), and confirmed their immunogenicity in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Dendritic cells pulsed with HSPB1 and HSP90AA1 peptides were used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers and myeloma patients to generate HSP peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). HSP peptide-specific CTLs efficiently lysed HLA-A*0201+ myeloma cells (established cell lines and primary plasma cells) but not HLA-A*0201− myeloma cells in vitro, indicating that myeloma cells naturally express HSP peptides in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. More importantly, HSP peptide-specific CTLs effectively reduced tumour burden in the xenograft mouse model of myeloma. Our study clearly demonstrated that HSPs might be novel tumour antigens for immunotherapy of myeloma. PMID:24824351

  2. A Gene Encoding Antigenic Peptides of Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Nakao, Masanobu; Imai, Yasuhisa; Takasu, Hideo; Kawamoto, Mayumi; Niiya, Fumihiko; Yang, Damu; Toh, Yuji; Yamana, Hideaki; Itoh, Kyogo

    1998-01-01

    Except for melanomas, tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are yet unidentified. We have identified a gene encoding antigenic peptides of human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) recognized by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)- A2601–restricted CTLs. This gene showed no similarity to known sequences, and encoded two (125- and 43-kilodalton [kD]) proteins. The 125-kD protein with the leucine zipper motif was expressed in the nucleus of the majority of proliferating cells tested, including normal and malignant cells. The 43-kD protein was expressed in the cytosol of most SCCs from various organs and half of lung adenocarcinomas, but was not expressed in other cancers nor in a panel of normal tissues. The three nonapeptides shared by the two proteins were recognized by the KE4 CTLs, and one of the peptides induced in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) the CTLs restricted to the autologous tumor cells. The 43-kD protein and this nonapeptide (KGSGKMKTE) may be useful for the specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2601+ epithelial cancer patients. PMID:9449708

  3. Monitoring of WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuriko; Heike, Yuji; Kawakami, Mami; Miura, Osamu; Nakatsuka, Shin-Ichi; Ebisawa, Michiko; Mori, Shin-Ichiro; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Fukuda, Takahiro; Kim, Sung-Won; Tobinai, Kensei; Takaue, Yoichi

    2006-09-15

    Donor-derived cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) that respond to tumor antigens emerge after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly in association with the status of immune recovery. To analyze the frequency of CTL against PR1, PRAME and WT1 after HSCT, a tetramer-based analysis was performed in 97 samples taken from 35 patients (9 AML, 11 MDS, 2 CML, 4 ALL, 7 lymphoma and 2 renal cell carcinoma [RCC]) with the HLA-A02 phenotype. Regarding PR1, only 1 sample showed the presence of tetramer-positive cells (0.04%/lymphocyte). Similarly, in PRAME, only 10 of 97 samples were sporadically positive with low titers. For WT1, positive results were detected in 39 of 97 samples and 7 (2 CML, 1 ALL, 2 lymphoma and 2 RCC) patients clearly showed positive results more than once. On the basis of these results, we performed serial analyses of WT1-specific CTL during the clinical course in 2 patients with RCC, who underwent HSCT with a reduced-intensity regimen, to examine the precise correlation between the kinetics of CTL, the occurrence of GVHD and the observed clinical response. A higher positive rate for WT1-specific CTL and a correlation with the clinical response suggest that WT1 may be a useful antigen for a wider monitoring application.

  4. TAP2-defective RMA-S cells present Sendai virus antigen to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Glas, R; Momburg, F; Hämmerling, G J; Jondal, M; Ljunggren, H G

    1993-08-01

    The murine antigen-processing-defective mutant cell line RMA-S is leaky in the presentation of certain endogenously synthesized minor histocompatibility and viral antigens to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The viral antigens include influenza virus nucleoprotein, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) nucleocapsid and Rauscher murine leukemia virus (MuLV) antigen. Here we demonstrate Sendai virus antigen presentation by the HAM2 (murine TAP2, transporter associated with antigen presentation type 2)-defective RMA-S cell line and compare antigen presentation after restoration of the defect by murine TAP1/2 gene transfection. Kinetic studies revealed that RMA-S cells required 2-3 h longer incubation and approximately 10 times higher doses of Sendai virus to reach the same level of killing as the RMA parental line. After transfection of RMA-S cells with the murine TAP1/2 gene, Sendai virus antigen presentation was restored to levels of the RMA wild-type line with regard to time of virus infection and dose of virus needed for sensitizing target cells. The presentation of Sendai virus antigen in RMA-S cells was sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA), suggesting that the presentation was mediated via the endogenous pathway. Our findings confirmed leakiness of antigen presentation in RMA-S cells and extended it to Sendai virus. The results underscored the role for intact expression of the TAP 1/2 molecules for efficient MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation.

  5. HDAC6 regulates the dynamics of lytic granules in cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Andrade, Norman; Iborra, Salvador; Trullo, Antonio; Moreno-Gonzalo, Olga; Calvo, Enrique; Catalán, Elena; Menasche, Gaël; Sancho, David; Vázquez, Jesús; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2016-01-01

    HDAC6 is a tubulin deacetylase involved in many cellular functions related to cytoskeleton dynamics including cell migration and autophagy. In addition, HDAC6 affects antigen-dependent CD4+ T cell activation. In this study, we show that HDAC6 contributes to the cytotoxic function of CD8+ T cells. Immunization studies revealed defective cytotoxic activity in vivo in the absence of HDAC6. Adoptive transfer of wild-type or Hdac6-/- CD8+ T cells to Rag1-/- mice demonstrated specific impairment in CD8+ T cell responses against vaccinia infection. Mechanistically, HDAC6-deficient cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) showed defective in vitro cytolytic activity related to altered dynamics of lytic granules, inhibited kinesin 1 – dynactin mediated terminal transport of lytic granules to the immune synapse and deficient exocytosis, but not to target cell recognition, T cell receptor (TCR) activation or interferon (IFNγ) production. Our results establish HDAC6 as an effector of the immune cytotoxic response that acts by affecting the dynamics, transport and secretion of lytic granules by CTLs. PMID:26869226

  6. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte effector function is independent of nucleus–centrosome dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Lui-Roberts, Winnie W Y; Stinchcombe, Jane C; Ritter, Alex T; Akhmanova, Anna; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2012-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) kill tumorigenic and virally infected cells by targeted secretion of lytic granule contents. The precise point at which secretion occurs is directed by the centrosome docking at the immunological synapse (IS). The centrosome is highly dynamic in CTLs, lagging behind the nucleus in the uropod of migrating CTLs, but translocating across the entire length of the cell to dock at the IS when a target cell is recognized. While in most cell types, the centrosome is always closely associated with the nuclear membrane, in CTLs, it often appears to be dissociated from the nucleus, both in migrating cells and when forming an IS. We asked whether this dissociation is required for CTL killing, by expressing GFP-BICD2-NT-nesprin-3, which tethers the centrosome to the nucleus irreversibly. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the centrosome polarized successfully to the central supramolecular activation complex (cSMAC) of the synapse in GFP-BICD2-NT-nesprin-3-expressing CTLs, with the centrosome and nucleus migrating together to the IS. CTLs in which the centrosome was “glued” to the nucleus were able to dock and release granules at the IS as effectively as mock-treated cells. These data demonstrate that CTL cytotoxicity is independent of centrosomal dissociation from the nuclear envelope. PMID:22736282

  7. Development of a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-based, broadly protective influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    The current vaccination strategy against influenza is to induce production of antibodies directed against the surface antigens of these viruses. However, frequent changes in the surface antigens of influenza viruses allow them to avoid antibody-mediated immunity. On the other hand, it is known that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) populations directed against internal antigens of influenza A virus are broadly cross-reactive to influenza virus subtypes. The present authors have previously demonstrated that antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes made using unsaturated fatty acids are cross-presented by APCs via MHC class I to CD8(+) T cells and induce antigen-specific CTLs. Based on this finding, a liposome vaccine that is capable of inducing CTL response against internal antigens of influenza viruses and removing virus-infected cells in the host has been developed. The CTL-based liposomal technique might be applicable for developing vaccines against influenza and other viruses, such as hepatitis C, HIV, and severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus, which frequently change their surface antigenic molecules.

  8. Analysis of the mechanisms of human cytotoxic T lymphocyte response inhibition by NO.

    PubMed

    Blesson, Séverine; Thiery, Jérôme; Gaudin, Catherine; Stancou, Rodica; Kolb, Jean-Pierre; Moreau, Jean-Louis; Theze, Jacques; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Chouaib, Salem

    2002-10-01

    NO is a potent cellular mediator which has been shown to modulate several immune mechanisms. Using human T lymphocytes as responder cells in a primary mixed lymphocyte reaction, we demonstrated that, at the initiation of the culture, exogenously provided NO via sodium nitroprusside, in non-toxic concentrations, inhibited both allogeneic proliferative and primary cytotoxic responses in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, it had no effect on the cytotoxic activity of established human TCR (alpha)beta and TCR (gamma)delta cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones. The NO inhibitory effect on primary cytotoxic T cell response correlates with inhibition of T cell blastogenesis. Furthermore, under our stimulation conditions, NO induced an inhibition of IL-2 production, an alteration of IL-2R(alpha) expression, and a down-regulation of NF-AT translocation in CD4(+) and CD8(+)allostimulated T cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the inhibition of allospecific CTL activity by the NO donor was at least in part related to an inhibition of granzyme B and Fas ligand transcription as revealed respectively by RNase protection and RT-PCR analysis. These results suggest that NO may function to fine tune human CD3(+) T cell activation and subsequent CTL generation.

  9. Dengue virus protein recognition by virus-specific murine CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Lai, C J; Bray, M; Falgout, B; Men, R; Ennis, F A

    1993-01-01

    The identification of the protein targets for dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes may be useful for planning the development of subunit vaccines against dengue. We studied the recognition by murine dengue virus-specific major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) of dengue virus proteins using recombinant vaccinia viruses containing segments of the dengue virus genome. CTL from H-2k mice recognized a single serotype-cross-reactive epitope on the nonstructural (NS) protein NS3. CTL from H-2b mice recognized a serotype-cross-reactive epitope that was localized to NS4a or NS4b. CTL from H-2d mice recognized at least three epitopes: a serotype-specific epitope on one of the structural proteins, a serotype-cross-reactive epitope on NS3, and a serotype-cross-reactive epitope on NS1 or NS2a. Our findings demonstrate the limited recognition of dengue virus proteins by CTL from three inbred mouse strains and the predominance of CTL epitopes on dengue virus nonstructural proteins, particularly NS3. Since human dengue virus-specific CTL show similar patterns of recognition, these findings suggest that nonstructural proteins should be considered in designing vaccines against dengue. PMID:7678307

  10. In vitro selection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus escape mutants by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Aebischer, T; Moskophidis, D; Rohrer, U H; Zinkernagel, R M; Hengartner, H

    1991-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated cytolysis is induced via the interaction of the specific T-cell antigen receptor and the peptidic viral antigen associated with the major histocompatibility complex class I antigen. Here we demonstrate in vitro that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) can escape the cytotoxic activity of LCMV-specific cloned CTLs by single amino acid changes within the recognized T-cell epitope defined by residues 275-289 of the LCMV glycoprotein [LCMV-GP-(275-289)]. LCMV-infected fibroblasts at a multiplicity of infection of 10(-3) exposed to virus-specific CTL at an effector-to-target cell ratio of 4:1 4 hr after infection was optimal for virus mutant selection. The selections were carried out with three LCMV-GP-(275-289)-specific CTL clones expressing T-cell antigen receptors containing the identical variable gene segments V alpha 4 and V beta 10 but different junctional regions; selection was also possible with LCMV-GP-(275-289)-specific cytotoxic polyclonal T cells. The most common escape mutation was an amino acid change of asparagine (AAT) to aspartic acid (GAT) at position 280; an additional mutation was glycine (GGT) to aspartic acid (GAT) at position 282. The results presented show that relevant point mutations within the T-cell epitope of LCMV-GP-(275-289) occur frequently and that they are selectable in vitro by CTLs. Images PMID:1722316

  11. Identification of genes and pathways associated with cytotoxic T lymphocyte infiltration of serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leffers, N; Fehrmann, R S N; Gooden, M J M; Schulze, U R J; ten Hoor, K A; Hollema, H; Boezen, H M; Daemen, T; de Jong, S; Nijman, H W; van der Zee, A G J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are predictors of disease-specific survival (DSS) in ovarian cancer. It is largely unknown what factors contribute to lymphocyte recruitment. Our aim was to evaluate genes and pathways contributing to infiltration of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. Methods: For this study global gene expression was compared between low TIL (n=25) and high TIL tumours (n=24). The differences in gene expression were evaluated using parametric T-testing. Selectively enriched biological pathways were identified with gene set enrichment analysis. Prognostic influence was validated in 157 late-stage serous ovarian cancer patients. Using immunohistochemistry, association of selected genes from identified pathways with CTL was validated. Results: The presence of CTL was associated with 320 genes and 23 pathways (P<0.05). In addition, 54 genes and 8 pathways were also associated with DSS in our validation cohort. Immunohistochemical evaluation showed strong correlations between MHC class I and II membrane expression, parts of the antigen processing and presentation pathway, and CTL recruitment. Conclusion: Gene expression profiling and pathway analyses are valuable tools to obtain more understanding of tumour characteristics influencing lymphocyte recruitment in advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. Identified genes and pathways need to be further investigated for suitability as therapeutic targets. PMID:20664601

  12. Engineered cytotoxic T lymphocytes with AFP-specific TCR gene for adoptive immunotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longhao; Guo, Hao; Jiang, Ruoyu; Lu, Li; Liu, Tong; He, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and could serve as a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) and potential target for adoptive immunotherapy. However, low frequency and severe functional impairment of AFP-specific T cells in vivo hamper adoptive infusion. TAA-specific T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer could be an efficient and reliable alternation to generate AFP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Autologous dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with AFP158-166 peptides were used to stimulate AFP-specific CTLs. TCR α/β chain genes of AFP-specific CTLs were cloned and linked by 2A peptide to form full-length TCR coding sequence synthesized into a lentiviral vector. Nonspecific activated T cells were engineered by lentivirus infection. Transgenetic CTLs were evaluated for transfection efficiency, expression of AFP158-166-specific TCR, interferon (IFN)-γ secretion, and specific cytotoxicity toward AFP+ HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry revealed the AFP158-166-MHC-Pentamer positive transgenetic CTLs was 9.86 %. The number of IFN-γ secretion T cells and the specific cytotoxicity toward HpeG2 in vitro and in tumor-bearing NOD/SCID mice were significantly raised in transgenetic CTLs than that of AFP158-166-specific CTLs obtained by peptide-pulsed DCs or control group. TCR gene transfer is a promising strategy to generate AFP158-166-specific CTLs for the treatment of HCC.

  13. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes established by seasonal human influenza cross-react against 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenwei; Mao, Huawei; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Yinping; Chiu, Susan S; Qin, Gang; Chan, Ping-Lung; Lam, Kwok-Tai; Guan, Jing; Zhang, Lijuan; Guan, Yi; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Peiris, J S Malik; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2010-07-01

    While few children and young adults have cross-protective antibodies to the pandemic H1N1 2009 (pdmH1N1) virus, the illness remains mild. The biological reasons for these epidemiological observations are unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the bulk memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) established by seasonal influenza viruses from healthy individuals who have not been exposed to pdmH1N1 can directly lyse pdmH1N1-infected target cells and produce gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Using influenza A virus matrix protein 1 (M1(58-66)) epitope-specific CTLs isolated from healthy HLA-A2(+) individuals, we further found that M1(58-66) epitope-specific CTLs efficiently killed both M1(58-66) peptide-pulsed and pdmH1N1-infected target cells ex vivo. These M1(58-66)-specific CTLs showed an effector memory phenotype and expressed CXCR3 and CCR5 chemokine receptors. Of 94 influenza A virus CD8 T-cell epitopes obtained from the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), 17 epitopes are conserved in pdmH1N1, and more than half of these conserved epitopes are derived from M1 protein. In addition, 65% (11/17) of these epitopes were 100% conserved in seasonal influenza vaccine H1N1 strains during the last 20 years. Importantly, seasonal influenza vaccination could expand the functional M1(58-66) epitope-specific CTLs in 20% (4/20) of HLA-A2(+) individuals. Our results indicated that memory CTLs established by seasonal influenza A viruses or vaccines had cross-reactivity against pdmH1N1. These might explain, at least in part, the unexpected mild pdmH1N1 illness in the community and also might provide some valuable insights for the future design of broadly protective vaccines to prevent influenza, especially pandemic influenza.

  14. Breast and ovarian cancer-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize the same HER2/neu-derived peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Peoples, G E; Goedegebuure, P S; Smith, R; Linehan, D C; Yoshino, I; Eberlein, T J

    1995-01-01

    The identification of antigenic peptides presented on the tumor cell surface by HLA class I molecules and recognized by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes may lead to a peptide vaccine capable of inducing protective cellular immunity. We demonstrate that both HLA-A2-restricted breast and ovarian tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize shared antigenic peptides. At least one of these peptides is derived from the oncogene product of HER2/neu, which is overexpressed in 30-40% of all breast and ovarian cancers. T cells sensitized against this nine-amino acid sequence demonstrate significant recognition of HLA-A2+, HER2/neu+ tumors. Since 50% of the tumor-cell population is HLA-A2+ and many different tumors express HER2/neu, this peptide may be widely recognized and have many clinical applications. PMID:7831305

  15. Designing and testing broadly-protective filoviral vaccines optimized for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope coverage.

    PubMed

    Fenimore, Paul W; Muhammad, Majidat A; Fischer, William M; Foley, Brian T; Bakken, Russell R; Thurmond, James R; Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Parker, Michael; Hart, Mary Kate; Dye, John M; Korber, Bette; Kuiken, Carla

    2012-01-01

    We report the rational design and in vivo testing of mosaic proteins for a polyvalent pan-filoviral vaccine using a computational strategy designed for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) but also appropriate for Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and potentially other diverse viruses. Mosaics are sets of artificial recombinant proteins that are based on natural proteins. The recombinants are computationally selected using a genetic algorithm to optimize the coverage of potential cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. Because evolutionary history differs markedly between HIV-1 and filoviruses, we devised an adapted computational technique that is effective for sparsely sampled taxa; our first significant result is that the mosaic technique is effective in creating high-quality mosaic filovirus proteins. The resulting coverage of potential epitopes across filovirus species is superior to coverage by any natural variants, including current vaccine strains with demonstrated cross-reactivity. The mosaic cocktails are also robust: mosaics substantially outperformed natural strains when computationally tested against poorly sampled species and more variable genes. Furthermore, in a computational comparison of cross-reactive potential a design constructed prior to the Bundibugyo outbreak performed nearly as well against all species as an updated design that included Bundibugyo. These points suggest that the mosaic designs would be more resilient than natural-variant vaccines against future Ebola outbreaks dominated by novel viral variants. We demonstrate in vivo immunogenicity and protection against a heterologous challenge in a mouse model. This design work delineates the likely requirements and limitations on broadly-protective filoviral CTL vaccines.

  16. No evidence for competition between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Helen R.; Scherer, Almut; Oxenius, Annette; Phillips, Rodney; McLean, Angela R.

    2009-01-01

    Strong competition between cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for different epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection would have important implications for the design of an HIV vaccine. To investigate evidence for this type of competition, we analysed CTL response data from 97 patients with chronic HIV infection who were frequently sampled for up to 96 weeks. For each sample, CTL responses directed against a range of known epitopes in gag, pol and nef were measured using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The Lotka–Volterra model of competition was used to predict patterns that would be expected from these data if competitive interactions materially affect CTL numbers. In this application, the model predicts that when hosts make responses to a larger number of epitopes, they would have diminished responses to each epitope and that if one epitope-specific response becomes dramatically smaller, others would increase in size to compensate; conversely if one response grows, others would shrink. Analysis of the experimental data reveals results that are wholly inconsistent with these predictions. In hosts who respond to more epitopes, the average epitope-specific response tends to be larger, not smaller. Furthermore, responses to different epitopes almost always increase in unison or decrease in unison. Our findings are therefore inconsistent with the hypothesis that there is competition between CTL responses directed against different epitopes in HIV infection. This suggests that vaccines that elicit broad responses would be favourable because they would direct a larger total response against the virus, in addition to being more robust to the effects of CTL escape. PMID:19776069

  17. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, T.M.; Bear, H.D. )

    1991-03-15

    Stimulation of lymphocytes with viable tumor cells can induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against autologous tumor. However, sufficient numbers of tumor cells are not always available for such stimulation, and high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) is often required for growth. Using the weakly immunogenic methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma MCA105, the authors demonstrate here that CTLs can be expected by pharmacologic manipulation of protein kinase C (PKC) and intracellular calcium with phorbol dibutyrate (PD-Bu) and ionomycin (Io), respectively. Lymphocytes were obtained from the spleens and ipsilateral popliteal draining lymph nodes (DLN) 10 days after the footpad injection of viable MCA105 tumor cells. The cells were stimulated with autologous tumor and 20U/ml IL-2 for 7 days and then treated with PDBu and Io and expanded in culture with 20U/ml IL-2 for an additional 14 days. The lymphocytes from the spleens and DLNs demonstrated significant expansion and marked cytotoxicity against MCA105. In another regimen, lymphocytes from the DLNs of tumor-bearing mice were stimulated directly with PDBu and Io without prior in vitro exposure to autologous tumor and expanded in culture with 20U/ml IL-2. The expansion of these lymphocytes was 500 fold and the cytotoxicity against MCA 105 remained high. Lymphocytes expanded with PDBu and Io also killed MCA102, but normal spleen cells expanded in the same way had no cytotoxic activity. The authors conclude that PKC activators coupled with calcium ionophores and low-dose IL-2 can generate CTL when little or no antigen is available.

  18. The impact of acemannan on the generation and function of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Womble, D; Helderman, J H

    1992-01-01

    Acemannan, an antiviral agent with immune enhancement capabilities, was studied for its impact on cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (Tc) function generated in response to alloantigen. To investigate whether acemannan directly stimulated the generation of Tc from primary mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), the drug was added at the initiation of the MLC. There was a dose-related, statistical increase in killer T-cell generation produced by acemannan in the clinically relevant dose range. The lowest test dose of the drug (2.6 x 10(-9) M) increased chromium release nearly two-fold; the 2.6 x 10(-8) M dose gave a maximal 3.5 fold increase in cytotoxic T-cells. To study whether acemannan enhanced the capacity of Tc once generated to alloantigen to destroy targets bearing the sensitizing antigens, MLR were established in the absence of any drug. Acemannan at the two highest doses increased the functional capacity of Tc to destroy target cells to which they had been sensitized in the MLR. To control for the possibility that acemannan was directly cytotoxic to target cells, targets were incubated alone with drug and without sensitized killer T-cells. No dose of acemannan was found to be cytotoxic to these cells. In conclusion, acemannan did enhance the generation of cytotoxic T-cells when added at the initiation of the MLR. When acemannan was added at the completion of allostimulation, an increase of almost 50% killing by Tc was also observed. These effects can not be explained by direct drug related toxicity and suggest a functional correlate to the previously described immune enhancing properties of the agent. As this drug is being tested for the treatment of HIV infections, these data provide at least one immunologic mechanism by which acemannan may be clinically salutory.

  19. Behavior and Properties of Mature Lytic Granules at the Immunological Synapse of Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ming, Min; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Stevens, David R; Rettig, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Killing of virally infected cells or tumor cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes requires targeting of lytic granules to the junction between the CTL and its target. We used whole-cell patch clamp to measure the cell capacitance at fixed intracellular [Ca2+] to study fusion of lytic granules in human CTLs. Expression of a fluorescently labeled human granzyme B construct allowed identification of lytic granule fusion using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this way capacitance steps due to lytic granule fusion were identified. Our goal was to determine the size of fusing lytic granules and to describe their behavior at the plasma membrane. On average, 5.02 ± 3.09 (mean ± s.d.) lytic granules were released per CTL. The amplitude of lytic granule fusion events was ~ 3.3 fF consistent with a diameter of about 325 nm. Fusion latency was biphasic with time constants of 15.9 and 106 seconds. The dwell time of fusing lytic granules was exponentially distributed with a mean dwell time of 28.5 seconds. Fusion ended in spite of the continued presence of granules at the immune synapse. The mobility of fusing granules at the membrane was indistinguishable from that of lytic granules which failed to fuse. While dwelling at the plasma membrane lytic granules exhibit mobility consistent with docking interspersed with short periods of greater mobility. The failure of lytic granules to fuse when visible in TIRF at the membrane may indicate that a membrane-confined reaction is rate limiting.

  20. Behavior and Properties of Mature Lytic Granules at the Immunological Synapse of Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Min; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Stevens, David R.; Rettig, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Killing of virally infected cells or tumor cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes requires targeting of lytic granules to the junction between the CTL and its target. We used whole-cell patch clamp to measure the cell capacitance at fixed intracellular [Ca2+] to study fusion of lytic granules in human CTLs. Expression of a fluorescently labeled human granzyme B construct allowed identification of lytic granule fusion using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this way capacitance steps due to lytic granule fusion were identified. Our goal was to determine the size of fusing lytic granules and to describe their behavior at the plasma membrane. On average, 5.02 ± 3.09 (mean ± s.d.) lytic granules were released per CTL. The amplitude of lytic granule fusion events was ~ 3.3 fF consistent with a diameter of about 325 nm. Fusion latency was biphasic with time constants of 15.9 and 106 seconds. The dwell time of fusing lytic granules was exponentially distributed with a mean dwell time of 28.5 seconds. Fusion ended in spite of the continued presence of granules at the immune synapse. The mobility of fusing granules at the membrane was indistinguishable from that of lytic granules which failed to fuse. While dwelling at the plasma membrane lytic granules exhibit mobility consistent with docking interspersed with short periods of greater mobility. The failure of lytic granules to fuse when visible in TIRF at the membrane may indicate that a membrane-confined reaction is rate limiting. PMID:26296096

  1. Effect of prolactin on carcinoembryonic antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response induced by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matera, L; Beltramo, E; Martinuzzi, E; Buttiglieri, S

    2004-08-01

    The cytokine hormone prolactin (PRL) has been shown previously to modulate native cellular responses and maturation of antigen-presenting cells. Here we have addressed its effect on the antigen-specific response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CTL were generated from HLA-A2 lymphocytes after three rounds of stimulation with autologous dendritic cells loaded with HLA-A2-restricted carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) Cap-1 (YLSGANLNL) peptide. Selected cultures were expanded on cytokine-supplemented feeder-layers, enriched for CD8+ lymphocytes and analysed for PRL-receptor (PRL-R) expression and PRL responsiveness. Resting CD8+ lymphocytes were negative for PRL-R, whereas antigen-activated CD8+ lymphocytes derived from long-term cultures were highly positive. Results of a 51Cr release assay showed CTL killing of CEA-loaded, but not unloaded, T2 cell line and the CEA-positive gastric carcinoma cell line KATO, but not of the CEA-negative T leukaemia cell line Jurkat. Interferon (IFN)-gamma release, evaluated in an ELISPOT assay against CEA-loaded T2, was enhanced (P < 0.05) by concentrations of PRL (12-25 ng/ml) very close to the physiological levels (6-20 ng/ml), but was decreased (P < 0.05) by high concentrations (200 ng/ml). Pre-incubation of the stimulators with the anti-MHC class I MoAb W6.32 induced a 40-60% decrease of the PRL-boosted IFN-gamma release, thus proving the MHC restriction of the lymphocyte response. Cytotoxicity against CEA-loaded T2 and KATO cell lines was also increased by 12-25 ng (P < 0.05) and decreased (P < 0.05) by 200 ng PRL. Pre-incubation of CTL with an antibody specific for the PRL-R almost completely abrogated this effect.

  2. Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen-4 Gene Variants in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with or without Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Javad; Khadempar, Saedeh; Hajilooi, Mehrdad; Rezaei, Hamzeh; Keshavarzi, Fatemeh; Solgi, Ghasem

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) gene variants are associated with several autoimmune diseases particularly type 1 diabetes. Due to the lack of consistent data for this association with type 2 diabetes (T2D), this study explored the possible influence of CTLA-4 gene polymorphisms at -1722 (T/C), -318 (C/T), and +49 (G/A) positions for susceptibility to T2D in relation with neuropathy. One hundred and eleven unrelated patients with T2D [49 patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and 62 patients without PDN] and 100 healthy ethnic- and gender-matched controls were included in this study. The dimorphisms at -1722 (C/T), -318 (C/T) and +49 (A/G) for CTLA-4 gene were determined using ARMS-PCR. The CTLA-4 (+49 G/G) and (+49 A/A) genotypes were found to be positively and negatively associated with T2D, respectively (p=0.03). The -318 C/T and T/T genotypes were more frequent in patients than controls and -318 C/C genotype was shown to be protective for T2D (p=0.003). ACT and GTT Haplotypes were less and more frequent in controls and patients, respectively (p=3.86×10-7 and p=2.29×10-5). Genotypes distribution among T2D patients with and without DPN compared to healthy controls showed significantly lower frequencies for -318 C/C and +49 A/A genotypes and significantly higher frequencies for -318 C/T and T/T genotypes as well. Our findings indicate that CTLA-4 (+49 A/G) and (-318 C/T) genotypes could be considered as genetic risk factors associated with susceptibility or protection for T2D.

  3. Antigen presentation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing studied in individual, living cells.

    PubMed

    Hahn, K; DeBiasio, R; Tishon, A; Lewicki, H; Gairin, J E; LaRocca, G; Taylor, D L; Oldstone, M

    1994-06-01

    Interactions between individual, living fibroblasts and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones were analyzed by using video-enhanced differential interference contrast and fluorescence microscopy in a multimode configuration. Fibroblasts expressing known major histocompatibility complex I alleles (MC57: H-2b; Balb: H-2d) were sensitized for killing by incubating or microinjecting them with peptide fragments of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Previous determination of the CTL clones' specificity for these peptides and MHC-I alleles enabled us to study CTL killing of fibroblasts, and nonlethal CTL interaction with targets due to "mismatches" of the CTL, target, and/or peptide. During viral peptide-specific MHC-restricted CTL killing, distinct morphological alterations were observed (CTL shape changes, movements of granules in CTL cytoplasm, and target cell contraction and blebbing). When no killing occurred, CTL engaged in prolonged, nonrandom movement on the target cells. Alloreactive and virus-specific CTL displayed the same morphology during killing. To study antigen presentation further within individual, living cells, a LCMV glycoprotein peptide (aa 272-286, LSDSSGVENPGGYCL) was covalently labeled with tetramethylrhodamine. In 51Cr release assays, the labeled peptide specifically induced potent CTL killing, but neither labeled nor unlabeled peptide proved toxic for unsensitized targets. Microinjection of the labeled peptide into the cytoplasm of fibroblast cells led to CTL killing of those cells, yet nearby uninjected cells contacted by CTL were not killed, indicating that killing was due to presentation of microinjected peptide rather than binding of extracellular peptide to cell surface MHC. Peptide-injected target cells were killed only when combined with CTL specific for the peptide and for the MHC allele of the injected cell.

  4. Activated cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immunotherapy is effective for advanced oral and maxillofacial cancers.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Tomoko; Yamada, Yoichi; Furuhashi, Akifumi; Ohmura, Yukinobu; Nakamura, Sayaka; Kato, Hidefumi; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kazaoka, Yoshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Conventional cancer treatments are surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, but treatment efficiency is insufficient and cancer recurrence is common. Immunotherapy has been added as an important cancer treatment component, but no reports on its efficacy in oral and maxillofacial cancers exist. We evaluated the clinical efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy using ex vivo-activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in the treatment of 7 patients with advanced oral and maxillofacial cancers with stage IV disease at diagnosis. The mean follow-up period was 26.2 months. Phenotype of the lymphocyte assay revealed that the percentage of CD4(+) T cells decreased and that of CD8(+) T cells increased among infused lymphocytes compared to that in unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and infused lymphocytes produced a significantly higher level of IFN-γ than PBMCs or tumor cells alone. In a representative patient who refused surgery tumor regression was confirmed after CTL infusion. Computed tomography clearly indicated a significant reduction in tumor size followed by the complete disappearance of the tumor. Histological examination showed that the cancers in patients receiving CTL therapy were heavily infiltrated with lymphocytes. The other 2 patients who received CTL therapy as adjuvant therapy showed neither recurrent disease nor new disease lesions. The 1-year survival rates showing response and those with progressive disease were 100 and 25%, respectively. Moreover, no significant adverse reactions were reported during the study period. CTL therapy remains in the early stages of treatment options, but it has potential as a valuable treatment and improvement of quality of life for patients with otherwise incurable cancers.

  5. Immunological potential of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 immunoglobulin in murine autoimmune cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Yang, G-X; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Zhang, W; Leung, P S C; Coppel, R L; Joh, T; Nadler, S G; Ansari, A A; Bowlus, C; Gershwin, M E

    2015-06-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) immunoglobulin (Ig) is an important regulator of T cell activation and a fusion protein directed at CD80 and CD86; it blocks co-stimulatory signalling and T cell activation. We have taken advantage of a murine model of human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), mice expressing a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β receptor II dominant negative (dnTGF-βRII) transgene to address the potential therapeutic efficacy of CTLA-4 Ig. To mimic patients with PBC at different stages or duration of disease, we treated mice with either CTLA-4 Ig or control IgG three times weekly from 3 to 12 or 24 weeks of age, or from 12 to 24 weeks of age. CTLA-4 Ig treatment from 3 weeks of age significantly reduced liver inflammation to 12 weeks of age. Treatment initiated at 12 weeks of age also ameliorated the autoimmune cholangitis at 24 weeks of age. However, in mice treated at 3 weeks of age, suppression of liver inflammation was not sustained and colitis was aggravated when treatment was extended to 24 weeks of age. Our data indicate that, in dnTGF-βRII mice, CTLA-4 Ig treatment has short-term beneficial effects on autoimmune cholangitis, but the effect varies according to duration of treatment and the time in which therapy was initiated. Further dissection of the events that lead to the reduction in therapeutic effectiveness of CTLA-4 Ig will be critical to determining whether such efforts can be applied to human PBC.

  6. Effect of prolactin on carcinoembryonic antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response induced by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Matera, L; Beltramo, E; Martinuzzi, E; Buttiglieri, S

    2004-01-01

    The cytokine hormone prolactin (PRL) has been shown previously to modulate native cellular responses and maturation of antigen-presenting cells. Here we have addressed its effect on the antigen-specific response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CTL were generated from HLA-A2 lymphocytes after three rounds of stimulation with autologous dendritic cells loaded with HLA-A2-restricted carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) Cap-1 (YLSGANLNL) peptide. Selected cultures were expanded on cytokine-supplemented feeder-layers, enriched for CD8+ lymphocytes and analysed for PRL-receptor (PRL-R) expression and PRL responsiveness. Resting CD8+ lymphocytes were negative for PRL-R, whereas antigen-activated CD8+ lymphocytes derived from long-term cultures were highly positive. Results of a 51Cr release assay showed CTL killing of CEA-loaded, but not unloaded, T2 cell line and the CEA-positive gastric carcinoma cell line KATO, but not of the CEA-negative T leukaemia cell line Jurkat. Interferon (IFN)-γ release, evaluated in an ELISPOT assay against CEA-loaded T2, was enhanced (P < 0·05) by concentrations of PRL (12–25 ng/ml) very close to the physiological levels (6–20 ng/ml), but was decreased (P < 0·05) by high concentrations (200 ng/ml). Pre-incubation of the stimulators with the anti-MHC class I MoAb W6·32 induced a 40–60% decrease of the PRL-boosted IFN-γ release, thus proving the MHC restriction of the lymphocyte response. Cytotoxicity against CEA-loaded T2 and KATO cell lines was also increased by 12–25 ng (P < 0·05) and decreased (P < 0·05) by 200 ng PRL. Pre-incubation of CTL with an antibody specific for the PRL-R almost completely abrogated this effect. PMID:15270849

  7. Designing and Testing Broadly-Protective Filoviral Vaccines Optimized for Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Epitope Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Fenimore, Paul W.; Foley, Brian T.; Bakken, Russell R.; Thurmond, James R.; Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Parker, Michael; Hart, Mary Kate; Dye, John M.; Korber, Bette; Kuiken, Carla

    2012-01-01

    We report the rational design and in vivo testing of mosaic proteins for a polyvalent pan-filoviral vaccine using a computational strategy designed for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) but also appropriate for Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and potentially other diverse viruses. Mosaics are sets of artificial recombinant proteins that are based on natural proteins. The recombinants are computationally selected using a genetic algorithm to optimize the coverage of potential cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. Because evolutionary history differs markedly between HIV-1 and filoviruses, we devised an adapted computational technique that is effective for sparsely sampled taxa; our first significant result is that the mosaic technique is effective in creating high-quality mosaic filovirus proteins. The resulting coverage of potential epitopes across filovirus species is superior to coverage by any natural variants, including current vaccine strains with demonstrated cross-reactivity. The mosaic cocktails are also robust: mosaics substantially outperformed natural strains when computationally tested against poorly sampled species and more variable genes. Furthermore, in a computational comparison of cross-reactive potential a design constructed prior to the Bundibugyo outbreak performed nearly as well against all species as an updated design that included Bundibugyo. These points suggest that the mosaic designs would be more resilient than natural-variant vaccines against future Ebola outbreaks dominated by novel viral variants. We demonstrate in vivo immunogenicity and protection against a heterologous challenge in a mouse model. This design work delineates the likely requirements and limitations on broadly-protective filoviral CTL vaccines. PMID:23056184

  8. Mathematical modeling of escape of HIV from cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V.; Neher, Richard A.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 or simply HIV) induces a persistent infection, which in the absence of treatment leads to AIDS and death in almost all infected individuals. HIV infection elicits a vigorous immune response starting about 2-3 weeks postinfection that can lower the amount of virus in the body, but which cannot eradicate the virus. How HIV establishes a chronic infection in the face of a strong immune response remains poorly understood. It has been shown that HIV is able to rapidly change its proteins via mutation to evade recognition by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Typically, an HIV-infected patient will generate 4-12 CTL responses specific for parts of viral proteins called epitopes. Such CTL responses lead to strong selective pressure to change the viral sequences encoding these epitopes so as to avoid CTL recognition. Indeed, the viral population ‘escapes’ from about half of the CTL responses by mutation in the first year. Here we review experimental data on HIV evolution in response to CTL pressure, mathematical models developed to explain this evolution, and highlight problems associated with the data and previous modeling efforts. We show that estimates of the strength of the epitope-specific CTL response depend on the method used to fit models to experimental data and on the assumptions made regarding how mutants are generated during infection. We illustrate that allowing CTL responses to decay over time may improve the model fit to experimental data and provides higher estimates of the killing efficacy of HIV-specific CTLs. We also propose a novel method for simultaneously estimating the killing efficacy of multiple CTL populations specific for different epitopes of HIV using stochastic simulations. Lastly, we show that current estimates of the efficacy at which HIV-specific CTLs clear virus-infected cells can be improved by more frequent sampling of viral sequences and by combining data on sequence evolution with

  9. Variable Fitness Impact of HIV-1 Escape Mutations to Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte (CTL) Response

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Ryan M.; McNevin, John; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Shao Chong; Krizan, Randall W.; Abraha, Awet; Tebit, Denis M.; Zhao, Hong; Avila, Santiago; Lobritz, Michael A.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mullins, James I.; Arts, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) target and kill HIV-infected cells expressing cognate viral epitopes. This response selects for escape mutations within CTL epitopes that can diminish viral replication fitness. Here, we assess the fitness impact of escape mutations emerging in seven CTL epitopes in the gp120 Env and p24 Gag coding regions of an individual followed longitudinally from the time of acute HIV-1 infection, as well as some of these same epitopes recognized in other HIV-1-infected individuals. Nine dominant mutations appeared in five gp120 epitopes within the first year of infection, whereas all four mutations found in two p24 epitopes emerged after nearly two years of infection. These mutations were introduced individually into the autologous gene found in acute infection and then placed into a full-length, infectious viral genome. When competed against virus expressing the parental protein, fitness loss was observed with only one of the nine gp120 mutations, whereas four had no effect and three conferred a slight increase in fitness. In contrast, mutations conferring CTL escape in the p24 epitopes significantly decreased viral fitness. One particular escape mutation within a p24 epitope was associated with reduced peptide recognition and high viral fitness costs but was replaced by a fitness-neutral mutation. This mutation appeared to alter epitope processing concomitant with a reduced CTL response. In conclusion, CTL escape mutations in HIV-1 Gag p24 were associated with significant fitness costs, whereas most escape mutations in the Env gene were fitness neutral, suggesting a balance between immunologic escape and replicative fitness costs. PMID:19343217

  10. Expression of structurally diverse Qa-2-encoded molecules on the surface of cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Extracts of 125I-labeled cloned murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) were immunoprecipitated with alloantisera to the cloned CTL and rabbit antisera to beta-2 microglobulin. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the specific precipitates revealed, as expected, 125I-labeled components that corresponded to products of class I genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). However, additional class I gene products of relatively low apparent molecular weight (Mr) were also observed. Similar analyses of spleen cells from a variety of MHC- congenic mouse strains suggested that the class I molecules of relatively low Mr are encoded in the Qa-2 region of the MHC, and this was confirmed by immunoprecipitation with a monoclonal antibody to Qa- 2. Surprisingly, however, the cell surface Qa-2 molecules of different CTL clones differed in Mr, in isoelectric focusing (IEF) pattern, and in the number of distinguishable molecules expressed per clone: some clones seemed to express only a single Qa-2-encoded molecule while others expressed two distinct ones. Treatment of the immunoprecipitated Qa-2 with endoglycosidase F (Endo F) resulted in a decrease in Mr of approximately 5,000-6,000, corresponding to the expected loss of N- linked oligosaccharides, but the decrease did not eliminate structural variability among the clones. Structural diversity of the Qa-2-encoded molecules expressed on CTL could arise because CTL clones differ (a) in the particular Qa-2 genes they express, (b) in the way they splice Qa-2 gene transcripts or, perhaps, (c) in Endo F-resistant oligosaccharides on their Qa-2 molecules. PMID:6333483

  11. Immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces a CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and confers a level of protection comparable to that of wild-type HSV-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Knipe, D M; Tevethia, S S

    1997-01-01

    Replication-deficient viruses provide an attractive alternative to conventional approaches used in the induction of antiviral immunity. We have quantitatively evaluated both the primary and memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses elicited by immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). In addition, we have examined the potential role of these CTL in protection against HSV infection. Using bulk culture analysis and limiting-dilution analysis, we have shown that a replication-deficient virus, d301, generates a strong primary CTL response that is comparable to the response induced by the wild type-strain, KOS1.1. Furthermore, the CTL induced by d301 immunization recognized the immunodominant, H-2Kb-restricted, CTL recognition epitope gB498-505 to a level similar to that for CTL from KOS1.1-immunized mice. The memory CTL response evoked by d301 was strong and persistent, even though the frequencies of CTL were slightly lower than the frequencies of CTL induced by KOS1.1. Adoptive transfer studies indicated that both the CD8+ and the CD4+ T-cell responses generated by immunization with d301 and KOS1.1 were able to limit the extent of a cutaneous HSV infection to comparable levels. Overall, these results indicate that viral replication is not necessary to elicit a potent and durable HSV-specific immune response and suggest that replication-deficient viruses may be effective in eliciting protection against viral pathogens. PMID:9094625

  12. Identification of Rhodococcus equi lipids recognized by host cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Seth P.; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Mealey, Robert H.; Alperin, Debra C.; Naka, Takashi; Goda, Reina

    2010-01-01

    Immune adult horses have CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that recognize and lyse Rhodococcus equi-infected cells in an equine lymphocyte alloantigen (ELA)-A [classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I]-unrestricted fashion. As protein antigens are MHC class I-restricted, the lack of restriction suggests that the bacterial antigens being recognized by the host are not proteins. The goals of this study were to test the hypothesis that these CTLs recognize unique R. equi cell-wall lipids related to mycobacterial lipids. Initial experiments showed that treatment of soluble R. equi antigen with broadly reactive proteases did not significantly diminish the ability of the antigen to stimulate R. equi-specific CTLs. R. equi-specific CTLs were also shown to lyse target cells (equine macrophages) pulsed with an R. equi lipid extract. Analysis of the R. equi lipid by TLC and MS (MALDI-TOF and ES) indicated that the extracted antigen consisted of three primary fractions: trehalose monomycolate (TMM), trehalose dimycolate (TDM) and cardiolipin (CL). ELA-A-mismatched cells pulsed with purified TMM and CL, but not the TDM fraction, were recognized and lysed by R. equi-specific CTLs. Because of their role in immune clearance and pathogenesis, transcription of the cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) was also measured in response to R. equi lipids by using real-time PCR; elevated IFN-γ, but not IL-4, was associated with host clearance of the bacteria. The whole-cell R. equi lipid and all three R. equi lipid fractions resulted in marked increases in IFN-γ transcription, but no increase in IL-4 transcription. Together, these data support the hypothesis that immune recognition of unique lipids in the bacterial cell wall is an important component of the protective immune response to R. equi. The results also identify potential lipid antigens not previously shown to be recognized by CTLs in an important, naturally occurring actinomycete

  13. Dendritic cells are accessory cells for the development of anti- trinitrophenyl cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    This study establishes that dendritic cells (DC) are the critical accessory cells for the development of anti-trinitrophenol (TNP) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in vitro. We developed a model in which nylon wool-nonadherent spleen cells were used both as the responding and stimulating cells, the latter having been TNP-modified and x- irradiated. Thy-1-bearing CTL developed in C57BL/6, B6D2F1, and CBA mice only when small numbers of DC were added. Maximal responses in 5-d cultures were achieved with 0.5-1 DC/100 responding T cells. The DC did not have to be TNP modified directly. Anti-Ia and complement inactivated accessory cells, whereas similar treatment of the responders had no effect. DC exposed to ultraviolet radiation were ineffective, but x-irradiated DC were fully active. Culture media from DC, or from DC-nylon wool-passed spleen T cell cocultures that contained abundant CTL, would not substitute for viable DC. Enriched preparations of macrophages (M phi) were obtained from blood, peritoneal cavity, and spleens of BCG-immune and unprimed mice. M phi added at doses of 0.2-4% were weak or inactive as accessory cells. The level of Ia antigens on test M phi populations was quantitated and visualized by binding of a radioiodinated monoclonal anti-I-Ab,d antibody, clone B-21. M phi that bore substantial amounts of Ia from all organs were weak accessory cells. Addition of M phi to DC-T cell cocultures produced inhibitory effects, usually at a dose of 2% M phi. In contrast, 0.5% Ia-bearing M phi from BCG-immune boosted mice inhibited > 80% of the DC-mediated CTL response. Addition of indomethacin reversed M phi inhibition, and 10(-9) M prostaglandin E2 in turn blocked the indomethacin effect. Indomethacin also restored a low level of accessory cell function in immune-boosted adherent peritoneal cells, but not in preparations of monocytes and spleen M phi. Small numbers of DC were identified in preparations of immune- boosted peritoneal cells and may have accounted

  14. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in dengue virus serotype 1.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhiliang; Guo, Jianglong; Huang, Xi; Liu, Huifang; Chen, Xinyu; Jiang, Minghua; Wen, Jinsheng

    2015-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has a serious and growing impact on global health and the exact role of DENV-specific CD8(+) T-cells in DENV infection is still uncertain. In the present study, SYFPEITHI algorithm was used to screen the amino acid sequence of Dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1) for potential epitopes, and seven putative HLA-A*1101-restricted and five putative HLA-A*2402-restricted epitopes conserved in hundreds of DENV-1 strains were synthesized. The binding affinity of these epitope candidates to corresponding HLA molecules was evaluated using competitive peptide-binding assay. The immunogenicity and specificity of peptides were further tested in HLA-A*1101 transgenic mice, HLA-A*2402 transgenic mice and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients infected with DENV-1. Percentage inhibition (PI) values calculated in competitive peptide-binding assay showed that six peptides (E39-47 PTLDIELLK, NS5(505-513) GVEGEGLHK, NS2b(15-23) SILLSSLLK, NS5(561-569) ALLATSIFK, NS3(99-107) AVEPGKNPK, and NS4b(159-167) VVYDAKFEK) could bind to HLA-A*1101 molecule with high affinity and five peptides (NS3472-480 QYIYMGQPL, NS4a40-48 AYRHAMEEL, NS5(880-888) DYMTSMKRF, NS3(548-556) SYKVASEGF, and NS3(22-30) IYRILQRGL) have a high affinity for HLA-A*2402 molecule. Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) results indicated that these high-affinity peptides were recognized by splenocytes of DENV-1-infected transgenic mice and high-affinity peptide-immunized transgenic mice displayed high levels of peptide-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells. In addition, both peptide-pulsed splenocytes and DENV-1-infected splenic monocytes were efficiently killed by these peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Finally, except NS2b(15-23), 10 high-affinity peptides were recognized by PBMCs of patients infected with DENV-1. These identified epitopes would contribute to the understanding of the function of DENV-specific CD8(+) T-cells.

  15. Oral vaccination with attenuated Salmonella enterica strains encoding T-cell epitopes from tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 induces specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jia-Zi; Dong, Yu-Jun; Huang, He; Li, Shuang; Zhong, Yi; Liu, Shu-Lin; Wang, Yue-Dan

    2010-06-01

    Bacterial fimbriae can accept foreign peptides and display them on the cell surface. A highly efficient gene replacement method was used to generate peptide vaccines based on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261. The T-cell epitopes (NY-ESO-1 p157-165 and p157-167) from NY-ESO-1, which is a promising target antigen in patients for the specific immune recognition of cancer, were incorporated into the gene encoding AgfA (the major subunit protein of thin aggregative fimbriae of Salmonella) by replacing an equal length of the DNA segment. To improve cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition, both termini of the peptide were flanked by double alanine (AA) residues. Immunofluorescence microscopy with AgfA-specific antiserum verified the expression of chimeric AgfA, which was also proved by a Congo red binding assay. Oral immunizations of HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice with recombinant SL3261 strains encoding NY-ESO-1 p157-165 or p157-167 induced NY-ESO-1 p157-165-specific CD8(+) T cells, detected by an HLA-A*0201 pentamer, and induced a T-cell response detected by an enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The Salmonella fimbrial display system was efficient at the induction of an antitumor cellular immune response in vivo, providing a new strategy for the development of efficient cancer vaccinations.

  16. Revival of the identification of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes for immunological diagnosis, therapy and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Shihong; Tan, Shuguang; Zheng, Beiwen; Gao, George F

    2011-03-01

    Immunogenic T-cell epitopes have a central role in the cellular immunity against pathogens and tumors. However, in the early stage of cellular immunity studies, it was complicated and time-consuming to identify and characterize T-cell epitopes. Currently, the epitope screening is experiencing renewed enthusiasm due to advances in novel techniques and theories. Moreover, the application of T-cell epitope-based diagnoses for tuberculosis and new data on epitope-based vaccine development have also revived the field. There is a growing knowledge on the emphasis of epitope-stimulated T-cell immune responses in the elimination of pathogens and tumors. In this review, we outline the significance of the identification and characterization of T-cell epitopes. We also summarize the methods and strategies for epitope definition and, more importantly, address the relevance of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes to clinical diagnoses, therapy and vaccine development.

  17. Recycling endosomes in human cytotoxic T lymphocytes constitute an auxiliary intracellular trafficking pathway for newly synthesized perforin.

    PubMed

    Lesteberg, Kelsey; Orange, Jordan; Makedonas, George

    2017-08-18

    Although cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) store perforin within cytoplasmic secretory granules for immediate use, perforin is synthesized anew within hours of TCR stimulation. Previously, we observed new perforin protein at an immunologic synapse independent of secretory lysosomes; herein, we aimed to determine how new perforin transits to the synapse if not via lytic granules. We analyzed antigen-specific human CTLs via imaging flow cytometry and high-resolution confocal microscopy, with attention to intracellular trafficking components and new perforin. The recycling endosome compartments identified by rab8, rab11a, rab4, and rab37 co-localized with new perforin, as well as the SNAREs vti1b and VAMP4. After ablating the function of the recycling endosome pathway, we observed a relative accumulation of new perforin in rab8 vesicles. The recycling endosome pathway may serve as an auxiliary intracellular route for the delivery of new perforin to an immunologic synapse in order to perpetuate a cytotoxic response.

  18. Dynamic visualization the whole process of cytotoxic T lymphocytes killing the B16 tumor cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) played a key role in the immune system to destroy the tumor cells. Although some mechanisms of CTLs killing the tumor cells are revealed already, the dynamic information of CTLs interaction with tumor cells are still not known very clearly. Here we used confocal microscopy to visualize the whole process of CTLs killing the tumor cells in vitro. The imaging data showed that CTLs destroyed the target tumor cells rapidly and efficiently. Several CTLs surrounded one or some tumor cells and the average time for CTLs destroying one tumor cell is just a few minutes in vitro. The study displayed the temporal events of CTLs interacting with tumor cells at the beginning and finally killing them and directly presented the efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity of the CTLs. The results helped us to deeply understand the mechanism of the CTLs destroying the tumor cells and to develop the cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Virus and cytotoxic T lymphocytes: crucial role of viral peptide secondary structure in major histocompatibility complex class I interactions.

    PubMed

    Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1993-05-01

    Viral antigens are presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by H-2-restricted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) glycoproteins. Binding of the endogenously processed viral peptides (epitopes) to their specific MHC molecules is an early intracellular event in the recognition process and is necessary for subsequent killing of virus-infected cells by virus-specific CTLs. It is now well established that interaction between a viral antigenic peptide and MHC is dependent on the primary structure (length and amino acid sequence) of that antigen. Here we show, using the H-2Db-restricted epitope GP277-286 of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as a model, that the secondary structure (conformation) of the viral sequence also plays a crucial role in the binding of a viral antigen to MHC glycoprotein and in its subsequent presentation to virus-specific CTLs.

  20. Virus and cytotoxic T lymphocytes: crucial role of viral peptide secondary structure in major histocompatibility complex class I interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1993-01-01

    Viral antigens are presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by H-2-restricted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) glycoproteins. Binding of the endogenously processed viral peptides (epitopes) to their specific MHC molecules is an early intracellular event in the recognition process and is necessary for subsequent killing of virus-infected cells by virus-specific CTLs. It is now well established that interaction between a viral antigenic peptide and MHC is dependent on the primary structure (length and amino acid sequence) of that antigen. Here we show, using the H-2Db-restricted epitope GP277-286 of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as a model, that the secondary structure (conformation) of the viral sequence also plays a crucial role in the binding of a viral antigen to MHC glycoprotein and in its subsequent presentation to virus-specific CTLs. PMID:7682632

  1. A Multiepitope of XBP1, CD138 and CS1 Peptides Induces Myeloma-Specific Cytotoxic T lymphocytes in T cells of Smoldering Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Prabhala, Rao; Voskertchian, Annie; Brown, Andrew; Maguire, Craig; Richardson, Paul; Dranoff, Glen; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a cocktail of HLA-A2-specific peptides including heteroclitic XBP1 US184-192 (YISPWILAV), heteroclitic XBP1 SP367-375 (YLFPQLISV), native CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) and native CS1239-247 (SLFVLGLFL), for their ability to elicit multipeptide specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (MP-CTL) using T cells from smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) patients. Our results demonstrate that MP-CTL generated from SMM patients’ T cells show effective anti-MM responses including CD137 (4-1BB) upregulation, CTL proliferation, IFN-γ production, and degranulation (CD107a) in an HLA-A2-restricted and peptide-specific manner. Phenotypically, we observed increased total CD3+CD8+ T cells (>80%) and cellular activation (CD69+) within the memory SMM MP-CTL (CD45RO+/CD3+CD8+) subset after repeated multipeptide stimulation. Importantly, SMM patients could be categorized into distinct groups by their level of MP-CTL expansion and anti-tumor activity. In high responders, the effector memory (CCR7-CD45RO+/CD3+CD8+) T cell subset was enriched, while the remaining responders’ CTL contained a higher frequency of the terminal effector (CCR7-CD45RO-/CD3+CD8+) subset. These results suggest that this multipeptide cocktail has the potential to induce effective and durable memory MP-CTL in SMM patients. Therefore, our findings provide the rationale for clinical evaluation of a therapeutic vaccine to prevent or delay progression of SMM to active disease. PMID:24935722

  2. Selection, transmission, and reversion of an antigen-processing cytotoxic T-lymphocyte escape mutation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Yu, Xu G; O'Sullivan, Kristin M; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Le Gall, Sylvie; John, Mina; Mothe, Bianca R; Lee, Paul K; Kalife, Elizabeth T; Cohen, Daniel E; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Strick, Daryld A; Johnston, Mary N; Sette, Alessandro; Rosenberg, Eric S; Mallal, Simon A; Goulder, Philip J R; Brander, Christian; Walker, Bruce D

    2004-07-01

    Numerous studies now support that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution is influenced by immune selection pressure, with population studies showing an association between specific HLA alleles and mutations within defined cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes. Here we combine sequence data and functional studies of CD8 T-cell responses to demonstrate that allele-specific immune pressures also select for mutations flanking CD8 epitopes that impair antigen processing. In persons expressing HLA-A3, we demonstrate consistent selection for a mutation in a C-terminal flanking residue of the normally immunodominant Gag KK9 epitope that prevents its processing and presentation, resulting in a rapid decline in the CD8 T-cell response. This single amino acid substitution also lies within a second HLA-A3-restricted epitope, with the mutation directly impairing recognition by CD8 T cells. Transmission of the mutation to subjects expressing HLA-A3 was shown to prevent the induction of normally immunodominant acute-phase responses to both epitopes. However, subsequent in vivo reversion of the mutation was coincident with delayed induction of new CD8 T-cell responses to both epitopes. These data demonstrate that mutations within the flanking region of an HIV-1 epitope can impair recognition by an established CD8 T-cell response and that transmission of these mutations alters the acute-phase CD8(+) T-cell response. Moreover, reversion of these mutations in the absence of the original immune pressure reveals the potential plasticity of immunologically selected evolutionary changes.

  3. In vitro priming of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes using allogeneic dendritic cells derived from the human MUTZ-3 cell line.

