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Sample records for d antiquarks

  1. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 {+-} 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 {+-} 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 {+-} 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  2. Hadron production in light and heavy, quark and antiquark jets

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, K.G.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    The authors review four hadronization studies performed by the SLD experiment at SLAC, involving separation of light (Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} u{anti u}, d{anti d}, s{anti s}), c, and b flavors using precision vertexing, and separation of q- and {anti q}-jets using the highly polarized SLC electron beam. They measured the differences between the average charged multiplicities in Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} light, {r_arrow} c{anti c}, and {r_arrow}b{anti b} events, and found that the results were consistent with predictions of perturbative QCD. Next, they measured {pi}/{Kappa}/p/{Kappa}{sup 0}/{Lambda}{sup 0} production in light events for the first time, and compared with production in c- and b-flavor events. They then examined particle production differences in light quark and antiquark hemispheres, and observed more high momentum baryons and K{sup {minus}}`s than antibaryons and K{sup +}`s in quark hemispheres, consistent with the leading particle hypothesis. Lastly, they performed a search for jet handedness in light q- and {anti q}-jets. Assuming Standard Model values of quark polarization in Z{sup 0} decays, they have set an improved upper limit on the analyzing power of the handedness method.

  3. Static strings in Randall-Sundrum scenarios and the quark-antiquark potential

    SciTech Connect

    Boschi-Filho, Henrique; Braga, Nelson R. F.; Ferreira, Cristine N.

    2006-05-15

    We calculate the energy of a static string in an anti-de Sitter (AdS) slice between two D3-branes with orbifold condition. The energy for configurations with end points on a brane grows linearly for large separation between these points. The derivative of the energy has a discontinuity at some critical separation. Choosing a particular position for one of the branes we find configurations with smooth energy. In the limit where the other brane goes to infinity the energy has a Coulombian behavior for short separations and can be identified with the Cornell potential for a quark antiquark pair. This identification leads to effective values for the AdS radius, the string tension and the position of the infrared brane. These results suggest an approximate duality between static strings in an AdS slice and a heavy quark antiquark configuration in a confining gauge theory.

  4. String Models for the Heavy Quark-Antiquark Bound States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Sze-Man

    1988-12-01

    The heavy quark-antiquark bound state is examined in the phenomenological string models. Specifically, the Nambu-Goto model and the Polyakov's smooth string model are studied in the large-D limit, D being the number of transverse space-time dimensions. The static potential V(R) is extracted in both models in the large-D limit. In the former case, this amounts to the usual saddle point calculation. In the latter case, the renormalized, physical string tension is expressed in terms of the bare string tension and the extrinsic curvature coupling. A systematic loop expansion of V(R) is developed and carried out explicitly to one loop order, with the two loops result presented without detail. For large separations R, the potential is linear in R with corrections of order 1/R. The coefficient of the 1/R Luscher term has the universal value -piD/24 to any finite order in the loop expansion. For very small separations R, the potential V(R) is also proportional to 1/R with a coefficient twice that of Luscher's term. The corrections are logarithmically small. Polyakov's smooth string model is extended to the finite temperature situation. The temperature dependence of the string tension is investigated in the large-D limit. The effective string tension is calculated to the second order in the loop expansion. At low temperature, it differs from that of the Nambu-Goto model only by terms that fall exponentially with inverse temperature. Comparison of the potential V(R) in the smooth string model with lattice gauge calculation and hadron spectroscopy data yields a consistent result.

  5. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 ± 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 ± 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 ± 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  6. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 ± 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 ± 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 ± 4.0)%.more » The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.« less

  7. Measuring the anti-quark contribution to the proton spin using parity violating W production in polarized proton proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian

    Since the 1980s the spin puzzle has been at the heart of many experimental measurements. The initial discovery that only ~30% of the spin of the proton comes from quarks and anti-quarks has been refined and cross checked by several other deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and semi inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments. Through measurements of polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) the individual contributions of the u, d, u, d, quarks have been measured. The flavor separation done in SIDIS experiments requires knowledge of fragmentation functions (FFs). However, due to the higher uncertainty of the anti-quark FFs compared to the quark FFs, the quark polarized PDFs (Deltau(x), Delta d(x)) are significantly better constrained than the anti-quark distributions (Deltau( x), Deltad(x). By accessing the anti-quarks directly through W boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions (ud → W+ → e+/mu+ and du→ W- → e-/mu-), the large FF uncertainties are avoided and a cleaner measurement can be done. The parity violating single spin asymmetry of the W decay leptons can be directly related to the polarized PDFs of the anti-quarks. The W+/- → e+/- measurement has been performed with the PHENIX central arm detectors at √s=510 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and is presented in this thesis. Approximately 40 pb-1 of data from the 2011 and 2012 was analyzed and a large parity violating single spin asymmetry for W+/- has been measured. The combined data for 2011 and 2012 provide a single spin asymmetry for both charges: W+: -0.27 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) W -: 0.28 +/- 0.16(stat) +/- 0.02(syst) These results are consistent with the different theoretical predictions at the 1sigma level. The increased statistical precision enabled and required a more careful analysis of the background contamination for the this measurement. A method based on Gaussian Processes for Regression has been employed to determine this background contribution. This

  8. Static quark-antiquark potential in the quark-gluon plasma from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Yannis; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2015-02-27

    We present a state-of-the-art determination of the complex valued static quark-antiquark potential at phenomenologically relevant temperatures around the deconfinement phase transition. Its values are obtained from nonperturbative lattice QCD simulations using spectral functions extracted via a novel Bayesian inference prescription. We find that the real part, both in a gluonic medium, as well as in realistic QCD with light u, d, and s quarks, lies close to the color singlet free energies in Coulomb gauge and shows Debye screening above the (pseudo)critical temperature T_{c}. The imaginary part is estimated in the gluonic medium, where we find that it is of the same order of magnitude as in hard-thermal loop resummed perturbation theory in the deconfined phase.

  9. Magnetic moments of octet baryons and sea antiquark polarizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanislaw

    2005-01-01

    Using generalized Sehgal equations for magnetic moments of baryon octet and taking into account {sigma}{sup 0}-{lambda} mixing and two particle corrections to independent quark contributions we obtain very good fit using experimental values for errors of such moments. We present sum rules for quark magnetic moments ratios and for integrated spin densities ratios. Because of the SU(3) structure of our equations the results for magnetic moments of quarks and their densities depend on two additional parameters. Using information from deep inelastic scattering and baryon {beta}-decays we discuss the dependence of antiquark polarizations on introduced parameters. For some plausible values of these parameters we show that these polarizations are small if we neglect angular momenta of quarks. Our very good fit to magnetic moments of baryon octet can still be improved by using specific model for angular momentum of quarks.

  10. Phase diagram of quark-antiquark and diquark condensates in the 3-dimensional Gross-Neveu model with the 4-component spinor representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kohyama, Hiroaki

    2008-07-01

    We construct the phase diagram of the quark-antiquark and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 2+1 dimensional (3D) two flavor massless Gross-Neveu (GN) model with the 4-component quarks. In contrast to the case of the 2-component quarks, there appears the coexisting phase of the quark-antiquark and diquark condensates. This is the crucial difference between the 2-component and 4-component quark cases in the 3D GN model. The coexisting phase is also seen in the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio model. Then we see that the 3D GN model with the 4-component quarks bears closer resemblance to the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio model.

  11. Magnetic moments of octet baryons, angular momenta of quarks, and sea antiquark polarizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanislaw

    2010-03-01

    One can determine antiquark polarizations in a proton using the information from deep inelastic scattering, {beta} decays of baryons, orbital angular momenta of quarks, as well as their integrated magnetic distributions. The last quantities were determined previously by us performing a fit to magnetic moments of a baryon octet. However, because of the SU(3) symmetry our results depend on two parameters. The quantity {Gamma}{sub V}, measured recently in a COMPASS experiment, gives the relation between these parameters. We can fix the last unknown parameter using the ratio of up and down quark magnetic moments which one can get from the fit to radiative vector meson decays. We calculate antiquark polarizations with the orbital momenta of valence quarks that follow from lattice calculations. The value of the difference of up and down antiquark polarizations obtained in our calculations is consistent with the result obtained in a HERMES experiment.

  12. Static strings in global AdS space and quark-antiquark potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bayona, C. A. Ballon; Ferreira, Cristine N.

    2008-07-15

    We investigate the finite temperature quark antiquark problem in a compact space S{sup n-1}xS{sup 1} by considering static strings in global AdS{sub n+1} space with n{>=}3. For high temperatures we work in the black hole metric where two possible solutions show up : the big black hole and the small black hole. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we calculate the quark antiquark potential (free energy) as a function of the distance. We show that this potential can be intrepeted as confining for the anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and deconfining for the big black hole. We find for the small black hole a confining limit for the potential but this solution is instable following the Hawking-Page criteria. Our results for the free energy reinforce the Witten interpretation of the confinement/deconfinement transition as the dual of the well-known Hawking-Page transition.

  13. Probing Flavor Asymmetry of Anti-quarks in the Proton by Drell-Yan Experiment SeaQuest

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, Shou

    2016-01-01

    A new measurement on the avor asymmetry between d and u in the proton is reported in this thesis. The proton contains a substantial number of antiquarks which arise from dynamical interactions of gluons such as gluon dissociation to a quark-antiquark pair, g ! q + q, and from non-perturbative processes as described by the pion-cloud model, for example. The antiquarks in the proton undertake an important role in determining the dynamic characteristics of the internal structure of the proton, although its distribution in the proton and its origin are not fully understood. Understanding sea quarks in hadron is an important subject for QCD. The SeaQuest experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is a xed target experiment using the 120 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Main Injector. One of the goals of the experiment is to measure the avor asymmetry between d quark and u quark in the proton as a function of the target Bjorken x using the Drell-Yan process in the p-p or p-d reactions. This process takes place in hadron-hadron collisions when a quark in one hadron in the beam and an antiquark in other hadron in the target annihilate into a virtual photon that decays into a lepton pair. The avor asymmetry between d and u quarks was found by deep-inelastic scattering experiment NMC at CERN. The E866/NuSea experiment at Fermilab obtained the avor asymmetry in the proton for 0:015 < x < 0:35 using the 800 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Tevatron. The result indicates the dominance of d; it is 70% larger than u at lower x. The SeaQuest experiment was planned to do a new precise measurement at higher x region. The lower energy beam (120 GeV) increases the Drell-Yan cross section and suppresses the background primarily arising from J/ decays. Therefore, SeaQuest will obtain more statistics in a shorter time than the E866 experiment. After detector construction, detector commissioning and accelerator upgrade, physics data taking started

  14. Two-Loop Fermionic Corrections to Heavy-Quark Pair Production: theQuark-Antiquark Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bonciani, R.; Ferroglia, A.; Gehrmann, T.; Maitre, D.; Studerus, C.; /Zurich U.

    2008-08-01

    We evaluate the fermionic two-loop QCD corrections to the heavy-quark pair production process in the quark-antiquark channel. We obtain analytic results which are valid for any value of the Mandelstam invariants s and t, and of the heavy quark mass m. Our findings confirm previous results for the analytic evaluation in the small-mass limit and numerical results for the exact amplitude. We furthermore provide the expansion of the two-loop amplitude at the production threshold s {approx}> 4m{sup 2}.

  15. Quark-antiquark states and their radiative transitions in terms of the spectral integral equation: Light mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Dakhno, L. G.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.; Sarantsev, A. V.

    2007-03-01

    We continue the investigation of mesons in terms of the spectral integral equation initiated before for the bbar b and cbar c systems; we consider the light-quark (u, d, s) mesons with masses M ≤ 3 GeV. The calculations have been performed for the mesons lying on linear trajectories in the (n, M 2) planes, where n is the radial quantum number. Our consideration relates to the qbar q states with one component in the flavor space, with the quark and antiquark masses equal to each other, such as π(0-+), ρ(1--), ω(1--), ϕ(1--), a 0(0++), a 1(1++), a 2(2++), b 1(1+-), f 2(2++), π 2(2-+), ρ 3(3--), ω 3(3--), ϕ 3(3--), π 4(4-+) at n ≤ 6. We obtained the wave functions and mass values of mesons lying on these trajectories. The corresponding trajectories are linear, in agreement with data. We have calculated the two-photon decays π, a 0(980), a 2(1320), f 2(1285), f 2(1525) and radiative transitions ρ, ω → γπ, which agree qualitatively with the experiment. On this basis, we extract the singular part of the interaction amplitude, which corresponds to the so-called “confinement interaction.” The description of the data requires the presence of the strong t-channel singularities for both scalar and vector exchanges.

  16. On quark-antiquark approximation in light front QCD with zero gluon modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zubov, Roman; Prokhvatilov, Evgeni

    2016-01-22

    We consider a transition to the light front Hamiltonian from theories quantized on spacelike planes approaching to the light front. In this approach we preserve the dynamics of zero mode present in the theories near the light front. We make the limit transition differently for zero and nonzero modes. This leads to the appearance of some phenomenological parameter which can be used to describe vacuum effects. Also we use a lattice gauge invariant regularization in transverse coordinate space. As an illustration of our scheme we consider the quark-antiquark bound states problem in 2+1 dimensions. We construct basis states in the light front Fock space and provide detailed computations of the Hamiltonian matrix in this basis. These steps allow us to construct the matrix eigenvalue equation. In conclusion we discuss the nuances of obtained results.

  17. Perfect Abelian dominance of confinement in quark-antiquark potential in SU(3) lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Hideo; Sakumichi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the dual superconductor picture for the confinement mechanism, we study maximally Abelian (MA) projection of quark confinement in SU(3) quenched lattice QCD with 324 at β=6.4 (i.e., a ≃ 0.058 fm). We investigate the static quark-antiquark potential V(r), its Abelian part VAbel(r) and its off-diagonal part Voff(r), respectively, from the on-axis lattice data. As a remarkable fact, we find almost perfect Abelian dominance for quark confinement, i.e., σAbel ≃ σ for the string tension, on the fine and large-volume lattice. We find also a nontrivial summation relation of V (r) ≃ VAbel(r)+Voff(r).

  18. Study of the Nuclear Antiquark Sea via p+N --> Dimuons

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, J.; Garvey, G.; Peng, J-C.; McCarthy, R.L.; Brown, C.N.; Cooper, W.E.; Jonckheere, A.M.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago

    1986-01-01

    We propose a precise measurement of the A dependence of the Drell-Yan process for 900 GeV protons on targets of deuterium and calcium using the E605 spectrometer. Emphasis will be placed on the kinematic region M > 4 GeV and x{sub F} > 0.2, where one is most sensitive to beam-valence-quark, target-antiquark annihilation. Such measurements will be very sensitive to the A dependence of the target sea quark distribution in the range 0.05 < x{sub 2} < 0.3, and hence provide important clues about the origin-of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect, and unique information on the general issue of quark distributions in nuclear systems. Only minor modifications (liquid deuterium target, and reduced-size beam dump) of the E605 spectrometer will be required.

  19. Perfect Abelian dominance of confinement in quark-antiquark potential in SU(3) lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Suganuma, Hideo; Sakumichi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-22

    In the context of the dual superconductor picture for the confinement mechanism, we study maximally Abelian (MA) projection of quark confinement in SU(3) quenched lattice QCD with 32{sup 4} at β=6.4 (i.e., a ≃ 0.058 fm). We investigate the static quark-antiquark potential V(r), its Abelian part V{sub Abel}(r) and its off-diagonal part V{sub off}(r), respectively, from the on-axis lattice data. As a remarkable fact, we find almost perfect Abelian dominance for quark confinement, i.e., σ{sub Abel} ≃ σ for the string tension, on the fine and large-volume lattice. We find also a nontrivial summation relation of V (r) ≃ V{sub Abel}(r)+V{sub off}(r)

  20. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in pp¯ collisions using the lepton+jets channel

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Falkowski, A.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.

    2014-10-01

    We present a measurement of the forward–backward asymmetry in top quark–antiquark production using the full Tevatron Run II data set collected by the D0 experiment at Fermilab. The measurement is performed in lepton+jets final states using a new kinematic fitting algorithm for events with four or more jets and a new partial reconstruction algorithm for events with only three jets. Corrected for detector acceptance and resolution effects, the asymmetry is evaluated to be AFB=(10.6±3.0)%. Results are consistent with the standard model predictions which range from 5.0% to 8.8%. We also present the dependence of the asymmetry on the invariant mass of the top quark–antiquark system and the difference in rapidities of the top quark and antiquark.

  1. Holographic Screening Length on Parallel Motion of Quark-Antiquark Pair in Four Dimensional Strongly Coupled = 4 super-Yang-Mills plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata Atmaja, Ardian

    2014-10-01

    We study the screening length of a quark-antiquark pair moving in a strongly coupled hot plasma of = 4 super-Yang-Mills using AdS/CFT correspondence where the background metric is five dimensional AdS black hole. We take the string solution as such the separation length L of quark-antiquark pair is parallel to the string velocity v. The screening length and the bound energy are computed numerically using Mathematica. We find that the plots are bounded from below by some functions that are related to the momentum flow of the drag force configuration Pc. We compare the result by computing the screening length in the quark-antiquark reference frame by boosting the AdS black hole.

  2. Search for CP violation in top quark-antiquark production and decay in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-11-27

    The results of a first search for CP violation in the production and decay of top quark-antiquark (ttbar) pairs are presented. The search is based on asymmetries in T-odd, triple-product correlation observables, where T is the time-reversal operator. The analysis uses a sample of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ TeV collected by the CMS experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns.. Events are selected having one electron or muon and at least four jets. The T-odd observables are measured using four-momentum vectors associated with ttbar production and decay. The measured asymmetries exhibit no evidence for CP-violating effects, consistent with the expectation from the standard model.

  3. Measurement of the mass difference between top quark and antiquark in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2016-10-29

    The invariance of the standard model (SM) under the CPT transformation predicts equality of particle and antiparticle masses. This prediction is tested by measuring the mass difference between the top quark and antiquark (Delta m[t] = m[t] - m[t-bar]) that are produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, using events with a muon or an electron and at least four jets in the final state. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 inverse-femtobarns collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, and yields a value of Delta m[t] = -0.15 +/- 0.19 (stat) +/- 0.09 (syst) GeV, which is consistent with the SM expectation. This result is significantly more precise than previously reported measurements.

  4. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of top-quark and antiquark pairs using the full CDF Run II data set

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2016-06-03

    In this study, we measure the forward--backward asymmetry of the production of top quark and antiquark pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96~\\mathrm{TeV}$ using the full data set collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Tevatron Run II corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $9.1~\\rm{fb}^{-1}$. The asymmetry is characterized by the rapidity difference between top quarks and antiquarks ($\\Delta y$), and measured in the final state with two charged leptons (electrons and muons). The inclusive asymmetry, corrected to the entire phase space at parton level, is measured to be $A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}} = 0.12 \\pm 0.13$, consistent with the expectations from the standard-model (SM) and previous CDF results in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combination of the CDF measurements of the inclusive $A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}$ in both final states yields $A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}=0.160\\pm0.045$, which is consistent with the SM predictions. We also measure the differential asymmetry as a function of $\\Delta y$. A linear fit to $A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}(|\\Delta y|)$, assuming zero asymmetry at $\\Delta y=0$, yields a slope of $\\alpha=0.14\\pm0.15$, consistent with the SM prediction and the previous CDF determination in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combined slope of $A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}(|\\Delta y|)$ in the two final states is $\\alpha=0.227\\pm0.057$, which is $2.0\\sigma$ larger than the SM prediction.

  5. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of top-quark and antiquark pairs using the full CDF Run II data set

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2016-06-03

    In this study, we measure the forward--backward asymmetry of the production of top quark and antiquark pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energymore » $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96~\\mathrm{TeV}$$ using the full data set collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Tevatron Run II corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $$9.1~\\rm{fb}^{-1}$$. The asymmetry is characterized by the rapidity difference between top quarks and antiquarks ($$\\Delta y$$), and measured in the final state with two charged leptons (electrons and muons). The inclusive asymmetry, corrected to the entire phase space at parton level, is measured to be $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}} = 0.12 \\pm 0.13$$, consistent with the expectations from the standard-model (SM) and previous CDF results in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combination of the CDF measurements of the inclusive $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}$$ in both final states yields $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}=0.160\\pm0.045$$, which is consistent with the SM predictions. We also measure the differential asymmetry as a function of $$\\Delta y$$. A linear fit to $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}(|\\Delta y|)$$, assuming zero asymmetry at $$\\Delta y=0$$, yields a slope of $$\\alpha=0.14\\pm0.15$$, consistent with the SM prediction and the previous CDF determination in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combined slope of $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}(|\\Delta y|)$$ in the two final states is $$\\alpha=0.227\\pm0.057$$, which is $$2.0\\sigma$$ larger than the SM prediction.« less

  6. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Júnior, W L Aldá; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; 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    A measurement of the cross section for the production of top quark-antiquark pairs ([Formula: see text]) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb[Formula: see text] recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and [Formula: see text]) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting [Formula: see text] events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for [Formula: see text] events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the [Formula: see text] cross section is measured as [Formula: see text], corresponding to a significance of 1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the [Formula: see text] cross section, [Formula: see text], is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. The measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive [Formula: see text] process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.

  7. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    The measurement of a cross section for the production of top quark–antiquark pairs (tt¯) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and μ) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting tt¯W events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for tt¯Z events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the tt¯W cross section is measured as σtt¯W=170+90-80(stat)±70(syst)fb, corresponding to a significance ofmore » 1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the tt¯Z cross section, σtt¯Z=200+80-70(stat)+40-30(syst)fb-1, is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. Finally, the measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive tt¯V process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.« less

  8. Measurement of associated production of vector bosons and top quark-antiquark pairs in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=7  TeV.

    PubMed

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Gritsan, A V; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tinti, G; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Bolton, T; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Peterman, A; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Krajczar, K; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wenger, E A; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Haupt, J; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Ofierzynski, R A; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Boulahouache, C; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Chung, Y S; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Rose, K; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Walker, M; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Sengupta, S; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Florez, C; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Friis, E; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Mozer, M U; Ojalvo, I; Palmonari, F; Pierro, G A; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2013-04-26

    The first measurement of vector-boson production associated with a top quark-antiquark pair in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 7  TeV is presented. The results are based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0  fb(-1), recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC in 2011. The measurement is performed in two independent channels through a trilepton analysis of ttZ events and a same-sign dilepton analysis of ttV (V = W or Z) events. In the trilepton channel a direct measurement of the ttZ cross section σ(ttZ) = 0.28(-0.11)(+0.14) (stat)(-0.03)(+0.06) (syst)  pb is obtained. In the dilepton channel a measurement of the ttV cross section yields σ(ttV) = 0.43(-0.15)(+0.17) (stat)(-0.07)(+0.09) (syst)  pb. These measurements have a significance, respectively, of 3.3 and 3.0 standard deviations from the background hypotheses and are compatible, within uncertainties, with the corresponding next-to-leading order predictions of 0.137(-0.016)(+0.012) and 0.306(-0.053)(+0.031)  pb.

  9. d/u Asymmetry in the Nucleon Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, C.A.; Awes, T.C.; Stankus, P.W.; Young, G.R.

    1998-08-24

    Fermilab E866 has performed a precise measurement of the ratio of Drell-Yan yields from an 800 GeV/c proton beam incident on hydrogen and deuterium targets, leading to the first determinations of {bar d}/{bar u} and {bar d}-{bar u} in the proton as functions of {chi}. The results show that {bar d} > {bar u} over a broad range of {chi} and provide valuable information regarding the origins of the {bar d}/{bar u} asymmetry and the antiquark sea in the nucleon. No known symmetry requires equality of the {bar d} and {bar u} distributions in the proton. However, until recently it had been generally assumed that {bar d}({chi}) {approx} {bar u}({chi}), where {chi} is the fraction of the proton's momentum (Bjorken-{chi}) carried by the antiquark, based both on the assumption that the majority of the antiquark sea in the nucleon originates from gluon splitting into q - {bar q} pairs and the lack of experimental evidence to the contrary. The first clear evidence that {bar d} {ne} {bar u} came from the NMC measurements of the structure functions F{sub 2}{sup p}({chi}) and F{sub 2}{sup n}({chi}) in deep-inelastic muon scattering on hydrogen and deuterium.

  10. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    The measurement of a cross section for the production of top quark–antiquark pairs (tt¯) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and μ) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting tt¯W events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for tt¯Z events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the tt¯W cross section is measured as σtt¯W=170+90-80(stat)±70(syst)fb, corresponding to a significance of 1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the tt¯Z cross section, σtt¯Z=200+80-70(stat)+40-30(syst)fb-1, is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. Finally, the measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive tt¯V process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.

  11. A Map Between d = 3 and d = 4 Spacetime Dimensional k-strings Using Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaolong; Stiffler, Kory

    2009-11-01

    We investigate k-string in d=3 and d=4 spacetime dimensions using holography. Exploiting the similarities between two supergravity backgrounds,Maldacena-Nunez background and Maldacena-Nastase background, we map calculations for k-strings between d = 3 and d = 4 spacetime dimensions. The specific calculations investigated are the usual lowest order tension term for the energy of k-strings and the first order, one loop corrections, the Luscher term. The tension term is proportional to L, the length between quark antiquark pairs and the Luscher term is the typical 1/L Coulombic correction.

  12. D K scattering and the D$_s$ spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, Daniel; Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Prelovsek, Sasa; Woloshyn, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying charmed-strange meson spectrum using two types of Clover-Wilson lattices. In addition to quark-antiquark interpolating fields we also consider meson-meson interpolators corresponding to D-meson kaon scattering states. To calculate the all-to-all propagation necessary for the backtracking loops we use the (stochastic) distillation technique. For the charm quark we use the Fermilab method. Results for the $J^P=0^+$ $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ charmed-strange meson are presented.

  13. D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfeld, Timothy John

    2000-10-01

    Three analyses of D0 meson decays are presented which use the data collected with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. First, a precision measurement of the ratio of the D0 --> K-π +π0 branching fraction to that of D 0 --> K-π+ is performed resulting in the best measurement to date. Second, a detailed high statistics study of the underlying resonant structure of the three body decay, D0 --> K -π+π0, is carried out. The resulting Dalitz plot is well fit by the inclusion of seven resonances, along with a non- resonant three body decay component. Finally a search for the radiative decays of the D0 meson is presented along with the four upper limits obtained.

  14. Measurement of d/u in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Hansen, J.O.; Jackson, H.E.

    1995-08-01

    Recent experimental results on the deep inelastic structure functions on hydrogen and deuterium, combined in a sum rule analysis, suggest that there is a substantial difference between the {bar u} and {bar d} sea in the proton. The Drell-Yan process, where a quark from a projectile annihilates with an antiquark in the target to form a timelike-virtual-photon, can provide a direct measurement of the x dependence of the antiquark distributions. A first examination of this process in CERN experiment NA-51 confirmed that the {bar u} and {bar d} distributions are indeed different near x of 0.15. A new experiment, E866, was approved for the next fixed target cycle at FNAL to measure accurately the Drell-Yan production of di-muon pairs using an 800 GeV proton beam on liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets with relative systematic errors of {approximately}1%. This will measure {bar d} / {bar u} to 1 % accuracy for 0.05 < x < 0.15 and with lesser statistical accuracy out to x {approximately}0.3, with one to two orders of magnitude higher statistics than NA-51. High statistics J/{sub {Psi}}, and {Psi}` and {gamma} production data will also be obtained. It is expected that the experiment will begin to take data in FY 1996 and continue in FY 1997.

  15. Hadron Production in Quark and Antiquark Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, David

    1999-09-27

    We present a number of jet fragmentation measurements e{sup +}e{sup -} --> hadrons. The ALEPH collaboration measures inclusive rho{sup 0}(770), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) production rates, improving the world averages. The SLD collaboration measures pi{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}} and p/anti-p production in light-, c- and b-flavor Z{sup 0} decays, as well as leading hadrons in light-quark jets, precisely. The DELPHI collaboration measures the average charged multiplicity in light- and b-flavor events at 183 and 189 GeV, verifying a precise prediction of QCD and excluding flavor-independent fragmentation.

  16. Dπ scattering and D meson resonances from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa; Woloshyn, R. M.

    2013-02-01

    A first exploratory lattice QCD simulation is presented, aimed at extracting the masses and widths of the broad scalar D0*(2400) and the axial D1(2430) charm-light resonances. For that purpose Dπ and D*π scattering are simulated, and the resonance parameters are extracted using a Breit-Wigner fit of the resulting phase shifts. We use a single two-flavor dynamical ensemble with mπ≈266MeV, a≃0.124fm and a rather small volume V=163×32. The resulting D0*(2400) mass is 351±21MeV above the spin average (1)/(4)(mD+3mD*), in agreement with the experimental value of 347±29MeV above. The resulting D0*→Dπ coupling, glat=2.55±0.21GeV, is close to the experimental value gexp⁡≤1.92±0.14GeV, where g parametrizes the width Γ≡g2p*/s. The resonance parameters for the broad D1(2430) are also found close to the experimental values; these are obtained by appealing to the heavy quark limit, where the neighboring resonance D1(2420) is narrow. The calculated I=1/2 scattering lengths are a0=0.81±0.14fm for Dπ and a0=0.81±0.17fm for D*π scattering. The simulation of the scattering in these channels incorporates quark-antiquark as well as multihadron interpolators, and the distillation method is used for contractions. In addition, the ground and several excited charm-light and charmonium states with various JP are calculated using standard quark-antiquark interpolators.

  17. The Hall D Physics Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.

    2012-09-01

    GlueX is one of the flagship experiments of the 12 GeV era at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The energy of the electron accelerator at JLab is presently undergoing an upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV and a 4th experimental hall (Hall D) is being added. The GlueX experimental apparatus consists of a tagged coherent bremsstrahlung photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The photoproduced mesons, which are created inside of a 2.2 T solenoid, will then pass through a pair of drift chambers and eventually deposit their energy into either of two calorimeters, depending on their respective angles. GlueX will attempt to map out the light meson spectrum and search for meson-gluon hybrids to better understand the confinement of quarks and gluons in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). There is little data on the photoproduction of light mesons and the GlueX experiment will exceed the current photoproduction data by several orders of magnitude in the first year alone. Photoproduction is specifically well suited to search for meson-gluon hybrids because in the flux tube model the production cross-sections are higher for meson-gluon hybrids from photons, with the spins of the virtual quark-antiquark pair aligned, than from other sources such as pions, with the spins of the quark-antiquark pair anti-aligned. There are also other Hall D experiments proposed to look for physics beyond the Standard Model by studying Eta rare or forbidden decay channels such as eta to two neutral pions. The 12 GeV upgrade of the JLab accelerator and the complete physics program of Hall D will be presented.