    PubMed

    Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Schreurs, Marco W J; Masterson, Allan J; Liu, Ying Poi; Goletz, Steffen; Baumeister, Hans; Kueter, Esther W M; Lougheed, Sinéad M; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; Hooijberg, Erik; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2006-12-01

    The adoptive transfer of in vitro-induced and expanded tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) presents a promising immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. The in vitro induction of tumor-reactive CTL requires repeated stimulation of CTL precursors with dendritic cells (DC). To circumvent problems like scarcity of blood DC precursors and donor variability, it would be attractive to use DC from a non-autologous, unlimited source. DCs derived from the human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line MUTZ-3 are attractive candidates since these DCs closely resemble monocyte-derived DC (MoDC) in terms of phenotype and T cell stimulatory capacity. Here we demonstrate that functional CTL clones could be generated against multiple tumor-associated antigens, i.e., human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), ErbB3-binding protein-1 (Ebp1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and Her-2/neu, by stimulating CD8beta(+) CTL precursors with peptide-loaded allogeneic, HLA-A2-matched MUTZ-3-derived DC. A consistent induction capacity, as determined by MHC tetramer-binding, was found in multiple donors and comparable to autologous peptide-loaded MoDC. Functional characterization at the clonal level revealed the priming of CTL that recognized endogenously processed epitopes on tumor cell lines in an HLA-A2-restricted fashion. Our data indicate that MUTZ-3-derived DC can be used as stimulator cells for in vitro priming and expansion of functional TAA-specific effector CTL. MUTZ-3-derived DCs thus represent a ready and standardized source of allogeneic DC to generate CTL for therapeutic adoptive transfer strategies.

  4. Selection, Transmission, and Reversion of an Antigen-Processing Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Escape Mutation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Yu, Xu G.; O'Sullivan, Kristin M.; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Le Gall, Sylvie; John, Mina; Mothe, Bianca R.; Lee, Paul K.; Kalife, Elizabeth T.; Cohen, Daniel E.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Strick, Daryld A.; Johnston, Mary N.; Sette, Alessandro; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Mallal, Simon A.; Goulder, Philip J. R.; Brander, Christian; Walker, Bruce D.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies now support that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution is influenced by immune selection pressure, with population studies showing an association between specific HLA alleles and mutations within defined cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes. Here we combine sequence data and functional studies of CD8 T-cell responses to demonstrate that allele-specific immune pressures also select for mutations flanking CD8 epitopes that impair antigen processing. In persons expressing HLA-A3, we demonstrate consistent selection for a mutation in a C-terminal flanking residue of the normally immunodominant Gag KK9 epitope that prevents its processing and presentation, resulting in a rapid decline in the CD8 T-cell response. This single amino acid substitution also lies within a second HLA-A3-restricted epitope, with the mutation directly impairing recognition by CD8 T cells. Transmission of the mutation to subjects expressing HLA-A3 was shown to prevent the induction of normally immunodominant acute-phase responses to both epitopes. However, subsequent in vivo reversion of the mutation was coincident with delayed induction of new CD8 T-cell responses to both epitopes. These data demonstrate that mutations within the flanking region of an HIV-1 epitope can impair recognition by an established CD8 T-cell response and that transmission of these mutations alters the acute-phase CD8+ T-cell response. Moreover, reversion of these mutations in the absence of the original immune pressure reveals the potential plasticity of immunologically selected evolutionary changes. PMID:15194783

  5. Persistent Virus Infection despite Chronic Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Activation in Gamma Interferon-Deficient Mice Infected with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Christina; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Wodarz, Dominik; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2000-01-01

    The role of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in the permanent control of infection with a noncytopathic virus was studied by comparing immune responses in wild-type and IFN-γ-deficient (IFN-γ −/−) mice infected with a slowly invasive strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV Armstrong). While wild-type mice rapidly cleared the infection, IFN-γ −/− mice became chronically infected. Virus persistence in the latter mice did not reflect failure to generate cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) effectors, as an unimpaired primary CTL response was observed. Furthermore, while ex vivo CTL activity gradually declined in wild-type mice, long-standing cytolytic activity was demonstrated in IFN-γ −/− mice. The prolonged effector phase in infected IFN-γ −/− mice was associated with elevated numbers of CD8+ T cells. Moreover, a higher proportion of these cells retained an activated phenotype and was actively cycling. However, despite the increased CD8+ T-cell turnover, which might have resulted in depletion of the memory CTL precursor pool, no evidence for exhaustion was observed. In fact, at 3 months postinfection we detected higher numbers of LCMV-specific CTL precursors in IFN-γ −/− mice than in wild-type mice. These findings indicate that in the absence of IFN-γ, CTLs cannot clear the infection and are kept permanently activated by the continuous presence of live virus, resulting in a delicate new balance between viral load and immunity. This interpretation of our findings is supported by mathematical modeling describing the effect of eliminating IFN-γ-mediated antiviral activity on the dynamics between virus replication and CTL activity. PMID:11044074

  6. Complex Consisting of β-Glucan and Antigenic Peptides with Cleavage Site for Glutathione and Aminopeptidases Induces Potent Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2017-09-20

    The efficient induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires not only promotion of the uptake of antigens and adjuvant molecules into antigen-presenting cells but also control of their intracellular behavior. We previously demonstrated that the β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG oligonucleotides with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses. In this study, we prepared various conjugates composed of antigenic peptide (OVA257-264) and dA40 and made complexes with SPG. The conjugates with a disulfide bond between OVA257-264 and dA40 were easily cleaved by glutathione. The resultant peptides with a hydrophobic amino acid at the C-terminal end was recognized by puromycin-insensitive leucine aminopeptidase (PILS-AP), which trims antigenic peptide precursors and prepares peptides of eight or nine amino acids in length, which is the optimal length for binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I. The conjugate exposed to such enzymes induced a high antigen presentation level. The antigen presentation level was almost the same before and after the complexation with SPG. Immunization with a mixture of dA-OVA257-264/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG induced high antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity at a much lower peptide dose than in previous studies. These results can be strongly ascribed to not only the cell-specific delivery by SPG but also the control of the intracellular behavior by the introduction of cleavage sites. Therefore, peptide-dA/SPG complexes could be used as potent vaccine antigens for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases.

  7. Immunization with antigenic peptides complexed with β-glucan induces potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in combination with CpG-ODNs.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ishii, Ken J; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-12-28

    The induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires immunization with not only antigens, but also adjuvants. CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) are well-known ligands for Toll-like receptor 9 and a potent adjuvant that induces both Th1-type humoral and cellular immune responses including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We previously demonstrated that β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG-ODNs with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses by co-administration of antigenic proteins, namely ovalbumin (OVA). Immunization with antigenic peptides, OVA257-264, did not induce these antigen-specific immune responses even in combination with CpG-dA/SPG, indicating that peptides require a carrier to antigen presenting cells. In this study, we prepared conjugates comprising OVA257-264 and dA40, and made complexes with SPG. Immunization with OVA257-264-dA/SPG induced peptide-specific immune responses in combination with CpG-dA regardless of complexation with SPG both in vitro and in vivo. When splenocytes from immunized mice were incubated with E.G7-OVA tumor model cells presenting OVA peptides, the number of cells drastically decreased after 24h. Furthermore, mice pre-immunized with OVA257-264-dA/SPG and CpG-ODNs exhibited a long delay in tumor growth after tumor inoculation. Therefore, these peptide-dA/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG complexes could be used as a potent vaccine for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases.

  8. Prediction and identification of HLA-A*0201-restricted epitopes from leukemia-associated protein MLAA-22 which elicit cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Bai, Ju; Gu, Liufang; He, Aili; Wang, Jin; Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Wanggang

    2014-12-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a critical role in the control of leukemia. However, few effective CTL epitopes have been identified to date yet. We previously reported that MLAA-22, a protein composed of 631 amino acid residues, is a novel acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated antigen. In the present study, ten high-score 9-mer peptides, which were selected from MLAA-22 by using ProPred1 and SYFPEITHI bioinformatics tools, were screened to identify HLA-A*0201-restricted-specific CTL epitopes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells were generated in vitro to be used as antigen-presenting cells for the induction of CTLs. We found that peptide MLAA-22(379-387) (LLPNAIYKV) exhibited the highest binding affinity to HLA-A*0201 among all peptide candidates in the peptide-T2 binding assay. The percentage of positive T2 cells treated with MLAA-22(379-387) was about 96.3%, which is even higher than that of the positive control peptide CML28(173-181) (95.1%). MLAA-22(379-387)-induced CTLs showed the most significant cytotoxic activity and apparent killing effects on the cell lines including THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia), A549, T2, U937, and MCF-7, and the specific lysis ratios were 83.8, 32.6, 64.4, 64.4, and 32.6%, respectively, when the effector to target ratio (E/T) was 20:1. Specific lysis (%) of MLAA1 was significantly increased (P < 0.05, P < 0.001, respectively) in THP-1 cell than those in other cancer cell lines and were 28.5, 67.8, and 83.8% at ratio 5:1, 10:1, and 20:1, respectively. Hence, MLAA-22(379-387) is a potential tumor-associated antigen target for AML immunotherapy.

  9. Suppression of murine tumour growth through CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes via activated DEC-205(+) dendritic cells by sequential administration of α-galactosylceramide in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kogo, Hideki; Shimizu, Masumi; Negishi, Yasuyuki; Uchida, Eiji; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2017-07-01

    Cancer immunity is mediated through the effective priming and activation of tumour-specific class I MHC molecule-restricted CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). DEC-205(+) dendritic cells (DCs) can cross-present the epitope(s) of captured tumour antigens associated with class I MHC molecules alongside co-stimulatory molecules to prime and activate tumour-specific CD8(+) CTLs. Immunosuppressive tolerogenic DCs with reduced co-stimulatory molecules may be a cause of impaired CTL induction. Hepa1-6-1 cells were established from the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa1-6; these cells grow continuously after subcutaneous implantation into syngeneic C57BL/6 (B6) mice and do not prime CD8(+) CTLs. In this study, we show that the growth of ongoing tumours was suppressed by activated CD8(+) CTLs with tumour-specific cytotoxicity through the administration of the glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), which is a compound known to stimulate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and selectively activate DEC-205(+) DCs. Moreover, we demonstrated that sequential repetitive intraperitoneal inoculation with α-GalCer every 48 hr appeared to convert tolerogenic DEC-205(+) DCs into immunogenic DCs with a higher expression of co-stimulatory molecules and a stronger cross-presentation capacity, which primed CTL precursors and induced tumour-specific CD8(+) CTLs within the tumour environment without activating iNKT cells. These findings provide a new basis for cancer immunotherapy to convert tolerogenic DEC-205(+) DCs within tumours into immunogenic DCs through the sequential administration of an immuno-potent lipid/glycolipid, and then activated immunogenic DCs with sufficient expression of co-stimulatory molecules prime and activate tumour-specific CD8(+) CTLs within the tumour to control tumour growth. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Sublethal exposure to alpha radiation (223Ra dichloride) enhances various carcinomas’ sensitivity to lysis by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes through calreticulin-mediated immunogenic modulation

    PubMed Central

    Malamas, Anthony S.; Gameiro, Sofia R.; Knudson, Karin M.; Hodge, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®; 223Ra) is an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical FDA-approved for the treatment of bone metastases in patients with advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. It is also being examined clinically in patients with breast and lung carcinoma and patients with multiple myeloma. As with other forms of radiation, the aim of 223Ra is to reduce tumor burden by directly killing tumor cells. External beam (photon) and proton radiation have been shown to augment tumor sensitivity to antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, little is known about whether treatment with 223Ra can also induce such immunogenic modulation in tumor cells that survive irradiation. We examined these effects in vitro by exposing human prostate, breast, and lung carcinoma cells to sublethal doses of 223Ra. 223Ra significantly enhanced T cell-mediated lysis of each tumor type by CD8+ CTLs specific for MUC-1, brachyury, and CEA tumor antigens. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the increase in CTL killing was accompanied by augmented protein expression of MHC-I and calreticulin in each tumor type, molecules that are essential for efficient antigen presentation. Enhanced tumor-cell lysis was facilitated by calreticulin surface translocation following 223Ra exposure. The phenotypic changes observed after treatment appear to be mediated by induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response pathway. By rendering tumor cells more susceptible to T cell-mediated lysis, 223Ra may potentially be effective in combination with various immunotherapies, particularly cancer vaccines that are designed to generate and expand patients’ endogenous antigen-specific T-cell populations against specific tumor antigens. PMID:27893426

  11. Sublethal exposure to alpha radiation (223Ra dichloride) enhances various carcinomas' sensitivity to lysis by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes through calreticulin-mediated immunogenic modulation.

    PubMed

    Malamas, Anthony S; Gameiro, Sofia R; Knudson, Karin M; Hodge, James W

    2016-12-27

    Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®; 223Ra) is an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical FDA-approved for the treatment of bone metastases in patients with advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. It is also being examined clinically in patients with breast and lung carcinoma and patients with multiple myeloma. As with other forms of radiation, the aim of 223Ra is to reduce tumor burden by directly killing tumor cells. External beam (photon) and proton radiation have been shown to augment tumor sensitivity to antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, little is known about whether treatment with 223Ra can also induce such immunogenic modulation in tumor cells that survive irradiation. We examined these effects in vitro by exposing human prostate, breast, and lung carcinoma cells to sublethal doses of 223Ra. 223Ra significantly enhanced T cell-mediated lysis of each tumor type by CD8+ CTLs specific for MUC-1, brachyury, and CEA tumor antigens. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the increase in CTL killing was accompanied by augmented protein expression of MHC-I and calreticulin in each tumor type, molecules that are essential for efficient antigen presentation. Enhanced tumor-cell lysis was facilitated by calreticulin surface translocation following 223Ra exposure. The phenotypic changes observed after treatment appear to be mediated by induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response pathway. By rendering tumor cells more susceptible to T cell-mediated lysis, 223Ra may potentially be effective in combination with various immunotherapies, particularly cancer vaccines that are designed to generate and expand patients' endogenous antigen-specific T-cell populations against specific tumor antigens.

  12. Dendritic cells engineered to secrete anti-DcR3 antibody augment cytotoxic T lymphocyte response against pancreatic cancer in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Li, Hong-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Xu, Wen-Da

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the enhanced cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against pancreatic cancer (PC) in vitro induced by dendritic cells (DCs) engineered to secrete anti-DcR3 monoclonal antibody (mAb). METHODS DCs, T lymphocytes and primary PC cells were obtained from PC patients. DCs were transfected with a designed humanized anti-DcR3 monoclonal antibody heavy and light chain mRNA and/or total tumor RNA (DC-tumor-anti-DcR3 RNA or DC-total tumor RNA) by using electroporation technology. The identification, concentration and function of anti-DcR3 mAb secreted by DC-tumor-anti-DcR3 RNA were determined by western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After co-culturing of autologous isolated PC cells with target DCs, the effects of secreting anti-DcR3 mAb on RNA-DCs’ viability and apoptosis were assessed by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Analysis of enhanced antigen-specific immune response against PC induced by anti-DcR3 mAb secreting DCs was performed using a 51Cr releasing test. T cell responses induced by RNA-loaded DCs were analyzed by measuring cytokine levels, including IFN-γ, IL-10, IL4, TNF-α and IL-12. RESULTS The anti-DcR3 mAb secreted by DCs reacted with recombinant human DcR3 protein and generated a band with 35 kDa molecular weight. The secreting mAb was transient, peaking at 24 h and becoming undetectable after 72 h. After co-incubation with DC-tumor-anti-DcR3 RNA for designated times, the DcR3 level in the supernatant of autologous PC cells was significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05). DCs secreting anti-DcR3 mAb could improve cell viability and slow down the apoptosis of RNA-loaded DCs, compared with DC-total tumor RNA (P < 0.01). The anti-DcR3 mAb secreted by DC-tumor-anti-DcR3 RNA could enhance the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) activity toward RNA-transfected DCs, primary tumor cells, and PC cell lines, compared with CTLs stimulated by DC-total tumor RNA or control group (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the antigen-specific CTL responses

  13. Clearance of HSV-2 from recurrent genital lesions correlates with infiltration of HSV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, D M; Posavad, C M; Barnum, G R; Johnson, M L; Frank, J M; Corey, L

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in host clearance of symptomatic mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection are unclear. We studied the functional properties of bulk cultures of skin-infiltrating lymphocytes from normal skin and serial biopsies of recurrent genital HSV-2 lesions, and compared HSV-specific and NK responses with viral clearance. HSV-specific CD4+ or CD8+ T cells were rarely detected in lymphocytes cultured from normal skin. The total lymphocyte count and HSV-specific and NK-like effector cell activities were markedly higher in cultures derived from lesional skin. HSV-specific CD4+ proliferative responses and NK-like cytotoxic responses were present at all stages of herpetic lesions, including biopsies early in the disease course. In contrast, cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity was generally low among cells derived from early culture-positive lesions, and increased during lesion evolution. Viral clearance from the lesion site was associated with a high level of local cytolytic activity towards HSV-infected cells. The phenotypes of cells with HSV-specific cytotoxic responses varied between patients, having CD4+ and CD8+ components. Immunotherapeutic approaches to HSV should be directed at improving in vivo cytolytic activity to HSV. PMID:9525993

  14. Dendritic cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP gene generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against ovarian cancer in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Kong, Beihua; Sheng, Xiugui; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2010-04-09

    Recently, some studies have indicated that Rsf-1/HBXAP plays a role in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation that may contribute to tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer. The present study demonstrates that using dendritic cells (DCs) from human cord blood CD34{sup +} cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP DNA plasmids by nucleofection generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against ovarian cancer in vitro. After transfection, DCs were analyzed for Rsf-1/HBXAP mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Then the DC phenotypes, T-cell stimulatory capacity, endocytic activity and migration capacity were explored by flow cytometry analysis, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, endocytosis and transwell chemotaxis assay, respectively. After transfection, Rsf-1/HBXAP expression was detected at mRNA and protein levels. Allogeneic T-cell proliferation induced by transfected DCs was obviously higher than non-transfected DCs, but the endocytosis capacity and migratory ability were not different. Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs could induce antigen-specific CTL and generate a very potent cytotoxicity to OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs may be a potential adjuvant immunotherapy for ovarian cancer in clinical applications.

  15. Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1) and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Associated Antigen 4 (CTLA-4) in Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung; Lee, Hwan Hee; Kim, Chang Wook

    2017-07-13

    Virus-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8+) cytotoxic T cells (CTL) recognize viral antigens presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chains on infected hepatocytes, with help from CD4+ T cells. However, this CTL response is frequently weak or undetectable in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) are receptors in the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules, providing inhibitory signals to T cells. The overexpressions of PD-1 and CTLA-4 in patients with viral infection have been shown to associate with functional impairment of virus-specific T cells. In acute viral hepatitis, PD-1 and CTLA-4 are up-regulated during the symptomatic phase, and then down-regulated after recovery. These findings suggest that PD-1 and CTLA-4 have protective effects as inhibitory molecules to suppress cytotoxic T cells which induce harmful destruction of viral infected hepatocytes in self-limited viral hepatitis. In chronic viral hepatitis, the extended upregulations of PD-1 and CTLA-4 are associated with T cell exhaustion and persistent viral infection, suggesting positive correlations between expression of immune inhibitory factors and the chronicity of viral disease. In this review, we summarize recent literature relating to PD-1, CTLA-4, and other inhibitory receptors in antigen-specific T cell exhaustion in viral hepatitis, including hepatitis A, B, C, and others.

  16. Cancer-induced defective cytotoxic T lymphocyte effector function: another mechanism how antigenic tumors escape immune-mediated killing.

    PubMed Central

    Radoja, S.; Frey, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The notion that a deficit in immune cell functions permits tumor growth has received experimental support with the discovery of several different biochemical defects in T lymphocytes that infiltrate cancers. Decreased levels of enzymes involved with T-cell signal transduction have been reported by several laboratories, suggesting that tumors or host cells recruited to the tumor site actively down-regulate antitumor T-cell immune response. This permits tumor escape from immune-mediated killing. The possibility that defects in T-cell signal transduction can be reversed, which would potentially permit successful vaccination or adoptive immunotherapy, motivates renewed interest in the field. Summarizing the literature concerning tumor-induced T-cell dysfunction, we focus on the end stage of immune response to human cancer, that of defective cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing function. Based on the data from several laboratories, we hypothesize a biochemical mechanism that accounts for the unusual phenotype of antitumor T-cell accumulation in tumors, but with defective killing function. PMID:10972084

  17. Treatment of solid organ transplant recipients with autologous Epstein Barr virus–specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs)

    PubMed Central

    Savoldo, Barbara; Goss, John A.; Hammer, Markus M.; Zhang, Lan; Lopez, Teresita; Gee, Adrian P.; Lin, Yu-Feng; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E.; Reinke, Petra; Schubert, Stephan; Gottschalk, Stephen; Finegold, Milton J.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Heslop, Helen E.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the in vivo safety, efficacy, and persistence of autologous Epstein Barr virus (EBV)–specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for the treatment of solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients at high risk for EBV-associated posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). EBV-CTLs generated from 35 patients expanded with normal kinetics contained both CD8 and CD4 lymphocytes and produced significant specific killing of autologous EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Twelve SOT recipients at high risk for PTLD, or with active disease, received autologous CTL infusions without toxicity. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring of EBV-DNA showed a transient increase in plasma EBV-DNA suggestive of lysis of EBV-infected cells, although there was no consistent decrease in virus load in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells. Interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and tetramer analysis showed an increase in the frequency of EBV-responsive T cells, which returned to preinfusion levels after 2 to 6 months. None of the treated patients developed PTLD. One patient with liver PTLD showed a complete response, and one with ocular disease has had a partial response stable for over one year. These data are consistent with an expansion and persistence of adoptively transferred EBV-CTLs that is limited in the presence of continued immunosuppression but that nonetheless produces clinically useful antiviral activity. PMID:16835376

  18. Recombinant Salmonella typhimurium strains that invade nonphagocytic cells are resistant to recognition by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, X M; Tite, J P; Lipscombe, M; Rowland-Jones, S; Ferguson, D J; McMichael, A J

    1992-01-01

    To address the question of whether Salmonella-infected nonphagocytic cells could serve as target cells for recognition by antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), four recombinant Salmonella typhimurium constructs that expressed full-length, or fragments of, influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) were made. The bacteria were shown to infect Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Appropriate major histocompatibility complex restriction molecules, HLA-B27 and H-2 Db, were transfected into CHO cells, which were then infected with recombinant S. typhimurium and used as targets for NP-specific CTL. The cells in which NP was expressed by intracellularly replicating bacteria were not lysed by NP-specific CTL, although they were killed when appropriate influenza A virus or peptides were used. Thus, S.typhimurium bacteria within nonphagocytic cells were resistant to CTL recognition. In contrast to these results, mice infected with recombinant S.typhimurium that expressed fragments of NP in the periplasm were primed for NP-specific CTL responses. The results indicate that CTL responses specific to Salmonella antigens can be generated, but the bacteria may be safe from the CTL attack once they have entered the nonphagocytic cells. Images PMID:1500187

  19. Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1) and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Associated Antigen 4 (CTLA-4) in Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung; Lee, Hwan Hee

    2017-01-01

    Virus-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8+) cytotoxic T cells (CTL) recognize viral antigens presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chains on infected hepatocytes, with help from CD4+ T cells. However, this CTL response is frequently weak or undetectable in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) are receptors in the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules, providing inhibitory signals to T cells. The overexpressions of PD-1 and CTLA-4 in patients with viral infection have been shown to associate with functional impairment of virus-specific T cells. In acute viral hepatitis, PD-1 and CTLA-4 are up-regulated during the symptomatic phase, and then down-regulated after recovery. These findings suggest that PD-1 and CTLA-4 have protective effects as inhibitory molecules to suppress cytotoxic T cells which induce harmful destruction of viral infected hepatocytes in self-limited viral hepatitis. In chronic viral hepatitis, the extended upregulations of PD-1 and CTLA-4 are associated with T cell exhaustion and persistent viral infection, suggesting positive correlations between expression of immune inhibitory factors and the chronicity of viral disease. In this review, we summarize recent literature relating to PD-1, CTLA-4, and other inhibitory receptors in antigen-specific T cell exhaustion in viral hepatitis, including hepatitis A, B, C, and others. PMID:28703774

  20. New insights into HIV-1 specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in exposed, persistently seronegative Kenyan sex workers.

    PubMed

    Kaul, R; Rowland-Jones, S L; Kimani, J; Fowke, K; Dong, T; Kiama, P; Rutherford, J; Njagi, E; Mwangi, F; Rostron, T; Onyango, J; Oyugi, J; MacDonald, K S; Bwayo, J J; Plummer, F A

    2001-11-01

    A clearer understanding of HIV-1 specific immune responses in highly-exposed, persistently seronegative (HEPS) subjects is important in developing models of HIV-1 protective immunity. HIV-1 specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) have been described in a cohort of HEPS Kenyan sex workers, and recent work has further elucidated these responses. CTL specific for HIV-1 Env were found in the blood of over half the sex workers meeting criteria for HIV resistance, and in some women recognized unmapped epitopes. The proportion of women with Env-specific CTL increased with the duration of uninfected HIV exposure, suggesting that these responses were acquired over time. CD8+ lymphocyte responses directed against predefined HIV-1 CTL epitopes from various HIV-1 genes were found in the blood and genital tract of >50% resistant sex workers, at a ten-fold lower frequency than in infected subjects. The epitope specificity of CD8+ responses differs between HEPS and HIV infected women, and in HEPS the maintenance of responses appears to be dependent on persistent HIV exposure. Several HIV-1 'resistant' sex workers have become HIV infected over the past 6 years, possibly related to waning of pre-existing HIV-specific CTL, and infection has often been associated with a switch in the epitope specificity of CD8+ responses. These findings suggest that vaccine-induced protective HIV immunity is a realistic goal, but that vaccine strategies of boosting or persistent antigen may be necessary for long-lived protection.

  1. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize an HLA-A2-restricted epitope within the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid antigen

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The absence of readily manipulable experimental systems to study the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens has thus far precluded a definitive demonstration of the role played by this response in the pathogenesis of liver cell injury and viral clearance during HBV infection. To circumvent the problem that HBV infection of human cells in vitro for production of stimulator/target systems for CTL analysis is not feasible, a panel of 22 overlapping synthetic peptides covering the entire amino acid sequence of the HBV core (HBcAg) and e (HBeAg) antigens were used to induce and to analyze the HBV nucleocapsid-specific CTL response in nine patients with acute hepatitis B, six patients with chronic active hepatitis B, and eight normal controls. By using this approach, we have identified an HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, located within the NH2- terminal region of the HBV core molecule, which is shared with the e antigen and is readily recognized by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with self-limited acute hepatitis B but less efficiently in chronic HBV infection. Our study provides the first direct evidence of HLA class I-restricted T cell cytotoxicity against HBV in humans. Furthermore, the different response in HBV-infected subjects who successfully clear the virus (acute patients) in comparison with patients who do not succeed (chronic patients) suggests a pathogenetic role for this CTL activity in the clearance of HBV infection. PMID:1720813

  2. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes on swine viruses: multi-epitope design for universal T cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chung, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) are the primary diseases affecting the pig industry globally. Vaccine induced CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune response might be long-lived and cross-serotype and thus deserve further attention. Although large panels of synthetic overlapping peptides spanning the entire length of the polyproteins of a virus facilitate the detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, it is an exceedingly costly and cumbersome approach. Alternatively, computational predictions have been proven to be of satisfactory accuracy and are easily performed. Such a method enables the systematic identification of genome-wide CTL epitopes by incorporating epitope prediction tools in analyzing large numbers of viral sequences. In this study, we have implemented an integrated bioinformatics pipeline for the identification of CTL epitopes of swine viruses including the CSF virus (CSFV), FMD virus (FMDV) and PRRS virus (PRRSV) and assembled these epitopes on a web resource to facilitate vaccine design. Identification of epitopes for cross protections to different subtypes of virus are also reported in this study and may be useful for the development of a universal vaccine against such viral infections among the swine population. The CTL epitopes identified in this study have been evaluated in silico and possibly provide more and wider protection in compared to traditional single-reference vaccine design. The web resource is free and open to all users through http://sb.nhri.org.tw/ICES.

  3. Cortical actin recovery at the immunological synapse leads to termination of lytic granule secretion in cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alex T; Kapnick, Senta M; Murugesan, Sricharan; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Griffiths, Gillian M; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2017-08-08

    CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminate virally infected cells through directed secretion of specialized lytic granules. Because a single CTL can kill multiple targets, degranulation must be tightly regulated. However, how CTLs regulate the termination of granule secretion remains unclear. Previous work demonstrated that centralized actin reduction at the immune synapse precedes degranulation. Using a combination of live confocal, total internal reflection fluorescence, and superresolution microscopy, we now show that, after granule fusion, actin recovers at the synapse and no further secretion is observed. Depolymerization of actin led to resumed granule secretion, suggesting that recovered actin acts as a barrier preventing sustained degranulation. Furthermore, RAB27a-deficient CTLs, which do not secrete cytotoxic granules, failed to recover actin at the synapse, suggesting that RAB27a-mediated granule secretion is required for actin recovery. Finally, we show that both actin clearance and recovery correlated with synaptic phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and that alterations in PIP2 at the immunological synapse regulate cortical actin in CTLs, providing a potential mechanism through which CTLs control cortical actin density. Our work provides insight into actin-related mechanisms regulating CTL secretion that may facilitate serial killing during immune responses.

  4. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes promote cytarabine-induced acute myeloid leukemia cell apoptosis via inhibiting Bcl-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Rui; Fan, Fang-Yi; Yi, Hai; Fu, Li; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Yi; Miao, Xiao-Juan; Shuai, Yan-Rong; He, Guang-Cui; Su, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains difficult to cure due to its drug tolerance and refractoriness. Immunotherapy is a growing area of cancer research, which has been applied for the treatment of numerous types of cancer, including leukemia. The present study generated AML cell-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in vitro and investigated the effect of combining CTL treatment with one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of hematological malignancies, cytarabine, on AML cell apoptosis. Firstly, it was observed that monocyte-depleted peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors could be used to generate large numbers of CD3+CD8+ CTLs through immune stimulation. These CD3+CD8+ CTLs could effectively recognize and induce the apoptosis of human Kasumi-3 AML cells. In addition, cytarabine-induced AML cell apoptosis was enhanced by CTL treatment. Western blotting revealed that Bcl-2 expression was downregulated in AML cells following cytarabine and CTL treatment, indicating that the synergistic effect of this treatment on AML cell apoptosis is due to the downregulation of Bcl-2. These results highlight the potential application of CTL immunotherapy for the treatment of AML. Further studies optimizing the specificity and potency of CTLs, and identifying favorable combinations with other chemotherapeutic drug are required. PMID:28810561

  5. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes promote cytarabine-induced acute myeloid leukemia cell apoptosis via inhibiting Bcl-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Deng, Rui; Fan, Fang-Yi; Yi, Hai; Fu, Li; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Yi; Miao, Xiao-Juan; Shuai, Yan-Rong; He, Guang-Cui; Su, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains difficult to cure due to its drug tolerance and refractoriness. Immunotherapy is a growing area of cancer research, which has been applied for the treatment of numerous types of cancer, including leukemia. The present study generated AML cell-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in vitro and investigated the effect of combining CTL treatment with one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of hematological malignancies, cytarabine, on AML cell apoptosis. Firstly, it was observed that monocyte-depleted peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors could be used to generate large numbers of CD3(+)CD8(+) CTLs through immune stimulation. These CD3(+)CD8(+) CTLs could effectively recognize and induce the apoptosis of human Kasumi-3 AML cells. In addition, cytarabine-induced AML cell apoptosis was enhanced by CTL treatment. Western blotting revealed that Bcl-2 expression was downregulated in AML cells following cytarabine and CTL treatment, indicating that the synergistic effect of this treatment on AML cell apoptosis is due to the downregulation of Bcl-2. These results highlight the potential application of CTL immunotherapy for the treatment of AML. Further studies optimizing the specificity and potency of CTLs, and identifying favorable combinations with other chemotherapeutic drug are required.

  6. H-2K/sup bm3/ mutation decreases the anti-vesicular stomatitis virus cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, M.R.; Lyles, D.; Parce, J.W.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have identified the substrain of mouse possessing the H-2K/sup bm3/ mutation as expressing a low anti-Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response upon secondary in vitro elicitation with ultraviolet light-inactivated virus. The CTL elicited from both the mutant, M505 (bm3), and the parental strain, C57B1/6(B6), kill B6 targets better than bm3 targets. Likewise, in cold target inhibition assays, unlabeled B6 cells inhibited better than unlabeled bm3 cells the recognition of /sup 51/Cr-labeled B6 targets regardless of whether B6 or bm3 CTL effector cells were used. CTL from both B6 and bm3 mice are H-2 restricted, virus specific, and possess the Thyl, Lyt2,3 phenotype. In addition, the effector cells use the H-2K molecule as the major restricting element. Both B6 and bm3 cells were shown by radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation to express an equivalent amount of G protein, the major viral surface glycoprotein, as well as equivalent amounts of H-2K. These data suggest the bm3 mutation in H-2K alters the association of H-2K with either the G protein or with a molecule on the CTL required for secondary in vitro elicitation.

  7. Macrophage Tropism of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Facilitates In Vivo Escape from Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schutten, M.; van Baalen, C. A.; Guillon, C.; Huisman, R. C.; Boers, P. H. M.; Sintnicolaas, K.; Gruters, R. A.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Early after seroconversion, macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants are predominantly found, even when a mixture of macrophage-tropic and non-macrophage-tropic variants was transmitted. For virus contracted by sexual transmission, this is presently explained by selection at the port of entry, where macrophages are infected and T cells are relatively rare. Here we explore an additional mechanism to explain the selection of macrophage-tropic variants in cases where the mucosa is bypassed during transmission, such as blood transfusion, needle-stick accidents, or intravenous drug abuse. With molecularly cloned primary isolates of HIV-1 in irradiated mice that had been reconstituted with a high dose of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we found that a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 clone escaped more efficiently from specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) pressure than its non-macrophage-tropic counterpart. We propose that CTLs favor the selective outgrowth of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 variants because infected macrophages are less susceptible to CTL activity than infected T cells. PMID:11222694

  8. Macrophage tropism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 facilitates in vivo escape from cytotoxic T-lymphocyte pressure.

    PubMed

    Schutten, M; van Baalen, C A; Guillon, C; Huisman, R C; Boers, P H; Sintnicolaas, K; Gruters, R A; Osterhaus, A D

    2001-03-01

    Early after seroconversion, macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants are predominantly found, even when a mixture of macrophage-tropic and non-macrophage-tropic variants was transmitted. For virus contracted by sexual transmission, this is presently explained by selection at the port of entry, where macrophages are infected and T cells are relatively rare. Here we explore an additional mechanism to explain the selection of macrophage-tropic variants in cases where the mucosa is bypassed during transmission, such as blood transfusion, needle-stick accidents, or intravenous drug abuse. With molecularly cloned primary isolates of HIV-1 in irradiated mice that had been reconstituted with a high dose of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we found that a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 clone escaped more efficiently from specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) pressure than its non-macrophage-tropic counterpart. We propose that CTLs favor the selective outgrowth of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 variants because infected macrophages are less susceptible to CTL activity than infected T cells.

  9. Neonatal mycobacterial specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and cytokine profiles in response to distinct BCG vaccination strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Gregory D; Watkins, Marcia L V; Goddard, Elizabeth A; Gottschalk, Sean; Hughes, Elizabeth J; Iloni, Karen; Kibel, Maurice A; Ress, Stanley R

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated whether different bacillus Calmette–Gue´rin (BCG) strains, routes of administration, vaccination age and percutaneous tools influenced immune responses to BCG vaccination in infants. Proliferative responses, cytokine production and cell-mediated cytotoxicity obtained in post-vaccinated children were compared to baseline cord bloods and unvaccinated 10-week-old infants. BCG vaccination generally induced strong lymphoproliferative and T helper type 1 (Th1)-type cytokine responses. There was a trend for greater responsiveness following the intradermal route of vaccination, with Japanese-172 strain and with delaying vaccination until 10 weeks. Cord mononuclear cells differentially stimulated the Th2-type cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-10 selectively in response to BCG, as compared to H37Rv or purified protein derivative stimulation. We document for the first time the generation of mycobacterium-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in neonates, following BCG vaccination. Cytotoxic activity correlated with the ratio of interferon-γ to IL-5, aside from a single instance where use of the Biovac® tool resulted in a striking dissociation selectively against H37Rv targets. These data have implications for correlates of protective immunity in design of vaccine studies. PMID:11918693

  10. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Escape from the Primary CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nicola A.; Wei, Xiping; Flower, Darren R.; Wong, MaiLee; Michor, Franziska; Saag, Michael S.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Nowak, Martin A.; Shaw, George M.; Borrow, Persephone

    2004-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in containment of virus replication in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV's ability to mutate to escape from CTL pressure is increasingly recognized; but comprehensive studies of escape from the CD8 T cell response in primary HIV infection are currently lacking. Here, we have fully characterized the primary CTL response to autologous virus Env, Gag, and Tat proteins in three patients, and investigated the extent, kinetics, and mechanisms of viral escape from epitope-specific components of the response. In all three individuals, we observed variation beginning within weeks of infection at epitope-containing sites in the viral quasispecies, which conferred escape by mechanisms including altered peptide presentation/recognition and altered antigen processing. The number of epitope-containing regions exhibiting evidence of early CTL escape ranged from 1 out of 21 in a subject who controlled viral replication effectively to 5 out of 7 in a subject who did not. Evaluation of the extent and kinetics of HIV-1 escape from >40 different epitope-specific CD8 T cell responses enabled analysis of factors determining escape and suggested that escape is restricted by costs to intrinsic viral fitness and by broad, codominant distribution of CTL-mediated pressure on viral replication. PMID:15545352

  11. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 gene polymorphism is related to rheumatoid arthritis in Egyptian population.

    PubMed

    Fattah, Shaimaa A; Ghattas, Maivel H; Saleh, Samy M; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M

    2017-02-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) is a CD28-family receptor expressed on T-cells which suppresses T cell proliferation. CTLA-4 -318C/T polymorphism is involved in regulation of CTLA-4 expression. The study aimed to investigate the genetic association of CTLA-4 -318C/T polymorphism with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the activity and severity of the disease in the Egyptian population. A single nucleotide polymorphism (rs5742909) in CTLA-4 was genotyped in 100 RA patients and 100 healthy controls using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Diagnostic tests were measured for RA patients. The frequency of T allele in RA patients was significantly higher than in the control subjects (p = 0.002). CT and TT genotypes had high C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and disease activity score 28 while CC genotype had a high rheumatoid factor. A minor allele of CTLA-4 rs5742909 polymorphism was associated with RA and the activity but not the severity of the disease.

  12. Identification of HLA-A*1101-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes derived from epidermal growth factor pathway substrate number 8

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huifang; Tang, Baishan; He, Yanjie; Zhou, Weijun; Qiu, Jielei; Li, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (EPS8) is critical in the proliferation, progression and metastasis of solid and hematological types of cancer, and thus constitutes an ideal target for cancer immunotherapy. The present study aimed to identify human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*1101-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from EPS8 and characterize their immunotherapeutic efficacy in vitro. Two computer-based algorithms were used to predict native EPS8 epitopes with potential high binding affinity to the HLA-A*1101 molecule, which is the HLA-A allele with the highest frequency in the Chinese population. The peptide-induced cytokine production from the CTLs was examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot analysis. The cytotoxic effects on cancer cells by CTLs primed with the identified peptides were examined using flow cytometry. A total of five peptides, designated as P380, P70, P82, P30 and P529, presented with high affinity towards the HLA-A*1101 molecule. In response to stimulation by these five peptides, enhanced secretion of interferon-γ from the CTLs and increased cytolytic capabilities of the CTLs toward cancer cells were noted, with the most potent effects observed from the P380 peptide. Taken together, the present study identified five potential CTL epitopes from EPS8. Among these, P380 presented with the highest therapeutic efficacy in vitro. These peptides may benefit the development of EPS8-based immunotherapy for the treatment of HLA-A*1101-positive hematological malignancies. PMID:27840923

  13. Relevance of viral context and diversity of antigen-processing routes for respiratory syncytial virus cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Carolina; Guil, Sara; Rico, Miguel A; García-Barreno, Blanca; López, Daniel; Melero, José A; Del Val, Margarita

    2008-09-01

    Antigen processing of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein epitopes F85-93 and F249-258 presented to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) by the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule Kd was studied in different viral contexts. Epitope F85-93 was presented through a classical endogenous pathway dependent on the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) when the F protein was expressed from either RSV or recombinant vaccinia virus (rVACV). At least in cells infected with rVACV encoding either natural or cytosolic F protein, the proteasome was required for epitope processing. In cells infected with rVACV encoding the natural F protein, an additional endogenous TAP-independent presentation pathway was found for F85-93. In contrast, epitope F249-258 was presented only through TAP-independent pathways, but presentation was brefeldin A sensitive when the F protein was expressed from RSV, or mostly resistant when expressed from rVACV. Therefore, antigen-processing pathways with different mechanisms and subcellular localizations are accessible to individual epitopes presented by the same MHC class I molecule and processed from the same protein but in different viral contexts. This underscores both the diversity of pathways available and the influence of virus infection on presentation of epitopes to CTLs.

  14. Naturally processed viral peptides recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes on cells chronically infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have established long-term cultures of several cell lines stably and uniformly expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in order to (a) identify naturally processed HIV-1 peptides recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from HIV-1-seropositive individuals and (b) consider the hypothesis that naturally occurring epitope densities on HIV-infected cells may limit their lysis by CTL. Each of two A2- restricted CD8+ CTL specific for HIV-1 gag or reverse transcriptase (RT) recognized a single naturally processed HIV-1 peptide in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) extracts of infected cells: gag 77-85 (SLYNTVATL) or RT 476-484 (ILKEPVHGV). Both processed peptides match the synthetic peptides that are optimally active in cytotoxicity assays and have the consensus motif described for A2-associated peptides. Their abundances were approximately 400 and approximately 12 molecules per infected Jurkat-A2 cell, respectively. Other synthetic HIV-1 peptides active at subnanomolar concentrations were not present in infected cells. Except for the antigen processing mutant line T2, HIV- infected HLA-A2+ cell lines were specifically lysed by both A2- restricted CTL, although infected Jurkat-A2 cells were lysed more poorly by RT-specific CTL than by gag-specific CTL, suggesting that low cell surface density of a natural peptide may limit the effectiveness of some HIV-specific CTL despite their vigorous activity against synthetic peptide-treated target cells. PMID:7523570

  15. Trivalent live attenuated influenza-simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines: efficacy and evolution of cytotoxic T lymphocyte escape in macaques.

    PubMed

    Reece, Jeanette C; Alcantara, Sheilajen; Gooneratne, Shayarana; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Amaresena, Thakshila; Fernandez, Caroline S; Laurie, Karen; Hurt, Aeron; O'Connor, Shelby L; Harris, Max; Petravic, Janka; Martyushev, Alexey; Grimm, Andrew; Davenport, Miles P; Stambas, John; De Rose, Robert; Kent, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    There is an urgent need for a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine that induces robust mucosal immunity. CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) apply substantial antiviral pressure, but CTLs to individual epitopes select for immune escape variants in both HIV in humans and SIV in macaques. Inducing multiple simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-specific CTLs may assist in controlling viremia. We vaccinated 10 Mane-A1*08401(+) female pigtail macaques with recombinant influenza viruses expressing three Mane-A1*08401-restricted SIV-specific CTL epitopes and subsequently challenged the animals, along with five controls, intravaginally with SIV(mac251). Seroconversion to the influenza virus vector resulted and small, but detectable, SIV-specific CTL responses were induced. There was a boost in CTL responses after challenge but no protection from high-level viremia or CD4 depletion was observed. All three CTL epitopes underwent a coordinated pattern of immune escape during early SIV infection. CTL escape was more rapid in the vaccinees than in the controls at the more dominant CTL epitopes. Although CTL escape can incur a "fitness" cost to the virus, a putative compensatory mutation 20 amino acids upstream from an immunodominant Gag CTL epitope also evolved soon after the primary CTL escape mutation. We conclude that vaccines based only on CTL epitopes will likely be undermined by rapid evolution of both CTL escape and compensatory mutations. More potent and possibly broader immune responses may be required to protect pigtail macaques from SIV.

  16. A specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope presentation system for antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Changzhen; Sun, Meiyi; Shen, Hexiao; Guo, Deyin; Gao, Bin

    2010-05-15

    The magnitude of CTL-mediated immunity response is highly dependent on the density of antigenic peptide-MHC I complexes at the cell surface. In this study, we adopt a novel strategy to promote the surface level of specific peptide-MHC I complexes. The strategy combines the inhibition of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) with the delivery of specific peptide into endoplasmic reticulum directly without the help of TAP. First, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was used to inhibit TAP expression for blocking endogenous epitope-assembled MHC class I on cell surface. Second, a peptide epitope of interest was covalently linked onto human beta-2-microglobulin (beta2m). Both TAP-specific siRNA and the peptide-linked beta2m were delivered into antigen-presentation cells sequentially or simultaneously using a retrovirus delivery system. The combined strategy produces a significant amount of MHC I loaded with specific epitopes on the surface while reducing endogenously peptide-assembled MHC class I both in vitro and in vivo. The efficacy of induction of specific immune response with the strategy against tumor cells is demonstrated in both tumor cell lines and a syngenic graft tumor model.

  17. Viral load and clinical disease enhancement associated with a lentivirus cytotoxic T lymphocyte vaccine regimen

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; Wagner, Bettina; Horohov, David W.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2009-01-01

    Effective DNA-based vaccines against lentiviruses will likely induce CTL against conserved viral proteins. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infects horses worldwide, and serves as a useful model for lentiviral immune control. Although attenuated live EIAV vaccines have induced protective immune responses, DNA-based vaccines have not. In particular, DNA-based vaccines have had limited success in inducing CTL responses against intracellular pathogens in the horse. We hypothesized that priming with a codon-optimized plasmid encoding EIAV Gag p15/p26 with co-administration of a plasmid encoding an equine IL-2/IgG fusion protein as a molecular adjuvant, followed by boosting with a vaccinia vector expressing Gag p15/p26, would induce protective Gag-specific CTL responses. Although the regimen induced Gag-specific CTL in four of seven vaccinated horses, CTL were not detected until after the vaccinia boost, and protective effects were not observed in EIAV challenged vaccinates. Unexpectedly, vaccinates had significantly higher viral loads and more severe clinical disease, associated with the presence of vaccine-induced CTL. It was concluded that 1.) further optimization of the timing and route of DNA immunization was needed for efficient CTL priming in vivo, 2.) co-administration of the IL-2/IgG plasmid did not enhance CTL priming by the Gag p15/p26 plasmid, 3.) vaccinia vectors are useful for lentivirus-specific CTL induction in the horse, 4.) Gag-specific CTL alone are either insufficient or a more robust Gag-specific CTL response is needed to limit EIAV viremia and clinical disease, and 5.) CTL-inducing vaccines lacking envelope immunogens can result in lentiviral disease enhancement. Although the mechanisms for enhancement associated with this vaccine regimen remain to be elucidated, these results have important implications for development of lentivirus T cell vaccines. PMID:19368787

  18. Subtypes of Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Japan Based on Genetic and Functional Analyses of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kozo; Yamamoto, Ken; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; An, Jun; Ochi, Toshiki; Suemori, Koichiro; Yasumi, Takahiro; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Sato, Maho; Morimoto, Akira; Heike, Toshio; Ishii, Eiichi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Background Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a rare disease of infancy or early childhood. To clarify the incidence and subtypes of FHL in Japan, we performed genetic and functional analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in Japanese patients with FHL. Design and Methods Among the Japanese children with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) registered at our laboratory, those with more than one of the following findings were eligible for study entry under a diagnosis of FHL: positive for known genetic mutations, a family history of HLH, and impaired CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Mutations of the newly identified causative gene for FHL5, STXBP2, and the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs in FHL patients, were analyzed. Results Among 31 FHL patients who satisfied the above criteria, PRF1 mutation was detected in 17 (FHL2) and UNC13D mutation was in 10 (FHL3). In 2 other patients, 3 novel mutations of STXBP2 gene were confirmed (FHL5). Finally, the remaining 2 were classified as having FHL with unknown genetic mutations. In all FHL patients, CTL-mediated cytotoxicity was low or deficient, and degranulation activity was also low or absent except FHL2 patients. In 2 patients with unknown genetic mutations, the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs appeared to be deficient in one patient and moderately impaired in the other. Conclusions FHL can be diagnosed and classified on the basis of CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, degranulation activity, and genetic analysis. Based on the data obtained from functional analysis of CTLs, other unknown gene(s) responsible for FHL remain to be identified. PMID:21152410

  19. Subtypes of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in Japan based on genetic and functional analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kozo; Yamamoto, Ken; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; An, Jun; Ochi, Toshiki; Suemori, Koichiro; Yasumi, Takahiro; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Sato, Maho; Morimoto, Akira; Heike, Toshio; Ishii, Eiichi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2010-11-30

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a rare disease of infancy or early childhood. To clarify the incidence and subtypes of FHL in Japan, we performed genetic and functional analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in Japanese patients with FHL. Among the Japanese children with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) registered at our laboratory, those with more than one of the following findings were eligible for study entry under a diagnosis of FHL: positive for known genetic mutations, a family history of HLH, and impaired CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Mutations of the newly identified causative gene for FHL5, STXBP2, and the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs in FHL patients, were analyzed. Among 31 FHL patients who satisfied the above criteria, PRF1 mutation was detected in 17 (FHL2) and UNC13D mutation was in 10 (FHL3). In 2 other patients, 3 novel mutations of STXBP2 gene were confirmed (FHL5). Finally, the remaining 2 were classified as having FHL with unknown genetic mutations. In all FHL patients, CTL-mediated cytotoxicity was low or deficient, and degranulation activity was also low or absent except FHL2 patients. In 2 patients with unknown genetic mutations, the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs appeared to be deficient in one patient and moderately impaired in the other. FHL can be diagnosed and classified on the basis of CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, degranulation activity, and genetic analysis. Based on the data obtained from functional analysis of CTLs, other unknown gene(s) responsible for FHL remain to be identified.

  20. Novel plant virus-based vaccine induces protective cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated antiviral immunity through dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Patrick; Denis, Jérôme; Lapointe, Réjean; Leclerc, Denis; Lamarre, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Currently used vaccines protect mainly through the production of neutralizing antibodies. However, antibodies confer little or no protection for a majority of chronic viral infections that require active involvement of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Virus-like particles (VLPs) have been shown to be efficient inducers of cell-mediated immune responses, but administration of an adjuvant is generally required. We recently reported the generation of a novel VLP system exploiting the self-assembly property of the papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) coat protein. We show here that uptake of PapMV-like particles by murine splenic dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo leads to their maturation, suggesting that they possess intrinsic adjuvant-like properties. DCs pulsed with PapMV-like particles displaying the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) p33 immunodominant CTL epitope (PapMV-p33) efficiently process and cross-present the viral epitope to p33-specific transgenic T cells. Importantly, the CTL epitope is also properly processed and presented in vivo, since immunization of p33-specific T-cell receptor transgenic mice with PapMV-p33 induces the activation of large numbers of specific CTLs. C57BL/6 mice immunized with PapMV-p33 VLPs in the absence of adjuvant develop p33-specific effector CTLs that rapidly expand following LCMV challenge and protect vaccinated mice against LCMV infection in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this novel plant virus-based vaccination platform in inducing DC maturation leading to protective CTL responses.

  1. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol suppresses cytotoxic T lymphocyte function independent of CB1 and CB 2, disrupting early activation events.

    PubMed

    Karmaus, Peer W F; Chen, Weimin; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2012-12-01

    Previously, CD8(+) T cells were found to be a sensitive target for suppression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) in a murine model of influenza infection. To study the effect of Δ(9)-THC on CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), an allogeneic model of MHC I mismatch was used to elicit CTL. In addition, to determine the requirement for the cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB(1)) and 2 (CB(2)) in Δ(9)-THC-mediated CTL response modulation, mice null for both receptors were used (CB(1) (-/-)CB(2) (-/-)). Δ(9)-THC suppressed CTL function independent of CB(1) and CB(2) as evidenced by reduction of (51)Cr release by CTL generated from CB(1) (-/-)CB(2) (-/-) mice. Furthermore, viability in CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner with Δ(9)-THC, independent of CB(1) and CB(2), but no effect of Δ(9)-THC on proliferation was observed, suggesting that Δ(9)-THC decreases the number of T cells initially activated. Δ(9)-THC increased expression of the activation markers, CD69 in CD8(+) cells and CD25 in CD4(+) cells in a concentration-dependent manner in cells derived from WT and CB(1) (-/-)CB(2) (-/-) mice. Furthermore, Δ(9)-THC synergized with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, to increase CD69 expression on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In addition, without stimulation, Δ(9)-THC increased CD69 expression in CD8(+) cells from CB(1) (-/-)CB(2) (-/-) and WT mice. Overall, these results suggest that CB(1) and CB(2) are dispensable for Δ(9)-THC-mediated suppression and that perturbation of Ca(2+) signals during T cell activation plays an important role in the mechanism by which Δ(9)-THC suppresses CTL function.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) nef-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in noninfected heterosexual contact of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Langlade-Demoyen, P; Ngo-Giang-Huong, N; Ferchal, F; Oksenhendler, E

    1994-01-01

    We report on the detection of HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) among 23 regular partners of HIV-infected individuals. 15 of the 46 individuals enrolled in the study were positive for HLA-A2.1 typing. Among the 23 contacts studied, 7 were seropositive and 16 were seronegative on repeated tests. None of the 16 seronegative contacts were positive for p24 antigenemia nor were they positive by the lymphocytes coculture assay, although, in two instances HIV-1 DNA could be detected by PCR (in one case using a gag SK 38/39 primer, and in the other using a primer for the pol P3/P4 primer). These two individuals remained seronegative for 18 and 36 mo, respectively. HIV-specific cytotoxicity was performed in the 15 HLA-A2.1 subjects (7 indexes, 2 seropositive contacts, and 6 seronegative contacts) and in 4 HLA-matched HIV negative donors. CTL specific for env, gag, or nef proteins could not be detected in unstimulated bulk cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes in any of the six seronegative contacts. However, using a limiting dilution assay we found an usually high frequency of HIV nef-specific CTL precursors (CTLp) for HIV env and gag was very similar to that observed in seronegative HLA-matched healthy donors. Because no presence of HIV could be demonstrated in these individuals, these findings argue against the possibility of a silent HIV infection and suggest that a CTL response against nef may be involved in a rapid and effective clearance of the virus after sexual exposure. PMID:8132769

  3. [Cytomegalovirus specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes for treatment of refractory cytomegalovirus infection in patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengli; Huang, Xiaojun; Sun, Yuqian; Wang, Fengrong; Yan, Chenhua; Zhang, Xiaohui; Han, Wei; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Jingzhi; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Kaiyan; Xu, Lanping

    2015-02-01

    To explore the efficacy and safety of expanding cytomegalovirus specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CMV-CTL) in vitro on refractory cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. A total of twenty-eight patients with refractory CMV infection following stem cell transplant (SCT) were treated with CMV-specific T cells, of which 19 cases were from hematopoietic stem cell donors and 9 from third-party donors. In the first course, CTL was infused once or twice and the efficacy and adverse effects were evaluated. If CMV infection relapsed after complete remission (CR), the second course would be given. Twenty-one patients with refractory CMV viremia and seven with CMV diseases were eligible for adoptive T-cell transfer. After a median of 76 (39-321) days post-transplant, patients received a median dose of 1.0 (0.5-10.0) × 10(7) CTL infusion in the first course. All twenty-one patients with CMV viremia and four patients with CMV diseases achieved CR after using 9 (3-23) and 7 (4-18) days respecitvely. Six patients with CMV viremia and one with CMV disease received the second course after recurrence. Another four patients with viremia and one with CMV disease had reached CR again. Five patients exhibited graft-versus-host diseases (GVHD), all experiencing mild to moderate skin involvement. Six patients died of CMV infection and 2 of other transplantation-related complications. Our preliminary results have shown that CMV-CTL infusion is effective against refractory cytomegalovirus infection following SCT, but therapeutic schedule still needs to be improved in further study.

  4. Discovery of a Good Responder Subtype of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Signatures Activated by Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Komatsuzaki, Rie; Komatsu, Masayuki; Chiwaki, Fumiko; Tamaoki, Masashi; Nishimura, Takao; Takahashi, Naoki; Oda, Ichiro; Tachimori, Yuji; Arao, Tokuzo; Nishio, Kazuto; Kitano, Shigehisa; Narumi, Kenta; Aoki, Kazunori; Fujii, Satoshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Muto, Manabu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Sasaki, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is a less invasive therapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Five-year survival rate of locally advanced ESCC patients by definitive CRT were 37%. We previously reported that tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activation signatures were preferentially found in long-term survivors. However, it is unknown whether the CTL activation is actually driven by CRT. We compared gene expression profiles among pre- and post-treatment biopsy specimens of 30 ESCC patients and 121 pre-treatment ESCC biopsy specimens. In the complete response (CR) cases, 999 overexpressed genes including at least 234 tumor-specific CTL-activation associated genes such as IFNG, PRF1, and GZMB, were found in post-treatment biopsy specimens. Clustering analysis using expression profiles of these 234 genes allowed us to distinguish the immune-activated cases, designating them as I-type, from other cases. However, despite the better CR rate in the I-type, overall survival was not significantly better in both these 30 cases and another 121 cases. Further comparative study identified a series of epithelial to mesenchymal transition-related genes overexpressed in the early relapse cases. Importantly, the clinical outcome of CDH2-negative cases in the I-type was significantly better than that of the CDH2-positive cases in the I-type. Furthermore, NK cells, which were activated by neutrophils-producing S100A8/S100A9, and CTLs were suggested to cooperatively enhance the effect of CRT in the CDH2-negative I-type. These results suggested that CTL gene activation may provide a prognostic advantage in ESCCs with epithelial characteristics. PMID:26625258

  5. HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes from human hepsin as novel targets for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, J; Li, G; Tang, J; Cao, X-B; Zhou, Q-Y; Fan, Z-J; Zhu, B; Pan, X-H

    2013-09-01

    Hepsin is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is overexpressed in prostate cancer, and it is associated with prostate cancer cellular migration and invasion. Therefore, HPN is a biomarker for prostate cancer. CD8(+) T cells play an important role in tumour immunity. This study predicted and identified HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in human hepsin protein. HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes were identified using the following four-step procedure: (1) a computer program generated predicted epitopes from the amino acid sequence of human hepsin; (2) an HLA-A2-binding assay detected the affinity of the predicted epitopes to the HLA-A2 molecule; (3) the primary T cell response against the predicted epitopes was stimulated in vitro; and (4) the induced CTLs towards different types of hepsin- or HLA-A2-expressing prostate cancer cells were detected. Five candidate peptides were identified. The effectors that were induced by human hepsin epitopes containing residues 229 to 237 (Hpn229; GLQLGVQAV), 268 to 276 (Hpn268; PLTEYIQPV) and 191 to 199 (Hpn199; SLLSGDWVL) effectively lysed LNCaP prostate cancer cells that were hepsin-positive and HLA-A2 matched. These peptide-specific CTLs did not lyse normal liver cells with low hepsin levels. Hpn229, Hpn268 and Hpn199 increased the frequency of IFN-γ-producing T cells compared with the negative peptide. These results suggest that the Hpn229, Hpn268 and Hpn199 epitopes are novel HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes that are capable of inducing hepsin-specific CTLs in vitro. Hpn229, Hpn268 and Hpn199 peptide-based vaccines may be useful for immunotherapy in patients with prostate cancer.