  18. Multichannel Calculation of D*s Vector States and the D+sJ(2632) Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beveren, Eef; Rupp, George

    2004-11-01

    We study bound states below threshold and resonances above threshold in the D0K+ and D+sη systems, using a many-coupled-channel model for nonexotic meson-meson scattering applied to states with the quantum numbers of cs¯ quark-antiquark vector mesons. We fit the ground state at 2.112GeV, whence the lowest resonances in D0K+ come out at 2.61, 2.72, 3.03, and 3.08GeV. The resonance at 2.61GeV acquires a width of about 8MeV, while its partial P wave cross section is up to 6 times larger in Dsη than in D0K+, provided a mechanism accounting for Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka forbidden decays is included. The latter finding is in agreement with the observations of the SELEX Collaboration with respect to the recently reported D+sJ(2632) resonance. Therefore, we conclude that the D+sJ(2632) is probably the first recurrence of the D*s(2112) meson.

  19. Including heavy spin effects in the prediction of a b ¯ ¯ d tetraquark with lattice QCD potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicudo, Pedro; Scheunert, Jonas; Wagner, Marc

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spin effects in four-quark systems consisting of two heavy antibottom quarks and two light up/down quarks. To this end, we use the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We utilize potentials of two static antiquarks in the presence of two quarks of finite mass computed via lattice QCD and solve a coupled-channel Schrödinger equation for the antibottom-antibottom separation. Without taking heavy quark spins into account, this approach predicted a u d b ¯b ¯ tetraquark bound state with quantum numbers I (JP)=0 (1+). We now extend this Born-Oppenheimer approach with coupled-channel Schrödinger equations, allowing us to incorporate effects due to the heavy b ¯ spins. We confirm the existence of the u d b ¯b ¯ tetraquark.

  20. D*+s(2317) and D*+s(2460): Tetraquarks bound by the 't Hooft instanton-induced interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrašinović, V.

    2004-11-01

    We calculate the influence of the ’t Hooft interaction on the single-charm (C=1) tetraquark (cqq¯2) mass spectrum and find that three SU(3)-flavor multiplets (3¯A,6,15¯) are significantly lowered, while the 3¯S-plet is lifted, as compared with their unperturbed masses. States with the D+s quantum numbers appear in two of the three lowered multiplets. The lower of the two states drops below both of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI)-allowed decay thresholds, thus being identified with D*+s(2320), while the heavier state drops below the η+D+s threshold, but stays above the K+D one. A signature prediction of this theory is the lowering of the exotic tetraquark 6-plet and 15¯-plet: most of these states cannot consist of only one quark and one antiquark. As a test we suggest a search for two quasistable exotic tetraquarks with open-charm and strangeness: the (isotriplet) csq¯q¯ and the (isodoublet) cqs¯s¯.

  1. Quark-antiquark bound-state spectroscopy and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1982-11-01

    The discussion covers quarks as we know them, the classification of ordinary mesons in terms of constituent quarks, hidden charm states and charmed mesons, bottom quarks, positronium as a model for quarti q, quantum chromodynamics and its foundation in experiment, the charmonium model, the mass of states, fine structure and hyperfine structure, classification, widths of states, rate and multipolarity of gamma transitions, questions about bottom, leptonic widths and the determination of Q/sub b/, the mass splitting of the n/sup 3/S/sub 1/ states, the center of gravity of the masses of the n/sup 3/P; states, n/sup 3/ P; fine structure and classification, branching ratios for upsilon' ..-->.. tau chi/sub 6j/ and the tau cascade reactions, hyperfine splitting, and top. (GHT)

  2. Analytical approximations to the spectra of quark antiquark potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amore, Paolo; DePace, Arturo; Lopez, Jorge

    2006-07-01

    A method recently devised to obtain analytical approximations to certain classes of integrals is used in combination with the WKB expansion to derive accurate analytical expressions for the spectrum of quantum potentials. The accuracy of our results is verified by comparing them both with the literature on the subject and with the numerical results obtained with a Fortran code. As an application of the method that we propose, we consider meson spectroscopy with various phenomenological potentials.

  3. Measuring asymmetry load pairs of top quarks-antitop in the final states dileptoniques from D0 and ATLAS detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chapelain, Antoine

    2014-06-20

    Particle physics aims to give a coherent description of the nature and the behavior of elementary particles of matter. Particle accelerators (colliders) allow pushing back our know- ledge in this domain producing particles that cannot be observed by other means. This thesis work contributes to this research eld and focuses on the study of the top quark which is the latest brick of matter discovered and the heaviest known elementary particle. The property of the top quark studied here, the charge asymmetry of the top quark-antiquark pairs, has driven a lot of attention in 2011 because of measurements released by Tevatron experiments. These measurements showed deviations with the predictions made in the framework of the standard model of particle physics. New measurements of the charge asymmetry performed at the Tevatron (with the D0 detector) and at the LHC (with the ATLAS detector) are presented in this thesis.

  4. PHENIX RPC R&D for the fast RPC muon trigger upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Beau; Phenix Rpc Upgrade Group

    2009-05-01

    The PHENIX collaboration at relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) will measure the maximal parity violating W asymmetries in polarized proton-proton collisions at high transverse momentum in order to make the most precise measurement of the quark and the anti-quark polarizations of the proton. For this measurement, the collaboration is installing resistive plate chambers (RPCs) similar to the CMS Endcap RPCs in the two existing muon spectrometers. In these proceedings, we shall discuss the research and development (R&D) that has been done by the collaboration in order to both understand and develop RPC technology. The R&D has been carried out at Georgia State University, the University of Colorado at Boulder, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with many other institutions contributing as well; each university has focused on the different aspects of the RPCs. Georgia State has focused on detector design, performance, and stability; Colorado has tested the front end electronics and termination schemes; Illinois has performed position resolution studies as well as two-dimensional efficiency scans of RPCs. Additionally, a cosmic ray teststand for final gap QA is currently operational at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

  5. Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vitamin D KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamin D A A ... get the recommended daily amount. continue How Much Vitamin D Do I Need? The Institute of Medicine ( ...

  6. Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vitamin D KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamin D Print A ... get the recommended daily amount. continue How Much Vitamin D Do I Need? The Institute of Medicine ( ...

  7. Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Calcium is ... main building blocks of bone. A lack of vitamin D can lead to bone diseases such as ...

  8. Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver, cheese, and egg yolks provide small amounts. Mushrooms provide some vitamin D. Some mushrooms you buy in the store have higher vitamin ... about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , editorial process and privacy policy . A.D.A.M. is ...

  9. Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Grant, William B.; Tangpricha, Vin

    2012-01-01

    Evidence that vitamin D reduces the risk of many types of disease is increasing exponentially. In 2011, 3,100 publications with “vitamin D” in the title or abstract were published, up from 2,606 in 2010, 1,303 in 2005, and 796 in 2000. A committee operating under the auspices of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the US National Academies reviewed the evidence for beneficial effects of vitamin D. Their report, issued at the end of 2010,1 found what they considered to be strong evidence for only one health outcome: skeletal health. They considered beneficial evidence only from published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused mainly on skeletal health. In contrast, to justify concern about higher vitamin D intake and serum 25(OH)D concentrations, they used data from nested case-control studies reporting U-shaped outcomes of prediagnostic serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] for cancer and all-cause mortality rates. They set the daily recommended intake of vitamin D at 600–800 IU for most children and adults and defined vitamin D sufficiency as a serum 25(OH)D level above 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/l). They also set a daily upper intake of 4,000 IU of vitamin D3 and called for more RCTs to determine nonskeletal health effects. As of this writing, more than 130 journal publications have criticized the IOM report as being too conservative. One summarized the problems succinctly: “The IOM recommendations for vitamin D fail in a major way on logic, on science, and on effective public health guidance. Moreover, by failing to use a physiological referent, the IOM approach constitutes precisely the wrong model for development of nutritional policy.”2 PMID:22928061

  10. Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Spitz, Jörg; Reichrath, Jörg; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D has received a lot of attention recently as a result of a meteoric rise in the number of publications showing that vitamin D plays a crucial role in a plethora of physiological functions and associating vitamin D deficiency with many acute and chronic illnesses including disorders of calcium metabolism, autoimmune diseases, some cancers, type 2 diabetes mellitus, infectious diseases and cardiovascular disease. The recent data on vitamin D from experimental, ecological, case-control, retrospective and prospective observational studies, as well as smaller intervention studies, are significant and confirm the sunshine vitamin’s essential role in a variety of physiological and preventative functions. The results of these studies justify the recommendation to improve the general vitamin D status in children and adults by means of a healthy approach to sunlight exposure, consumption of foods containing vitamin D and supplementation with vitamin D preparations. In general, closer attention should therefore be paid to vitamin D deficiency in medical and pharmaceutical practice than has been the case hitherto. PMID:24516687

  11. Hadronic production of D (2550 ) , D*(2600 ) , D (2750 ) , D1*(2760 ) , and D3*(2760 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ze; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Ailin

    2016-12-01

    Hadronic decays of radially excited 2 D D (2 3D1) , D (2 3D3) , D (2 D2) , and D (2 D2') have been studied in a 3P0 model. All Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decay channels of these 2 D D resonances have been given, and relevant decay widths have been calculated. D (2550 ), D*(2600 ), D (2750 ), D1*(2760 ), and D3*(2760 ) can be produced in hadronic decays of D (2 3D1) , D (2 3D3) , D (2 D2), and D (2 D2'). In different assignments, hadronic decay widths and some relevant ratios from the 2 D D resonances to D (2550 ), D*(2600 ), D (2750 ), D1*(2760 ), or D3*(2760 ) final states have been predicted, which may provide more information to identify these resonances in forthcoming experiments.

  12. A walk through superstring theory with an application to Yang-Mills theory: K-strings and D-branes as gauge/gravity dual objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiffler, Kory M.

    Superstring theory is one current, promising attempt at unifying gravity with the other three known forces: the electromagnetic force, and the weak and strong nuclear forces. Though this is still a work in progress, much effort has been put toward this goal. A set of specific tools which are used in this effort are gauge/gravity dualities. This thesis consists of a specific implementation of gauge/gravity dualities to describe k-strings of strongly coupled gauge theories as objects dual to Dp-branes embedded in confining supergravity backgrounds from low energy superstring field theory. Along with superstring theory, k-strings are also commonly investigated with lattice gauge theory and Hamiltonian methods. A k-string is a colorless combination of quark-antiquark source pairs, between which a color flux tube develops. The two most notable terms of the k-string energy are, for large quark anti-quark separation L, the tension term, proportional to L, and the Coulombic 1/L correction, known as the Luscher term. This thesis provides an overview of superstring theories and how gauge/gravity dualities emerge from them. It shows in detail how these dualities can be used for the specific problem of calculating the k-string energy in 2 + 1 and 3 + 1 space-time dimensions as the energy of D p-branes in the dual gravitational theory. A detailed review of k-string tension calculations is given where good agreement is found with lattice gauge theory and Hamiltonian methods. In reviewing the k-string tension, we also touch on how different representations of k-strings can be described with Dp-branes through gauge/gravity dualities. The main result of this thesis is how the Luscher term is found to emerge as the one loop quantum corrections to the Dp-brane energy. In 2+1 space-time dimensions, we have Luscher term data to compare with from lattice gauge theory, where we find good agreement.

  13. D Meson Production in Negative Pion-Proton and Proton-Proton Interactions at 360 Gev/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Immerseel, Marina

    The aim of the NA16 experiment is to study charm production in (pi)('-)p and pp interactions at 360 GeV/c. The possibility of direct observation and interpretation of the charmed particle decays is chosen. Therefore, the experimental set-up is composed of a high resolution hydrogen bubble chamber LEBC coupled to the European Hybrid Spectrometer EHS. In this experiment 56 D mesons are identified. The neutral and charged D lifetimes are found to be respectively. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). The ratio of the charged over the neutral D meson lifetime is thus. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). This supports the idea that the weak decay of a charmed particle cannot be described by simple spectator diagrams wherein the light quarks, bound to the c-quark, do not participate actively in the decay. Processes in which the heavy charm quark and the light quark annihilate have to be included and this implies that a charmed particle cannot be described simply by its valence quarks. The D meson production in both (pi)('-)p and pp interactions is studied. In principle, this opens the possibility to check the relevance. of the different QCD diagrams for charm production. The inclusive single D/(')D cross section for x(,F) > 0 in (pi)('-)p interactions is found to be. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). whereas the D(')D pair cross section for all x(,F) in pp interactions has the same magnitude,. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). These charm yields are in agreement with production models including as well quark-antiquark and gluon-gluon fusion as charm excitation diagrams. The x(,F) distributions of the D mesons produced in both (pi)('-)p and pp interactions are flatter than predicted by the fusion models, indicating that the charm excitation processes are important. In addition, also the characteristics of the D(')D pairs seem to support the idea that more production mechanisms than qq and gg fusion

  14. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  15. D2 to D2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezhuthachan, Bobby; Mukhi, Sunil; Papageorgakis, Constantinos

    2008-07-01

    Starting from maximally supersymmetric (2+1)d Yang-Mills theory and using a duality transformation due to de Wit, Nicolai and Samtleben, we obtain the ghost-free Lorentzian 3-algebra theory that has recently been proposed to describe M2-branes. Our derivation does not invoke any properties of 3-algebras. Being derivable from SYM, the final theory is manifestly equivalent to it on-shell and should not be thought of as the IR limit that describes M2-branes, though it does have enhanced R-symmetry as well as superconformal symmetry off-shell.

  16. Dalitz plot studies of D0→KS0π+π- decays in a factorization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedonder, J.-P.; Kamiński, R.; Leśniak, L.; Loiseau, B.

    2014-05-01

    The presently available high-statistics data of the D0→KS0π+π- processes measured by the Belle and BABAR collaborations are analyzed within a quasi-two-body factorization framework. Starting from the weak effective Hamiltonian, tree and annihilation amplitudes build up the D0→KS0π+π- decay amplitude. Two of the three final-state mesons are assumed to form a single scalar, vector or tensor state originating from a quark-antiquark pair so that the factorization hypothesis can be applied. The meson-meson final state interactions are described by Kπ and ππ scalar and vector form factors for the S and P waves and by relativistic Breit-Wigner formulas for the D waves. A combined χ2 fit to a Belle Dalitz plot density distribution, to the total experimental branching fraction and to the τ-→KS0π-ντ decay data, is carried out to fix the 33 free parameters. These are mainly related to the strengths of the scalar form factors and to unknown meson to meson transition form factors at a large momentum transfer squared equal to the D0 mass squared. A good overall agreement to the Belle Dalitz plot density distribution is achieved. Another set of parameters fits equally well the BABAR collaboration Dalitz plot model. The parameters of both fits are close, following from similar Dalitz density distribution data for both collaborations. The corresponding one-dimensional effective mass distributions display the contributions of the ten quasi-two-body channels entering our D0→KS0π+π- decay amplitude. The branching fractions of the dominant channels compare well with those of the isobar Belle or BABAR models. The lower-limit values of the branching fractions of the annihilation amplitudes are significant. Built upon experimental data from other processes, the unitary Kπ and ππ scalar form factors, entering our decay amplitude and satisfying analyticity and chiral symmetry constraints, are furthermore constrained by the present Dalitz plot analysis. Our D0→KS0

  17. D-D tokamak reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K.E. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Finn, P.A.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Misra, B.; Smith, D.L.; Stevens, H.C.

    1980-11-01

    A tokamak D-D reactor design, utilizing the advantages of a deuterium-fueled reactor but with parameters not unnecessarily extended from existing D-T designs, is presented. Studies leading to the choice of a design and initial studies of the design are described. The studies are in the areas of plasma engineering, first-wall/blanket/shield design, magnet design, and tritium/fuel/vacuum requirements. Conclusions concerning D-D tokamak reactors are stated.

  18. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  19. 6D Interpretation of 3D Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfray, Yannick; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We show that 3D gravity, in its pure connection formulation, admits a natural 6D interpretation. The 3D field equations for the connection are equivalent to 6D Hitchin equations for the Chern–Simons 3-form in the total space of the principal bundle over the 3-dimensional base. Turning this construction around one gets an explanation of why the pure connection formulation of 3D gravity exists. More generally, we interpret 3D gravity as the dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory. To this end, we show that any \\text{SU}(2) invariant closed 3-form in the total space of the principal \\text{SU}(2) bundle can be parametrised by a connection together with a 2-form field on the base. The dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory then gives rise to 3D gravity coupled to a topological 2-form field.

  20. Facts about Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin D from three sources—food, supplements, and sunlight. Sunlight When exposed to sunlight, the skin makes vitamin D, which is then ... body. Most people get some vitamin D from sunlight. However, several factors affect how well the body ...

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin D Deficiency A Patient’s Guide Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. Along with calcium, it is vital ... for physicians about testing for, treating, and preventing vitamin D deficiency. These guidelines do not apply to people who ...

  2. Observation of D0-D0 oscillations.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, V; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maino, M; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martí Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-03-08

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent ratio of D(0) → K(+) π- to D(0) → K(-) π(+) decay rates in D(*+)-tagged events using 1.0 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity recorded by the LHCb experiment. We measure the mixing parameters x('2) = (-0.9 ± 1.3) × 10(-4), y' = (7.2 ± 2.4) × 10(-3), and the ratio of doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored decay rates R(D) = (3.52 ± 0.15) × 10^{-3}, where the uncertainties include statistical and systematic sources. The result excludes the no-mixing hypothesis with a probability corresponding to 9.1 standard deviations and represents the first observation of D0-D0 oscillations from a single measurement.

  3. Haemoglobin D Punjab (D Los Angeles)

    PubMed Central

    Vella, F.; Lehmann, H.

    1974-01-01

    A search for haemoglobin variants undertaken in Canada revealed 21 unrelated instances of Hb D Punjab amongst 207,300 specimens tested. Of these, eight came from East Indian immigrants and the rest from Canadians of United Kingdom origin. No instances of Hb D Punjab were found in 14,500 specimens from Canadian Indians that were tested. The geographical origins of 27 instances of Hb D Punjab characterized at the MRC Abnormal Haemoglobin Unit, Cambridge are presented. Of these five were natives of the British Isles. The results of surveys undertaken in the United Kingdom are summarized. The global distribution of Hb D Punjab is discussed. PMID:4613830

  4. Measurement of σ(p$\\bar{p}$ -> t$\\bar{t}$) in the τ + jets channel by the D0 experiment at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Arov, Mikhail

    2008-07-01

    The top quark is the heaviest and most mysterious of the known elementary particles. Therefore, careful study of its production rate and other properties is of utmost importance for modern particle physics. The Tevatron is the only facility currently capable of studying top quark properties by on-shell production. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section is one of the major goals of the Tevatron Run II physics program. It provides an excellent test of QCD at energies exceeding 100 GeV. We report on a new measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ production at √s = 1.96 TeV using 350 pb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2005. We focus on the final state where a W boson from one of the top quarks decays into a τ lepton and its associated neutrino, while the other decays into a quark-antiquark pair. We aim to select those events in which the τ lepton subsequently decays to one or three charged hadrons, zero or more neutral hadrons and a tau neutrino (the charge conjugate processes are implied in all of the above). The observable signature thus consists of a narrow calorimeter shower with associated track(s) characteristic of a hadronic tau decay, four or more jets, of which two are initiated by b quarks accompanying the W's in the top quark decays, and a large net missing momentum in the transverse plane due to the energetic neutrino-antineutrino pair that leave no trace in the detector media. The preliminary result for the measured cross section is: σ(t$\\bar{t}$) = 5.1$+4.3\\atop{-3.5}$(stat) $+0.7\\atop{-0.7}$(syst) ± 0.3 (lumi.) pb.

  5. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  6. JANUS reactor d and d project.

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C. R.

    1998-02-16

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-E) has recently completed the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the JANUS Reactor Facility located in Building 202. The 200 KW reactor operated from August 1963 to March 1992. The facility was used to study the effects of both high and low doses of fission neutrons in animals. There were two exposure rooms on opposite sides of the reactor and the reactor was therefore named after the two-faced Roman god. The High Dose Room was capable of specimen exposure at a dose rate of 3,600 rads per hour. During calendar year 1996 a detailed characterization of the facility was performed by ANL-E Health Physics personnel. ANL-E Analytical Services performed the required sample analysis. An Auditable Safety Analysis and an Environmental Assessment were completed. D and D plans, procedures and procurement documents were prepared and approved. A D and D subcontractor was selected and a firm, fixed price contract awarded for the field work and final survey effort. The D and D subcontractor was mobilized to ANL-E in January 1997. Electrical isolation of all reactor equipment and control panels was accomplished and the equipment removed. A total of 207,230 pounds (94,082 Kg) of lead shielding was removed, surveyed and sampled, and free-released for recycle. All primary and secondary piping was removed, size reduced and packaged for disposal or recycled as appropriate. The reactor vessel was removed, sized reduced and packaged as radioactive waste in April. The activated graphite block reflector was removed next, followed by the bioshield concrete and steel. All of this material was packaged as low level waste. Total low level radioactive waste generation was 4002.1 cubic feet (113.3 cubic meters). Mixed waste generation was 538 cubic feet (15.2 cubic meters). The Final Release Survey was completed in September. The project field work was completed in 38 weeks without any lost-time accidents, personnel contaminations or unplanned

  7. Vitamin D and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cannell, John J; Grant, William B; Holick, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Several studies found an inverse relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and markers of inflammation. A controversy exists as to whether vitamin D lowers inflammation or whether inflammation lowers 25(OH)D concentrations. Certainly 25(OH)D concentrations fall after major surgery. However, is this due to inflammation lowering 25(OH)D or is 25(OH)D being metabolically cleared by the body to quell inflammation. We searched the literature and found 39 randomized controlled trials (RCT) of vitamin D and markers of inflammation. Seventeen found significantly reduced inflammatory markers, 19 did not, one was mixed and one showed adverse results. With few exceptions, studies in normal subjects, obesity, type 2 diabetics, and stable cardiovascular disease did not find significant beneficial effects. However, we found that 6 out of 7 RCTS of vitamin D3 in highly inflammatory conditions (acute infantile congestive heart failure, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, SLE, active TB and evolving myocardial infarction) found significant reductions. We found baseline and final 25(OH)D predicted RCTs with significant reduction in inflammatory markers. Vitamin D tends to modestly lower markers of inflammation in highly inflammatory conditions, when baseline 25(OH)D levels were low and when achieved 25(OH)D levels were higher. Future inquiries should: recruit subjects with low baseline 25(OH)D levels, subjects with elevated markers of inflammation, subjects with inflammatory conditions, achieve adequate final 25(OH)D levels, and use physiological doses of vitamin D. We attempted to identify all extant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of vitamin D that used inflammatory markers as primary or secondary endpoints. PMID:26413186

  8. Sunlight and Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Matthias; Holick, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is the sunshine vitamin that has been produced on this earth for more than 500 million years. During exposure to sunlight 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin absorbs UV B radiation and is converted to previtamin D3 which in turn isomerizes into vitamin D3. Previtamin D3 and vitamin D3 also absorb UV B radiation and are converted into a variety of photoproducts some of which have unique biologic properties. Sun induced vitamin D synthesis is greatly influenced by season, time of day, latitude, altitude, air pollution, skin pigmentation, sunscreen use, passing through glass and plastic, and aging. Vitamin D is metabolized sequentially in the liver and kidneys into 25-hydroxyvitamin D which is a major circulating form and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D which is the biologically active form respectively. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D plays an important role in regulating calcium and phosphate metabolism for maintenance of metabolic functions and for skeletal health. Most cells and organs in the body have a vitamin D receptor and many cells and organs are able to produce 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. As a result 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D influences a large number of biologic pathways which may help explain association studies relating vitamin D deficiency and living at higher latitudes with increased risk for many chronic diseases including autoimmune diseases, some cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes. A three-part strategy of increasing food fortification programs with vitamin D, sensible sun exposure recommendations and encouraging ingestion of a vitamin D supplement when needed should be implemented to prevent global vitamin D deficiency and its negative health consequences. PMID:24494042

  9. The dS/dS Correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Karch, Andreas; Silverstein, Eva; Tong, David

    2004-12-01

    We present a holographic duality for the de Sitter static patch which consolidates basic features of its geometry and the behavior of gravity and brane probes, valid on timescales short compared to the decay or Poincare recurrence times. Namely de Sitter spacetime dSd(R) in d dimensions with curvature radius R is holographically dual to two conformal field theories on dSd-1(R), cut off at an energy scale 1/R where they couple to each other and to d - 1 dimensional gravity. As part of our analysis, we study brane probes in de Sitter and thermal Anti de Sitter spaces, and interpret the terms in the corresponding DBI action via strongly coupled thermal field theory. This provides a dual field theoretic interpretation of the fact that probes take forever to reach a horizon in general relativity.

  10. Evidence for D0-D0 mixing.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-05-25

    We present evidence for D0-D(0) mixing in D(0)-->K(+)pi(-) decays from 384 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) colliding-beam data recorded near square root s=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We find the mixing parameters x('2)=[-0.22+/-0.30(stat)+/-0.21(syst)] x 10(-3) and y(')=[9.7+/-4.4(stat)+/-3.1(syst)] x 10(-3) and a correlation between them of -0.95. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.9 standard deviations. We measure R(D), the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored decay rates, to be [0.303+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.010(syst)]%. We find no evidence for CP violation.

  11. K-25 D and D Challenges - 12170

    SciTech Connect

    Eidam, Greg

    2012-07-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the K-25 former gaseous diffusion plant provides lessons learned applicable to other D and D projects in the DOE Complex. The 175,000- square-meter, 1.6-kilometer-long building is contaminated with highly enriched uranium (HEU), Tc-99, trace quantities of other fission products, asbestos, PCBs, and other hazardous wastes. Safety challenges include deteriorated electrical systems, significant structural degradation, and criticality and exposure risks. The project completely revised the D and D approach after a worker fell through an operating floor and was seriously injured. For protection from deteriorated building conditions, the project reduced the number of workers in the facility, limited their hours in the building, and installed nets and barriers to protect them from falls through weakened floors and from falling material. The new plan involved removing high-risk components, removing motors and compressors, and demolishing the building from the outside with heavy equipment with most of the piping and components inside the building during demolition. The team provided temporary electrical power; reconfigured the criticality alarm system; upgraded security; performed sampling and analysis to locate and characterize HEU deposits and Tc-99; and, to establish 'criticality incredible' conditions, conducted a nondestructive assay program and injected foam into equipment and piping as a contamination fixative. (authors)

  12. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... body forms vitamin D naturally after exposure to sunlight. But too much sun exposure can lead to ... problem) You don't get enough exposure to sunlight. Your liver or kidneys cannot convert vitamin D ...

  13. [VITAMIN D AND PREGNANCY].

    PubMed

    Hitrova-Nikolova, St; Nikolov, A

    2015-01-01

    This arcicle reviews the role of vitimin D during pregnancy. Adequate intake of vitamin D during pregnancy is very important for the health of mother and infant. A number of epidemiological data worldwide show widespread suboptimal levels of vitamin D in pregnant women. Vitamin D deficiency may be associated with an increased risk of infection, bacterial vaginosis, pre-eclampsia, low serum vitamin D levels in the newborn and others. There are not universal recommendations for dosage and intake of vitamin D for pregnant women in the world. It is recommended that serum level of vitamin D in all pregnant women and its adequate supplementation. Normal maternal vitamin D levels would provide sufficient its accumulation in the fetus.

  14. Vitamin D Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... low and/or a person has symptoms of vitamin D deficiency, such as bone malformation in children ( rickets ) and ... individual is known to be at risk of vitamin D deficiency. Older adults, people who are institutionalized or homebound ...

  15. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Cancer.gov

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  16. Vitamin D and Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... give enough weight to some of the latest science on vitamin D and health. For bone health ... fracture with vitamin d supplementation: evidence from a comparative metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials. J Clin Endocrinol ...

  17. Vitamin D in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Patton, Chad M; Powell, Amy P; Patel, Alpesh A

    2012-03-01

    Vitamin D is an important component in musculoskeletal development, maintenance, and function. Adequate levels of vitamin D correlate with greater bone mineral density, lower rates of osteoporotic fractures, and improved neuromuscular function. Debate exists about both adequate levels required and intake requirements needed to prevent deficiency of vitamin D. Epidemiologic data have identified an increasing number of orthopaedic patients at risk for vitamin D deficiency, with potentially widespread consequences for bone healing, risk of fracture, and neuromuscular function.

  18. Nonclassical vitamin D action.

    PubMed

    Zittermann, Armin; Gummert, Jan F

    2010-04-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that vitamin D has a broad range of actions in the human body. Besides its well-known effects on calcium/phosphate homeostasis, vitamin D influences muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nervous function, and the immune response. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency has been associated with muscle weakness and a high incidence of various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes. Most importantly, low vitamin D status has been found to be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Several recent randomized controlled trials support the assumption that vitamin D can improve muscle strength, glucose homeostasis, and cardiovascular risk markers. In addition, vitamin D may reduce cancer incidence and elevated blood pressure. Since the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is high throughout the world, there is a need to improve vitamin D status in the general adult population. However, the currently recommended daily vitamin D intake of 5-15 µg is too low to achieve an adequate vitamin D status in individuals with only modest skin synthesis. Thus, there is a need to recommend a vitamin D intake that is effective for achieving adequate circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>75 nmol/L).

  19. Five Equivalent d Orbitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; McClure, Vance

    1970-01-01

    Amplifies and clarifies a previous paper on pyramidal d orbitals. Discusses two sets of pyramid d orbitals with respect to their maximum bond strength and their symmetry. Authors described the oblate and prolate pentagonal antiprisms arising from the two sets of five equivalent d orbitals. (RR)

  20. Vitamin D supplementation guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pludowski, Pawel; Holick, Michael F; Grant, William B; Konstantynowicz, Jerzy; Mascarenhas, Mario R; Haq, Afrozul; Povoroznyuk, Vladyslav; Balatska, Nataliya; Barbosa, Ana Paula; Karonova, Tatiana; Rudenka, Ema; Misiorowski, Waldemar; Zakharova, Irina; Rudenka, Alena; Łukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Marcinowska-Suchowierska, Ewa; Łaszcz, Natalia; Abramowicz, Pawel; Bhattoa, Harjit P; Wimalawansa, Sunil J

    2017-02-12

    Research carried out during the past two-decades extended the understanding of actions of vitamin D, from regulating calcium and phosphate absorption and bone metabolism to many pleiotropic actions in organs and tissues in the body. Most observational and ecological studies report association of higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations with improved outcomes for several chronic, communicable and non-communicable diseases. Consequently, numerous agencies and scientific organizations have developed recommendations for vitamin D supplementation and guidance on optimal serum 25(OH)D concentrations. The bone-centric guidelines recommend a target 25(OH)D concentration of 20ng/mL (50nmol/L), and age-dependent daily vitamin D doses of 400-800IU. The guidelines focused on pleiotropic effects of vitamin D recommend a target 25(OH)D concentration of 30ng/mL (75nmol/L), and age-, body weight-, disease-status, and ethnicity dependent vitamin D doses ranging between 400 and 2000IU/day. The wise and balanced choice of the recommendations to follow depends on one's individual health outcome concerns, age, body weight, latitude of residence, dietary and cultural habits, making the regional or nationwide guidelines more applicable in clinical practice. While natural sources of vitamin D can raise 25(OH)D concentrations, relative to dietary preferences and latitude of residence, in the context of general population, these sources are regarded ineffective to maintain the year-round 25(OH)D concentrations in the range of 30-50ng/mL (75-125nmol/L). Vitamin D self-administration related adverse effects, such as hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria are rare, and usually result from taking extremely high doses of vitamin D for a prolonged time.

  1. [Ethnicity and vitamin D].

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Philippe; Aparicio, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Cohort studies, mainly US, show that vitamin D deficiency is more common in African-American population. Social and environmental factors play a role but the difference in skin color is essential. Despite low 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, a lower risk of fragility or fracture exists in these populations. Vitamin D deficiency is a contributing factor in many chronic diseases. There is a relationship between vitamin D deficiencies, progression of chronic kidney disease and increased relative risk of mortality. If the ethnicity of patients is now taken into account to estimate renal function, probably specific recommendations for vitamin D deficiency are needed.

  2. Dynamical D4-D8 and D3-D7 branes in supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, Pierre; Sasaki, Misao; Uzawa, Kunihito

    2009-07-15

    We present a class of dynamical solutions for intersecting D4-D8 and D3-D7 brane systems in ten-dimensional type IIA and IIB supergravity. We discuss if these solutions can be recovered in lower-dimensional effective theories for the warped compactification of a general p-brane system. It is found that an effective p+1-dimensional description is not possible in general due to the entanglement of the transverse coordinates and the p+1-dimensional coordinates in the metric components. For the D4-D8 brane system, the dynamical solutions reduces to a static warped AdS{sub 6}xS{sup 4} geometry in a certain spacetime region. For the D3-D7 brane system, we find a dynamical solution whose metric form is similar to that of a D3-brane solution. The main difference is the existence of a nontrivial dilaton configuration in the D3-D7 solution. Then we discuss cosmology of these solutions. We find that they behave like a Kasner-type cosmological solution at {tau}{yields}{infinity}, while it reduces to a warped static solution at {tau}{yields}0, where {tau} is the cosmic time.

  3. Vitamin D and Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Biricik, Ebru; Güneş, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is a vitamin not only associated with calcium-phosphorus metabolism but also affects many organ systems. Because of its effect on the immune system in recent years, it has attracted much attention. Vitamin D deficiency is a clinical condition that can be widely observed in the society. Thus, patients with vitamin D deficiency are often seen in anaesthesia practice. In the absence of vitamin D, prolongation of intensive care unit stay, increase in mortality and morbidity and also association of chronic diseases further increase the importance of vitamin D deficiency. The results obtained from studies have led to the question of whether poor surgical outcome is associated with vitamin D deficiency. We assessed the vitamin D deficiency and its negative consequences for the anaesthesiologist. PMID:27366509

  4. Pragmatic and cost efficient D and D

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.

    1998-03-01

    A great deal of effort is expended by remediation professionals in the pursuit of new technologies to assist them in performing their tasks more efficiently. These individuals understand the cost savings associated with volume reduction and waste minimization and routinely incorporate these practices into their planning. However, the largest cost component on many D and D projects is labor. Increasing the efficiency of work force utilization is frequently the most overlooked technique that can be instituted and which can easily offer major cost savings. Granted, some D and D jobs require highly specialized tools and equipment which are quite expensive. Decreasing these costs is often not an option or will yield minimal results. Conversely, the increase in worker efficiency can usually decrease costs dramatically. During the performance of the Safe Shutdown Project at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (the Fernald site), a process improvement initiative was instituted in support of the development of the Ten Year Plan. Costs associated with the removal of hundreds of thousands of pounds of nuclear material from formerly utilized equipment piping, and ductwork in nuclear facilities at the Fernald site were analyzed. This analysis indicated that the labor component was large enough to merit further inspection. A new approach to the activities was instituted and the results were significant. A macroscopic overview of all work activities utilized work evolution control (sequencing), building segmentation, and efficient use of engineering controls to streamline the D and D process. Overall costs on the first facility were reduced by over 20%. The increased labor efficiency resulted in decreased Personal Protective Equipment costs for field personnel. This approach will be discussed in detail.

  5. D & D screening risk evaluation guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

  6. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  7. Vitamin D and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.; DAWSON-HUGHES, BESS

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of evidence from animal and human studies, vitamin D has emerged as a potential risk modifier for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes). Vitamin D is thought to have both direct (through activation of the vitamin D receptor) and indirect (via regulation of calcium homeostasis) effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of both types of diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammation. Observational case-control studies have shown that vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy or early childhood is associated with reduced risk of incident type 1 diabetes. There are no trials on the effect of vitamin D (ergocalciferol or cholecalciferol) on type 1 diabetes. An association between vitamin D insufficiency and incident type 2 diabetes has been reported in longitudinal observational studies, but the association is not consistent. Results from small underpowered trials and post-hoc analyses of data from larger trials designed for bone-specific outcomes show no effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemia in healthy adults but vitamin D may retard the progression to diabetes in adults with glucose intolerance. Because vitamin D is an excellent marker of general health status, the positive results reported in some observational studies might reflect unmeasured and unaccounted confounding. Therefore, the hypothesis that vitamin D may modify diabetes risk needs to be confirmed in trials specifically designed for that purpose. PMID:20304061

  8. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  9. Catalyzed D-D stellarator reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Sheffield, John; Spong, Donald A.

    2016-05-12

    The advantages of using the catalyzed deuterium-deuterium (D-D) approach for a fusion reactor—lower and less energetic neutron flux and no need for a tritium breeding blanket—have been evaluated in previous papers, giving examples of both tokamak and stellarator reactors. This paper presents an update for the stellarator example, taking account of more recent empirical transport scaling results and design studies of lower-aspect-ratio stellarators. We use a modified version of the Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor model to cost a stellarator-type reactor. Recently, this model has been updated to reflect the improved science and technology base and costs in the magnetic fusionmore » program. Furthermore, it is shown that an interesting catalyzed D-D, stellarator power plant might be possible if the following parameters could be achieved: R/ ≈ 4, required improvement factor to ISS04 scaling, FR = 0.9 to 1.15, <β> ≈ 8.0% to 11.5%, Zeff ≈ 1.45 plus a relativistic temperature correction, fraction of fast ions lost ≈ 0.07, Bm ≈ 14 to 16 T, and R ≈ 18 to 24 m.« less

  10. Catalyzed D-D stellarator reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, John; Spong, Donald A.

    2016-05-12

    The advantages of using the catalyzed deuterium-deuterium (D-D) approach for a fusion reactor—lower and less energetic neutron flux and no need for a tritium breeding blanket—have been evaluated in previous papers, giving examples of both tokamak and stellarator reactors. This paper presents an update for the stellarator example, taking account of more recent empirical transport scaling results and design studies of lower-aspect-ratio stellarators. We use a modified version of the Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor model to cost a stellarator-type reactor. Recently, this model has been updated to reflect the improved science and technology base and costs in the magnetic fusion program. Furthermore, it is shown that an interesting catalyzed D-D, stellarator power plant might be possible if the following parameters could be achieved: R/ ≈ 4, required improvement factor to ISS04 scaling, FR = 0.9 to 1.15, <β> ≈ 8.0% to 11.5%, Zeff ≈ 1.45 plus a relativistic temperature correction, fraction of fast ions lost ≈ 0.07, Bm ≈ 14 to 16 T, and R ≈ 18 to 24 m.

  11. Study of B-->D(*)sJ +-D(*) decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-10-29

    We report a study of D(*)(sJ)(2317)(+) and D(sJ)(2460)(+) meson production in B decays. We observe the decays B+-->D((*)+)(sJ)D ((*)0) and B0-->D((*)+)(sJ)D((*)-) with the subsequent decays D(*)(sJ)(2317)(+)-->D(+)(s)pi(0), D(sJ)(2460)(+)-->D(+)(s)gamma, and D(sJ)(2460)(+)-->D(*+)(s)pi(0). Based on a data sample of 122.1 x 10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory, we obtain branching fractions for these modes, including the previously unseen decays B-->D((*)+)(sJ)D(*). In addition, we perform an angular analysis of D(sJ)(2460)(+)-->D(+)(s)gamma decays to test the different D(sJ)(2460)(+) spin hypotheses.

  12. Vitamin D and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Grace; Brehm, John M.; Alcorn, John F.; Holguín, Fernando; Aujla, Shean J.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and asthma are common conditions that share risk factors such as African American ethnicity, inner-city residence, and obesity. This review provides a critical examination of current experimental and epidemiologic evidence of a causal association between vitamin D status and asthma or asthma morbidity, including potential protective mechanisms such as antiviral effects and enhanced steroid responsiveness. Because most published epidemiologic studies of vitamin D and asthma or asthma morbidity are observational, a recommendation for or against vitamin D supplementation as preventive or secondary treatment for asthma is not advisable and must await results of ongoing clinical trials. Should these trials confirm a beneficial effect of vitamin D, others will be needed to assess the role of vitamin D supplementation to prevent or treat asthma in different groups such as infants, children of school age, and ethnic minorities. PMID:22016447

  13. 4-D photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  14. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  15. Vitamin D and depression.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2011-02-01

    Vitamin D is an essential nutrient proven to be important for bone health. It has other physiological functions, and there are plausible reasons for investigating vitamin D in depressive disorders. Some cross-sectional clinical and epidemiologic studies, but not all studies, have found that low levels of vitamin D are significantly associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms or with a depression diagnosis. However, cross-sectional studies cannot establish causality, and the methodology of these studies has been criticized. Due to the poor quality of the treatment studies, the effectiveness of vitamin D for depression cannot be adequately assessed. Current evidence does not definitively demonstrate that vitamin D deficiency is a cause of or risk for developing depression or that vitamin D is an effective therapy for depression.

  16. Super D-helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Oh, Phillial

    2001-11-01

    We study the ``Myers effect'' for a bunch of D1-branes with type-IIB superstrings moving in one direction along the branes. We show that the ``blown-up'' configuration is a helical D1-brane, which is self-supported from collapse by the axial momentum flow. The tilting angle of the helix is determined by the number of D1-branes. The radius of the helix is stabilized to a certain value depending on the number of D1-branes and the momentum carried by type-IIB superstrings. This helix is actually a T-dual version of the supertube recently found as the ``blown-up'' configuration of a bunch of type-IIA superstrings carrying a D0-brane charge. It is shown that the helical D1 configuration preserves one-quarter of the supersymmetry of the type-IIB Minkowski vacuum.

  17. D-brane bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.; McAllister, Liam

    2013-10-01

    We study the dynamics of ultrarelativistic D-branes. The dominant phenomenon is bremsstrahlung: mild acceleration induced by closed string interactions triggers extremely rapid energy loss through radiation of massless closed strings. After characterizing bremsstrahlung from a general k-dimensional extended object in a D-dimensional spacetime, we incorporate effects specific to D-branes, including velocity-dependent forces and open string pair creation. We then show that dissipation due to bremsstrahlung can substantially alter the dynamics in DBI inflation.

  18. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  19. Vitamin D Supplementation in Submariners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-02

    vitamin D3 (vit D3 ) or pre- vitamin D2 (vit D2 ) that are both acquired from the environment, but has...skin) (From Diet) Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol) UV light Vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) Liver 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D (Calcidiol) Kidney 1,25-Dihydroxy...Gallagher JC, Haynatzki G. Effect of vitamins D2 and D3 supplement use on serum 25OHD concentration in elderly women in summer and winter.

  20. [Aging and vitamin D].

    PubMed

    Kurasawa, Kentaro

    2006-07-01

    Although vitamin D plays an important role in bone metabolism, various factors tend to reduce the production of vitamin D in the elderly women, including their reduced activities of daily living (ADL). There is as yet no consensus among researchers as to what intake level of nutrients such as calcium and vitamin D is appropriate for each racial group to prevent bone fractures. To judge the effectiveness of anti-absorptive agents, however, an understanding of sufficient calcium and vitamin D intake levels is fundamental. It is important to re-evaluate both diet and the use of supplements for the elderly women.

  1. Production of neutral Sigma baryon in 91.2 GeV quark - anti-quark events at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legan, Christopher Kenneth

    1997-09-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of one of the three isospin states of the JP = [1/over 2]+ octet Σ baryons, the Σ0. In addition, the analysis yields the first differential cross-section measurement of the Σ0 hyperon in e+e/sp-/to q/bar q events. The unique particle identification capabilities of the DELPHI detector at LEP are used to obtain an increased efficiency by extending the standard Λ-finding algorithm. The average number of Σ0's produced per Z0 decay is calculated to beN(Σ0)/Zhad0=0.101/pm 0.008( stat)/pm 0.014(syst)/pm 0.007(extrap) eqno(0.1) The measurement is about 30% above the prediction of the scJETSET model, but nevertheless is compatible with scJETSET within 2 /sigma. Comparison with ARGUS results at /sqrt[s] = 10 GeV reveals similar levels of spin and strangeness suppression in hyperon production, within errors.

  2. Alternative D and D Planning Tool - 12466

    SciTech Connect

    Starling, D.A.; Schubert, A.L.; Bergener, T.W.

    2012-07-01

    On August 1, 2011, URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) began cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). UCOR's $2.2 billion contract has an initial five-year term and a four-year option period for completing the cleanup of ETTP and performing surveillance and maintenance and waste management operations at both the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 National Security Complex. ETTP D and D work includes disposition of large, complex, contaminated, Manhattan Project-era facilities such as the K-25 and K-27 uranium enrichment facilities. At ETTP, UCOR views the D and D process as a 'Waste Factory' with waste production lines from the point-of-generation to the point-of-disposal. Safely transforming vertically-standing buildings into horizontally-lying waste in a disposal facility is the primary cleanup objective. Whereas a factory produces widgets, D and D produces waste-lots of waste. In support of the Waste Factory view, UCOR is developing a systems planning tool to help better plan how to effect cleanup by improving waste planning, uniting waste generator with waste dis-positioner, and represent the 'waste factory' in a computer model that allows the D and D and waste management teams to better understand available disposal paths, waste uncertainties and potential consequences, driving variables, and sensitivity to changes. Any model of reality represents a compromise. Part of the Waste Factory Model's value may be in providing standardization and relative direction for assisting decision making as opposed to absolute cost or schedule answers. From that relative direction, management can commission detailed planning and estimating. Also, the model's output credibility is tied directly to its input quality. That is why, as discussed above, the Waste Factory Model's key informational component will be the standardized waste streams (e.g., Structure/Debris disposed at EMWMF) and associated standardized unit costs. The model development process generally

  3. Enterovirus D68

    MedlinePlus

    Non-polio enterovirus ... Updated October 10, 2014. www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/about/EV-D68.html . Accessed January 11, ... Updated October 14, 2014. www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/outbreaks/EV-D68-outbreaks.html . Accessed October ...

  4. Vitamin D and Influenza

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    the average American gets between 50 and 1000 IU units 5 minutes in a bathing suit in the summer noon day sun provides about 3,000 IU. Melanin in...Surveillance System Army Rations for troops in WW I supplied ~ 500 IU of vitamin D (and ~1,300 mg of Omega -3) Toxicity Vitamin D is fat soluble

  5. Enterovirus D68 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    First described in 1962 in children hospitalized for pneumonia and bronchiolitis, the Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emergent viral pathogen. Since its discovery, during the long period of surveillance up to 2005, EV-D68 was reported only as a cause of sporadic outbreaks. In recent years, many reports from different countries have described an increasing number of patients with respiratory diseases due to EV-D68 associated with relevant clinical severity. In particular, an unexpectedly high number of children have been hospitalized for severe respiratory disease due to EV-D68, requiring intensive care such as intubation and mechanical ventilation. Moreover, EV-D68 has been associated with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction in children, which has caused concerns in the community. As no specific antiviral therapy is available, treatment is mainly supportive. Moreover, because no vaccines are available, conventional infection control measures (i.e., standard, for contacts and droplets) in both community and healthcare settings are recommended. However, further studies are required to fully understand the real importance of this virus. Prompt diagnosis and continued surveillance of EV-D68 infections are essential to managing and preventing new outbreaks. Moreover, if the association between EV-D68 and severe diseases will be confirmed, the development of adequate preventive and therapeutic approaches are a priority. PMID:26610548

  6. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  7. Vitamin D and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vuolo, Laura; Di Somma, Carolina; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D system is a complex pathway that includes precursors, active metabolites, enzymes, and receptors. This complex system actives several molecular pathways and mediates a multitude of functions. In addition to the classical role in calcium and bone homeostasis, vitamin D plays “non-calcemic” effects in host defense, inflammation, immunity, and cancer processes as recognized in vitro and in vivo studies. The aim of this review is to highlight the relationship between vitamin D and cancer, summarizing several mechanisms proposed to explain the potential protective effect of vitamin D against the development and progression of cancer. Vitamin D acts like a transcription factor that influences central mechanisms of tumorigenesis: growth, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition to cellular and molecular studies, epidemiological surveys have shown that sunlight exposure and consequent increased circulating levels of vitamin D are associated with reduced reduced occurrence and a reduced mortality in different histological types of cancer. Another recent field of interest concerns polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor (VDR); in this context, preliminary data suggest that VDR polymorphisms more frequently associated with tumorigenesis are Fok1, Bsm1, Taq1, Apa1, EcoRV, Cdx2; although further studies are needed to clarify their role in the cancer. In this review, the relationship between vitamin D and cancer is discussed. PMID:22649423

  8. INEL D&D long-range plan

    SciTech Connect

    Buckland, R.J.; Kenoyer, D.J.; LaBuy, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    This Long-Range Plan presents the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D&D) Program planning status for facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan provides a general description of the D&D Program objectives, management criteria, and policy; discusses current activities; and documents the INEL D&D Program cost and schedule estimate projections for the next 15 years. Appendices are included that provide INEL D&D project historical information, a comprehensive descriptive summary of each current D&D surplus facility, and a summary database of all INEL contaminated facilities awaiting or undergoing the facility transition process.

  9. Vitamin D and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    MITRI, JOANNA; PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis There has been increasing evidence suggesting that vitamin D may play an important role in modifying risk of diabetes. In this regard, Vitamin D has both direct and indirect effects, the latter via regulation of calcium effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammation. The human evidence comes primarily from many cross-sectional and prospective observational studies, most of which showed an inverse association between vitamin D status and prevalence or incidence of type 2 diabetes. The effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemia or incident type 2 diabetes has been reported in several trials with mixed results. The present article describes the biological plausibility behind the potential association between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes and summarizes the current evidence supporting a relation between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes and briefly reports on the potential association between vitamin D and type 1 diabetes. PMID:24582099

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Alshishtawy, Moeness Moustafa

    2012-01-01

    Recently, scientists have generated a strong body of evidence providing new information about the preventive effect of vitamin D on a broad range of disorders. This evidence suggests that vitamin D is much more than a nutrient needed for bone health; it is an essential hormone required for regulation of a large number of physiological functions. Sufficient concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is essential for optimising human health. This article reviews the present state-of-the-art knowledge about vitamin D’s status worldwide and refers to recent articles discussing some of the general background of vitamin D, including sources, benefits, deficiencies, and dietary requirements, especially in pregnancy. They offer evidence that vitamin D deficiency could be a major public health burden in many parts of the world, mostly because of sun deprivation. The article also discusses the debate about optimal concentration of circulating serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and explores different views on the amount of vitamin D supplementation required to achieve and maintain this concentration. PMID:22548132

  11. Helical-D pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    A stabilized pinch configuration is described, consisting of a D-shaped plasma cross section wrapped tightly around a guiding axis. The {open_quotes}helical-D{close_quotes} geometry produces a very large axial (toroidal) transform of magnetic line direction that reverses the pitch of the magnetic lines without the need of azimuthal (poloidal) plasma current. Thus, there is no need of a {open_quotes}dynamo{close_quotes} process and its associated fluctuations. The resulting configuration has the high magnetic shear and pitch reversal of the reversed field pinch (RFP). (Pitch = P = qR, where R = major radius). A helical-D pinch might demonstrate good confinement at q << 1.

  12. A Search For The Z → b anti-b Process at The D-Zero Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Amber Helen

    2006-11-01

    In 2001, the D0 experiment entered a new era. Run II of the Tevatron at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory began, and the collider became the highest energy particle accelerator in the world. Accordingly, the D0 detector had already undergone a series of upgrades in order to fully exploit the physics now within reach. These included improvements to the tracking, calorimetry, muon detection and triggering capabilities. In the Standard Model, the Higgs boson is the last piece of the puzzle that remains to be discovered. The Higgs mechanism and consequently the Higgs boson is thought to be the fundamental ingredient by which particles acquire mass, and its existence (or lack of existence) is one of the most pressing issues in particle physics today. As such, one of the main goals of the Run II physics programme at D0 is to search for it. Armed with new accelerator capabilities, D0 will be able to impose tighter constraints on the mass of the Higgs, and perhaps even detect this elusive particle. If the Higgs does exist, it will be extremely difficult to find. One of the main challenges at a hadron-hadron collider is to reduce the large QCD background that masks the relatively tiny Higgs signal. Experimental evidence indicates that the Higgs mass is relatively low, in which case it will decay predominantly to a b$\\bar{b}$ quark-antiquark pair. The daughter products that must be used to reconstruct the parent Higgs are therefore likely to be heavy flavour b-quark jets whose energies must be known as accurately as possible. In the first part of this thesis consideration is given to these jets, in particular to the jet energy resolution and dijet mass resolution that they could offer. One way of investigating the necessary tools for such a Higgs search is to study a very similar decay to that of a low-mass Higgs particle: a Z boson decaying to a b quark and an anti-b-quark. This signal, not previously observed at the Tevatron, offers an ideal testbed in which to

  13. Breastfeeding: Vitamin D Supplementation

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to synthesize additional vitamin D through routine sunlight exposure. However, published reports of cases of vitamin ... a vitamin supplement or from adequate exposure to sunlight. A number of factors decrease the amount of ...

  14. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000216.htm Delta agent (Hepatitis D) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Delta agent is a type of virus called hepatitis ...

  15. D and C

    MedlinePlus

    ... bleeding between periods Perform a therapeutic or elective abortion Your provider may also recommend a D and ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Abortion Ectopic Pregnancy Female Infertility Miscarriage Uterine Cancer Uterine ...

  16. Calcium-D-glucarate.

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    Calcium-D-glucarate is the calcium salt of D-glucaric acid, a substance produced naturally in small amounts by mammals, including humans. Glucaric acid is also found in many fruits and vegetables with the highest concentrations to be found in oranges, apples, grapefruit, and cruciferous vegetables. Oral supplementation of calcium-D-glucarate has been shown to inhibit beta-glucuronidase, an enzyme produced by colonic microflora and involved in Phase II liver detoxification. Elevated beta-glucuronidase activity is associated with an increased risk for various cancers, particularly hormone-dependent cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Other potential clinical applications of oral calcium-D-glucarate include regulation of estrogen metabolism and as a lipid-lowering agent.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Linsey Utami; How, Choon How

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common and may contribute to osteopenia, osteoporosis and falls risk in the elderly. Screening for vitamin D deficiency is important in high-risk patients, especially for patients who suffered minimal trauma fractures. Vitamin D deficiency should be treated according to the severity of the deficiency. In high-risk adults, follow-up serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration should be measured 3–4 months after initiating maintenance therapy to confirm that the target level has been achieved. All patients should maintain a calcium intake of at least 1,000 mg for women aged ≤ 50 years and men ≤ 70 years, and 1,300 mg for women > 50 years and men > 70 years. PMID:26311908

  18. AD(H)D.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2008-06-01

    The BEACH program (Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health) shows that management of attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder (AD(H)D) was rare in general practice, occurring only six times per 1,000 encounters with children aged 5-17 years, between April 2000 and December 2007. This suggests that general practitioners manage AD(H)D about 46,000 times for this age group nationally each year.

  19. Fokker D.VII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Fokker D.VII: The Fokker D.VII was one of the best fighter aircraft of World War I, and was the only weapon used by the Central Powers specifically mentioned in the Versailles Treaty. The Central Powers surrendered 142 at the close of the war, and the Fokker company sold even more to the U. S. Air Service. Several were flown at Langley Field, but this one was the sole example operated by the NACA.

  20. D mesic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Recio, C.; Nieves, J.; Tolos, L.

    2010-06-01

    The energies and widths of several D0 meson bound states for different nuclei are obtained using a D-meson selfenergy in the nuclear medium, which is evaluated in a selfconsistent manner using techniques of unitarized coupled-channel theory. The kernel of the meson-baryon interaction is based on a model that treats heavy pseudoscalar and heavy vector mesons on equal footing, as required by heavy quark symmetry. We find D0 bound states in all studied nuclei, from 12C up to 208Pb. The inclusion of vector mesons is the keystone for obtaining an attractive D-nucleus interaction that leads to the existence of D0-nucleus bound states, as compared to previous studies based on SU(4) flavor symmetry. In some cases, the half widths are smaller than the separation of the levels, what makes possible their experimental observation by means of a nuclear reaction. This can be of particular interest for the future P¯ANDA@FAIR physics program. We also find a D+ bound state in 12C, but it is too broad and will have a significant overlap with the energies of the continuum.

  1. Pediatric Hypovitaminosis D

    PubMed Central

    Ariganjoye, Rafiu

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D, a secosteroid, is essential for the development and maintenance of healthy bone in both the adult and pediatric populations. Low level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-(OH)-D) is highly prevalent in children worldwide and has been linked to various adverse health outcomes including rickets, osteomalacia, osteomalacic myopathy, sarcopenia, and weakness, growth retardation, hypocalcemia, seizure and tetany, autism, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancers (prostate, colon, breast), infectious diseases (viral, tuberculosis), and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Risk factors for hypovitaminosis D are people with darker skin pigmentation, use of sunscreen, insufficient ultraviolet B exposure, prematurity, living in northern latitudes, malnutrition, obesity, exclusive breastfeeding, low maternal vitamin D level, certain medications, drinking unfortified cow’s milk, liver failure, chronic renal insufficiency, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. This review highlights and summarizes the molecular perspectives of vitamin D deficiency and its potential adverse health outcomes in pediatric age groups. The recommended treatment regimen is beyond the scope of this review. PMID:28229097

  2. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. D&D TECHNOLOGIES FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, Julia L.

    2003-02-27

    A new Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project was awarded in FY 2002 to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to deploy technologies that decrease pollution and waste in the areas of facility characterization, sludge treatment, dust and contamination control, and concrete demolition. This project was called ''D&D Technologies for Pollution Prevention'' and planned to deploy four different technologies. To reduce protective equipment requirements, waste generation, and risk of radiation exposure during facility characterization, the Russian Gamma Locater Device (GLD) and Isotopic Identification Device (IID) for remote characterization was investigated. The GLD detects gamma ray readings and video images remotely and uses radio communication to transmit the readings to personnel located a safe distance from the contaminated area. The IID, an integral part of the GLD, provides real-time spectrometric analysis of radiation sources for remotely identifying the specific radioactive isotopes present in the facility. At the INEEL, sludge has accumulated in the bottom of a fuel storage pool and the presence of heavy metals in the sludge makes it a mixed waste. This project planned to use LEADX{reg_sign} to treat sludge in place to effectively make all heavy metals in the sludge insoluble. LEADX{reg_sign} is a dry granular chemical additive (apatite) used for in-situ treatment of heavy-metal-contaminated material. LEADX{reg_sign} chemically bonds to any free heavy metals that it contacts and forms a stable, non-leachable molecule. After treating the sludge with LEADX{reg_sign}, it was to be left in the basin and the pool filled with grout. The successful treatment of the sludge with LEADX{reg_sign} will reduce the amount of waste to be disposed at the burial ground by eliminating the need to remove the sludge from the basin. Many off-gas and duct systems being dismantled contain dust and lint that has been contaminated

  4. Fusion product studies via fast ion D-D and D-3He fusion on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Hellsten, T.; Kiptily, V. G.; Craciunescu, T.; Eriksson, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Girardo, J.-B.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Johnson, T.; Kazakov, Y.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Monakhov, I.; Nabais, F.; Nocente, M.; Perez von Thun, C.; Rimini, F.; Santala, M.; Schneider, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Tsalas, M.; Yavorskij, V.; Zoita, V.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Dedicated fast ion D-D and D-3He fusion experiments were performed on JET with carbon wall (2008) and ITER-like wall (2014) for testing the upgraded neutron and energetic ion diagnostics of fusion products. Energy spectrum of D-D neutrons was the focus of the studies in pure deuterium plasmas. A significant broadening of the energy spectrum of neutrons born in D-D fast fusion was observed, and dependence of the maximum D and D-D neutron energies on plasma density was established. Diagnostics of charged products of aneutronic D-3He fusion reactions, 3.7 MeV alpha-particles similar to those in D-T fusion, and 14.6 MeV protons, were the focus of the studies in D-3He plasmas. Measurements of 16.4 MeV gamma-rays born in the weak secondary branch of D(3He, γ)5Li reaction were used for assessing D-3He fusion power. For achieving high yield of D-D and D-3He reactions at relatively low levels of input heating power, an acceleration of D beam up to the MeV energy range was used employing 3rd harmonic (f=3{{f}CD} ) ICRH technique. These results were compared to the techniques of D beam injection into D-3He mixture, and 3He-minority ICRH in D plasmas.