  6. Thymic selection and adaptability of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in transgenic mice expressing a viral protein in the thymus.

    PubMed

    von Herrath, M G; Dockter, J; Nerenberg, M; Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1994-11-01

    Upon primary challenge with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), H-2d (BALB/cByJ) mice mount a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to a single immunodominant domain of the viral nucleoprotein (NP) but no detectable response to the viral glycoprotein (GP). To manipulate this CTL response, the viral NP gene was expressed in the thymus and peripheral T lymphocytes using the murine Thy1.2 promoter. As a result, such Thy1.2-NP (H-2d) transgenic (tg) mice deleted their high-affinity anti-LCMV-NP CTL, but generated equal numbers of lower-affinity NP CTL. Further, they made an alternative anti-LCMV-GP CTL response that is not normally found in non-tg mice indicating a hierarchial control of the CTL response. Unlike the H-2d mice, H-2b (C57Bl/6J) mice normally mount a CTL response to both LCMV-GP and -NP. When the LCMV-NP was expressed using the Thy1.2 promoter in these H-2b mice, the LCMV-NP-specific CTL response was completely aborted and no CTL to new, alternative viral epitopes were generated. Dilutions of H-2b or H-2d NP peptides indicated that 3-4 logs less H-2b NP peptide was required to sensitize syngeneic target cells for CTL-specific lysis, suggesting that the differing affinities of H-2b and H-2d major histocompatibility complex molecules for their peptides likely account for the total removal of NP CTL in the H-2b mice but only partial removal in H-2d mice made to express thymic NP. Thymic grafting experiments done with thymi from newborn Thy1.2-NP tg mice show that selection processes studied in this model are of central (thymic) origin and are not caused by Thy1.2-positive LCMV-NP-expressing T lymphocytes in the periphery.

  7. Immune checkpoints programmed death 1 ligand 1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated molecule 4 in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlößer, Hans A.; Drebber, Uta; Kloth, Michael; Thelen, Martin; Rothschild, Sacha I.; Haase, Simon; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Wennhold, Kerstin; Berlth, Felix; Urbanski, Alexander; Alakus, Hakan; Schauss, Astrid; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; Warnecke-Ebertz, Ute; Stippel, Dirk L.; Zippelius, Alfred; Büttner, Reinhard; Hallek, Michael; Hölscher, Arnulf H.; Zander, Thomas; Mönig, Stefan P.; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition has been reported for several types of solid tumors and early studies in gastric adenocarcinoma are promising. A detailed knowledge about the natural biology of immune checkpoints in gastric adenocarcinoma is essential for clinical and translational evaluation of these drugs. This study is a comprehensive analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated molecule 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in gastric adenocarcinoma. PD-L1 and CTLA-4 were stained on tumor sections of 127 Caucasian patients with gastric adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and somatic mutation profiling was performed using targeted next-generation sequencing. Expression of PD-L1 and CTLA-4 on lymphocytes in tumor sections, tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN) and peripheral blood were studied by flow-cytometry and immune-fluorescence microscopy in an additional cohort. PD-L1 and CTLA-4 were expressed in 44.9% (57/127) and 86.6% (110/127) of the analyzed gastric adenocarcinoma samples, respectively. Positive tumor cell staining for PD-L1 or CTLA-4 was associated with inferior overall survival. Somatic mutational analysis did not reveal a correlation to expression of PD-L1 or CTLA-4 on tumor cells. Expression of PD-1 (52.2%), PD-L1 (42.2%) and CTLA-4 (1.6%) on tumor infiltrating T cells was significantly elevated compared to peripheral blood. Of note, PD-1 and PD-L1 were expressed far higher by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes than CTLA-4. In conclusion, specific immune checkpoint-inhibitors should be evaluated in this disease and the combination with molecular targeted therapies might be of benefit. An extensive immune monitoring should accompany these studies to better understand their mode of action in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27467911

  8. Specific antitumour immunity of HIFU-activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes after adoptive transfusion in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ran, Li-Feng; Xie, Xun-Peng; Xia, Ji-Zhu; Xie, Fang-Lin; Fan, Yan-Min; Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the specific anti-tumour immunity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) activated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) after adoptive transfer in a murine tumour model. H22 tumour-bearing mice were treated by either HIFU or sham-HIFU, while naïve syngeneic mice were used as controls. They were sacrificed and the spleens were harvested 14 days after HIFU. T lymphocytes were obtained from the spleens, and then adoptively transferred into 40 mice each bearing a 3-day implanted H22 tumour. On day 14 after adoptive transfer, 10 mice were sacrificed in each group for assessment of the number of tumour-infiltrating T lymphocytes and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) secreting cells. The remaining 30 mice were continuously observed for 60 days, and tumour growth, progression and survival were recorded. HIFU significantly increased peripheral blood CD3(+), CD4(+) levels and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio (P < 0.05), CTL cytotoxicity (P < 0.01) and IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion (P < 0.01) in H22 tumour-bearing mice. Adoptive transfer of HIFU-activated T lymphocytes into the autologous tumour-bearing mice induced a significant increase of tumour-infiltrating T lymphocytes and IFN-γ-secreting cells (P < 0.001). Compared to the control and sham-HIFU groups, HIFU-activated lymphocytes elicited significant inhibition of in vivo tumour growth (P < 0.01) and progression (P < 0.0001), and longer survival time in the tumour-bearing mice (P < 0.001). HIFU could enhance CTL's specific antitumour immunity. Adoptive transfer of HIFU-activated T lymphocytes could increase local antitumour immunity, and elicit stronger inhibition on tumour growth and progression, with more survival benefit in the autologous tumour-bearing mice.

  9. Sustained Complete Responses in Patients With Lymphoma Receiving Autologous Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Targeting Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bollard, Catherine M.; Gottschalk, Stephen; Torrano, Vicky; Diouf, Oumar; Ku, Stephanie; Hazrat, Yasmin; Carrum, George; Ramos, Carlos; Fayad, Luis; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Pro, Barbara; Liu, Hao; Wu, Meng-Fen; Lee, Daniel; Sheehan, Andrea M.; Zu, Youli; Gee, Adrian P.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tumor cells from approximately 40% of patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma express the type II latency Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and LMP2, which represent attractive targets for immunotherapy. Because T cells specific for these antigens are present with low frequency and may be rendered anergic by the tumors that express them, we expanded LMP–cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from patients with lymphoma using autologous dendritic cells and EBV-transformed B–lymphoblastoid cell lines transduced with an adenoviral vector expressing either LMP2 alone (n = 17) or both LMP2 and ΔLMP1 (n = 33). Patients and Methods These genetically modified antigen-presenting cells expanded CTLs that were enriched for specificity against type II latency LMP antigens. When infused into 50 patients with EBV-associated lymphoma, the expanded CTLs did not produce infusional toxicities. Results Twenty-eight of 29 high-risk or multiple-relapse patients receiving LMP-CTLs as adjuvant therapy remained in remission at a median of 3.1 years after CTL infusion. None subsequently died as a result of lymphoma, but nine succumbed to complications associated with extensive prior chemoradiotherapy, including myocardial infarction and secondary malignancies. Of 21 patients with relapsed or resistant disease at the time of CTL infusion, 13 had clinical responses, including 11 complete responses. T cells specific for LMP as well as nonviral tumor-associated antigens (epitope spreading) could be detected in the peripheral blood within 2 months after CTL infusion, but this evidence for epitope spreading was seen only in patients achieving clinical responses. Conclusion Autologous T cells directed to the LMP2 or LMP1 and LMP2 antigens can induce durable complete responses without significant toxicity. Their earlier use in the disease course may reduce delayed treatment-related mortality. PMID:24344220

  10. Enhanced function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced by dendritic cells modified with truncated PSMA and 4-1BBL.

    PubMed

    Youlin, Kuang; Li, Zhang; Xin, Gou; Mingchao, Xiao; Xiuheng, Liu; Xiaodong, Weng

    2013-04-01

    Interactions between costimulatory molecules and their receptors are vital for Ag-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) to initiate T cells activation, expansion and their antitumor immune responses. Augmentation of costimulatory signal due to the interaction of DCs and T cells may amplify, sustain and drive diversity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and consequently enhance the antitumor response. 4-1BBL/4-1BB is such a pair of costimulatory ligand and receptor, playing an important role in the co-stimulation of CTLs. Previously, we demonstrated that DCs transduced with recombinant adenovirus encoding truncated PSMA (tPSMA) and m4-1BBL could induce prostate cancer regression in mouse models. In the present study, we further explored the adjuvant role of 4-1BBL in modulating CTLs activation induced by tPSMA gene-pulsed DCs. The apoptosis and cytotoxicity against tPSMA expressing RM-1 cells of CTLs were determined. Results showed that tPSMA gene-pulsed DCs effectively induced T lymphocyte activation and cytotoxicity, which was enhanced by upregulated expression of 4-1BBL, displaying better cell viability, lower CTLs apoptosis, higher expression anti-apoptotic protein of Bcl-xL and phosphorylation of P38, enhanced NF-κB activation, as well as more IFN-γ production. These results demonstrated that 4-1BBL may play a significant role in the co-stimulation pathway for Ag-presenting DCs-mediated CTLs activity, which might be a beneficial adjuvant factor for DCs-based cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Modulation of MUC1 mucin as an escape mechanism of breast cancer cells from autologous cytotoxic T-lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kontani, K; Taguchi, O; Narita, T; Izawa, M; Hiraiwa, N; Zenita, K; Takeuchi, T; Murai, H; Miura, S; Kannagi, R

    2001-01-01

    MUC1 mucin is known to serve as a target molecule in the killing of breast cancer cells by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). We searched for a possible mechanism allowing tumour cells to escape from autologous CTLs. When the killing of breast cancer cells by autologous lymphocytes was examined in 26 patients with breast cancer, significant tumour cell lysis was observed in 8 patients, whereas virtually no autologous tumour cell lysis was detected in as many as 18 patients. In the patients who showed negligible tumour cell lysis, the autologous tumour cells expressed MUC1-related antigenic epitopes much more weakly than the tumour cells in the patients who exhibited strong cytotoxicity (significant statistically at P< 0.0005–0.0045), suggesting that the unresponsiveness of cancer cells to CTLs observed in these patients was mainly due to loss of MUC1 expression or modulation of its antigenicity. A breast cancer cell line, NZK-1, established from one of the cytotoxicity-negative patients, did not express MUC1 and was resistant to killing by CTLs, while control breast cancer cell lines expressing MUC-1 were readily killed by CTLs. Transfection of NZK-1 cells with MUC1 cDNA induced significant lysis by autologous T-lymphocytes. These results supported the importance of MUC1 mucin in autologous anti-tumour immunity, but suggested that the major escape mechanism of tumour cells from autologous T-lymphocytes is the loss and/or modulation of MUC1 antigenicity on tumour cells, which would limit the effectiveness of possible immunotherapy designed to target the MUC1 mucin. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11336479

  12. Immune privilege and FasL: two ways to inactivate effector cytotoxic T lymphocytes by FasL-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie-Hui; Rosen, Dalia; Sondel, Paul; Berke, Gideon

    2002-01-01

    The theory that Fas ligand (FasL)-expressing tumours are immune-privileged and can directly counterattack Fas-expressing effector T lymphocytes has recently been questioned and several alternative mechanisms have been proposed. To address this controversial issue, we analysed the impact of FasL-expressing tumours on in vivo-primed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and the mechanisms involved. CTLs were obtained from the peritoneal cavity (PEL) after in vivo priming with syngeneic or allogeneic murine tumour cells. We have found that PEL populations undergo Fas-based apoptotic cell death when co-cultured with FasL-expressing tumour cells and that PEL destruction of cognate targets in a 51Cr-release assay was markedly inhibited by the pre-exposure to either cognate or non-cognate tumour cells expressing FasL. Furthermore, cytocidal function of PEL was markedly inhibited by preincubation with FasL-negative tumour cells, if and only if they were the cognate targets of the CTL; this CTL inhibition involved FasL–Fas interactions. The killing function of ‘bystander’ PELs, reactive to a third-party target cell, was inhibited by co-cultivation with PELs mixed with their cognate target. This activation-induced CTL fratricide was not influenced by the expression of FasL on the cognate target cells. These studies demonstrate the existence of two distinct pathways whereby FasL-expressing cells inhibit in vivo-primed FasL- and Fas-expressing CTLs: first, by FasL-based direct tumour counterattack, and second, by FasL-mediated activation-induced cell death of the CTLs, which is consistent with the concept that FasL expression in vivo could play a role in inducing immune privilege. PMID:11918688

  13. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells display impaired cytotoxic functions and reduced activation in patients with alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Støy, Sidsel; Dige, Anders; Sandahl, Thomas Damgaard; Laursen, Tea Lund; Buus, Christian; Hokland, Marianne; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-02-15

    The dynamics and role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), natural killer (NK) cells, and NKT cells in the life-threatening inflammatory disease alcoholic hepatitis is largely unknown. These cells directly kill infected and damaged cells through, e.g., degranulation and interferon-γ (IFNγ) production, but cause tissue damage if overactivated. They also assist tissue repair via IL-22 production. We, therefore, aimed to investigate the frequency, functionality, and activation state of such cells in alcoholic hepatitis. We analyzed blood samples from 24 severe alcoholic hepatitis patients followed for 30 days after diagnosis. Ten healthy abstinent volunteers and 10 stable abstinent alcoholic cirrhosis patients were controls. Using flow cytometry we assessed cell frequencies, NK cell degranulation capacity following K562 cell stimulation, activation by natural killer group 2 D (NKG2D) expression, and IL-22 and IFNγ production. In alcoholic hepatitis we found a decreased frequency of CTLs compared with healthy controls (P < 0.001) and a similar trend for NK cells (P = 0.089). The NK cell degranulation capacity was reduced by 25% compared with healthy controls (P = 0.02) and by 50% compared with cirrhosis patients (P = 0.04). Accordingly, the NKG2D receptor expression was markedly decreased on NK cells, CTLs, and NKT cells (P < 0.05, all). The frequencies of IL-22-producing CTLs and NK cells were doubled compared with healthy controls (P < 0.05, all) but not different from cirrhosis patients. This exploratory study for the first time showed impaired cellular cytotoxicity and activation in alcoholic hepatitis. This is unlikely to cause hepatocyte death but may contribute toward the severe immune incompetence. The results warrant detailed and mechanistic studies.

  14. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qingwen; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  15. Dominant recognition by human CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes of dengue virus nonstructural proteins NS3 and NS1.2a.

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, A; Kurane, I; Rothman, A L; Zeng, L L; Brinton, M A; Ennis, F A

    1996-01-01

    A severe complication of dengue virus infection, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), is hypothesized to be immunologically mediated and virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) may trigger DHF. It is also likely that dengue virus-specific CTLs are important for recovery from dengue virus infections. There is little available information on the human CD8+ T cell responses to dengue viruses. Memory CD8+CTL responses were analyzed to determine the diversity of the T cell response to dengue virus and to identify immunodominant proteins using PBMC from eight healthy adult volunteers who had received monovalent, live-attenuated candidate vaccines of the four dengue serotypes. All the donors had specific T cell proliferation to dengue and to other flaviviruses that we tested. CTLs were generated from the stimulated PBMC of all donors, and in the seven donors tested, dengue virus-specific CD8+CTL activity was demonstrated. The nonstructural (NS3 and NS1.2a) and envelope (E) proteins were recognized by CD8+CTLs from six, five, and three donors, respectively. All donors recognized either NS3 or NS1.2a. In one donor who received a dengue 4 vaccine, CTL killing was seen in bulk culture against the premembrane protein (prM). This is the first demonstration of a CTL response against the prM protein. The CTL responses using the PBMC of two donors were serotype specific, whereas all other donors had serotype-cross-reactive responses. For one donor, CTLs specific for E, NS1.2a, and NS3 proteins were all HLA-B44 restricted. For three other donors tested, the potential restricting alleles for recognition of NS3 were B38, A24, and/or B62 and B35.These results indicate that the CD8+CTL responses of humans after immunization with one serotype of dengue virus are diverse and directed against a variety of proteins. The NS3 and NS1.2a proteins should be considered when designing subunit vaccines for dengue. PMID:8833919

  16. Localization of two cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes and three anchoring residues on a single nonameric peptide that binds to H-2Ld and is recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes against mouse tumor P815.

    PubMed

    Van den Eynde, B; Mazarguil, H; Lethé, B; Laval, F; Gairin, J E

    1994-11-01

    Mouse mastocytoma P815 expresses tumor antigens P815A and P815B encoded by a single gene called P1A and carried by a single peptide named P1A 35-43 (NH2-Leu-Pro-Tyr-Leu-Gly-Trp-Leu-Val-Phe-COOH). P1A 35-43 is presented to anti-P815A and anti-P815B cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) H-2Ld molecules. In order to determine the individual role played by each amino acid residue of P1A 35-43 in binding to H-2Ld and in recognition by anti-A and anti-B T cell receptors (TcR), a series of P1A35-43 peptides substituted by alanine at single positions was synthesized and tested for binding to H-2Ld and for CTL recognition. Binding to H-2Ld was estimated by measuring the ability of the peptide to up-regulate cell surface expression of H-2Ld. We found that three residues were important for interaction of P1A 35-43 with H-2Ld. Two of them, Pro at position 2 and Phe at position 9 were consistent with the described H-2Ld binding motif. A third residue, Trp at position 6, was also required for effective MHC binding of the tumor antigen. CTL sensitization assays showed that alanine substitution at position 7 (Leu) or at position 8 (Val) dramatically affected peptide recognition by anti-A CTL while positions 3 (Tyr) and 4 (Leu) were critical for recognition by anti-B CTL. We conclude that Pro2, Trp6 and Phe9 constitute the anchor residues of P1A 35-43 to H-2Ld, whereas the dipeptidyl sequences Tyr3-Leu4 and Leu7-Val8 form the core epitopes recognized by the TcR of anti-P815B and anti-P815A CTL, respectively.

  17. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) and Thyroglobulin (TG) Genetic Variants with Autoimmune Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hinal; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Singh, Mala; Begum, Rasheedunnisa; Shastri, Minal; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hypothyroidism is known to be caused by immune responses related to the thyroid gland and its immunological feature includes presence of autoimmune antibodies. Therefore the aim was to analyze presence of anti-TPO antibodies in hypothyroidism patients in Gujarat. Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) is one of the susceptibility genes for various autoimmune diseases. Hence, exon1 +49A/G and 3’UTR CT60A/G single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CTLA4 and its mRNA expression levels were investigated in autoimmune hypothyroidism patients. Thyroglobulin (TG) is known to be associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders and thus exon 33 (E33) SNP in TG was investigated. We analyzed the presence of anti-TPO antibodies in the plasma samples of 84 hypothyroidism patients and 62 controls by ELISA. PCR-RFLP technique was used for genotyping of polymorphisms. sCTLA4 and flCTLA4 mRNA expression levels were assessed by real time PCR. 59.52% of hypothyroid patients had anti-TPO antibodies in their circulation. The genotype and allele frequencies differed significantly for +49A/G (p = 0.0004 for +49AG, p = 0.0019 for +49GG & p = 0.0004 for allele), CT60 (p = 0.0110 for CT60AG, p = 0.0005 for CT60GG & p<0.0001 for allele) and TG E33 (p = 0.0003 for E33TC p<0.0001 for E33CC& p<0.0001 for allele) SNPs between patients and controls. Patients had significantly decreased mRNA levels of both sCTLA4 (p = 0.0017) and flCTLA4 (p<0.0001) compared to controls. +49A/G and CT60 polymorphisms of CTLA4 were in moderate linkage disequilibrium. Logistic regression analysis indicated significant association of CT49A/G, CT60A/G and TG exon 33 polymorphisms with susceptibility to autoimmune hypothyroidism when adjusted for age and gender. Our results suggest +49A/G and CT60 polymorphism of CTLA4 and E33 polymorphism of TG may be genetic risk factors for autoimmune hypothyroidism susceptibility and down regulation of both forms of CTLA4 advocates the crucial role of CTLA4 in

  18. Monitoring Integration over Time Supports a Role for Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and Ongoing Replication as Determinants of Reservoir Size.

    PubMed

    Pinzone, Marilia Rita; Graf, Erin; Lynch, Lindsay; McLaughlin, Brigit; Hecht, Frederick M; Connors, Mark; Migueles, Stephen A; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Nunnari, Giuseppe; O'Doherty, Una

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of HIV reservoir accumulation off antiretroviral therapy (ART) is underexplored. Levels of integrated HIV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were longitudinally monitored before and after antiviral therapy. HIV integration increased over time in both elite controllers (ECs; n = 8) and noncontrollers (NCs; n = 6) before ART, whereas integration remained stable in patients on ART (n = 4). The median annual fold change was higher in NCs than in ECs and negatively correlated with CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function as assessed by infected CD4 T-cell elimination (ICE) and granzyme B activity did not significantly change over time in ECs, suggesting that the gradual increase in integrated HIV DNA observed in ECs was not a result of progressive loss of immune-mediated control. Also, acutely infected (n = 7) but not chronically infected (n = 6) patients exhibited a significant drop in integrated HIV DNA 12 months after ART initiation. In conclusion, in the absence of ART, integrated HIV accumulates over time both in NCs and in ECs, at variable individual rates. Starting ART early in infection leads to a greater drop in integrated HIV DNA than does initiating treatment after years of infection. The increase in integrated HIV DNA over time suggests that early treatment may be of benefit in limiting HIV reservoirs. The establishment of a latent reservoir represents a barrier to cure among HIV-infected individuals. The dynamics of HIV reservoir accumulation over time in patients before antiviral therapy is underexplored, in large part because it is difficult to accurately and reproducibly measure the size of HIV reservoir in this setting. In our study, we compared the dynamics of integrated HIV DNA over time in ECs and NCs before and after ART was initiated. We found that integrated HIV DNA levels progressively increase over time in the absence of ART, but with a higher, albeit variable, rate in NCs compared to ECs. In

  19. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) and Thyroglobulin (TG) Genetic Variants with Autoimmune Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hinal; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Singh, Mala; Begum, Rasheedunnisa; Shastri, Minal; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hypothyroidism is known to be caused by immune responses related to the thyroid gland and its immunological feature includes presence of autoimmune antibodies. Therefore the aim was to analyze presence of anti-TPO antibodies in hypothyroidism patients in Gujarat. Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) is one of the susceptibility genes for various autoimmune diseases. Hence, exon1 +49A/G and 3'UTR CT60A/G single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CTLA4 and its mRNA expression levels were investigated in autoimmune hypothyroidism patients. Thyroglobulin (TG) is known to be associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders and thus exon 33 (E33) SNP in TG was investigated. We analyzed the presence of anti-TPO antibodies in the plasma samples of 84 hypothyroidism patients and 62 controls by ELISA. PCR-RFLP technique was used for genotyping of polymorphisms. sCTLA4 and flCTLA4 mRNA expression levels were assessed by real time PCR. 59.52% of hypothyroid patients had anti-TPO antibodies in their circulation. The genotype and allele frequencies differed significantly for +49A/G (p = 0.0004 for +49AG, p = 0.0019 for +49GG & p = 0.0004 for allele), CT60 (p = 0.0110 for CT60AG, p = 0.0005 for CT60GG & p<0.0001 for allele) and TG E33 (p = 0.0003 for E33TC p<0.0001 for E33CC& p<0.0001 for allele) SNPs between patients and controls. Patients had significantly decreased mRNA levels of both sCTLA4 (p = 0.0017) and flCTLA4 (p<0.0001) compared to controls. +49A/G and CT60 polymorphisms of CTLA4 were in moderate linkage disequilibrium. Logistic regression analysis indicated significant association of CT49A/G, CT60A/G and TG exon 33 polymorphisms with susceptibility to autoimmune hypothyroidism when adjusted for age and gender. Our results suggest +49A/G and CT60 polymorphism of CTLA4 and E33 polymorphism of TG may be genetic risk factors for autoimmune hypothyroidism susceptibility and down regulation of both forms of CTLA4 advocates the crucial role of CTLA4 in pathogenesis

  20. Monitoring Integration over Time Supports a Role for Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and Ongoing Replication as Determinants of Reservoir Size

    PubMed Central

    Pinzone, Marilia Rita; Graf, Erin; Lynch, Lindsay; McLaughlin, Brigit; Hecht, Frederick M.; Connors, Mark; Migueles, Stephen A.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dynamics of HIV reservoir accumulation off antiretroviral therapy (ART) is underexplored. Levels of integrated HIV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were longitudinally monitored before and after antiviral therapy. HIV integration increased over time in both elite controllers (ECs; n = 8) and noncontrollers (NCs; n = 6) before ART, whereas integration remained stable in patients on ART (n = 4). The median annual fold change was higher in NCs than in ECs and negatively correlated with CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function as assessed by infected CD4 T-cell elimination (ICE) and granzyme B activity did not significantly change over time in ECs, suggesting that the gradual increase in integrated HIV DNA observed in ECs was not a result of progressive loss of immune-mediated control. Also, acutely infected (n = 7) but not chronically infected (n = 6) patients exhibited a significant drop in integrated HIV DNA 12 months after ART initiation. In conclusion, in the absence of ART, integrated HIV accumulates over time both in NCs and in ECs, at variable individual rates. Starting ART early in infection leads to a greater drop in integrated HIV DNA than does initiating treatment after years of infection. The increase in integrated HIV DNA over time suggests that early treatment may be of benefit in limiting HIV reservoirs. IMPORTANCE The establishment of a latent reservoir represents a barrier to cure among HIV-infected individuals. The dynamics of HIV reservoir accumulation over time in patients before antiviral therapy is underexplored, in large part because it is difficult to accurately and reproducibly measure the size of HIV reservoir in this setting. In our study, we compared the dynamics of integrated HIV DNA over time in ECs and NCs before and after ART was initiated. We found that integrated HIV DNA levels progressively increase over time in the absence of ART, but with a higher, albeit variable, rate in NCs

  1. Consequences of cytotoxic T lymphocyte interaction with major histocompatibility complex class I-expressing neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Neurons have evolved strategies to evade immune surveillance that include an inability to synthesize the heavy chain of the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC), proteins that are necessary for cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition of target cells. Multiple viruses have taken advantage of the lack of CTL-mediated recognition and killing of neurons by establishing persistent neuronal infections and thereby escaping attack by antiviral CTL. We have expressed a class I MHC molecule (Db) in neurons of transgenic mice using the neuron- specific enolase (NSE) promoter to determine the pathogenic consequences of CTL recognition of virally infected, MHC-expressing central nervous system (CNS) neurons. The NSE-Db transgene was expressed in H-2b founder mice, and transgene-derived messenger RNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in transgenic brains from several lines. Purified primary neurons from transgenic but not from nontransgenic mice adhered to coverslips coated with a conformation-dependent monoclonal antibody directed against the Dv molecule and presented viral peptide to CTL in an MHC-restricted manner, indicating that the Db molecule was expressed on transgenic neurons in a functional form. Transgenic mice infected with the neurotropic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and given anti- LCMV, MHC-restricted CTL displayed a high morbidity and mortality when compared with controls receiving MHC-mismatched CTL or expressing alternative transgenes. After CTL transfer, transgenic brains showed an increased number of CD8+ cells compared with nontransgenic controls as well as an increased rate of clearance of infectious virus from the CNS. Additionally, an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was detected during viral clearance in NSE-Db transgenic mice and lasted several months after clearance of virus from neurons. In contrast, LCMV- infected, nontransgenic littermates and mice expressing other gene products from

  2. Elicitation of Anti-Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes by Using Purified Viral and Cellular Antigens Incorporated into Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ruebush, Mary J.; Hale, Arthur H.; Harris, David T.

    1981-01-01

    We evaluated the minimal molecular and cellular requirements for elicitation of anti-vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The results indicated that lipid vesicles containing the purified major surface glyco-protein of VSV (G protein) and purified H-2Kk glycoproteins elicited specific H-2Kk-restricted anti-VSV CTL. These antiviral CTL were shown to be Ly 1−,2+. However, both Ly 1+,2− and Ly1−,2+ T-cell subpopulations were shown to be required for elicitation of these CTL. Images PMID:6265359

  3. Elicitation of anti-vesicular stomatitis virus cytotoxic T lymphocytes by using purified viral and cellular antigens incorporated into phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ruebush, M J; Hale, A H; Harris, D T

    1981-05-01

    We evaluated the minimal molecular and cellular requirements for elicitation of anti-vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The results indicated that lipid vesicles containing the purified major surface glyco-protein of VSV (G protein) and purified H-2K(k) glycoproteins elicited specific H-2K(k)-restricted anti-VSV CTL. These antiviral CTL were shown to be Ly 1(-),2(+). However, both Ly 1(+),2(-) and Ly1(-),2(+) T-cell subpopulations were shown to be required for elicitation of these CTL.

  4. Induction of anti-leukemic cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusion of patient-derived dendritic cells with autologous myeloblasts.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo; Kato, Yoko; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Chen, Dongshu; Jonas, Anna; Galinsky, Ilene; DeAngelo, Daniel; Avigan, David; Kufe, Donald; Stone, Richard

    2004-12-01

    Presentation of AML antigens by dendritic cells (DC) could potentially induce a T cell-mediated anti-leukemic immune response. In the present study, we generated DC from adherent (AD-DC) and non-adherent (NAD-DC) myeloblasts obtained from bone marrows of AML patients. Both cell populations displayed morphological, phenotypic and functional properties of DC. The functions of NAD-DC were compared to AD-DC that had been fused with autologous AML blasts (FC/AML). The FC/AML induced greater T cell proliferation and CTL activity against autologous AML blasts (9/10 cases) as compared to NAD-DC. FC/AML may thus represent a promising strategy for DC-based immunotherapy of patients with AML.

  5. Large-scale preparation of human anti-third-party veto cytotoxic T lymphocytes depleted of graft-versus-host reactivity: a new source for graft facilitating cells in bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Shraga; Yao, Xin; Krauthgamer, Rita; Gan, Yehudit; Goren-Arbel, Rinat; Klein, Tirza; Tabilio, Antonio; McMannis, John D; Champlin, Richard; Martelli, Massimo F; Bachar-Lustig, Esther; Reisner, Yair

    2005-06-01

    Induction of donor type chimerism in mildly prepared hosts without graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a most desirable goal in bone morrow transplantation. We have recently demonstrated in a mouse model that donor veto cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can facilitate the induction of donor type chimerism in sublethally irradiated recipients without causing GvHD if they are effectively depleted of alloreactivity against host cells by means of stimulation against a third party. We extend this approach to human cells, by preparing CTLs in two major steps: primary culture in the absence of interleukin 2, leading to death by neglect of antihost clones, and addition of interleukin 2 and subsequent dilution of antihost clones as a consequence of the expansion of the anti-third-party clones. CTLs prepared in this way specifically suppress host cytotoxic T cells directed against antigens of the donor, but not against fourth-party antigens, as demonstrated in a standard (51)Cr release assay. We conclude that human anti-third-party CTLs afford a new source of veto cells that are depleted of potential graft-versus-host-reactive clones. The cells generated by this approach could potentially be used to facilitate engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  6. Eliciting cytotoxic T lymphocytes against acute myeloid leukemia-derived antigens: evaluation of dendritic cell-leukemia cell hybrids and other antigen-loading strategies for dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    PubMed

    Galea-Lauri, Joanna; Darling, David; Mufti, Ghulam; Harrison, Phillip; Farzaneh, Farzin

    2002-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have been successfully used in clinical pilot studies to induce tumor-specific immunity as well as clinical response in selected patients. However, DC-based immunotherapy remains a challenge and several parameters need to be examined in order to optimize the induction of anti-tumor immune responses. This study focuses on DC vaccination for leukemia and evaluates the in vitro efficacy of three different strategies for generating antigen-loaded DC-based vaccines for the induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted anti-leukemia cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. These included direct fusion of DC with leukemia cells to generate DC-leukemia cell hybrids, and DC pulsed with either apoptotic leukemia cell fragments or whole tumor cell lysates. Using either the U937 cell line or primary human acute myeloid leukemia blasts (AML), DC-leukemia cell hybrids were found to be the most potent in vitro inducers of CTL activity. DC pulsed with apoptotic tumor cell fragments were less efficient, but induced a more potent CTL response compared to tumor lysate-pulsed DC. The CTL responses were both MHC class I-restricted and antigen-specific, as shown by the inability of the CTL to lyse other control targets. The data presented here suggest that the method of antigen loading onto DC may be critical in the design of tumor vaccines.

  7. Human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles combined with low-dose irradiation: a new approach to enhance drug targeting in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lianru; Li, Rutian; Chen, Hong; Wei, Jia; Qian, Hanqing; Su, Shu; Shao, Jie; Wang, Lifeng; Qian, Xiaoping; Liu, Baorui

    2017-01-01

    Cell membrane-derived nanoparticles are becoming more attractive because of their ability to mimic many features of their source cells. This study reports on a biomimetic delivery platform based on human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte membranes. In this system, the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles was camouflaged using T-lymphocyte membranes, and local low-dose irradiation (LDI) was used as a chemoattractant for nanoparticle targeting. The T-lymphocyte membrane coating was verified using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. This new platform reduced nanoparticle phagocytosis by macrophages to 23.99% (P=0.002). Systemic administration of paclitaxel-loaded T-lymphocyte membrane-coated nanoparticles inhibited the growth of human gastric cancer by 56.68% in Balb/c nude mice. Application of LDI at the tumor site significantly increased the tumor growth inhibition rate to 88.50%, and two mice achieved complete remission. Furthermore, LDI could upregulate the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor vessels, which is important in the process of leukocyte adhesion and might contribute to the localization of T-lymphocyte membrane-encapsulated nanoparticles in tumors. Therefore, this new drug-delivery platform retained both the long circulation time and tumor site accumulation ability of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while local LDI could significantly enhance tumor localization. PMID:28360520

  8. The importance of local mucosal HIV-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes for resistance to mucosal viral transmission in mice and enhancement of resistance by local administration of IL-12.

    PubMed Central

    Belyakov, I M; Ahlers, J D; Brandwein, B Y; Earl, P; Kelsall, B L; Moss, B; Strober, W; Berzofsky, J A

    1998-01-01

    Although crucial to mucosal vaccine development, the mechanisms of defense against mucosal viral infection are still poorly understood. Protection, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and neutralizing antibodies have all been observed, but cause and effect have been difficult to determine. The ability of CTL in the mucosa to mediate protection against mucosal viral transmission has never been proven. Here, we use an HIV peptide immunogen and an HIV-1 gp160-expressing recombinant vaccinia viral intrarectal murine challenge system, in which neutralizing antibodies do not play a role, to demonstrate for the first time that long-lasting immune resistance to mucosal viral transmission can be accomplished by CD8(+) CTL that must be present in the mucosal site of exposure. The resistance is ablated by depleting CD8(+) cells in vivo and requires CTL in the mucosa, whereas systemic (splenic) CTL are shown to be unable to protect against mucosal challenge. Furthermore, the resistance as well as the CTL response can be increased by local mucosal delivery of IL-12 with the vaccine. These results imply that induction of local mucosal CTL may be critical for success of a vaccine against viruses transmitted through a mucosal route, such as HIV. PMID:9854042

  9. [Immunotherapy for leukemia cells by using cytotoxic T lymphocyte specifically against WT1-derived peptide: an experimental study in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei-ying; Cao, Xiang-shan; Qiu, Guo-qiang; Chen, Zi-xing; Sheng, Li-xia; Xie, Xiao-bao; He, Jun; Cen, Jian-nong; Shen, Hui-ling

    2005-12-28

    To investigate the effect of targeting immunotherapy for leukemia cells by using cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) specifically against WT (Wilm's tumor) 1-derived peptide. A 9-mer WT1 peptide (CMTWNQMNL) containing HLA-A*0201-binding anchor motifs was synthesized. Dendritic cells (DCs) generated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of an HLA-A*0201-positive healthy donor were cultured and divided into 2 groups: experimental group to be loaded with Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) peptide so as to elicit CTL's specifically for WT1 peptide, restricted by HLA-A*0201, and control group. Six days later rhTNF-alpha was added for 3 days more to promote the maturation of DCs. Before loading of WT1 peptide and 2 days after the addition of rhTNF-alpha direct immunofluorescence labeling method was used with PE or FITC labeled mono-antibodies to detect the expression of the surface antigens: CD83, CD1alpha, CD80, CD86, CD14, and HLA-DR. DCs suspended and attached to wall were collected and then divided into 2 groups: pure T cell group (group D) to be cultured in culture medium without IL-2, and IL-2 + T cell group (Group C) to be cultured in 1640 culture medium with IL-2. Eight days later the T cells of Group C were co-cultured with the DCs of the experimental group (WTI peptide + DC + IL-2 + T cells, Group A) or the DCs of the control group (DC + IL-2 + T cells, Group B). Five days later the killing activity was detected. The CTLs of Groups A, B, and C at logarithmic growth phase were mixed with leukemic cells of the lines: NB4/WT1D, NB4WT1A, NB4 (all HLA-A*0201 +, WT1 +), U937 (HLA-A*0201 +, WTl -), and K562 (HLA-A*0201 -, WTI +), and mononuclear cells of the bone marrow of leukemic patients at different effector cell-target cell of 20:1 and 10:1. MTT method was used to examine the killing rate of CTL to the target cells. (1) The killing rates of Group A cells to NB4/WT1 D, NB4WTA, and NB4, leukemic cells were 60.4% +/- 3.1%, 56.4% +/- 5.7%, and 55.0% +/- 3.7%, all significantly

  10. Drug-associated dermatomyositis following ipilimumab therapy: a novel immune-mediated adverse event associated with cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 blockade.

    PubMed

    Sheik Ali, Shirwa; Goddard, Allison L; Luke, Jason J; Donahue, Hilary; Todd, Derrick J; Werchniak, Andrew; Vleugels, Ruth Ann

    2015-02-01

    Ipilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeted against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4, has shown promise in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. However, given its mechanism of action, immune-related adverse effects have been reported with this therapy. Despite increasing reports of immune-related adverse effects related to ipilimumab therapy, dermatomyositis associated with this agent has not previously been reported. We describe a woman undergoing treatment with ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma who developed classic cutaneous findings of dermatomyositis along with proximal muscle weakness and elevated muscle enzymes. This case adds to the expanding literature regarding immune-related adverse events associated with ipilimumab. To our knowledge, drug-induced dermatomyositis from ipilimumab has not previously been reported. Physicians should be aware of these potential immune-related adverse events and consider drug-associated dermatomyositis in the differential diagnosis in patients receiving ipilimumab who present with a cutaneous eruption or muscle weakness.

  11. Design of high-affinity major histocompatibility complex-specific antagonist peptides that inhibit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity: implications for control of viral disease.

    PubMed

    Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1992-11-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize viral antigens presented by infected cells in the context of their major histocompatibility complex glycoproteins. The irreversible killing of virus-infected cells by virus-specific CTLs can be the cause of serious disease, particularly in the central nervous, hepatic, and cardiovascular systems. Design of molecules controlling (blocking) interaction between CTLs and infected cells, and their further use to inhibit (or antagonize) T-lymphocyte activity, is an important pharmacologic goal. In this report, we describe the design of a new family of peptides which selectively inhibit activity of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which recognize endogenously processed viral epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

  12. Antiviral pressure exerted by HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during primary infection demonstrated by rapid selection of CTL escape virus.

    PubMed

    Borrow, P; Lewicki, H; Wei, X; Horwitz, M S; Peffer, N; Meyers, H; Nelson, J A; Gairin, J E; Hahn, B H; Oldstone, M B; Shaw, G M

    1997-02-01

    The HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is temporally associated with the decline in viremia during primary HIV-1 infection, but definitive evidence that it is of importance in virus containment has been lacking. Here we show that in a patient whose early CTL response was focused on a highly immunodominant epitope in gp 160, there was rapid elimination of the transmitted virus strain and selection for a virus population bearing amino acid changes at a single residue within this epitope, which conferred escape from recognition by epitope-specific CTL. The magnitude (> 100-fold), kinetics (30-72 days from onset of symptoms) and genetic pathways of virus escape from CTL pressure were comparable to virus escape from antiretroviral therapy, indicating the biological significance of the CTL response in vivo. One aim of HIV-1 vaccines should thus be to elicit strong CTL responses against multiple codominant viral epitopes.

  13. Design of high-affinity major histocompatibility complex-specific antagonist peptides that inhibit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity: implications for control of viral disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1992-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize viral antigens presented by infected cells in the context of their major histocompatibility complex glycoproteins. The irreversible killing of virus-infected cells by virus-specific CTLs can be the cause of serious disease, particularly in the central nervous, hepatic, and cardiovascular systems. Design of molecules controlling (blocking) interaction between CTLs and infected cells, and their further use to inhibit (or antagonize) T-lymphocyte activity, is an important pharmacologic goal. In this report, we describe the design of a new family of peptides which selectively inhibit activity of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which recognize endogenously processed viral epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. PMID:1383569

  14. Alphavirus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Recognize a Cross-Reactive Epitope from the Capsid Protein and Can Eliminate Virus from Persistently Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Linn, May La; Mateo, L.; Gardner, J.; Suhrbier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Persistent alphavirus infections in synovial and neural tissues are believed to be associated with chronic arthritis and encephalitis, respectively, and represent likely targets for CD8+ αβ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Here we show that the capsid protein is a dominant target for alphavirus-specific CTL in BALB/c mice and that capsid-specific CTL from these mice recognize an H-2Kd restricted epitope, QYSGGRFTI. This epitope lies in the highly conserved region of the capsid protein, and QYSGGRFTI-specific CTL were cross reactive across a range of Old World alphaviruses. In vivo the acute primary viraemia of these highly cytopathic viruses was unaffected by QYSGGRFTI-specific CTL. However, in vitro these CTL were able to completely clear virus from macrophages persistently and productively infected with the arthrogenic alphavirus Ross River virus. PMID:9573286

  15. Tracking in vivo migration and distribution of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester staining during cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-li; Li, Suo-lin; Wen, Ming; Wen, Jun-ye; Han, Jie; Zhang, Hong-zhen; Gao, Fei; Cai, Jian-hui

    2013-08-01

    Killing of targeted tumors during adoptive cell transfer therapy is associated with cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) numbers, immunophenotype, tumor-specificity, and in vivo residence time, migration, and distribution. Therefore, tracing in vivo persistence, migration, and distribution of CTLs is important for cancer immunotherapy. Optimal staining concentration for CTL proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and killing efficiencies of CTLs or carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeled melanoma antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CFSE-CTLs) for malignant melanoma cells in vitro were compared. Additionally, CFSE-CTLs were intravenously transfused to mice receiving B16 melanoma, and their residence time, migration, and distribution in vivo were observed by measuring fluorescence intensities of CFSE-CTLs per gram of tissue (%FI/g) in various tissues and analyzing tumor/non-tumor (T/NT) values. Anti-tumor effects of transferred CTLs and correlation between %FI/g and D-value of tumor size were analyzed. Five-micromolar CFSE was optimal for labeling CTLs with minimal cytotoxicity. No significant difference occurred between CTLs and CFSE-CTLs for tumor cell killing (P = 0.849) or interleukin-2 (P = 0.318) and interferon-γ (P = 0.201) levels. Distribution of CTLs in vivo varied with time. A negative correlation between %FI/g in tumors and D-value of tumor sizes by Spearman correlation analysis was observed. CTLs were recruited to and killed tumors from 6 hours to 3 days after cell infusion. CTLs were observed up to three weeks later in the tumor, liver, kidneys, and spleen; this was related to the abundant blood supply or the nature of immune organs. CCK-8 assay is a novel method to select optimal CFSE staining concentrations. Fluorescence intensity of transferred CTLs reflects their killing efficiency of tumors. CFSE fluorescent markers can trace in vivo CTL persistence, migration, and distribution because of its stability

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones rapidly expanded from CD8(+) CD62L((high)+) T cells of healthy donors prevent AML engraftment in NOD/SCID IL2Rgamma(null) mice.

    PubMed

    Distler, Eva; Wölfel, Catherine; Köhler, Sylvia; Nonn, Marion; Kaus, Nina; Schnürer, Elke; Meyer, Ralf G; Wehler, Thomas C; Huber, Christoph; Wölfel, Thomas; Hartwig, Udo F; Herr, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Current in vitro techniques for isolating leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from healthy donors are of relatively low efficiency and yield responder populations with unknown biological significance. This study aimed at the development of a more reliable approach, allowing generation and expansion of acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-reactive CTLs using primary in vitro stimulation. We established allogeneic mini-mixed lymphocyte-leukemia cultures (mini-MLLCs) by stimulating donor CD8(+) T cells with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-matched AML blasts in microtiter plates. Before culture, CD8(+) T cells were separated into CD62L((high)+) and CD62L((low)+/neg) subsets enriched for naive/central memory and effector memory cells, respectively. In eight different related and unrelated donor/AML pairs, numerous CTL populations were isolated that specifically lysed myeloid leukemias in association with various HLA-A, -B, or -C alleles. These CTLs expressed T-cell receptors of single Vbeta-chain families, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of CTL clones were obtained from mini-MLLCs initiated with CD62L((high)+) cells. Using antigen-specific stimulation, multiple CTL populations were amplified to 10(8)-10(10) cells within 6 to 8 weeks. Three of four representative CTL clones were capable of completely preventing engraftment of human primary AML blasts in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immune deficient IL2Rgamma(null) mice. The mini-MLLC approach allows the efficient in vitro expansion of AML-reactive CTL clones from CD8(+)CD62L((high)+) precursors of healthy donors. These CTLs can inhibit leukemia engraftment in immunodeficient mice, suggesting their potential biological relevance.

  17. Patterns of Immunodominance in HIV-1–specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Responses in Two Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigens (HLA)-identical Siblings with HLA-A*0201 Are Influenced by Epitope Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Goulder, P.J.R.; Sewell, A.K.; Lalloo, D.G.; Price, D.A.; Whelan, J.A.; Evans, J.; Taylor, G.P.; Luzzi, G.; Giangrande, P.; Phillips, R.E.; McMichael, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    Primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is controlled principally by HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to a steady-state level of virus load, which strongly influences the ultimate rate of progression to disease. Epitope selection by CTL may be an important determinant of the degree of immune control over the virus. This report describes the CTL responses of two HLA-identical hemophiliac brothers who were exposed to identical batches of Factor VIII and became seropositive within 10 wk of one another. Both have HLA-A*0201. The CTL responses of the two siblings were very dissimilar, one donor making strong responses to two epitopes within p17 Gag (HLA-A*0201–restricted SLYNTVATL and HLA-A3–restricted RLRPGGKKK). The sibling responded to neither epitope, but made strong responses to two epitopes presented by HLA-B7. This was not the result of differences in presentation of the epitopes. However, mutations in both immunodominant epitopes of the p17 Gag responder were seen in proviral sequences of the nonresponder. We then documented the CTL responses to two HLA-A*0201–restricted epitopes, in Gag (SLYNTVATL) and Pol (ILKEPVHGV) in 22 other HIV-infected donors with HLA-A*0201. The majority (71%) generated responses to the Gag epitope. In the 29% of donors failing to respond to the Gag epitope in standard assays, there was evidence of low frequency memory CTL responses using peptide stimulation of PBMC, and most of these donors also showed mutations in or around the Gag epitope. We concluded that HLA class I genotype determines epitope selection initially but that mutation in immunodominant epitopes can profoundly alter the pattern of CTL response. PMID:9126923

  18. Prediction of cross-recognition of peptide-HLA A2 by Melan-A-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes using three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Fagerberg, Theres; Zoete, Vincent; Viatte, Sebastien; Baumgaertner, Petra; Alves, Pedro M; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel E; Michielin, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The cross-recognition of peptides by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key element in immunology and in particular in peptide based immunotherapy. Here we develop three-dimensional (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to predict cross-recognition by Melan-A-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes of peptides bound to HLA A*0201 (hereafter referred to as HLA A2). First, we predict the structure of a set of self- and pathogen-derived peptides bound to HLA A2 using a previously developed ab initio structure prediction approach [Fagerberg et al., J. Mol. Biol., 521-46 (2006)]. Second, shape and electrostatic energy calculations are performed on a 3D grid to produce similarity matrices which are combined with a genetic neural network method [So et al., J. Med. Chem., 4347-59 (1997)] to generate 3D-QSAR models. The models are extensively validated using several different approaches. During the model generation, the leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient (q (2)) is used as the fitness criterion and all obtained models are evaluated based on their q (2) values. Moreover, the best model obtained for a partitioned data set is evaluated by its correlation coefficient (r = 0.92 for the external test set). The physical relevance of all models is tested using a functional dependence analysis and the robustness of the models obtained for the entire data set is confirmed using y-randomization. Finally, the validated models are tested for their utility in the setting of rational peptide design: their ability to discriminate between peptides that only contain side chain substitutions in a single secondary anchor position is evaluated. In addition, the predicted cross-recognition of the mono-substituted peptides is confirmed experimentally in chromium-release assays. These results underline the utility of 3D-QSARs in peptide mimetic design and suggest that the properties of the unbound epitope are sufficient to capture most of the information to determine the

  19. Identification of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes from porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus matrix protein in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-seven nanopeptides derived from the matrix (M) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were screened for their ability to elicit a recall interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response from the splenocytes of BALB/c mice following DNA vaccination and a booster vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus rWR-PRRSV-M. We identified two peptides (amino acid residues K93FITSRCRL and F57GYMTFVHF) as CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. These peptides elicited significant numbers of IFN-γ secreting cells, compared with other M nonapeptides and one irrelevant nonapeptide. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the former is an H-2Kd-restricted CTL epitope, and the latter is an H-2Dd-restricted CTL epitope. Multiple amino acid sequence alignment among different PRRSV M sequences submitted to GenBank indicated that these two CTL epitopes are strongly conserved, and they should therefore be considered for further research on the mechanisms of cellular immune responses to PRRSV. PMID:21619712

  20. Definition of an epitope on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) envelope protein recognized by JEV-specific murine CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Takada, K; Masaki, H; Konishi, E; Takahashi, M; Kurane, I

    2000-01-01

    We defined an epitope on the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) envelope (E) protein recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). CTLs induced in JEV-infected BALB/c (H-2d) mice recognized E and/or premembrane (PrM) proteins, while CTLs in C57BL/6J (H-2b) and C3H/HeJ (H-2k) mice did not. JEV-specific CTLs had a phenotype of CD3+ CD4- CD8+. Twenty-four 9-amino acid (a.a.) peptides, which had binding motifs for H-2Kd, H-2Ld or H-2Dd, were synthesized according to the amino acid sequences of PrM and E proteins. CTLs induced by JEV infection recognized only the peptide K-3. Immunization of BALB/c mice with only a group of peptides including K-3 induced CTLs which recognized the homologous K-3 peptide, while immunization with other peptides did not. The peptide K-3 had a binding motif for H-2Kd. This is consistent with the finding that JEV-specific CTLs in BALB/c mice was H-2Kd-restricted. These results indicate that the epitope recognized by CTLs in BALB/c mice is located between a.a. 60 and 68 on the E protein, corresponding to an a.a. sequence of CYHASVTDI.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and CD137 co-stimulation in a spontaneous breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pinku; Tinder, Teresa L; Basu, Gargi D; Pathangey, Latha B; Chen, Lieping; Gendler, Sandra J

    2004-01-01

    To study immunology in breast tumors, we have utilized a mammary gland adenocarcinoma model in which mice develop spontaneous tumors of the mammary gland which are initiated at puberty and express a human tumor antigen, MUC1. MUC1 (CD227) is over-expressed in 90% of human breast cancers and its glycosylation status and pattern of expression in cancer cells is altered. Humoral and cellular responses to MUC1 have been reported in breast cancer patients and therefore, MUC1 is being evaluated as a target for immune intervention. This mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer allows the evaluation of anti-MUC1 immune responses at all stages of the disease. In this report, we review the model as it pertains to a) the development of the tumor, b) MUC1 expression, and the native immune responses against MUC1 as tumors progress, and c) the immune suppressive microenvironment within the developing tumor. Finally, we report our latest findings describing the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (MUC1-CTL) in these mice and discuss ways to increase their effectiveness by agonistic monoclonal antibody against CD137 T cell costimulatory molecule.

  2. Effect of mutations and variations of HLA-A2 on recognition of a virus peptide epitope by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    McMichael, A J; Gotch, F M; Santos-Aguado, J; Strominger, J L

    1988-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for influenza A virus were prepared from 15 donors. Those with HLA-A2 recognized autologous or HLA-A2-matched B-lymphoblastoid cells in the presence of synthetic peptide representing residues 55-73 or 56-68 of the virus matrix protein sequence. Influenza A virus-specific CTL from donors without HLA-A2 or with an HLA-A2 variant type failed to respond to this peptide. CTL lines specific for HLA-A2 plus peptide did not lyse peptide-treated target cells from HLA-A2 variant donors. They also failed to lyse peptide-treated cells with point mutations that had been inserted into HLA-A2 at positions 62-63, 66, 152, and 156 and, in some instances, mutations at positions 9 and 70. CTL lysed peptide-treated target cells with mutations in HLA-A2 at positions 43, 74, and 107. The results imply that this defined peptide epitope therefore interacts with HLA-A2 in the binding groove so that the long alpha-helices of HLA-A2 make important contact with the peptide at positions 66, 152, and 156. Different amino acids at position 9, which is in the floor of the peptide binding groove of HLA-A2 and the closely related position 70, modulate the peptide interaction so that some T-cell clones react and some do not. PMID:2461564

  3. An initial and rapid step of lytic granule secretion precedes microtubule organizing center polarization at the cytotoxic T lymphocyte/target cell synapse

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Florie; Müller, Sabina; Roh, Kyung-Ho; Laurent, Camille; Dupré, Loïc; Valitutti, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    It is presently assumed that lethal hit delivery by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is mechanistically linked to centrosome polarization toward target cells, leading to dedicated release of lytic granules within a confined secretory domain. Here we provide three lines of evidence showing that this mechanism might not apply as a general paradigm for lethal hit delivery. First, in CTLs stimulated with immobilized peptide–MHC complexes, lytic granules and microtubule organizing center localization into synaptic areas are spatio-temporally dissociated, as detected by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Second, in many CTL/target cell conjugates, lytic granule secretion precedes microtubule polarization and can be detected during the first minute after cell–cell contact. Third, inhibition of microtubule organizing center and centrosome polarization impairs neither lytic granule release at the CTL synapse nor killing efficiency. Our results broaden current views of CTL biology by revealing an extremely rapid step of lytic granule secretion and by showing that microtubule organizing center polarization is dispensable for efficient lethal hit delivery. PMID:23536289

  4. Interferon-gamma Inhibits Melanogenesis and Induces Apoptosis in Melanocytes: A Pivotal Role of CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Wei, Yi; Sun, Yue; Shi, Weimin; Yang, Ji; Zhu, Lubing; Li, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Increased expression of the cytokine interferon (IFN)-γ plays a pivotal role in vitiligo-induced depigmentation. However, the major source of IFN-γ in vitiligo patients and the mechanisms underlying melanocyte destruction are unknown. In this study, a large number of skin infiltrating IFN-γ+ cells and CD8+ T cells were detected in progressive vitiligo. Among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of vitiligo patients, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that express IFN-γ exhibited significant expansion, which suggests that activated CTLs are the main source of increased IFN-γ in progressive vitiligo. An in vitro analysis demonstrated that IFN-γ inhibits melanogenesis in primary cultured human melanocytes by altering melanogenic enzyme mRNA expression and, more importantly, that IFN-γ directly induces melanocyte apoptosis. Our data indicate that vitiligo pathophysiology may be linked to globally activated CD8+ CTL subpopulations, which produce increased IFN-γ and induce melanocyte dysfunction and apoptosis.

  5. Carthamus tinctorius Enhances the Antitumor Activity of Dendritic Cell Vaccines via Polarization toward Th1 Cytokines and Increase of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jia-Ming; Hung, Le-Mei; Chyan, Yau-Jan; Cheng, Chun-Ming; Wu, Rey-Yuh

    2011-01-01

    Carthamus tinctorius (CT), also named safflower, is a traditional Chinese medicine widely used to improve blood circulation. CT also has been studied for its antitumor activity in certain cancers. To investigate the effects of CT on the dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine in cancer treatment, cytokine secretion of mouse splenic T lymphocytes and the maturation of DCs in response to CT were analyzed. To assess the antitumor activity of CT extract on mouse CD117+ (c-kit)-derived DCs pulsed with JC mammal tumor antigens, the JC tumor was challenged by the CT-treated DC vaccine in vivo. CT stimulated IFN-γ and IL-10 secretion of splenic T lymphocytes and enhanced the maturation of DCs by enhancing immunological molecule expression. When DC vaccine was pulsed with tumor antigens along with CT extract, the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were dramatically increased with a dose-dependent response and more immunologic and co-stimulatory molecules were expressed on the DC surface. In addition, CT-treated tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccine reduced the tumor weight in tumor-bearing mice by 15.3% more than tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccine without CT treatment. CT polarized cytokine secretion toward the Th1 pathway and also increased the population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes ex vivo. In conclusion, CT activates DCs might promote the recognition of antigens and facilitate antigen presentation to Th1 immune responses. PMID:19001481

  6. The route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influences the recruitment of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the lung that provide potent protection from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suda, Tatsuya; Kawano, Masaaki; Nogi, Yasuhisa; Ohno, Naohito; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Matsui, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in the lung are considered to confer protection from respiratory viruses. Several groups demonstrated that the route of priming was likely to have an implication for the trafficking of antigen-specific CTLs. Therefore, we investigated whether the route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influenced the recruitment of virus-specific CTLs in the lung that should provide potent protection from influenza A virus. Mice were immunized with recombinant adenovirus expressing the matrix (M1) protein of influenza A virus via various immunization routes involving intraperitoneal, intranasal, intramuscular, or intravenous administration as well as subcutaneous administration in the hind hock. We found that the immunization route dramatically impacted the recruitment of M1-specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells both in the lung and the spleen. Surprisingly, hock immunization was most effective for the accumulation in the lung of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells that possessed M1-specific cytolytic activity. Further, antigen-driven IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells in the lung, but not in the spleen, were likely to be correlated with the resistance to challenge with influenza A virus. These results may improve our ability to design vaccines that target virus-specific CTL responses to respiratory viruses such as influenza A virus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dendritic cells pulsed with alpha-fetoprotein and mutant P53 fused gene induce bi-targeted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response against hepatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Jia, Jun; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Liwang; Ma, Bo; Jiang, Hanfang; Di, Lijun; Song, Guohong; Yu, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is rapidly emerging as a promising treatment in cancer therapy. We had previously shown that DC pulsed with either defined mRNA of tumor antigen (Ag) such as alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), or total RNA of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could elicit Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. Therefore, we suggested a novel DC-based therapeutic method, in which DCs derived from CD34(+) cells enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells were pulsed with liposome-coated AFP and mutant P53 (mtP53) fused gene pEGFP-C3/AFP-mtP53 to induce bi-targeted specific CTL responses against HCC. Three different genotype HCC cell lines, HepG2 (human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA) A2 positive, AFP expressing positive, P53 expressing negative), SMMC7721 (HLA A2 positive, neither AFP nor P53 expressing positive), and HMCC97 (HLA A2 positive, both AFP and P53 expressing positive) were selected as targets for CTL responses. An important finding was that DCs pulsed with the liposome-coated fused gene could evoke more intensive bi-targeted Ag-specific CTL responses against HMCC97 than DCs pulsed with either AFP or P53 single gene (P < 0.05). This experimental therapeutic model provides a new promising cytotherapeutic approach, in that DCs pulsed with the fused gene of different Ags might induce more extensive multitargeted antitumor immunity.