  5. Genetic and Transgenic Reagents for Drosophila simulans, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, D. santomea, and D. virilis.

    PubMed

    Stern, David L; Crocker, Justin; Ding, Yun; Frankel, Nicolas; Kappes, Gretchen; Kim, Elizabeth; Kuzmickas, Ryan; Lemire, Andrew; Mast, Joshua D; Picard, Serge

    2017-04-03

    Species of the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup, including the species D. simulans, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, and D. santomea, have long served as model systems for studying evolution. However, studies in these species have been limited by a paucity of genetic and transgenic reagents. Here, we describe a collection of transgenic and genetic strains generated to facilitate genetic studies within and between these species. We have generated many strains of each species containing mapped piggyBac transposons including an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) gene expressed in the eyes and a ϕC31 attP site-specific integration site. We have tested a subset of these lines for integration efficiency and reporter gene expression levels. We have also generated a smaller collection of other lines expressing other genetically encoded fluorescent molecules in the eyes and a number of other transgenic reagents that will be useful for functional studies in these species. In addition, we have mapped the insertion locations of 58 transposable elements in D. virilis that will be useful for genetic mapping studies.

  6. Genetic and Transgenic Reagents for Drosophila simulans, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, D. santomea, and D. virilis

    PubMed Central

    Stern, David L.; Crocker, Justin; Ding, Yun; Frankel, Nicolas; Kappes, Gretchen; Kim, Elizabeth; Kuzmickas, Ryan; Lemire, Andrew; Mast, Joshua D.; Picard, Serge

    2017-01-01

    Species of the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup, including the species D. simulans, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, and D. santomea, have long served as model systems for studying evolution. However, studies in these species have been limited by a paucity of genetic and transgenic reagents. Here, we describe a collection of transgenic and genetic strains generated to facilitate genetic studies within and between these species. We have generated many strains of each species containing mapped piggyBac transposons including an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) gene expressed in the eyes and a ϕC31 attP site-specific integration site. We have tested a subset of these lines for integration efficiency and reporter gene expression levels. We have also generated a smaller collection of other lines expressing other genetically encoded fluorescent molecules in the eyes and a number of other transgenic reagents that will be useful for functional studies in these species. In addition, we have mapped the insertion locations of 58 transposable elements in D. virilis that will be useful for genetic mapping studies. PMID:28280212

  7. NanoSail-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Adams, Charles L.

    2008-01-01

    The "NanoSail-D" mission is currently scheduled for launch onboard a Falcon-1 Launch Vehicle in the early June 2008 timeframe. The NanoSail-D spacecraft will consist of a solar sail subsystem stowed in a 2U volume and a 1U spacecraft bus, provided by Ames Research Center. The primary objectives of the NanoSail-D technology demonstration mission are to fabricate, stow and deploy on-orbit a solar sail and perform a de-orbit maneuver to demonstrate a potential orbital debris mitigation technology. The NanoSail-D mission is being developed through a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the NASA Ames Research Center Small Spacecraft Office. Details of the NanoSail-D system will be presented, including: 1) design details of the solar sail reflective membrane quadrants, gossamer booms, deployment system and passive attitude control system, 2) design analysis results including structural, thermal, environmental, orbital debris and safety, and 3) test results including deployment, ascent venting, launch vibration and PPOD integration verification.

  8. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  9. [3D display of sequential 2D medical images].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yisong; Chen, Yazhu

    2003-12-01

    A detailed review is given in this paper on various current 3D display methods for sequential 2D medical images and the new development in 3D medical image display. True 3D display, surface rendering, volume rendering, 3D texture mapping and distributed collaborative rendering are discussed in depth. For two kinds of medical applications: Real-time navigation system and high-fidelity diagnosis in computer aided surgery, different 3D display methods are presented.

  10. D-flation

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V. E-mail: nikolaos.mavromatos@kcl.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    In a recent paper we showed how Starobinsky-like inflation could emerge from dilaton dynamics in brane cosmology scenarios based on string theory, in which our universe is represented as a three-brane and the effective potential acquires a constant term from a density of effectively point-like non-perturbative defects on the brane: ''D-particles''. Here we explore how quantum fluctuations of the ensemble of D-particles during the inflationary period may modify the effective inflationary potential due to the dilaton. We then discuss two specific ways in which an enhanced ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations may arise: via either a condensate of vector fields with a Born-Infeld action that may be due to such recoil fluctuations, or graviton production in the D-particle vacuum.

  11. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  12. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  13. Sintering of Synroc D

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, G.

    1982-06-01

    Sintering has been investigated as a method for the mineralization and densification of high-level nuclear defense waste powder. Studies have been conducted on Synroc D composite powder LS04. Optimal densification has been found to be highly dependent on the characteristics of the starting material. Powder subjected to milling, which was believed to reduce the level of agglomeration and possibly particle size, was found to densify better than powder not subjected to this milling. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical could be achieved for samples sintered at 1150 to 1200/sup 0/C. Mineralogy was found to be as expected for Synroc D for samples sintered in a CO/sub 2//CO atmosphere where the Fe/sup +2//Fe/sup +3/ ratio was maintained at 1.0 to 5.75. In a more oxidizing, pure CO/sub 2/ atmosphere a new phase, not previously identified in Synroc D, was found.

  14. INEL D&D Long-Range Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Buckland, R.J.; Kenoyer, D.J.; Preussner, D.H.

    1993-10-01

    This Long-Range Plan presents the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program planning status for facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan provides a general description of the D&D Program objectives, management criteria, and philosophy; discusses current activities; and documents the INEL D&D Program cost and schedule estimate projections for the next 15 years. appendices are included that provide INEL D&D project historical information and a comprehensive descriptive summary of each current surplus facility.

  15. RISK D/C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    RISK D/C is a prototype program which attempts to do program risk modeling for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) architectures proposed in the Synthesis Group Report. Risk assessment is made with respect to risk events, their probabilities, and the severities of potential results. The program allows risk mitigation strategies to be proposed for an exploration program architecture and to be ranked with respect to their effectiveness. RISK D/C allows for the fact that risk assessment in early planning phases is subjective. Although specific to the SEI in its present form, RISK D/C can be used as a framework for developing a risk assessment program for other specific uses. RISK D/C is organized into files, or stacks, of information, including the architecture, the hazard, and the risk event stacks. Although predefined, all stacks can be upgraded by a user. The architecture stack contains information concerning the general program alternatives, which are subsequently broken down into waypoints, missions, and mission phases. The hazard stack includes any background condition which could result in a risk event. A risk event is anything unfavorable that could happen during the course of a specific point within an architecture, and the risk event stack provides the probabilities, consequences, severities, and any mitigation strategies which could be used to reduce the risk of the event, and how much the risk is reduced. RISK D/C was developed for Macintosh series computers. It requires HyperCard 2.0 or later, as well as 2Mb of RAM and System 6.0.8 or later. A Macintosh II series computer is recommended due to speed concerns. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. RISK D/C was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Macintosh and HyperCard are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.

  16. Factor D Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The trauma caused by the open heart surgery often triggers massive inflammation because the immune system overreacts. Factor D, the protein which plays a key role in the biological steps that activate this immune response prevents the imune system from inappropriately rurning out of control, allowing the patient to recover more rapidly. Factor D blockers, with their great potential to alleviate the complication of inflammation associated with heart surgery, are now being developed for clinical trials. These new drugs, developed from space research, should be commercially available as soon as year 2001.

  17. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  18. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  19. Vitamin D and Disease Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... The skin makes vitamin D after exposure to sunlight. We also absorb vitamin D from certain foods, ... not make enough vitamin D by exposure to sunlight* or get enough through their diets. They may ...

  20. Anti-D Antibodies in Pregnant D Variant Antigen Carriers Initially Typed as RhD+

    PubMed Central

    Lukacevic Krstic, Jelena; Dajak, Slavica; Bingulac-Popovic, Jasna; Dogic, Vesna; Mratinovic-Mikulandra, Jela

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the incidence, the consequences, and the prevention strategy of anti-D alloimmunizations of D variant carriers in the obstetric population of Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia. Methods RhD immunization events were evaluated retrospectively for the period between 1993 and 2012. Women were tested for RhD antigen and irregular antibodies. Those with anti-D antibody who were not serologically D- were genotyped for RHD. They were evaluated for their obstetric and transfusion history and their titer of anti-D. The neonates were evaluated for RhD status, direct antiglobulin test (DAT), hemoglobin and bilirubin levels, transfusion therapy as well as phototherapy and outcome. Results Out of 104,884 live births 102,982 women were tested for RhD antigen. Anti-D immunization occurred in 184 women which accounts for 0.9% of individuals at risk of anti-D formation. 181 cases occurred in women serologically typed as D-. Three women were partial D carriers (DVa n = 2, DNB n = 1), initially typed RhD+, and recognized as D variant carriers after the immunization occurred. Anti-D titer varied from 1:1 to 1:16. Six children were RhD+, four had positive DAT, and two underwent phototherapy. Conclusion Anti-D immunization occurred in pregnant partial D carriers (DVa, DNB). RhD+ children had serologic markers of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), with no cases of severe HDFN. PMID:27994529

  1. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  2. Spacelab D-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, Bonnie J.

    1990-01-01

    The Spacelab D-1 (Deutchland Eins) Mission is discussed from the points of view of safety, materials handling, and toxic materials; the laboratory and equipment used; and some of the different philosophies utilized on this flight. How to enhance scientific return at the same time as being safe was examined.

  3. d-Limonene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    d - Limonene ; CASRN 5989 - 27 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  4. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  5. Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5).

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5; CAS No. 541-02-6) is a precursor in the production of siloxane polymers for industry and medicine and is a carrier ingredient in many toiletries and cosmetics. D5 has a relatively low order of toxicity following acute administration via the oral, dermal, and inhalation routes of exposure. It is not considered to be a dermal or eye irritant or a dermal sensitizer. There is no appreciable dermal absorption of D5 based on results from in vivo and in vitro studies. It has not been shown to be genotoxic/mutagenic when tested in a number of short-term in vitro and in vivo assays and did not cause reproductive or developmental toxicity in rats. Inhalation exposure of rats to 160 ppm D5 for up to 24 months produced adverse effects in the liver (weight changes and hepatocellular hypertrophy) and uterus (increased incidence of endometrial adenocarcinoma, endometrial adenoma, and adenomatous polyps in several animals); however, the results of recent mode-of-action studies are consistent with a uterine tumorigenesis mechanism that is not relevant for humans. Based on the results of the chronic inhalation study, 160 ppm was determined to be the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) and was selected as the point of departure for the derivation of the workplace environmental exposure level (WEEL®) value. This NOAEL was adjusted to account for interindividual variability and residual uncertainty regarding upper respiratory tract changes still occurring at 160 ppm. The resulting 8-h time-weighted average WEEL value of 10 ppm is expected to provide a significant margin of safety against any potential adverse health effects in workers exposed to airborne D5.

  6. Energy Efficiency of D2D Multi-User Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zufan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-28

    The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication system is an important part of heterogeneous networks. It has great potential to improve spectrum efficiency, throughput and energy efficiency cooperation of multiple D2D users with the advantage of direct communication. When cooperating, D2D users expend extraordinary energy to relay data to other D2D users. Hence, the remaining energy of D2D users determines the life of the system. This paper proposes a cooperation scheme for multiple D2D users who reuse the orthogonal spectrum and are interested in the same data by aiming to solve the energy problem of D2D users. Considering both energy availability and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is introduced in the cooperation scheme to solve relay selection problems. Thus, the cooperation issue is transformed into a maximum weighted matching (MWM) problem. In order to enhance energy efficiency without the deterioration of Quality of Service (QoS), the link outage probability is derived according to the Shannon Equation by considering the data rate and delay. The simulation studies the relationships among the number of cooperative users, the length of shared data, the number of data packets and energy efficiency.

  7. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities.

  8. D and D Knowledge Management Information Tool - 2012 - 12106

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, H.; Lagos, L.; Quintero, W.; Shoffner, P.; DeGregory, J.

    2012-07-01

    Deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) work is a high priority activity across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Subject matter specialists (SMS) associated with the different ALARA (As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable) Centers, DOE sites, Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) and the D and D community have gained extensive knowledge and experience over the years in the cleanup of the legacy waste from the Manhattan Project. To prevent the D and D knowledge and expertise from being lost over time from the evolving and aging workforce, DOE and the Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) proposed to capture and maintain this valuable information in a universally available and easily usable system. D and D KM-IT provides single point access to all D and D related activities through its knowledge base. It is a community driven system. D and D KM-IT makes D and D knowledge available to the people who need it at the time they need it and in a readily usable format. It uses the World Wide Web as the primary source for content in addition to information collected from subject matter specialists and the D and D community. It brings information in real time through web based custom search processes and its dynamic knowledge repository. Future developments include developing a document library, providing D and D information access on mobile devices for the Technology module and Hotline, and coordinating multiple subject matter specialists to support the Hotline. The goal is to deploy a high-end sophisticated and secured system to serve as a single large knowledge base for all the D and D activities. The system consolidates a large amount of information available on the web and presents it to users in the simplest way possible. (authors)

  9. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  10. Vitamin D and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kempker, Jordan A.; Han, Jenny E.; Tangpricha, Vin; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Martin, Greg S.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency and sepsis are both highly prevalent worldwide problems and this article reviews the emerging science that is defining the intersections of these conditions. The importance of vitamin D’s role in skeletal health has long been understood but recent evidence is beginning to highlight its role in the functioning of other physiologic systems of the body. Basic science data reveal its integral role in local immune responses to pathogens and the systemic inflammatory pathways of sepsis. Furthermore, clinical scientists have found associations with respiratory infections, critical illness and sepsis but the causal relationship and its clinical impact have yet to be clearly defined. The article ends with speculations on the connections between racial disparities and seasonal differences in sepsis and vitamin D insufficiency. PMID:22928065

  11. Multiple Sclerosis and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... mL) levels. Every participant received 1,000 IU vitamin D2, a synthetic form of vitamin D derived from ... identical pill containing 6,000 IU of additional vitamin D2. Vitamin D levels were checked during the study ...

  12. 2-D Versus 3-D Magnetotelluric Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, the number of publications dealing with the mathematical and physical 3-D aspects of the magnetotelluric method has increased drastically. However, field experiments on a grid are often impractical and surveys are frequently restricted to single or widely separated profiles. So, in many cases we find ourselves with the following question: is the applicability of the 2-D hypothesis valid to extract geoelectric and geological information from real 3-D environments? The aim of this paper is to explore a few instructive but general situations to understand the basics of a 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data and to determine which data subset (TE-mode or TM-mode) is best for obtaining the electrical conductivity distribution of the subsurface using 2-D techniques. A review of the mathematical and physical fundamentals of the electromagnetic fields generated by a simple 3-D structure allows us to prioritise the choice of modes in a 2-D interpretation of responses influenced by 3-D structures. This analysis is corroborated by numerical results from synthetic models and by real data acquired by other authors. One important result of this analysis is that the mode most unaffected by 3-D effects depends on the position of the 3-D structure with respect to the regional 2-D strike direction. When the 3-D body is normal to the regional strike, the TE-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, while the TM-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects. In this case, a 2-D interpretation of the TM-mode is prone to error. When the 3-D body is parallel to the regional 2-D strike the TE-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects and the TM-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, making it more suitable for 2-D interpretation. In general, a wise 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data can be a guide to a reasonable geological interpretation.

  13. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  14. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. Reconstruction-based 3D/2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel 3D/2D registration method, where first, a 3D image is reconstructed from a few 2D X-ray images and next, the preoperative 3D image is brought into the best possible spatial correspondence with the reconstructed image by optimizing a similarity measure. Because the quality of the reconstructed image is generally low, we introduce a novel asymmetric mutual information similarity measure, which is able to cope with low image quality as well as with different imaging modalities. The novel 3D/2D registration method has been evaluated using standardized evaluation methodology and publicly available 3D CT, 3DRX, and MR and 2D X-ray images of two spine phantoms, for which gold standard registrations were known. In terms of robustness, reliability and capture range the proposed method outperformed the gradient-based method and the method based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs).

  16. D1/D5 dopamine receptors modulate spatial memory formation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Weber C N; Köhler, Cristiano C; Radiske, Andressa; Cammarota, Martín

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effect of the intra-CA1 administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 and the D1/D5 receptor agonist SKF38393 on spatial memory in the water maze. When given immediately, but not 3h after training, SCH23390 hindered long-term spatial memory formation without affecting non-spatial memory or the normal functionality of the hippocampus. On the contrary, post-training infusion of SKF38393 enhanced retention and facilitated the spontaneous recovery of the original spatial preference after reversal learning. Our findings demonstrate that hippocampal D1/D5 receptors play an essential role in spatial memory processing.

  17. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  18. Bioconversion of D-psicose to D-tagatose and D-talitol by Mucoraceae fungi.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Kazutoshi; Shinohara, Yoshihiro; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Izumori, Ken

    2006-03-01

    Rhizopus oryzae MYA-2483, which cannot utilize D-psicose as a sole source of carbon, converted D-psicose to two other compounds. These compounds were identified by NMR and IR as D-tagatose and D-talitol. In this study, we describe for the first time the bioconversion of D-psicose to D-tagatose. Various strains of Mucoraceae fungi, to which R. oryzae MYA-2483 belongs, exhibited conversion activity similar to that of R. oryzae MYA-2483. There is the possibility that a considerable number of fungi belonging to Mucoraceae possess such D-psicose conversion activity.

  19. D5 dopamine receptor carboxyl tail involved in D5-D2 heteromer formation

    PubMed Central

    O’Dowd, Brian F.; Nguyen, Tuan; Ji, Xiaodong; George, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that D5 and D2 dopamine receptors exist as heteromers in cells, and determined these receptor interact through amino acids in the cytoplasmic regions of each receptor. Specifically involved in heteromer formation we identified in the carboxyl tail of the D5 receptor three adjacent glutamic acid residues, and in intracellular loop 3 of the D2 receptor two adjacent arginine residues. Any pairing of these three D5 receptor glutamic acids were sufficient for heteromer formation. These identified residues in D5 and D2 receptors are oppositely charged and likely interact by electrostatic interactions. PMID:23318175

  20. Vitamin D and the skin.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mona; Kerr, Philip E; Slade, Karren; Grant-Kels, Jane E

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble nutrient that humans obtain through the diet and by synthesis in the skin upon exposure to ultraviolet B. Vitamin D is then converted by the liver to 25-hydroxyvitamin D, its major circulating form. This form is the best indicator of vitamin D nutritional status and is easily measured. Under the influence of parathyroid hormone, the kidney then converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the biologically active, hormonal form of the nutrient that is important in the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus and is critical in building and maintaining healthy bones. Many cell types outside of the skeletal system, including various cells in the skin, also express the vitamin D receptor. In addition, many cell types convert circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D for local use. This metabolite has been shown to exert potent effects on cellular differentiation, cellular proliferation, and immune regulation. It is theorized that by these mechanisms vitamin D and its analogues are effective treatment options for psoriasis and other skin diseases. Insufficient vitamin D nutritional status has been associated with a host of other diseases, most notably cancer. There is evidence that supplementation with vitamin D reduces the overall incidence of cancer, although current evidence is insufficient to prove a causative effect. Sunscreen use blocks the ability of the skin to photosynthesize vitamin D, although the effect this has on the vitamin D status of the general population is unclear.

  1. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  2. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  3. Nimbus D RMP program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an advanced long life rate measuring package, designed for a five year useful life as a meteorological satellite control sensor is discussed. The primary function of the rate mesuring package is to provide rate information for the reaction wheel and gas jet torquing devices that are used to damp spacecraft oscillations and to constrain the spacecraft to the required attitude with respect to the orbital plane. The specifications for the rate measuring package sensor are described. Application of the rate measuring package to the Nimbus D satellite is proposed.

  4. 'Insightful D-branes'

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Gary; Lawrence, Albion; Silverstein, Eva; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2010-08-26

    We study a simple model of a black hole in AdS and obtain a holographic description of the region inside the horizon. A key role is played by the dynamics of the scalar fields in the dual gauge theory. This leads to a proposal for a dual description of D-branes falling through the horizon of any AdS black hole. The proposal uses a field-dependent time reparameterization in the field theory. We relate this reparametrization to various gauge invariances of the theory. Finally, we speculate on information loss and the black hole singularity in this context.

  5. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  6. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  7. Measurement of the B -> D(*)D(*)K Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, P.del Amo

    2010-12-16

    The authors present a measurement of the branching fractions of the 22 decay channels of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons to {bar D}{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K, where the D{sup (*)} and {bar D}{sup (*)} mesons are fully reconstructed. Summing the 10 neutral modes and the 12 charged modes, the branching fractions are found to be {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar D}{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K) = (3.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.24)% and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K) = (4.05 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.28)%, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The results are based on 429 fb{sup -1} of data containing 471 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  8. The environment of D and cD galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.

    1983-11-01

    The Dressler (1980) morphological sample of galaxies in clusters is used in an investigation of bright galaxy spatial distribution, which has established that such galaxies with luminous extended halos as the D or cD lie on significant cluster galaxy distribution peaks irrespective of whether they are the brightest cluster member. The mean distance of bright D and cD galaxies from local density peaks is of the order of their halo scales, and the positions of bright galaxies of other morphological types are consistent with their being drawn at random from each morphological population. It is noted that local density peaks with associated d ocD galaxies have a mean density 2-3 times greater than peaks without a D or cD.

  9. Couplings between the ρ and D and D* mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bennich, Bruno; Paracha, M. Ali; Roberts, Craig D.; Rojas, Eduardo

    2017-02-01

    We compute couplings between the ρ -meson and D and D* mesons—D(*)ρ D(*)—that are relevant to phenomenological meson-exchange models used to analyze nucleon-D -meson scattering and explore the possibility of exotic charmed nuclei. Our framework is built from elements constrained by Dyson-Schwinger equation studies in QCD, and therefore expresses a simultaneous description of light- and heavy-quarks and the states they constitute. We find that all interactions, including the three independent DD* couplings, differ markedly amongst themselves in strength and also in range, as measured by their evolution with ρ -meson virtuality. As a consequence, it appears that one should be cautious in using a single coupling strength or parametrization for the study of interactions between D(*) mesons and matter.

  10. A simultaneous 2D/3D autostereo workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Dennis; McGinnis, Bradley; Talandis, Jonas; Leigh, Jason; Peterka, Tom; Knoll, Aaron; Sumer, Aslihan; Papka, Michael; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel immersive workstation environment that scientists can use for 3D data exploration and as their everyday 2D computer monitor. Our implementation is based on an autostereoscopic dynamic parallax barrier 2D/3D display, interactive input devices, and a software infrastructure that allows client/server software modules to couple the workstation to scientists' visualization applications. This paper describes the hardware construction and calibration, software components, and a demonstration of our system in nanoscale materials science exploration.

  11. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  12. The D0 upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tuts, P.M.; The D0 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    The original D0 detector was proposed in 1983, with a focus on high P{sub T} physics using precision measurements of e`s, {mu}`s, jets, and missing E{sub T}. This detector, as of the summer of 1992, has started data taking at the Fermilab Collider. However, by 1995/6 the luminosity will reach 10{sup 31} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}, and the minimum bunch spacing will drop to 396ns from the present 3.5{mu}s (by the Main Injector era, luminosities will approach 10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1} and minimum bunch spacings may reach 132ns). These changes in the accelerator conditions force us to upgrade or replace a number of detector subsystems in order to meet these new demands. In addition, the upgrade offers us the opportunity to expand the physics horizons to include not only the all important high P{sub T} physics menu, but also the low P{sub T} physics that has become increasingly important. In this paper we describe the D0 detector upgrade.

  13. The D0 upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tuts, P.M. . Physics Dept.)

    1992-10-01

    The original D0 detector was proposed in 1983, with a focus on high P[sub T] physics using precision measurements of e's, [mu]'s, jets, and missing E[sub T]. This detector, as of the summer of 1992, has started data taking at the Fermilab Collider. However, by 1995/6 the luminosity will reach 10[sup 31] cm[sup [minus]2]sec[sup [minus]1], and the minimum bunch spacing will drop to 396ns from the present 3.5[mu]s (by the Main Injector era, luminosities will approach 10[sup 32] cm[sup [minus]2]sec[sup [minus]1] and minimum bunch spacings may reach 132ns). These changes in the accelerator conditions force us to upgrade or replace a number of detector subsystems in order to meet these new demands. In addition, the upgrade offers us the opportunity to expand the physics horizons to include not only the all important high P[sub T] physics menu, but also the low P[sub T] physics that has become increasingly important. In this paper we describe the D0 detector upgrade.

  14. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. A Comparison of D. O. and M. D. Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachnik, Thomas J.; Simons, Ronald C.

    1977-01-01

    Performances of students from two medical colleges, one allopathic (M.D.) and one osteopathic (D.O.), at Michigan State University in a first course in psychiatry are compared. The M.D. students had scored significantly higher on the MCAT, but there was no difference in psychiatry course performance. (Author/LBH)

  16. Efficacy of hybrid tetrahydrobenzo[d]thiazole based aryl piperazines D-264 and D-301 at D2 and D3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Juan; Antonio, Tamara; Jacob, Joanna C.; Grandy, David K.

    2016-01-01

    In elucidating the role of pharmacodynamic efficacy at D3 receptors in therapeutic effectiveness of dopamine receptor agonists, the influence of study system must be understood. Here two compounds with D3 over D2 selectivity developed in our earlier work, D-264 and D-301, are compared in dopamine receptor-mediated G-protein activation in striatal regions of wild-type and D2 receptor knockout mice and in CHO cells expressing D2 or D3 receptors. In caudate-putamen of D2 knockout mice, D-301 was ~ 3-fold more efficacious than D-264 in activating G-proteins as assessed by [35S]GTP S binding; in nucleus accumbens, D-301 stimulated G-protein activation whereas D-264 did not. In contrast, the two ligands exerted similar efficacy in both regions of wild-type mice, suggesting both ligands activate D2 receptors with similar efficacy. In D2 and D3 receptor-expressing CHO cells, D-264 and D-301 appeared to act in the [35S]GTP S assay as full agonists because they produced maximal stimulation equal to dopamine. Competition for [3H]spiperone binding was then performed to determine Ki/EC50 ratios as an index of receptor reserve for each ligand. Action of D-301, but not D-264, showed receptor reserve in D3 but not in D2 receptor-expressing cells, whereas dopamine showed receptor reserve in both cell lines. G o1 is highly expressed in brain and is important in D2 -like receptor-G protein coupling. Transfection of G o1 in D3- but not D2-expressing CHO cells led to receptor reserve for D-264 without altering receptor expression levels. D-301 and dopamine exhibited receptor reserve in D3-expressing cells both with and without transfection of G o1. Altogether, these results indicate that D-301 has greater intrinsic efficacy to activate D3 receptors than D-264, whereas the two compounds act on D2 receptors with similar intrinsic efficacy. These findings also suggest caution in interpreting Emax values from functional assays in receptor-transfected cell models without accounting for

  17. 3D Equilibrium Reconstructions in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. W.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.; Hirshman, H. P.; Lazarus, E. A.; Sontag, A. C.; Hanson, J.; Trevisan, G.

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and efficient 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed in tokamaks for study of 3D magnetic field effects on experimentally reconstructed equilibrium and for analysis of MHD stability experiments with externally imposed magnetic perturbations. A large number of new magnetic probes have been recently installed in DIII-D to improve 3D equilibrium measurements and to facilitate 3D reconstructions. The V3FIT code has been in use in DIII-D to support 3D reconstruction and the new magnetic diagnostic design. V3FIT is based on the 3D equilibrium code VMEC that assumes nested magnetic surfaces. V3FIT uses a pseudo-Newton least-square algorithm to search for the solution vector. In parallel, the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code is being extended to allow for 3D effects using a perturbation approach based on an expansion of the MHD equations. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include the magnetic island and stochastic effects. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the GATO, MARS-F, or M3D-C1 MHD codes. DIII-D 3D reconstruction examples using EFIT and V3FIT and the new 3D magnetic data will be presented. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  18. Towards functional assembly of 3D and 2D nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.; Wang, Kai; Ievlev, Anton V.; Muckley, Eric S.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-09-01

    Functional assemblies of materials can be realized by tuning the work function and band gap of nanomaterials by rational material selection and design. Here we demonstrate the structural assembly of 2D and 3D nanomaterials and show that layering a 2D material monolayer on a 3D metal oxide leads to substantial alteration of both the surface potential and optical properties of the 3D material. A 40 nm thick film of polycrystalline NiO was produced by room temperature rf-sputtering, resulting in a 3D nanoparticle assembly. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown 10-30 μm WS2 flakes (2D material) were placed on the NiO surface using a PDMS stamp transfer technique. The 2D/3D WS2/NiO assembly was characterized using confocal micro Raman spectroscopy to evaluate the vibrational properties and using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to evaluate the surface potential. Raman maps of the 2D/3D assembly show spatial non-uniformity of the A1g mode ( 418 cm-1) and the disorder-enhanced longitudinal acoustic mode, 2LA(M) ( 350 cm-1), suggesting that the WS2 exists in a strained condition on when transferred onto 3D polycrystalline NiO. KPFM measurements show that single layer WS2 on SiO2 has a surface potential 75 mV lower than that of SiO2, whereas the surface potential of WS2 on NiO is 15 mV higher than NiO, indicating that WS2 could act as electron donor or acceptor depending on the 3D material it is interfaced with. Thus 2D and 3D materials can be organized into functional assemblies with electron flow controlled by the WS2 either as the electron donor or acceptor.

  19. D and D knowledge management information tool - a web based system developed to share D and D knowledge worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, L.; Upadhyay, H.; Shoffner, P.

    2013-07-01

    Deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) work is a high risk and technically challenging enterprise within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. During the past three decades, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management has been in charge of carrying out one of the largest environmental restoration efforts in the world: the cleanup of the Manhattan Project legacy. In today's corporate world, worker experiences and knowledge that have developed over time represent a valuable corporate asset. The ever-dynamic workplace, coupled with an aging workforce, presents corporations with the ongoing challenge of preserving work-related experiences and knowledge for cross-generational knowledge transfer to the future workforce [5]. To prevent the D and D knowledge base and expertise from being lost over time, the DOE and the Applied Research Center at Florida International University (FIU) have developed the web-based Knowledge Management Information Tool (KM-IT) to capture and maintain this valuable information in a universally available and easily accessible and usable system. The D and D KM-IT was developed in collaboration with DOE Headquarters (HQ), the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), and the ALARA [as low as reasonably achievable] Centers at Savannah River Sites to preserve the D and D information generated and collected by the D and D community. This is an open secured system that can be accessed from https://www.dndkm.org over the web and through mobile devices at https://m.dndkm.org. This knowledge system serves as a centralized repository and provides a common interface for D and D-related activities. It also improves efficiency by reducing the need to rediscover knowledge and promotes the reuse of existing knowledge. It is a community-driven system that facilitates the gathering, analyzing, storing, and sharing of knowledge and information within the D and D community. It assists the DOE D and D community in identifying potential solutions to their

  20. Vitamin D and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... D Deficiency? Things like a lack of direct sunlight and insufficient vitamin D in the diet put ... is limited. Because of limited skin exposure to sunlight from November to February, kids who live in ...

  1. [Vitamina D. A wonderful drug?].

    PubMed

    Casado de Frías, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    During the last years vitamina D receptors have been found in a vast number of tissues and cell types. In paralel, the therapeutic utility of vitamina D has expanded to the prophylaxis of muscular, oncologic, cardiovascular and autoinmmune disorders.

  2. 25-hydroxy vitamin D test

    MedlinePlus

    ... than-normal level can be due to a vitamin D deficiency , which can result from: Lack of exposure to ... ML; US Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for vitamin D deficiency in adults: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation ...

  3. DIII-D research operations

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R D; and collaborative efforts.

  4. Treating P.A.D.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Treating P.A.D. Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For ... Illustration courtesy of NHLBI Treatment for P.A.D. is designed to reduce a patient's symptoms, prevent ...

  5. Vitamin D4 in mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine M; Horst, Ronald L; Koszewski, Nicholas J; Simon, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    An unknown vitamin D compound was observed in the HPLC-UV chromatogram of edible mushrooms in the course of analyzing vitamin D(2) as part of a food composition study and confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be vitamin D(4) (22-dihydroergocalciferol). Vitamin D(4) was quantified by HPLC with UV detection, with vitamin [(3)H] itamin D(3) as an internal standard. White button, crimini, portabella, enoki, shiitake, maitake, oyster, morel, chanterelle, and UV-treated portabella mushrooms were analyzed, as four composites each of a total of 71 samples from U.S. retail suppliers and producers. Vitamin D(4) was present (>0.1 µg/100 g) in a total of 18 composites and in at least one composite of each mushroom type except white button. The level was highest in samples with known UV exposure: vitamin D enhanced portabella, and maitake mushrooms from one supplier (0.2-7.0 and 22.5-35.4 µg/100 g, respectively). Other mushrooms had detectable vitamin D(4) in some but not all samples. In one composite of oyster mushrooms the vitamin D(4) content was more than twice that of D(2) (6.29 vs. 2.59 µg/100 g). Vitamin D(4) exceeded 2 µg/100 g in the morel and chanterelle mushroom samples that contained D(4), but was undetectable in two morel samples. The vitamin D(4) precursor 22,23-dihydroergosterol was found in all composites (4.49-16.5 mg/100 g). Vitamin D(4) should be expected to occur in mushrooms exposed to UV light, such as commercially produced vitamin D enhanced products, wild grown mushrooms or other mushrooms receiving incidental exposure. Because vitamin D(4) coeluted with D(3) in the routine HPLC analysis of vitamin D(2) and an alternate mobile phase was necessary for resolution, researchers analyzing vitamin D(2) in mushrooms and using D(3) as an internal standard should verify that the system will resolve vitamins D(3) and D(4).

  6. Vitamin D4 in Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Katherine M.; Horst, Ronald L.; Koszewski, Nicholas J.; Simon, Ryan R.

    2012-01-01

    An unknown vitamin D compound was observed in the HPLC-UV chromatogram of edible mushrooms in the course of analyzing vitamin D2 as part of a food composition study and confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be vitamin D4 (22-dihydroergocalciferol). Vitamin D4 was quantified by HPLC with UV detection, with vitamin [3H] itamin D3 as an internal standard. White button, crimini, portabella, enoki, shiitake, maitake, oyster, morel, chanterelle, and UV-treated portabella mushrooms were analyzed, as four composites each of a total of 71 samples from U.S. retail suppliers and producers. Vitamin D4 was present (>0.1 µg/100 g) in a total of 18 composites and in at least one composite of each mushroom type except white button. The level was highest in samples with known UV exposure: vitamin D enhanced portabella, and maitake mushrooms from one supplier (0.2–7.0 and 22.5–35.4 µg/100 g, respectively). Other mushrooms had detectable vitamin D4 in some but not all samples. In one composite of oyster mushrooms the vitamin D4 content was more than twice that of D2 (6.29 vs. 2.59 µg/100 g). Vitamin D4 exceeded 2 µg/100 g in the morel and chanterelle mushroom samples that contained D4, but was undetectable in two morel samples. The vitamin D4 precursor 22,23-dihydroergosterol was found in all composites (4.49–16.5 mg/100 g). Vitamin D4 should be expected to occur in mushrooms exposed to UV light, such as commercially produced vitamin D enhanced products, wild grown mushrooms or other mushrooms receiving incidental exposure. Because vitamin D4 coeluted with D3 in the routine HPLC analysis of vitamin D2 and an alternate mobile phase was necessary for resolution, researchers analyzing vitamin D2 in mushrooms and using D3 as an internal standard should verify that the system will resolve vitamins D3 and D4. PMID:22870201

  7. USJ metrology: from 0D to 3D analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2007-09-26

    The analysis of ultra shallow junctions is becoming a challenging task for which numerous tools and concepts are available. The requirements range from a simple 0D-analysis such as the integral dose or the sheet resistance over a simple 1D-profile (as obtained on blanket films) towards the 2D-dopant profile within a transistor. The ultimate complexity will be the analysis of a complete 3D-structure such as a FINFET, requiring a metrology tool with 3D-resolution. In each of these areas significant progress has been made in recent years and new concepts are emerging which will be discussed in this review.

  8. [Vitamin D and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Otto

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease is without any doubt multifactorial, and it is generally accepted, that conventional risk factors determined only about 80% of cardiovascular risk. There is accumulating evidence that vitamin D exerts important pathophysiological effects on cardiovascular system. Low vitamin D was associated with increased cardiovascular risk in several reports. This review summarizes recent epidemiological evidence and possible pathophysiological mechanism for a role of low vitamin D in cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, available data concerning vitamin D supplementation are depicted.

  9. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  10. Vitamin D Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The solar dosimeter, a spinoff from NASA solar cell technology, measures the amount of solar radiation to which its wearer is exposed. It was used in a University of Cincinnati Medical Center investigation into the effect of sunlight exposure on maintaining vitamin D status in infants. The infants were exposed to sunlight and records were kept by mothers. Each baby wore a solar dosimeter. The two circular "eyes" in the instrument are silicon photovoltaic detectors which collect solar energy, convert it to electric signals and transmit the charge to E-cells that record the charge by plating silver ions onto an electrode. The time required to plate the silver measures the radiation received. The University found the solar dosimeter to be very effective.

  11. D2-D1 phase transition of columnar liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. F.; Swift, J.

    1986-04-01

    The D2-D1 phase transition in columnar liquid crystals of the HAT series [e.g., HAT11 (triphenelene hexa-n-dodecanoate)] is discussed within the framework of Landau theory. The order parameters which describe the transition are abstracted from a tensor density function, and are associated with two irreducible representations of the symmetry group of the high-temperature D2 phase. A mechanism for a first-order transition is then suggested in accordance with both theoretical considerations and the experimental result for the D2-D1 transition. Two possible arrangements of the herringbone structure of the D1 phase are obtained, each of which gives six orientational states in the low-temperature D1 phase.

  12. LANDSAT-D Investigations Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented which highlight LANDSAT-D project status and ground segment; early access TM processing; LANDSAT-D data acquisition and availability; LANDSAT-D performance characterization; MSS pre-NOAA characterization; MSS radiometric sensor performance (spectral information, absolute calibration, and ground processing); MSS geometric sensor performance; and MSS geometric processing and calibration.

  13. Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D requirements have become one of the most highly debated and controversial topics in nutrition. Recommendations for vitamin D intake during pregnancy are a central part of this discussion. The publication of a controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation in pregnant women by Hollis and cow...

  14. Observation of D+ --> etae + nue.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Ernst, J; Ecklund, K M; Severini, H; Love, W; Savinov, V; Aquines, O; Lopez, A; Mehrabyan, S; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J

    2009-02-27

    Using a 281 pb-1 data sample collected at the psi(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we report the first observation of D+ --> etae + nue. We also set upper limits for D+ --> eta'e + nue and D + --> varphie + nue that are about 2 orders of magnitude more restrictive than those obtained by previous experiments.

  15. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  16. Epidemiology of HBV subgenotypes D.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, Resat; Inanc Balkan, Ilker; Yemisen, Mucahit; Tabak, Fehmi

    2015-02-01

    The natural history of hepatitis B virus infection is not uniform and affected from several factors including, HBV genotype. Genotype D is a widely distributed genotype. Among genotype D, several subgenotypes differentiate epidemiologically and probably clinically. D1 is predominant in Middle East and North Africa, and characterized by early HBeAg seroconversion and low viral load. D2 is seen in Albania, Turkey, Brazil, western India, Lebanon, and Serbia. D3 was reported from Serbia, western India, and Indonesia. It is a predominant subgenotype in injection drug use-related acute HBV infections in Europe and Canada. D4 is relatively rare and reported from Haiti, Russia and Baltic region, Brazil, Kenya, Morocco and Rwanda. Subgenotype D5 seems to be common in Eastern India. D6 has been reported as a rare subgenotype from Indonesia, Kenya, Russia and Baltic region. D7 is the main genotype in Morocco and Tunisia. D8 and D9 are recently described subgenotypes and reported from Niger and India, respectively. Subgenotypes of genotype D may have clinical and/or viral differences. More subgenotype studies are required to conclude on subgenotype and its clinical/viral characteristics.

  17. Multispectroscopic methods reveal different modes of interaction of anti cancer drug mitoxantrone with Poly(dG-dC).Poly(dG-dC) and Poly(dA-dT).Poly(dA-dT).

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Pamita; Dogra, Shilpa; Barthwal, Ritu

    2013-10-05

    The interaction of mitoxantrone with alternating Poly(dG-dC).Poly(dG-dC) and Poly(dA-dT).Poly(dA-dT) duplex has been studied by absorption, fluorescence and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at Drug to Phosphate base pair ratios D/P=20.0-0.04. Binding to GC polymer occurs in two distinct modes: partial stacking characterized by red shifts of 18-23nm at D/P=0.2-0.8 and external binding at D/P=1.0-20.0 whereas that to AT polymer occurs externally in the entire range of D/P. The binding constant and number of binding sites is 3.7×10(5)M(-1), 0.3 and 1.3× 10(4)M(-1), 1.5 in GC and AT polymers, respectively at low D/P ratios. CD binding isotherms show breakpoints at D/P=0.1, 0.5 and 0.25, 0.5 in GC and AT polymers, respectively. The intrinsic CD bands indicate that the distortions in GC polymer are significantly higher than that in AT polymer. Docking studies show partial insertion of mitoxantrone rings between to GC base pairs in alternating GC polymer. Side chains of mitoxantrone interact specifically with base pairs and DNA backbone. The studies are relevant to the understanding of suppression or inhibition of DNA cleavage on formation of ternary complex with topoisomerase-II enzyme and hence the anti cancer action.

  18. Vitamin D: A millenium perspective.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2003-02-01

    Vitamin D is one of the oldest hormones that have been made in the earliest life forms for over 750 million years. Phytoplankton, zooplankton, and most plants and animals that are exposed to sunlight have the capacity to make vitamin D. Vitamin D is critically important for the development, growth, and maintenance of a healthy skeleton from birth until death. The major function of vitamin D is to maintain calcium homeostasis. It accomplishes this by increasing the efficiency of the intestine to absorb dietary calcium. When there is inadequate calcium in the diet to satisfy the body's calcium requirement, vitamin D communicates to the osteoblasts that signal osteoclast precursors to mature and dissolve the calcium stored in the bone. Vitamin D is metabolized in the liver and then in the kidney to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D]. 1,25(OH)(2)D receptors (VDR) are present not only in the intestine and bone, but in a wide variety of other tissues, including the brain, heart, stomach, pancreas, activated T and B lymphocytes, skin, gonads, etc. 1,25(OH)(2)D is one of the most potent substances to inhibit proliferation of both normal and hyperproliferative cells and induce them to mature. It is also recognized that a wide variety of tissues, including colon, prostate, breast, and skin have the enzymatic machinery to produce 1,25(OH)(2)D. 1,25(OH)(2)D and its analogs have been developed for treating the hyperproliferative disease psoriasis. Vitamin D deficiency is a major unrecognized health problem. Not only does it cause rickets in children, osteomalacia and osteoporosis in adults, but may have long lasting effects. Chronic vitamin D deficiency may have serious adverse consequences, including increased risk of hypertension, multiple sclerosis, cancers of the colon, prostate, breast, and ovary, and type 1 diabetes. There needs to be a better appreciation of the importance of vitamin D for overall health and well being.

  19. [Vitamin D and infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Jade; Viard, Jean-Paul

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in the synthesis of antibacterial peptids and in autophagy. Several studies have shown that low levels of vitamin D are associated with the susceptibility and the severity of acute infections on one hand, and with an unfavorable outcome of some chronic infections (such as HIV infection). Vitamin D supplementation improves response to treatment of some viral (such as chronic hepatitis C infection) or bacterial infections (such as pulmonar tuberculosis). Vitamin D supplementation demonstrated no benefit in reducing the incidence of pulmonary infections. The target level of vitamin D to be reached after supplementation is not known yet.

  20. Vitamin D: a d-lightful solution for health.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2011-08-01

    Throughout evolution, sunlight-produced vitamin D in the skin has been critically important for health. Vitamin D, known as the sunshine vitamin, is actually a hormone. Once it is produced in the skin or ingested from the diet, it is converted sequentially in the liver and kidneys to its biologically active form 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. This hormone interacts with its receptor in the small intestine to increase the efficiency of intestinal calcium and phosphate absorption for the maintenance of the skeleton throughout life. Vitamin D deficiency during the first few years of life results in a flattened pelvis, making it difficult for childbirth. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia and osteoporosis, increasing risk of fracture. Essentially, every tissue and cell in the body has a vitamin D receptor. Therefore, vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased risk for preeclampsia, requiring a cesarean section for birthing, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, types I and II diabetes, heart disease, dementia, deadly cancers, and infectious diseases. Therefore, sensible sun exposure along with vitamin D supplementation of at least 2000 IU/d for adults and 1000 IU/d for children is essential to maximize their health.

  1. D-D neutron generator development at LBNL.

    PubMed

    Reijonen, J; Gicquel, F; Hahto, S K; King, M; Lou, T-P; Leung, K-N

    2005-01-01

    The plasma and ion source technology group in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing advanced, next generation D-D neutron generators. There are three distinctive developments, which are discussed in this presentation, namely, multi-stage, accelerator-based axial neutron generator, high-output co-axial neutron generator and point source neutron generator. These generators employ RF-induction discharge to produce deuterium ions. The distinctive feature of RF-discharge is its capability to generate high atomic hydrogen species, high current densities and stable and long-life operation. The axial neutron generator is designed for applications that require fast pulsing together with medium to high D-D neutron output. The co-axial neutron generator is aimed for high neutron output with cw or pulsed operation, using either the D-D or D-T fusion reaction. The point source neutron generator is a new concept, utilizing a toroidal-shaped plasma generator. The beam is extracted from multiple apertures and focus to the target tube, which is located at the middle of the generator. This will generate a point source of D-D, T-T or D-T neutrons with high output flux. The latest development together with measured data will be discussed in this article.

  2. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nemerovski, Carrie W; Dorsch, Michael P; Simpson, Robert U; Bone, Henry G; Aaronson, Keith D; Bleske, Barry E

    2009-06-01

    The hormonal derivative of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH](2)D) or calcitriol, has been implicated in many physiologic processes beyond calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, and likely plays a role in several chronic disease states, in particular, cardiovascular disease. Experimental data suggest that 1,25(OH)(2)D affects cardiac muscle directly, controls parathyroid hormone secretion, regulates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and modulates the immune system. Because of these biologic effects, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with hypertension, several types of vascular diseases, and heart failure. We conducted a MEDLINE search of the English-language literature (1950-2008) to identify studies that examined these relationships; additional citations were obtained from the articles retrieved from the literature search. Treatment with vitamin D lowered blood pressure in patients with hypertension and modified the cytokine profile in patients with heart failure. Measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration usually provides the best assessment of an individual's vitamin D status. Serum levels below 20 ng/ml represent vitamin D deficiency, and levels above 30 ng/ml are considered optimal. Although the observational data linking vitamin D status to cardiovascular disease appear robust, vitamin D supplementation is not recommended as routine treatment for heart disease until definitive prospective, randomized trials can be carried out to assess its effects. However, such supplementation is often appropriate for other reasons and may be beneficial to cardiovascular health in certain patients.

  3. 3D/4D sonography - any safety problem.

    PubMed

    Pooh, Ritsuko K; Maeda, Kazuo; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Ebrashy, Alaa; Adra, Abdallah; Dayyabu, Aliyu Labaran; Wataganara, Tuangsit; de Sá, Renato Augusto Moreira; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Gray-scale image data are processed in 3D ultrasound by repeated scans of multiple planes within a few seconds to achieve one surface rendering image and three perpendicular plane images. The 4D image is achieved by repeating 3D images in short intervals, i.e. 3D and 4D ultrasound are based on simple B-mode images. During 3D/4D acquisition, a fetus in utero is exposed by ultrasound beam for only a few seconds, and it is as short as real-time B-mode scanning. Therefore, simple 3D imaging is as safe as a simple B-mode scan. The 4D ultrasound is also as safe as a simple B-mode scan, but the ultrasound exposure should be shorter than 30 min. The thermal index (TI) and mechanical index (MI) should both be lower than 1.0, and the ultrasound study is regulated by the Doppler ultrasound if it is combined with simple 3D or 4D ultrasound. Recently, some articles have reported the functional changes of animal fetal brain neuronal cells and liver cell apoptosis with Doppler ultrasound. We discuss cell apoptosis by ultrasound in this report. Diagnostic ultrasound safety is achieved by controlling the output pulse and continuous ultrasound waves using thermal and mechanical indices, which should be <1.0 in abdominal and transvaginal scan, pulsed Doppler, as well as 3D and 4D ultrasound. The lowest spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity of the ultrasound to suppress cultured cell growth is 240 mW/cm2, below which no ultrasound effect has been reported. An ultrasound user must be trained to recognize the ultrasound bioeffects; thermal and mechanical indices, and how to reduce these when they are higher than 1.0 on the monitor display; and guide the proper use of the ultrasound under the ALARA principle, because the user is responsible for ensuring ultrasound safety.

  4. [Vitamin D and the skin].

    PubMed

    Libon, F; Cavalier, E; Nikkels, A F

    2013-09-01

    Vitamin D is well known for its beneficial effects on phosphocalcic homeostasis. The discovery of the role of vitamin D in cancers, infections, cardiovascular or autoimmune pathologies have promoted interest for this molecule. Skin and vitamin D are closely related. The skin is not only the site of vitamin D synthesis, but also a target organ as calcitriol plays an important hormonal and regulatory role, acting on cell proliferation, differentiation and immunomodulation. Furthermore, vitamin D influences the incidence and therapeutic response of certain dermatoses. In addition, many medical situations, mainly dermatological, require strict photoprotection and may therefore indirectly be responsible for a vitamin D deficiency in patients. The current role of vitamin D in skin cancers, inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases is summarized.

  5. Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is best known for its influence on skeletal health. There is growing recognition, however, that vitamin D has nonskeletal actions, which could have important implications for understanding the consequences of vitamin D deficiency. In epidemiologic studies, vitamin D deficiency has been consistently associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Disruption of vitamin D signaling in animal models promotes hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and atherosclerosis. This evidence has led to the initiation of prospective randomized trials of vitamin D supplementation in individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease. The results of these trials should help to guide strategies for screening and management of vitamin D deficiency in the clinic and at the population level.

  6. Vitamin D and Mammographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, J.; Straub, L.; Wissing, J.; Artmann, A.; Schmidmayr, M.; Kiechle, M.; Seifert-Klauss, V. R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleiotropic immune-modulatory and anti-proliferative effects of vitamin D and hopes to stop cancerogenesis have led to an increased interest in possible reduction of breast cancer with higher vitamin D levels. Mammographic density is an established risk factor for breast cancer risk, and its association with serum vitamin D is complex, as recent studies have shown. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 1103 participants were recruited in the breast diagnostic unit of the Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU Munich. A standardised questionnaire and blood samples for 25-OH-vitamin D were taken on the day of mammography. Histologic results of biopsies in suspicious mammographies were documented. Results: In the 1090 data-sets analysed, vitamin D-deficiency was common among women under 40. Highest vitamin D values were observed in participants aged 60–69 years, but average values for all age cohorts were below 20 ng/ml of vitamin D. 15.6 % of all participants had very low vitamin D values (< 10 ng/ml), 51.3 % were vitamin D-deficient (10–19 ng/ml) and only 5.7 % were above 30 ng/ml, i.e. showed sufficient vitamin D. Patients with malignant results had vitamin D < 10 ng/ml more often (16.9 %; p = 0.61), and only 3.4 % in this group had sufficient vitamin D supply (> 30 ng/ml). There were no significant differences in vitamin D-levels between density groups according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria. Conclusion: Vitamin D values were lower than in comparable US women. Up to now, there is no direct clinical evidence for a relationship between the risk for breast cancer and a specific vitamin D value. PMID:27239067

  7. Reconnaissance invariante d'objets 3-D et correlation SONG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sebastien

    Cette these propose des solutions a deux problemes de la reconnaissance automatique de formes: la reconnaissance invariante d'objets tridimensionnels a partir d'images d'intensite et la reconnaissance robuste a la presence de bruit disjoint. Un systeme utilisant le balayage angulaire des images et un classificateur par trajectoires d'espace des caracteristiques permet d'obtenir la reconnaissance invariante d'objets tridimensionnels. La reconnaissance robuste a la presence de bruit disjoint est realisee au moyen de la correlation SONG. Nous avons realise la reconnaissance invariante aux translations, rotations et changements d'echelle d'objets tridimensionnels a partir d'images d'intensite segmentees. Nous utilisons le balayage angulaire et un classificateur a trajectoires d'espace des caracteris tiques. Afin d'obtenir l'invariance aux translations, le centre de balayage angulaire coincide avec le centre geometrique de l'image. Le balayage angulaire produit un vecteur de caracteristiques invariant aux changements d'echelle de l'image et il transforme en translations du signal les rotations autour d'un axe parallele a la ligne de visee. Le classificateur par trajectoires d'espace des caracteristiques represente une rotation autour d'un axe perpendiculaire a la ligne de visee par une courbe dans l'espace. La classification se fait par la mesure de la distance du vecteur de caracteristiques de l'image a reconnaitre aux trajectoires stockees dans l'espace. Nos resultats numeriques montrent un taux de classement atteignant 98% sur une banque d'images composee de 5 vehicules militaires. La correlation non-lineaire generalisee en tranches orthogonales (SONG) traite independamment les niveaux de gris presents dans une image. Elle somme les correlations lineaires des images binaires ayant le meme niveau de gris. Cette correlation est equivalente a compter le nombre de pixels situes aux memes positions relatives et ayant les memes intensites sur deux images. Nous presentons

  8. Not enough vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the evidence on vitamin D (VTD) insufficiency and deficiency from a Canadian perspective and to highlight some of the known and evolving implications of insufficiency or deficiency for health. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE PubMed was searched for articles on VTD insufficiency or deficiency and the role they play in various diseases and conditions. Level I and II evidence indicates that lack of VTD has a major role in short- and long-latency diseases. MAIN MESSAGE The long winters in Canada and lack of exposure to the sun contribute to lower levels of VTD among Canadians in late winter and spring. Currently recommended levels of fortification and supplementation are likely not high enough to restore adequate levels of VTD in the body. Repletion and maintenance therapy might be needed. CONCLUSION Many Canadians are at risk of VTD insufficiency or deficiency. Assessment of VTD status is important because optimal levels of VTD have been determined for various conditions. Low levels of VTD have negative implications for bone health and the health of other cell types. PMID:17872747

  9. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  10. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  11. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  12. D Photographs in Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kiel, St.

    2013-07-01

    This paper on providing "oo-information" (= objective object-information) on cultural monuments and sites, based on 3D photographs is also a contribution of CIPA task group 3 to the 2013 CIPA Symposium in Strasbourg. To stimulate the interest in 3D photography for scientists as well as for amateurs, 3D-Masterpieces are presented. Exemplary it is shown, due to their high documentary value ("near reality"), 3D photography support, e.g. the recording, the visualization, the interpretation, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. This also includes samples for excavation documentation, 3D coordinate calculation, 3D photographs applied for virtual museum purposes and as educational tools. In addition 3D photography is used for virtual museum purposes, as well as an educational tool and for spatial structure enhancement, which in particular holds for inscriptions and in rock arts. This paper is also an invitation to participate in a systematic survey on existing international archives of 3D photographs. In this respect it is also reported on first results, to define an optimum digitization rate for analog stereo views. It is more than overdue, in addition to the access to international archives for 3D photography, the available 3D photography data should appear in a global GIS(cloud)-system, like on, e.g., google earth. This contribution also deals with exposing new 3D photographs to document monuments of importance for Cultural Heritage, including the use of 3D and single lense cameras from a 10m telescope staff, to be used for extremely low earth based airborne 3D photography, as well as for "underwater staff photography". In addition it is reported on the use of captive balloon and drone platforms for 3D photography in Cultural Heritage. It is liked to emphasize, the still underestimated 3D effect on real objects even allows, e.g., the spatial perception of extremely small scratches as well as of nuances in color differences

  13. [The phenomenon of vitamin D].

    PubMed

    Gruber, Beata M

    2015-01-23

    The receptor of vitamin D (VDR) is present in most non-skeletal human cells, suggesting its role beyond the bone and calcium metabolism. The relationship between vitamin D and the respiratory tract is a consequence of its activity in the immune system. Some gastrointestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, coeliac disease, liver, pancreas or cardiac diseases, lead to vitamin D deficiency. Many studies indicate a correlation between vitamin D and diabetes. VDR and 1α-hydroxylase have been detected in the cutaneous capillary vessels, endothelium, vascular smooth muscles, myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts. The influence of vitamin D on the expression of genes related to the vascular walls implies its role in the pathomechanisms of vascular diseases and the cardiovascular system. Due to the VDR detected in most immunocompetent cells, calcitriol can modulate the congenital and acquired immune system. The correlation between vitamin D and cancer development is also not surprising because of many functions which vitamin D has in the organism. The vitamin D-regulated genes encode the proteins which participate in differentiation, proliferation or apoptosis. This paper aims to focus on the less well known roles of vitamin D in the organism, especially considering that most "sun consumers" know only its antirachitic and bone reinforcing action. So, this article may be surprising, and first of all it should convince everyone to vitamin D supplemention.

  14. Vitamin D and spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mabey, Thomas; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Limthongkul, Worawat; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is crucial for musculoskeletal health, maintenance, and function. Vitamin D insufficiency is common among patients undergoing spine surgery and the ideal vitamin D level for spine surgery has yet to be investigated. There is a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with musculoskeletal pain regardless of surgical intervention. With the frequency and costs of spine surgery increasing, it is imperative that efforts are continued to reduce the impact on patients and healthcare services. Studies into vitamin D and its associations with orthopaedic surgery have yielded alarming findings with regards to the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Importantly, altered vitamin D status also contributes to a wide range of disease conditions. Therefore, future investigations are still essential for better understanding the relationship between vitamin D and spine surgery outcomes. Whilst further research is required to fully elucidate the extent of the effects of hypovitaminosis D has on surgical outcomes, it is strongly advisable to reduce the impacts by appropriate vitamin D supplementation of deficient and at-risk patients. PMID:27900269

  15. Vitamin D and Muscle Function.

    PubMed

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2017-03-21

    Muscle weakness is a hallmark of severe vitamin D deficiency, but the effect of milder vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency on muscle mass and performance and risk of falling is uncertain. In this presentation, I review the evidence that vitamin D influences muscle mass and performance, balance, and risk of falling in older adults. Special consideration is given to the impact of both the starting 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and the dose administered on the clinical response to supplemental vitamin D in older men and women. Based on available evidence, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels <40nmol/L appear most likely to improve their muscle performance with supplementation. The vitamin D dose range of 800-1000 IU per day has been effective in many studies; lower doses have generally been ineffective and several doses above this range have increased the risk of falls. In conclusion, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels <40nmol/L are likely to have fewer falls if supplemented with 800 to 1,000 IU per day of vitamin D.

  16. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Krone, Wilhelm; Berthold, Heiner K

    2009-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently vitamin D deficiency has been identified as a potential risk factor for many diseases not traditionally associated with vitamin D, such as cancer and CVD. This review discusses the evidence suggesting an association between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and CVD and the possible mechanisms mediating it. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with CVD risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis such as intima-media thickness and coronary calcification as well as with cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke as well as congestive heart failure. It could be suggested that vitamin D deficiency contributes to the development of CVD through its association with risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension. However, direct effects of vitamin D on the cardiovascular system may also be involved. Vitamin D receptors are expressed in a variety of tissues, including cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells and vitamin D has been shown to affect inflammation and cell proliferation and differentiation. While much evidence supports a potential antiatherosclerotic effect of vitamin D, prospective, placebo-controlled randomized as well as mechanistic studies are needed to confirm this association. Since vitamin D deficiency is easy to screen for and treat, the confirmation of such an association could have important implications for both, patient care and health policy.