  8. A β-tubulin 5-derived peptide induces cytotoxic T lymphocytes restricted to the HLA-A24 allele in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Nobukazu; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Noguchi, Masanori; Todo, Satoru; Itoh, Kyogo; Shichijo, Shigeki

    2010-09-01

    To facilitate the development of a peptide-based cancer vaccine for prostate cancer patients, we examined whether any of the 13 peptides previously reported to induce HLA-class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in HLA-A3 supertype (-A3, -A11, -A31 and -A33)-positive prostate cancer patients are also capable of inducing CTLs restricted to HLA-A2, HLA-A24 or HLA-A26 alleles. Among the 13 peptides tested, a peptide at positions 309 to 318 of β-tubulin 5 exhibited binding activity to the HLA-A(*)2402 molecule and induced HLA-A24-restricted CTL activity against prostate cancer cells derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of prostate cancer patients. The CTL activity was determined to be specific to this peptide and was mediated by CD8(+) T cells in an HLA-class I-restricted manner. These results suggest that this peptide could be applicable as a peptide vaccine, not only for HLA-A3 supertype-positive, but also for HLA-A24-positive prostate cancer patients.

  9. Identification of SART3-derived peptides having the potential to induce cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from prostate cancer patients with HLA-A3 supertype alleles.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Matsueda, Satoko; Takedatsu, Hiroko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Noguchi, Masanori; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Itoh, Kyogo; Harada, Mamoru

    2007-05-01

    SART3-derived peptides applicable to prostate cancer patients with HLA-A3 supertype alleles were identified in order to expand the possibility of an anti-cancer vaccine, because the peptide vaccine candidates receiving the most attention thus far have been the HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 alleles. Twenty-nine SART3-derived peptides that were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A3 supertype alleles (HLA-A11, -A31, and -A33) were first screened for their recognizability by immunoglobulin G (IgG) of prostate cancer patients and subsequently for the potential to induce peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from HLA-A3 supertype(+) prostate cancer patients. As a result, five SART3 peptides were frequently recognized by IgG, and two of them-SART3 (511-519) and SART3 (734-742)-efficiently induced peptide-specific and cancer-reactive CTLs. Their cytotoxicity toward prostate cancer cells was ascribed to peptide-specific and CD8(+) T cells. These results indicate that these two SART3 peptides could be promising candidates for peptide-based immunotherapy for HLA-A3 supertype(+) prostate cancer patients.

  10. Development of an Enhanced Phenotypic Screen of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Lytic Granule Exocytosis Suitable for Use with Synthetic Compound and Natural Product Collections.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziyan; deMayo, James A; West, Ashley M; Balunas, Marcy J; Zweifach, Adam

    2016-07-01

    We previously developed an assay of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte lytic granule exocytosis based on externalization of LAMP-1/CD107A using nonphysiological stimuli to generate maximal levels of exocytosis. Here, we used polystyrene beads coated with anti-CD3 antibodies to stimulate cells. Light scatter let us distinguish cells that contacted beads from cells that had not, allowing comparison of signaling events and exocytosis from stimulated and unstimulated cells in one sample. Bead stimulation resulted in submaximal exocytosis, making it possible to detect compounds that either augment or inhibit lytic granule exocytosis. Coupled with the assay's ability to distinguish responses in cells that have and have not contacted a stimulatory bead, it is possible to detect three kinds of compounds: inhibitors, stimulators, which cause exocytosis, and augmenters, which enhance receptor-stimulated exocytosis. To validate the assay, we screened a set of synthetic compounds identified using our previous assay and a library of 320 extracts prepared from tunicate-associated bacteria. One of the extracts augmented exocytosis threefold. Activity-guided fractionation and structure elucidation revealed that this compound is the known PKC activator teleocidin A-1. We conclude that our modified assay is suitable for screening synthetic compound plates and natural product collections, and will be useful for identifying immunologically active small molecules.

  11. Association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 +49A/G polymorphism and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Deng, Tao; Luo, He-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen-4 (CTLA-4) gene has been implicated in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the results are inconsistent. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the associations between the CTLA-4 +49A/G polymorphism and risk of CRC. Relevant studies were identified using PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI and WanFang databases up to November 10, 2014. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association using the fixed or random effect model. A total of 8 case-control studies, including 1180 cases and 2110 controls, were included. Overall, a significant association between the CTLA-4 +49A/G polymorphism and CRC risk was found (dominant model: OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.09-2.43; AG vs. AA: OR=1.69, 95% CI: 1.15-2.48). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, we observed a significant association in Asian descent (dominant model: OR=2.42, 95% CI: 1.40-4.16; AG vs. AA: OR=2.39, 95% CI: 1.52-3.76), but not among Europeans; when stratified by source of control, no significant association was detected in both population-based and hospital-based populations. This meta-analysis demonstrated that the CTLA-4 +49A/G polymorphism significantly increases the risk of CRC, especially for Asians.

  12. Generation of leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-identical donors of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia using modifications of a limiting dilution assay.

    PubMed

    Smit, W M; Rijnbeek, M; van Bergen, C A; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, J H

    1998-03-01

    Donor leukocyte transfusions (DLT) have an anti-leukemic effect in most patients with a relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. However, DLT are often complicated by graft-versus-host disease. Selection of donor lymphocytes with a relative specificity for leukemic cells is desirable. The generation of leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses between HLA-identical donors and patients in bulk cultures showed major variations, and false negative results were observed. In a modification of a limiting dilution analysis (LDA) two-fold serial dilutions of HLA-identical donor mononuclear cells (MNC) were cultured in the presence of CML cells. The anti-leukemic CTL precursor frequencies in these donors varied between <1 and 9 per 106 MNC. HLA-restricted CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocytes as well as MHC non-restricted gammadelta T cells were responsible for the anti-leukemic responses. A positive correlation between cytotoxicity in the various wells after 3, 4 and 5 weeks of culture could be found. The LDA may be superior to bulk cultures in selecting stable immune responses and in separating multiple different anti-leukemic T cell responses in each donor-patient combination.

  13. Association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 +49A/G gene polymorphism with acute rejection risk in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Hua; Chen, Xue-Xia; Chen, Li; Zheng, Dong-Hua; Liu, Qiong-Shan; Xie, Wen-Feng

    2017-03-23

    The conclusions on the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) +49A/G gene polymorphism and acute rejection risk in renal transplantation are still debated. This meta-analysis was performed to update the association between CTLA4 +49A/G and acute rejection risk in renal transplantation. The association investigations were identified from PubMed and Cochrane Library, and eligible studies were included and synthesized using meta-analysis method. Fourteen reports were included into this meta-analysis for the association of CTLA4 A/G gene polymorphism and acute rejection risk in renal transplantation, consisting of 962 acute rejection patients and 2084 non-acute rejection controls. The association between CTLA4 G allele/GG genotype and acute rejection risk in renal transplantation was found in this meta-analysis (G allele: OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.03-1.44, P=.02; GG genotype: OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.10-1.69, P=.004). However, the AA genotype was not associated with acute rejection risk in renal transplantation. In conclusion, CTLA4 G allele/GG genotype is associated with the acute rejection risk in renal transplantation.

  14. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 plays an essential role in the function of CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory cells that control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Read, S; Malmström, V; Powrie, F

    2000-07-17

    It is now clear that functionally specialized regulatory T (Treg) cells exist as part of the normal immune repertoire, preventing the development of pathogenic responses to both self- and intestinal antigens. Here, we report that the Treg cells that control intestinal inflammation express the same phenotype (CD25(+)CD45RB(low)CD4(+)) as those that control autoimmunity. Previous studies have failed to identify how CD25(+) Treg cells function in vivo. Our studies reveal that the immune-suppressive function of these cells in vivo is dependent on signaling via the negative regulator of T cell activation cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), as well as secretion of the immune-suppressive cytokine transforming growth factor beta. Strikingly, constitutive expression of CTLA-4 among CD4(+) cells was restricted primarily to Treg cells, suggesting that CTLA-4 expression by these cells is involved in their immune-suppressive function. These findings raise the possibility that Treg cell function contributes to the immune suppression characteristic of CTLA-4 signaling. Identification of costimulatory molecules involved in the function of Treg cells may facilitate further characterization of these cells and development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  15. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and CD4 epitope mutations in the pre-core/core region of hepatitis B virus in chronic hepatitis B carriers in Northeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Zhand, Sareh; Tabarraei, Alijan; Nazari, Amineh; Moradi, Abdolvahab

    2017-07-25

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is vulnerable to many various mutations. Those within epitopes recognized by sensitized T cells may influence the re-emergence of the virus. This study was designed to investigate the mutation in immune epitope regions of HBV pre-core/core among chronic HBV patients of Golestan province, Northeast Iran. In 120 chronic HBV carriers, HBV DNA was extracted from blood plasma samples and PCR was done using specific primers. Direct sequencing and alignment of the pre-core/core region were applied using reference sequence from Gene Bank database (Accession Number AB033559). The study showed 27 inferred amino acid substitutions, 9 of which (33.3%) were in CD4 and 2 (7.4%) in cytotoxic T lymphocytes' (CTL) epitopes and 16 other mutations (59.2%) were observed in other regions. CTL escape mutations were not commonly observed in pre-core/core sequences of chronic HBV carriers in the locale of study. It can be concluded that most of the inferred amino acid substitutions occur in different immune epitopes other than CTL and CD4.

  16. Association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C viral infection and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: an Egyptian study.

    PubMed

    Khorshied, Mervat Mamdooh; Gouda, Heba Mahmoud; Khorshid, Ola M Reda

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The present study aimed to investigate the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell NHL risk in Egypt. Genotyping of CTLA-4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay for 181 adult patients with B-NHL and 200 controls. Our study revealed that CTLA-4 + 49 A/G polymorphism conferred increased risk of B-NHL (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-2.565). The prevalence of HCV infection in individuals harboring the mutant genotype + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T SNPs was higher in patients with B-NHL and was associated with increased risk of B-NHL (OR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.24-6.93 for + 49 A/G and OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.01-15.98 for - 318 C/T). In conclusion, some SNPs of CTLA-4 are genetic risk factors for B-NHL. Moreover, this study identified an association of CTLA-4 + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T promoter polymorphisms with HCV infection.

  17. Flavivirus-cross-reactive, HLA-DR15-restricted epitope on NS3 recognized by human CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones.

    PubMed

    Kurane, I; Okamoto, Y; Dai, L C; Zeng, L L; Brinton, M A; Ennis, F A

    1995-09-01

    The role of flavivirus-cross-reactive T lymphocytes in recovery from and pathogenesis of flavivirus infections is not known. In the present paper, we have defined a flavivirus-cross-reactive epitope recognized by two CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones, JK4 and JK43. The T cell clones were established from the peripheral blood T lymphocytes of a dengue-4-immune donor, using a limiting-dilution method with dengue-4 antigen. These two T cell clones were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1, 2, 3 and 4, yellow fever virus and West Nile virus, and recognized NS3 protein. The smallest synthetic peptide recognized by these T cell clones was an identical 9 amino acid peptide which contains amino acids 146 to 154 (VIGLYGNGV) of dengue-4 NS3. HLA-DR15 was the restriction allele for recognition of this epitope by JK4 and JK43. JK4 and JK43 both used T cell receptor V alpha 8, but JK4 used V beta 8 and JK43 used V beta 2. This result indicates that this epitope is recognized by two flavivirus-cross-reactive CD4+ T cell clones which originated from different T cells in vivo.

  18. Definition of an epitope on NS3 recognized by human CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones cross-reactive for dengue virus types 2, 3, and 4.

    PubMed

    Kurane, I; Zeng, L; Brinton, M A; Ennis, F A

    1998-01-20

    The role of dengue virus-specific serotype-cross-reactive T lymphocytes in recovery from and pathogenesis of dengue virus infections is not known. In the present paper, we have defined a dengue serotype-cross-reactive epitope recognized by two CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones, JK36 and JK46. These T cell clones were established from the peripheral blood T lymphocytes of a dengue-3-immune donor, using a limiting dilution method. JK36 and JK46 were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 2, 3, and 4, but not for type 1, and recognized the NS3 protein. The smallest synthetic peptide recognized by JK36 was an 8-amino acid peptide that contains amino acids (aa) 226 to 233 (VVAAEMEE) of NS3. The smallest peptide recognized by JK46 was an 11-amino acid peptide that contains aa 224 to 234 (TRVVAAEMEEA). HLA-DR15 was the restriction allele for recognition of these peptides by both JK36 and JK46. This is the first epitope to be defined that is recognized by human CD4+ CTL cross-reactive for dengue virus types 2, 3, and 4.

  19. Allospecific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize an H-2 peptide in the context of a murine major histocompatibility complex class I molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Song, E S; Linsk, R; Olson, C A; McMillan, M; Goodenow, R S

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) preferentially reactive with the alpha 1 external domain of the H-2Ld antigen by selecting for T cells capable of recognizing a variant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen sharing alpha 1 sequences with H-2Ld. Using these CTL, we demonstrate that a synthetic alpha 1 peptide corresponding to one of the helices derived from the H-2Ld molecule can be presented by a class I restriction element to reconstitute a CTL determinant borne by intact H-2Ld. Moreover, several other H-2L-reactive CTL generated independently were also able to recognize H-2Ld either as an intact alloantigen or as a peptide in conjunction with appropriate class I restriction elements. These data demonstrate that an H-2 peptide can reconstitute a CTL target structure and suggest that some alloreactive T cells in fact might be directed against allogeneic class I peptides in the context of a class I framework. PMID:3258067

  20. Abundant tax protein expression in CD4+ T cells infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is prevented by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hanon, E; Hall, S; Taylor, G P; Saito, M; Davis, R; Tanaka, Y; Usuku, K; Osame, M; Weber, J N; Bangham, C R

    2000-02-15

    The role of the cellular immune response in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infection is not fully understood. A persistently activated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to HTLV-I is found in the majority of infected individuals. However, it remains unclear whether this CTL response is protective or causes tissue damage. In addition, several observations paradoxically suggest that HTLV-I is transcriptionally silent in most infected cells and, therefore, not detectable by virus-specific CTLs. With the use of a new flow cytometric procedure, we show here that a high proportion of naturally infected CD4+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (between 10% and 80%) are capable of expressing Tax, the immunodominant target antigen recognized by virus-specific CTLs. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that autologous CD8+ T cells rapidly kill CD4+ cells naturally infected with HTLV-I and expressing Tax in vitro by a perforin-dependent mechanism. Consistent with these observations, we observed a significant negative correlation between the frequency of Tax(11-19)-specific CD8+ T cells and the percentage of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood of patients infected with HTLV-I. Those results are in accordance with the view that virus-specific CTLs participate in a highly efficient immune surveillance mechanism that persistently destroys Tax-expressing HTLV-I-infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. (Blood. 2000;95:1386-1392)

  1. Vaccination of rhesus monkeys with synthetic peptide in a fusogenic proteoliposome elicits simian immunodeficiency virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    An effective vaccine against the human immunodeficiency virus should be capable of eliciting both an antibody and a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. However, when viral proteins and peptides are formulated with traditional immunological adjuvants and inoculated via a route acceptable for use in humans, they have not been successful at eliciting virus-specific, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted CTL. We have designed a novel viral subunit vaccine by encapsulating a previously defined synthetic peptide CTL epitope of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag protein within a proteoliposome capable of attaching to and fusing with plasma membranes. Upon fusing, the encapsulated contents of this proteoliposome can enter the MHC class I processing pathway through the cytoplasm. In this report, we show that after a single intramuscular vaccination, rhesus monkeys develop a CD8+ cell-mediated, MHC class I-restricted CTL response that recognizes the synthetic peptide immunogen. The induced CTL also demonstrate antiviral immunity by recognizing SIV gag protein endogenously processed by target cells infected with SIV/vaccinia recombinant virus. These results demonstrate that virus-specific, MHC class I-restricted, CD8+ CTL can be elicited by a safe, nonreplicating viral subunit vaccine in a primate model for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Moreover, the proteoliposome vaccine formation described can include multiple synthetic peptide epitopes, and, thus, offers a simple means of generating antiviral cell-mediated immunity in a genetically heterogeneous population. PMID:1460429

  2. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing AFP(158-166) peptide and interleukin-15 activate AFP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longhao; Guo, Hao; Jiang, Ruoyu; Lu, Li; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Zhixiang; He, Xianghui

    2016-04-05

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are potent generators of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for adoptive immunotherapy; however, generation of APCs is cumbersome, expensive, and subject to the tumor microenvironment. Artificial APCs (aAPCs) have been developed as a cost-effective alternative to APCs. We developed a cellular aAPC that efficiently generated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-specific CTLs. We genetically modified the human B cell lymphoma cell line BJAB with a lentiviral vector to establish an aAPC called BA15. The expression of AFP(158-166)-HLA-A*02:01 complex, CD80, CD86, and interleukin (IL)-15 in BA15 cells was assessed. The efficiency of BA15 at generating AFP-specific CTLs and the specific cytotoxicity of CTLs against AFP+ cells were also determined. BA15 cells expressed high levels of AFP(158-166) peptide, HLA-A2, CD80, CD86, and IL-15. BA15 cells also exhibited higher efficiency in generating AFP-specific CTLs than did dendritic cells. These CTLs had greater cytotoxicity against AFP+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells than did CTLs obtained from dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo. Our novel aAPC system could provide a robust platform for the generation of functional AFP-specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Linking Pig-Tailed Macaque Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Haplotypes and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Escape Mutations in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Shayarana L.; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Diako; Bohn, Patrick S.; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; Davenport, Miles P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influence of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) alleles on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diversity in humans has been well characterized at the population level. MHC-I alleles likely affect viral diversity in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) model, but this is poorly characterized. We studied the evolution of SIV in pig-tailed macaques with a range of MHC-I haplotypes. SIVmac251 genomes were amplified from the plasma of 44 pig-tailed macaques infected with SIVmac251 at 4 to 10 months after infection and characterized by Illumina deep sequencing. MHC-I typing was performed on cellular RNA using Roche/454 pyrosequencing. MHC-I haplotypes and viral sequence polymorphisms at both individual mutations and groups of mutations spanning 10-amino-acid segments were linked using in-house bioinformatics pipelines, since cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape can occur at different amino acids within the same epitope in different animals. The approach successfully identified 6 known CTL escape mutations within 3 Mane-A1*084-restricted epitopes. The approach also identified over 70 new SIV polymorphisms linked to a variety of MHC-I haplotypes. Using functional CD8 T cell assays, we confirmed that one of these associations, a Mane-B028 haplotype-linked mutation in Nef, corresponded to a CTL epitope. We also identified mutations associated with the Mane-B017 haplotype that were previously described to be CTL epitopes restricted by Mamu-B*017:01 in rhesus macaques. This detailed study of pig-tailed macaque MHC-I genetics and SIV polymorphisms will enable a refined level of analysis for future vaccine design and strategies for treatment of HIV infection. IMPORTANCE Cytotoxic T lymphocytes select for virus escape mutants of HIV and SIV, and this limits the effectiveness of vaccines and immunotherapies against these viruses. Patterns of immune escape variants are similar in HIV type 1-infected human

  4. Identification of HLA-A*2402-restricted HCMV immediate early-1 (IE-1) epitopes as targets for CD8+ HCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong-Baeck; Kim, Hyun Ok; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Ha, Joo Eun; Jang, Sunphil; Lee, Sang-Guk; Lee, Kyungwon; Stroncek, David

    2009-08-23

    To identify novel HLA-A*2402-restricted human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate early-1 (IE-1) epitopes for adoptive immunotherapy, we explored 120 overlapping 15-amino acid spanning IE-1. These peptides were screened by measuring the frequency of polyclonal CD8+ T cells producing intracellular interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) using flow cytometry and the epitopes were validated with a HCMV-infected target Cr release cytotoxicity assay. Initial screening was performed with 12 mini-pools of 10 consecutive peptides made from 120 overlapping peptides15-amino acids in length that spanned IE-1. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HLA-A*2402 HCMV-seropositive donors were sensitized with each of the 12 mini-pools, mini-pools 1 and 2 induced the highest frequency of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) producing IFN-gamma. When PBMCs were stimulated with each of the twenty peptides belonging to mini-pools 1 and 2, peptides IE-11-15MESSAKRKMDPDNPD and IE-15-19AKRKMDPDNPDEGPS induced the greatest quantities of IFN-gamma production and cytotoxicity of HLA-matched HCMV-infected fibroblasts. To determine the exact HLA-A*2402-restricted epitopes within the two IE-1 proteins, we synthesized a total of twenty-one overlapping 9- or 10 amino acid peptides spanning IE-11-15 and IE-15-19. Peptide IE-13-12SSAKRKMDPD induced the greatest quantities of IFN-gamma production and target cell killing by CD8+ CTLs. HCMV IE-13-12SSAKRKMDPD is a HLA-A*2402-restricted HCMV IE-1 epitope that can serve as a common target for CD8+ HCMV-specific CTLs.

  5. Expansion of cytomegalovirus pp65 and IE-1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes for cytomegalovirus-specific immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Dunham, Kimberly; Stamer, Mindy; Mulieri, Kevin M; Lucas, Kenneth G

    2008-10-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) has proven effective in restoring cellular immunity to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and preventing viral reactivation after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). In an effort to develop a cost-effective, relatively rapid method of CMV CTL expansion, we investigated the use of a pool of overlapping CMV peptides. Because the possibility exists of vaccinating CMV-seronegative donors, and these individuals may have T cell responses predominantly against IE-1, commercially available peptide mixes for pp65 as well as IE-1 were used to stimulate CTLs from 10 seropositive donors. Of these 10 donors, 4 responded to pp65 only, 1 did not respond to either pp65 or IE-1, 4 responded to both pp65 and IE-1, and 1 responded to IE-1 only. These CMV- specific T cells included a mixture of CD4(+) and CD8(+) effectors, and specific cytotoxicity correlated with interferon-gamma production. The costs associated with a 28-day maintenance course of intravenous ganciclovir, cidofovir, foscarnet, and valganciclovir, as well as the preparation and shipping a single dose of CTLs, were determined. The price of generating CMV CTLs using this method was comparable to or less expensive than a 28-day maintenance course for these agents, not including the costs associated with drug administration, supportive care, and the treatment of drug-related complications. Considering the relative ease, low cost, and the fact that CTL administration can result in CMV-specific immune reconstitution, this option should be considered for patients with CMV reactivation or for prophylaxis in patients at high risk for infection.

  6. Identification of Immunogenic Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Containing Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral Treatment-Naïve HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Heredia, Juan; Lecanda, Aarón; Valenzuela-Ponce, Humberto; Brander, Christian; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic HIV vaccines may prove helpful to intensify antiretroviral treatment (ART) efficacy and may be an integral part of future cure strategies. Methods We examined IFN-gamma ELISpot responses to a panel of 218 HIV clade B consensus-based HIV protease-reverse transcriptase peptides, designed to mimic previously described and predicted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes overlapping drug resistance (DR) positions, that either included the consensus sequence or the DR variant sequence, in 49 ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Next generation sequencing was used to assess the presence of minority DR variants in circulating viral populations. Results Although a wide spectrum of differential magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptide pairs was observed, responses to DR peptides were frequent and strong in the study cohort. No difference between the median magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptides was observed. Interestingly, of the 22 peptides that were recognized by >15% of the participants, two-thirds (64%) corresponded to DR peptides. When analysing responses per peptide pair per individual, responses to only WT (median 4 pairs/individual) or DR (median 6 pairs/individual) were more common than responses to both WT and DR (median 2 pairs/individual; p<0.001). While the presence of ELISpot responses to WT peptides was frequently associated with the presence of the corresponding peptide sequence in the patient’s virus (mean 68% of cases), responses to DR peptides were generally not associated with the presence of DR mutations in the viral population, even at low frequencies (mean 1.4% of cases; p = 0.0002). Conclusions Our data suggests that DR peptides are frequently immunogenic and raises the potential benefit of broadening the antigens included in a therapeutic vaccine approach to immunogenic epitopes containing common DR sequences. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of responses elicited by DR peptides. PMID:26808823

  7. Multiple HLA A11-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes of different immunogenicities in the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 4.

    PubMed

    Gavioli, R; Kurilla, M G; de Campos-Lima, P O; Wallace, L E; Dolcetti, R; Murray, R J; Rickinson, A B; Masucci, M G

    1993-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous herpesvirus, induces potent HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Analyses of target antigen choice have shown that the very strong CTL responses which are often observed through the HLA A11 allele map are due almost entirely to a single transformation-associated EBV protein, the nuclear antigen EBNA4. Here, we sought to determine the number and relative immunogenicities of HLA A11-restricted epitopes within this 938-amino-acid protein. An initial screening with a series of recombinant vaccinia virus vectors encoding progressively truncated forms of EBNA4 was followed by peptide sensitization experiments using overlapping 14- or 15-mers from the entire sequence. These two approaches allowed the identification of five epitope regions located between residues 101 and 115, 416 and 429, 396 and 410, 481 and 495, and 551 and 564 of the EBNA4 molecule. CTL preparations from all seven HLA A11-positive donors tested had demonstrable reactivities against the 416-to-429 peptide, whereas reactivities against the other epitopes either tended to be lost on serial passage or, for some of the donors, were never detected. The immunodominance of the 416-to-429 epitope was further supported by peptide dilution assays using polyclonal effectors and by CTL cloning experiments. Analysis of the 416-to-429 region identified the nanomer 416-424 (IVTDFSVIK) as the cognate peptide. This peptide was able to sensitize targets to lysis by A11-restricted CTL clones at concentrations as low as 5 x 10(-14) M.

  8. Class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines against which they were raised.

    PubMed

    Hill, A B; Lee, S P; Haurum, J S; Murray, N; Yao, Q Y; Rowe, M; Signoret, N; Rickinson, A B; McMichael, A J

    1995-06-01

    We have raised CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from three Epstein-Barr virus-seropositive donors by incubating peripheral blood lymphocytes with irradiated autologous B95.8-strain EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cells (LCL). However, to detect lysis in a standard 51Cr release assay of the LCL against which these CTL were raised, superinfection with recombinant vaccinia expressing the appropriate EBV protein or incubation with the peptide epitope was necessary. The untreated LCL were not lysed, even though Western blotting demonstrated that they expressed the EBV antigens containing the CTL epitopes. We have found CTL of this phenotype that are restricted by human leukocyte antigen-A2, -A3, -B7, or -B39, and which recognize the EBV latent proteins, EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA)-3A, EBNA-3C, or terminal protein. During these experiments, we identified a new human leukocyte antigen-A3-restricted EBNA-3A epitope, residues 603-611, RLRAEAGVK. We raised a spontaneous LCL, transformed by endogenous EBV, from one donor, but this was also not lysed. For at least one of the epitopes, CTL from another donor lysed the LCL without superinfection or addition of peptides. We conclude that the CTL were unable to achieve a high enough avidity of interaction with untreated LCL to trigger effector function, although the LCL were able to stimulate them to grow in vitro for up to 4 mo. To assess whether a small percentage of the LCL might possess a higher antigen density, we used an assay of tumor necrosis factor release from a CTL clone, which was able to detect antigen-bearing cells representing only 1% of a stimulating LCL population. Nevertheless, the untreated autologous LCL line failed to stimulate tumor necrosis factor release.

  9. Cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated elimination of target cells transduced with engineered adeno-associated virus type 2 vector in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengwen; Hirsch, Matt; DiPrimio, Nina; Asokan, Aravind; Goudy, Kevin; Tisch, Roland; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-07-01

    A recent clinical trial in patients with hemophilia B has suggested that adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminated AAV-transduced hepatocytes and resulted in therapeutic failure. AAV capsids elicit a CTL response in animal models; however, these capsid-specific CTLs fail to kill AAV-transduced target cells in mice. To better model the human clinical trial data in mice, we introduced an immunodominant epitope derived from ovalbumin (OVA; SIINFEKL) into the AAV capsid and tested CTL-mediated killing of AAV2-transduced target tissues in vivo. Initially, in vitro experiments demonstrated both classical class I and cross-presentation of the OVA antigen, following endogenous expression or AAV2-OVA vector transduction, respectively. Furthermore, an OVA-specific CTL response was elicited after muscular or systemic injection of the AAV2-OVA vector. Finally, CTL reactivity was enhanced in mice with established SIINFEKL-specific immunity after AAV2-OVA/alpha1 anti-trypsin (AAT) administration. Most importantly, these OVA-specific CTLs decreased AAT expression in mice treated with AAV2-OVA/AAT vector that followed a time course mimicking uncoating kinetics of AAV2 transduction in OVA-immunized mice. These results demonstrate that AAV capsid-derived antigens elicit CD8(+) CTL reactivity, and these CTLs eliminated AAV-transduced target cells in mice. Notably, this model system can be exploited to study the kinetics of capsid presentation from different serotypes of AAV and permit the design of novel strategies to block CTL-mediated killing of AAV-transduced cells.

  10. Acquisition of an anti-idiotypic cytotoxic T lymphocyte repertoire in B cell-transferred or tetraparental bone marrow chimeric mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, H.; Bitoh, S.; Fujimoto, S.

    1987-10-01

    In previous studies we showed that major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for the cross-reactive idiotype (CRI) of MOPC-104E myeloma protein could only be induced in BALB/c or BAB-14 mice which have the ability to produce the CRI, but not in C.AL-20 or C.B-20 mice which have no ability to produce the CRI. The strong correlation between CRI-specific CTL responder strains and CRI producers supports the idea that the VH gene products are intrinsic primary antigenic stimuli for the generation of the anti-idiotypic CTL. To investigate the role of B lymphocytes in the selection of T lymphocyte repertoire, the purified B cells of CRI producer strains were repeatedly injected into anti-CRI CTL nonresponder neonatal mice. CRI-specific CTL activity was successfully induced in the CRI nonproducer mice only when they were exposed to CRI producer strain B lymphocytes from neonatal life. When the CTL nonresponder adult mice received CRI producer B lymphocytes, the nonresponder phenotype was not changed into the responder phenotype. Inducibility of CRI-specific CTL was also analyzed in tetraparental bone marrow chimeras. When CRI nonproducer bone marrow cells repopulated along with CRI producer bone marrow cells, the anti-CRI CTL of CRI nonproducer origin were generated. Adaptive differentiation of haplotype preference was also observed. When these observations are taken collectively, we see that the anti-idiotypic T lymphocyte repertoire is not a genetically determined one, but rather that the repertoire of T lymphocytes strongly depends on the postnatal selection process through the intrinsic idiotypic repertoire of B lymphocytes, i.e., internal images.

  11. Acquisition of an anti-idiotypic cytotoxic T lymphocyte repertoire in B cell-transferred or tetraparental bone marrow chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Bitoh, S; Fujimoto, S

    1987-10-01

    In previous studies we showed that major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for the cross-reactive idiotype (CRI) of MOPC-104E myeloma protein could only be induced in BALB/c or BAB-14 mice which have the ability to produce the CRI, but not in C.AL-20 or C.B-20 mice which have no ability to produce the CRI. The strong correlation between CRI-specific CTL responder strains and CRI producers supports the idea that the VH gene products are intrinsic primary antigenic stimuli for the generation of the anti-idiotypic CTL. To investigate the role of B lymphocytes in the selection of T lymphocyte repertoire, the purified B cells of CRI producer strains were repeatedly injected into anti-CRI CTL nonresponder neonatal mice. CRI-specific CTL activity was successfully induced in the CRI nonproducer mice only when they were exposed to CRI producer strain B lymphocytes from neonatal life. When the CTL nonresponder adult mice received CRI producer B lymphocytes, the nonresponder phenotype was not changed into the responder phenotype. Inducibility of CRI-specific CTL was also analyzed in tetraparental bone marrow chimeras. When CRI nonproducer bone marrow cells repopulated along with CRI producer bone marrow cells, the anti-CRI CTL of CRI nonproducer origin were generated. Adaptive differentiation of haplotype preference was also observed. When these observations are taken collectively, we see that the anti-idiotypic T lymphocyte repertoire is not a genetically determined one, but rather that the repertoire of T lymphocytes strongly depends on the postnatal selection process through the intrinsic idiotypic repertoire of B lymphocytes, i.e., internal images.

  12. De novo generation of escape variant-specific CD8+ T-cell responses following cytotoxic T-lymphocyte escape in chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Allen, Todd M; Yu, Xu G; Kalife, Elizabeth T; Reyor, Laura L; Lichterfeld, Mathias; John, Mina; Cheng, Michael; Allgaier, Rachel L; Mui, Stanley; Frahm, Nicole; Alter, Galit; Brown, Nancy V; Johnston, Mary N; Rosenberg, Eric S; Mallal, Simon A; Brander, Christian; Walker, Bruce D; Altfeld, Marcus

    2005-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evades CD8(+) T-cell responses through mutations within targeted epitopes, but little is known regarding its ability to generate de novo CD8(+) T-cell responses to such mutants. Here we examined gamma interferon-positive, HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses and autologous viral sequences in an HIV-1-infected individual for more than 6 years following acute infection. Fourteen optimal HIV-1 T-cell epitopes were targeted by CD8(+) T cells, four of which underwent mutation associated with dramatic loss of the original CD8(+) response. However, following the G(357)S escape in the HLA-A11-restricted Gag(349-359) epitope and the decline of wild-type-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses, a novel CD8(+) T-cell response equal in magnitude to the original response was generated against the variant epitope. CD8(+) T cells targeting the variant epitope did not exhibit cross-reactivity against the wild-type epitope but rather utilized a distinct T-cell receptor Vbeta repertoire. Additional studies of chronically HIV-1-infected individuals expressing HLA-A11 demonstrated that the majority of the subjects targeted the G(357)S escape variant of the Gag(349-359) epitope, while the wild-type consensus sequence was significantly less frequently recognized. These data demonstrate that de novo responses against escape variants of CD8(+) T-cell epitopes can be generated in chronic HIV-1 infection and provide the rationale for developing vaccines to induce CD8(+) T-cell responses directed against both the wild-type and variant forms of CD8 epitopes to prevent the emergence of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte escape variants.

  13. Computer-based design of an HLA-haplotype and HIV-clade independent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assay for monitoring HIV-specific immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Amicosante, Massimo; Gioia, Cristiana; Montesano, Carla; Casetti, Rita; Topino, Simone; D'Offizi, Gianpiero; Cappelli, Giulia; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Colizzi, Vittorio; Poccia, Fabrizio; Pucillo, Leopoldo P.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- specific CD8-positive cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) play a key role in controlling HIV infection. Monitoring CTL response could be clinically relevant during structured therapy interruption (STI), HIV exposure, and vaccine trials. However, HLA patients' restriction and HIV variability limited the development of a CTL assay with broad specificity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed an HLA-class I/HIV-1 clade independent assay for assessing HIV- specific CTL by using a computer-assisted selection ofthe CTL epitopes. Twenty-eight 15-mers were selected by peptide-binding motifs analysis using different databases (HIV-Immunology Database, SYFPEITHI, BIMAS). Altogether they putatively bind to more than 90% of HLA haplotypes in different populations, with an overall HIV-1 variability below 9%. The peptide pool was used as an antigen in an intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay for quantifying HIV-specific CTL response. RESULTS: The test can be performed using both fresh and cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whereas GAG protein as antigen works only on fresh PBMC. A significantly higher CTL response with respect to HIV-negative controls was detected in all HIV-1 infected subjects of two groups of patients with different ethnicities (Caucasians and Africans) and coming from areas with different HIV-1 clade prevalences (clade B and A/G, respectively). In Caucasian patients, after month of STI, the number of HIV-1 specific CTL (2,896 +/- 2,780 IFN-gamma specific CD8 cells/ml) was significantly higher than that found at enrolment (2,125 +/- 4,426 IFN-gamma specific CD8 cells/ml, p< 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that this CTL assay is broadly specific and could represent a useful clinical tool for HIV immunodiagnostic independent of HLA-haplotype and HIV-clade variabilities. PMID:12606814

  14. Target cell death triggered by cytotoxic T lymphocytes: a target cell mutant distinguishes passive pore formation and active cell suicide mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ucker, D S; Wilson, J D; Hebshi, L D

    1994-01-01

    The role of the target cell in its own death mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) has been controversial. The ability of the pore-forming granule components of CTL to induce target cell death directly has been taken to suggest an essentially passive role for the target. This view of CTL-mediated killing ascribes to the target the single role of providing an antigenic stimulus to the CTL; this signal results in the vectoral degranulation and secretion of pore-forming elements onto the target. On the other hand, by a number of criteria, target cell death triggered by CTL appears fundamentally different from death resulting from membrane damage and osmotic lysis. CTL-triggered target cell death involves primary internal lesions of the target cell that reflect a physiological cell death process. Orderly nuclear disintegration, including lamin phosphorylation and solubilization, chromatin condensation, and genome digestion, are among the earliest events, preceding the loss of plasma membrane integrity. We have tested directly the involvement of the target cell in its own death by examining whether we could isolate mutants of target cells that have retained the ability to be recognized by and provide an antigenic stimulus to CTL while having lost the capacity to respond by dying. Here, we describe one such mutant, BW87. We have used this CTL-resistant mutant to analyze the mechanisms of CTL-triggered target cell death under a variety of conditions. The identification of a mutable target cell element essential for the cell death response to CTL provides genetic evidence that target cell death reflects an active cell suicide process similar to other physiological cell deaths. PMID:8264610

  15. A Novel CD8-Independent High-Avidity Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Response Directed against an Epitope in the Phosphoprotein of the Paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter M.; Parks, Griffith D.; Alexander-Miller, Martha A.

    2001-01-01

    Adoptive transfer studies have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) of high avidity, capable of recognizing low levels of peptide-MHC I molecules, are more efficient at reducing viral titers than are low-avidity CTL, thus establishing CTL avidity as a critical parameter for the ability of a CTL to clear virus in vivo. It has been well documented that CTL of high avidity are relatively CD8 independent, whereas low-avidity CTL require CD8 engagement in order to become activated. In this study we have analyzed the antiviral CTL response elicited following infection with the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5). We have identified the immunodominant and subdominant CTL responses and subsequently assessed the avidity of these responses by their CD8 dependence. This is the first study in which the relationship between immunodominance and CTL avidity has been investigated. The immunodominant response was directed against an epitope present in the viral M protein, and subdominant responses were directed against epitopes present in the P, F, and HN proteins. Similarly to other CTL responses we have analyzed, the immunodominant response and the subdominant F and HN responses were comprised of both high- and low-avidity CTL. However, the subdominant response directed against the epitope present in the P protein is novel, as it is exclusively high avidity. This high-avidity response is independent of both the route of infection and expression by recombinant SV5. A further understanding of the inherent properties of P that elicit only high-avidity CTL may allow for the design of more efficacious vaccine vectors that preferentially elicit high-avidity CTL in vivo. PMID:11581375

  16. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes directed to seasonal influenza A viruses cross-react with the newly emerging H7N9 virus.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; de Mutsert, Gerrie; Geelhoed-Mieras, Martina M; Hillaire, Marine L B; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2014-02-01

    In February 2013, zoonotic transmission of a novel influenza A virus of the H7N9 subtype was reported in China. Although at present no sustained human-to-human transmission has been reported, a pandemic outbreak of this H7N9 virus is feared. Since neutralizing antibodies to the hemagglutinin (HA) globular head domain of the virus are virtually absent in the human population, there is interest in identifying other correlates of protection, such as cross-reactive CD8(+) T cells (cytotoxic T lymphocytes [CTLs]) elicited during seasonal influenza A virus infections. These virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are known to recognize conserved internal proteins of influenza A viruses predominantly, but it is unknown to what extent they cross-react with the newly emerging H7N9 virus. Here, we assessed the cross-reactivity of seasonal H3N2 and H1N1 and pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus-specific polyclonal CD8(+) T cells, obtained from HLA-typed study subjects, with the novel H7N9 virus. The cross-reactivity of CD8(+) T cells to H7N9 variants of known influenza A virus epitopes and H7N9 virus-infected cells was determined by their gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response and lytic activity. It was concluded that, apart from recognition of individual H7N9 variant epitopes, CD8(+) T cells to seasonal influenza viruses display considerable cross-reactivity with the novel H7N9 virus. The presence of these cross-reactive CD8(+) T cells may afford some protection against infection with the new virus.

  17. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, YA; Seregin, SS; Kousa, YA; Rastall, DPW; Appledorn, DM; Godbehere, S; Schutte, BC; Amalfitano, A

    2014-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general. PMID:23949283

  18. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  19. Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Directed to Seasonal Influenza A Viruses Cross-React with the Newly Emerging H7N9 Virus

    PubMed Central

    van de Sandt, Carolien E.; Kreijtz, Joost H. C. M.; de Mutsert, Gerrie; Geelhoed-Mieras, Martina M.; Hillaire, Marine L. B.; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2014-01-01

    In February 2013, zoonotic transmission of a novel influenza A virus of the H7N9 subtype was reported in China. Although at present no sustained human-to-human transmission has been reported, a pandemic outbreak of this H7N9 virus is feared. Since neutralizing antibodies to the hemagglutinin (HA) globular head domain of the virus are virtually absent in the human population, there is interest in identifying other correlates of protection, such as cross-reactive CD8+ T cells (cytotoxic T lymphocytes [CTLs]) elicited during seasonal influenza A virus infections. These virus-specific CD8+ T cells are known to recognize conserved internal proteins of influenza A viruses predominantly, but it is unknown to what extent they cross-react with the newly emerging H7N9 virus. Here, we assessed the cross-reactivity of seasonal H3N2 and H1N1 and pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus-specific polyclonal CD8+ T cells, obtained from HLA-typed study subjects, with the novel H7N9 virus. The cross-reactivity of CD8+ T cells to H7N9 variants of known influenza A virus epitopes and H7N9 virus-infected cells was determined by their gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response and lytic activity. It was concluded that, apart from recognition of individual H7N9 variant epitopes, CD8+ T cells to seasonal influenza viruses display considerable cross-reactivity with the novel H7N9 virus. The presence of these cross-reactive CD8+ T cells may afford some protection against infection with the new virus. PMID:24257602

  20. Antigenic, functional, and molecular genetic studies of human natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes not restricted by the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Lanier, L L; Le, A M; Cwirla, S; Federspiel, N; Phillips, J H

    1986-11-01

    Cytotoxicity not restricted by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is mediated by two distinct types of lymphocyte: natural killer (NK) cells and non-MHC-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). These two types of cytotoxic lymphocytes can be distinguished by antigenic phenotype, function, and molecular genetic studies. In human peripheral blood, NK cells are identified by expression of the Leu-19 and/or CD16 cell surface antigens, and lack of CD3/T cell antigen receptor (Ti) complex expression (i.e., CD3-,Leu-19+). Peripheral blood non-MHC-restricted CTL express both CD3 and Leu-19 (i.e., CD3+, Leu-19+, referred to as Leu-19+ T cells). Both Leu-19+ T cells and NK cells lyse "NK-sensitive" hematopoietic tumor cell targets, such as K562, without deliberate immunization of the host. However, most "NK activity" in peripheral blood is mediated by NK cells, because they are usually more abundant and more efficient cytotoxic effectors than Leu-19+ T cells. The cytolytic activity of both NK cells and Leu-19+ T cells against hematopoietic targets was enhanced by recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL 2). NK cells, but not peripheral blood Leu-19+ T cells, were also capable of lysing solid tumor cell targets after short-term culture in rIL 2. Southern blot analysis of NK cells revealed that both the T cell antigen receptor beta-chain genes and the T cell-associated gamma genes were not rearranged, but were in germ-line configuration. These findings indicate that NK cells are distinct in lineage from T lymphocytes and do not use the T cell antigen receptor genes for target recognition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Enhanced in vivo gene expression mediated by listeriolysin O incorporated anionic LPDII: Its utility in cytotoxic T lymphocyte-inducing DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xun; Provoda, Chester; Lee, Kyung-Dall

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced in vivo gene expression using non-viral vectors is a critical issue in gene therapy in general. Among the many potential utilities of non-viral vector-mediated gene delivery, its application in DNA-based vaccination is an attractive approach with several practical advantages over conventional vaccination. We have previously shown that the endosomolytic bacterial protein listeriolysin O (LLO) is capable of facilitating transfection in vitro using the LPDII (anionic liposome-polycation-DNA complexes) delivery system. In the present study we have extended and investigated the DNA delivery of LLO-containing LPDII to in vivo and evaluated its utility in DNA vaccination in mice. We further investigated the ability of this non-viral gene delivery system to elicit an immune response to a model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), particularly focusing on the OVA-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, after delivery of a plasmid containing the OVA cDNA. A DNA prime and protein boost protocol was employed to generate cytotoxic T cell responses. Our results show that increased in vitro and in vivo transfection efficiencies were observed when LLO was incorporated into LPDII. This LLO-LPDII formulation produced an enhanced functional antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response in vivo compared to the heat-inactivated LLO-containing LPDII (HI-LLO-LPDII) formulation. Furthermore, a significantly higher CTL frequency was observed in the splenocytes isolated from the mice primed with LLO-LPDII by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. Interferon-γ production upon specific stimulation by OVA-specific CD8(+) peptide was also significantly stronger with the inclusion of LLO into LPDII. These findings suggest that the LLO-containing LPDII system possesses noteworthy potential as a candidate carrier for DNA vaccine delivery.

  2. Influence of the Route of Infection on Development of T-Cell Receptor β-Chain Repertoires of Reovirus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Jonathan R.; Smith, Jeremy; Cunningham, Cynthia; Cuff, Christopher F.

    2004-01-01

    It is well established that the route of infection affects the nature of the adaptive immune response. However, little is known about the effects of the route of exposure on development of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Alternative antigen-presenting cell populations, tissue-restricted expression of class I major histocompatibility complex-encoded molecules, and unique T-cell receptor (TCR)-bearing cells in mucosal tissues could influence the selection and expansion of responder T cells. This study addresses the question of whether the route of virus infection affects the selection and expansion of subpopulations of virus-specific CTLs. Mice were infected orally or in the hind footpads with reovirus, and the repertoires of TCR β-chains expressed on virus-specific CD8+ T cells in Peyer's patches or lymph nodes and spleens were examined. CD8+ cells expressing the variable gene segment of the TCR β-chain 6 (Vβ6) expanded in the spleens of mice infected by either route and in CTL lines established from the spleens and draining lymphoid tissues. Adoptively transferred Vβ6+ CD8+ T cells from orally or parenterally infected donors expanded in reovirus-infected severe combined immunodeficient recipient mice and mediated cytotoxicity ex vivo. Furthermore, recovered Vβ6+ cells were enriched for clones utilizing uniform complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) lengths. However, sequencing of CDR3β regions from Vβ6+ CD8+ cells indicated that Jβ gene segment usage is significantly more restricted in CTLs from orally infected mice, suggesting that the route of infection affects selection and/or subsequent expansion of virus-specific CTLs. PMID:14722312

  3. Anti-HTLV-1 tax antibody and tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte are associated with a reduction in HTLV-1 proviral load in asymptomatic carriers.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Masaki; Kozako, Tomohiro; Sawada, Takashi; Matsushita, Kakushi; Ozaki, Atsuo; Hamada, Heiichiro; Kawada, Hideaki; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Tokunaga, Masahito; Haraguchi, Koichi; Uozumi, Kimiharu; Arima, Naomichi; Tei, Chuwa

    2007-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that higher anti-human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) antibody titer and lower anti-HTLV-1 Tax antibody reactivity are risk factors for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. In the present study, we analyzed the relationships between these factors and clarified their significance. Forty-five carriers were examined for anti-HTLV-1 and anti-Tax antibody by ELISA. In addition, 43 of the 45 carriers with HLA-A*0201 and/or A*2402 were examined for frequency of Tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) using HTLV-1/HLA tetramers, and 44 were examined for proviral load by real-time PCR. The relationships between these factors were analyzed statistically. The frequencies of Tax11-19 and Tax301-309-specific CTLs were significantly higher in the anti-Tax antibody-positive group as compared with the antibody-negative group (P = 0.002 and 0.033, respectively). Anti-HTLV-1 antibody titer had a positive correlation with proviral load (P = 0.019), whereas anti-Tax antibody did not show a significant correlation. Higher frequencies of both Tax11-19 and Tax301-309-specific CTLs are related to a reduction in proviral load (P = 0.017 and 0.015, respectively). Synergistic interactions of humoral and cellular immunity against Tax protein were demonstrated in HTLV-1 carriers. Tax-specific CTL may reduce HTLV-1 proviral load to prevent asymptomatic carriers from developing adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

  4. Shifting immunodominance pattern of two cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes in the F glycoprotein of the Long strain of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Carolina; de León, Patricia; Medina, Francisco; Melero, José A; García-Barreno, Blanca; Del Val, Margarita

    2004-11-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory infection in children and in the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein has long been recognized as a vaccine candidate as it elicits cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) and antibody responses. Two murine H-2K(d)-restricted CTL epitopes (F85-93 and F92-106) are known in the F protein of the A2 strain of RSV. F-specific CTL lines using BCH4 fibroblasts that are persistently infected with the Long strain of human RSV as stimulators were generated, and it was found that in this strain only the F85-93 epitope is conserved. Motif based epitope prediction programs and an F2 chain deleted F protein encoded in a recombinant vaccinia virus enabled identification of a new epitope in the Long strain, F249-258, which is presented by K(d) as a 9-mer (TYMLTNSEL) or a 10-mer (TYMLTNSELL) peptide. The results suggest that the 10-mer might be a naturally processed endogenous K(d) ligand. The CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses to epitopes F85-93 and F249-258 present in the F protein of RSV Long were found to be strongly skewed to F85-93 in in vitro multispecific CTL lines and in vivo during a secondary response to a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the entire F protein. However, no hierarchy in CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses to F85-93 and F249-258 epitopes was observed in vivo during a primary response.

  5. TCR gamma delta cytotoxic T lymphocytes expressing the killer cell-inhibitory receptor p58.2 (CD158b) selectively lyse acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Dolstra, H; Fredrix, H; van der Meer, A; de Witte, T; Figdor, C; van de Wiel-van Kemenade, E

    2001-05-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are thought to play an important role in the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) response. Unfortunately, GVL reactivity is often associated with life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Characterization of CTL that selectively attack leukemic cells but not normal cells may lead to the development of adjuvant immunotherapy that separates GVL from GVHD. Here, we describe TCR gamma delta (V gamma 9/V delta 1) CTL, isolated from the peripheral blood of an AML patient after stem cell transplantation (SCT), that very efficiently lysed freshly isolated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and AML cell lines. Interestingly, HLA-matched non-malignant hematopoietic cells were not killed. We revealed that the killer cell-inhibitory receptor (KIR) p58.2 (CD158b) specific for group 2 HLA-C molecules negatively regulates the cytotoxic effector function displayed by these TCR gamma delta CTL. First, an antibody against HLA-C enhances lysis of non-malignant cells. Secondly, stable transfection of HLA-Cw*0304 into the class I-negative cell line 721.221 inhibited lysis. Finally, engagement of p58.2 by antibodies immobilized on Fc gamma R-expressing murine P815 cells inhibits CD3- and TCR gamma delta-directed lysis. Compared to non-malignant hematopoietic cells, AML cells express much lower levels of MHC class I molecules making them susceptible to lysis by p58.2(+) TCR gamma delta CTL. Such KIR-regulated CTL reactivity may have a role in the GVL response without affecting normal tissues of the host and leading to GVHD.

  6. Adoptive transfer of PR1 cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with reduced leukemia burden in a mouse acute myeloid leukemia xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; Wang, Changqing; Jones, Dan; Quintanilla, Kathryn E; Li, Dan; Wang, Yang; Wieder, Eric D; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Alatrash, Gheath; Mj, You; Munsell, Mark F; Lu, Sijie; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-01

    Tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been used in the treatment of human cancer, including leukemia. Several studies have established PR1 peptide, an HLA-A2.1-restricted peptide derived from proteinase 3 (P3), as a human leukemia-associated antigen. PR1-specific CTL elicited in vitro from healthy donors have been shown to lyse P3-expressing AML cells from patients. We investigated whether PR1-CTL can be adoptively transferred into NOD/SCID mice to eliminate human leukemia cells. PR1-CTL were generated in bulk culture from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with autologous dendritic cells. Human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples were injected and engrafted in murine bone marrow at 2 weeks post-transfer. Following adoptive transfer, bone marrow aspirate from mice that received AML alone had 72-88% blasts in a hypercellular marrow, whereas mice that received AML plus PR1-CTL co-infusion had normal hematopoietic elements and only 3-18% blasts in a hypocellular marrow. The PR1-CTL persisted in the bone marrow and liver and maintained a CD45RA⁻CD28+ effector phenotype. We found that adoptive transfer of PR1-CTL generated in vitro is associated with reduced AML cells in NOD/SCID mice. PR1-CTL can migrate to the sites of disease and maintain their capacity to kill the AML cells. The surface phenotype of PR1-CTL was consistent with their trafficking pattern in both vascular and end-organ tissues.

  7. Adoptive transfer of PR1 cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with reduced leukemia burden in a mouse acute myeloid leukemia xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Wang, Changqing; Jones, Dan; Quintanilla, Kathryn E.; Li, Dan; Wang, Yang; Wieder, Eric D.; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Alatrash, Gheath; You, M. James; Munsell, Mark F.; Lu, Sijie; Qazibash, Muzaffar H.; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Background aims Tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been used in the treatment of human cancer, including leukemia. Several studies have established PR1 peptide, an HLA-A2.1-restricted peptide derived from proteinase 3 (P3), as a human leukemia-associated antigen. PR1-specific CTL elicited in vitro from healthy donors have been shown to lyse P3-expressing AML cells from patients. We investigated whether PR1-CTL can be adoptively transferred into NOD/SCID mice to eliminate human leukemia cells. Methods PR1-CTL were generated in bulk culture from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with autologous dendritic cells. Human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples were injected and engrafted in murine bone marrow at 2 weeks post-transfer. Results Following adoptive transfer, bone marrow aspirate from mice that received AML alone had 72–88% blasts in a hypercellular marrow, whereas mice that received AML plus PR1-CTL co-infusion had normal hematopoietic elements and only 3–18% blasts in a hypocellular marrow. The PR1-CTL persisted in the bone marrow and liver and maintained a CD45RA− CD28+ effector phenotype. Conclusions We found that adoptive transfer of PR1-CTL generated in vitro is associated with reduced AML cells in NOD/SCID mice. PR1-CTL can migrate to the sites of disease and maintain their capacity to kill the AML cells. The surface phenotype of PR1-CTL was consistent with their trafficking pattern in both vascular and end-organ tissues. PMID:20735170

  8. Prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke alters later-life antitumor cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity via possible changes in T-regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sheung P; Silverstone, Allen E; Lai, Zhi-Wei; Zelikoff, Judith T

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that maternal smoking increases the incidence in the progeny of certain childhood cancers. Our previous study in mice demonstrated the feasibility of such an association by demonstrating that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) elevated the incidence of transplanted tumors and reduced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity in juvenile male offspring. The current study extends these findings by investigating the relationship between CS-induced CTL suppression and effects on regulators of effector T-cell activity, such as T-regulatory (Treg; CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+) cells and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Results here demonstrate that in utero exposure to CS, at a maternal particle concentration of 15 mg/m3 (4 h/d, 5 d/wk), significantly reduced ex vivo CTL activity of whole splenocytes (and isolated CD8+ cells) against tumor cells both before and after injection of prenatally exposed mice with EL4 lymphoma cells. In contrast, prenatal CS exposure significantly increased levels of thymic Treg cells in a time-dependent manner following tumor cell injection. In vitro production of TGF-β by splenocytes recovered from prenatally exposed, tumor-bearing mice was also altered. Neither prenatal CS exposure nor subsequent administration of EL4 cells exerted any marked effects on lymphoid organ weights, cellularity, or histologic profiles. Given that Treg cells and TGF-β suppress effector T-cell activities, these findings suggest possible immune mechanisms by which early exposure to CS reduces CTL tumoricidal activity during tumor cell development. Data suggest that children of smoking mothers may be less able to mount an appropriate adaptive immune response to tumors, thus increasing their risk for some cancers later in life.

  9. Optimal lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus sequences restricted by H-2Db major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gairin, J E; Mazarguil, H; Hudrisier, D; Oldstone, M B

    1995-04-01

    Infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus induces the generation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). In the H-2b mouse, this cellular immune response is directed against three viral structural epitopes (GP1, GP2, and NP) presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I H-2Db molecules. This study was undertaken to delineate which sequence of each of these three epitopes is optimal for MHC binding and CTL recognition. The first step was to synthesize the relevant peptides truncated at the N or C terminus and flanking the crucial H-2Db-anchoring Asn residue in position 5. These peptides were then tested (i) for their binding properties in two H-2Db-specific assays with viable cells (upregulation of H-2Db expression on the surface of RMA-S cells and competition against the Db-restricted peptide 125I-gp276-286 on T2-Db cells) and (ii) for their abilities to sensitize H-2b target cells for CTL lysis in vitro. For optimal antigenic presentation, all three epitopes required the MHC-anchoring Asn residue at position 5 of their sequences. The results clearly and unambiguously delineated optimal lengths for two of the epitopes and two options for the third. NP appeared as a conventional 9-amino-acid (aa)-long peptide, np396-404 (FQPQNGQFI). GP2 was defined as a longer peptide (11 aa), gp276-286 (SGVENPGGYCL). Characterization of the GP1 epitope was more complex: the 9-aa-long peptide gp33-41 (KAVYNFATC) and the carboxyl-extended 11-aa-long peptide gp33-43 (KAVYN FATCGI) were both established as possible optimal sequences depending on the cell line used to test binding and lysis.