  17. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, P E; Powell, J T

    2014-01-17

    Vitamin D plays a classical hormonal role in skeletal health by regulating calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Vitamin D metabolites also have physiological functions in nonskeletal tissues, where local synthesis influences regulatory pathways via paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. The active metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, binds to the vitamin D receptor that regulates numerous genes involved in fundamental processes of potential relevance to cardiovascular disease, including cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis, oxidative stress, membrane transport, matrix homeostasis, and cell adhesion. Vitamin D receptors have been found in all the major cardiovascular cell types including cardiomyocytes, arterial wall cells, and immune cells. Experimental studies have established a role for vitamin D metabolites in pathways that are integral to cardiovascular function and disease, including inflammation, thrombosis, and the renin-angiotensin system. Clinical studies have generally demonstrated an independent association between vitamin D deficiency and various manifestations of degenerative cardiovascular disease including vascular calcification. However, the role of vitamin D supplementation in the management of cardiovascular disease remains to be established. This review summarizes the clinical studies showing associations between vitamin D status and cardiovascular disease and the experimental studies that explore the mechanistic basis for these associations.

  18. Intersecting D 3 -D3 ' -brane system at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, William; Hanson, James; Hashimoto, Akikazu; Loveridge, Andrew; Pettengill, Duncan

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the intersecting D 3 -D3 ' -brane system overlapping in 1 +1 dimensions, in a holographic treatment where N D3 branes are manifested as anti-de Sitter Schwartzschild geometry, and the D3 ' brane is treated as a probe. We extract the thermodynamic equation of state from the set of embedding solutions, and analyze the stability at the perturbative and the nonperturbative level. We review a systematic procedure to resolve local instabilities and multivaluedness in the equations of state based on classic ideas of convexity in the microcanonical ensemble. We then identify a runaway behavior which was not noticed previously for this system.

  19. Hybrid 3D-2D printing for bone scaffolds fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2017-02-01

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  20. 25(OH)D status: Effect of D3 supplement

    PubMed Central

    Luebbers, P. E.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Excess adipose tissue may lead to sequestrating of vitamin D, making it less available for use in the body. Objective This study determined if overweight or obese individuals (BMI > 25 kg m−2) had insufficient (<30 ng mL−1) levels of 25‐hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and, if so, would serum levels respond to exogenous supplementation. Methods Sixty‐three women who were overweight/obese (BMI = 31.07 ± 5.00 kg m−2) were randomly assigned in a double‐blind manner to receive 5,000 IU of vitamin D3 (D3) (n = 31) or a placebo (PL) (n = 32) daily. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured by finger‐stick analyses at baseline and after 8 weeks of supplementation. Data were analyzed by using a 2 × 2 (group × time) repeated measure multivariate analysis of variance to determine group differences for pre‐values and post‐values (p < 0.05). Results On day one of the study, both D3 and PL groups had insufficient levels of vitamin D (mean ± SD) 24.03 ± 9.78 ng mL−1 and 23.62 ± 9.77 ng mL−1, respectively. After 8 weeks of supplementation, the D3 group 25(OH)D level rose to a mean of 43.57 ± 10.87 ng mL−1 (p < 0.001) versus the PL group whose 25(OH)D level remained statistically unchanged 24.31 ± 8.84 ng mL−1. Women who were overweight/obese had insufficient vitamin D levels prior to supplementation. Conclusions Following supplementation with 5,000 IU of vitamin D3, all subjects' 25(OH)D levels rose to a sufficient level (≥30 ng mL−1). The findings of this study concur with the Institute of Medicine and Endocrine Society recommendations in that two to three times the daily requirement of vitamin D is required to improve serum vitamin D levels in individuals who are overweight or obese. PMID:28392936

  1. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zittermann, Armin

    2014-09-01

    It has long been known from case series that vitamin D excess can lead to atherosclerosis and vascular calcification in humans. In the 1980s, ecological studies provided data that deficient human vitamin D status may also increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The assumption of a biphasic vitamin D effect on CVD is supported by experimental studies: Numerous studies have demonstrated positive effects of the vitamin D hormone (1,25-dihydroxyviramin D) on the cardiovascular system. However, the effects and mechanisms that lead to vascular calcification by vitamin D excess could also be confirmed. Large prospective observational studies support the hypothesis of a U-shaped association between vitamin D and CVD. These studies indicate that deficient circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (<30 nmol/l) are independently-associated with increased CVD morbidity and mortality. They also suggest that those circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, which have long been considered to be safe (100-150 nmol/l), are associated with an increased CVD risk. Meanwhile, numerous randomized controlled trials have investigated the effects of vitamin D supplements or ultraviolet B radiation on biochemical cardiovascular risk markers, cardiovascular physiology, and cardiovascular outcomes. Overall, results are mixed with the majority of studies reporting neither beneficial nor adverse vitamin D effects. Several limitations in the study design, which may have prevented beneficial vitamin D effects, are discussed. In conclusion, it must be stated that the role of vitamin D in the prevention and management of CVD as well as the dose-response relationship of potentially harmful effects still remain to be established.

  2. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  3. Vitamin D: present and future.

    PubMed

    Varsavsky, M; Alonso, G; García-Martín, A

    2014-10-01

    In recent years has been a growing interest by vitamin D, not only for its important role in the bone mineral metabolism, but also by the extra-osseous effects. Most of the scientific societies consider that deposits are sufficient if the serum concentration of 25-OH vitamin D is above 30ng/ml and are considered deficient if levels are below 20ng/ml. The majority of studies found that supplements of calcium plus vitamin D have a positive effect in reducing the risk of fracture and the risk of falls in the elderly, although several specifies that doses should be 700-1.000 IU daily. The treatment of the deficit can be performed with vitamin D2, D3 as well as calcidiol or the active metabolite calcitriol. In certain pathologies also selective vitamin D receptor activators can be used.

  4. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  5. Vitamin D and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Beyond its critical function in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D has recently been found to play an important role in the modulation of the immune/inflammation system via regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting the proliferation of proinflammatory cells, both of which are crucial for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Several studies have associated lower vitamin D status with increased risk and unfavorable outcome of acute infections. Vitamin D supplementation bolsters clinical responses to acute infection. Moreover, chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and others, tend to have lower vitamin D status, which may play a pleiotropic role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. In this article, we review recent epidemiological and interventional studies of vitamin D in various inflammatory diseases. The potential mechanisms of vitamin D in regulating immune/inflammatory responses in inflammatory diseases are also discussed. PMID:24971027

  6. Vitamin D and Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Prietl, Barbara; Treiber, Gerlies; Pieber, Thomas R.; Amrein, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolizing enzymes and vitamin D receptors are present in many cell types including various immune cells such as antigen-presenting-cells, T cells, B cells and monocytes. In vitro data show that, in addition to modulating innate immune cells, vitamin D also promotes a more tolerogenic immunological status. In vivo data from animals and from human vitamin D supplementation studies have shown beneficial effects of vitamin D on immune function, in particular in the context of autoimmunity. In this review, currently available data are summarized to give an overview of the effects of vitamin D on the immune system in general and on the regulation of inflammatory responses, as well as regulatory mechanisms connected to autoimmune diseases particularly in type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23857223

  7. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  8. Recent DIII-D results

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, P.I.

    1994-07-01

    This paper summarizes the recent DIII-D experimental results and the development of the relevant hardware systems. The DIII-D program focuses on divertor solutions for next generation tokamaks such as International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), and on developing configurations with enhanced confinement and stability properties that will lead to a more compact and economical fusion reactor. The DIII-D program carries out this research in an integrated fashion.

  9. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  10. dBASE IV basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  11. Vitamin D and adolescent health

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-López, Faustino R; Pérez-Roncero, Gonzalo; López-Baena, María T

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is a hormone sequentially produced at different body sites, and which plays a significant role in human health, particularly bone health. However, other roles are emerging. When the serum concentration of vitamin D is very low, the risk of rickets, osteomalacia and osteoporosis is increased. In children and adolescents there is a high prevalence of low vitamin D status, especially in females and during the winter–the prevalence being lower than during the summer. Although there is no unanimous agreement over the minimum values necessary for good health, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels below 20 ng/mL may be regarded as a vitamin D-deficient condition, and levels between 20–30 ng/mL may be the range of vitamin D insufficiency. Mild low levels have been associated with bone mass accrual alterations in children and adolescents, diminished muscle strength, negative cardiovascular outcomes, insulin resistance and obesity, and neurological disorders. Effective preventive strategies are needed to guarantee adequate vitamin D levels throughout childhood and adolescence, taking into account the geographical setting, season of the year, the level of environmental pollution, skin characteristics, eating habits and body weight, with a view to securing optimum health during these phases, and the prevention of complications in adulthood. There needs to be a renewed appreciation of the beneficial effect of moderate sunlight for providing all humans with the vitamin D needed for ensuring good health. Prolonged sun exposure is not advised, however, due to the risk of skin cancer. In addition, a balanced diet is indicated, since vitamin D-rich foods are better assimilated than supplements. When such conditions cannot be met, then the supplementation of 400 IU/day of vitamin D is advised in children and adolescents–though correcting vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency may require 1000 IU/day or more. High-dose calcifediol depots are an alternative for

  12. Education Payload Operation - Kit D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Kit D (EPO-Kit D) includes education items that will be used to support the live International Space Station (ISS) education downlinks and Education Payload Operation (EPO) demonstrations onboard the ISS. The main objective of EPO-Kit D supports the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goal of attracting students to study and seek careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

  13. Vitamin D deficiency and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2017-03-24

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to the onset of diabetes. This review summarizes the role of Vitamin D in maintaining the normal release of insulin by the pancreatic beta cells (β-cells). Diabetes is initiated by the onset of insulin resistance. The β-cells can overcome this resistance by releasing more insulin, thus preventing hyperglycaemia. However, as this hyperactivity increases, the β-cells experience excessive Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling that results in cell death and the onset of diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency contributes to both the initial insulin resistance and the subsequent onset of diabetes caused by β-cell death. Vitamin D acts to reduce inflammation, which is a major process in inducing insulin resistance. Vitamin D maintains the normal resting levels of both Ca(2+) and ROS that are elevated in the β-cells during diabetes. Vitamin D also has a very significant role in maintaining the epigenome. Epigenetic alterations are a feature of diabetes by which many diabetes-related genes are inactivated by hypermethylation. Vitamin D acts to prevent such hypermethylation by increasing the expression of the DNA demethylases that prevent hypermethylation of multiple gene promoter regions of many diabetes-related genes. What is remarkable is just how many cellular processes are maintained by Vitamin D. When Vitamin D is deficient, many of these processes begin to decline and this sets the stage for the onset of diseases such as diabetes.

  14. STS-41D Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The crew assigned to the STS-41D mission included (seated left to right) Richard M. (Mike) Mullane, mission specialist; Steven A. Hawley, mission specialist; Henry W. Hartsfield, commander; and Michael L. (Mike) Coats, pilot. Standing in the rear are Charles D. Walker, payload specialist; and Judith A. (Judy) Resnik, mission specialist. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery August 30, 1984 at 8:41:50 am (EDT), the STS-41D mission deployed three satellites: the Satellite Business System SBS-D; the SYCOM IV-2 (also known as LEASAT-2); and the TELSTAR.

  15. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  16. Hybrid 3D-2D printing of bone scaffolds Hybrid 3D-2D printing methods for bone scaffolds fabrication.

    PubMed

    Prinz, V Ya; Seleznev, Vladimir

    2016-12-13

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  17. Antimicrobial implications of vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Dima A; Miller, Christopher WT; El-Abbassi, Adel M; Cutchins, Della C; Cutchins, Coleman; Grant, William B

    2011-01-01

    Evidence exists that vitamin D has a potential antimicrobial activity and its deficiency has deleterious effects on general well-being and longevity. Vitamin D may reduce the risk of infection through multiple mechanisms. Vitamin D boosts innate immunity by modulating production of anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) and cytokine response. Vitamin D and its analogues via these mechanisms are playing an increasing role in the management of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne and rosacea. Vitamin D may reduce susceptibility to infection in patients with atopic dermatitis and the ability to regulate local immune and inflammatory responses offers exciting potential for understanding and treating chronic inflammatory dermatitides. Moreover, B and T cell activation as well as boosting the activity of monocytes and macrophages also contribute to a potent systemic anti-microbial effect. The direct invasion by pathogenic organisms may be minimized at sites such as the respiratory tract by enhancing clearance of invading organisms. A vitamin D replete state appears to benefit most infections, with the possible noteworthy exception of Leishmaniasis. Antibiotics remain an expensive option and misuse of these agents results in significant antibiotic resistance and contributes to escalating health care costs. Vitamin D constitutes an inexpensive prophylactic option and possibly therapeutic product either by itself or as a synergistic agent to traditional antimicrobial agents. This review outlines the specific antimicrobial properties of vitamin D in combating a wide range of organisms. We discuss the possible mechanisms by which vitamin D may have a therapeutic role in managing a variety of infections. PMID:22259647

  18. D Dimer in acute care

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Prachee M.; Patwa, Urvil D.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) are important sources of mortality and morbidity in intensive care unit (ICU). And every time D-dimer remains the the commonest investigation. Many times D-dimer is erroneously considered as a diagnostic test in above mentioned conditions. Its interpretation requires cautions. To circumvent this source of error it is necessary to understand D-dimer test and its significance in various disorder. This article review some basic details of D-dimer, condition associated with its increased level and some prognostic value in intracranial hemorrhage and gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. PMID:25337485

  19. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  20. Rotation invariance principles in 2D/3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernard; Staedele, Harald; Hammer, Beat; Gellrich, Niels C.; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-05-01

    2D/3D patient-to-computed tomography (CT) registration is a method to determine a transformation that maps two coordinate systems by comparing a projection image rendered from CT to a real projection image. Applications include exact patient positioning in radiation therapy, calibration of surgical robots, and pose estimation in computer-aided surgery. One of the problems associated with 2D/3D registration is the fast that finding a registration includes sovling a minimization problem in six degrees-of-freedom in motion. This results in considerable time expenses since for each iteration step at least one volume rendering has to be computed. We show that by choosing an appropriate world coordinate system and by applying a 2D/2D registration method in each iteration step, the number of iterations can be grossly reduced from n6 to n5. Here, n is the number of discrete variations aroudn a given coordinate. Depending on the configuration of the optimization algorithm, this reduces the total number of iterations necessary to at least 1/3 of its original value. The method was implemented and extensively tested on simulated x-ray images of a pelvis. We conclude that this hardware-indepenent optimization of 2D/3D registration is a step towards increasing the acceptance of this promising method for a wide number of clinical applications.

  1. Building 3D scenes from 2D image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul D.

    2006-05-01

    Sequences of 2D images, taken by a single moving video receptor, can be fused to generate a 3D representation. This dynamic stereopsis exists in birds and reptiles, whereas the static binocular stereopsis is common in mammals, including humans. Most multimedia computer vision systems for stereo image capture, transmission, processing, storage and retrieval are based on the concept of binocularity. As a consequence, their main goal is to acquire, conserve and enhance pairs of 2D images able to generate a 3D visual perception in a human observer. Stereo vision in birds is based on the fusion of images captured by each eye, with previously acquired and memorized images from the same eye. The process goes on simultaneously and conjointly for both eyes and generates an almost complete all-around visual field. As a consequence, the baseline distance is no longer fixed, as in the case of binocular 3D view, but adjustable in accordance with the distance to the object of main interest, allowing a controllable depth effect. Moreover, the synthesized 3D scene can have a better resolution than each individual 2D image in the sequence. Compression of 3D scenes can be achieved, and stereo transmissions with lower bandwidth requirements can be developed.

  2. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  3. Avery D. Weisman, M.D.: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, 1993

    1993-01-01

    In this interview, Avery D. Weisman, M.D., distinguished contributor to study of human encounter with death, discusses personal and professional facets of his long and productive career. Includes review of his concepts of appropriate death and middle knowledge; and findings of Project Omega, clinical research study directed by Weisman for 18…

  4. 2D-3D transition of gold cluster anions resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Mikael P.; Lechtken, Anne; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M.; Furche, Filipp

    2008-05-01

    Small gold cluster anions Aun- are known for their unusual two-dimensional (2D) structures, giving rise to properties very different from those of bulk gold. Previous experiments and calculations disagree about the number of gold atoms nc where the transition to 3D structures occurs. We combine trapped ion electron diffraction and state of the art electronic structure calculations to resolve this puzzle and establish nc=12 . It is shown that theoretical studies using traditional generalized gradient functionals are heavily biased towards 2D structures. For a correct prediction of the 2D-3D crossover point it is crucial to use density functionals yielding accurate jellium surface energies, such as the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functional or the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional modified for solids (PBEsol). Further, spin-orbit effects have to be included, and large, flexible basis sets employed. This combined theoretical-experimental approach is promising for larger gold and other metal clusters.

  5. D0 - D0bar Mixing: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Jorg; /Heidelberg U.

    2011-11-14

    Recently, the B factory experiments BABAR and Belle as well as the CDF collaboration found evidence for mixing in the D meson system. The current status (beginning of summer 2008) of the experimental results of D{sup 0} mixing is summarized. In this paper, we present an overview of D{sup 0} mixing. After an introduction to the charm mixing phenomenology and analysis techniques, results of the mixing parameters and CP violation as related to mixing are summarized. They are obtained from hadronic two-body, multi-body final states and from quantum correlated D{sup 0} decays of the experiments BABAR, Belle, Cleo and CDF. Mixing results from semileptonic D{sup 0} decays can be found elsewhere.

  6. Applications of Doppler Tomography in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M.; Budaj, J.; Agafonov, M.; Sharova, O.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past few years, the applications of Doppler tomography have been extended beyond the usual calculation of 2D velocity images of circumstellar gas flows. This technique has now been used with the new Shellspec spectrum synthesis code to demonstrate the effective modeling of the accretion disk and gas stream in the TT Hya Algol binary. The 2D tomography procedure projects all sources of emission onto a single central (Vx, Vy) velocity plane even though the gas is expected to flow beyond that plane. So, new 3D velocity images were derived with the Radioastronomical Approach method by assuming a grid of Vz values transverse to the central 2D plane. The 3D approach has been applied to the U CrB and RS Vul Algol-type binaries to reveal substantial flow structures beyond the central velocity plane.

  7. 2D/3D Image Registration using Regression Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Frederick, Brandon; Mageras, Gig; Chang, Sha; Pizer, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In computer vision and image analysis, image registration between 2D projections and a 3D image that achieves high accuracy and near real-time computation is challenging. In this paper, we propose a novel method that can rapidly detect an object’s 3D rigid motion or deformation from a 2D projection image or a small set thereof. The method is called CLARET (Correction via Limited-Angle Residues in External Beam Therapy) and consists of two stages: registration preceded by shape space and regression learning. In the registration stage, linear operators are used to iteratively estimate the motion/deformation parameters based on the current intensity residue between the target projec-tion(s) and the digitally reconstructed radiograph(s) (DRRs) of the estimated 3D image. The method determines the linear operators via a two-step learning process. First, it builds a low-order parametric model of the image region’s motion/deformation shape space from its prior 3D images. Second, using learning-time samples produced from the 3D images, it formulates the relationships between the model parameters and the co-varying 2D projection intensity residues by multi-scale linear regressions. The calculated multi-scale regression matrices yield the coarse-to-fine linear operators used in estimating the model parameters from the 2D projection intensity residues in the registration. The method’s application to Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) requires only a few seconds and yields good results in localizing a tumor under rigid motion in the head and neck and under respiratory deformation in the lung, using one treatment-time imaging 2D projection or a small set thereof. PMID:24058278

  8. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  9. Vitamin D and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Athanassiou, Panagiotis; Lyraki, Aikaterini; Raftakis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Christodoulos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 1 and multiple sclerosis. Reduced vitamin D intake has been linked to increased susceptibility to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with disease activity in patients with RA. The objective was to evaluate vitamin D status in patients with RA and to assess the relationship between vitamin D levels and disease activity. Methods: In a cohort of 44 patients with RA, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] levels, parathyroid hormone levels, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured. Disease activity was evaluated by calculating the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). A control group (n = 44), matched for age and sex, was evaluated as well. Results: In the cohort of 44 patients with RA 25(OH)D3 levels were found to be low compared with the control group, 25(OH)D3 being 15.26 ± 1.07 ng/ml [mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM)] and 25.8 ± 1.6 ng/ml in the patient and control group respectively (Student’s t test, p < 0.001). Parathyroid hormone levels were 71.08 ± 7.02 pg/ml (mean ± SEM) (normal values 10.0–65.0 pg/ml), CRP 7.6 ± 1.57 mg/litre (mean ± SEM) (normal values < 3 mg/litre) and ESR was 38.0 ± 4.6 mm/h (mean ± SEM) in the group of patients with RA. Levels of 25(OH)D3 were found to be negatively correlated to the DAS28, the correlation coefficient being −0.084. Levels of 25(OH)D3 were also found to be negatively correlated to CRP and ESR, the correlation coefficient being –0.115 and −0.18, respectively. Conclusion: It appears that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with RA, and that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to disease severity in RA. As vitamin D deficiency has been linked to diffuse musculoskeletal pain, these results have therapeutic implications. Vitamin D supplementation may be needed

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  12. Temperature derivatives for fusion reactivity of D-D and D-T

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, James R.; Makaruk, Hanna Ewa

    2016-11-29

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction rates are observable using leakage gamma flux. A direct measurement of γ-rays with equipment that exhibits fast temporal response could be used to infer temperature, if the detector signal is amenable for taking the logarithmic time-derivative, alpha. We consider the temperature dependence for fusion cross section reactivity.

  13. Quasi 3D dosimetry (EPID, conventional 2D/3D detector matrices)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient specific pretreatment measurement for IMRT and VMAT QA should preferably give information with a high resolution in 3D. The ability to distinguish complex treatment plans, i.e. treatment plans with a difference between measured and calculated dose distributions that exceeds a specified tolerance, puts high demands on the dosimetry system used for the pretreatment measurements and the results of the measurement evaluation needs a clinical interpretation. There are a number of commercial dosimetry systems designed for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. 2D arrays such as MapCHECK® (Sun Nuclear), MatriXXEvolution (IBA Dosimetry) and OCTAVIOUS® 1500 (PTW), 3D phantoms such as OCTAVIUS® 4D (PTW), ArcCHECK® (Sun Nuclear) and Delta4 (ScandiDos) and software for EPID dosimetry and 3D reconstruction of the dose in the patient geometry such as EPIDoseTM (Sun Nuclear) and Dosimetry CheckTM (Math Resolutions) are available. None of those dosimetry systems can measure the 3D dose distribution with a high resolution (full 3D dose distribution). Those systems can be called quasi 3D dosimetry systems. To be able to estimate the delivered dose in full 3D the user is dependent on a calculation algorithm in the software of the dosimetry system. All the vendors of the dosimetry systems mentioned above provide calculation algorithms to reconstruct a full 3D dose in the patient geometry. This enables analyzes of the difference between measured and calculated dose distributions in DVHs of the structures of clinical interest which facilitates the clinical interpretation and is a promising tool to be used for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. However, independent validation studies on the accuracy of those algorithms are scarce. Pretreatment IMRT QA using the quasi 3D dosimetry systems mentioned above rely on both measurement uncertainty and accuracy of calculation algorithms. In this article, these quasi 3D dosimetry systems and their use in patient specific pretreatment IMRT

  14. Vertical D4-D2-D0 Bound States on K3 Fibrations and Modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Vincent; Creutzig, Thomas; Diaconescu, Duiliu-Emanuel; Doran, Charles; Quigley, Callum; Sheshmani, Artan

    2017-03-01

    An explicit formula is derived for the generating function of vertical D4-D2-D0 bound states on smooth K3 fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds, generalizing previous results of Gholampour and Sheshmani. It is also shown that this formula satisfies strong modularity properties, as predicted by string theory. This leads to a new construction of vector valued modular forms which exhibit some of the features of a generalized Hecke transform.

  15. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  16. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  17. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  18. The Vitamin D Endocrine System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Anthony W.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the physiology and biochemistry of the vitamin D endocrine system, including role of biological calcium and phosphorus, vitamin D metabolism, and related diseases. A 10-item, multiple-choice test which can be used to obtain continuing medical education credit is included. (JN)

  19. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  20. Electroweak physics from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, N.A.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    The D0 detector was recently commissioned at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider and is presently taking data. Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W and Z electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons.

  1. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  2. Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four articles on dBASE III include three on library applications: a photocopy invoicing system for interlibrary loan, a vertical file subject headings list program, and a subject index to statistical resources. Another article explains the differences between interpreters and compilers and the advantages of the Clipper compiler for dBASE III. (EM)

  3. Rebooting the EdD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Jon Wergin reminds readers of the philosophical and historical foundations of the doctor of education (EdD) degree. He argues that the EdD should be based, in large part, on John Dewey's progressive ideals of democratization and Paulo Freire's concepts of emancipatory education. Drawing on theories of reflective practice,…

  4. Vitamin D and urological cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dzięgała, Mateusz; Kołodziej, Anna; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D controls calcium and phosphate homeostasis. Additionally, it has been proven that vitamin D is an important modulator of cellular differentiation and proliferation in a number of normal and malignant cells. Vitamin D can regulate proliferation, apoptosis, and cell adhesion at the tumor cell level. It also modifies tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis and also decreases oxidative DNA damage. Material and methods The Medline and Web of Science databases were searched without time limit on October 2015 using the terms ‘vitamin D’ in conjunction with ‘kidney cancer’, ‘bladder cancer’, ‘prostate cancer’, and ‘testis cancer’. Autoalerts in Medline were also run and reference lists of original articles, review articles, and book chapters were searched for further eligible articles. Results In recent years, vitamin D has received vast attention due to suggestions that it may have a crucial role in the prevention and therapy of various cancers. Many epidemiologic studies have reported the impact of VD3 on preventing several cancers and other pathologies. Assuming that vitamin D status changes cancer risk, enough vitamin D supply would be an easy, economical, and safe cancer incidence and mortality reduction method. However, despite numerous researches, the role of vitamin D in cancer incidence and therapy remains unclear. Conclusions The impact of vitamin D is well described in breast, colon, and prostate cancer; yet, there is only little published about other malignancies. PMID:27551550

  5. Vitamin D safety and requirements.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Francisco J A; Rosen, Clifford J

    2012-07-01

    Vitamin D an ancient secosteroid is essential for mineral homeostasis, bone remodeling, immune modulation, and energy metabolism. Recently, debates have emerged about the daily vitamin D requirements for healthy and elderly adults, the safety and efficacy of long term supplementation and the role of vitamin D deficiency in several chronic disease states. Since this molecule acts as both a vitamin and a hormone, it should not be surprising that the effects of supplementation are multi-faceted and complex. Yet despite significant progress in the last decade, our understanding of vitamin D physiology and the clinical relevance of low circulating levels of this vitamin remains incomplete. The present review provides the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of vitamin D requirements and safety. It also raises some provocative research questions.

  6. [Hypovitaminosis D and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miñambres, Inka; de Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Metabolic syndrome and hypovitaminosis D are 2 diseases with high prevalence that share several risk factors, while epidemiological evidence shows they are associated. Although the mechanisms involved in this association are not well established, hypovitaminosis D is associated with insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. However, the apparent ineffectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic syndrome components, as well as the limited information about the effect of improving metabolic syndrome components on vitamin D concentrations, does not clarify the direction and the mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between these 2 pathologies. Overall, because of the high prevalence and the epidemiological association between both diseases, hypovitaminosis D could be considered a component of the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Le syndrome d'apert

    PubMed Central

    Benmiloud, Sarra; Chaouki, Sana; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2013-01-01

    Le syndrome d'Apert est une affection congénitale rare, caractérisée par une sténose cranio-faciale associée à une syndactylie des mains et des pieds. Sa prise en charge doit être précoce et multidisciplinaire. Sa gravité réside dans la coexistence de plusieurs malformations avec un risque d'hypertension intracrânienne chronique responsable d'une cécité et d'une débilité mentale. Les auteurs rapportent une nouvelle observation à travers laquelle ils illustrent les aspects cliniques et évolutifs ainsi que les difficultés thérapeutiques de cette affection. PMID:23565313

  8. Vitamin D and Influenza12

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D has become increasingly recognized in the literature for its extra-skeletal roles, including an effect on inflammation and the immune response to infection. Our goal was to describe the role of vitamin D in the immune response and implications for the risk of influenza infection in humans. In this review, we first consider literature that provides molecular and genetic support to the idea that vitamin D is related to the adaptive and innate immune responses to influenza infection in vitro and in animal models. We then discuss observational studies and randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation in humans. Finally, we consider some of the knowledge gaps surrounding vitamin D and immune response that must be filled. PMID:22797987

  9. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Giovannucci, Edward

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that deficient vitamin D status may increase risk of both ischemic and nonischemic cardiovascular diseases independently of established cardiovascular risk factors. The role of vitamin D in potentially regulating many functions in the cardiovascular system is just beginning to be understood. Among the potentially relevant mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases, vitamin D may influence blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone levels, myocardial function, inflammation, and vascular calcification. Cardiovascular risk appears especially elevated at 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels below 10 or 15 ng/mL, and optimal levels may be at least 30 ng/mL. Among individuals who are not receiving substantial exposure to sun, intakes of 1000 to 2000 IU may be needed to achieve levels of at least 30 ng/mL. Further study, including properly designed randomized control trials, is required to further establish the role of vitamin D on cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Vitamin D Safety and Requirements

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Francisco J.A.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D an ancient secosteroid is essential for mineral homeostasis, bone remodeling, immune modulation, and energy metabolism. Recently, debates have emerged about the daily vitamin D requirements for healthy and elderly adults, the safety and efficacy of long term supplementation and the role of vitamin D deficiency in several chronic disease states. Since this molecule acts as both a vitamin and a hormone, it should not be surprising that the effects of supplementation are multi-faceted and complex. Yet despite significant progress in the last decade, our understanding of vitamin D physiology and the clinical relevance of low circulating levels of this vitamin remains incomplete. The present review provides the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of vitamin D requirements and safety. It also raises some provocative research questions. PMID:22179017

  11. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  12. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  13. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  14. Fully automated 2D-3D registration and verification.

    PubMed

    Varnavas, Andreas; Carrell, Tom; Penney, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    Clinical application of 2D-3D registration technology often requires a significant amount of human interaction during initialisation and result verification. This is one of the main barriers to more widespread clinical use of this technology. We propose novel techniques for automated initial pose estimation of the 3D data and verification of the registration result, and show how these techniques can be combined to enable fully automated 2D-3D registration, particularly in the case of a vertebra based system. The initialisation method is based on preoperative computation of 2D templates over a wide range of 3D poses. These templates are used to apply the Generalised Hough Transform to the intraoperative 2D image and the sought 3D pose is selected with the combined use of the generated accumulator arrays and a Gradient Difference Similarity Measure. On the verification side, two algorithms are proposed: one using normalised features based on the similarity value and the other based on the pose agreement between multiple vertebra based registrations. The proposed methods are employed here for CT to fluoroscopy registration and are trained and tested with data from 31 clinical procedures with 417 low dose, i.e. low quality, high noise interventional fluoroscopy images. When similarity value based verification is used, the fully automated system achieves a 95.73% correct registration rate, whereas a no registration result is produced for the remaining 4.27% of cases (i.e. incorrect registration rate is 0%). The system also automatically detects input images outside its operating range.

  15. Digit ratio (2D:4D), salivary testosterone, and handedness.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Alan A; Rudling, Nick; Kissling, Christian; Taurines, Regine; Thome, Johannes

    2011-03-01

    The length of the index finger relative to that of the ring finger, the 2D:4D ratio, has been taken to be a marker of the amount of testosterone (T) that was present in the foetal environment (Manning, Scutt, Wilson, & Lewis-Jones, 1998). It has also been suggested (Geschwind & Galaburda, 1987) that elevated levels of foetal T are associated with left-handedness and that adult levels of circulating T might relate to foetal levels (Jamison, Meier, & Campbell, 1993). We used multiple regression analyses to investigate whether there is any relationship between either left or right hand 2D:4D ratio and handedness. We also examined whether adult levels of salivary T (or cortisol, used as a control hormone) predict digit ratio and/or handedness. Although the 2D:4D ratio of neither the left nor the right hand was related to handedness, the difference between the digit ratios of the right and left hands, D(R-L), was a significant predictor of handedness and of the performance difference between the hands on a peg-moving task, supporting previous findings (Manning & Peters, 2009; Manning et al., 1998; Manning, Trivers, Thornhill, & Singh, 2000; Stoyanov, Marinov, & Pashalieva, 2009). Adult circulating T levels did not predict the digit ratio of the left or right hand; nor was there a significant relationship between concentrations of salivary T (or cortisol) and either hand preference or asymmetry in manual skill. We suggest that the association between D(R-L) and hand preference arises because D(R-L) is a correlate of sensitivity to T in the developing foetus.

  16. D3-D5 theories with unquenched flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Eduardo; Lin, Hai; Penín, José Manuel; Ramallo, Alfonso V.; Zoakos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    We construct the string duals of the defect theories generated when Nf flavor D5-branes intersect Nc color D3-branes along a 2 + 1 dimensional subspace. We work in the Veneziano limit in which Nc and Nf are large and Nf /Nc is fixed. By smearing the D5-branes, we find supergravity solutions that take into account the backreaction of the flavor branes and preserve two supercharges. When the flavors are massless the resulting metric displays an anisotropic Lifshitz-like scale invariance. The case of massive quarks is also considered.

  17. 2D/3D Synthetic Vision Navigation Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, J. J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Sweeters, jason L.

    2008-01-01

    Flight-deck display software was designed and developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) terrain, obstacle, and flight-path perspectives on a single navigation display. The objective was to optimize the presentation of synthetic vision (SV) system technology that permits pilots to view multiple perspectives of flight-deck display symbology and 3D terrain information. Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the concept. The concept has numerous unique implementation features that would permit enhanced operational concepts and efficiencies in both current and future aircraft.

  18. ANL-E Health Physics experience with D and D

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.I.; Mosho, G.D.; Munyon, W.J.; Murdoch, B.T.; Sholeen, C.M.; Shuman, J.P.

    1996-04-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory--East (ANL-E) Health Physics Section provides direct and/or oversight support to various D&D projects at ANL-E. The health physics problems encountered have been challenging, primarily because they involved the potential for high internal exposures as well as actual high external exposures. The lessons learned are applicable to other radiological facilities. A number of D&D projects being conducted concurrently at ANL-E are described. The problems encountered are then categorized, and lessons learned and recommendations are provided. The main focus will be limited to the support and technical assistance provided by personnel from the ANL Health Physics Section during the course of the work activities.

  19. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on D3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, M. J.; Pinsker, R. I.; Petty, C. C.; Chiu, S. C.; Jackson, G. L.; Lippmann, S. I.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the D3-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high (beta) target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n(sub parallel) value (approximately = 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90 degrees) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. We describe the performance of the D3-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  20. Preliminary abatement device evaluation: 1D-2D KGM cyclone design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are predominately used in controlling cotton gin particulate matter (PM) emissions. The most commonly used cyclone designs are the 2D-2D and 1D-3D; however other designs such as the 1D-2D KGM have or are currently being used. A 1D-2D cyclone has a barrel length equal to the barrel diamete...

  1. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  2. [The vitamin D endocrine system].

    PubMed

    Castro, Luiz Claudio Gonçalves de

    2011-11-01

    The vitamin D endocrine system comprises a group of 7-dehydrocholesterol-derived secosteroid molecules, including its active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D), its precursors and other metabolites, its binding protein (DBP) and nuclear receptor (VDR), as well as cytochrome P450 complex enzymes participating in activation and inactivation pathways of those molecules. The biologic effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D are mediated by VDR, a ligand-activated transcription factor which is a member of the nuclear receptors family, spread in almost all human cells. In addition to its classic role in the regulation of calcium metabolism and bone health, evidence suggests that 1,25(OH)(2)D directly or indirectly modulates about 3% of the human genome, participating in the regulation of chief functions of systemic homeostasis, such as cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis, regulation of immune, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems, and insulin metabolism. Given the critical influence of the vitamin D endocrine system in many processes of systemic metabolic equilibrium, the laboratory assays available for the evaluation of this system have to present high accuracy and reproducibility, enabling the establishment of cutoff points that, beyond being consensually accepted, reliably express the vitamin D status of the organism, and the respective clinical-metabolic impacts on the global health of the individual.

  3. R & D increases electricity markets

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, S.S.

    1995-10-01

    As the electric utility industry moves increasingly toward open competition, sharing of information among utilities will become more restrictive. Today, the spirit of cooperation seens to be faltering, due to each companies` concerns about revealing potentially sensitive information which could be exploited by a utility`s competitors. This situation raises a serious question regarding the future of cooperative R&D. One area of R&D that will benefit all electric energy providers is that which will create new or larger markets for electricity. An R&D consortia can also help to satisfy some rather generic needs of its competitive members. Members of competitive industries have quickly and economically developed market-building technologies through their support of R&D consortium. It is very likely that as the electric utility industry undergoes restructuring, collaborative R&D will continue to produce mutually beneficial technologies. The realities of competition will require the electric R&D consortia to adjust the processes used to plan and manage R&D projects.

  4. 2D and 3D Traveling Salesman Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haxhimusa, Yll; Carpenter, Edward; Catrambone, Joseph; Foldes, David; Stefanov, Emil; Arns, Laura; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    When a two-dimensional (2D) traveling salesman problem (TSP) is presented on a computer screen, human subjects can produce near-optimal tours in linear time. In this study we tested human performance on a real and virtual floor, as well as in a three-dimensional (3D) virtual space. Human performance on the real floor is as good as that on a…

  5. 2D to 3D conversion implemented in different hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Huitron, Victor; Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Hernandez-Fragoso, Araceli

    2015-02-01

    Conversion of available 2D data for release in 3D content is a hot topic for providers and for success of the 3D applications, in general. It naturally completely relies on virtual view synthesis of a second view given by original 2D video. Disparity map (DM) estimation is a central task in 3D generation but still follows a very difficult problem for rendering novel images precisely. There exist different approaches in DM reconstruction, among them manually and semiautomatic methods that can produce high quality DMs but they demonstrate hard time consuming and are computationally expensive. In this paper, several hardware implementations of designed frameworks for an automatic 3D color video generation based on 2D real video sequence are proposed. The novel framework includes simultaneous processing of stereo pairs using the following blocks: CIE L*a*b* color space conversions, stereo matching via pyramidal scheme, color segmentation by k-means on an a*b* color plane, and adaptive post-filtering, DM estimation using stereo matching between left and right images (or neighboring frames in a video), adaptive post-filtering, and finally, the anaglyph 3D scene generation. Novel technique has been implemented on DSP TMS320DM648, Matlab's Simulink module over a PC with Windows 7, and using graphic card (NVIDIA Quadro K2000) demonstrating that the proposed approach can be applied in real-time processing mode. The time values needed, mean Similarity Structural Index Measure (SSIM) and Bad Matching Pixels (B) values for different hardware implementations (GPU, Single CPU, and DSP) are exposed in this paper.

  6. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  7. 3D surface configuration modulates 2D symmetry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Sio, Lok-Teng

    2015-02-01

    We investigated whether three-dimensional (3D) information in a scene can affect symmetry detection. The stimuli were random dot patterns with 15% dot density. We measured the coherence threshold, or the proportion of dots that were the mirror reflection of the other dots in the other half of the image about a central vertical axis, at 75% accuracy with a 2AFC paradigm under various 3D configurations produced by the disparity between the left and right eye images. The results showed that symmetry detection was difficult when the corresponding dots across the symmetry axis were on different frontoparallel or inclined planes. However, this effect was not due to a difference in distance, as the observers could detect symmetry on a slanted surface, where the depth of the two sides of the symmetric axis was different. The threshold was reduced for a hinge configuration where the join of two slanted surfaces coincided with the axis of symmetry. Our result suggests that the detection of two-dimensional (2D) symmetry patterns is subject to the 3D configuration of the scene; and that coplanarity across the symmetry axis and consistency between the 2D pattern and 3D structure are important factors for symmetry detection.

  8. 2D:4D Ratio and its Implications in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jeevanandam, Saravanakumar

    2016-01-01

    Digit ratios, especially 2D:4D ratio, a potential proxy marker for prenatal androgen exposure shows sexual dimorphism. Existing literature and recent research show accumulating evidence on 2D:4D ratio showing correlations with various phenotypic traits in humans. Ratio of 2D:4D is found to correlate negatively to testosterone and positively to oestrogen in the foetus. Interestingly, it is constant since birth and not influenced by the adult hormone levels. Usually, males have lower ratios when compared to females. Prenatal androgen exposure and therefore, digit ratios have been reported to be associated with numerical competencies, spatial skills, handedness, cognitive abilities, academic performance, sperm counts, personalities and prevalence of obesity, migraine, eating disorders, depression, myopia, autism etc. The authors have attempted to write a brief account on the digit ratios and the dimorphism observed in various physiological, psychological and behavioural traits. Also, the authors have discussed the relevant molecular basics and the methods of measurement of digit ratios. PMID:28208851

  9. Conception d'un generateur miniaturise d'ondes mecaniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, Louise-Philippe

    De nos jours, les maladies cardiaques représentent la première cause de décès dans le monde. Parmi ces maladies, les occlusions coronariennes occupent un rôle important. Aussi, 10 à 15 % de la population souffre de calculs urinaires et ces pourcentages augmentent d'année en année dans les pays industrialisés. Considérant ces données et le fait que les outils médicaux actuels ne permettent pas de répondre à l'ensemble des besoins exigés par ces domaines, il existe une opportunité intéressante pour le développement d'appareils mieux adaptés. Le présent mémoire a pour but de démontrer le potentiel technologique d'un générateur miniaturisé d'ondes mécaniques comme futur dispositif médical dans les domaines de la lithotritie intracorporelle et de la cardiologie d'intervention. Le générateur proposé exploite les ondes acoustiques (profil de pression) pour briser les calculs urinaires ou traverser les occlusions coronariennes. Le concept présenté vise à être plus efficace, plus sécuritaire et moins dispendieux que les appareils actuels. Pour parvenir à générer le profil de, pression désiré à l'extrémité d'une longue et mince tige, un processus d'amplification exploitant la focalisation des ondes dans un solide et la dispersion dans un guide d'ondes est utilisé. Ce processus nécessite une étape préliminaire de calibration qui permet de caractériser les propriétés acoustiques des milieux de propagation (concentrateur et guide dispersif). Tirant profit du retournement temporel, il est ensuite possible de concentrer spatialement et de compresser temporellement le signal de calibration pour former le profil de pression désiré. Le gain combiné de ces méthodes permettent de respecter les requis fixés pour l'appareil. Le prototype fabriqué est composé d'une source acoustique convergente, d'un guide d'ondes dispersif ainsi que d'un réducteur de section. La source acoustique comprend sept transducteurs pi

  10. Design Application Translates 2-D Graphics to 3-D Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Fabric Images Inc., specializing in the printing and manufacturing of fabric tension architecture for the retail, museum, and exhibit/tradeshow communities, designed software to translate 2-D graphics for 3-D surfaces prior to print production. Fabric Images' fabric-flattening design process models a 3-D surface based on computer-aided design (CAD) specifications. The surface geometry of the model is used to form a 2-D template, similar to a flattening process developed by NASA's Glenn Research Center. This template or pattern is then applied in the development of a 2-D graphic layout. Benefits of this process include 11.5 percent time savings per project, less material wasted, and the ability to improve upon graphic techniques and offer new design services. Partners include Exhibitgroup/Giltspur (end-user client: TAC Air, a division of Truman Arnold Companies Inc.), Jack Morton Worldwide (end-user client: Nickelodeon), as well as 3D Exhibits Inc., and MG Design Associates Corp.

  11. Life without dUTPase

    PubMed Central

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Szabó, Judit E.; Papp-Kádár, Veronika; Dobay, Orsolya; Szabó, Dóra; Grolmusz, Vince; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2016-01-01

    Fine-tuned regulation of the cellular nucleotide pools is indispensable for faithful replication of Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA). The genetic information is also safeguarded by DNA damage recognition and repair processes. Uracil is one of the most frequently occurring erroneous bases in DNA; it can arise from cytosine deamination or thymine-replacing incorporation. Two enzyme activities are primarily involved in keeping DNA uracil-free: dUTPase (dUTP pyrophosphatase) activity that prevent thymine-replacing incorporation and uracil-DNA glycosylase activity that excise uracil from DNA and initiate uracil-excision repair. Both dUTPase and the most efficient uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) is thought to be ubiquitous in free-living organisms. In the present work, we have systematically investigated the genotype of deposited fully sequenced bacterial and Archaeal genomes. We have performed bioinformatic searches in these genomes using the already well described dUTPase and UNG gene sequences. For dUTPases, we have included the trimeric all-beta and the dimeric all-alpha families and also, the bifunctional dCTP (deoxycytidine triphosphate) deaminase-dUTPase sequences. Surprisingly, we have found that in contrast to the generally held opinion, a wide number of bacterial and Archaeal species lack all of the previously described dUTPase gene(s). The dut– genotype is present in diverse bacterial phyla indicating that loss of this (or these) gene(s) has occurred multiple times during evolution. We discuss potential survival strategies in lack of dUTPases, such as simultaneous lack or inhibition of UNG and possession of exogenous or alternate metabolic enzymes involved in uracil-DNA metabolism. The potential that genes previously not associated with dUTPase activity may still encode enzymes capable of hydrolyzing dUTP is also discussed. Our data indicate that several unicellular microorganisms may efficiently cope with a dut– genotype lacking all of the previously described d

  12. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  13. 1. 185/189D in center, north end west facades (190D front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 185/189-D in center, north end west facades (190-D front left and west facade; 195-D rear right). Looking south. - D-Reactor Complex, Deaeration Plant-Refrigeration Buildings, Area 100-D, Richland, Benton County, WA

  14. Sequence specificity of mutagen-nucleic acid complexes in solution: intercalation and mutagen-base pair overlap geometries for proflavine binding to dC-dC-dG-dG and dG-dG-dC-dC self-complementary duplexes.

    PubMed

    Patel, D J; Canuel, L L

    1977-07-01

    The complex formed between the mutagen proflavine and the dC-dC-dG-dG and dG-dG-dC-dC self-complementary tetranucleotide duplexes has been monitored by proton high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 0.1 M phosphate solution at high nucleotide/drug ratios. The large upfield shifts (0.5 to 0.85 ppm) observed at all the proflavine ring nonexchangeable protons on complex formation are consistent with intercalation of the mutagen between base pairs of the tetranucleotide duplex. We have proposed an approximate overlap geometry between the proflavine ring and nearest neighbor base pairs at the intercalation site from a comparison between experimental shifts and those calculated for various stacking orientations. We have compared the binding of actinomycin D, propidium diiodide, and proflavine to self-complementary tetranucleotide sequences dC-dC-dG-dG and dG-dG-dC-dC by UV absorbance changes in the drug bands between 400 and 500 nm. Actinomycin D exhibits a pronounced specificity for sequences with dG-dC sites (dG-dG-dC-dC), while propidium diiodide and proflavine exhibit a specificity for sequences with dC-dG sites (dC-dC-dG-dG). Actinomycin D binds more strongly than propidium diiodide and proflavine to dC-dG-dC-dG (contains dC-dG and dG-dC binding sites), indicative of the additional stabilization from hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions between the pentapeptide lactone rings of actinomycin D and the base pair edges and sugar-phosphate backbone of the tetranucleotide duplex.

  15. D-Glucose and D-mannose-based metabolic probes. Part 3: Synthesis of specifically deuterated D-glucose, D-mannose, and 2-deoxy-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Fokt, Izabela; Skora, Stanislaw; Conrad, Charles; Madden, Timothy; Emmett, Mark; Priebe, Waldemar

    2013-03-07

    Altered carbohydrate metabolism in cancer cells was first noted by Otto Warburg more than 80 years ago. Upregulation of genes controlling the glycolytic pathway under normoxia, known as the Warburg effect, clearly differentiates malignant from non-malignant cells. The resurgence of interest in cancer metabolism aims at a better understanding of the metabolic differences between malignant and non-malignant cells and the creation of novel therapeutic and diagnostic agents exploiting these differences. Modified d-glucose and d-mannose analogs were shown to interfere with the metabolism of their respective monosaccharide parent molecules and are potentially clinically useful anticancer and diagnostic agents. One such agent, 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG), has been extensively studied in vitro and in vivo and also clinically evaluated. Studies clearly indicate that 2-DG has a pleiotropic mechanism of action. In addition to effectively inhibiting glycolysis, 2-DG has also been shown to affect protein glycosylation. In order to better understand its molecular mechanism of action, we have designed and synthesized deuterated molecular probes to study 2-DG interference with d-glucose and d-mannose metabolism using mass spectrometry. We present here the synthesis of all desired probes: 2-deutero-d-glucose, 2-deutero-d-mannose, 6-deutero-d-glucose, 6-deutero-d-mannose, and 2-deutero-2-deoxy-d-glucose as well as their complete chemical characterization.

  16. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Vivian Cristina; Martini, Lígia Araújo

    2010-04-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency has been observed worldwide at all stages of life. It has been characterized as a public health problem, since low concentrations of this vitamin have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases. Several studies have suggested that vitamin D is involved in cardiovascular diseases and have provided evidence that it has a role in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. It may be involved in regulation of gene expression through the presence of vitamin D receptors in various cells, regulation of blood pressure (through renin-angiotensin system), and modulation of cell growth and proliferation including vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Identifying correct mechanisms and relationships between vitamin D and such diseases could be important in relation to patient care and healthcare policies.

  17. Black rings at large D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    We study the effective theory of slowly rotating black holes at the infinite limit of the spacetime dimension D. This large D effective theory is obtained by integrating the Einstein equation with respect to the radial direction. The effective theory gives equations for non-linear dynamical deformations of a slowly rotating black hole by effective equations. The effective equations contain the slowly rotating Myers-Perry black hole, slowly boosted black string, non-uniform black string and black ring as stationary solutions. We obtain the analytic solution of the black ring by solving effective equations. Furthermore, by perturbation analysis of effective equations, we find a quasinormal mode condition of the black ring in analytic way. As a result we confirm that thin black ring is unstable against non-axisymmetric perturbations. We also include 1 /D corrections to the effective equations and discuss the effects by 1 /D corrections.

  18. 303(d) Listed Impaired Waters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Geospatial data for 303(d) Impaired Waters are available as prepackaged national downloads or as GIS web and and data services. EPA provides geospatial data in the formats: GIS compatible shapefiles and geodatabases and ESRI and OGC web mapping.

  19. D and C - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    D and C, or dilatation and curettage (uterine scraping), is a procedure to scrape and collect the ... Uterine scraping has relatively few risks and can relieve bleeding and diagnose problems, including infection, cancer, infertility, and other ...

  20. RGB-D SLAM Based on Extended Bundle Adjustment with 2D and 3D Information

    PubMed Central

    Di, Kaichang; Zhao, Qiang; Wan, Wenhui; Wang, Yexin; Gao, Yunjun

    2016-01-01

    In the study of SLAM problem using an RGB-D camera, depth information and visual information as two types of primary measurement data are rarely tightly coupled during refinement of camera pose estimation. In this paper, a new method of RGB-D camera SLAM is proposed based on extended bundle adjustment with integrated 2D and 3D information on the basis of a new projection model. First, the geometric relationship between the image plane coordinates and the depth values is constructed through RGB-D camera calibration. Then, 2D and 3D feature points are automatically extracted and matched between consecutive frames to build a continuous image network. Finally, extended bundle adjustment based on the new projection model, which takes both image and depth measurements into consideration, is applied to the image network for high-precision pose estimation. Field experiments show that the proposed method has a notably better performance than the traditional method, and the experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in improving localization accuracy. PMID:27529256

  1. D0 Silicon Upgrade: D0 Cryo to D0 Physics DAQ Communications Link

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, Dan; /Fermilab

    1995-03-07

    This engineering note documents a communication link between the D0 cryo/gas control system and the D0 physics data acquisition computer system. This note is being written well after the work has been completed, in order to document this communications link, and to satisfy needs of planned upgrades. These upgrades are the D0 Super Conducting Solenoid, VLPC system, and Silicon Detector System. The D0 cryo/gas control system is a Programmable Logic Controller based process control system. It is responsible for controlling many of the physical parameters of the D0 experiment, such as Calorimeter cooling, vacuum, Instrument air, TRD gas pressures and flows, W AMUS pressures and flows, SAMUS pressure and flows, etc. It works independent of the Physics DAQ system. There is a need for the Physics DAQ system to record some of these process values with the D0 physics data. This process data will later be used to calibrate certain features of the Physics data during reconstruction. The process data is also used to interlock (via the Physics DAQ system) some of the other D0 systems such as the TRD high voltage system. Some of the Process data values will be continuously monitored and will stop the Physics data taking of the experiment if it is out of tolerance.

  2. Study of D sJ (*) + mesons decaying to D ∗ + K S 0 and D *0 K + final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Fabianska, M.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-02-01

    A search is performed for D sJ (*) + mesons in the reactions pp → D ∗ + K S 0 X and pp → D *0 K + X using data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. For the D ∗ + K S 0 final state, the decays D *+ → D 0 π + with D 0 → K - π + and D 0 → K - π + π + π - are used. For D *0 K +, the decay D *0 → D 0 π 0 with D 0 → K - π + is used. A prominent D s1(2536)+ signal is observed in both D ∗ + K S 0 and D *0 K + final states. The resonances D s1 * (2700)+ and D s3 * (2860)+ are also observed, yielding information on their properties, including spin-parity assignments. The decay D s2 * (2573)+ → D ∗ + K S 0 is observed for the first time, at a significance of 6 .9 σ, and its branching fraction relative to the D s2 * (2573)+ → D + K S 0 decay mode is measured. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Vitamin D in Tear Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaowen; Elizondo, Rodolfo A.; Nielsen, Rikke; Christensen, Erik I.; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D.; Watsky, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the source(s) of vitamin D in tear fluid and examine the expression of the endocytic proteins and putative vitamin D transporters megalin and cubilin in lacrimal and Harderian glands. Methods Wild-type, heterozygous, and vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout C57BL/6 mice were used, with a subset of knockout mice fed a replenishment diet for some studies. Mouse lacrimal and Harderian glands from each group were used to measure megalin and cubilin by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. New Zealand white rabbits were used to collect lacrimal and accessory gland fluid for vitamin D mass spectroscopy measurements. Results Ten-week-old knockout mice were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller than wild-type mice. Real-time PCR and Western blot showed decreased expression of megalin and cubilin in select VDR knockout mouse groups. Immunohistochemistry showed apical duct cell megalin staining and weaker megalin staining in VDR knockout mice compared with controls. Vitamin D2 was more prevalent in rabbit lacrimal and accessory gland fluid than vitamin D3, and greater amounts of Vitamin D2 were found in in tear fluid obtained directly from lacrimal and accessory glands as compared with plasma concentrations. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the presence of megalin and cubilin in lacrimal and accessory glands responsible for producing tear fluid. The results strengthen the hypothesis that megalin and cubilin are likely involved in the secretory pathway of vitamin D into tear fluid by the duct cells. PMID:26348637

  4. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  5. Hunting the Dibaryon d'(2065)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Gerhard J.; Bilger, R.; Clement, H.; Denig, A.; Foehl, K.; Graeter, J.; Kluge, W.; Paetzold, J.; Meier, R.; Schepkin, M.; Wagne, G. J.; Amaudruz, P. A.; Ambardar, A.; Bilger, R.; Bonutti, F.; Camerini, P.; Clark, J.; Clement, H.; Felawka, L.; Friedman, E.; Graeter, J.; Grion, N.; Hofman, G. J.; Hong, P.; Kermani, M.; Mathie, E. L.; Meier, R.; Ottewell, D.; Patarakin, O.; Rui, R.; Schepkin, M.; Sevior, M. E.; Smith, G. R.; Tacik, R.; Tagliente, G.; Wagner, G. J.; Bilger, R.; Brodowski, W.; Calen, H.; Clement, H.; Ekstroem, C.; Foehl, K.; Fransson, K.; Gustafsson, L.; Haeggstroem, S.; Hoeistad, B.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Kilian, K.; Kullander, S.; Kupsc, A.; Kurz, G.; Marciniewski, P.; Morosov, B.; Moehn, J.; Moertsell, A.; Oelert, W.; Renken, V.; Ruber, R.; Schepkin, M. G.; Siodlaczek, U.; Stepaniak, J.; Sukhanov, A.; Turowiecki, A.; Wagner, G. J.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Zabierowski, J.; Zernov, A.; Zlomanczuk, J.

    1998-09-01

    In order to explain the resonance-like excitation functions of pionic double-charge-exchange reactions near 50 MeV the existence of a narrow πNN-resonance d' with a mass of about 2.06 GeV has been postulated. The status of the various experiments that have been performed to establish the existence of the d' is reported.

  6. MSS D Multispectral Scanner System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauletta, A. M.; Johnson, R. L.; Brinkman, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The development and acceptance testing of the 4-band Multispectral Scanners to be flown on LANDSAT D and LANDSAT D Earth resources satellites are summarized. Emphasis is placed on the acceptance test phase of the program. Test history and acceptance test algorithms are discussed. Trend data of all the key performance parameters are included and discussed separately for each of the two multispectral scanner instruments. Anomalies encountered and their resolutions are included.

  7. The D-material universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghozi, Thomas; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Furqaan Yusaf, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    In a previous publication by some of the authors (N.E.M., M.S. and M.F.Y.), we have argued that the ``D-material universe'', that is a model of a brane world propagating in a higher-dimensional bulk populated by collections of D-particle stringy defects, provides a model for the growth of large-scale structure in the universe via the vector field in its spectrum. The latter corresponds to D-particle recoil velocity excitations as a result of the interactions of the defects with stringy matter and radiation on the brane world. In this article, we first elaborate further on the results of the previous study on the galactic growth era and analyse the circumstances under which the D-particle recoil velocity fluid may ``mimic'' dark matter in galaxies. A lensing phenomenology is also presented for some samples of galaxies, which previously were known to provide tension for modified gravity (TeVeS) models. The current model is found in agreement with these lensing data. Then we discuss a cosmic evolution for the D-material universe by analysing the conditions under which the late eras of this universe associated with large-scale structure are connected to early epochs, where inflation takes place. It is shown that inflation is induced by dense populations of D-particles in the early universe, with the rôle of the inflaton field played by the condensate of the D-particle recoil-velocity fields under their interaction with relativistic stringy matter, only for sufficiently large brane tensions and low string mass scales compared to the Hubble scale. On the other hand, for large string scales, where the recoil-velocity condensate fields are weak, inflation cannot be driven by the D-particle defects alone. In such cases inflation may be driven by dilaton (or other moduli) fields in the underlying string theory.

  8. The D-material universe

    SciTech Connect

    Elghozi, Thomas; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Yusaf, Muhammad Furqaan E-mail: nikolaos.mavromatos@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: furqaan.yusaf@bristol.ac.uk

    2016-02-01

    In a previous publication by some of the authors (N.E.M., M.S. and M.F.Y.), we have argued that the ''D-material universe'', that is a model of a brane world propagating in a higher-dimensional bulk populated by collections of D-particle stringy defects, provides a model for the growth of large-scale structure in the universe via the vector field in its spectrum. The latter corresponds to D-particle recoil velocity excitations as a result of the interactions of the defects with stringy matter and radiation on the brane world. In this article, we first elaborate further on the results of the previous study on the galactic growth era and analyse the circumstances under which the D-particle recoil velocity fluid may ''mimic'' dark matter in galaxies. A lensing phenomenology is also presented for some samples of galaxies, which previously were known to provide tension for modified gravity (TeVeS) models. The current model is found in agreement with these lensing data. Then we discuss a cosmic evolution for the D-material universe by analysing the conditions under which the late eras of this universe associated with large-scale structure are connected to early epochs, where inflation takes place. It is shown that inflation is induced by dense populations of D-particles in the early universe, with the rôle of the inflaton field played by the condensate of the D-particle recoil-velocity fields under their interaction with relativistic stringy matter, only for sufficiently large brane tensions and low string mass scales compared to the Hubble scale. On the other hand, for large string scales, where the recoil-velocity condensate fields are weak, inflation cannot be driven by the D-particle defects alone. In such cases inflation may be driven by dilaton (or other moduli) fields in the underlying string theory.

  9. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  10. The agreement between 3D, standard 2D and triplane 2D speckle tracking: effects of image quality and 3D volume rate.