  10. Optimal lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus sequences restricted by H-2Db major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gairin, J E; Mazarguil, H; Hudrisier, D; Oldstone, M B

    1995-01-01

    Infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus induces the generation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). In the H-2b mouse, this cellular immune response is directed against three viral structural epitopes (GP1, GP2, and NP) presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I H-2Db molecules. This study was undertaken to delineate which sequence of each of these three epitopes is optimal for MHC binding and CTL recognition. The first step was to synthesize the relevant peptides truncated at the N or C terminus and flanking the crucial H-2Db-anchoring Asn residue in position 5. These peptides were then tested (i) for their binding properties in two H-2Db-specific assays with viable cells (upregulation of H-2Db expression on the surface of RMA-S cells and competition against the Db-restricted peptide 125I-gp276-286 on T2-Db cells) and (ii) for their abilities to sensitize H-2b target cells for CTL lysis in vitro. For optimal antigenic presentation, all three epitopes required the MHC-anchoring Asn residue at position 5 of their sequences. The results clearly and unambiguously delineated optimal lengths for two of the epitopes and two options for the third. NP appeared as a conventional 9-amino-acid (aa)-long peptide, np396-404 (FQPQNGQFI). GP2 was defined as a longer peptide (11 aa), gp276-286 (SGVENPGGYCL). Characterization of the GP1 epitope was more complex: the 9-aa-long peptide gp33-41 (KAVYNFATC) and the carboxyl-extended 11-aa-long peptide gp33-43 (KAVYN FATCGI) were both established as possible optimal sequences depending on the cell line used to test binding and lysis. PMID:7533855

  11. Magnitude and Frequency of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses: Identification of Immunodominant Regions of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype C

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, V.; Cao, H.; Rybak, N.; Gilbert, P.; McLane, M. F.; Gaolekwe, S.; Peter, T.; Thior, I.; Ndung'u, T.; Marlink, R.; Lee, T. H.; Essex, M.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic analysis of immune responses on a population level is critical for a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine design. Our studies in Botswana on (i) molecular analysis of the HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) epidemic, (ii) frequencies of major histocompatibility complex class I HLA types, and (iii) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in the course of natural infection allowed us to address HIV-1C-specific immune responses on a population level. We analyzed the magnitude and frequency of the gamma interferon ELISPOT-based CTL responses and translated them into normalized cumulative CTL responses. The introduction of population-based cumulative CTL responses reflected both (i) essentials of the predominant virus circulating locally in Botswana and (ii) specificities of the genetic background of the Botswana population, and it allowed the identification of immunodominant regions across the entire HIV-1C. The most robust and vigorous immune responses were found within the HIV-1C proteins Gag p24, Vpr, Tat, and Nef. In addition, moderately strong responses were scattered across Gag p24, Pol reverse transcriptase and integrase, Vif, Tat, Env gp120 and gp41, and Nef. Assuming that at least some of the immune responses are protective, these identified immunodominant regions could be utilized in designing an HIV vaccine candidate for the population of southern Africa. Targeting multiple immunodominant regions should improve the overall vaccine immunogenicity in the local population and minimize viral escape from immune recognition. Furthermore, the analysis of HIV-1C-specific immune responses on a population level represents a comprehensive systematic approach in HIV vaccine design and should be considered for other HIV-1 subtypes and/or different geographic areas. PMID:12239290

  12. A vaccine-elicited, single viral epitope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response does not protect against intravenous, cell-free simian immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Yasutomi, Y; Koenig, S; Woods, R M; Madsen, J; Wassef, N M; Alving, C R; Klein, H J; Nolan, T E; Boots, L J; Kessler, J A

    1995-01-01

    Protection against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge was assessed in rhesus monkeys with a vaccine-elicited, single SIV epitope-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in the absence of SIV-specific antibody. Strategies were first explored for eliciting an optimal SIV Gag epitope-specific CTL response. These studies were performed in rhesus monkeys expressing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene Mamu-A*01, a haplotype associated with a predominant SIV CTL epitope mapped to residues 182 to 190 of the Gag protein (p11C). We demonstrated that a combined modality immunization strategy using a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG-SIV Gag construct for priming, and peptide formulated in liposome for boosting, elicited a greater p11C-specific CTL response than did a single immunization with peptide-liposome alone. Vaccinated and control monkeys were then challenged with cell-free SIVmne by an intravenous route of inoculation. Despite a vigorous p11C-specific CTL response at the time of virus inoculation, all monkeys became infected with SIV. gag gene sequencing of the virus isolated from these monkeys demonstrated that the established viruses had no mutations in the p11C-coding region. Thus, the preexisting CTL response did not select for a viral variant that might escape T-cell immune recognition. These studies demonstrate that a potent SIV-specific CTL response can be elicited by combining live vector and peptide vaccine modalities. However, a single SIV Gag epitope-specific CTL response in the absence of SIV-specific antibody did not provide protection against a cell-free, intravenous SIV challenge. PMID:7884874

  13. Branched multipeptide immunotherapy for glioblastoma using human leukocyte antigen-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes from ERBB2, BIRC5 and CD99

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hee; Tran, Thi-Anh-Thuy; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Jung, Sook-In; Lee, Je-Jung; Jang, Wool-Youl; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin; Jung, Tae-Young

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in peptide immunotherapy for glioblastoma. Three peptides (ERBB2, BIRC5 and CD99) were selected based on their peptide-T2 cell binding affinities and combined in a multipeptide cocktail or a branched multipeptide synthesized with mini-polyethylene glycol spacers. Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with the multipeptide cocktail or branched multipeptide were compared based on their immunophenotype and cytokine secretion. FACS analysis of alpha-type 1 polarized dendritic cells (αDC1s) revealed that both groups highly expressed CD80, CD83 and CD86, indicating that both treatments efficiently generated mature αDC1s with the expected phenotype. Production of IL-12p70, IL-12p40 and IL-10 also increased upon αDC1 maturation in both groups. CTLs stimulated by either αDC1 group (“DC-CTLs”) included numerous IFN-γ-secreting cells against T2 cells loaded with the corresponding multipeptides. Large numbers of IFN-γ-secreting cells were observed when human glioblastoma cell lines and primary cells were treated with multipeptide-pulsed DC-CTLs. Both multipeptide-pulsed DC-CTL groups exhibited cytotoxic activity of 40-60% against the U251 cell line and 60-80% against primary cells. Branched multipeptide from ERBB2, BIRC5 and CD99 stably bound with T2 cells, and its cytotoxicity toward target cells was similar to that of the multipeptide cocktail. Thus, branched multipeptides could be promising candidates for immunotherapeutic glioblastoma treatment. PMID:27409668

  14. Therapeutic effect of interleukin 12 on mouse haemangiosarcomas is not associated with an increased anti-tumour cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, C.; Rosato, A.; Calderazzo, F.; Quintieri, L.; Fruscella, P.; Wainstok de Calmanovici, R.; Mantovani, A.; Vecchi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.

    1998-01-01

    In syngeneic mice, the H5V polyoma middle-T oncogene-transformed endothelioma cell line induces Kaposi's sarcoma-like cavernous haemangiomas that regress transiently, probably because of an anti-tumour immune response, but eventually grow progressively and kill the host. To evaluate the generation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), spleen cells of tumour-bearing mice were restimulated with irradiated H5V cells in mixed leucocyte-tumour cell cultures. Tumour-specific CTLs were demonstrable only when low numbers of H5V stimulator cells were used (<1 H5V cell per 50 splenocytes). We found that H5V cells secrete immunosuppressive mediators because CTL generation was blocked when H5V cells culture supernatants were added to allogeneic mixed leucocyte cultures. As numerous tumour-derived immunosuppressive mediators may interfere with interleukin 12 (IL-12) production, we tested whether IL-12 treatment of the tumour-bearing mice would augment their immune response and thus suppress tumour growth. Indeed, IL-12 inhibited tumour growth and prevented mortality, but did not increase anti-H5V CTL generation either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, the anti-tumour activity in IL-12-treated mice was abrogated by anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma monoclonal antibody (MAb) co-administration. These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumour effect of IL-12 is principally mediated by IFN-gamma release that in turn blocks H5V cell proliferation and induces the release of factors that suppress angiogenesis. PMID:9484826

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cells as efficient antigen presenting cells to propagate Aspergillus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal

    2008-01-01

    To overcome the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) expansion limitations imposed by the lack of sufficient dendritic cells (DC) alternative sources of autologous antigen presenting cells (APC) such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCL), which are easy to establish in vitro, have been considered and studied in the present work. Non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells of three healthy donors were repeatedly primed with autologous Aspergillus fumigatus commercial culture-filtrate antigen-pulsed fast monocyte-derived DC (Aspf-CFA-DC) alone, Aspf-CFA-pulsed BLCL (Aspf-CFA-BLCL) alone or Aspf-CFA-BLCL after one, two, or three primings with Aspf-CFA-DC (1DC/BLCL, 2DC/BLCL or 3DCIBLCL; respectively). After 5th priming, lines generated by Aspf-CFA-BLCL only showed strong/weak lytic activity for EBV/Aspf; respectively. Aspf-specific lytic activity in all donors was increased by increasing the number of primings with Aspf-CFA-DC before switching to Aspf-CFA-BLCL (18.20 +/- 1.65% versus 35.67 +/- 1.02% and 40.03 +/- 1.41% in bulk cultures generated by 1DC/BLCL versus 2DC/BLCL and 3DC/BLCL, respectively). Bulk cultures generated by Aspf-CFA-BLCL after at least two primings with Aspf-CFA-DC showed approximately the same Aspf-specific lytic activity, effector cell phenotype, expansion level and percentage expression of IFN-gamma, CD69 and CD107a without any significant differences (p > 0.05) as standard bulk cultures generated by only Aspf-CFA-DC. Thus, this study explored the use of a combined DC/BLCL protocol to establish/propagate Aspf-specific CTL for adoptive immunotherapy to prevent or treat invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

  16. Cytotoxic-T-Lymphocyte-Mediated Elimination of Target Cells Transduced with Engineered Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Vector In Vivo▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengwen; Hirsch, Matt; DiPrimio, Nina; Asokan, Aravind; Goudy, Kevin; Tisch, Roland; Samulski, R. Jude

    2009-01-01

    A recent clinical trial in patients with hemophilia B has suggested that adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminated AAV-transduced hepatocytes and resulted in therapeutic failure. AAV capsids elicit a CTL response in animal models; however, these capsid-specific CTLs fail to kill AAV-transduced target cells in mice. To better model the human clinical trial data in mice, we introduced an immunodominant epitope derived from ovalbumin (OVA; SIINFEKL) into the AAV capsid and tested CTL-mediated killing of AAV2-transduced target tissues in vivo. Initially, in vitro experiments demonstrated both classical class I and cross-presentation of the OVA antigen, following endogenous expression or AAV2-OVA vector transduction, respectively. Furthermore, an OVA-specific CTL response was elicited after muscular or systemic injection of the AAV2-OVA vector. Finally, CTL reactivity was enhanced in mice with established SIINFEKL-specific immunity after AAV2-OVA/α1 anti-trypsin (AAT) administration. Most importantly, these OVA-specific CTLs decreased AAT expression in mice treated with AAV2-OVA/AAT vector that followed a time course mimicking uncoating kinetics of AAV2 transduction in OVA-immunized mice. These results demonstrate that AAV capsid-derived antigens elicit CD8+ CTL reactivity, and these CTLs eliminated AAV-transduced target cells in mice. Notably, this model system can be exploited to study the kinetics of capsid presentation from different serotypes of AAV and permit the design of novel strategies to block CTL-mediated killing of AAV-transduced cells. PMID:19369348

  17. Dicer-regulated microRNAs 222 and 339 promote resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes by down-regulation of ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Ryo; Kohanbash, Gary; Sasaki, Kotaro; Fujita, Mitsugu; Zhu, Xinmei; Kastenhuber, Edward R; McDonald, Heather A; Potter, Douglas M; Hamilton, Ronald L; Lotze, Michael T; Khan, Saleem A; Sobol, Robert W; Okada, Hideho

    2009-06-30

    The RNase III endonuclease Dicer plays a key role in generation of microRNAs (miRs). We hypothesized that Dicer regulates cancer cell susceptibility to immune surveillance through miR processing. Indeed, Dicer disruption up-regulated intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and enhanced the susceptibility of tumor cells to antigen-specific lysis by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), while expression of other immunoregulatory proteins examined was not affected. Blockade of ICAM-1 inhibited the specific lysis of CTLs against Dicer-disrupted cells, indicating a pivotal role of ICAM-1 in the interaction between tumor cells and CTL. Both miR-222 and -339 are down-regulated in Dicer-disrupted cells and directly interacted with the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of ICAM-1 mRNA. Modulation of Dicer or these miRs inversely correlated with ICAM-1 protein expression and susceptibility of U87 glioma cells to CTL-mediated cytolysis while ICAM-1 mRNA levels remained stable. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analyses of 30 primary glioblastoma tissues demonstrated that expression of Dicer, miR-222, or miR-339 was inversely associated with ICAM-1 expression. Taken together, Dicer is responsible for the generation of the mature miR-222 and -339, which suppress ICAM-1 expression on tumor cells, thereby down-regulating the susceptibility of tumor cells to CTL-mediated cytolysis. This study suggests development of novel miR-targeted therapy to promote cytolysis of tumor cells.

  18. Generation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for adoptive T-cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Silvia; Delbue, Serena; Signorini, Lucia; Setola, Elisabetta; Bagliani, Anna; Della Valle, Alberto; Galli, Andrea; Ferrante, Pasquale; Bregni, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This study designs a strategy for an adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) protocol based on the ex-vivo selection of autologous peripheral blood-derived CD8-enriched T-cells, stimulated with dendritic cells (DCs) that had been pulsed with apoptotic tumor cells to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) with anti-tumor activity. Seventy-eight colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were enrolled in this study. Tumor tissues and peripheral blood (PB) were obtained at surgery. Tissues were mechanically dissociated and cultured to obtain a primary tumor cell line from each patient. DCs were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using magnetic positive selection of CD14+ monocytes. Anti-tumor CTLs were elicited in co-/micro-cultures using DCs as antigen-presenting cells, autologous apoptotic tumor cells as a source of antigens, and CD8+ T lymphocytes as effectors. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion was assessed by ELISpot assays to evaluate the activation of the CTLs against the autologous tumor cells. Primary tumor cell lines were obtained from 20 of 78 patients (25.6%). DCs were generated from 26 patients, and of them, corresponding tumor cell lines were derived from six patients. ELISpot results showed that significant IFN-γ secretion was detected after different numbers of stimulations for two patients, whereas weak secretion was observed for three patients. Despite difficulties due to contamination of several primary tumor cell lines with gut intestinal flora, the results suggest that the generation of tumor-specific CTLs is feasible from patients with CRC, and could be useful for supporting an ACT approach in CRC.

  19. JAK-STAT-mediated chronic inflammation impairs cytotoxic T lymphocyte activation to decrease anti-PD-1 immunotherapy efficacy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunwan; Talukder, Asif; Savage, Natasha M; Singh, Nagendra; Liu, Kebin

    2017-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer does not respond to immune check point blockade immunotherapy. One key feature of pancreatic cancer is the association between its progression and chronic inflammation. Emerging evidence supports a key role for the JAK-STAT pathway in pancreatic cancer inflammation. We aimed at testing the hypothesis that sustained JAK-STAT signaling suppresses cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activation to counteract anti-PD-1 immunotherapy-induced CTL activity in pancreatic cancer. We show that human pancreatic carcinomas express high level of PD-L1 and exhibit low level of CTL infiltration. JAK-STAT inhibitor Ruxolitinib selectively inhibits STAT1 and STAT3 activation and increases CTL infiltration to induce a Tc1/Th1 immune response in the tumor microenvironment in an orthotopic pancreatic cancer mouse model. Ruxilitinib-mediated tumor suppressive efficacy diminishes in T-cell-deficient mice. Pancreatic tumor grows significantly faster in IFNγ-deficient mice. However, neutralizing IFNγ does not alter tumor growth but diminishes Ruxolitinib-induced tumor suppression in vivo, indicating that lymphocytes and IFNγ are essential for Ruxolitinib-induced host antitumor immune response. Both type I and type II interferons upregulate PD-L1 expression through the JAK-STAT signaling pathway in mouse pancreatic tumor cells. Tumor cells respond to activated T cells by activating STAT3. The inhibition of STAT3 downregulates immune suppressive cytokines production by tumor cells, resulting in increased T cell activation and effector function. Consequently, Ruxolitinib significantly improves the efficacy of anti-PD-1 immunotherapy. Our data demonstrate that Ruxolitinib is effective in the inhibition of systemic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment and therefore upregulates CTL infiltration and activation to overcome pancreatic cancer resistance to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy.

  20. Functional profile of human influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity is influenced by interleukin-2 concentration and epitope specificity

    PubMed Central

    Boon, ACM; de Mutsert, G; Fouchier, RAM; Osterhaus, ADME; Rimmelzwaan, GF

    2005-01-01

    The ability of influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to degranulate and produce cytokines upon antigenic restimulation was studied in four HLA-A*0101 and HLA-A*0201 positive subjects. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of these subjects were stimulated with influenza A virus in the presence of high or low interleukin (IL)-2 concentrations. CD8+ T cell populations specific for the HLA-A*0101 restricted epitope NP44–52 and the HLA-A*0201 restricted epitope M158–66 were identified by positive staining with tetramers of peptide major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) (NP-Tm and M1-Tm, respectively). Within these populations, the proportion of cells mobilizing CD107a, or expressing interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor-(TNF)-α upon short-term peptide restimulation was determined by flow cytometry. Independent of IL-2 concentrations, large subject-dependent differences in the mobilization of CD107a and expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α by both NP- and M1-specific T cells were observed. In two of the four subjects, the functional profile of NP-Tm+ and M1-Tm+ cells differed considerably. Overall, no difference in the proportion of NP-Tm+ or M1-Tm+ cells expressing CD107a was observed. The proportion of M1-Tm+ cells that produced IFN-γ (P < 0·05) was larger than for NP-Tm+ cells, independent of IL-2 concentration. When cultured under IL-2hi concentrations higher TNF-α expression was also observed in M1-Tm+ cells (P < 0·05). The IL-2 concentration during expansion of virus-specific cells had a profound effect on the functionality of both M1-Tm+ and NP-Tm+ cells. PMID:16178855

  1. Identification of Programmed Death Ligand 1-derived Peptides Capable of Inducing Cancer-reactive Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes From HLA-A24+ Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Minami, Tomoko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2015-09-01

    Molecular therapy targeting tumor angiogenesis has been the standard treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, despite their significant antitumor effects, most of patients with mRCC have not been cured. Under such circumstances, anticancer immunotherapy has been considered a promising treatment modality for mRCC, and cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are the most powerful effectors among several immune cells. However, anticancer CTLs can be inhibited by several immune inhibitory mechanisms, including the interaction between programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1, on T cells and cancer cells, respectively. Alternatively, this also means that PD-L1 could be a promising target for anticancer immunotherapy. Therefore, we searched for PD-L1-derived peptides that are applicable for anticancer vaccine for HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Among 5 peptides derived from PD-L1, which were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A24(+) allele, both PD-L1(11-19) and PD-L1(41-50) peptides induced peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Such PD-L1 peptide-stimulated CD8 T cells showed cytotoxicity against HLA-A24(+) and PD-L1-expressing RCC cells. Although IFN-γ treatment increased PD-L1 expression on PD-L1(low) RCC cells, their sensitivity to cytotoxicity of PD-L1 peptide-stimulated CD8(+) T cells varied between patients. Altogether, these results indicate that both PD-L1(11-19) and PD-L1(41-50) peptides could be candidates for peptide-based anticancer vaccines for HLA-A24(+) mRCC patients.

  2. Identification of erythropoietin receptor-derived peptides having the potential to induce cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-A24(+) patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Minami, Tomoko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2014-05-01

    Molecular targeting therapy with anti-angiogenic agents, including sunitinib and sorafenib, has been proven to be the first- and second-line standard treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) worldwide. Despite their significant antitumor effects, most of the patients with mRCC have not been cured. Under such circumstances, anti-cancer immunotherapy has been considered as a promising treatment modality for mRCC, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are the most powerful effectors among several immune cells and molecules. Therefore, we previously conducted anti-cancer vaccine therapy with peptides derived from carbonic anhydrase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 as phase-I/II trials for mRCC patients and reported their clinical benefits. Alternatively, up-regulated expression of erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR) in RCC has been reported, and their co-expression is involved in tumorigenesis. In order to increase options for peptide-based vaccination therapy, we searched for novel EpoR-peptides for HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Among 5 peptides derived from EpoR, which were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A24 allele, EpoR52-60 peptide had the potential to induce peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Cytotoxicity toward HLA-A24(+) and EpoR-expressing RCC cells was ascribed to peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells. These results indicate that the EpoR52-60 peptide could be a promising candidate for a peptide-based anti-cancer vaccine for HLA-A24(+) mRCC patients.

  3. Virus-specific HLA-restricted lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected human monocytes and macrophages mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Torpey, D.J. III

    1987-01-01

    Freshly-isolated peripheral blood human monocytes and 5 day in vitro cultured macrophages were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), labeled with /sup 51/Cr, and used as target cells in a 12-14 hour cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from HSV-1 non-immune individuals, whether unstimulated or stimulated with HSV-1 antigen, did not mediate significant lysis of either target cell. HSV-immune MNL, both freshly-isolated and cultured for 5 days without antigen, demonstrated only low levels of natural killer (NK) cell-mediate lysis. MNL from HSV-immune individuals incubated for 5 days in vitro with HSV-1 antigen mediated significant virus-specific lysis of both target cells. Mean virus-specific lysis of autologous monocytes was 8.5(/+-/2.0)% compared to a three-fold greater virus-specific lysis of autologous macrophages. Greater than 70% of this lytic activity was mediated by Leu-11-negative, T3-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Allogeneic target cells lacking a common HLA determinant were not significantly lysed while T8-positive CTL mediated infrequent lysis of target cells sharing a common HLA-A and/or HLA-B determinant. T4-positive lymphocytes were demonstrated to be the predominant cell mediating lysis of autologous target cells and allogeneic target cells sharing both HLA-A and/or HLA-B plus HLA-DR determinants with the CTL; the T4-positive cell was the sole CTL mediator of lysis of allogeneic target cells having a common HLA-DR determinant.

  4. Multiple mechanisms underlie defective recognition of melanoma cells cultured in three-dimensional architectures by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Feder-Mengus, C; Ghosh, S; Weber, W P; Wyler, S; Zajac, P; Terracciano, L; Oertli, D; Heberer, M; Martin, I; Spagnoli, G C; Reschner, A

    2007-01-01

    Cancer cells' growth in three-dimensional (3D) architectures promotes resistance to drugs, cytokines, or irradiation. We investigated effects of 3D culture as compared to monolayers (2D) on melanoma cells' recognition by tumour-associated antigen (TAA)-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Culture of HBL, D10 (both HLA-A*0201+, TAA+) and NA8 (HLA-A*0201+, TAA−) melanoma cells on polyHEMA-coated plates, resulted in generation of 3D multicellular tumour spheroids (MCTS). Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by HLA-A*0201-restricted Melan-A/MART-127–35 or gp100280–288-specific CTL clones served as immunorecognition marker. Co-culture with melanoma MCTS, resulted in defective TAA recognition by CTL as compared to 2D as witnessed by decreased IFN-γ production and decreased Fas Ligand, perforin and granzyme B gene expression. A multiplicity of mechanisms were potentially involved. First, MCTS per se limit CTL capacity of recognising HLA class I restricted antigens by reducing exposed cell surfaces. Second, expression of melanoma differentiation antigens is downregulated in MCTS. Third, expression of HLA class I molecules can be downregulated in melanoma MCTS, possibly due to decreased interferon-regulating factor-1 gene expression. Fourth, lactic acid production is increased in MCTS, as compared to 2D. These data suggest that melanoma cells growing in 3D, even in the absence of immune selection, feature characteristics capable of dramatically inhibiting TAA recognition by specific CTL. PMID:17342088

  5. Gag Protein Epitopes Recognized by ELA-A-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes from Horses with Long-Term Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Lonning, Scott M.; McGuire, Travis C.

    1998-01-01

    Most equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-infected horses have acute clinical disease, but they eventually control the disease and become lifelong carriers. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are considered an important immune component in the control of infections with lentiviruses including EIAV, but definitive evidence for CTL in the control of disease in carrier horses is lacking. By using retroviral vector-transduced target cells expressing different Gag proteins and overlapping synthetic peptides of 16 to 25 amino acids, peptides containing at least 12 Gag CTL epitopes recognized by virus-stimulated PBMC from six long-term EIAV-infected horses were identified. All identified peptides were located within Gag matrix (p15) and capsid (p26) proteins, as no killing of target cells expressing p11 and p9 occurred. Each of the six horses had CTL recognizing at least one Gag epitope, while CTL from one horse recognized at least eight different Gag epitopes. None of the identified peptides were recognized by CTL from all six horses. Two nonamer peptide epitopes were defined from Gag p26; one (18a) was likely restricted by class I equine leukocyte alloantigen A5.1 (ELA-A5.1) molecules, and the other (28b-1) was likely restricted by ELA-A9 molecules. Sensitization of equine kidney target cells for CTLm killing required 10 nM peptide 18a and 1 nM 28b-1. The results demonstrated that diverse CTL responses against Gag epitopes were generated in long-term EIAV-infected horses and indicated that ELA-A class I molecules were responsible for the diversity of CTL epitopes recognized. This information indicates that multiple epitopes or whole proteins will be needed to induce CTL in horses with different ELA-A alleles in order to evaluate their role in controlling EIAV. PMID:9811694

  6. The life span of major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes influences the efficiency of presentation and immunogenicity of two class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 4

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the reactivity to two human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) A11-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes derived from amino acids 416-424 (IVTDFSVIK, designated IVT) and 399-408 (AVFDRKSVAK, designated AVF) of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA) 4. A strong predominance of CTL clones specific for the IVT epitope was demonstrated in polyclonal cultures generated by stimulation of lymphocytes from the EBV-seropositive donor BK with the autologous B95.8 virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). This was not due to intrinsic differences of CTL efficiency since clones specific for the two epitopes lysed equally well A11- positive phytohemagglutinin blasts and LCLs pulsed with the relevant synthetic peptide. Irrespective of the endogenous levels of EBNA4 expression, untreated LCLs were lysed more efficiently by the IVT- specific effectors, suggesting that a higher density of A11-IVT complexes is presented at the cell surface. In accordance, 10-50-fold higher amounts of IVT peptides were found in high-performance liquid chromatography fractions of acid extracts corresponding to an abundance of about 350-12,800 IVT and 8-760 AVF molecules per cell. Peptide- mediated competition of CTL sensitization, transport assays in streptolysin-O permeabilized cells, and induction of A11 expression in the transporter associated with antigen presentation-deficient T2/A11 transfectant demonstrated that the IVT and AVF peptides bind with similar affinities to A11, are translocated with equal efficiency to the endoplasmic reticulum, and form complexes of comparable stability over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. A rapid surface turnover of A11 molecules containing the AVF peptide was demonstrated in metabolically active T2/A11 cells corresponding to a half-life of approximately 3.5 as compared to approximately 2 h for molecules induced at 26 degrees C in the absence of exogenous peptides and >12 h for IVT

  7. Attachment of an anti-receptor antibody to non-target cells renders them susceptible to lysis by a clone of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kranz, D M; Tonegawa, S; Eisen, H N

    1984-12-01

    The molecular basis for the dependence of antigen recognition by T cells on products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is unknown, and the antigenic structures that are actually bound by T-cell receptors are ill-defined. In this study, we asked whether a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that reacts with the T-cell receptor of a clone of murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and not with the receptors of other CTL clones can substitute for that clone's natural ligand in specific cytolytic reactions. To answer the question, a mAb (1B2) to the receptor of a CTL clone (2C) was attached covalently to 51Cr-labeled cells that were not otherwise susceptible to lysis by clone 2C, and the cells thus modified were then tested as targets for clone 2C and other CTL clones of similar specificity. All labeled cells modified in this way, including a murine cell line that expresses no cell-surface MHC class I molecules and a human cell line, were lysed by clone 2C but not by other CTL clones. If, however, instead of attaching the mAb to the receptor of clone 2C, the cells were modified by attaching to them mAbs to other surface antigens on CTL [lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1), Thy-1.2], they were not lysed. In cytolytic titrations, the cells that had been converted by attachment of mAb 1B2 into specific targets for clone 2C were just as susceptible to lysis by that clone as the clone's natural H-2d targets (e.g., P815 cells). However, some accessory surface molecules (LFA-1, Lyt-2) that are required for clone 2C to lyse its natural H-2d targets seemed not to be required for this clone to lyse the mAb-converted target cells. By demonstrating that a variety of different cell types can be thus converted into target cells for CTL, the approach described in this study may provide opportunities to analyze further the mechanisms by which CTL destroy target cells.

  8. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to a wild type hepatitis B virus epitope in patients chronically infected by variant viruses carrying substitutions within the epitope

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Mutations that abrogate recognition of a viral epitope by class I- restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) can lead to viral escape if the CTL response against that epitope is crucial for viral clearance. The likelihood of this type of event is low when the CTL response is simultaneously directed against multiple viral epitopes, as has been recently reported for patients with acute self-limited hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The CTL response to HBV is usually quite weak, however, during chronic HBV infection, and it is generally acknowledged that this is a major determinant of viral persistence in this disease. If such individuals were to produce a mono- or oligospecific CTL response, however, negative selection of the corresponding mutant viruses might occur. We have recently studied two HLA-A2-positive patients with chronic hepatitis B who, atypically, developed a strong HLA-A2-restricted CTL response against an epitope (FLPSDFFPSV) that contains an HLA-A2-binding motif located between residues 18-27 of the viral nucleocapsid protein, hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg). These patients failed, however, to respond to any of other HLA-A2-restricted HBV-derived peptides that are generally immunogenic in acutely infected patients who successfully clear the virus. Interestingly, DNA sequence analysis of HBV isolates from these two patients demonstrated alternative residues at position 27 (V --> A and V --> I) and position 21 (S --> N, S --> A, and S --> V) that reduced the HLA and T cell receptor-binding capacities of the variant sequences, respectively. Synthetic peptides containing these alternative sequences were poorly immunogenic compared to the prototype HBc18-27 sequence, and they could not be recognized by CTL clones specific for the prototype peptide. While we do not know if the two patients were originally infected by these variant viruses or if the variants emerged subsequent to infection because of immune selection, the results are most consistent with

  9. Identification of a gag-encoded cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope from FBL-3 leukemia shared by Friend, Moloney, and Rauscher murine leukemia virus-induced tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Qin, H; Chesebro, B; Cheever, M A

    1996-01-01

    FBL-3 is a highly immunogenic murine leukemia of C57BL/6 origin induced by Friend murine leukemia virus (MuLV). Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with FBL-3 readily elicits CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) capable of lysing FBL-3 as well as syngeneic leukemias induced by Moloney and Rauscher MuLV. The aim of this current study was to identify the immunogenic epitope(s) recognized by the FBL-3-specific CD8+ CTL. A series of FBL-3-specific CD8+ CTL clones were generated from C57BL/6 mice immunized to FBL-3. The majority of CTL clones (32 of 38) were specific for F-MuLV gag-encoded antigen. By using a series of recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing full-length and truncated F-MuLV gag genes, the antigenic epitope recognized by the FBL-3 gag-specific CTL clones, as well as by bulk-cultured CTL from spleens of mice immune to FBL-3, was localized to the leader sequence of gPr80gag protein. The precise amino acid sequence of the CTL epitope in the leader sequence was identified as CCLCLTVFL (positions 85-93) by examining lysis of targets incubated with a series of synthetic leader sequence peptides. No evidence of other CTL epitopes in the gPr80gag or Pr65gag core virion structural polyproteins was found. The identity of CCLCLTVFL as the target peptide was validated by showing that immunization with the peptide elicited CTL that lysed FBL-3. The CTL elicited by the Gag peptide also specifically lysed syngeneic leukemia cells induced by Moloney and Rauscher MuLV (MBL-2 and RBL-5). The transmembrane peptide was shown to be the major gag-encoded antigenic epitope recognized by bulk-cultured CTL derived from C57BL/6 mice immunized to MBL-2 or RBL-5. Thus, the CTL epitope of FBL-3 is localized to the transmembrane anchor domain of the nonstructural Gag polyprotein and is shared by leukemia/lymphoma cell lines induced by Friend, Moloney, and Rauscher MuLV. PMID:8892898

  10. Discriminated selection among viral peptides with the appropriate anchor residues: implications for the size of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte repertoire and control of viral infection.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, M B; Lewicki, H; Borrow, P; Hudrisier, D; Gairin, J E

    1995-12-01

    Structural characterization of peptides restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has identified residues critical for MHC class I binding and for T-cell receptor recognition. For example, optimal peptides fitting into the murine MHC class I Db groove are 9 to 11 amino acids long and require as MHC anchor residues an Asn (N) at position 5 and also either a hydrophobic residue, a Met (M) or a Cys (C), at the carboxy terminus. The three known Db-restricted peptides of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are glycoproteins GP1 (amino acids [aa] 33 KAVYNFATC), GP2 (aa 276 SGVENPGGYCL), and nucleoprotein NP (aa 396 FQPQNGQFI). In addition to these two GP and one NP peptides, computer search revealed 11 other GP peptide sequences and 20 additional NP sequences that contained the Db binding motif. By Db competitive binding analysis, only two of these 11 GP peptides and 1 of these 20 NP peptides bound to the MHC Db molecule with an affinity equivalent to the measured affinities for the three known GP1, GP2, and NP cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. No CTL specific for these three peptides were generated when H-2b mice were inoculated with viral variants in which either the two known GP epitopes (GP1 and GP2; termed GPV) or the GPV and NP epitopes (termed GPV + NPV) were mutated. However, a novel CD8+ anti-LCMV CTL response ordinarily not seen in H-2b mice inoculated with wild-type virus was noted when such mice were inoculated with the GPV + NPV-mutated variant. This result indicates that (i) despite large numbers of peptides containing the appropriate anchor residues within a viral protein, only a restricted number induce CTL, thereby maintaining a limited CTL repertoire, (ii) despite the limited repertoire, the immune system retains the flexibility to generate an immune response(s) to a previously silent protein(s), suggesting a hierarchial control mechanism, and (iii) identification of a primary amino acid sequence is not sufficient

  11. Discriminated selection among viral peptides with the appropriate anchor residues: implications for the size of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte repertoire and control of viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oldstone, M B; Lewicki, H; Borrow, P; Hudrisier, D; Gairin, J E

    1995-01-01

    Structural characterization of peptides restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has identified residues critical for MHC class I binding and for T-cell receptor recognition. For example, optimal peptides fitting into the murine MHC class I Db groove are 9 to 11 amino acids long and require as MHC anchor residues an Asn (N) at position 5 and also either a hydrophobic residue, a Met (M) or a Cys (C), at the carboxy terminus. The three known Db-restricted peptides of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are glycoproteins GP1 (amino acids [aa] 33 KAVYNFATC), GP2 (aa 276 SGVENPGGYCL), and nucleoprotein NP (aa 396 FQPQNGQFI). In addition to these two GP and one NP peptides, computer search revealed 11 other GP peptide sequences and 20 additional NP sequences that contained the Db binding motif. By Db competitive binding analysis, only two of these 11 GP peptides and 1 of these 20 NP peptides bound to the MHC Db molecule with an affinity equivalent to the measured affinities for the three known GP1, GP2, and NP cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. No CTL specific for these three peptides were generated when H-2b mice were inoculated with viral variants in which either the two known GP epitopes (GP1 and GP2; termed GPV) or the GPV and NP epitopes (termed GPV + NPV) were mutated. However, a novel CD8+ anti-LCMV CTL response ordinarily not seen in H-2b mice inoculated with wild-type virus was noted when such mice were inoculated with the GPV + NPV-mutated variant. This result indicates that (i) despite large numbers of peptides containing the appropriate anchor residues within a viral protein, only a restricted number induce CTL, thereby maintaining a limited CTL repertoire, (ii) despite the limited repertoire, the immune system retains the flexibility to generate an immune response(s) to a previously silent protein(s), suggesting a hierarchial control mechanism, and (iii) identification of a primary amino acid sequence is not sufficient

  12. Carriage of a Tumor Necrosis Factor Polymorphism Amplifies the Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 Attributed Risk of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis: Evidence for a Gene–Gene Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Brian D.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Larson, Joseph J.; Schlicht, Erik M.; Liu, Xiangdong; Heathcote, E. Jenny; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2010-01-01

    Common genetic variants significantly influence complex diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We recently reported an association between PBC and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs231725) of the immunoreceptor gene cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4). We hypothesized that PBC risk attributed to this polymorphism might be increased by propensity to an overly robust inflammatory response. Thus, we examined its potential interaction with the commonly studied −308AG promoter polymorphism (rs1800629) of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) gene for which the variant TNF2A allele causes increased TNF production. The polymorphisms were genotyped in 866 PBC patients and 761 controls from independent US and Canadian registries; the effects of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their interaction on PBC risk was assessed by logistic regression. The reported association of PBC with the CTLA4 “A/A” genotype was replicated in the Canadian cohort and significant for PBC risk in the combined data (odds ratio [OR], 1.68; P = 0.0005). TNF2A allele frequency was elevated in PBC patients, but only reached borderline significance using the combined data (OR, 1.21; P = 0.042). Analysis showed that TNF2A carriage was significantly increased in CTLA4 “A/A” PBC patients compared with CTLA4 “A/A” controls (39.7% versus 16.5%, P = 0.0004); no apparent increase of TNF2A carriage was noted in CTLA4 “A/G” or “G/G” individuals. Finally, interaction under a logistic model was highly significant, as TNF2A carriage in combination with the CTLA4 “A/A” genotype was present in 6.5% of PBC patients, compared with 1.7% of controls (OR, 3.98; P < 0.0001). Conclusion TNF2A amplifies the CTLA4 rs231725 “A/A” genotype risk for PBC. Although the mechanisms remain unclear, the premise that deficiency in T-cell regulation resulting in an increased risk of PBC is amplified by overexpression of an important proinflammatory cytokine provides a basis

  13. Regulatory B cells inhibit cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and elimination of infected CD4 T cells after in vitro reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Wallace, Jennillee; Rygielski, Sonya; Stapleton, Jack T; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G; Landay, Alan

    2014-01-01

    During HIV infection, IL-10/IL-10 receptor and programmed death-1 (PD-1)/programmed death-1-ligand (PD-L1) interactions have been implicated in the impairment of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), attenuated anti-HIV CTL functions present a major hurdle towards curative measures requiring viral eradication. Therefore, deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired CTL is crucial before HIV viral eradication is viable. The generation of robust CTL activity necessitates interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APC), CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We have shown that in vitro, IL-10hiPD-L1hi regulatory B cells (Bregs) directly attenuate HIV-specific CD8+-mediated CTL activity. Bregs also modulate APC and CD4+ T cell function; herein we characterize the Breg compartment in uninfected (HIVNEG), HIV-infected "elite controllers" (HIVEC), ART-treated (HIVART), and viremic (HIVvir), subjects, and in vitro, assess the impact of Bregs on anti-HIV CTL generation and activity after reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs using suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We find that Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable IL-10 expression levels significantly higher than HIVNEG subjects, but significantly lower than HIVVIR subjects. Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable PD-L1 expression, significantly higher than in HIVVIR and HIVNEG subjects. SAHA-treated Breg-depleted PBMC from HIVEC and HIVART subjects, displayed enhanced CD4+ T-cell proliferation, significant upregulation of antigen-presentation molecules, increased frequency of CD107a+ and HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, associated with efficient elimination of infected CD4+ T cells, and reduction in integrated viral DNA. Finally, IL-10-R and PD-1 antibody blockade partially reversed Breg-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Our data suggest that, possibly, via an IL-10 and PD-L1 synergistic mechanism; Bregs likely inhibit APC function

  14. A matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor enhances anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody immunotherapy in breast cancer by reprogramming the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    LI, MINGYUE; XING, SHUGANG; ZHANG, HAIYING; SHANG, SIQI; LI, XIANGXIANG; REN, BO; LI, GAIYUN; CHANG, XIAONA; LI, YILEI; LI, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) treatment is effective for the treatment of primary tumors, but not sufficient for the treatment of metastatic tumors, likely owing to the effects of the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we aimed to determine the therapeutic effects of combined treatment with a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (MMPI) and anti-CTLA-4 antibody in a breast cancer model in mice. Interestingly, combined treatment with MMPI and anti-CTLA-4 antibody delayed tumor growth and reduced lung and liver metastases compared with anti-CTLA-4 alone or vehicle treatment. The functions of the liver and kidney in mice in the different groups did not differ significantly compared with that in normal mice. The CD8+/CD4+ ratio in T cells in the spleen and tumor were increased after monotherapy or combined anti-CTLA-4 antibody plus MMPI therapy compared with that in vehicle-treated mice. Anti-CTLA-4 antibody plus MMPI therapy reduced the percentage of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and decreased the Treg/Th17 cell ratio in the spleen compared with those in the vehicle-treated group. Additionally, anti-CTLA-4 antibody plus MMPI therapy reduced the percentages of regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and Th17 cells in tumors compared with that in the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, combined treatment with MMPI and anti-CTLA-4 antibody reduced the microvessel density (MVD) in tumors compared with that in vehicle or MMPI-treated mice. There was a negative correlation between MVD and the CD8+ T cell percentage, CD4+ T cell percentage, and CD8+/CD4+ T cell ratio, but a positive correlation with Tregs, Th17 cells, Treg/Th17 cell ratio, and MDSCs. Thus, these data demonstrated that addition of MMPI enhanced the effects of anti-CTLA-4 antibody treatment in a mouse model of breast cancer by delaying tumor growth and reducing metastases. PMID:26752000

  15. Prognostic impact of the tumor-infiltrating regulatory T-cell (Foxp3+)/activated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (granzyme B+) ratio on resected left-sided pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Kim, Se Hoon; Choi, Junjeong; Kang, Chang Moo; Kim, Kyung Sik; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Among the subsets of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (granzyme B+) have an antitumor effect, while regulatory T lymphocytes [forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)+] suppress the antitumor immune response. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible associations between TIL subsets and survival outcomes in patients with left-sided pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). From January 2000 to December 2008, 30 patients who underwent curative distal pancreatectomy without neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy due to left-sided PDAC were enrolled in the present study. TIL subsets were enumerated by immunohistochemical staining for cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3 and granzyme B in the intra-tumoral areas of tissue blocks. Patients were divided into two groups according to the median value of the absolute counts and relative ratios of TIL subsets. In the univariate analysis, age, gender, tumor size, nodal stage, tumor differentiation and lymphovascular/perineural invasion were not significantly associated with survival outcome. However, low levels of preoperative cancer antigen (CA) 19–9 were associated with a longer overall survival (OS), although the association was not significant (37 vs. 18 months; P=0.061). A high level of granzyme B+ was associated with enhanced disease-free survival (DFS) (25 vs. 10 months; P=0.023), and a low Foxp3+/granzyme B+ ratio was associated with a favorable prognosis in terms of DFS (25 vs. 8 months; P=0.008) and OS (47 vs. 17 months; P=0.003). In the multivariate analysis, the ratio of Foxp3+/granzyme B+ was an independent prognostic factor for determining DFS [Exp(B), 3.060; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.259–47.436; P=0.014] and OS [Exp(B), 3.580; 95% CI, 1.460–8.780; P=0.005]. Among the clinicopathological factors, low levels of CA 19–9 were significantly associated with a low Foxp3+/granzyme B+ ratio (P=0.016). The results of the present study suggested that a low Foxp3

  16. Elicitation of anti-Sendai virus cytotoxic T lymphocytes by viral and H-2 antigens incorporated into the same lipid bilayer by membrane fusion and by reconstitution into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Hale, A H; Lyles, D S; Fan, D P

    1980-02-01

    We have investigated the minimal molecular requirements for elicitation of anti-Sendai virus cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and the minimal molecular requirements for the recognition and lysis processes associated with anti-Sendai virus CTL-target cell interactions. This report demonstrates a) that the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and/or fusion glycoproteins of Sendai virus can elicit anti-Sendai virus CTL and b) that these glycoproteins and H-2 antigens must be within the same membrane lipid bilayer for effective elicitation of anti-Sendai-virus CTL and for effective recognition and lysis of target cells by anti-Sendai virus CTL.

  17. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein gIII is a major target antigen for murine and swine virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zuckermann, F A; Zsak, L; Mettenleiter, T C; Ben-Porat, T

    1990-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PrV) is the etiological agent of Aujeszky's disease, a disease that causes heavy economic losses in the swine industry. A rational approach to the generation of an effective vaccine against this virus requires an understanding of the immune response induced by it and of the role of the various viral antigens in inducing such a response. We have constructed mutants of PrV [strain PrV (Ka)] that differ from each other only in expression of the viral nonessential glycoproteins gI, gp63, gX, and gIII (i.e., are otherwise isogenic). These mutants were used to ascertain the importance of each of the nonessential glycoproteins in eliciting a PrV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in mice and pigs. Immunization of DBA/2 mice and pigs with a thymidine kinase-deficient (TK-) mutant of PrV elicits the formation of cytotoxic cells that specifically lyse syngeneic infected target cells. These PrV-specific cytolytic cells have the phenotype of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen-restricted CTLs. The relative number of CTLs specific for glycoproteins gI, gp63, gX, and gIII induced in mice vaccinated with a TK- mutant of PrV was ascertained by comparing their levels of cytotoxicity against syngeneic cells infected with either wild-type virus or gI-/gp63-, gX-, or gIII- virus deletion mutants. The PrV-specific CLTs were significantly less effective in lysing gIII(-)-infected targets than in lysing gI-/gp63-, gX-, or wild-type-infected targets. The in vitro secondary CTL response of lymphocytes obtained from either mice or pigs 6 or more weeks after immunization with a TK- mutant of PrV was also tested. Lymphocytes obtained from these animals were cultured with different glycoprotein-deficient mutants of PrV, and their cytolytic activities against wild-type-infected targets were ascertained. The importance of each of the nonessential viral glycoproteins in eliciting CTLs was assessed from the effectiveness of each of the virus mutants to

  18. Pre-infection frequencies of equine herpesvirus-1 specific, cytotoxic T lymphocytes correlate with protection against abortion following experimental infection of pregnant mares.

    PubMed

    Kydd, J H; Wattrang, E; Hannant, D

    2003-12-15

    In general, vaccines containing inactivated equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) fail to prevent abortion in pregnant mares following infection with a virulent strain of EHV-1. We have tested the hypothesis that resistance to EHV-1-induced abortion in pregnant mares is associated with high frequencies of EHV-1 specific, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in the circulation. To test this theory, three groups of pregnant mares were assembled with varying backgrounds of infection or vaccination in an attempt to mimic the immune status of the general population. Group 1 mares (n=9) were untreated controls selected at random. Group 2 mares (n=5) were vaccinated three times intramuscularly with inactivated EHV-1. Group 3 mares (n=3) had been infected with EHV-1 on four previous occasions. The frequency of CTL in blood leucocytes was measured by limiting dilution analysis at three time points; at the beginning of pregnancy (approximately 28 weeks before infection) in the Group 2 and Group 3 mares (4-7 weeks of gestation) (Group 1 was unavailable for sampling) and then 2 weeks before (30-40 weeks of gestation) and 3 weeks after experimental infection in all the mares. Serum samples were collected to monitor complement fixing (CF) antibody titres. Mares in all three groups were infected experimentally with EHV-1 strain Ab4/8 by the intranasal route after which they were monitored clinically to determine the outcome of pregnancy and samples were collected to determine the duration of nasopharyngeal shedding and cell-associated viraemia. The untreated control mares showed low pre-infection CTL. After experimental infection, they all seroconverted, aborted and demonstrated expected clinical and virological signs. Some vaccinated mares (3/5) had elevated titres of CF antibody prior to their first vaccination. All the vaccinated mares seroconverted after vaccination and exhibited higher CTL frequencies than controls before infection

  19. Increased Expression of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 by T Cells, Induced by B7 in Sera, Reduces Adaptive Immunity in Patients With Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Khamri, Wafa; Abeles, Robin D; Hou, Tie Zheng; Anderson, Amy E; El-Masry, Ahmed; Triantafyllou, Evangelos; Bernsmeier, Christine; Larsen, Fin S; Singanayagam, Arjuna; Kudo, Nobuaki; Possamai, Lucia A; Lebosse, Fanny; Auzinger, Georg; Bernal, William; Willars, Christopher; Weston, Christopher J; Lombardi, Giovanna; Wendon, Julia; Thursz, Mark; Antoniades, Charalambos G

    2017-07-01

    Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) have defects in innate immune responses to microbes (immune paresis) and are susceptible to sepsis. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4), which interacts with the membrane receptor B7 (also called CD80 and CD86), is a negative regulator of T-cell activation. We collected T cells from patients with ALF and investigated whether inhibitory signals down-regulate adaptive immune responses in patients with ALF. We collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with ALF and controls from September 2013 through September 2015 (45 patients with ALF, 20 patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, 15 patients with cirrhosis with no evidence of acute decompensation, 20 patients with septic shock but no cirrhosis or liver disease, and 20 healthy individuals). Circulating CD4(+) T cells were isolated and analyzed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) T cells were incubated with antigen, or agonist to CD3 and dendritic cells, with or without antibody against CTLA4; T-cell proliferation and protein expression were quantified. We measured levels of soluble B7 molecules in supernatants of isolated primary hepatocytes, hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells, and biliary epithelial cells from healthy or diseased liver tissues. We also measured levels of soluble B7 serum samples from patients and controls, and mice with acetaminophen-induced liver injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Peripheral blood samples from patients with ALF had a higher proportion of CD4(+) CTLA4(+) T cells than controls; patients with infections had the highest proportions. CD4(+) T cells from patients with ALF had a reduced proliferative response to antigen or CD3 stimulation compared to cells from controls; incubation of CD4(+) T cells from patients with ALF with an antibody against CTLA4 increased their proliferative response to antigen and to CD3 stimulation, to the same levels as cells from controls. CD4(+) T cells from controls up

  20. Capability of SART3(109-118) peptide to induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes from prostate cancer patients with HLA class I-A11, -A31 and -A33 alleles.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Elnisr Rashed; Naito, Masayasu; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Niu, Yamei; Gohara, Shojiro; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Itoh, Kyogo; Noguchi, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    We previously reported the SART3 gene to be a tumor-rejection antigen gene encoding a peptide at positions 109-118 (SART3(109-118)) with the ability to induce HLA-A24-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated both humoral and cellular responses to this peptide in cancer patients with alleles other than HLA-A24 to explore the possibility of using this peptide as a cancer vaccine for these patients. IgG reactive to SART3(109-118) peptide was identified in sera of the vast majority of non-cancer subjects (n=50) and all cancer patients (n=50) tested without apparent HLA-A association. Levels of anti-SART3(109-118) peptide antibody in cancer patients were significantly higher than those of non-cancer subjects, but no difference was found between HLA-A24+A2- and HLA-A24-A2+ cancer patients. This peptide induced cancer cell-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of both healthy donors and prostate cancer patients with HLA-A11, HLA-A31 and HLA-A33 alleles, but not with HLA-A2. These results suggest that this peptide can be applicable as a cancer vaccine not only for HLA-A24+, but also for HLA-A11+, HLA-A31+ and HLA-A33+ prostate cancer patients.

  1. New peptides of the polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 with the potential to induce cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes in human leukocyte antigen-A2+ prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yukoh; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Minami, Takafumi; Saito, Koujiro; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo; Harada, Mamoru

    2007-11-01

    The polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is linked to aggressive prostate cancer and could be an appropriate target in specific immunotherapy. In this study, we attempted to identify EZH2-derived peptides that have the potential to generate cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2+ prostate cancer patients. Twelve EZH2-derived peptides were prepared based on the HLA-A2 binding motif. These peptide candidates were screened first by their ability to be recognized by immunoglobulin G (IgG), and then by their ability to induce peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). As a result, five EZH2 peptides recognized by IgG (EZH2 120-128, EZH2 165-174, EZH2 569-577, EZH2 665-674, and EZH2 699-708) were frequently detected in the plasma of prostate cancer patients. Among them, the EZH2 120-128 and EZH2 165-174 peptides effectively induced HLA-A2-restricted and cancer-reactive CTLs from prostate cancer patients. The cytotoxicity was mainly dependent on EZH2 peptide-specific and HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that these EZH2 120-128 and EZH2 165-174 peptides could be promising candidates in peptide-based immunotherapy for HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients.

  2. CD40 stimulation leads to effective therapy of CD40− tumors through induction of strong systemic cytotoxic T lymphocyte immunity

    PubMed Central

    van Mierlo, Geertje J. D.; den Boer, Annemieke Th.; Medema, Jan Paul; van der Voort, Ellen I. H.; Fransen, Marieke F.; Offringa, Rienk; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Toes, Rene E. M.

    2002-01-01

    Adequate spontaneous activation of tumor-specific T lymphocytes in tumor-bearing hosts is rare, despite the expression of tumor antigens that are potentially highly immunogenic. For example, failure of the immune system to raise competent responses against established tumors expressing the human adenovirus E1A-antigen allows this tumor to grow in immunocompetent mice. We show that systemic in vivo administration of agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies into tumor-bearing mice results in tumor eradication mediated by CD8+ T cells. Treatment resulted in a strong expansion and systemic accumulation of E1A-specific CTL and depended on CD40 expression on host cells, as the tumor was CD40−, and therapy failed in CD40-deficient mice. Local intratumoral administration of anti-CD40 mAb is equally effective in licensing strong, systemic CTL immunity, resulting in the clearance of distant tumor nodules. Our data indicate that the immune response after cancer–host interactions can be directed toward competence, leading to the cure of established tumors merely by delivery of a CD40-dependent “license to kill” signal. PMID:11929985

  3. Induction of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes by immunization with syngeneic irradiated HIV-1 envelope derived peptide-pulsed dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Nakagawa, Y; Yokomuro, K; Berzofsky, J A

    1993-08-01

    Based on the evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTL) precursors do not appear to distinguish between virus-infected cells and viral peptide-pulsed syngeneic cells, we have developed methods for priming class I MHC molecule restricted CD8+ CTL with such peptides without using any adjuvant. We were able to prime in vivo such CTL immunity lasting at least 6 months with a single i.v. injection of syngeneic 2200-3300 rad irradiated peptide-pulsed spleen cells, and even more efficiently with a very small number of irradiated class II MHC molecule expressing splenic dendritic cells (DC). No foreign serum source was necessary during the pulsing. Interestingly, we could not generate significant CTL activity with unirradiated or low dose (< 1100 rad) irradiated spleen cells. Because even purified DC required irradiation for optimal activity, because unirradiated B cells did not significantly inhibit the immunization with DC, and because B cell depletion did not substitute for irradiation, we believe that the effect of irradiation is more to determine homing of the cells than to eliminate interference by B cells. Intravenous immunization was much more effective than s.c. or i.p. immunization. CTL generated by this method could kill both peptide-pulsed syngeneic targets and targets endogenously expressing the whole gp160 gene. Moreover, we found that we could prime CD8+ CTL with the minimal 10-residue core peptide (RGPGRAFVTI) for optimal presentation by class I MHC molecules as efficiently as the original p18. These results suggested that DC bearing antigenic peptide may prime antigen-specific CD8+ CTL in vivo. These results offer useful information for development of synthetic peptide vaccines and immunotherapy.

  4. Use of a high-affinity peptide that aborts MHC-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity against multiple viruses in vitro and virus-induced immunopathologic disease in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, M B; von Herrath, M; Lewicki, H; Hudrisier, D; Whitton, J L; Gairin, J E

    1999-04-10

    Binding of a specific peptide(s) from a viral protein to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is a critical step in the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Once activated, CTLs can cause lethal disease in an infected host, for example, by killing virus-containing ependymal and ventricular cells in the central nervous system or viral protein-expressing beta cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Here we describe the usage of a designed (not natural) high-affinity peptide to compete with viral peptide(s)-MHC binding. This peptide blocks virus-induced CTL-mediated disease both in the CNS and in the pancreatic islets in vivo. Further, the blocking peptide aborts MHC-restricted killing of target cells by CTLs generated to three separate viruses: lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, influenza virus, and simian virus 40. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Identification of Two New HLA-A*1101-Restricted Tax Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in an Adult T-Cell Leukemia Patient after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Harashima, Nanae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Takao; Okamura, Jun; Kannagi, Mari

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), directed to single epitopes restricted by HLA-A2 or A24, expanded in vitro and in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from some adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients after but not before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here, we demonstrated similar Tax-specific CTL expansion in PBMC from another post-HSCT ATL patient without HLA-A2 or A24, whose CTLs equally recognized two newly identified epitopes, Tax88-96 and Tax272-280, restricted by HLA-A11, suggesting that these immunodominant Tax epitopes are present in the ATL patient in vivo. PMID:16014972

  6. Identification of two new HLA-A*1101-restricted tax epitopes recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes in an adult T-cell leukemia patient after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Harashima, Nanae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Takao; Okamura, Jun; Kannagi, Mari

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), directed to single epitopes restricted by HLA-A2 or A24, expanded in vitro and in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from some adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients after but not before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here, we demonstrated similar Tax-specific CTL expansion in PBMC from another post-HSCT ATL patient without HLA-A2 or A24, whose CTLs equally recognized two newly identified epitopes, Tax88-96 and Tax272-280, restricted by HLA-A11, suggesting that these immunodominant Tax epitopes are present in the ATL patient in vivo.

  7. Polymorphisms in HLA Class I Genes Associated with both Favorable Prognosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Infection and Positive Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses to ALVAC-HIV Recombinant Canarypox Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kaslow, Richard A.; Rivers, Charles; Tang, Jianming; Bender, Thomas J.; Goepfert, Paul A.; El Habib, Raphaelle; Weinhold, Kent; Mulligan, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    Carriers of certain human leukocyte antigen class I alleles show favorable prognosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, presumably due to effective CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses, but close relationships between class I variants mediating such responses to natural and to vaccine HIV-1 antigen have not been established. During 6 to 30 months of administration and follow-up in trials of ALVAC-HIV recombinant canarypox vaccines, cells from 42% of 291 HIV-1-negative vaccinated subjects typed at class I loci responded to an HIV-1 protein in a lytic bulk CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assay. By 2 weeks after the second dose, higher proportions of vaccinees carrying one of two alleles consistently associated with slower progression of natural HIV-1 infection reacted at least once: B∗27 carriers reacted to Gag (64%; odds ratio [OR] = 10.3, P = 0.001) and Env (36%; OR = 4.6, P = 0.04), and B∗57 carriers reacted to Env (44%; OR = 6.6, P < 0.05). By 2 weeks after the third or fourth dose, B∗27 carriers had responded (two or more reactions) to Gag (33%; OR = 4.4, P < 0.05) and B∗57 carriers had responded to both Gag (39%; OR = 5.3, P = 0.013) and Env (39%; OR = 9.5, P = 0.002). Homozygosity at class I loci, although conferring an unfavorable prognosis following natural infection, showed no such disadvantage for vaccine response. Individual class I alleles have not previously demonstrated such clear and consistent relationship with both the clinical course of an infection and cellular immunity to a vaccine against the infectious agent. This proof of principle that class I an alleles modulate both processes has implications for development of HIV-1 and presumably other vaccines. PMID:11507213

  8. TLR agonists are highly effective at eliciting functional memory CTLs of effector memory phenotype in peptide immunization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Given the importance of memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in eliminating altered self-cells, including virus-infected and tumor cells, devising effective vaccination strategies for generating memory CTLs is a priority in the field of immunology. Herein, we elaborate upon a novel boosting approac...

  9. Detailed analysis of immunologic effects of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab in peripheral blood of patients with melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Lee, Yohan; Jalil, Jason; Algazi, Alain; de la Rocha, Pilar; Camacho, Luis H; Bozon, Viviana A; Bulanhagui, Cecile A; Seja, Elisabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; Straatsma, Bradley R; Gualberto, Antonio; Economou, James S; Glaspy, John A; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Ribas, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background CTLA4-blocking antibodies induce tumor regression in a subset of patients with melanoma. Analysis of immune parameters in peripheral blood may help define how responses are mediated. Methods Peripheral blood from HLA-A*0201-positive patients with advanced melanoma receiving tremelimumab (formerly CP-675,206) at 10 mg/kg monthly was repeatedly sampled during the first 4 cycles. Samples were analyzed by 1) tetramer and ELISPOT assays for reactivity to CMV, EBV, MART1, gp100, and tyrosinase; 2) activation HLA-DR and memory CD45RO markers on CD4+/CD8+ cells; and 3) real-time quantitative PCR of mRNA for FoxP3 transcription factor, preferentially expressed by T regulatory cells. The primary endpoint was difference in MART1-specific T cells by tetramer assay. Immunological data were explored for significant trends using clustering analysis. Results Three of 12 patients eligible for immune monitoring had tumor regression lasting > 2 years without relapse. There was no significant change in percent of MART1-specific T cells by tetramer assay. Additionally, there was no generalized trend toward postdosing changes in other antigen-specific CD8+ cell populations, FoxP3 transcripts, or overall changes in surface expression of T-cell activation or memory markers. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering based on immune monitoring data segregated patients randomly. However, clustering according to T-cell activation or memory markers separated patients with clinical response and most patients with inflammatory toxicity into a common subgroup. Conclusion Administration of CTLA4-blocking antibody tremelimumab to patients with advanced melanoma results in a subset of patients with long-lived tumor responses. T-cell activation and memory markers served as the only readout of the pharmacodynamic effects of this antibody in peripheral blood. Clinical trial registration number NCT00086489 PMID:18452610

  10. Ceramide mediates FasL-induced caspase 8 activation in colon carcinoma cells to enhance FasL-induced cytotoxicity by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Genevieve L.; Redd, Priscilla S.; Paschall, Amy V.; Lu, Chunwan; Gu, Lilly; Cai, Houjian; Albers, Thomas; Lebedyeva, Iryna O.; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    FasL-mediated cytotoxicity is one of the mechanisms that CTLs use to kill tumor cells. However, human colon carcinoma often deregulates the Fas signaling pathway to evade host cancer immune surveillance. We aimed at testing the hypothesis that novel ceramide analogs effectively modulate Fas function to sensitize colon carcinoma cells to FasL-induced apoptosis. We used rational design and synthesized twenty ceramide analogs as Fas function modulators. Five ceramide analogs, IG4, IG7, IG14, IG17, and IG19, exhibit low toxicity and potent activity in sensitization of human colon carcinoma cells to FasL-induced apoptosis. Functional deficiency of Fas limits both FasL and ceramide analogs in the induction of apoptosis. Ceramide enhances FasL-induced activation of the MAPK, NF-κB, and caspase 8 despite induction of potent tumor cell death. Finally, a sublethal dose of several ceramide analogs significantly increased CTL-mediated and FasL-induced apoptosis of colon carcinoma cells. We have therefore developed five novel ceramide analogs that act at a sublethal dose to enhance the efficacy of tumor-specific CTLs, and these ceramide analogs hold great promise for further development as adjunct agents in CTL-based colon cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27487939

  11. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama . E-mail: nirupama@icgeb.res.in

    2006-12-22

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine.

  12. Novel immunodominant peptide presentation strategy: a featured HLA-A*2402-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope stabilized by intrachain hydrogen bonds from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Peng; Gao, Feng; Qi, Jianxun; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Xie, Jing; Vavricka, Christopher J; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Li, Taisheng; Gao, George F

    2010-11-01

    Antigenic peptides recognized by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC; or human leukocyte antigen [HLA] in humans) molecules, and the peptide selection and presentation strategy of the host has been studied to guide our understanding of cellular immunity and vaccine development. Here, a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein-derived CTL epitope, N1 (QFKDNVILL), restricted by HLA-A*2402 was identified by a series of in vitro studies, including a computer-assisted algorithm for prediction, stabilization of the peptide by co-refolding with HLA-A*2402 heavy chain and β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)m), and T2-A24 cell binding. Consequently, the antigenicity of the peptide was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), proliferation assays, and HLA-peptide complex tetramer staining using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors who had recovered from SARS donors. Furthermore, the crystal structure of HLA-A*2402 complexed with peptide N1 was determined, and the featured peptide was characterized with two unexpected intrachain hydrogen bonds which augment the central residues to bulge out of the binding groove. This may contribute to the T-cell receptor (TCR) interaction, showing a host immunodominant peptide presentation strategy. Meanwhile, a rapid and efficient strategy is presented for the determination of naturally presented CTL epitopes in the context of given HLA alleles of interest from long immunogenic overlapping peptides.

  13. Construction of a fusion plasmid containing the PSCA gene and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and its anti-tumor effect in an animal model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mai, T.J.; Ma, R.; Li, Z.; Bi, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is a negative regulator of T cell activation, which competes with CD28 for B7.1/B7.2 binding, and which has a greater affinity. Fusion of specific antigens to extracellular domain of CTLA4 represents a promising approach to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In this study, we evaluated this interesting approach for CTLA4 enhancement on prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-specific immune responses and its anti-tumor effects in a prostate cancer mouse model. Consequently, we constructed a DNA vaccine containing the PSCA and the CTLA-4 gene. Vaccination with the CTLA4-fused DNA not only induced a much higher level of anti-PSCA antibody, but also increased PSCA-specific T cell response in mice. To evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of the plasmids, murine models with PSCA-expressing tumors were generated. After injection of the tumor-bearing mouse model, the plasmid carrying the CTLA4 and PSCA fusion gene showed stronger inhibition of tumor growth than the plasmid expressing PSCA alone. These observations emphasize the potential of the CTLA4-fused DNA vaccine, which could represent a promising approach for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27783810

  14. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules with super-enhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and non-specifically activate cytotoxic T lymphocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Wooldridge, Linda; Clement, Matthew; Lissina, Anna; Edwards, Emily S. J.; Ladell, Kristin; Ekeruche, Julia; Hewitt, Rachel E.; Laugel, Bruno; Gostick, Emma; Cole, David K.; Debets, Reno; Berrevoets, Cor; Miles, John J.; Burrows, Scott R.; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are essential for effective immune defence against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTL recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Antigen recognition involves the binding of both T cell receptor (TCR) and CD8 co-receptor to a single ligand (pMHCI). The TCR/pMHCI interaction confers antigen specificity, whereas the pMHCI/CD8 interaction mediates enhanced sensitivity to antigen. Striking biophysical differences exist between the TCR/pMHCI and pMHCI/CD8 interactions; indeed, the pMHCI/CD8 interaction can be >100-fold weaker than the cognate TCR/pMHCI interaction. Here, we show that increasing the strength of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction by ~15-fold results in non-specific, cognate antigen-independent pMHCI tetramer binding at the cell surface. Furthermore, pMHCI molecules with super-enhanced affinity for CD8 activate CTL in the absence of a specific TCR/pMHCI interaction to elicit a full range of effector functions, including cytokine/chemokine release, degranulation and proliferation. Thus, the low solution binding affinity of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction is essential for the maintenance of CTL antigen specificity. PMID:20190139

  15. Genetically encoded and post-translationally modified forms of a major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted antigen bearing a glycosylation motif are independently processed and co-presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, D; Riond, J; Mazarguil, H; Oldstone, M B; Gairin, J E

    1999-12-17

    The mechanisms by which antigenic peptides bearing a glycosylation site may be processed from viral glycoproteins, post-translationally modified, and presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules remain poorly understood. With the aim of exploring these processes, we have dissected the structural and functional properties of the MHC-restricted peptide GP92-101 (CSANNSHHYI) generated from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) GP1 glycoprotein. LCMV GP92-101 bears a glycosylation motif -NXS- that is naturally N-glycosylated in the mature viral glycoprotein, displays high affinity for H-2D(b) molecules, and elicits a CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte response. By analyzing the functional properties of natural and synthetic peptides and by identifying the viral sequence(s) from the pool of naturally occurring peptides, we demonstrated that multiple forms of LCMV GP92-101 were generated from the viral glycoprotein and co-presented at the surface of LCMV-infected cells. They corresponded to non-glycosylated and post-translationally modified sequences (conversion of Asn-95 to Asp or alteration of Cys-92). The glycosylated form, despite its potential immunogenicity, was not detected. These data illustrate that distinct, non-mutually exclusive antigen presentation pathways may occur simultaneously within a cell to generate structurally and functionally different peptides from a single genetically encoded sequence, thus contributing to increasing the diversity of the T cell repertoire.

  16. T cell receptor genes in a series of class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones specific for a Plasmodium berghei nonapeptide: implications for T cell allelic exclusion and antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We report here the first extensive study of a T cell repertoire for a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. We have found that the T cell receptors (TCRs) carried by 28 H-2Kd-restricted CTL clones specific for a single Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite nonapeptide are highly diverse in terms of V alpha, J alpha, and J beta segments and aminoacid composition of the junctional regions. However, despite this extensive diversity, a high proportion of the TCRs contain the same V beta segment. These results are in contrast to most previously reported T cell responses towards class II MHC-peptide complexes, where the TCR repertoires appeared to be much more limited. In our study, the finding of a dominant V beta in the midst of otherwise highly diverse TCRs suggests the importance of the V beta segment in shaping the T cell repertoire specific for a given MHC-peptide complex. As an additional finding, we observed that nearly all clones have rearranged both TCR alpha loci. Moreover, as many as one-third of the CTL clones that we analyzed apparently display two productive alpha rearrangements. This argues against a regulated model of sequential recombination at the alpha locus and consequently raises the question of whether allelic exclusion of the TCR alpha chain is achieved at all. PMID:1836010

  17. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined. PMID:12954220

  18. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Robert H; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R; Littke, Matt H; McGuire, Travis C

    2003-09-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined.

  19. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Klar, Agnes S.; Gopinadh, Jakka; Kleber, Sascha; Wadle, Andreas; Renner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA) family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157–165) peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment. PMID:26447882

  20. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Klar, Agnes S; Gopinadh, Jakka; Kleber, Sascha; Wadle, Andreas; Renner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA) family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157-165) peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels. These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment.

  1. IL-17-Dependent, IFN-γ-Independent Tumor Rejection is Mediated by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and Occurs at Extraocular Sites, but is Excluded from the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Coursey, Terry G.; Chen, Peter W.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2011-01-01

    Although intraocular tumors reside in an immune privileged site where immune responses are suppressed, some tumors are rejected nonetheless. An example of this is the rejection of intraocular adenovirus-induced (Ad5E1) tumors in C57BL/6 mice. We previously identified an Ad5E1 tumor clone in which the rejection is IFN-γ-dependent and culminates in the destruction of both the tumor and the eye. Although Ad5E1 tumors are not rejected when transplanted into the eyes of IFN-γ KO mice, they are rejected following subcutaneous transplantation (SC). Thus, outside of the eye Ad5E1 tumors elicit a form of tumor immunity that is IFN-γ-independent. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-γ-independent SC rejection requires both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, SC tumor rejection requires IL-17, which is produced by IFN-γ-deficient CD4+ T cells in response to tumor antigens (TAs). Splenocytes from CD4-depleted IFN-γ KO mice produce significantly less IL-17 compared to splenocytes from isotype-treated IFN-γ KO animals in response to TAs. Furthermore, depletion of IL-17 decreases CTL activity against Ad5E1 tumor cells. In this model we propose that in the absence of IFN-γ, CD4+ T cells produce IL-17 in response to TAs, which increases CTL activity that mediates tumor rejection. However, this does not occur in the eye. IL-6 production within the eye is severely reduced, which is consistent with the failure to induce Th17 cells within the intraocular tumors. By contrast, the SC environment is replete with IL-6 and supports the induction of Th17 cells. Therefore, IFN-γ-independent tumor rejection is excluded from the eye and may represent a newly recognized form of ocular immune privilege. PMID:21918192

  2. An immunodominant class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte determinant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 induces CD4 class II-restricted help for itself

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have observed that a peptide corresponding to an immunodominant epitope of the HIV-1 envelope protein recognized by class I MHC- restricted CD8+ CTL can also induce T cell help for itself. The help is necessary for restimulation of CTL precursors in vitro with peptide alone in the absence of exogenous lymphokines, can be removed by depletion of CD4+ T cells, and can be replaced by exogenous IL-2. Whereas the CTL in BALB/c or B10. D2 mice are restricted by the class I molecule Dd, the Th cells are restricted by the class II molecule Ad, and the help can be blocked by anti-Ad mAb. To examine the genetic regulation of the induction of help, we studied B10.A mice that share the class I Dd molecule, but have different class II molecules, Ak and Ek. Spleen cells of immune B10.A mice behave like CD4-depleted BALB/c spleen cells in that they cannot be restimulated in vitro by the peptide alone, but can with peptide plus IL-2. Therefore, in the absence of exogenous lymphokines, peptide-specific help is necessary for restimulation with this immunodominant CTL epitope peptide, and in H-2d mice, this peptide stimulates help for itself as well as CTL. We speculate on the implications of these findings for the immunodominance of this peptide in H-2d mice, and for the selective advantage of pairing certain class I and class II molecules in an MHC haplotype. PMID:1689366

  3. Enhancement of the antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-inducing ability in the PMDC11 leukemic plasmacytoid dendritic cell line via lentiviral vector-mediated transduction of the caTLR4 gene.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Minami; Narita, Miwako; Uchiyama, Takayoshi; Iwaya, Shunpei; Oiwa, Eri; Nishizawa, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Bonehill, Aude; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Takizawa, Jun; Takahashi, Masuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to enhance the efficiency of leukemia immunotherapy by increasing the antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-inducing ability of leukemia cells. The leukemic plasmacytoid dendritic cell line PMDC05 containing the HLA-A02/24 antigen, which was previously established in our laboratory (Laboratory of Hematology and Oncology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan), was used in the present study. It exhibited higher expression levels of CD80 following transduction with lentiviruses encoding the CD80 gene. This CD80-expressing PMDC05 was named PMDC11. In order to establish a more potent antigen-presenting cell for cellular immunotherapy of tumors or severe infections, PMDC11 cells were transduced with a constitutively active (ca) toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene using the Tet-On system (caTLR4-PMDC11). CD8(+) T cells from healthy donors with HLA-A02 were co-cultured with mutant WT1 peptide-pulsed PMDC11, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PMDC11 or caTLR4-PMDC11 cells. Interleukin (IL)-2 (50 IU/ml) and IL-7 (10 ng/ml) were added on day three of culture. Priming with mutant WT1 peptide-pulsed PMDC11, LPS-stimulated PMDC11 or caTLR4-PMDC11 cells was conducted once per week and two thirds of the IL-2/IL-7 containing medium was replenished every 3-4 days. Immediately prior to the priming with these various PMDC11 cells, the cultured cells were analyzed for the secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ in addition to the percentage and number of CD8(+)/WT1 tetramer(+) T cells using flow cytometry. caTLR4-PMDC11 cells were observed to possess greater antigen-presenting abilities compared with those of PMDC11 or LPS-stimulated PMDC11 cells in a mixed leukocyte culture. CD8 T cells positive for the WT1 tetramer were generated following 3-4 weeks of culture and CD8(+)/WT1 tetramer+ T cells were markedly increased in caTLR4-PMDC11-primed CD8(+) T cell culture compared with PMDC11 or LPS-stimulated PMDC11-primed CD8(+) T

  4. Differential T cell receptor photoaffinity labeling among H-2Kd restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones specific for a photoreactive peptide derivative. Labeling of the alpha-chain correlates with J alpha segment usage

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Using a direct binding assay based on photoaffinity labeling, we studied the interaction of T cell receptor (TCR) with a Kd-bound photoreactive peptide derivative on living cells. The Kd-restricted Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite (PbCS) peptide 253-260 (YIPSAEKI) was reacted NH2-terminally with biotin and at the TCR contact residue Lys259 with photoreactive iodo, 4-azido salicylic acid (IASA) to make biotin-YIPSAEK(IASA)I. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones derived from mice immunized with this derivative recognized this conjugate, but not a related one lacking the IASA group nor the parental PbCS peptide. The clones were Kd restricted. Recognition experiments with variant conjugates, lacking substituents from IASA, revealed a diverse fine specificity pattern and indicated that this group interacted directly with the TCR. The TCR of four clones could be photoaffinity labeled by biotin-YIPSAEK(125IASA)I. This labeling was dependent on the conjugates binding to the Kd molecule and was selective for the TCR alpha (2 clones) or beta chain (1 clone), or was common for both chains (1 clone). TCR sequence analysis showed a preferential usage of J alpha TA28 containing alpha chains that were paired with V beta 1 expressing beta chains. The TCR that were photoaffinity labeled at the alpha chain expressed these J alpha and V beta segments. The tryptophan encoded by the J alpha TA28 segment is rarely found in other J alpha segments. Moreover, we show that the IASA group interacts preferentially with tryptophan in aqueous solution. We thus propose that for these CTL clones, labeling of the alpha chain occurs via the J alpha-encoded tryptophan residue. PMID:8478607

  5. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursor frequency (CTLp-f) as a tool for distinguishing permissible from non-permissible class I mismatches in T-cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, A; Joosten, I; Schattenberg, A V; de Witte, T J; Allebes, W A

    2000-11-01

    Matching for HLA has been the gold standard in bone marrow donor selection. But, with the ever increasing number of identified HLA alleles, it is becoming more difficult to find a fully HLA-identical donor other than a sibling. Retrospective analysis revealed that HLA mismatches do not necessarily give rise to acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). However, we have no means of defining these 'permissible' mismatches before bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Thus, we set out to establish whether functional matching by means of helper and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursor frequency analysis (HTLp-f and CTLp-f respectively) can be applied to this end. Fifty-five recipient-donor pairs other than HLA-identical siblings, the recipient of which received a T-cell-depleted graft, were analysed by high-resolution HLA typing and/or HTLp-f/CTLp-f analysis. The predictive value of the CTLp-f assay for development of acute GVHD was confirmed. More importantly, our data indicate that the CTLp-f assay was able to discriminate permissible from non-permissible HLA-A, -B or -Cw mismatches, but not for DRB/DQB mismatches. The absolute number of alloreactive CTLs present in the graft correlated with the risk of acute GVHD. Although HTLp-f and CTLp-f together had a high negative predictive value, HTLp-f outcome by itself was not correlated with acute GVHD. As we have no evidence yet that HTLp-f or CTLp-f can identify permissible DRB/DQB mismatches, high-resolution matching for these antigens remains the best option. The combination of high-resolution DRB/DQB typing and the CTLp-f assay would enable the accurate prediction of the risk of acute GVHD while extending the pool of potential donors. Furthermore, it would enable adjustment of the number of T- cells in the graft accordingly to improve clinical outcome.

  6. IL-21-treated naive CD45RA+ CD8+ T cells represent a reliable source for producing leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes with high proliferative potential and early differentiation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jana; Frey, Michaela; Teschner, Daniel; Carbol, Alexander; Theobald, Matthias; Herr, Wolfgang; Distler, Eva

    2011-02-01

    Clinical tumor remissions after adoptive T-cell therapy are frequently not durable due to limited survival and homing of transfused tumor-reactive T cells, what can be mainly attributed to the long-term culture necessary for in vitro expansion. Here, we introduce an approach allowing the reliable in vitro generation of leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from naive CD8+ T cells of healthy donors, leading to high cell numbers within a relatively short culture period. The protocol includes the stimulation of purified CD45RA+ CD8+ T cells with primary acute myeloid leukemia blasts of patient origin in HLA-class I-matched allogeneic mixed lymphocyte-leukemia cultures. The procedure allowed the isolation of a large diversity of HLA-A/-B/-C-restricted leukemia-reactive CTL clones and oligoclonal lines. CTLs showed reactivity to either leukemia blasts exclusively, or to leukemia blasts as well as patient-derived B lymphoblastoid-cell lines (LCLs). In contrast, LCLs of donor origin were not lysed. This reactivity pattern suggested that CTLs recognized leukemia-associated antigens or hematopoietic minor histocompatibility antigens. Consistent with this hypothesis, most CTLs did not react with patient-derived fibroblasts. The efficiency of the protocol could be further increased by addition of interleukin-21 during primary in vitro stimulation. Most importantly, leukemia-reactive CTLs retained the expression of early T-cell differentiation markers CD27, CD28, CD62L and CD127 for several weeks during culture. The effective in vitro expansion of leukemia-reactive CD8+ CTLs from naive CD45RA+ precursors of healthy donors can accelerate the molecular definition of candidate leukemia antigens and might be of potential use for the development of adoptive CTL therapy in leukemia.

  7. The Contributory Roles of Th17 Lymphocyte and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte at the Hair Bulge Region as Well as the Hair Bulb Area in the Chronic Alopecia Areata Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin-Woo; Lee, Chae-Young; Ha, Seung-Min; Choi, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Song, Ki-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Background Alopecia areata (AA) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that targets hair follicles and interrupts hair regrowth. The microenvironment of the effector T cells and their related cytokines may affect immunopathogenesis around the hair bulb/bulge. Objective To determine the contributory roles of the effector T cell subsets and related cytokines to the pathogenesis of AA. Methods We investigated the correlation between histopathological grades and four clinical prognostic factors in 331 patients with AA, and analyzed the topography of T cell infiltrates and related cytokines around the hair bulb/bulge according to histopathological grades through immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescence studies on a subset of AA specimens. Results First, the groups with more severe histopathological grades were associated with earlier onset, longer duration, more hair loss, as well as poorer therapeutic outcomes. Second, the pattern of CD4 and CD8 expression around the hair bulb/bulge varied by histopathological grade, with staining density decreasing in the following order: type 1>type 2>type 3. In addition, interferon-γ and transforming growth factor-β1 expression appeared denser in the peribulbar area. Interestingly, the denser CCR6+ cells (Th17 cells) showed more infiltration than CCR5+ cells (Th1 cells) around the hair bulb/bulge as histopathological grade worsened. Conclusion The insidious destruction of bulge stem cells and hair bulb matrix stem cells results in more severe hair loss in patients with chronic AA, which is mediated by Th17 lymphocyte and cytotoxic T lymphocyte infiltration. Furthermore, Th17 lymphocytes may play an even more important role than cytotoxic T cells in the development of AA. PMID:28392642

  8. Crystal structure of swine major histocompatibility complex class I SLA-1 0401 and identification of 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nianzhi; Qi, Jianxun; Feng, Sijia; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xiaocheng; Chen, Rong; Li, Qirun; Chen, Zhaosan; Li, Xiaoying; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F

    2011-11-01

    The presentation of viral epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA I) is crucial for swine immunity. To illustrate the structural basis of swine CTL epitope presentation, the first SLA crystal structures, SLA-1 0401, complexed with peptides derived from either 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV(NW9); NSDTVGWSW) or Ebola virus (Ebola(AY9); ATAAATEAY) were determined in this study. The overall peptide-SLA-1 0401 structures resemble, as expected, the general conformations of other structure-solved peptide major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). The major distinction of SLA-1 0401 is that Arg(156) has a "one-ballot veto" function in peptide binding, due to its flexible side chain. S-OIV(NW9) and Ebola(AY9) bind SLA-1 0401 with similar conformations but employ different water molecules to stabilize their binding. The side chain of P7 residues in both peptides is exposed, indicating that the epitopes are "featured" peptides presented by this SLA. Further analyses showed that SLA-1 0401 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I HLA-A 0101 can present the same peptides, but in different conformations, demonstrating cross-species epitope presentation. CTL epitope peptides derived from 2009 pandemic S-OIV were screened and evaluated by the in vitro refolding method. Three peptides were identified as potential cross-species influenza virus (IV) CTL epitopes. The binding motif of SLA-1 0401 was proposed, and thermostabilities of key peptide-SLA-1 0401 complexes were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra. Our results not only provide the structural basis of peptide presentation by SLA I but also identify some IV CTL epitope peptides. These results will benefit both vaccine development and swine organ-based xenotransplantation.

  9. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes elicited by dendritic cell-targeted delivery of human papillomavirus type-16 E6/E7 fusion gene exert lethal effects on CaSki cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Mei; Liu, Xing; Jiao, Qing-Fang; Fu, Shao-Yue; Bu, You-Quan; Song, Fang-Zhou; Yi, Fa-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary etiologic agent of cervical cancer. Consideration of safety and non human leukocyte antigen restriction, protein vaccine has become the most likely form of HPV therapeutic vaccine, although none have so far been reported as effective. Since tumor cells consistently express the two proteins E6 and E7, most therapeutic vaccines target one or both of them. In this study, we fabricated DC vaccines by transducing replication-defective recombinant adenoviruses expressing E6/E7 fusion gene of HPV-16, to investigate the lethal effects of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against CaSki cells in vitro. Mouse immature dendritic cells (DC) were generated from bone marrow, and transfected with pAd-E6/E7 to prepare a DC vaccine and to induce specific CTL. The surface expression of CD40, CD68, MHC II and CD11c was assessed by flow cytometry (FCM), and the lethal effects of CTL against CaSki cells were determined by DAPI, FCM and CCK-8 methods. Immature mouse DC was successfully transfected by pAd-E6/E7 in vitro, and the transfecting efficiency was 40%-50%. A DC vaccine was successfully prepared and was used to induce specific CTL. Experimental results showed that the percentage of apoptosis and killing rate of CaSki cells were significantly increased by coculturing with the specific CTL (p <0.05). These results illustrated that a DC vaccine modified by HPV-16 E6/E7 gene can induce apoptosis of CaSki cells by inducing CTL, which may be used as a new strategy for biological treatment of cervical cancer.

  10. Crystal Structure of Swine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I SLA-1*0401 and Identification of 2009 Pandemic Swine-Origin Influenza A H1N1 Virus Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Peptides ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianzhi; Qi, Jianxun; Feng, Sijia; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xiaocheng; Chen, Rong; Li, Qirun; Chen, Zhaosan; Li, Xiaoying; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F.

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of viral epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA I) is crucial for swine immunity. To illustrate the structural basis of swine CTL epitope presentation, the first SLA crystal structures, SLA-1*0401, complexed with peptides derived from either 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIVNW9; NSDTVGWSW) or Ebola virus (EbolaAY9; ATAAATEAY) were determined in this study. The overall peptide–SLA-1*0401 structures resemble, as expected, the general conformations of other structure-solved peptide major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). The major distinction of SLA-1*0401 is that Arg156 has a “one-ballot veto” function in peptide binding, due to its flexible side chain. S-OIVNW9 and EbolaAY9 bind SLA-1*0401 with similar conformations but employ different water molecules to stabilize their binding. The side chain of P7 residues in both peptides is exposed, indicating that the epitopes are “featured” peptides presented by this SLA. Further analyses showed that SLA-1*0401 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I HLA-A*0101 can present the same peptides, but in different conformations, demonstrating cross-species epitope presentation. CTL epitope peptides derived from 2009 pandemic S-OIV were screened and evaluated by the in vitro refolding method. Three peptides were identified as potential cross-species influenza virus (IV) CTL epitopes. The binding motif of SLA-1*0401 was proposed, and thermostabilities of key peptide–SLA-1*0401 complexes were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra. Our results not only provide the structural basis of peptide presentation by SLA I but also identify some IV CTL epitope peptides. These results will benefit both vaccine development and swine organ-based xenotransplantation. PMID:21900158

  11. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 +49A/G polymorphisms contribute to the risk of type 1 diabetes in children: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Du, Wei; Jia, Yutao; Zhang, Xiaobai; Ma, Guorui

    2017-02-07

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a heritable disease associated with multiple genetic variants. This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the correlation between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4(CTLA-4) +49A/G polymorphisms and the risk of T1D in children. The random effects model was used to estimate the related odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) was used to determine whether the currently available evidence was sufficient and conclusive. Our results indicated that CTLA-4 gene polymorphisms significantly increased the risk of childhood T1D in an allelic model (G vs. A: OR=1.33, 95%CI=1.19-1.48; I2=44.0% and P=0.001for heterogeneity) and a codominant model (GG vs. AA: OR=1.75, 95%CI=1.37-2.24; I2=57.5% and P=0.001for heterogeneity; GA vs. AA: OR=1.26, 95%CI=1.09-1.46; I2=40.4% and P=0.036for heterogeneity). Subgroup analysis results indicated that the ORs were higher in the Asian population (ORallelic model=1.60, ORGG vs. AA=2.46 and ORGA vs. AA=1.58) than the Caucasian population (ORallelic model==1.24, ORGG vs. AA=1.55 and ORGA vs. AA=1.19). The TSA results indicated that the evidence of the effect was sufficient. In conclusion, CTLA4 +49A/G polymorphisms increased the risk of T1D in children, and CTLA4 +49A/G can be considered to be a genetic marker for T1D in children.

  12. Accumulation of Pol Mutations Selected by HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 Protective Haplotype-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Causes Low Plasma Viral Load Due to Low Viral Fitness of Mutant Viruses.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Hayato; Koyanagi, Madoka; Chikata, Takayuki; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Kuse, Nozomi; Sakai, Keiko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2017-02-15

    HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02, which is the most abundant haplotype in Japan, has a protective effect on disease progression in HIV-1-infected Japanese individuals, whereas HLA-B*57 and -B*27 protective alleles are very rare in Japan. A previous study on HLA-associated polymorphisms demonstrated that the number of HLA-B*52:01-associated mutations at four Pol positions was inversely correlated with plasma viral load (pVL) in HLA-B*52:01-negative individuals, suggesting that the transmission of HIV-1 with these mutations could modulate the pVL in the population. However, it remains unknown whether these mutations were selected by HLA-B*52:01-restricted CTLs and also reduced viral fitness. In this study, we identified two HLA-B*52:01-restricted and one HLA-C*12:02-restricted novel cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in Pol. Analysis using CTLs specific for these three epitopes demonstrated that these CTLs failed to recognize mutant epitopes or more weakly recognized cells infected with mutant viruses than wild-type virus, supporting the idea that these mutations were selected by the HLA-B*52:01- or HLA-C*12:02-restricted T cells. We further showed that these mutations reduced viral fitness, although the effect of each mutation was weak. The present study demonstrated that the accumulation of these Pol mutations selected by HLA-B*52:01- or HLA-C*12:02-restricted CTLs impaired viral replication capacity and thus reduced the pVL. The fitness cost imposed by the mutations partially accounted for the effect of the HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotype on clinical outcome, together with the effect of HLA-B*52:01-restricted CTLs on viral replication, which had been previously demonstrated.

  13. Preinfection human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes failed to prevent HIV type 1 infection from strains genetically unrelated to viruses in long-term exposed partners.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Woodward, Amanda; Zhu, Haiying; Andrus, Thomas; McNevin, John; Lee, Jean; Mullins, James I; Corey, Lawrence; McElrath, M Juliana; Zhu, Tuofu

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying potential altered susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in highly exposed seronegative (ES) individuals and the later clinical consequences of breakthrough infection can provide insight into strategies to control HIV-1 with an effective vaccine. From our Seattle ES cohort, we identified one individual (LSC63) who seroconverted after over 2 years of repeated unprotected sexual contact with his HIV-1-infected partner (P63) and other sexual partners of unknown HIV-1 serostatus. The HIV-1 variants infecting LSC63 were genetically unrelated to those sequenced from P63. This may not be surprising, since viral load measurements in P63 were repeatedly below 50 copies/ml, making him an unlikely transmitter. However, broad HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses were detected in LSC63 before seroconversion. Compared to those detected after seroconversion, these responses were of lower magnitude and half of them targeted different regions of the viral proteome. Strong HLA-B27-restricted CTLs, which have been associated with disease control, were detected in LSC63 after but not before seroconversion. Furthermore, for the majority of the protein-coding regions of the HIV-1 variants in LSC63 (except gp41, nef, and the 3' half of pol), the genetic distances between the infecting viruses and the viruses to which he was exposed through P63 (termed the exposed virus) were comparable to the distances between random subtype B HIV-1 sequences and the exposed viruses. These results suggest that broad preinfection immune responses were not able to prevent the acquisition of HIV-1 infection in LSC63, even though the infecting viruses were not particularly distant from the viruses that may have elicited these responses.

  14. Recognition of clonogenic leukemic cells, remission bone marrow and HLA-identical donor bone marrow by CD8+ or CD4+ minor histocompatibility antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Faber, L M; van der Hoeven, J; Goulmy, E; Hooftman-den Otter, A L; van Luxemburg-Heijs, S A; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, J H

    1995-08-01

    We investigated whether minor histocompatibility (mH) antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) can discriminate between leukemic hematopoietic progenitor cells (leukemic-HPC) from AML or CML patients, the HPC from their remission bone marrow (remission-HPC), and normal HPC from their HLA-identical sibling bone marrow donor (donor-HPC). Specific lysis by CD8+ CTL clones was observed not only of the leukemic-HPC but also of the donor-HPC in 3/4 patient/donor combinations expressing mH antigen HA-1, 3/5 combinations expressing mH antigen HA-2, 2/3 combinations expressing mH antigen HA-3, and 2/2 combinations expressing mH antigen HY-A1. In four patient/donor combinations the recognition of the donor-HPC was clearly less than of the leukemic-HPC, indicating differential susceptibility to lysis by these mH CTL clones. In addition, differential recognition of leukemic-HPC and remission-HPC within seven patients was analyzed. In one patient expressing the HA-2 antigen on the leukemic cells the recognition of the remission-HPC was clearly less than of the leukemic-HPC. One CD4+ CTL clone showed specific lysis of the leukemic-HPC from an AML patient and a CML patient as well as of normal remission-HPC and donor-HPC. These results illustrate that in general CD8+ and CD4+ mH antigen specific CTL clones do not differentially recognize leukemic-HPC and normal-HPC. However, differences in susceptibility to lysis of malignant versus normal cells may contribute to a differential GVL effect.

  15. New polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog (EZH) 2-derived peptide with the potential to induce cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes in prostate cancer patients with HLA-A3 supertype alleles.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Minami, Tomoko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco A; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    Analyses on reactivity of anti-cancer cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and clinical application of peptide-based anti-cancer vaccine have been mainly focused on patients with HLA-A2 or -A24 alleles. In this study, we identified an enhancer of zeste homolog (EZH) 2-derived peptide applicable for anti-cancer vaccine for prostate cancer patients with HLA-A3 supertype alleles. Five EZH2-derived peptides that were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A3 supertype alleles (HLA-A11, -A31, and -A33) were functionally screened for their potential to induce peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HLA-A3 supertype allele(+) prostate cancer patients. As a result, EZH2733-741 peptide was found to efficiently induce peptide-specific CTLs. The EZH2733-741 peptide-stimulated and purified CD8(+) T cells from PBMCs of HLA-A3 supertype allele(+) prostate cancer patients showed higher cytotoxicity against HLA-A3 supertype allele-expressing LNCaP prostate cancer cells than against parental LNCaP cells. This cytotoxicity against HLA-A3 supertype allele-expressing LNCaP cells was partially but significantly inhibited by the addition of EZH2733-741 peptide-pulsed competitive cells. These results indicate that the EZH2733-741 peptide could be a promising candidate for peptide-based immunotherapy for HLA-A3 supertype allele(+) prostate cancer patients.

  16. Frequency analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors in chimeric mice. Evidence for intrathymic maturation of clonally distinct self- major histocompatibility complex- and allo-major histocompatiblilty complex-restricted virus-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    To study whether the thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) imposes a constraint on the receptor repertoire of maturating cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors, the restriction phenotypes of virus- specific CTL of MHC-compatible and of MHC-incompatible thymus- and bone marrow-grafted (A X B)F1 chimeric mice were compared. Dependent on the mode of in vitro sensitization, thymocytes or splenocytes of both types of chimeric mice generated Sendai virus-specific, self-MHC-or allo-MHC- restricted CTL. By applying the limiting-dilution technique, the CTL- precursor (CTL-P) frequencies of self-MHC-restricted and allo-MHC- restricted virus-specific T cells as well as of alloreactive T cells were determined. The data obtained revealed that independent of MHC differences between thymus and bone marrow, the frequencies of self-MHC- restricted and allo-MHC-restricted CTL-P were comparable, and in the same older of magnitude as those previously determined in conventionally reared mice. Self-MHC-restricted, virus-specific CTL-P were in a three- to fivefold excess over allo-MHC-restricted CTL-P. A segregation analysis revealed that clonally distinct CTL-P give rise to either self-restricted or allo-MHC-restricted, virus-specific CTL. Both sets were found not only in the spleen, but also in the thymus of chimeric mice, formally demonstrating the intrathymic differentiation pathway of self-MHC as well of allo-MHC-restricted CTL-P. These data reveal no major constraint of the thymic MHC on the capacity of T cells to recognize viral antigens either in the context of self-MHC or of allogeneic MHC products. PMID:6265587

  17. Hypoxia-inducing factor (HIF)-1α-derived peptide capable of inducing cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-A24(+) patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Matsumura, Naoki; Sugimoto, Koichi; Shimizu, Nobutaka; De Velasco, Marco; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironment makes cancer cells to be therapy-resistant and hypoxia-inducing factors (HIFs) play a central role in hypoxic adaptation. Especially, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene mutations, leading to up-regulation of HIFs. However, from a different point of view, this suggests the possibility that HIFs could be promising targets in anti-cancer therapy. In this study, we searched for HIF-1α-derived peptides that are able to induce RCC-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Among five peptides derived from HIF-1α, which were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A24 allele, a HIF-1α278-287 peptide induced peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A24(+) RCC patients most effectively. In immunoblot assays, the expression of HIF-1α was lowly detected in whole and nuclear lysates of RCC cell lines even under normoxia (20% O2), and their expression in whole lysates was increased under hypoxia (1% O2). Additionally, HIF-1α278-287 peptide-stimulated T cells showed a higher cytotoxicity against HLA-A24(+) HIF-1α-expressing RCC cells than against HLA-A24(-) HIF-1α-expressing RCC cells. The cytotoxicity was inhibited by the addition of HIF-1α278-287 peptide-pulsed cold target cells. Altogether, these results indicate that the HIF-1α278-287 peptide could be a candidate for peptide-based anti-cancer vaccines for HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Characterization of cloned class I MHC-restricted, CD8+ anti-Meth A cytotoxic T-lymphocytes: recognition of an epitope derived from the Meth A gp110 tumor rejection antigen.

    PubMed

    Fassanito, M A; Loftus, D; De Leo, R M; Law, L W; Appella, E; De Leo, A B

    1994-08-15

    Meth A gp110 has been tentatively identified as a tumor rejection antigen. Following isolation of a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, CD8+ anti-Meth A cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL), we sought to determine whether the determinant recognized by this CTL was: (a) functional in tumor rejection of Meth A sarcoma; and (b) derived from Meth A gp110. Initially, we isolated an anti-Meth A CTL-resistant variant of Meth A sarcoma, Meth A4R, by immunoselection. The results of the subsequent analysis of Meth A4R cells showed the CTL-defined determinant as having a functional role in transplantation rejection of Meth A sarcoma. Walker et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 89: 7915-7918, 1993) showed that the cationic lipid, N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N- trimethylammonium-methyl sulfate, mediated delivery of a recombinant glycoprotein into the cytosol of target cells, making it available for processing and presentation by class I MHC molecules. As a result, the cells were sensitized for cytolysis by a class I MHC-restricted CD8+ CTL, which recognized an epitope expressed by the glycoprotein. In a similar manner, we treated the SV40-transformed BALB/c cell line, SVBalb, which is relatively insensitive to cytolysis by the anti-Meth A CTL, with Meth A gp110 and N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium methyl sulfate. The sensitivities of the treated cells and control cell lines to the anti-Meth A CTL were then examined. The results of these experiments permit us to conclude that the determinant recognized by the anti-Meth A CTL line is derived from Meth A gp110.

  19. Molecular basis of viral persistence: a single amino acid change in the glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is associated with suppression of the antiviral cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and establishment of persistence.

    PubMed Central

    Salvato, M; Borrow, P; Shimomaye, E; Oldstone, M B

    1991-01-01

    Isolates of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) that elicit a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response (CTL+) have been compared with isolates that suppress the CTL response (CTL-) in an effort to map this phenotype. A single amino acid change in the glycoprotein of the LCMV Armstrong (ARM) strain is consistently associated with the CTL- trait and the ability of the virus to persist (P+). The CTL+ P- parental strain spontaneously gives rise to CTL- P+ variants within lymphoid tissues of mice persistently infected from birth. To map the structural basis of the phenotype, the complete RNA sequence of LCMV ARM 53b (CTL+) was compared with that of its variant ARM clone 13 (CTL-). Differences in 5 of 10,600 nucleotides were found. Three changes are noted in the large L RNA segment, and two are noted in the small S RNA segment. Only two of the changes distinguishing CTL+ from CTL- isolates affect amino acid coding: lysine to glutamine at amino acid 1079 of the polymerase protein, and phenylalanine to leucine at amino acid 260 of the envelope glycoprotein (GP). We also analyzed two additional CTL- variants and four spontaneous CTL+ revertants. All three CTL- variants differ from the original CTL+ parental strain at GP amino acid 260, indicating that this amino acid change is consistently associated with the CTL- phenotype. By contrast the other four mutations in LCMV are not associated with the CTL- phenotype. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of four CTL+ revertants of ARM clone 13 did not reveal back mutations at the GP 260 locus. This finding indicates that the GP 260 mutation is necessary but not sufficient for a CTL- P+ phenotype and that the reversion to CTL+ P- is likely either due to secondary mutations in other regions of the viral genome or to quasispecies within the revertant population that make significant contributions to the phenotype. Images PMID:1840619

  20. Full-length EBNA1 mRNA-transduced dendritic cells stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognizing a novel HLA-Cw*0303- and -Cw*0304-restricted epitope on EBNA1-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshinori; Demachi-Okamura, Ayako; Ohta, Rieko; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Nishida, Keiko; Tsujimura, Kunio; Morishima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Toshitada; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka

    2007-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is an attractive target for immunotherapy against EBV-associated malignancies because it is expressed in all EBV-positive cells. Although CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope presentation is largely prevented by its glycine-alanine-repeat domain (GAr), the use of mRNA-transduced dendritic cells (DCs) would offer the advantage of priming EBNA1-specific CTLs. After stimulation with GAr-containing EBNA1-transduced monocyte-derived DCs, two EBNA1-specific CTL clones, B5 and C6, were isolated successfully from a healthy donor. These CTLs recognize peptides in the context of HLA-B*3501 and HLA-Cw*0303, respectively. A novel epitope, FVYGGSKTSL, was then identified, presented by both HLA-Cw*0303 and -Cw*0304, which are expressed by >35% of Japanese, >20% of Northern Han Chinese and >25% of Caucasians. The mixed lymphocyte-peptide culture method revealed that FVYGGSKTSL-specific CTL-precursor frequencies in HLA-Cw*0303- or -Cw*0304-positive donors were between 1x10(-5) and 1x10(-4) CD8+ T cells. Moreover, both CTL clones inhibited growth of HLA-matched EBV-transformed B lymphocytes in vitro, and B5 CTLs produced a gamma interferon response to EBNA1-expressing gastric carcinoma cells in the context of HLA-Cw*0303. These data demonstrate that EBNA1 mRNA-transduced DCs may be useful tools for inducing EBNA1-specific CTLs that might be of clinical interest for CTL therapy of EBV-associated malignancies.

  1. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 inhibition increases the antitumor activity of adoptive T-cell therapy when carried out with naïve rather than differentiated T cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takeshi; Adachi, Satoko; Okayama, Tetsuya; Kokura, Satoshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Doi, Toshifumi; Matsuyama, Tatsuzo; Sakamoto, Naoyuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Handa, Osamu; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2015-05-01

    Although treatment with an antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) combined with multiple therapeutic interventions has been explored, the effect of combination therapy with CTLA-4 inhibition and adoptive T-cell therapy has not been determined. In the present study, our aim was to determine whether CTLA-4 inhibition, combined with adoptive transfer of T cells at different stages of differentiation, exhibits synergistic antitumor effects in a murine colon cancer model. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were administered adoptive T-cell transfer of CD62Lhigh or CD62Llow cells combined with an anti-CTLA-4 antibody (α-CTLA-4) or control immunoglobulin G. Subcutaneous tumors were harvested, and the antitumor effects and helper T-cell polarization were analyzed. CTLA-4 inhibition combined with CD62Lhigh cell administration showed the strongest antitumor effect. Combination therapy increased the number of CD3+ cells within the tumor. Moreover, CTLA-4 inhibition induced polarization of T cells infiltrating the tumor toward the T helper 1 lineage, and suppressed the frequency of regulatory T cells within the tumor, particularly in combination with CD62Lhigh T-cell transfer. This is the first report demonstrating that the efficacy of α-CTLA-4 and adoptive T-cell transfer combination therapy depends on the state of differentiation of the transferred T cells. Our data support the notion that a combination of α-CTLA-4 and adoptive T-cell transfer containing an abundance of naïve phenotype cells could potentially exert antitumor effects in a clinical setting.

  2. Suppression of antitumour protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to a human papillomavirus 16 E7 DNA vaccine by coinjection of interleukin-12 complementary DNA: involvement of nitric oxide in immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Jeong-Im

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) has been shown to enhance cellular immunity in vitro and in vivo. The beneficial roles of IL-12 as a DNA vaccine adjuvant have been commonly observed. Here the impact of IL-12 complementary DNA (cDNA) as an adjuvant for a human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 DNA vaccine is investigated in a mouse tumour model. Coinjection of E7 DNA vaccine with IL-12 cDNA completely suppressed antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses, leading to a complete loss of antitumour protection from a tumour cell challenge. In addition, antigen-specific antibody and T helper cell proliferative responses were also suppressed by IL-12 cDNA coinjection. This inhibition was observed over different IL-12 cDNA doses. Furthermore, separate leg injections of IL-12 and E7 cDNAs suppressed antigen-specific CTL and tumour protective responses, but not antibody and T helper cell proliferative responses, suggesting different pathways for suppression of these two separate responses. Further knockout animal studies demonstrated that interferon-γ and nitric oxide are not directly associated with suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses by IL-12 cDNA coinjection. However, nitric oxide was found to be involved in suppression of antigen-specific CTL and tumour protective responses by IL-12 cDNA coinjection. These data suggest that coinjection of IL-12 cDNA results in suppression of E7-specific CTL responses through nitric oxide, leading to a loss of antitumour resistance in this DNA vaccine model. This study further shows that the adjuvant effect of IL-12 is dependent on the antigen types tested. PMID:19740332

  3. Suppression of antitumour protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to a human papillomavirus 16 E7 DNA vaccine by coinjection of interleukin-12 complementary DNA: involvement of nitric oxide in immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Sin, Jeong-Im

    2009-09-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) has been shown to enhance cellular immunity in vitro and in vivo. The beneficial roles of IL-12 as a DNA vaccine adjuvant have been commonly observed. Here the impact of IL-12 complementary DNA (cDNA) as an adjuvant for a human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 DNA vaccine is investigated in a mouse tumour model. Coinjection of E7 DNA vaccine with IL-12 cDNA completely suppressed antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses, leading to a complete loss of antitumour protection from a tumour cell challenge. In addition, antigen-specific antibody and T helper cell proliferative responses were also suppressed by IL-12 cDNA coinjection. This inhibition was observed over different IL-12 cDNA doses. Furthermore, separate leg injections of IL-12 and E7 cDNAs suppressed antigen-specific CTL and tumour protective responses, but not antibody and T helper cell proliferative responses, suggesting different pathways for suppression of these two separate responses. Further knockout animal studies demonstrated that interferon-gamma and nitric oxide are not directly associated with suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses by IL-12 cDNA coinjection. However, nitric oxide was found to be involved in suppression of antigen-specific CTL and tumour protective responses by IL-12 cDNA coinjection. These data suggest that coinjection of IL-12 cDNA results in suppression of E7-specific CTL responses through nitric oxide, leading to a loss of antitumour resistance in this DNA vaccine model. This study further shows that the adjuvant effect of IL-12 is dependent on the antigen types tested.

  4. Deletion mutation analysis of the adenovirus type 2 E3-gp19K protein: identification of sequences within the endoplasmic reticulum lumenal domain that are required for class I antigen binding and protection from adenovirus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hermiston, T W; Tripp, R A; Sparer, T; Gooding, L R; Wold, W S

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus E3-gp19K is a transmembrane glycoprotein, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which forms a complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens and retains them in the ER, thereby preventing cytolysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The ER lumenal domain of gp19K, residues 1 to 107, is known to be sufficient for binding to class I antigens; the transmembrane and cytoplasmic ER retention domains are located at residues ca. 108 to 127 and 128 to 142, respectively. To identify more precisely which gp19K regions are involved in binding to class I antigens, we constructed 13 in-frame virus deletion mutants (4 to 12 amino acids deleted) in the ER lumenal domain of gp19K, and we analyzed the ability of the mutant proteins to form a complex with class I antigens, retain them in the ER, and prevent cytolysis by adenovirus-specific CTL. All mutant proteins except one (residues 102 to 107 deleted) were defective for these properties, indicating that the ability of gp19K to bind to class I antigens is highly sensitive to mutation. All mutant proteins were stable and were retained in the ER. Sequence comparisons among adenovirus serotypes reveal that the ER lumenal domain of gp19K consists of a variable region (residues 1 to 76) and a conserved region (residues 77 to 98). We show, using the mutant proteins, that the gp19K-specific monoclonal antibody Tw1.3 recognizes a noncontiguous epitope in the variable region and that disruption of the variable region by deletion destroys the epitope. The monoclonal antibody and class I antigen binding results, together with the serotype sequence comparisons, are consistent with the idea that the ER lumenal domain of gp19K has three subdomains that we have termed the ER lumenal variable domain (residues 1 to ca. 77 to 83), the ER lumenal conserved domain (residues ca. 84 to 98), and the ER lumenal spacer domain (residues 99 to 107). We suggest that the ER lumenal variable domain of gp19K has a specific

  5. Use of “one-pot, mix-and-read” peptide-MHC class I tetramers and predictive algorithms to improve detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Peptide-major histocompatibility complex (p-MHC) class I tetramer complexes have facilitated the early detection and functional characterisation of epitope specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Here, we report on the generation of seven recombinant bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) and recombinant bovine β2-microglobulin from which p-MHC class I tetramers can be derived in ~48 h. We validated a set of p-MHC class I tetramers against a panel of CTL lines specific to seven epitopes on five different antigens of Theileria parva, a protozoan pathogen causing the lethal bovine disease East Coast fever. One of the p-MHC class I tetramers was tested in ex vivo assays and we detected T. parva specific CTL in peripheral blood of cattle at day 15-17 post-immunization with a live parasite vaccine. The algorithm NetMHCpan predicted alternative epitope sequences for some of the T. parva CTL epitopes. Using an ELISA assay to measure peptide-BoLA monomer formation and p-MHC class I tetramers of new specificity, we demonstrate that a predicted alternative epitope Tp229-37 rather than the previously reported Tp227-37 epitope is the correct Tp2 epitope presented by BoLA-6*04101. We also verified the prediction by NetMHCpan that the Tp587-95 epitope reported as BoLA-T5 restricted can also be presented by BoLA-1*02301, a molecule similar in sequence to BoLA-T5. In addition, Tp587-95 specific bovine CTL were simultaneously stained by Tp5-BoLA-1*02301 and Tp5-BoLA-T5 tetramers suggesting that one T cell receptor can bind to two different BoLA MHC class I molecules presenting the Tp587-95 epitope and that these BoLA molecules fall into a single functional supertype. PMID:24775445

  6. Analysis of the human env-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in natural human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: low prevalence of broadly cross-reactive env-specific CTL.

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, A; Jin, X; Sissons, P

    1996-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are part of the cellular immune response to persistent virus infections. Candidate vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) should elicit broad cross-reactive immunity to confer protection against different strains of HIV-1. As it is likely that candidate vaccines will include the envelope gene product Env, we determined the proportion of CTL clones which recognized variable and conserved determinants in three env variants during natural infection. Limiting dilution analysis was used to characterize numerous short-term CTL clones derived from peripheral blood of HIV-1-infected subjects, using split-well analysis to assay cytotoxicity against target cells expressing gp160env of HIV-1 strains IIIB, MN, and RF. In 9 of 12 HIV-1-infected subjects, at the clonal level most env-specific CTL recognized determinant(s) within one env variant but not in the other variants. In some subjects, CTL recognized multiple nonconserved determinants in different variants. The pattern of recognition of different env variants was relatively stable over time. In most of the patients studied, the proportion of CTL which showed cross-recognition of conserved determinants shared among the three strains was low. Two novel CTL epitopes within gp41 were identified by using 15-mer peptides of the HIV-SF2 sequence. When specific peptide was used to stimulate CTL precursors in vitro, the frequency of peptide-specific CTL precursors was very high, but the CTL elicited by this stimulation were highly strain specific. We conclude that the use of a single HIV env variant to detect CTL activity can underestimate the magnitude and complexity of the env-specific CTL response. The low prevalence of CTL clones which show cross-recognition of conserved determinants may have implications for immunization strategies based solely on env; to elicit broadly cross-reactive CTL other, more conserved viral antigens are

  7. Rapid induction of false memory for pictures.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Yana; Shanks, David R

    2010-07-01

    Recognition of pictures is typically extremely accurate, and it is thus unclear whether the reconstructive nature of memory can yield substantial false recognition of highly individuated stimuli. A procedure for the rapid induction of false memories for distinctive colour photographs is proposed. Participants studied a set of object pictures followed by a list of words naming those objects, but embedded in the list were names of unseen objects. When subsequently shown full colour pictures of these unseen objects, participants consistently claimed that they had seen them, while discriminating with high accuracy between studied pictures and new pictures whose names did not appear in the misleading word list. These false memories can be reported with high confidence as well as the feeling of recollection. This new procedure allows the investigation of factors that influence false memory reports with ecologically valid stimuli and of the similarities and differences between true and false memories.

  8. Optogenetic Induction of Aversive Taste Memory

    PubMed Central

    C. Keene, Alex; Masek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster gustatory system consists of several neuronal pathways representing diverse taste modalities. The two predominant modalities are a sweet sensing pathway that mediates attraction, and a bitter sensing pathway that mediates avoidance. A central question is how flies integrate stimuli from these pathways and generate the appropriate behavioral response. We have developed a novel assay for induction of taste memories. We demonstrate that the gustatory response to fructose is suppressed when followed by the presence of bitter quinine. We employ optogenetic neural activation using infrared laser in combination with heat sensitive channel - TRPA1 to precisely activate gustatory neurons. This optogenetic system allows for spatially and temporally controlled activation of distinct neural classes in the gustatory circuit. We directly activated bitter-sensing neurons together with presentation of fructose for remote induction of aversive taste memories. Here we report that activation of bitter-sensing neurons in the proboscis suffices as a conditioning stimulus. Spatially restricted stimulation indicates that the conditioning stimulus is indeed a signal from the bitter neurons in the proboscis and it is independent of postingestive feedback. The coincidence of temporally specific activation of bitter-sensing neurons with fructose presentation is crucial for memory formation, establishing aversive taste learning in Drosophila as associative learning. Taken together, this optogenetic system provides a powerful new tool for interrogation of the central brain circuits that mediate memory formation. PMID:22820051

  9. Comparison of adjuvant formulations for cytotoxic T cell induction using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Hioe, C E; Qiu, H; Chend, P D; Bian, Z; Li, M L; Li, J; Singh, M; Kuebler, P; McGee, P; O'Hagan, D; Zamb, T; Koff, W; Allsopp, C; Wang, C Y; Nixon, D F

    1996-04-01

    We have investigated the capacity of synthetic peptides delivered in different adjuvant formulations to induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses to a class I H-2Kd-restricted Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite epitope, CS 252-260. Using three immunogen formulations: soybean emulsion; Montanide ISA720; and lipopeptide (P3-CS), we first evaluated the effects of immunization routes on CTL induction. No CTL response was induced in mice immunized s.c. or i.p. with CS peptide formulated in soybean emulsion. In contrast, immunization with lipopeptide P3-CS either s.c. or i.p. effectively primed for CTL. Interestingly, CS peptide emulsified in Montanide ISA720 induced a CTL response only when delivered s.c. and not i.p., indicating the critical influence of immunization routes on CTL induction. We then compared the effectiveness of eight adjuvant formulations to induce CTL response following a single s.c. immunization. Notably, lipopeptide P3-CS and CS peptide admixed with P3 or POE lipid molecules stimulated a vigorous CTL response. However, only mice immunized with P3-CS and CS peptide admixed with P3 molecule generated long-lived CTL which persisted in vivo for 5 months. Thus, based on a simultaneous comparison of the different adjuvant formulations, we demonstrated that the conjugated and unconjugated P3 lipopeptides were the most effective immunogens for eliciting primary and memory CTL in mice.

  10. Nasal Immunization of Mice with Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) Virus-Like Particles or with the HPV-16 L1 Gene Elicits Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Vaginal Draining Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Catherine; Buzoni-Gatel, Dominique; Touzé, Antoine; Bout, Daniel; Coursaget, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) infects the genital tract and is closely associated with the development of cervical cancer. HPV-16 initiates infection at the genital mucosal surface; thus, mucosal immune responses are likely to contribute to defense against HPV-16 infection. However, little information is available regarding the induction of immune responses in the genital tract mucosa. In this study, we evaluated the potential of intranasally administered papillomavirus vaccines to elicit both systemic and vaginal immune responses. HPV-16 virus-like particles (VLPs) produced by self-assembly of L1 protein and the HPV-16 L1 gene cloned into a mammalian expression vector were used as vaccines. Intranasally administered VLPs induced serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and vaginal IgA secretory antibodies. Very weak serum IgG and vaginal IgA responses were found after DNA immunization. Both splenic and vaginal lymphocytes could be activated by intranasal immunization with VLPs and the HPV-16 L1 gene. Activated CD4+ Th1-like T cells were shown to synthesize gamma interferon, and activated CD8+ T cells were demonstrated to be cytotoxic. PMID:10516012

  11. The Relationship between Memory and Inductive Reasoning: Does It Develop?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Brett K.; Fritz, Kristina; Heit, Evan

    2013-01-01

    In 2 studies, the authors examined the development of the relationship between inductive reasoning and visual recognition memory. In both studies, 5- to 6-year-old children and adults were shown instances of a basic-level category (dogs) followed by a test set containing old and new category members that varied in their similarity to study items.…

  12. Induction of tolerance to bone marrow allografts by donor-derived host nonreactive ex vivo–induced central memory CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ophir, Eran; Eidelstein, Yaki; Afik, Ran; Bachar-Lustig, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Enabling engraftment of allogeneic T cell–depleted bone marrow (TDBM) under reduced-intensity conditioning represents a major challenge in bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Anti–third-party cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were previously shown to be endowed with marked ability to delete host antidonor T cells in vitro, but were found to be less effective in vivo. This could result from diminished lymph node (LN) homing caused by the prolonged activation, which induces a CD44+CD62L− effector phenotype, and thereby prevents effective colocalization with, and neutralization of, alloreactive host T cells (HTCs). In the present study, LN homing, determined by imaging, was enhanced upon culture conditions that favor the acquisition of CD44+CD62L+ central memory cell (Tcm) phenotype by anti–third-party CD8+ cells. These Tcm-like cells displayed strong proliferation and prolonged persistence in BM transplant recipients. Importantly, adoptively transferred HTCs bearing a transgenic T-cell receptor (TCR) with antidonor specificity were efficiently deleted only by donor-type Tcms. All these attributes were found to be associated with improved efficacy in overcoming T cell–mediated rejection of TDBM, thereby enabling high survival rate and long-term donor chimerism, without causing graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, anti–third-party Tcms, which home to recipient LNs and effectively delete antidonor T cells, could provide an effective and novel tool for overcoming rejection of BM allografts. PMID:20042725

  13. How similar are recognition memory and inductive reasoning?

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan

    2013-07-01

    Conventionally, memory and reasoning are seen as different types of cognitive activities driven by different processes. In two experiments, we challenged this view by examining the relationship between recognition memory and inductive reasoning involving multiple forms of similarity. A common study set (members of a conjunctive category) was followed by a test set containing old and new category members, as well as items that matched the study set on only one dimension. The study and test sets were presented under recognition or induction instructions. In Experiments 1 and 2, the inductive property being generalized was varied in order to direct attention to different dimensions of similarity. When there was no time pressure on decisions, patterns of positive responding were strongly affected by property type, indicating that different types of similarity were driving recognition and induction. By comparison, speeded judgments showed weaker property effects and could be explained by generalization based on overall similarity. An exemplar model, GEN-EX (GENeralization from EXamples), could account for both the induction and recognition data. These findings show that induction and recognition share core component processes, even when the tasks involve flexible forms of similarity.

  14. The relationship between memory and inductive reasoning: does it develop?

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brett K; Fritz, Kristina; Heit, Evan

    2013-05-01

    In 2 studies, the authors examined the development of the relationship between inductive reasoning and visual recognition memory. In both studies, 5- to 6-year-old children and adults were shown instances of a basic-level category (dogs) followed by a test set containing old and new category members that varied in their similarity to study items. Participants were given either recognition instructions (memorize study items and discriminate between old and new test items) or induction instructions (learn about a novel property shared by the study items and decide whether it generalizes to test items). Across both tasks, children made a greater number of positive responses than did adults. Across both age groups, a greater number of positive responses were made in induction than in recognition. The application of a mathematical model, called GEN-EX for generalization from examples, showed that both memory and reasoning data could be explained by a single exemplar-based process that assumes task and age differences in generalization gradients. These results show considerable developmental continuity in the cognitive processes that underlie memory and inductive reasoning.

  15. Using Implicit Instructional Cues to Influence False Memory Induction.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Laura K; Dickinson, Joël; Poirier, Marie

    2015-10-01

    Previous research has shown that explicit cues specific to the encoding process (endogenous) or characteristic of the stimuli themselves (exogenous) can be used to direct a reader's attentional resources towards either relational or item-specific information. By directing attention to relational information (and therefore away from item-specific information) the rate of false memory induction can be increased. The purpose of the current study was to investigate if a similar effect would be found by manipulating implicitly endogenous cues. An instructional manipulation was used to influence the perceptual action participants performed on word stimuli during the encoding of DRM list words. Results demonstrated that the instructional conditions that encouraged faster processing also led to an increased rate of false memory induction for semantically related words, supporting the hypothesis that attention was directed towards relational information. This finding supports the impoverished relational processing account of false memory induction. This supports the idea that implicitly endogenous cues, exogenous cues (like font) or explicitly endogenous cues (like training) can direct attentional resources during encoding.

  16. Nicotine inhibits memory CTL programming.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhifeng; Smyth, Kendra; Garcia, Karla; Mattson, Elliot; Li, Lei; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine is the main tobacco component responsible for tobacco addiction and is used extensively in smoking and smoking cessation therapies. However, little is known about its effects on the immune system. We confirmed that multiple nicotinic receptors are expressed on mouse and human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and demonstrated that nicotinic receptors on mouse CTLs are regulated during activation. Acute nicotine presence during activation increases primary CTL expansion in vitro, but impairs in vivo expansion after transfer and subsequent memory CTL differentiation, which reduces protection against subsequent pathogen challenges. Furthermore, nicotine abolishes the regulatory effect of rapamycin on memory CTL programming, which can be attributed to the fact that rapamycin enhances expression of nicotinic receptors. Interestingly, naïve CTLs from chronic nicotine-treated mice have normal memory programming, which is impaired by nicotine during activation in vitro. In conclusion, simultaneous exposure to nicotine and antigen during CTL activation negatively affects memory development.

  17. Nicotine Inhibits Memory CTL Programming

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhifeng; Smyth, Kendra; Garcia, Karla; Mattson, Elliot; Li, Lei; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine is the main tobacco component responsible for tobacco addiction and is used extensively in smoking and smoking cessation therapies. However, little is known about its effects on the immune system. We confirmed that multiple nicotinic receptors are expressed on mouse and human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and demonstrated that nicotinic receptors on mouse CTLs are regulated during activation. Acute nicotine presence during activation increases primary CTL expansion in vitro, but impairs in vivo expansion after transfer and subsequent memory CTL differentiation, which reduces protection against subsequent pathogen challenges. Furthermore, nicotine abolishes the regulatory effect of rapamycin on memory CTL programming, which can be attributed to the fact that rapamycin enhances expression of nicotinic receptors. Interestingly, naïve CTLs from chronic nicotine-treated mice have normal memory programming, which is impaired by nicotine during activation in vitro. In conclusion, simultaneous exposure to nicotine and antigen during CTL activation negatively affects memory development. PMID:23844169

  18. Induction of Protective CTL Responses in Newborn Mice by a Murine Retrovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzotti, Marcella; Robbins, Deanna S.; Hoffman, Paul M.

    1996-03-01

    The susceptibility of neonates to virus-induced disease is thought to reflect, in part, the immaturity of their immune systems. However, inoculation of newborn mice with low doses of Cas-Br-M murine leukemia virus induced a protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. The inability of neonates to develop a CTL response to high doses of virus was not the result of immunological immaturity but correlated with the induction of a nonprotective type 2 cytokine response. Thus, the initial viral dose is critical in the development of protective immunity in newborns.

  19. When development and learning decrease memory. Evidence against category-based induction in children.

    PubMed

    Sloutsky, Vladimir M; Fisher, Anna V

    2004-08-01

    Inductive inference is crucial for learning: If one learns that a cat has a particular biological property, one could expand this knowledge to other cats. We argue that young children perform induction on the basis of similarity of compared entities, whereas adults may induce on the basis of category information. If different processes underlie induction at different points in development, young children and adults would form different memory traces during induction, and would subsequently have different memory accuracy. Experiment 1 demonstrates that after performing an induction task, 5-year-olds exhibit more accurate memory than adults. Experiment 2 indicates that after 5-year-olds are trained to perform induction in an adultlike manner, their memory accuracy drops to the level of adults. These results, indicating that sometimes 5-year-olds exhibit better memory than adults, support the claim that, unlike adults, young children perform similarity-based rather than category-based induction.

  20. Induction of potent CD8+ T-cell responses by novel biodegradable nanoparticles carrying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Uto, Tomofumi; Akagi, Takami; Akashi, Mitsuru; Baba, Masanori

    2007-09-01

    The mainstream of recent anti-AIDS vaccines is a prime/boost approach with multiple doses of the target DNA of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and recombinant viral vectors. In this study, we have attempted to construct an efficient protein-based vaccine using biodegradable poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA) nanoparticles (NPs), which are capable of inducing potent cellular immunity. A significant expansion of CD8+ T cells specific to the major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted gp120 epitope was observed in mice intranasally immunized once with gp120-carrying NPs but not with gp120 alone or gp120 together with the B-subunit of cholera toxin. Both the gp120-encapsulating and -immobilizing forms of NPs could induce antigen-specific spleen CD8+ T cells having a functional profile of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Long-lived memory CD8+ T cells could also be elicited. Although a substantial decay in the effector memory T cells was observed over time in the immunized mice, the central memory T cells remained relatively constant from day 30 to day 238 after immunization. Furthermore, the memory CD8+ T cells rapidly expanded with boosting with the same immunogen. In addition, gamma-PGA NPs were found to be a much stronger inducer of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses than nonbiodegradable polystyrene NPs. Thus, gamma-PGA NPs carrying various HIV-1 antigens may have great potential as a novel priming and/or boosting tool in current vaccination regimens for the induction of cellular immune responses.

  1. Inductive reasoning and implicit memory: evidence from intact and impaired memory systems.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Luisa; Semenza, Carlo; Delazer, Margarete

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we modified a classic problem solving task, number series completion, in order to explore the contribution of implicit memory to inductive reasoning. Participants were required to complete number series sharing the same underlying algorithm (e.g., +2), differing in both constituent elements (e.g., 2468 versus 57911) and correct answers (e.g., 10 versus 13). In Experiment 1, reliable priming effects emerged, whether primes and targets were separated by four or ten fillers. Experiment 2 provided direct evidence that the observed facilitation arises at central stages of problem solving, namely the identification of the algorithm and its subsequent extrapolation. The observation of analogous priming effects in a severely amnesic patient strongly supports the hypothesis that the facilitation in number series completion was largely determined by implicit memory processes. These findings demonstrate that the influence of implicit processes extends to higher level cognitive domain such as induction reasoning.

  2. Metronomic cyclophosphamide eradicates large implanted GL261 gliomas by activating antitumor Cd8(+) T-cell responses and immune memory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjie; Waxman, David J

    2015-04-01

    Cancer chemotherapy using cytotoxic drugs can induce immunogenic tumor cell death; however, dosing regimens and schedules that enable single-agent chemotherapy to induce adaptive immune-dependent ablation of large, established tumors with activation of long-term immune memory have not been identified. Here, we investigate this issue in a syngeneic, implanted GL261 glioma model in immune-competent mice given cyclophosphamide on a 6-day repeating metronomic schedule. Two cycles of metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment induced sustained upregulation of tumor-associated CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) cells, natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages, and other immune cells. Expression of CTL- and NK-cell-shared effectors peaked on Day 6, and then declined by Day 9 after the second cyclophosphamide injection and correlated inversely with the expression of the regulatory T cell (Treg) marker Foxp3. Sustained tumor regression leading to tumor ablation was achieved after several cyclophosphamide treatment cycles. Tumor ablation required CD8(+) T cells, as shown by immunodepletion studies, and was associated with immunity to re-challenge with GL261 glioma cells, but not B16-F10 melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Rejection of GL261 tumor re-challenge was associated with elevated CTLs in blood and increased CTL infiltration in tumors, consistent with the induction of long-term, specific CD8(+) T-cell anti-GL261 tumor memory. Co-depletion of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells did not inhibit tumor regression beyond CD8(+) T-cell depletion alone, suggesting that the metronomic cyclophosphamide-activated NK cells function via CD8a(+) T cells. Taken together, these findings provide proof-of-concept that single-agent chemotherapy delivered on an optimized metronomic schedule can eradicate large, established tumors and induce long-term immune memory.

  3. A Toll-like receptor 2 agonist-fused antigen enhanced antitumor immunity by increasing antigen presentation and the CD8 memory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiao-Chieh; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Leng, Chih-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    The induction of long-lived effector CD8+ T cells is key to the development of efficient cancer vaccines. In this study, we demonstrated that a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-fused antigen increased antigen presentation via TLR2 signaling and induced effector memory-like CD8+ T cells against cancer after immunization. The N-terminus of ovalbumin (OVA) was biologically fused with a bacterial lipid moiety TLR2 agonist to produce a recombinant lipidated ovalbumin (rlipo-OVA). We demonstrated that rlipo-OVA activated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) maturation and increased antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I via TLR2. After immunization, rlipo-OVA skewed the immune response towards T helper (Th) 1 and induced OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Moreover, immunization with rlipo-OVA induced higher numbers of effector memory (CD44+CD62L−) CD8+ T cells compared with recombinant ovalbumin (rOVA) alone or rOVA mixed with the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4. Accordingly, the CD27+CD43+ effector memory CD8+ T cells expressed high levels of the long-lived CD127 marker. The administration of rlipo-OVA could inhibit tumor growth, but the anti-tumor effects were lost after the depletion of CD8 or CD127 cells in vivo. These findings suggested that the TLR2 agonist-fused antigen induced long-lived memory CD8+ T cells for efficient cancer therapy. PMID:27127171

  4. Inflammasome-Dependent Induction of Adaptive NK Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    van den Boorn, Jasper G; Jakobs, Christopher; Hagen, Christian; Renn, Marcel; Luiten, Rosalie M; Melief, Cornelis J M; Tüting, Thomas; Garbi, Natalio; Hartmann, Gunther; Hornung, Veit

    2016-06-21

    Monobenzone is a pro-hapten that is exclusively metabolized by melanocytes, thereby haptenizing melanocyte-specific antigens, which results in cytotoxic autoimmunity specifically against pigmented cells. Studying monobenzone in a setting of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), we observed that monobenzone induced a long-lasting, melanocyte-specific immune response that was dependent on NK cells, yet fully intact in the absence of T- and B cells. Consistent with the concept of "memory NK cells," monobenzone-induced NK cells resided in the liver and transfer of these cells conferred melanocyte-specific immunity to naive animals. Monobenzone-exposed skin displayed macrophage infiltration and cutaneous lymph nodes showed an inflammasome-dependent influx of macrophages with a tissue-resident phenotype, coinciding with local NK cell activation. Indeed, macrophage depletion or the absence of the NLRP3 inflammasome, the adaptor protein ASC or interleukin-18 (IL-18) abolished monobenzone CHS, thereby establishing a non-redundant role for the NLRP3 inflammasome as a critical proinflammatory checkpoint in the induction of hapten-dependent memory NK cells.

  5. Immunoproteasome induction is suppressed in hepatitis C virus-infected cells in a protein kinase R-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Oh, In Soo; Textoris-Taube, Kathrin; Sung, Pil Soo; Kang, Wonseok; Gorny, Xenia; Kähne, Thilo; Hong, Seon-Hui; Choi, Young Joon; Cammann, Clemens; Naumann, Michael; Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Su-Hyung; Yoo, Ook Joon; Kloetzel, Peter M; Seifert, Ulrike; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    By changing the relative abundance of generated antigenic peptides through alterations in the proteolytic activity, interferon (IFN)-γ-induced immunoproteasomes influence the outcome of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection on IFN-γ-induced immunoproteasome expression using a HCV infection cell culture system. We found that, although IFN-γ induced the transcriptional expression of mRNAs encoding the β1i/LMP2, β2i/MECL-1 and β5i/LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits, the formation of immunoproteasomes was significantly suppressed in HCV-infected cells. This finding indicated that immunoproteasome induction was impaired at the translational or posttranslational level by HCV infection. Gene silencing studies showed that the suppression of immunoproteasome induction is essentially dependent on protein kinase R (PKR). Indeed, the generation of a strictly immunoproteasome-dependent cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope was impaired in in vitro processing experiments using isolated 20S proteasomes from HCV-infected cells and was restored by the silencing of PKR expression. In conclusion, our data point to a novel mechanism of immune regulation by HCV that affects the antigen-processing machinery through the PKR-mediated suppression of immunoproteasome induction in infected cells. PMID:27833096

  6. Creativity and Memory: Effects of an Episodic Specificity Induction on Divergent Thinking

    PubMed Central

    Madore, Kevin P.; Addis, Donna Rose; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    After receiving an episodic specificity induction - brief training in recollecting details of a recent event - people produce more episodic details when imagining future events and solving means-end problems than after receiving a control induction not focused on episodic retrieval. Here we show for the first time that an episodic specificity induction also enhances divergent creative thinking. In Experiment 1, participants exhibited a selective boost on a divergent thinking task that involves generating unusual uses of common objects after a specificity induction compared with a control induction; by contrast, performance was similar on an object association task thought to involve little divergent thinking. In Experiment 2, we replicated the specificity induction effect on divergent thinking using a different control induction, and also found that participants performed similarly on a convergent thinking task following both inductions. These experiments provide novel evidence that episodic memory is involved in divergent creative thinking. PMID:26205963

  7. Induction of WT1-specific human CD8+ T cells from human HSCs in HLA class I Tg NOD/SCID/IL2rgKO mice

    PubMed Central

    Najima, Yuho; Tomizawa-Murasawa, Mariko; Saito, Yoriko; Watanabe, Takashi; Ono, Rintaro; Ochi, Toshiki; Suzuki, Nahoko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Ohara, Osamu; Shultz, Leonard D.; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Induction of specific immune response against therapy-resistant tumor cells can potentially improve clinical outcomes in malignancies. To optimize immunotherapy in the clinic, we aimed to create an in vivo model enabling us to analyze human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses against human malignancies. To this end, we developed NOD/SCID/IL2rgKO (NSG) mice expressing the HLA class I molecules HLA-A*0201 and A*2402. In the bone marrow (BM) and spleen of HLA class I transgenic (Tg) NSG mice transplanted with cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), we found human memory CD8+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells. To evaluate antigen-specific human CTL responses, we immunized HLA class I Tg NSG mice using polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid mixed Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptides, with or without WT1 peptide–loaded autologous dendritic cells. After immunization, the frequencies of HLA-restricted WT1-specific CTLs increased significantly in the spleen. Next, we transplanted the WT1-specific T-cell receptor (WT1-TCR) gene–transduced human HSCs into HLA class I Tg NSG newborn mice. WT1 tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells differentiated from WT1-TCR-transduced HSCs in the recipients’ BM, spleen, and thymus. Upon stimulation with WT1 peptide in vitro, these CTLs produced interferon-γ and showed lytic activity against leukemia cells in an antigen-specific, HLA-restricted manner. HLA class I Tg NSG xenografts may serve as a preclinical model to develop effective immunotherapy against human malignancies. PMID:26702062

  8. Chaetocin enhances dendritic cell function via the induction of heat shock protein and cancer testis antigens in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ju; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Nu-Ri; Hoang, My-Dung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC)-based vaccines are considered useful in cancer immuno-therapy, and the interactions of DC and dying tumor cells are important and promising for cancer immunotherapy. We investigated whether chaetocin could be used to induce death of myeloma cells, for loading onto DCs can affect DCs function. In this study, we show that the dying myeloma cells treated with chaetocin resulted in the induction of heat shock protein (HSP) 90, which was inhibited by antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, and showed an increase in the expression of MAGE-A3 and MAGE-C1/CT7. DCs loaded with chaetocin-treated dying myeloma cells produced low levels of IL-10 and enhanced the cross presentation of DCs. Additionally, these DCs most potently inhibited regulatory T cells, induced Th1 polarization and activated myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes compared with DCs loaded with UVB-irradiated dying myeloma cells. These results suggest that the pretreatment of myeloma cells with chaetocin can enhance DC function through the up-regulation of HSP90 and cancer testis antigens in dying myeloma cells and can potently induce the Th1 polarization of DCs and myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. PMID:28512265

  9. Nanoscale superconducting memory based on the kinetic inductance of asymmetric nanowire loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Andrew; Averin, Dmitri V.; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2017-06-01

    The demand for low-dissipation nanoscale memory devices is as strong as ever. As Moore’s law is staggering, and the demand for a low-power-consuming supercomputer is high, the goal of making information processing circuits out of superconductors is one of the central goals of modern technology and physics. So far, digital superconducting circuits could not demonstrate their immense potential. One important reason for this is that a dense superconducting memory technology is not yet available. Miniaturization of traditional superconducting quantum interference devices is difficult below a few micrometers because their operation relies on the geometric inductance of the superconducting loop. Magnetic memories do allow nanometer-scale miniaturization, but they are not purely superconducting (Baek et al 2014 Nat. Commun. 5 3888). Our approach is to make nanometer scale memory cells based on the kinetic inductance (and not geometric inductance) of superconducting nanowire loops, which have already shown many fascinating properties (Aprili 2006 Nat. Nanotechnol. 1 15; Hopkins et al 2005 Science 308 1762). This allows much smaller devices and naturally eliminates magnetic-field cross-talk. We demonstrate that the vorticity, i.e., the winding number of the order parameter, of a closed superconducting loop can be used for realizing a nanoscale nonvolatile memory device. We demonstrate how to alter the vorticity in a controlled fashion by applying calibrated current pulses. A reliable read-out of the memory is also demonstrated. We present arguments that such memory can be developed to operate without energy dissipation.

  10. CSI (Crime Scene Induction): Creating False Memories of Committing Crime.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen B; Baker, Alysha T

    2015-12-01

    We describe two merging lines of empirical inquiry: entire false memories for autobiographical events and false confessions. A recent study showed that people can be led to remember, and confess to, perpetrating serious crimes that never occurred when confronted with suggestive interview tactics commonly used in police interrogations.

  11. The Velten Mood Induction Procedure: Effects on Mood and Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riskind, John H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined the hypothesis that the self-devaluative aspects of the Velton Mood Induction Procedure (VMIP) do not lower mood but that the depression-related somatic states of the VMIP do lower mood. Found that both aspects of the VMIP have a powerful impact on mood. (Author/RC)

  12. The Velten Mood Induction Procedure: Effects on Mood and Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riskind, John H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined the hypothesis that the self-devaluative aspects of the Velton Mood Induction Procedure (VMIP) do not lower mood but that the depression-related somatic states of the VMIP do lower mood. Found that both aspects of the VMIP have a powerful impact on mood. (Author/RC)

  13. Pharmacologic Induction of CD8+ T Cell Memory: Better Living Through Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gattinoni, Luca; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    The generation of a robust population of memory T cells is critical for effective vaccine and cell-based therapies to prevent and treat infectious diseases and cancer. A series of recent papers have established a new, cell-intrinsic approach in which small molecules target key metabolic and developmental pathways to enhance the formation and maintenance of highly functional CD8+ memory T cells. These findings raise the exciting new possibility of using small molecules, many of which are already approved for human use, for the pharmacologic induction of immunologic memory. PMID:20371454

  14. INFLUENCE OF EXPOSURE HISTORY ON VITELLOGENIN INDUCTION IN MEDAKA: A CASE OF "ESTROGEN MEMORY"?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Exposure History on Vitellogenin Induction in Medaka: a Case of "Estrogen Memory"? (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 50(1-5):196.

    In this study, we exposed female medaka to aqueous solutions of o,p'-DDT until tissues residues reached approximately 100 g/g. Male...

  15. INFLUENCE OF EXPOSURE HISTORY ON VITELLOGENIN INDUCTION IN MEDAKA: A CASE OF "ESTROGEN MEMORY"?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Exposure History on Vitellogenin Induction in Medaka: a Case of "Estrogen Memory"? (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 50(1-5):196.

    In this study, we exposed female medaka to aqueous solutions of o,p'-DDT until tissues residues reached approximately 100 g/g. Male...

  16. Creativity and Memory: Effects of an Episodic-Specificity Induction on Divergent Thinking.

    PubMed

    Madore, Kevin P; Addis, Donna Rose; Schacter, Daniel L

    2015-09-01

    People produce more episodic details when imagining future events and solving means-end problems after receiving an episodic-specificity induction-brief training in recollecting details of a recent event-than after receiving a control induction not focused on episodic retrieval. Here we show for the first time that an episodic-specificity induction also enhances divergent creative thinking. In Experiment 1, participants exhibited a selective boost on a divergent-thinking task (generating unusual uses of common objects) after a specificity induction compared with a control induction; by contrast, performance following the two inductions was similar on an object association task thought to involve little divergent thinking. In Experiment 2, we replicated the specificity-induction effect on divergent thinking using a different control induction, and also found that participants performed similarly on a convergent-thinking task following the two inductions. These experiments provide novel evidence that episodic memory is involved in divergent creative thinking. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Noninvasive induction implant heating: an approach for contactless altering of mechanical properties of shape memory implants.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Ronny; Hustedt, Michael; Wesling, Volker; Hurschler, Christoph; Olender, Gavin; Mach, Martin; Gösling, Thomas; Müller, Christian W

    2013-01-01

    This article shows an approach to change the properties of an orthopaedic shape memory implant within biological tissue, using contactless induction heating. Due to inducing the one way-memory effect, triggered by the rise of temperature within the implant, the geometry and hence the mechanical properties of the implant itself, are altered. The power uptake of the implant, depending on the induction parameters as well as on its position within the induction coil, is shown. Thermographic measurements are carried out in order to determine the surface temperature distribution of the implant. In order to simulate biological tissue, the implant was embedded in agarose gel. Suitable heating parameters, in terms of a short heating process in combination with a reduced heat impact on the surrounding environment, were determined. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A requirement for physical linkage between determinants recognized by helper molecules and cytotoxic T cell precursors in the induction of cytotoxic T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Krowka, J F; Singh, B; Fotedar, A; Mosmann, T; Giedlin, M A; Pilarski, L M

    1986-05-15

    It has long been understood that both antibody and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses are induced through collaborative events in which the determinants recognized by the precursor cells must be physically linked to the determinants recognized by the helper. Although it is clear that the generation of memory cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (CTLp) involves linked recognition of determinants, the induction of CTL responses has been viewed as being dependent upon interleukin 2 (IL 2), which could be provided by a helper cell, but independent of requirements for antigen bridging. In this work, we have designed a system that lacks exogenous IL 2 by using as our source of help, antigen-specific helper molecules derived from helper T cells. These soluble helper molecules are uncontaminated by IL 2 and unlike a helper cell, are unable to produce IL 2. Helper molecules specific for chicken red blood cells (Crbc) and for a synthetic polypeptide, poly 18, were tested. Thymocyte responders require a source of help to respond to alloantigens intrinsically expressed on the surface of adherent stimulator cells. To analyze the mechanism whereby the helper molecules acted, we used a system involving recognition of haptenic and carrier determinants that were physically linked by virtue of being located on the same cell surface (intra-structural linkage). Adherent stimulator cells were pulsed with Crbc or poly 18 so that the alloantigens recognized by the thymocyte CTLp (intrinsically expressed class I) were either linked or unlinked to the carrier determinants (Crbc or poly 18) presented by the adherent cells and recognized by the helper molecules. Both types of helper molecule were shown to be antigen-specific in crisscross experiments. The helper molecules specific for Crbc were able to induce the thymocyte CTLp only when both hapten and carrier were present on the same stimulator cell surface. Because we were not able to detect a requirement for H-2-restricted recognition

  19. Playing with fire: effects of negative mood induction and working memory on vocabulary acquisition.

    PubMed

    Miller, Zachary F; Fox, Jessica K; Moser, Jason S; Godfroid, Aline

    2017-08-03

    We investigated the impact of emotions on learning vocabulary in an unfamiliar language to better understand affective influences in foreign language acquisition. Seventy native English speakers learned new vocabulary in either a negative or a neutral emotional state. Participants also completed two sets of working memory tasks to examine the potential mediating role of working memory. Results revealed that participants exposed to negative stimuli exhibited difficulty in retrieving and correctly pairing English words with Indonesian words, as reflected in a lower performance on the prompted recall tests and the free recall measure. Emotional induction did not change working memory scores from pre to post manipulation. This suggests working memory could not explain the reduced vocabulary learning in the negative group. We argue that negative mood can adversely affect language learning by suppressing aspects of native-language processing and impeding form-meaning mapping with second language words.

  20. Depressive symptoms moderate the effects of a self-discrepancy induction on overgeneral autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Smets, Jorien; Griffith, James W; Wessel, Ineke; Walschaerts, Dominique; Raes, Filip

    2013-01-01

    According to the CaRFAX model, rumination is one of the key underlying mechanisms of overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM). The association between rumination and OGM is well established in clinical populations, but this relationship is not robust in nonclinical samples. A series of null findings is reported in the current paper. Additionally we followed up on recent findings suggesting that a state of rumination needs to be active in order to detect a relationship between trait-rumination and OGM. Secondary school students (N= 123) completed questionnaires assessing trait-rumination and depressive symptoms as well as two autobiographical memory tests (AMTs), one before and one after a self-discrepancy induction. This induction should trigger state-rumination, which would subsequently promote the retrieval of general rather than specific memories. Trait-rumination failed to predict increases in OGM. We did find, however, that higher BDI-II scores were positively related to an increase in OGM following the induction. This adds to the growing body of evidence that OGM reactivity might be more important than baseline memory specificity.

  1. Initiation of shape-memory effect by inductive heating of magnetic nanoparticles in thermoplastic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, R.; Kratz, K.; Weigel, T.; Lucka-Gabor, M.; Moneke, M.; Lendlein, A.

    2006-01-01

    In shape-memory polymers, changes in shape are mostly induced by heating, and exceeding a specific switching temperature, Tswitch. If polymers cannot be warmed up by heat transfer using a hot liquid or gaseous medium, noncontact triggering will be required. In this article, the magnetically induced shape-memory effect of composites from magnetic nanoparticles and thermoplastic shape-memory polymers is introduced. A polyetherurethane (TFX) and a biodegradable multiblock copolymer (PDC) with poly(p-dioxanone) as hard segment and poly(ε-caprolactone) as soft segment were investigated as matrix component. Nanoparticles consisting of an iron(III)oxide core in a silica matrix could be processed into both polymers. A homogeneous particle distribution in TFX could be shown. Compounds have suitable elastic and thermal properties for the shape-memory functionalization. Temporary shapes of TFX compounds were obtained by elongating at increased temperature and subsequent cooling under constant stress. Cold-drawing of PDC compounds at 25°C resulted in temporary fixation of the mechanical deformation by 50–60%. The shape-memory effect of both composite systems could be induced by inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field (f = 258 kHz; H = 30 kA·m−1). The maximum temperatures achievable by inductive heating in a specific magnetic field depend on sample geometry and nanoparticle content. Shape recovery rates of composites resulting from magnetic triggering are comparable to those obtained by increasing the environmental temperature. PMID:16537442

  2. Do Development and Learning Really Decrease Memory? On Similarity and Category-Based Induction in Adults and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilburn, Catherine; Feeney, Aidan

    2008-01-01

    In a recently published study, Sloutsky and Fisher [Sloutsky, V. M., & Fisher, A.V. (2004a). When development and learning decrease memory: Evidence against category-based induction in children. "Psychological Science", 15, 553-558; Sloutsky, V. M., & Fisher, A. V. (2004b). Induction and categorization in young children: A similarity-based model.…

  3. Do Development and Learning Really Decrease Memory? On Similarity and Category-Based Induction in Adults and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilburn, Catherine; Feeney, Aidan

    2008-01-01

    In a recently published study, Sloutsky and Fisher [Sloutsky, V. M., & Fisher, A.V. (2004a). When development and learning decrease memory: Evidence against category-based induction in children. "Psychological Science", 15, 553-558; Sloutsky, V. M., & Fisher, A. V. (2004b). Induction and categorization in young children: A similarity-based model.…

  4. DTIC xenogenized lines obtained from an L1210 clone: clonal analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, O.; Franco, P.; Canti, G.; Ricci, L.; Prandoni, N.; Nicolin, A.; Festenstein, H.

    1988-01-01

    Antineoplastic compounds can induce on tumour cells new antigens that undetectable on parental cells and which are transmissible as a genetic character. In this study mouse leukaemia L1210 was cloned in vitro by limiting dilution and one cloned line was recloned in vivo. Four subcloned tumour cell lines (A,D,R,S) were xenogenized in vivo by DTIC treatment (A/DTIC, D/DTIC, R/DTIC, S/DTIC) following a schedule previously described. Up to 10(7) cells of these xenogenized subclones, injected i.p., were rejected by syngeneic hosts, although they grew in immunosuppressed hosts. The DTIC treated subclones were lysed by in vivo-primed, in vitro-restimulated (with the relevant subclone) lymphocytes. The cytotoxic lymphocyte activity was not strictly specific since parental, DTIC-untreated cells were also lysed, although less efficiently. CTL directed against the D/DTIC subclone were cloned by limiting dilution. Ninety-four CTL clones were assayed against L1210 subcloned cells, DTIC-treated and untreated, and against different murine tumours (syngeneic or allogenic). Three specific antigens could be identified in the 51Cr release assay. The DTIC subclones expressed one antigen that was specifically recognized by a set of CTL clones. A number of CTL clones were able to lyse the L1210 subcloned cell exclusively, targetting a tumour-associated antigen that did not appear to be modified in the DTIC-treated subclones. A third antigen was demonstrated in the parental and DTIC treated D subclone. On the basis of these results it was postulated that there was at least one common DTIC-inducible antigen specific and reproducible within an identical cell population. Moreover, DTIC treatment did not modify histocompatibility antigens or TAA pre-existing in L1210 cells. The findings discussed here provide new information about permanent xenogenization of tumour cells, which might be exploited for experimental chemo-immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:2458749

  5. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Natalie J; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell - cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell - melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Ovarian Carcinoma Peptide Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    R01CA90815 (K. T. Hogan) and Department of Defense W81XWH-05-1-0012 (K. T. Hogan). References 1. Dunn GP , Old LJ , Schreiber RD . The Three Es of Cancer...of melanoma-associated antigens. J Cell Physiol 2000;182(3):323-31. 18. Scanlan MJ, Simpson AJ, Old LJ . The cancer/testis genes: review...Parmiani G. A listing of human tumor antigens recognized by T cells: March 2004 update. Cancer Immunol Immunother 2005;54(3):187-207. 11. Ohnmacht GA

  7. Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Induced by Liposomal Antigens: Mechanisms of Immunological Presentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE C AIS RESEARCH AND HUMAN RETROVIRUSES Vobme 10, Supplement 2, 194 Mary Am Usbew laný Puirtsen Novel Vaccines and Adjuvants...incorporated into phospholipid vesicles 38. White WI. Cassatt DR. Madsen J, Burke Si, Woods RM. Wassef elicit specific allogeneic cytotoxic T

  8. MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes eradicate tumors when adoptively transferred in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, P; Ginardi, A R; Tinder, T L; Sterner, C J; Gendler, S J

    2001-03-01

    We have reported previously that MUC1 transgenic mice with spontaneous tumors of the pancreas (designated MET) naturally develop MHC class I-restricted, MUC1-specific CTLs as tumors progress (P. Mukherjee et al., J. Immunol., 165: 3451-3460, 2000). From these MET mice, we have isolated, expanded, and cloned naturally occurring MUC1-specific CTLs in vitro. In this report, we show that the CTL line is predominantly CD8+ T cells and expresses T-cell receptor Vbeta chains 5.1/5.2, 11, 13, and 2 and Valpha chains 2, 8.3, 3.2, and 11.1/11.2. These CTLs recognize several epitopes on the MUC1 tandem repeat with highest affinity to APGSTAPPA. The CTL clone, on the other hand, is 100% CD8+ cells and expresses a single Vbeta chain of 5.1/5.2 and Valpha2. It recognizes only the H-2Db class I-restricted epitope of MUC1, APGSTAPPA. When adoptively transferred, the CTLs were effective in eradicating MUC1-expressing injected tumor cells including mammary gland cells (C57mg) and B16 melanomas. These results suggest that MUC1-specific CTLs are capable of possibly preventing, or at least substantially delaying, MUC1-expressing tumor formation. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that demonstrates that the naturally occurring MUC1-specific CTLs isolated from one tumor model has antitumor effects on other MUC1-expressing tumors in vivo. Therefore, our data confirm that MUC1 is an important tumor rejection antigen and can serve as a target for immunotherapy.

  9. Recognition of cloned vesicular stomatitis virus internal and external gene products by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that most if not all CTL specific for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells recognize the viral glycoprotein (G), an integral membrane protein abundantly expressed on infected cell surfaces. Using recombinant vaccinia viruses containing copies of cloned VSV genes to examine CTL recognition of VSV, we have confirmed that G is recognized by VSV-specific CTL. More interestingly, however, we have also found that nucleocapsid protein (N), an internal virion protein, can be detected on infected cell surfaces using mAb, and serves as a major target antigen for VSV-specific CTL. In contrast to the highly serotype-specific recognition of G, N is recognized by a major population of CTL able to lyse cells infected with either the Indiana or New Jersey VSV serotypes. Using target cells expressing a cloned MHC class I gene, we could directly show that CTL recognition of N occurs in the context of the MHC Ld molecule. PMID:3011949

  10. Identification and Characterization of Ovarian Carcinoma Peptide Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    β1 and 2 in ovarian carcinoma. Clin. Cancer Res. 5:2498-2505. 23. Toutirais, O., P. Chartier , D. Dubois, F. Bouet, J. Leveque, V. Catros-Quemener...immune surveillance. Cancer Cell 8:369–380 62. Toutirais O, Chartier P, Dubois D, Bouet F, Leveque J, Catros- Quemener V, Genetet N (2003) Constitutive

  11. Activation of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusions of human dendritic cells and breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianlin; Avigan, David; Chen, Dongshu; Wu, Zekui; Koido, Shigeo; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kufe, Donald

    2000-01-01

    We have reported that fusions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) and murine carcinoma cells reverse unresponsiveness to tumor-associated antigens and induce the rejection of established metastases. In the present study, fusions were generated with primary human breast carcinoma cells and autologous DCs. Fusion cells coexpressed tumor-associated antigens and DC-derived costimulatory molecules. The fusion cells also retained the functional potency of DCs and stimulated autologous T cell proliferation. Significantly, the results show that autologous T cells are primed by the fusion cells to induce MHC class I-dependent lysis of autologous breast tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that fusions of human breast cancer cells and DCs activate T cell responses against autologous tumors. PMID:10688917

  12. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) A49G polymorphism and autoimmune blood diseases.

    PubMed

    Aktürk, Faruk; Hançer, Veysel Sabri; Küçükkaya, Reyhan

    2010-06-05

    AMAÇ: Sitotoksik T lenfosit antijen-4 (CTLA-4) ifadesi T lenfositlerde gerçekleşir ve T hücre cevabını engeller. Hayvan modellerinde CTLA-4 yokluğunun, dokuların poliklonal çoğalan lenfositler tarafından yoğun infiltrasyonu nedeni ile, ölümcül olduğu gösterilmiştir. Farklı otoimmün hastalıklar ile ilişkilendirilmiş CTLA-4 A49G polimorfizminin, CTLA-4 molekülünün inhibitör fonksiyonunu azalttığı düşünülmektedir. YÖNTEMLER: Bu çalışmada otoimmun hemolitik anemi (OIHA) hastası 46 kişi, immun trombositopenik purpura (ITP) hastası 62 kişi ve 150 sağlıklı kontrol bireyinde CTLA-4 A49G polimorfizmi çalışılmıştır.

  13. Plasmid DNA encoding targeted naturally processed peptides generates protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in immunized animals.

    PubMed

    Hedley, M L; Strominger, J L; Urban, R G

    1998-02-10

    Genetic immunization has been widely applied in efforts to find novel and efficient mechanisms of stimulating the immune response. An effective attack against viral pathogens or tumors often requires activation of T cell-mediated immunity and the generation of cytotoxic T cells. Intramuscular immunization with plasmid DNA containing cDNAs that encode proteins results in expression and secretion of the foreign antigen by muscle cells. T cell activation occurs when peptide fragments of the exogenous protein are presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells. Identification of specific peptide epitopes from a protein antigen presented to T cells during an infectious process or tumor situation would provide all of the antigenic information needed to stimulate effective T cell-mediated immunity. Such peptides represent the naturally processed epitopes selected by the processing machinery of antigen presenting cells. Delivery of this information to the appropriate cells in vivo might be sufficient to stimulate T cell immunity and overcome the difficulties associated with overexpression of large protein antigens or those with potentially toxic side effects. This report describes the use of naturally processed T cell epitopes, administered in plasmid DNA vaccines, to stimulate cytotoxic T cell responses to two viral antigens effectively.

  14. FLT3-regulated antigens as targets for leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brackertz, B; Conrad, H; Daniel, J; Kast, B; Krönig, H; Busch, D H; Adamski, J; Peschel, C; Bernhard, H

    2011-01-01

    The FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is highly expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Internal tandem duplications (ITD) of the juxtamembrane domain lead to the constitutive activation of the FLT3 kinase inducing the activation of multiple genes, which may result in the expression of leukemia-associated antigens (LAAs). We analyzed the regulation of LAA in FLT3-wild-type (WT)- and FLT3-ITD+ myeloid cells to identify potential targets for antigen-specific immunotherapy for AML patients. Antigens, such as PR-3, RHAMM, Survivin, WT-1 and PRAME, were upregulated by constitutively active FLT3-ITD as well as FLT3-WT activated by FLT3 ligand (FL). Cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) clones against PR-3, RHAMM, Survivin and an AML-directed CTL clone recognized AML cell lines and primary AML blasts expressing FLT3-ITD, as well as FLT3-WT+ myeloid dendritic cells in the presence of FL. Downregulation of FLT3 led to the abolishment of CTL recognition. Comparing our findings concerning LAA upregulation by the FLT3 kinase with those already made for the Bcr-Abl kinase, we found analogies in the LAA expression pattern. Antigens upregulated by both FLT3 and Bcr-Abl may be promising targets for the development of immunotherapeutical approaches against myeloid leukemia of different origin. PMID:22829124

  15. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Natalie J.; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell – cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell – melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27625650

  16. Manufacturing of gene-modified cytotoxic T lymphocytes for autologous cellular therapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, L J N; Ausubel, L; Gutierrez, M; Stephan, S; Shakeley, R; Olivares, S; Serrano, L M; Burton, L; Jensen, M C V; Forman, S J; DiGiusto, D L

    2006-01-01

    The production of therapeutic T-cell populations for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer requires extensive ex vivo cell processing, including the isolation or creation of Ag-specific T cells and their subsequent propagation to clinically relevant numbers. These procedures must be performed according to the principles of current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) for phase I clinical trials to ensure the identity, purity potency and safety of the cellular product. In this report we describe our approach to manufacturing and characterizing bulk populations of gene-modified autologous T cells for use in treating follicular lymphoma. PBMC from healthy donors, obtained after informed consent, were stimulated in vitro with Ab to CD3epsilon (OKT3) and recombinant human IL-2 and then electroporated with plasmid DNA containing a human CD19-specific chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) gene and HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Stably transfected cells were selected in cytocidal concentrations of hygromycin B over multiple 14-day stimulation culture cycles and then cryopreserved. Vials of cryopreserved/selected T cells were used to initiate T-cell expansion cultures to produce cell products for clinical infusion. These cultures were characterized for phenotype, function and suitability for use in adoptive immunotherapy studies. Our results demonstrate that bulk populations of gene-modified T cells derived from peripheral blood of healthy donors express CD19+ chimeric Ag receptor at low levels and can specifically lyse CD19+ target cells in vitro. These cells display a differentiated T-effector phenotype, are sensitive to ganciclovir-mediated killing and display a non-transformed phenotype. TCR Vbeta usage indicated that all populations tested were polyclonal. Ex vivo cell expansion from cryopreserved cell banks is sufficient to produce doses of between 5 x 10(9) and 1 x 10(10) cells/run. One of three transductions resulted in a population of cells that was not suitable for infusion but was identified during release testing. No populations displayed any evidence of bacterial, fungal or mycoplasma contamination. We have established a manufacturing strategy that is being used to produce T cells for a phase I clinical trial for follicular lymphoma. Genetically modified T cells have been characterized by cell-surface marker phenotype, functional activity against CD19+ targets and requisite safety testing. These pre-clinical data confirm the feasibility of this approach to manufacturing T-cell products.

  17. FLT3-regulated antigens as targets for leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Brackertz, B; Conrad, H; Daniel, J; Kast, B; Krönig, H; Busch, D H; Adamski, J; Peschel, C; Bernhard, H

    2011-03-01

    The FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is highly expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Internal tandem duplications (ITD) of the juxtamembrane domain lead to the constitutive activation of the FLT3 kinase inducing the activation of multiple genes, which may result in the expression of leukemia-associated antigens (LAAs). We analyzed the regulation of LAA in FLT3-wild-type (WT)- and FLT3-ITD(+) myeloid cells to identify potential targets for antigen-specific immunotherapy for AML patients. Antigens, such as PR-3, RHAMM, Survivin, WT-1 and PRAME, were upregulated by constitutively active FLT3-ITD as well as FLT3-WT activated by FLT3 ligand (FL). Cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) clones against PR-3, RHAMM, Survivin and an AML-directed CTL clone recognized AML cell lines and primary AML blasts expressing FLT3-ITD, as well as FLT3-WT(+) myeloid dendritic cells in the presence of FL. Downregulation of FLT3 led to the abolishment of CTL recognition. Comparing our findings concerning LAA upregulation by the FLT3 kinase with those already made for the Bcr-Abl kinase, we found analogies in the LAA expression pattern. Antigens upregulated by both FLT3 and Bcr-Abl may be promising targets for the development of immunotherapeutical approaches against myeloid leukemia of different origin.

  18. Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Humans Exposed to Plasmodium Falciparum by Immunization or Natural Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Patarapotikul J, Beaudoin RL, Dubeaux C. Tartar A, Mercereau-Puijalon 0, Langsley G (1987) A liver-stage-specific antigen of Plasmodium falciparum...2 ,13 ; PNG4; BRAl G S PNG3 D Q C S GAM3; 3662,, 6,7 Q N 40610; 4191-9; GAM4; 4062 R A GAM5; 4063,9 A D In mice and humans, a peptide including amino...Exposed to Plasmodium falciparum 201 Alonso PL, Lindsay SW, Armstrong JR, Conteh M, Hill AG, David PH, Fegan G (1991) The effect of insecticide-treated

  19. Immunotherapy of cancer via mediation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes by methionine enkephalin (MENK).

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Chen, Wenna; Herberman, Ronald B; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2014-03-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate the immunological mechanisms by which synthetic methionine enkephalin (MENK) exerts therapeutic effects on tumor growth. Our findings in vivo or in vitro show that MENK treatment either in vivo or in vitro could up-regulate the percentages of CD8+T cells, induce markers of activated T cells, increased cytotoxic activity against mouse S180 tumor cells and increase secretion of IFNγ. In addition, the adoptively transferred CD8+T cells, after either in vitro or in vivo treatment with MENK, result in significantly increased survival of S180 tumor-bearing mice and significant shrinkage in tumor growth. Opioid receptors are detected on normal CD8+T cells and exposure to MENK leads to increased expression of opioid receptors. Interaction between MENK and the opioid receptors on CD8+T cells appears to be essential for the activation of CTL, since the addition of naltrexone (NTX), an opioid receptor antagonist, significantly inhibits all of the effects of MENK. The evidence obtained indicates that the MENK-induced T cell signaling is associated with a significant up-regulation of Ca2+ influx into the cytoplasm and the translocation of NFAT2 into nucleus, and these signaling effects are also inhibited by naltrexone.

  20. Elicitation of anti-viral cytotoxic T lymphocytes with purified viral and H-2 antigens.

    PubMed

    Hale, A H; Ruebush, M J; Harris, D T

    1980-07-01

    The minimal molecular requirements for elicitation of secondary anti-Sendai virus CTL were investigated. The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of Sendai virus and the H-2Kk glycoprotein of YAC tumor cells were purified and incorporated into phospholipid vesicles. These unilamellar liposomes were then tested for the ability to elicit H-2 restricted secondary anti-Sendai virus CTL. The results indicate that these well-defined vesicles were capable of eliciting secondary anti-Sendai virus CTL which lysed only target cells possessing the H-2Kk haplotype and modified with inactivated Sendai virus.

  1. Marking hypoxic cells for complement and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated lysis: using pimonidazole.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, S. C.; Flood, P. M.; Raleigh, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Artificial antigens are created when 2-nitroimidazoles bind to hypoxic cells. These antigens have been used in the immunodetection of tumour hypoxia but they might also serve to stimulate immune lysis of hypoxic tumour cells by complement- and cell-mediated processes. In order to test this hypothesis, lymphocytes isolated from the spleens of C3H/HeN mice that had been immunised with pimonidazole-labelled 3152-PRO cells were subcultured and tested for their ability to lyse chromium-51 loaded, pimonidazole-labelled 3152-PRO cells in an in vitro assay. In a parallel study, commercially available, rabbit complement was tested for its ability to lyse pimonidazole-labelled V79-4 cells in the presence of monoclonal antibodies which recognise protein adducts of reductively activated pimonidazole. Complement-mediated cell lysis was measured by means of an MTT assay. Complement-mediated and cell-mediated lysis was observed at pimonidazole concentrations which, in themselves, do not produce cell killing. PMID:8763883

  2. Prediction and identification of mouse cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in Ebola virus glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ebola viruses (EBOVs) cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. At present, there are no licensed vaccines or efficient therapies to combat EBOV infection. Previous studies have shown that both humoral and cellular immune responses are crucial for controlling Ebola infection. CD8+ T cells play an important role in mediating vaccine-induced protective immunity. The objective of this study was to identify H-2d-specific T cell epitopes in EBOV glycoproteins (GPs). Results Computer-assisted algorithms were used to predict H-2d-specific T cell epitopes in two species of EBOV (Sudan and Zaire) GP. The predicted peptides were synthesized and identified in BALB/c mice immunized with replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing the EBOV GP. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays and intracellular cytokine staining showed that the peptides RPHTPQFLF (Sudan EBOV), GPCAGDFAF and LYDRLASTV (Zaire EBOV) could stimulate splenoctyes in immunized mice to produce large amounts of interferon-gamma. Conclusion Three peptides within the GPs of two EBOV strains were identified as T cell epitopes. The identification of these epitopes should facilitate the evaluation of vaccines based on the Ebola virus glycoprotein in a BALB/c mouse model. PMID:22695180

  3. Protection from Ebola Virus Mediated by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Specific for the Viral Nucleoprotein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    C. .1. Peters. 1999. Evaluation of immune globulin and recombinant interferon-«2b for treatment of exper- imental Ebola virus infections. J. Infect...Kudoyarova-Zuhavichene, N. M.„ N. N. Sergeyev, A. A. Chepurnov, and S. V. Netesov. 1999. Preparation and use of hyperimmune serum for prophylaxis and

  4. Dynamic properties of regulatory motifs associated with induction of three temporal domains of memory in aplysia.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, David B; Smolen, Paul; Baxter, Douglas A; Byrne, John H

    2005-01-01

    A model was developed to examine dynamical properties of regulatory motifs correlated with different temporal domains of memory. The model represents short-, intermediate-, and long-term phases of protein kinase A (PKA) activation, which appear related to corresponding phases of facilitation of the Aplysia sensorimotor synapse. The model also represents phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB1 by PKA and consequent induction of the immediate-early gene Aplysia ubiquitin hydrolase (Ap-uch), which is essential for long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF). Simulations suggest mechanisms responsible for differing profiles of synaptic facilitation following massed vs. spaced exposures to 5-HT, and suggest a novel regulatory motif (gated positive feedback) is important for LTF. Simulations suggest zero-order ultrasensitivity may underlie a requirement of a threshold number of exposures to 5-HT for LTF induction. The model makes predictions for the dynamics of PKA activation and Ap-uch induction when MAP kinase is activated, or when repression of Ap-uch is relieved by inhibiting the transcription factor CREB2. This model may therefore be useful for understanding processes underlying memory formation in Aplysia and other systems.

  5. Electromagnetic induction heating of an orthopaedic nickel--titanium shape memory device.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian W; Pfeifer, Ronny; El-Kashef, Tarek; Hurschler, Christof; Herzog, Dirk; Oszwald, Markus; Haasper, Carl; Krettek, Christian; Gösling, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Shape memory orthopaedic implants made from nickel-titanium (NiTi) might allow the modulation of fracture healing, changing their cross-sectional shape by employing the shape memory effect. We aimed to show the feasibility and safety of contact-free electromagnetic induction heating of NiTi implants in a rat model. A water-cooled generator-oscillator combination was used. Induction characteristics were determined by measuring the temperature increase of a test sample in correlation to generator power and time. In 53 rats, NiTi implants were introduced into the right hind leg. The animals were transferred to the inductor, and the implant was electromagnetically heated to temperatures between 40 and 60°C. Blood samples were drawn before and 4 h after the procedure. IL-1, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were measured. Animals were euthanized at 3 weeks. Histological specimens from the hind leg and liver were retrieved and examined for inflammatory changes, necrosis, and corrosion pits. Cytokine measurements and histological specimens showed no significant differences among the groups. We concluded that electromagnetic induction heating of orthopedic NiTi implants is feasible and safe in a rat model. This is the first step in the development of new orthopedic implants in which stiffness or rigidity can be modified after implantation to optimize bone-healing.

  6. A validated model for induction heating of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Robert N.; Boyd, James G.; Hartl, Darren J.; Brown, Jonathan K.; Calkins, Frederick T.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators deliver high forces while being compact and reliable, making them ideal for consideration in aerospace applications. One disadvantage of these thermally driven actuators is their slow cyclic time response compared to conventional actuators. Induction heating has recently been proposed to quickly heat SMA components. However efforts to date have been purely empirical. The present work approachs this problem in a computational manner by developing a finite element model of induction heating in which the time-harmonic electromagnetic equations are solved for the Joule heat power field, the energy equation is solved for the temperature field, and the linear momentum equations are solved to find the stress, displacement, and internal state variable fields. The combined model was implemented in Abaqus using a Python script approach and applied to SMA torque tube and beam actuators. The model has also been used to examine magnetic flux concentrators to improve the induction systems performance. Induction heating experiments were performed using the SMA torque tube, and the model agreed well with the experiments.

  7. Reward improves long-term retention of a motor memory through induction of offline memory gains

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Mitsunari; Schambra, Heidi; Wassermann, Eric M; Luckenbaugh, Dave; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2011-01-01

    Summary In humans, training in which good performance is rewarded or bad performance punished results in transient behavioral improvements [1–3]. Their relative effects on consolidation and long-term retention, critical behavioral stages for successful learning [4, 5], are not known. Here, we investigated the effects of reward and punishment on these different stages of human motor skill learning. We studied healthy subjects who trained on a motor task under rewarded, punished, or neutral control conditions. Performance was tested before, and immediately, 6 hs, 24 hs and 30 days after training in the absence of reward or punishment. Performance improvements immediately after training were comparable in the three groups. At 6 hs, the rewarded group maintained performance gains while the other two groups experienced significant forgetting. At 24 hs, the reward group showed significant offline (posttraining) improvements while the other two groups did not. At 30 days, the rewarded group retained the gains identified at 24 hs, while the other two groups experienced significant forgetting. We conclude that training under rewarded conditions is more effective than training under punished or neutral conditions in eliciting lasting motor learning, an advantage driven by offline memory gains that persist over time. PMID:21419628

  8. Reward improves long-term retention of a motor memory through induction of offline memory gains.

    PubMed

    Abe, Mitsunari; Schambra, Heidi; Wassermann, Eric M; Luckenbaugh, Dave; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2011-04-12

    In humans, training in which good performance is rewarded or bad performance punished results in transient behavioral improvements. The relative effects of reward and punishment on consolidation and long-term retention, critical behavioral stages for successful learning, are not known. Here, we investigated the effects of reward and punishment on these different stages of human motor skill learning. We studied healthy subjects who trained on a motor task under rewarded, punished, or neutral control conditions. Performance was tested before and immediately, 6 hr, 24 hr, and 30 days after training in the absence of reward or punishment. Performance improvements immediately after training were comparable in the three groups. At 6 hr, the rewarded group maintained performance gains, whereas the other two groups experienced significant forgetting. At 24 hr, the reward group showed significant offline (posttraining) improvements, whereas the other two groups did not. At 30 days, the rewarded group retained the gains identified at 24 hr, whereas the other two groups experienced significant forgetting. We conclude that training under rewarded conditions is more effective than training under punished or neutral conditions in eliciting lasting motor learning, an advantage driven by offline memory gains that persist over time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The phosphatase SHP2 regulates the spacing effect for long-term memory induction.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Mario R; Oishi, Kimihiko; Gelb, Bruce D; Zhong, Yi

    2009-10-02

    A property of long-term memory (LTM) induction is the requirement for repeated training sessions spaced over time. This augmentation of memory formation with spaced resting intervals is called the spacing effect. We now show that in Drosophila, the duration of resting intervals required for inducing LTM is regulated by activity levels of the protein tyrosine phosphatase corkscrew (CSW). Overexpression of wild-type CSW in mushroom body neurons shortens the inter-trial interval required for LTM induction, whereas overexpression of constitutively active CSW proteins prolongs these resting intervals. These gain-of-function csw mutations are associated with a clinical condition of mental retardation. Biochemical analysis reveals that LTM-inducing training regimens generate repetitive waves of CSW-dependent MAPK activation, the length of which appears to define the duration of the resting interval. Constitutively active CSW proteins prolong the resting interval by altering the MAPK inactivation cycle. We thus provide insight into the molecular basis of the spacing effect.

  10. Induction of resident memory T cells enhances the efficacy of cancer vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Roussel, Hélène; Diniz, Mariana O.; Karaki, Soumaya; Tran, Thi; Voron, Thibault; Dransart, Estelle; Sandoval, Federico; Riquet, Marc; Rance, Bastien; Marcheteau, Elie; Fabre, Elizabeth; Mandavit, Marion; Terme, Magali; Blanc, Charlotte; Escudie, Jean-Baptiste; Gibault, Laure; Barthes, Françoise Le Pimpec; Granier, Clemence; Ferreira, Luis C. S.; Badoual, Cecile; Johannes, Ludger; Tartour, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm) represent a new subset of long-lived memory T cells that remain in tissue and do not recirculate. Although they are considered as early immune effectors in infectious diseases, their role in cancer immunosurveillance remains unknown. In a preclinical model of head and neck cancer, we show that intranasal vaccination with a mucosal vector, the B subunit of Shiga toxin, induces local Trm and inhibits tumour growth. As Trm do not recirculate, we demonstrate their crucial role in the efficacy of cancer vaccine with parabiosis experiments. Blockade of TFGβ decreases the induction of Trm after mucosal vaccine immunization, resulting in the lower efficacy of cancer vaccine. In order to extrapolate this role of Trm in humans, we show that the number of Trm correlates with a better overall survival in lung cancer in multivariate analysis. The induction of Trm may represent a new surrogate biomarker for the efficacy of cancer vaccine. This study also argues for the development of vaccine strategies designed to elicit them. PMID:28537262

  11. Induction of resident memory T cells enhances the efficacy of cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Roussel, Hélène; Diniz, Mariana O; Karaki, Soumaya; Tran, Thi; Voron, Thibault; Dransart, Estelle; Sandoval, Federico; Riquet, Marc; Rance, Bastien; Marcheteau, Elie; Fabre, Elizabeth; Mandavit, Marion; Terme, Magali; Blanc, Charlotte; Escudie, Jean-Baptiste; Gibault, Laure; Barthes, Françoise Le Pimpec; Granier, Clemence; Ferreira, Luis C S; Badoual, Cecile; Johannes, Ludger; Tartour, Eric

    2017-05-24

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm) represent a new subset of long-lived memory T cells that remain in tissue and do not recirculate. Although they are considered as early immune effectors in infectious diseases, their role in cancer immunosurveillance remains unknown. In a preclinical model of head and neck cancer, we show that intranasal vaccination with a mucosal vector, the B subunit of Shiga toxin, induces local Trm and inhibits tumour growth. As Trm do not recirculate, we demonstrate their crucial role in the efficacy of cancer vaccine with parabiosis experiments. Blockade of TFGβ decreases the induction of Trm after mucosal vaccine immunization, resulting in the lower efficacy of cancer vaccine. In order to extrapolate this role of Trm in humans, we show that the number of Trm correlates with a better overall survival in lung cancer in multivariate analysis. The induction of Trm may represent a new surrogate biomarker for the efficacy of cancer vaccine. This study also argues for the development of vaccine strategies designed to elicit them.

  12. Transcutaneous electromagnetic induction heating of an intramedullary nickel-titanium shape memory implant.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian W; ElKashef, Tarek; Pfeifer, Ronny; Decker, Sebastian; Neunaber, Claudia; Meier, Karen; Fehr, Michael; Wesling, Volker; Gösling, Thomas; Hurschler, Christof; Krettek, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Inadequate mechanical stimuli are a major cause for nonunions following surgery for femoral and tibial shaft fractures. Adapting fixation rigidity during the course of fracture healing requires additional surgery. Nickel-titanium (NiTi) implants can change shape and rigidity by employing a temperature-dependent shape-memory effect. As a first step in the development of advanced intramedullary (IM) NiTi devices for fracture healing, this study aimed to test the feasibility and safety of transcutaneous electromagnetic induction heating of an IM NiTi implant in a rat model. In 51 rats, NiTi implants were introduced into the left distal femur. Forty-four animals were transferred to an induction coil, and the implant was electromagnetically heated to temperatures between 40° and 60 °C Blood samples were drawn before and four hours after the procedure. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-4, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were measured. Animals were sacrificed at three weeks. Histological specimens from the hind leg and liver were retrieved and examined for inflammatory changes, necrosis or corrosion pits. All animals successfully underwent the surgical procedure. Following transcutaneous induction heating, target temperature was confirmed in 37/44 rats. Postoperative controls showed no signs of undue limitations. Neither cytokine measurements nor histological specimens showed any significant differences between groups. There were no corrosion pits or necrosis. We conclude that electromagnetic induction heating of IM NiTi implants is feasible and safe in a rat femur model. These findings reflect a further step in the development of novel concepts for IM fracture fixation that might lead to better fracture healing, less patient discomfort and less need for surgical interventions.

  13. Temporal dynamics of Arc gene induction in hippocampus: relationship to context memory formation.

    PubMed

    Pevzner, Aleksandr; Miyashita, Teiko; Schiffman, Aaron J; Guzowski, John F

    2012-03-01

    Past studies have proposed a role for the hippocampus in the rapid encoding of context memories. Despite this, there is little data regarding the molecular processes underlying the stable formation of a context representation that occurs in the time window established through such behavioral studies. One task that is useful for investigating the rapid encoding of context is contextual fear conditioning (CFC). Behavioral studies demonstrate that animals require approximately 30 s of exploration prior to a footshock to form a contextual representation supporting CFC. Thus, any potential molecular process required for the stabilization of the cellular representation for context must be activated within this narrow and behaviorally defined time window. Detection of the immediate-early gene Arc presents an ideal method to assess the activation of specific neuronal ensembles, given past studies showing the context specific expression of Arc in CA3 and CA1 subfields and the role of Arc in hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. Therefore, we examined the temporal dynamics of Arc induction within the hippocampus after brief context exposure to determine whether experience-dependent Arc expression could be involved in the rapid encoding of incidental context memories. We found that the duration of context exposure differentially activated Arc expression in hippocampal subfields, with CA3 showing rapid engagement within as little as 3 s of exposure. By contrast, Arc induction in CA1 required 30 s of context exposure to reach maximal levels. A parallel behavioral experiment revealed that 30 s, but not 3 s, exposure to a context resulted in strong conditioned freezing 24 h later, consistent with past studies from other laboratories. The current study is the first to examine the rapid temporal dynamics of Arc induction in hippocampus in a well-defined context memory paradigm. These studies demonstrate within 30 s of context exposure Arc is fully activated in CA3 and CA1

  14. Inductively Heated Shape Memory Polymer for the Magnetic Actuation of Medical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, P; Mckinley, G; Wilson, T; Small, W; Benett, W; Bearinger, J; McElfresh, M; Maitland, D

    2005-09-06

    Presently there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with Nickel Zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  15. Inductively heated shape memory polymer for the magnetic actuation of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick R; McKinley, Gareth H; Wilson, Thomas S; Small, Ward; Benett, William J; Bearinger, Jane P; McElfresh, Michael W; Maitland, Duncan J

    2006-10-01

    Presently, there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with nickel zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  16. Modeling and development of a twisting wing using inductively heated shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Robert N.; Hartl, Darren J.; Boyd, James G.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2015-04-01

    Wing twisting has been shown to improve aircraft flight performance. The potential benefits of a twisting wing are often outweighed by the mass of the system required to twist the wing. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators repeatedly demonstrate abilities and properties that are ideal for aerospace actuation systems. Recent advances have shown an SMA torsional actuator that can be manufactured and trained with the ability to generate large twisting deformations under substantial loading. The primary disadvantage of implementing large SMA actuators has been their slow actuation time compared to conventional actuators. However, inductive heating of an SMA actuator allows it to generate a full actuation cycle in just seconds rather than minutes while still . The aim of this work is to demonstrate an experimental wing being twisted to approximately 10 degrees by using an inductively heated SMA torsional actuator. This study also considers a 3-D electromagnetic thermo-mechanical model of the SMA-wing system and compare these results to experiments to demonstrate modeling capabilities.

  17. Induction of latent memory for conditioned food aversion and its transformation into "active" state depend on translation and transcription processes.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, S V; Nikitin, V P

    2014-05-01

    Mechanisms of induction and retrieval of latent (hidden) memory for conditioned food aversion were investigated in snails. After initial training (single combination of a food stimulus with electric shock), aversive reactions to presentation of the conditioned food stimulus were not revealed. Repeated presentation of the stimuli in 12 days after the first combination was followed by the appearance of aversive food reactions that persisted for at least 14 days. Injections of inhibitors of protein (cycloheximide) or RNA (α-amanitin) synthesis immediately after the first or second combined presentation of the stimuli disturbed skill performance. We hypothesized that single combination of food and reinforcing stimuli led to translation- and transcription-dependent induction of latent conditioned food aversion memory. Transformation of this memory into an active state after repeated presentation of the stimulus combination also depends on the synthesis of new proteins and RNA.

  18. Depletion of CD8 Memory T Cells for Induction of Tolerance of a Previously Transplanted Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, I.; Nadazdin, O.; Boskovic, S.; Ochiai, T.; Smith, R. N.; Sykes, M.; Sogawa, H.; Murakami, T.; Strom, T. B.; Colvin, R. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Benichou, G.; Cosimi, A. B.; Kawai, T.

    2013-01-01

    Heterologous immunologic memory has been considered a potent barrier to tolerance induction in primates. Induction of such tolerance for a previously transplanted organ may be more difficult, because specific memory cells can be induced and activated by a transplanted organ. In the current study, we attempted to induce tolerance to a previously transplanted kidney allograft in nonhuman primates. The conditioning regimen consisted of low dose total body irradiation, thymic irradiation, antithymocyte globulin, and anti- CD154 antibody followed by a brief course of a calcineurin inhibitor. This regimen had been shown to induce mixed chimerism and allograft tolerance when kidney transplantation (KTx) and donor bone marrow transplantation (DBMT) were simultaneously performed. However, the same regimen failed to induce mixed chimerism when delayed DBMT was performed after KTx. We found that significant levels of memory T cells remained after conditioning, despite effective depletion of naïve T cells. By adding humanized anti-CD8 monoclonal antibody (cM-T807), CD8 memory T cells were effectively depleted and these recipients successfully achieved mixed chimerism and tolerance. The current studies provide ‘proof of principle’ that the mixed chimerism approach can induce renal allograft tolerance, even late after organ transplantation if memory T-cell function is adequately controlled. PMID:17286617

  19. Cancer-reactive memory T cells from bone marrow: Spontaneous induction and therapeutic potential (Review).

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Volker

    2015-12-01

    Cognate interactions between naïve tumor antigen (TA)-specific T cells and TA-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) are facilitated by secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes or the spleen. These can result either in TA-specific tolerance or, depending on environmental costimulatory signals, in TA-specific immune responses. In the present review, we describe such events for the bone marrow (BM) when blood-borne TA, released from the primary tumor or expressed by blood circulating tumor cells or DCs enters the BM stroma and parenchyma. We argue that cognate T-DC interactions in the BM result in immune responses and generation of memory T cells (MTCs) rather than tolerance because T cells in the BM show an increased level of pre-activation. The review starts with the spontaneous induction of cancer-reactive MTCs in the BM and the involvement of such MTCs in the control of tumor dormancy. The main part deals with the therapeutic potency of BM MTCs. This is a new area of research in which the authors research group has performed pioneering studies which are summarized. These include studies in animal tumor models, studies with human cells in tumor xenotransplant models and clinical studies. Based on observations of an enormous expansion capacity, longevity and therapeutic capacity of BM MTCs, a hypothesis is presented which suggests the involvement of stem-like MTCs.

  20. ECM components guide IL-10 producing regulatory T-cell (TR1) induction from effector memory T-cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Bollyky, Paul L; Wu, Rebecca P; Falk, Ben A; Lord, James D; Long, S Alice; Preisinger, Anton; Teng, Brandon; Holt, Gregory E; Standifer, Nathan E; Braun, Kathleen R; Xie, Cindy Fang; Samuels, Peter L; Vernon, Robert B; Gebe, John A; Wight, Thomas N; Nepom, Gerald T

    2011-05-10

    We describe a role for ECM as a biosensor for inflammatory microenvironments that plays a critical role in peripheral immune tolerance. We show that hyaluronan (HA) promotes induction of Foxp3- IL-10-producing regulatory T cells (TR1) from conventional T-cell precursors in both murine and human systems. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ECM component inducing regulatory T cells. Intact HA, characteristic of healing tissues, promotes induction of TR1 capable of abrogating disease in an IL-10-dependent mouse colitis model whereas fragmentary HA, typical of inflamed tissues, does not, indicating a decisive role for tissue integrity in this system. The TR1 precursor cells in this system are CD4(+)CD62L(-)FoxP3(-), suggesting that effector memory cells assume a regulatory phenotype when they encounter their cognate antigen in the context of intact HA. Matrix integrity cues might thereby play a central role in maintaining peripheral tolerance. This TR1 induction is mediated by CD44 cross-linking and signaling through p38 and ERK1/2. This induction is suppressed, also in a CD44-dependent manner, by osteopontin, a component of chronically inflamed ECM, indicating that CD44 signaling serves as a nexus for fate decisions regarding TR1 induction. Finally, we demonstrate that TR1 induction signals can be recapitulated using synthetic matrices. These results reveal important roles for the matrix microenvironment in immune regulation and suggest unique strategies for immunomodulation.

  1. The induction of antigen-specific CTL by in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ariyoshi, Y; Watanabe, M; Eikawa, S; Yamazaki, C; Sadahira, T; Hirata, T; Araki, M; Ebara, S; Nasu, Y; Udono, H; Kumon, H

    2016-05-01

    An adenovirus vector carrying the human Reduced Expression in Immortalized Cell (REIC)/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC) mediates simultaneous induction of cancer-selective apoptosis and augmentation of anticancer immunity. In our preclinical and clinical studies, in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy showed remarkable direct and indirect antitumor effects to realize therapeutic cancer vaccines. We herein aimed to confirm the induction of tumor-associated antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by Ad-REIC. Using an ovalbumin (OVA), a tumor-associated antigen, expressing E.G7 tumor-bearing mouse model, we investigated the induction and expansion of OVA-specific CTLs responsible for indirect, systemic effects of Ad-REIC. The intratumoral administration of Ad-REIC mediated clear antitumor effects with the accumulation of OVA-specific CTLs in the tumor tissues and spleen. The CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs) were upregulated in the tumor draining lymph nodes of Ad-REIC-treated mice. In a dual tumor-bearing mouse model in the left and right back, Ad-REIC injection in one side significantly suppressed the tumor growth on both sides and significant infiltration of OVA-specific CTLs into non-injected tumor was also detected. Consequently, in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy is expected to realize a new-generation cancer vaccine via anticancer immune activation with DC and tumor antigen-specific CTL expansion.

  2. Quiescence of Memory CD8(+) T Cells Is Mediated by Regulatory T Cells through Inhibitory Receptor CTLA-4.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vandana; Penny, Laura Anne; Yuzefpolskiy, Yevgeniy; Baumann, Florian Martin; Sarkar, Surojit

    2015-06-16

    Immune memory cells are poised to rapidly expand and elaborate effector functions upon reinfection yet exist in a functionally quiescent state. The paradigm is that memory T cells remain inactive due to lack of T cell receptor (TCR) stimuli. Here, we report that regulatory T (Treg) cells orchestrate memory T cell quiescence by suppressing effector and proliferation programs through inhibitory receptor, cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 (CTLA-4). Loss of Treg cells resulted in activation of genome-wide transcriptional programs characteristic of effector T cells and drove transitioning as well as established memory CD8(+) T cells toward terminally differentiated KLRG-1(hi)IL-7Rα(lo)GzmB(hi) phenotype, with compromised metabolic fitness, longevity, polyfunctionality, and protective efficacy. CTLA-4 functionally replaced Treg cells in trans to rescue memory T cell defects and restore homeostasis. These studies present the CTLA-4-CD28-CD80/CD86 axis as a potential target to accelerate vaccine-induced immunity and improve T cell memory quality in current cancer immunotherapies proposing transient Treg cell ablation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Induction of Associative Olfactory Memory by Targeted Activation of Single Olfactory Neurons in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Takato; Lee, Chi-Yu; Yoshida-Kasikawa, Maki; Honjo, Ken; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo

    2014-01-01

    It has been postulated that associative memory is formed by at least two sets of external stimuli, CS and US, that are transmitted to the memory centers by distinctive conversing pathways. However, whether associative memory can be induced by the activation of only the olfactory CS and a biogenic amine-mediated US pathways remains to be elucidated. In this study, we substituted the reward signals with dTrpA1-mediated thermogenetic activation of octopaminergic neurons and the odor signals by ChR2-mediated optical activation of a specific class of olfactory neurons. We show that targeted activation of the olfactory receptor and the octopaminergic neurons is indeed sufficient for the formation of associative olfactory memory in the larval brain. We also show that targeted stimulation of only a single type of olfactory receptor neurons is sufficient to induce olfactory memory that is indistinguishable from natural memory induced by the activation of multiple olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:24762789

  4. Processes of DNA methylation are involved in the mechanisms of amnesia induction and conditioned food aversion memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, S V; Filatova, T S; Nikitin, P V; Bredov, D V; Kozyrev, S A; Nikitin, V P

    2014-02-01

    We studied the role of DNA methylation in the mechanisms of amnesia in edible snails, which was induced by impairment of conditioned food aversion memory reconsolidation with NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist. The effects of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors were shown to depend on the stage of amnesia. At the early stage of amnesia (day 3 after induction), injections of methyltransferase inhibitors in combination with conditioned food stimulus (reminder) were followed by memory recovery. Application of inhibitors in the absence of the reminder was ineffective. Methyltransferase inhibitors were ineffective at the late stage of amnesia (day 10). Our results suggest that the presentation of reminding conditioned stimuli is followed by reactivation of amnesia. Methylation or demethylation of DNA in nerve cells serves as one of the key mechanisms for amnesia.

  5. ECM components guide IL-10 producing regulatory T-cell (TR1) induction from effector memory T-cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Bollyky, Paul L.; Wu, Rebecca P.; Falk, Ben A.; Lord, James D.; Long, S. Alice; Preisinger, Anton; Teng, Brandon; Holt, Gregory E.; Standifer, Nathan E.; Braun, Kathleen R.; Xie, Cindy Fang; Samuels, Peter L.; Vernon, Robert B.; Gebe, John A.; Wight, Thomas N.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a role for ECM as a biosensor for inflammatory microenvironments that plays a critical role in peripheral immune tolerance. We show that hyaluronan (HA) promotes induction of Foxp3- IL-10–producing regulatory T cells (TR1) from conventional T-cell precursors in both murine and human systems. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ECM component inducing regulatory T cells. Intact HA, characteristic of healing tissues, promotes induction of TR1 capable of abrogating disease in an IL-10–dependent mouse colitis model whereas fragmentary HA, typical of inflamed tissues, does not, indicating a decisive role for tissue integrity in this system. The TR1 precursor cells in this system are CD4+CD62L−FoxP3−, suggesting that effector memory cells assume a regulatory phenotype when they encounter their cognate antigen in the context of intact HA. Matrix integrity cues might thereby play a central role in maintaining peripheral tolerance. This TR1 induction is mediated by CD44 cross-linking and signaling through p38 and ERK1/2. This induction is suppressed, also in a CD44-dependent manner, by osteopontin, a component of chronically inflamed ECM, indicating that CD44 signaling serves as a nexus for fate decisions regarding TR1 induction. Finally, we demonstrate that TR1 induction signals can be recapitulated using synthetic matrices. These results reveal important roles for the matrix microenvironment in immune regulation and suggest unique strategies for immunomodulation. PMID:21518860

  6. Induction of an Olfactory Memory by the Activation of a Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaba, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Higuchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1994-07-01

    Female mice form an olfactory memory of male pheromones at mating; exposure to the pheromones of a strange male after that mating will block pregnancy. The formation of this memory is mediated by the accessory olfactory system, in which an increase in norepinephrine after mating reduces inhibitory transmission of γ-aminobutyric acid from the granule cells to the mitral cells. This study shows that the activation of mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor that suppresses the γ-aminobutyric acid inhibition of the mitral cells, permits the formation of a specific olfactory memory without the occurrence of mating by infusion of mGluR2 agonists into the female's accessory olfactory bulb. This memory faithfully reflects the memory formed at mating.

  7. Induction of Postsurgical Tumor Immunity and T-Cell Memory by a Poorly Immunogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisheng; Côté, Anik L.; de Vries, Victor C.; Usherwood, Edward J.; Turk, Mary Jo

    2008-01-01

    The generation of protective CD8 T-cell memory against tumor-expressed self-antigens is an important but elusive goal of cancer immunotherapy. The possibility that a progressive, poorly immunogenic tumor can induce T-cell memory against self-antigens has not previously been studied. Herein, we report that growth of the poorly immunogenic B16 melanoma in the absence of regulatory T cells (Treg) generates CD8 T-cell responses that develop into functional memory after the tumor has been surgically excised. Tumor-primed memory T cells recognized melanocyte differentiation antigens TRP-2/DCT and gp100 and persisted for as long as 5 months following surgical tumor excision. Phenotypic analysis showed that these cells develop into both central and effector memory T-cell subsets, which produce IFN-γ and interleukin-2 on reencounter with antigen. Most importantly, tumor-primed memory T cells mediated the rejection of intradermal and systemically disseminated challenge tumors given 30 to 60 days following surgery. Tumor-excised mice also developed autoimmune vitiligo, showing that Treg cells prevent tissue-specific autoimmunity in tumor-bearing hosts. This study establishes that Treg depletion in tumor-bearing hosts drives the natural development of protective T-cell memory. Generating such responses may aid in the clinical management of tumor recurrence and metastasis following surgery. PMID:17616708

  8. Chronic stress-induced memory deficits are reversed by regular exercise via AMPK-mediated BDNF induction.

    PubMed

    Kim, D-M; Leem, Y-H

    2016-06-02

    Chronic stress has a detrimental effect on neurological insults, psychiatric deficits, and cognitive impairment. In the current study, chronic stress was shown to impair learning and memory functions, in addition to reducing in hippocampal Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. Similar reductions were also observed for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synaptophysin, and post-synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) levels, all of which was counter-regulated by a regime of regular and prolonged exercise. A 21-day restraint stress regimen (6 h/day) produced learning and memory deficits, including reduced alternation in the Y-maze and decreased memory retention in the water maze test. These effects were reversed post-administration by a 3-week regime of treadmill running (19 m/min, 1 h/day, 6 days/week). In hippocampal primary culture, phosphorylated-AMPK (phospho-AMPK) and BDNF levels were enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by 5-amimoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) treatment, and AICAR-treated increase was blocked by Compound C. A 7-day period of AICAR intraperitoneal injections enhanced alternation in the Y-maze test and reduced escape latency in water maze test, along with enhanced phospho-AMPK and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. The intraperitoneal injection of Compound C every 4 days during exercise intervention diminished exercise-induced enhancement of memory improvement during the water maze test in chronically stressed mice. Also, chronic stress reduced hippocampal neurogenesis (lower Ki-67- and doublecortin-positive cells) and mRNA levels of BDNF, synaptophysin, and PSD-95. Our results suggest that regular and prolonged exercise can alleviate chronic stress-induced hippocampal-dependent memory deficits. Hippocampal AMPK-engaged BDNF induction is at least in part required for exercise-induced protection against chronic stress.

  9. Monoclonal antibody against IFN-gamma inhibits Moloney murine sarcoma virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zanovello, P.; Vallerani, E.; Biasi, G.; Landolfo, S.; Collavo, D.

    1988-02-15

    The role of autochthonous IFN- production was evaluated in immune reactions to Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV)-induced tumors which are characterized by spontaneous regression mainly caused by virus-specific CTL activity. A functional IFN- depletion, induced by repeated administration of mAb anti-IFN- at the site of virus inoculation, prevented tumor regression in M-MSV-injected mice. Moreover, this antibody inhibited in vitro both proliferation and differentiation of M-MSV-specific T lymphocytes obtained in bulk cultures, but not growth and lytic activity of the already differentiated virus-specific CTL clone CHM-14 stimulated with rIL-2 and relevant tumor Ag. In addition, in mice receiving mAb treatment the frequency of M-MSV-specific CTL precursors, evaluated by means of limiting dilution analysis, was strongly reduced in comparison with that of control mice injected only with virus. Because CTL secrete IFN- following antigenic stimulation, the possibility that non-T effector cells recruited by this lymphokine might mediate tumor regression was also considered. Adoptive immunotherapy experiments, performed in T cell-deficient (Tx + BM) and in sublethally irradiated mice, demonstrated that transfer of CHM-14 CTL clone, which secretes IFN-, was able to counteract M-MSV tumor growth despite the local mAb anti-IFN- treatment which may have prevented host cell recruitment. Moreover, repeated local rIFN- inoculations in Tx + BM mice did not counteract M-MSV tumor progression, thus confirming that other IFN- properties such as non-T cell recruitment, antiviral or anti-proliferative IFN- activities have little or no relevance when M-MSV-specific CTL are lacking. On the whole, these results indicate that in M-MSV-injected mice, tumor enhancement after mAb anti-IFN- treatment is principally caused by impaired differentiation of virus-specific CTL precursors.

  10. Regulation of interleukin 2 receptor expression on a human cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone, synergism between alloantigenic stimulation and interluekin 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, Y.; Le Mauff, B.; Godard, A.; Olive, D.; Moreau, J.F.; Soulillou, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    A human T cell clone (termed 40.2.6) established from a rejected human kidney allograft has been studied for its ability to express membrane IL 2 receptors in response to antigen (irradiated cells from the graft's donor) and recombinant IL 2 (rec-IL 2). On antigenic stimulation, the 40.2.6 clone produced low levels of IL 2 and incorporated (/sup 3/H) thymidine. This incorporation was strongly enhanced on addition of rec-IL 2 and was inhibited by the 33B31 antibody, an anti-human IL 2 receptor monoclonal antibody (Mab). The /sup 125/I-labeled 33B31 Mab has been used to quantify the density of IL 2 receptors on 40.2.6 cells. Cells not re-exposed to antigen or rec-IL 2 had a level of 33B31-binding sites which declined rapidly. This level remained much more stable when rec-IL 2 (1 U/ml) was present in the medium (80% at day 2). Antigen induced a three- to eight-fold increase in the level of 33B31-binding sites which peaked at 24 hr and then declined. When a similar antigenic stimulation was performed in the presence of rec-IL 2 (1 U/ml), the level of 33B31-binding sites peaked at a higher value (eight- to 20-fold increase at day 2), and its subsequent decline was slower. Finally, high affinity IL 2 receptors, as measured by the binding of /sup 35/S-labeled rec-Il 2, were found to be similarly up-regulated by antigen and rec-IL 2. Together, the authors results obtained on a monoclonal human T cell population with highly purified rec-IL 2 demonstrate that rec-IL 2 and antigen act in synergy to induce the expression of both high and low affinity membrane IL 2 receptors.

  11. CMRF-56(+) blood dendritic cells loaded with mRNA induce effective antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Phillip D; Papadimitrious, Michael S; Hsu, Jennifer L; Van Kooten Losio, Nicolas; Verma, Nirupama D; Lo, Tsun Ho; Silveira, Pablo A; Bryant, Christian E; Turtle, Cameron J; Prue, Rebecca L; Vukovic, Peter; Munster, David J; Nagasaki, Tomoko; Barnard, Ross T; Mahler, Stephen M; Anguille, Sébastien A; Berneman, Zwi; Horvath, Lisa G; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Joshua, Douglas E; Clark, Georgina J; Hart, Derek N J

    2016-06-01

    There are numerous transcriptional, proteomic and functional differences between monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DC) and primary blood dendritic cells (BDC). The CMRF-56 monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizes a cell surface marker, which is upregulated on BDC following overnight culture. Given its unique ability to select a heterogeneous population of BDC, we engineered a human chimeric (h)CMRF-56 IgG4 mAb to isolate primary BDC for potential therapeutic vaccination. The ability to select multiple primary BDC subsets from patients and load them with in vitro transcribed (IVT) mRNA encoding tumor antigen might circumvent the issues limiting the efficacy of Mo-DC. After optimizing and validating the purification of hCMRF-56(+) BDC, we showed that transfection of hCMRF-56(+) BDC with mRNA resulted in efficient mRNA translation and antigen presentation by myeloid BDC subsets, while preserving superior DC functions compared to Mo-DC. Immune selected and transfected hCMRF-56(+) BDC migrated very efficiently in vitro and as effectively as cytokine matured Mo-DC in vivo. Compared to Mo-DC, hCMRF-56(+) BDC transfected with influenza matrix protein M1 displayed superior MHC peptide presentation and generated potent antigen specific CD8(+) T-cell recall responses, while Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) transfected CMRF-56(+) BDC generated effective primary autologous cytotoxic T-cell responses. The ability of the combined DC subsets within hCMRF-56(+) BDC to present mRNA delivered tumor antigens merits phase I evaluation as a reproducible generic platform for the next generation of active DC immune therapies.

  12. Divergent effects of norepinephrine, dopamine and substance P on the activation, differentiation and effector functions of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Neurotransmitters are important regulators of the immune system, with very distinct and varying effects on different leukocyte subsets. So far little is known about the impact of signals mediated by neurotransmitters on the function of CD8+ T lymphocytes. Therefore, we investigated the influence of norepinephrine, dopamine and substance P on the key tasks of CD8+ T lymphocytes: activation, migration, extravasation and cytotoxicity. Results The activation of naïve CD8+ T lymphocytes by CD3/CD28 cross-linking was inhibited by norepinephrine and dopamine, which was caused by a downregulation of interleukin (IL)-2 expression via Erk1/2 and NF-κB inhibition. Furthermore, all of the investigated neurotransmitters increased the spontaneous migratory activity of naïve CD8+ T lymphocytes with dopamine being the strongest inducer. In contrast, activated CD8+ T lymphocytes showed a reduced migratory activity in the presence of norepinephrine and substance P. With regard to extravasation we found norepinephrine to induce adhesion of activated CD8+ T cells: norepinephrine increased the interleukin-8 release from endothelium, which in turn had effect on the activated CXCR1+ CD8+ T cells. At last, release of cytotoxic granules from activated cells in response to CD3 cross-linking was not influenced by any of the investigated neurotransmitters, as we have analyzed by measuring the β-hexosamidase release. Conclusion Neurotransmitters are specific modulators of CD8+ T lymphocytes not by inducing any new functions, but by fine-tuning their key tasks. The effect can be either stimulatory or suppressive depending on the activation status of the cells. PMID:19968887

  13. Neurotransmitter Supression of the In Vitro Generation of a Cytotoxic T- Lymphocyte Response against the Syngeneic MOPC-315 Plasmacytoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity was generated by coculture of normal spleen lymphocytes from BALB/c mice with syngeneic MOPC-315 plasmacytoma cells and was assayed by...studies were purchased from Sigma, St. Louis, MO. Tumor Cells. MOPC-315 plasmacytomas were maintained in vivo as subcutaneous tumors as previously...syngeneic MOPC-315 plasmacytoma . These molecules were inhibitory at a concentration of 100 pM, a nontoxic concentration not unexpected for localized

  14. Interleukin-21 activates cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells to generate antitumor response in mouse renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Masafumi; Hara, Isao; Furukawa, Junya; Oniki, Shuntaro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the antitumor effects of IL-21 gene transfer into mouse RenCa renal cell carcinoma cells, so that cells could spontaneously secrete IL-21. We also investigated the mechanisms underlying this antitumor effect. The IL-21 gene was introduced into RenCa cells by the liposome mediated method using Lipofectamine. The in vivo antitumor effect of IL-21 secreting RenCa cells was assessed by subcutaneous injection into syngeneic BALB/c mice. Mechanisms underlying the antitumor effects were investigated in syngeneic mice in which CD8 T, CD4 T or natural killer cells had been depleted using the corresponding antibody. The cytotoxic activity of splenocytes in mice injected with IL-21 secreting RenCa cells was determined using the CytoTox 96 nonradioactive cytotoxicity assay. Immunohistochemical examinations were performed to investigate infiltrating cells around tumor sites in vivo. Tumor vaccine study was also performed. IL-21 secreting RenCa cells were almost all rejected following subcutaneous injection into syngeneic mice. The antitumor effect of IL-21 secreting RenCa cells remained in mice in which CD4 T cells had been depleted but it was totally abrogated in mice depleted of CD8 T cells or natural killer cells. Cytotoxic activities of splenocytes were higher in IL-21 secreting RenCa cell rejected mice than in parental RenCa mice. Immunohistochemical study also supported the involvement of CD8 T cells and natural killer cells in the antitumor effect of IL-21 secreting RenCa cells. Moreover, mitomycin C treated IL-21 secreting RenCa cells inhibited the growth of parental RenCa at distant site. IL-21 secreting RenCa could be rejected in syngeneic mice by the activation of CD8 T cells and natural killer cells. Moreover, mitomycin C treated IL-21 secreting RenCa cells could work as a tumor vaccine for parental RenCa.

  15. The prognostic value of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 in cancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pingping; Liu, Qiqi; Deng, Guodong; Zhang, Jingxin; Liang, Ning; Xie, Jian; Zhang, Jiandong

    2017-01-01

    The outcomes of studies analyzing the prognostic role of CTLA-4 in cancers are controversial. Therefore, the aim of our meta-analysis was to clarify the correlation between CTLA-4 expression and OS in different cancer cases. Relevant literature was searched using PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. The clinicopathological features, hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were collected from these studies and were analyzed using Stata version 12.0 software. The pooled HR values showed no significant correlation between CTLA-4 expression levels and OS in relation to tumors (HR: 1.24, 95% CI: 0.98–1.56, I2 = 71.7%, P = 0.000). Further subgroup analyses were conducted and categorized by experimental methods, CTLA-4 sources and cancer types. The survey showed a significant correlation (HR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.14–1.89) between high expression of CTLA-4 and OS in the SNP subgroup, and subgroups analyzing by PCR (HR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.20–1.86) and flow cytometry (HR: 2.76, 95% CI: 1.49–5.14). In addition, our analysis observed significant differences between patients and controls in inCTLA-4+CD4+ lymphocytes, surCTLA-4+CD4+ lymphocytes, inCTLA-4+CD8+ lymphocytes, and surCTLA-4+CD8+ lymphocytes. Knowledge of the effects of CTLA-4 could potentially be used to effectively guide appropriate prognosis and therapeutic strategies in cancer patients. PMID:28211499

  16. Fetal liver T cell receptor gamma/delta+ T cells as cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for maternal alloantigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have established fetal liver-derived T cell receptor (TCR) gamma/delta+, CD3+ T cell lines that are cytotoxic for maternal T cells. Fetal liver-derived lymphoid progenitors yielded predominantly TCR-gamma/delta+ cell clusters when cultured on fetal bone marrow- derived stromal cells in the presence of a cytokine cocktail under magnetic force. These tightly adherent clusters were cloned by limiting dilution and the resulting cell lines analyzed for phenotype and function. Six of eight TCR-gamma/delta lines from 8-9.5-wk gestation fetuses were V delta 2+ as compared with zero of eight lines from later stages of gestation (10 and 15 wk), where all the lines were V delta 1+. In cytotoxicity assays, these TCR-gamma/delta+, CD3+, CD4-, and CD8+ or CD8- long-term cultured lymphoid cells (LLC) were killer cells active against the class I antigens on maternal T cells. Of the cell lines, the CD8+ TCR-gamma/delta+ LLC had the highest levels of killer activity. Thus fetal liver TCR-gamma/delta+ T cells may play a crucial role in protection against invading maternal T cells generated in the feto-maternal interaction. PMID:1535364

  17. Genetic vaccination against the melanocyte lineage-specific antigen gp100 induces cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated tumor protection.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, M W; de Boer, A J; Figdor, C G; Adema, G J

    1998-06-15

    Melanocyte lineage-specific antigens, such as gp100, have been shown to induce both cellular and humoral immune responses against melanoma. Therefore, these antigens are potential targets for specific antimelanoma immunotherapy. A novel approach to induce both cellular and humoral immunity is genetic vaccination, the injection of antigen-encoding naked plasmid DNA. In a mouse model, we investigated whether genetic vaccination against the human gp100 antigen results in specific antitumor immunity. The results demonstrate that vaccinated mice were protected against a lethal challenge with syngeneic B16 melanoma-expressing human gp100, but not control-transfected B16. Both cytotoxic T cells and IgG specific for human gp100 could be detected in human gp100-vaccinated mice. However, only adoptive transfer of spleen-derived lymphocytes, not of the serum, isolated from protected mice was able to transfer antitumor immunity to nonvaccinated recipients, indicating that CTLs are the predominant effector cells. CTI, lines generated from human gp100-vaccinated mice specifically recognized human gp100. Interestingly, one of the CTL lines cross-reacted between human and mouse gp100, indicating the recognition of a conserved epitope. However, these CTLs did not appear to be involved in the observed tumor protection. Collectively, our results indicate that genetic vaccination can result in a potent antitumor response in vivo and constitutes a potential immunotherapeutic strategy to fight cancer.

  18. A repertoire-independent and cell-intrinsic defect in murine GVHD induction by effector memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Kathryn W.; Anderson, Britt E.; Zhang, Cuiling; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Demetris, Anthony J.; Farber, Donna L.; Caton, Andrew J.; Shlomchik, Warren D.

    2011-01-01

    Effector memory T cells (TEM) do not cause graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), though why this is has not been elucidated. To compare the fates of alloreactive naive (TN) or memory (TM) T cells, we developed a model of GVHD in which donor T cells express a transgene-encoded TCR specific for an antigenic peptide that is ubiquitously expressed in the recipient. Small numbers of naive TCR transgenic (Tg) T cells induced a robust syndrome of GVHD in transplanted recipients. We then used an established method to convert TCR Tg cells to TM and tested these for GVHD induction. This allowed us to control for the potentially different frequencies of alloreactive T cells among TN and TM, and to track fates of alloreactive T cells after transplantation. TEM caused minimal, transient GVHD whereas central memory T cells (TCM) caused potent GVHD. Surprisingly, TEM were not inert: they, engrafted, homed to target tissues, and proliferated extensively, but they produced less IFN-γ and their expansion in target tissues was limited at later time points, and local proliferation was reduced. Thus, cell-intrinsic properties independent of repertoire explain the impairment of TEM, which can initiate but cannot sustain expansion and tissue damage. PMID:21768295

  19. Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  20. Location rather than CD62L phenotype is critical in the early establishment of influenza-specific CD8+ T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Kedzierska, Katherine; Stambas, John; Jenkins, Misty R.; Keating, Rachael; Turner, Stephen J.; Doherty, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid recall of influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cell effector function is protective, although our understanding of T cell memory remains incomplete. Recent debate has focused particularly on the CD62L lymph node homing receptor. The present analysis shows that although functional memory can be established from both CD62Lhi and CD62Llo CD8+ T cell subsets soon after initial encounter between naïve precursors and antigen, the optimal precursors are CD8+CD44hiCD25lo immune lymphocytes isolated from draining lymph nodes on day 3.5 after influenza virus infection. Analysis of primed T cells at different times after challenge indicates that the capacity to transfer memory is diminished at the peak of the primary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response, challenging speculations that the transition to memory first requires full differentiation to effector status. It seems that location rather than CD62Lhi/lo phenotype may be the more profitable focus for further dissection of the early establishment of T cell memory. PMID:17522251

  1. Induction of immunogenic cell death by radiation-upregulated karyopherin alpha 2 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung-Hee; Jung, Seung-Youn; Kang, Seong-Mook; Kim, Mi-Hyoung; Ahn, Jiyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lim, Dae-Seog; Nam, Seon Young; Song, Jie-Young

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests the potential for radiation therapy to generate antitumor immune responses against tumor cells by inducing immunogenic cell death and phenotypic changes. We recently found that ionizing radiation upregulated karyopherin α2 (KPNA2) in HT-29 colorectal tumor cells using quantitative proteomic analysis. To determine whether this increased KPNA2 could function as a damage-associated molecular pattern to induce antitumor immune responses, mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were treated with KPNA2. KPNA2 enhanced the surface expression of CD40, CD54, CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II on BMDCs. DCs treated with KPNA2 exhibited increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, and TNF-α. Co-culture of CD4(+) T cells and KPNA2-treated DCs resulted in induction of Th1/17 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17) and reduction of TGF-β production. Moreover, KPNA2-treated DCs were capable of increasing granzyme B and perforin expression in cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These results demonstrated that radiation-induced dying colorectal cancer cells released considerable amounts of KPNA2 that induce the maturation and activation of DCs for synergistic antitumor effect of radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Aging-associated B7-DC+ B cells enhance anti-tumor immunity via Th1 and Th17 induction.

    PubMed

    Tomihara, Kei; Shin, Takako; Hurez, Vincent J; Yagita, Hideo; Pardoll, Drew M; Zhang, Bin; Curiel, Tyler J; Shin, Tahiro

    2012-02-01

    Because most patients with cancer are aged and because immunological functions are altered during aging, it is important to account for aging-associated immunological alterations in the design of new cancer immunotherapies. We thus compared immune populations in young and aged mice and found that B7-DC(+) (PD-L2/CD273) B cells, a minor population in young mice, were significantly increased in aged mice. Induction of both Th1 and Th17 cells was significantly augmented by B7-DC(+) B cells from aged mice, and this effect was blocked with anti-B7-DC antibodies in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, retardation of tumor growth in aged mice was largely B7-DC dependent. Tumor growth in young mice was significantly inhibited by immunization with B7-DC(+) B cells from aged mice owing to increased induction of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These data indicate that B7-DC(+) B cells could play an important role in aging-associated cancer immunopathology as well as in other aging-associated diseases and further suggest that B7-DC(+) B cells have potential for future cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Role of germinal centers for the induction of broadly-reactive memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2017-03-27

    Virus-specific memory B cells (Bmem) play a crucial role in protecting against variant viruses. The ability to recognize these variant viruses, defined as antibody breadth, is achieved in Bmem populations by two very different pathways, germline-encoded cross-reactivity and affinity-driven, somatic evolution in germinal centers (GCs) for conserved viral epitopes. The latter class of broadly-reactive Bmem cells are not cross-reactive per se, but bind epitopes crucial for viral fitness. Although these conserved epitopes are often weakly immunogenic, the GC reaction is surprisingly permissive for the continued survival/proliferation of B cells that bind with low affinity or react to cryptic epitopes, increasing their chance of memory recruitment. In this review, we discuss the adaptive strategies of B-cell memory to viral antigenic variations.

  4. Induction of Innate Immune Memory by Engineered Nanoparticles: A Hypothesis That May Become True.

    PubMed

    Italiani, Paola; Boraschi, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Innate immune memory is the capacity of cells of the innate immune system, such as monocytes and macrophages, to react differently to an inflammatory or infectious challenge if previously exposed to the same or to another agent. Innate immune memory is a protective mechanism, based on epigenetic reprogramming, that ensures effective protection while limiting side effects of tissue damage, by controlling innate/inflammatory responses to repeated stimulations. Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are novel challenges for our innate immune system, and their ability to induce inflammatory activation, thereby posing health risks, is currently being investigated with controversial results. Besides their putative direct inflammation-inducing effects, we hypothesize that engineered NPs may induce innate memory based on their capacity to induce epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Preliminary results using non-toxic non-inflammatory gold NPs show that in fact NPs can induce memory by modulating in either positive or negative fashion the inflammatory activation of human monocytes to a subsequent bacterial challenge. The possibility of shaping innate/inflammatory reactivity with NPs could open the way to future novel approaches of preventive and therapeutic immunomodulation.

  5. Memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus via induction of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Oh, Myung Sook

    2013-07-14

    Fruits rich in phytochemicals have been shown to improve memory by protecting or enhancing neuronal functions mediated by neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), in the hippocampus. Mori Fructus (Morus alba L., Moraceae), also called mulberry, is used as a food, dietary supplement and an anti-ageing agent in traditional Oriental medicine. It is also known to contain abundant flavonoid compounds and to exhibit various pharmacological effects. The present study was performed to evaluate the memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus extract (ME) in mice, with a focus on NGF regulation. ME (20, 100 and 500 mg/kg per d for 7 d, per os) dose-dependently promoted NGF release in the mouse hippocampus, leading to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. ME significantly increased pre- and post-synapse formation, acetylcholine synthesisation, neuronal cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth and neuronal cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, ME significantly increased latency time in the passive avoidance task (P< 0·001) and recognition time of novel objects in the object recognition test (P< 0·05), indicating improvements in learning and memory. Taken together, these data suggest that ME exhibits a memory-enhancing effect via up-regulation of NGF.

  6. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  7. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  8. The interface between transcriptional and epigenetic control of effector and memory CD8+ T-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Simon M.; Kaech, Susan M.; Staron, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Immunity to many intracellular pathogens requires the proliferation, differentiation, and function of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). While the majority of effector CTLs die upon clearance of the pathogen, a small proportion of them survive to become long-lived memory CTLs. Memory CTLs can provide protective immunity against re-exposure to the same pathogen and are the principle motivation behind T-cell- based vaccine design. While a large body of cellular immunologic research has proven invaluable to define effector and memory CTLs by their different phenotypes and functions, an emerging focus in the field has been to understand how environmental cues regulate CTL differentiation on a genomic level. Genome-wide studies to profile transcriptional and epigenetic changes during infection have revealed that dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns and histone modifications accompany transcriptional signatures that define and regulate CTL differentiation states. In this review, we emphasize the importance of epigenetic regulation of CD8+ T-cell differentiation and the likely role that transcription factors play in this process. PMID:25123283

  9. Pharmacologically regulated induction of silent mutations (PRISM): combined pharmacological and genetic approaches for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Frankland, Paul W; Ohno, Masuo; Takahashi, Eiki; Chen, Adele R; Costa, Rui M; Kushner, Steven A; Silva, Alcino J

    2003-04-01

    Mouse transgenic and knock-out approaches have made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the molecular and cellular bases of learning and memory. These approaches have successfully identified a large number of molecules with either a central or modulatory role in learning and memory. However, there are limitations associated with first-generation mutant mice, which include, for example, the lack of temporal control over the mutation. Recent technical developments have started to address some of these shortcomings. Here, the authors review a newly developed inducible approach that takes advantage of synergistic interactions between subthreshold genetic and pharmacological manipulations. This approach is easily set up and can be used to study the functional interactions between molecules in signaling pathways.

  10. Immune activation and induction of memory: lessons learned from controlled human malaria infection with Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    Controlled human malaria infections (CHMIs) are a powerful tool to assess the efficacy of drugs and/or vaccine candidates, but also to study anti-malarial immune responses at well-defined time points after infection. In this review, we discuss the insights that CHMI trials have provided into early immune activation and regulation during acute infection, and the capacity to induce and maintain immunological memory. Importantly, these studies show that a single infection is sufficient to induce long-lasting parasite-specific T- and B-cell memory responses, and suggest that blood-stage induced regulatory responses can limit inflammation both in ongoing and potentially future infections. As future perspective of investigation in CHMIs, we discuss the role of innate cell subsets, the interplay between innate and adaptive immune activation and the potential modulation of these responses after natural pre-exposure.

  11. Induction of a physiological memory in the cerebral cortex by stimulation of the nucleus basalis.

    PubMed

    Bakin, J S; Weinberger, N M

    1996-10-01

    Auditory cortical receptive field plasticity produced during behavioral learning may be considered to constitute "physiological memory" because it has major characteristics of behavioral memory: associativity, specificity, rapid acquisition, and long-term retention. To investigate basal forebrain mechanisms in receptive field plasticity, we paired a tone with stimulation of the nucleus basalis, the main subcortical source of cortical acetylcholine, in the adult guinea pig. Nucleus basalis stimulation produced electroencephalogram desynchronization that was blocked by systemic and cortical atropine. Paired tone/nucleus basalis stimulation, but not unpaired stimulation, induced receptive field plasticity similar to that produced by behavioral learning. Thus paired activation of the nucleus basalis is sufficient to induce receptive field plasticity, possibly via cholinergic actions in the cortex.

  12. Roles of testosterone and amygdaloid LTP induction in determining sex differences in fear memory magnitude.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Shen; Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Chuang, Jia-Ying; Cherng, Chianfang G; Gean, Po-Wu; Yu, Lung

    2014-08-01

    Women are thought to form fear memory more robust than men do and testosterone is suspected to play a role in determining such a sex difference. Mouse cued fear freezing was used to study the sex-related susceptibility and the role of testosterone in fear memory in humans. A 75-dB tone was found to provoke weak freezing, while 0.15-mA and 0.20-mA footshock caused strong freezing responses. No sex differences were noticed in the tone- or footshock-induced (naïve fear) freezing. Following the conditionings, female mice exhibited greater tone (cued fear)-induced freezing than did male mice. Nonetheless, female mice demonstrated indistinctive cued fear freezing across the estrous phases and ovariectomy did not affect such freezing in female mice. Orchidectomy enhanced the cued fear freezing in male mice. Systemic testosterone administrations and an intra-lateral nucleus of amygdala (LA) testosterone infusion diminished the cued fear freezing in orchidectomized male mice, while pretreatment with flutamide (Flu) eradicated these effects. Long-term potentiation (LTP) magnitude in LA has been known to correlate with the strength of the cued fear conditioning. We found that LA LTP magnitude was indeed greater in female than male mice. Orchidectomy enhanced LTP magnitude in males' LA, while ovariectomy decreased LTP magnitude in females' LA. Testosterone decreased LTP magnitude in orchidectomized males' LA and estradiol enhanced LTP magnitude in ovariectomized females' LA. Finally, male mice had lower LA GluR1 expression than female mice and orchidectomy enhanced the GluR1 expression in male mice. These findings, taken together, suggest that testosterone plays a critical role in rendering the sex differences in the cued fear freezing and LA LTP. Testosterone is negatively associated with LA LTP and the cued fear memory in male mice. However, ovarian hormones and LA LTP are loosely associated with the cued fear memory in female mice.

  13. Improving potato drought tolerance through the induction of long-term water stress memory.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, D A; Rolando, J L; Yactayo, W; Monneveux, P; Mares, V; Quiroz, R

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of drought tolerance in potato is limited and very little is known about stress memory in this crop. In the present study, long-term stress memory was tested on tuber yield and drought tolerance related traits in three potato varieties (Unica, Désirée and Sarnav) with contrasted yields under water restriction. Seed tubers produced by plants grown under non-restricted (non-primed tubers) and restricted (primed tubers) water conditions were sown and exposed to similar watering treatments. Tuber yield and leaf greenness of plants from primed and non-primed seeds as well as tuber carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) and antioxidant activity (AA) responses to watering treatments were compared. Higher tuber yield, both under non-restricted and restricted water regimes, was produced by primed Sarnav plants. The decrease of tuber yield and Δ(13)C with water restriction was lower in primed Unica plants. Long-term stress memory consequently appears to be highly genotype-dependent in potato. Its expression in plants originated from primed tubers and facing water restriction seems to be positively associated to the degree of inherent capability of the cultivar to yield under water restriction. However, other effects of priming appear to be genotype-independent as priming enhanced the tuber AA in response to water restriction in the three varieties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impairment of long-term potentiation induction is essential for the disruption of spatial memory after microwave exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Peng, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Wang, Lifeng; Yong, Zheng; Zuo, Hongyan; Zhao, Li; Dong, Ji; Xu, Xinping; Su, Zhentao

    2013-12-01

    To assess the impact of microwave exposure on learning and memory and to explore the underlying mechanisms. 100 Wistar rats were exposed to a 2.856 GHz pulsed microwave field at average power densities of 0 mW/cm(2), 5 mW/cm(2), 10 mW/cm(2) and 50 mW/cm(2) for 6 min. The spatial memory was assessed by the Morris Water Maze (MWM) task. An in vivo study was conducted soon after microwave exposure to evaluate the changes of population spike (PS) amplitudes of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the medial perforant path (MPP)-dentate gyrus (DG) pathway. The structure of the hippocampus was observed by the light microscopy and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at 7 d after microwave exposure. Our results showed that the rats exposed in 10 mW/cm(2) and 50 mW/cm(2) microwave displayed significant deficits in spatial learning and memory at 6 h, 1 d and 3 d after exposure. Decreased PS amplitudes were also found after 10 mW/cm(2) and 50 mW/cm(2) microwave exposure. In addition, varying degrees of degeneration of hippocampal neurons, decreased synaptic vesicles and blurred synaptic clefts were observed in the rats exposed in 10 mW/cm(2) and 50 mW/cm(2) microwave. Compared with the sham group, the rats exposed in 5 mW/cm(2) microwave showed no difference in the above experiments. This study suggested that impairment of LTP induction and the damages of hippocampal structure, especially changes of synapses, might contribute to cognitive impairment after microwave exposure.

  15. Induction of specific antitumor immunity in the mouse with the electrofusion product of tumor cells and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Siders, William M; Vergilis, Kristin L; Johnson, Carrie; Shields, Jacqueline; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2003-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells capable of inducing primary T-cell responses. Several immunotherapy treatment strategies involve manipulation of DCs, both in vivo and ex vivo, to promote the immunogenic presentation of tumor-associated antigens. In this study, an electrofusion protocol was developed to induce fusion between tumor cells and allogeneic bone marrow-derived DCs. Preimmunization with irradiated electrofusion product was found to provide partial to complete protection from tumor challenge in the murine Renca renal cell carcinoma model and the B16 and M3 melanoma models. Vaccinated survivors developed specific immunological memory and were able to reject a subsequent rechallenge with the same tumor cells but not a syngeneic unrelated tumor line. Antitumor protection in the B16 model was accompanied by the development of a polyclonal cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against defined melanoma-associated antigens. The therapeutic potential of this type of approach was suggested by the ability of a Renca-DC electrofusion product to induce tumor rejection in a substantial percentage of hosts (60%) bearing pre-established tumor cells. These results indicate that treatment with electrofused tumor cells and allogeneic DCs is capable of inducing a potent antitumor response and could conceivably be applied to a wide range of cancer indications for which tumor-associated antigens have not been identified.

  16. Intradermal gene immunization: the possible role of DNA uptake in the induction of cellular immunity to viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Raz, E; Carson, D A; Parker, S E; Parr, T B; Abai, A M; Aichinger, G; Gromkowski, S H; Singh, M; Lew, D; Yankauckas, M A

    1994-01-01

    The skin and mucous membranes are the anatomical sites were most viruses are first encountered by the immune system. Previous experiments have suggested that striated muscle cells are unique among mammalian cell types in their capacity to take up and express free DNA in the absence of a viral vector or physical carrier. However, we have found that mice injected into the superficial skin with free (naked) plasmid DNA encoding the influenza nucleoprotein gene had discrete foci of epidermal and dermal cells, including cells with dendritic morphology, that contained immunoreactive nucleoprotein antigen. A single intradermal administration of 0.3-15 micrograms of free plasmid DNA induced anti-nucleoprotein-specific antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes that persisted for at least 68-70 weeks after vaccination. Intradermal gene administration induced higher antibody titers than did direct gene injection into skeletal muscle and did not cause local inflammation or necrosis. Compared with control animals, the gene-injected mice were resistant to challenge with a heterologous strain of influenza virus. These results indicate that the cells of the skin can take up and express free foreign DNA and induce cellular and humoral immune responses against the encoded protein. We suggest that DNA uptake by the skin-associated lymphoid tissues may play a role in the induction of cytotoxic T cells against viruses and other intracellular pathogens. Images PMID:7937799

  17. Induction of antigen-specific class I-restricted cytotoxic T cells by soluble proteins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, S; Tonks, M; Carbone, F; Ryskamp, T; Morrow, W J; Hanna, N

    1992-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are induced specifically against viral and tumor antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on the surface of infected or transformed cells. Intracellular synthesized antigens are processed and associated with class I antigens within cells before presentation on the cell surface. Because of this special requirement for CTL induction, exogenous soluble antigens do not, in general, induce specific CTL responses. To overcome this problem, various laboratories have resorted to the use of vaccinia virus and other replicating expression vectors for intracellular antigen delivery leading to the stimulation of humoral and cell-mediated immunity to specific proteins. However, for human use it is safer to use purified and defined antigens for inducing immune responses. Using soluble ovalbumin and human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein gp120, we have explored the possibility of using an antigen formulation consisting of squalane and Tween 80 to elicit antigen-specific CTL responses in mice. We have demonstrated that this antigen formulation is a potent inducer of CD8+, class I-restricted, antigen-specific CTLs. The CTL priming induced by soluble antigen in squalane/Tween 80 resembles the reported response to the vaccinia recombinant containing human immunodeficiency virus envelope protein and by splenocytes cytoplasmically loaded with soluble ovalbumin. The ramifications of these findings for vaccine development are discussed. PMID:1518862

  18. Induction of antigen-specific class I-restricted cytotoxic T cells by soluble proteins in vivo.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, S; Tonks, M; Carbone, F; Ryskamp, T; Morrow, W J; Hanna, N

    1992-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are induced specifically against viral and tumor antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on the surface of infected or transformed cells. Intracellular synthesized antigens are processed and associated with class I antigens within cells before presentation on the cell surface. Because of this special requirement for CTL induction, exogenous soluble antigens do not, in general, induce specific CTL responses. To overcome this problem, various laboratories have resorted to the use of vaccinia virus and other replicating expression vectors for intracellular antigen delivery leading to the stimulation of humoral and cell-mediated immunity to specific proteins. However, for human use it is safer to use purified and defined antigens for inducing immune responses. Using soluble ovalbumin and human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein gp120, we have explored the possibility of using an antigen formulation consisting of squalane and Tween 80 to elicit antigen-specific CTL responses in mice. We have demonstrated that this antigen formulation is a potent inducer of CD8+, class I-restricted, antigen-specific CTLs. The CTL priming induced by soluble antigen in squalane/Tween 80 resembles the reported response to the vaccinia recombinant containing human immunodeficiency virus envelope protein and by splenocytes cytoplasmically loaded with soluble ovalbumin. The ramifications of these findings for vaccine development are discussed.

  19. A strategy for efficient cross-presentation of CTL-epitope peptides leading to enhanced induction of in vivo tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akira; Wakita, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Mayumi, Tadanori; Mukai, Yohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2007-01-22

    The activation of antitumor cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) depends on how efficiently the relevant tumor antigen peptides are delivered into the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway in antigen presenting cells (APCs). An elegant approach to promote the peptide-MHC class I association has been described for enhanced peptide transportation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by adding an ER insertion signal sequence (Eriss). Nevertheless, this approach does not appear potent enough to induce in vivo tumor protective immunity. Herein, we present a novel peptide-vaccine strategy based on the combined utilization of Eriss and fusogenic liposomes (FLs) capable of directly introducing encapsulated CTL-epitope peptides into the MHC class I pathway of APCs. APCs pulsed with free peptides, FL-encapsulated peptides, or FL-encapsulated Eriss-conjugated peptides exhibited comparable levels of antigen-presenting activity at early phases after pulsing. Interestingly, whereas in the first two methods the APC ability began to decline 40 to 60 h after pulsing, FL-encapsulated Eriss(+) peptides allowed APCs to retain peptide-presentation activity for at least 140 h. This advantage of FL-encapsulated Eriss(+) peptides correlated with the induction of more potent antitumor immunity compared with soluble Eriss(+) or Eriss(-) peptides or FL-encapsulated Eriss(-) peptides when they were administered in vivo. Thus, Eriss-conjugated CTL-epitope peptides encapsulated in FLs provide a highly efficient tumor-vaccine to enhance the induction of in vivo tumor immunity.

  20. Recombinant poxvirus boosting of DNA-primed rhesus monkeys augments peak but not memory T lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sampa; Barouch, Dan H; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Lord, Carol I; Krivulka, Georgia R; Yu, Faye; Beddall, Margaret H; Gorgone, Darci A; Lifton, Michelle A; Miura, Ayako; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Markham, Phillip D; Parrish, John; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Schmitz, Jörn E; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shiver, John W; Montefiori, David C; Panicali, Dennis; Letvin, Norman L

    2004-07-27

    Although a consensus has emerged that an HIV vaccine should elicit a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, the characteristics of an effective vaccine-induced T lymphocyte response remain unclear. We explored this issue in the simian human immunodeficiency virus/rhesus monkey model in the course of assessing the relative immunogenicity of vaccine regimens that included a cytokine-augmented plasmid DNA prime and a boost with DNA or recombinant pox vectors. Recombinant vaccinia virus, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), and recombinant fowlpox were comparable in their immunogenicity. Moreover, whereas the magnitude of the peak vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses in the recombinant pox virus-boosted monkeys was substantially greater than that seen in the monkeys immunized with plasmid DNA alone, the magnitudes of recombi