    PubMed

    Trache, Tudor; Stöbe, Stephan; Tarr, Adrienn; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Hagendorff, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Comparison of 3D and 2D speckle tracking performed on standard 2D and triplane 2D datasets of normal and pathological left ventricular (LV) wall-motion patterns with a focus on the effect that 3D volume rate (3DVR), image quality and tracking artifacts have on the agreement between 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 37 patients with normal LV function and 18 patients with ischaemic wall-motion abnormalities underwent 2D and 3D echocardiography, followed by offline speckle tracking measurements. The values of 3D global, regional and segmental strain were compared with the standard 2D and triplane 2D strain values. Correlation analysis with the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was also performed. The 3D and 2D global strain values correlated good in both normally and abnormally contracting hearts, though systematic differences between the two methods were observed. Of the 3D strain parameters, the area strain showed the best correlation with the LVEF. The numerical agreement of 3D and 2D analyses varied significantly with the volume rate and image quality of the 3D datasets. The highest correlation between 2D and 3D peak systolic strain values was found between 3D area and standard 2D longitudinal strain. Regional wall-motion abnormalities were similarly detected by 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 2DST of triplane datasets showed similar results to those of conventional 2D datasets. 2D and 3D speckle tracking similarly detect normal and pathological wall-motion patterns. Limited image quality has a significant impact on the agreement between 3D and 2D numerical strain values.

  11. Lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Pinliang

    2009-10-01

    Spatial scale plays an important role in many fields. As a scale-dependent measure for spatial heterogeneity, lacunarity describes the distribution of gaps within a set at multiple scales. In Earth science, environmental science, and ecology, lacunarity has been increasingly used for multiscale modeling of spatial patterns. This paper presents the development and implementation of a geographic information system (GIS) software extension for lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns. Depending on the application requirement, lacunarity analysis can be performed in two modes: global mode or local mode. The extension works for: (1) binary (1-bit) and grey-scale datasets in any raster format supported by ArcGIS and (2) 1D, 2D, and 3D point datasets as shapefiles or geodatabase feature classes. For more effective measurement of lacunarity for different patterns or processes in raster datasets, the extension allows users to define an area of interest (AOI) in four different ways, including using a polygon in an existing feature layer. Additionally, directionality can be taken into account when grey-scale datasets are used for local lacunarity analysis. The methodology and graphical user interface (GUI) are described. The application of the extension is demonstrated using both simulated and real datasets, including Brodatz texture images, a Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-C) image, simulated 1D points on a drainage network, and 3D random and clustered point patterns. The options of lacunarity analysis and the effects of polyline arrangement on lacunarity of 1D points are also discussed. Results from sample data suggest that the lacunarity analysis extension can be used for efficient modeling of spatial patterns at multiple scales.

  12. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  13. Vitamin D in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wöbke, Thea K.; Sorg, Bernd L.; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Changes in vitamin D serum levels have been associated with inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis (MS), atherosclerosis, or asthma. Genome- and transcriptome-wide studies indicate that vitamin D signaling modulates many inflammatory responses on several levels. This includes (i) the regulation of the expression of genes which generate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenases or 5-lipoxygenase, (ii) the interference with transcription factors, such as NF-κB, which regulate the expression of inflammatory genes and (iii) the activation of signaling cascades, such as MAP kinases which mediate inflammatory responses. Vitamin D targets various tissues and cell types, a number of which belong to the immune system, such as monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) as well as B- and T cells, leading to individual responses of each cell type. One hallmark of these specific vitamin D effects is the cell-type specific regulation of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and the interplay between vitamin D signaling and other signaling cascades involved in inflammation. An important task in the near future will be the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses by vitamin D on the molecular level by the use of techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), ChIP-seq, and FAIRE-seq. PMID:25071589

  14. Serum Concentrations of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Response to Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3 Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Biancuzzo, Rachael M.; Clarke, Nigel; Reitz, Richard E.; Travison, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 [1,25(OH)2D2] levels in healthy adults consuming 1000 IU vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 per day for 11 weeks. Subjects and Design: Blood from 34 healthy male and female adults, aged 18 to 79 years, from a placebo-controlled, double-blind study who received a placebo, 1000 IU vitamin D3, or 1000 IU vitamin D2 daily for 11 weeks at end of winter was analyzed. Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, 1,25(OH)2D2, and 1,25(OH)2D3 were determined by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy. Results: Of the adults, 82% were vitamin D insufficient (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D <30 ng/mL]) at the start of the study. Administration of vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 induced similar increases in total 25(OH)D as well as in 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, respectively. Compared with placebo and adjusting for baseline levels, 1000 IU daily of vitamin D2 was associated with a mean increase of 7.4 pg/mL (95% confidence interval, 4.4–10.3) in 1,25(OH)2D2, which was accompanied by a mean decrease of 9.9 pg/mL (−15.8 to −4.0) in 1,25(OH)2D3. No such differences accompanied administration of 1000 IU daily of vitamin D3. Conclusion: Vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 were effective in raising and maintaining total serum concentrations of 25(OH)D. Ingestion of vitamin D2 also resulted in an increase in serum concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D2. This increase was accompanied by a comparable decrease in serum concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3; therefore, the total 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] concentrations did not significantly change after 11 weeks compared with baseline levels. Ingestion of vitamin D3 did not alter serum concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3 or total 1,25(OH)2D. Therefore, ingestion of 1000 IU vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 for 11 weeks was effective in raising total serum concentrations of 25(OH)D as well as sustaining serum

  15. GNSS meteorology for severe weather - 1D, 2D and 3D solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohm, Witold; Manning, Toby; Yuan, Yubin; Biadeglgne, Bertukan; Choy, Sue Lynn; Zhang, Kefei

    2013-04-01

    The variability of water vapour (WV) is strongly correlated with the formation, course and dissipation of the mesoscale convective storm systems, due to the large latent heat transfers in the evaporation/condensation process. Contrary to its importance WV space and time distribution remains under sampled in both domains, especially in sparsely populated countries such as Australia. GPS meteorology currently is a very important data source for meteorology, climatology and forecasting, due to the relatively dense network of receivers, operating in the unified reference frame. Point observations of troposphere delay (1D), integrated water vapour (1D), as well as maps of these parameters (2D) are highly sensitive to building up of high amount of water vapour in the troposphere, as well as storm passage. The Kalman filter based GNSS tomography is an emerging method of reconstructing dynamically changing wet refractivity fields (3D). All types of ground based GNSS products has solid scientific foundations and are routinely estimated by major GNSS processing centres with high accuracy and low latency (ie. EGVAP AC). The forthcoming challenge of for the analyse of GNSS meteorology estimates (1D, 2D and 3D) is developing a quantifiable method to predict as well as identify location, size and severity of mesoscale convective storm system. In the course of this research several spatial and temporal filter and indicators have been developed to aid in early detection, prediction and monitoring of severe weather events using all types of GNSS meteorology by-products estimates (1D, 2D and 3D). This research presents a case study based on the analysis of an extreme convective super cell storm in the Victorian region during March 2010 using GPS tomography. Integrated Perceptible Water readings collected from MOBS stations confirmed high time resolution as well as sensitivity to incoming severe weather. Another, special measure of Refractive Index adopted for GPS tomography wet

  16. Differential Responses to Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3 Are Associated With Variations in Free 25-Hydroxyvitamin D.

    PubMed

    Chun, Rene F; Hernandez, Ivan; Pereira, Renata; Swinkles, Leon; Huijs, Tonnie; Zhou, Rui; Liu, Nancy Q; Shieh, Albert; Guemes, Miriam; Mallya, Sanjay M; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2016-09-01

    25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25D) circulates bound primarily to serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP), with DBP showing higher binding affinity for 25D3 than 25D2. We therefore hypothesized that vitamin D2 (D2) promotes higher serum levels of unbound 25D (free 25D), with different functional responses, relative to vitamin D3 (D3). Week 3 C56BL/6 mice were placed on diets containing either D2 or D3 alone (both 1000 IU/kg). At week 8 and week 16, D2 mice had only 25D2 in circulation (26.6 ± 1.9 and 33.3 ± 4.4 ng/mL), and D3 mice had only 25D3 (28.3 ± 2.0 and 31.7 ± 2.1 ng/mL). At week 8 (44.5 ± 6.4 vs 62.4 ± 11.6 pg/mL, P < .05) and week 16 (78.4 ± 12.6 vs 95.5 ± 11.6), D2 mice had lower serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D relative to D3 mice. By contrast, measured free 25D was significantly higher in D2 mice at week 8 (16.8 ± 0.65 vs 8.4 ± 0.63 pg/mL, P < .001) and week 16 (17.4 ± 0.43 vs 8.4 ± 0.44, P < .001). A two-way ANOVA of bone histomorphometry showed that week 8 D2 mice had significantly higher osteoclast surface/bone surface, eroded surface/bone surface, and mineral apposition rate compared with D3 mice. Osteoblast surface/bone surface was higher in week 8 D2 females but not week 8 D2 males. At week 16, D2 mice had significantly higher bone volume/total volume and trabecular number compared with D3 mice. Differences in bone phenotype were observed despite D2 mice reaching similar serum 25D levels and lower 1,25D levels compared with D3 mice. These data indicate that 25D2 binds less well to DBP than 25D3, with resulting higher levels of free 25D promoting differential effects on bone in mice exposed to D2 alone.

  17. Calibration of a 1D/1D urban flood model using 1D/2D model results in the absence of field data.

    PubMed

    Leandro, J; Djordjević, S; Chen, A S; Savić, D A; Stanić, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently increased flood events have been prompting researchers to improve existing coupled flood-models such as one-dimensional (1D)/1D and 1D/two-dimensional (2D) models. While 1D/1D models simulate sewer and surface networks using a one-dimensional approach, 1D/2D models represent the surface network by a two-dimensional surface grid. However their application raises two issues to urban flood modellers: (1) stormwater systems planning/emergency or risk analysis demands for fast models, and the 1D/2D computational time is prohibitive, (2) and the recognized lack of field data (e.g. Hunter et al. (2008)) causes difficulties for the calibration/validation of 1D/1D models. In this paper we propose to overcome these issues by calibrating a 1D/1D model with the results of a 1D/2D model. The flood-inundation results show that: (1) 1D/2D results can be used to calibrate faster 1D/1D models, (2) the 1D/1D model is able to map the 1D/2D flood maximum extent well, and the flooding limits satisfactorily in each time-step, (3) the 1D/1D model major differences are the instantaneous flow propagation and overestimation of the flood-depths within surface-ponds, (4) the agreement in the volume surcharged by both models is a necessary condition for the 1D surface-network validation and (5) the agreement of the manholes discharge shapes measures the fitness of the calibrated 1D surface-network.

  18. Fluor Hanford ALARA Center is a D and D Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O.

    2008-01-15

    The mission at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation changed when the last reactor plant was shut down in 1989 and work was started to place all the facilities in a safe condition and begin decontamination, deactivation, decommissioning, and demolition (D and D). These facilities consisted of old shutdown reactor plants, spent fuel pools, processing facilities, and 177 underground tanks containing 53 million gallons of highly radioactive and toxic liquids and sludge. New skills were needed by the workforce to accomplish this mission. By 1995, workers were in the process of getting the facilities in a safe condition and it became obvious improvements were needed in their tools, equipment and work practices. The Hanford ALARA Program looked good on paper, but did little to help contractors that were working in the field. The Radiological Control Director decided that the ALARA program needed to be upgraded and a significant improvement could be made if workers had a place they could visit that had samples of the latest technology and could talk to experienced personnel who have had success doing D and D work. Two senior health physics personnel who had many years experience in doing radiological work were chosen to obtain tools and equipment from vendors and find a location centrally located on the Hanford site. Vendors were asked to loan their latest tools and equipment for display. Most vendors responded and the Hanford ALARA Center of Technology opened on October 1, 1996. Today, the ALARA Center includes a classroom for conducting training and a mockup area with gloveboxes. Two large rooms have a containment tent, several glove bags, samples of fixatives/expandable foam, coating displays, protective clothing, heat stress technology, cutting tools, HEPA filtered vacuums, ventilation units, pumps, hydraulic wrenches, communications equipment, shears, nibblers, shrouded tooling, and several examples of innovative tools developed by the Hanford facilities. See Figures I and

  19. A D-D/D-T fusion reaction based neutron generator system for liver tumor BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunoro, H.; Lou, T.P.; Leung, K. N.; Reijonen, J.

    2003-04-02

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiation treatment modality used for highly malignant tumor treatments. Prior to irradiation with low energetic neutrons, a 10B compound is located selectively in the tumor cells. The effect of the treatment is based on the high LET radiation released in the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction with thermal neutrons. BNCT has been used experimentally for brain tumor and melanoma treatments. Lately applications of other severe tumor type treatments have been introduced. Results have shown that liver tumors can also be treated by BNCT. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, various compact neutron generators based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions are being developed. The earlier theoretical studies of the D-D or D-T fusion reaction based neutron generators have shown that the optimal moderator and reflector configuration for brain tumor BNCT can be created. In this work, the applicability of 2.5 MeV neutrons for liver tumor BNCT application was studied. The optimal neutron energy for external liver treatments is not known. Neutron beams of different energies (1eV < E < 100 keV) were simulated and the dose distribution in the liver was calculated with the MCNP simulation code. In order to obtain the optimal neutron energy spectrum with the D-D neutrons, various moderator designs were performed using MCNP simulations. In this article the neutron spectrum and the optimized beam shaping assembly for liver tumor treatments is presented.

  20. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  1. 1d, 2d, and 3d periodic structures: Electromagnetic characterization, design, and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockett, Timothy John

    Periodic structures have many useful applications in electromagnetics including phased arrays, frequency selective surfaces, and absorbing interfaces. Their unique properties can be used to provide increased performance in antenna gain, electromagnetic propagation, and electromagnetic absorption. In antenna arrays, repeating elements create a larger eective aperture, increasing the gain of the antenna and the ability to scan the direction of the main beam. Three-dimensional periodic structures, such as an array of shaped pillars such as columns, cones, or prisms have the potential of improving electromagnetic absorption, improving performance in applications such as solar cell eciency and absorbing interfaces. Furthermore, research into periodic structures is a continuing endeavor where novel approaches and analysis in appropriate applications can be sought. This dissertation will address the analysis, diagnostics, and enhancement of 1D, 2D, and 3D periodic structures for antenna array applications and solar cell technology. In particular, a unique approach to array design will be introduced to prevent the appearance of undesirable grating lobes in large antenna arrays that employ subarrays. This approach, named the distortion diagnostic procedure, can apply directly to 1D and 2D periodic structures in the form of planar antenna arrays. Interesting corollaries included here are developments in millimeter-wave antenna measurements including spiral planar scanning, phaseless measurements, and addressing antennas that feature an internal source. Finally, analysis and enhancement of 3D periodic structures in nanostructure photovoltaic arrays and absorbing interfaces will be examined for their behavior and basic operation in regards to improved absorption of electromagnetic waves.

  2. CASTOR3D: linear stability studies for 2D and 3D tokamak equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strumberger, E.; Günter, S.

    2017-01-01

    The CASTOR3D code, which is currently under development, is able to perform linear stability studies for 2D and 3D, ideal and resistive tokamak equilibria in the presence of ideal and resistive wall structures and coils. For these computations ideal equilibria represented by concentric nested flux surfaces serve as input (e.g. computed with the NEMEC code). Solving an extended eigenvalue problem, the CASTOR3D code takes simultaneously plasma inertia and wall resistivity into account. The code is a hybrid of the CASTOR_3DW stability code and the STARWALL code. The former is an extended version of the CASTOR and CASTOR_FLOW code, respectively. The latter is a linear 3D code computing the growth rates of resistive wall modes in the presence of multiply-connected wall structures. The CASTOR_3DW code, and some parts of the STARWALL code have been reformulated in a general 3D flux coordinate representation that allows to choose between various types of flux coordinates. Furthermore, the implemented many-valued current potentials in the STARWALL part allow a correct treatment of the m  =  0, n  =  0 perturbation. In this paper, we outline the theoretical concept, and present some numerical results which illustrate the present status of the code and demonstrate its numerous application possibilities.

  3. 23 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 230 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION..., Subpt. D, App. D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 230—Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process...

  4. 23 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

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  5. 23 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 230 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION..., Subpt. D, App. D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 230—Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process...

  6. 23 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 230 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION..., Subpt. D, App. D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 230—Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process...

  7. 23 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process Flow Chart D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 230 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION..., Subpt. D, App. D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 230—Equal Opportunity Compliance Review Process...

  8. Low-impact plutonium glove box D&D

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    A dilemma often encountered in decontamination and decommissioning operations is the lack of choice of the location where the work is to be performed. High-priority research activities,which cannot be interrupted may be occurring in adjacent nonradiological facilities in the immediate vicinity. Determining project boundaries and ensuring that adjacent occupants are included in the planning/scheduling of specific operations that have an impact on the work area are important for the development of the safety envelope. This describes management of such a situation with recent D & D of 61 glove boxes contaminated with plutonium and other transuranic nuclides at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  9. D0-D bar 0 mixing and rare charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Burdman, Gustavo; Shipsey, Ian

    2003-10-08

    We review the current status of flavor-changing neutral currents in the charm sector. We focus on the standard-model predictions and identify the main sources of theoretical uncertainties in both D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} mixing and rare charm decays. The potential of these observables for constraining short-distance physics in the standard model and its extensions is compromised by the presence of large nonperturbative effects. We examine the possible discovery windows in which short-distance physics can be tested and study the effects of various extensions of the standard model. The current experimental situation and future prospects are reviewed.

  10. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  11. Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Tak Pui

    2003-01-01

    Neutron generators based on the 2H(d,n)3He and 3H(d,n)4He fusion reactions are the most commonly available neutron sources. The applications of current commercial neutron generators are often limited by their low neutron yield and their short operational lifetime. A new generation of D-D/D-T fusion-based neutron generators has been designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) by using high current ion beams hitting on a self-loading target that has a large surface area to dissipate the heat load. This thesis describes the rationale behind the new designs and their potential applications. A survey of other neutron sources is presented to show their advantages and disadvantages compared to the fusion-based neutron generator. A prototype neutron facility was built at LBNL to test these neutron generators. High current ion beams were extracted from an RF-driven ion source to produce neutrons. With an average deuteron beam current of 24 mA and an energy of 100 keV, a neutron yield of >109 n/s has been obtained with a D-D coaxial neutron source. Several potential applications were investigated by using computer simulations. The computer code used for simulations and the variance reduction techniques employed were discussed. A study was carried out to determine the neutron flux and resolution of a D-T neutron source in thermal neutron scattering applications for condensed matter experiments. An error analysis was performed to validate the scheme used to predict the resolution. With a D-T neutron yield of 1014 n/s, the thermal neutron flux at the sample was predicted to be 7.3 x 105 n/cm2s. It was found that the resolution of cold neutrons was better than that of thermal neutrons when the duty factor is high. This neutron generator could be efficiently used for research and educational purposes at universities. Additional applications studied were positron production and

  12. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  13. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  14. [Vitamin D and kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Étienne; Thervet, Éric; Courbebaisse, Marie

    2013-10-01

    Calcitriol and analogs inhibit renin-angiotensin system, which has a pivotal role in glomerular and tubulo-interstitial damages and proteinuria, and inhibit NF-κB activation which is known to play an important role in renal diseases by promoting inflammation and fibrogenesis. Vitamin D presents interesting pleiotropic effects for the CKD patient (reduction of mortality, antiproteinuric effect and anti-inflammatory properties). "Native" vitamin D (cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol) administration in these patients also decrease parathyroid hormone levels. Native vitamin D administration in CKD patients is safe and does not lead to increased risk of vascular calcification, despite the known hypercalcemic and hyperphosphoremic properties of the molecule in its active form. Native vitamin D administration is not associated with an increased risk of renal stones, at pharmacological doses and without important concomitant administration of calcium salts. In the field of renal transplantation, experimental studies show that vitamin D analogs have a protective role against acute rejection but clinical studies remain mainly observational.

  15. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  16. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  17. 3D/4D sonographic evaluation of amniotic band syndrome in early pregnancy: a supplement to 2D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Noguchi, Junko

    2011-06-01

    We present two cases of amniotic band syndrome diagnosed using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound with three-dimensional (3D)/four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound in early pregnancy. In Case 1, at 13 weeks' gestation, multiple amniotic bands, acrania, the absence of fingers and amputation of the toes bilaterally were clearly shown using transvaginal 3D/4D ultrasound. In Case 2, at 15 weeks' gestation, several amniotic bands, acrania and a cleft lip were depicted with transabdominal 3D/4D ultrasound. The spatial relationship between the amniotic bands and the fetus was clearly visualized and easily discernible by 3D/4D ultrasound. The parents and families could readily understand the fetal conditions and undergo counseling; they then choose the option of termination of pregnancy. 3D/4D ultrasound has the potential to be a supplement to conventional 2D ultrasound in evaluating amniotic band syndrome.

  18. Vitamin D and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Danescu, Liviu G; Levy, Shiri; Levy, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Better understanding of the physiological role of the vitamin-D system, in particular its potential effects on inflammatory and autoimmune conditions as well as on insulin secretion and possibly also on insulin resistance, increased the interest in its potential role in prevention and control of the diabetic condition, both type-1 and -2 diabetes. Both these conditions are associated with inflammation and type-1 diabetes also with an autoimmune pathology. Indeed, animal and human studies support the notion that adequate vitamin-D supplementation may decrease the incidence of type-1 and possibly also of type-2 diabetes mellitus and may improve the metabolic control in the diabetes state. However, the exact mechanisms by which vitamin-D and calcium supplementation exert their beneficial effects are not clear and need further investigation.

  19. Aquarius/SAC-D mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Amit; Caruso, Daniel; Lagerloef, Gary; Torrusio, Sandra; Durham, David; Falcon, Carlos

    2008-10-01

    Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is a key parameter in the global water cycle but it is not yet monitored from space. Conventional in situ SSS sampling is too sparse to give the global view of salinity variability that a remote sensing satellite can provide. The Aquarius/SAC-D Mission will make pioneering space-based measurements of global SSS with the precision, resolution, and coverage needed to characterize salinity variations (spatial and temporal), investigate the linkage between ocean circulation, the Earth's water cycle, and climate variability. It is being jointly developed by NASA and the Space Agency of Argentina, the Comision Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE). The Project is currently in implementation phase with the flight Aquarius Instrument undergoing environmental testing at NASA-JPL/Caltech in California, USA and the SAC-D instruments and spacecraft development undergoing at CONAE/INVAP facilities in Argentina. Aquarius/SAC-D launch is scheduled for May 2010.

  20. Flowcharting with D-charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, D.

    1985-01-01

    A D-Chart is a style of flowchart using control symbols highly appropriate to modern structured programming languages. The intent of a D-Chart is to provide a clear and concise one-for-one mapping of control symbols to high-level language constructs for purposes of design and documentation. The notation lends itself to both high-level and code-level algorithmic description. The various issues that may arise when representing, in D-Chart style, algorithms expressed in the more popular high-level languages are addressed. In particular, the peculiarities of mapping control constructs for Ada, PASCAL, FORTRAN 77, C, PL/I, Jovial J73, HAL/S, and Algol are discussed.

  1. [Hypovitaminosis D: a veiled diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Grootjans-Geerts, I

    2001-10-27

    Four cases of hypovitaminosis D were seen in a general practitioner's population in the Netherlands: a Somalian veiled woman aged 53 and her 11-year-old daughter, a dark-skinned Surinam woman aged 31, and a veiled Moroccan woman aged 56 years. This cause of myopathy has only been recently recognised and is more prevalent than often thought, especially in high-risk groups such as veiled and dark-skinned immigrants who lack sunlight in the Netherlands. Symptoms are muscle pain and mainly proximal muscle weakness resulting in difficulties in ascending a staircase or getting up out of a chair. The diagnosis is made on the basis of a detailed history and measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Calcium and serum alkaline phosphatase activity may be normal. Treatment with ergocalciferol is effective and cheap. As diagnosis and treatment are relatively simple, finding and treating hypovitaminosis D is a rewarding challenge to primary health care practitioners in the Netherlands.

  2. Measurement of the Relative Branching Fractions for B^- to D/D^{*}/D^{**}(D^{(*)}\\pi) \\ell^- \\bar{\

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2006-09-26

    We present a study of B semileptonic decays into charm final states based on 211.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Using a novel technique based on the simultaneous fit of a set of variables reconstructed on the recoil of a B tagged in an hadronic decay mode, we measure the relative branching fractions {Lambda}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = 0.611 {+-} 0.022 (stat.) {+-} 0.027 (syst.) and {Lambda}(B{sup -} {yields} D**{sup 0})(D{sup (*)}{pi}){ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}/{Lambda}(B{sup -} {yields} DX{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = 0.173 {+-} 0.017 (stat.) {+-} 0.021 (syst.).

  3. D1 Mission Project Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Gunther

    1982-02-01

    The mission D1 is the first complete SL mission in the framework of the German Manned Space Program. This Mission will be under the mission management responsibility of the German Space Agency DFVLR. Its primary objective is to support basic and applied research in the following fields: materials processing, fluid physics, medicine, biology, botany. A further mission objective is to test: instrument reflyability (reuse of FSLP equipment, efficiency of crew operations in space and economies possible in crew operations. An important spin-off will be establishment of the management capability to implement and control complex manned space programs. This paper describes how the D1 project is implemented under German mission management responsibility. The major project tasks as they will be performed using German facilities, in particular all D1 unique aspects, will be addressed.

  4. Projection-slice theorem based 2D-3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Homan, R.; Timmer, J.; Bartels, L. W.

    2007-03-01

    In X-ray guided procedures, the surgeon or interventionalist is dependent on his or her knowledge of the patient's specific anatomy and the projection images acquired during the procedure by a rotational X-ray source. Unfortunately, these X-ray projections fail to give information on the patient's anatomy in the dimension along the projection axis. It would be very profitable to provide the surgeon or interventionalist with a 3D insight of the patient's anatomy that is directly linked to the X-ray images acquired during the procedure. In this paper we present a new robust 2D-3D registration method based on the Projection-Slice Theorem. This theorem gives us a relation between the pre-operative 3D data set and the interventional projection images. Registration is performed by minimizing a translation invariant similarity measure that is applied to the Fourier transforms of the images. The method was tested by performing multiple exhaustive searches on phantom data of the Circle of Willis and on a post-mortem human skull. Validation was performed visually by comparing the test projections to the ones that corresponded to the minimal value of the similarity measure. The Projection-Slice Theorem Based method was shown to be very effective and robust, and provides capture ranges up to 62 degrees. Experiments have shown that the method is capable of retrieving similar results when translations are applied to the projection images.

  5. A fast scanning probe for D3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. G.; Salmonson, J.; Doerner, R.; Lehmer, R.; Moyer, R.; Schmitz, L.; Hill, D. N.

    A fast reciprocating probe was developed for D3-D which can penetrate the separatrix during H - mode with up to 5MW of NBI heating. The probe was designed to carry various sensor tips into the scrape-off layer at a velocity of 3 m/sec and dwell motionless for a programmed period of time. The driving force is provided by a pneumatic cylinder charged with helium to facilitate greater mass flow. The first series of experiments were done using a Langmuir probe head with 5 graphite tips to measure radial profiles of n(sub e), T(sub e), phi(sub f), (n tilde)(sub e), and (phi tilde)(sub f). The amplitude and phase of the fluctuating quantities are measured by using specially constructed vacuum compatible 5 kV coaxial transmission lines which allow us to extend the measurements into the MHz range. TTZ ceramic bearings and fast stroke bellows were also specially designed for the D3-D probe. Initial measurements will be presented.

  6. 6D microstate geometries from 10D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusto, Stefano; Martucci, Luca; Petrini, Michela; Russo, Rodolfo

    2013-11-01

    We use the formalism of Generalised Geometry to characterise in general the supersymmetric backgrounds in type II supergravity that have a null Killing vector. We then specify this analysis to configurations that preserve the same supersymmetries as the D1-D5-P system compactified on a four-manifold. We give a set of equations on the forms defining the supergravity background that are equivalent to the supersymmetry constraints and the equations of motion. This study is motivated by the search of new microstate geometries for the D1-D5-P black hole. As an example, we rewrite the linearised three-charge solution of arXiv:hep-th/0311092 in our formalism and show how to extend it to a non-linear, regular and asymptotically flat configuration. The dictionary is the following: H=H, FhereIIA=-FthereIIA, FhereIIB=FthereIIB, K=-32K, χ=-32K, ΨhereIIB=32ΦthereIIB, ΨhereIIA=-32ΦthereIIA.

  7. Interactive 2D to 3D stereoscopic image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Mark H.; Lipton, Lenny

    2005-03-01

    Advances in stereoscopic display technologies, graphic card devices, and digital imaging algorithms have opened up new possibilities in synthesizing stereoscopic images. The power of today"s DirectX/OpenGL optimized graphics cards together with adapting new and creative imaging tools found in software products such as Adobe Photoshop, provide a powerful environment for converting planar drawings and photographs into stereoscopic images. The basis for such a creative process is the focus of this paper. This article presents a novel technique, which uses advanced imaging features and custom Windows-based software that utilizes the Direct X 9 API to provide the user with an interactive stereo image synthesizer. By creating an accurate and interactive world scene with moveable and flexible depth map altered textured surfaces, perspective stereoscopic cameras with both visible frustums and zero parallax planes, a user can precisely model a virtual three-dimensional representation of a real-world scene. Current versions of Adobe Photoshop provide a creative user with a rich assortment of tools needed to highlight elements of a 2D image, simulate hidden areas, and creatively shape them for a 3D scene representation. The technique described has been implemented as a Photoshop plug-in and thus allows for a seamless transition of these 2D image elements into 3D surfaces, which are subsequently rendered to create stereoscopic views.

  8. D Recording for 2d Delivering - the Employment of 3d Models for Studies and Analyses -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, A.; Baratti, G.; Jiménez, B.; Girardi, S.; Remondino, F.

    2011-09-01

    In the last years, thanks to the advances of surveying sensors and techniques, many heritage sites could be accurately replicated in digital form with very detailed and impressive results. The actual limits are mainly related to hardware capabilities, computation time and low performance of personal computer. Often, the produced models are not visible on a normal computer and the only solution to easily visualized them is offline using rendered videos. This kind of 3D representations is useful for digital conservation, divulgation purposes or virtual tourism where people can visit places otherwise closed for preservation or security reasons. But many more potentialities and possible applications are available using a 3D model. The problem is the ability to handle 3D data as without adequate knowledge this information is reduced to standard 2D data. This article presents some surveying and 3D modeling experiences within the APSAT project ("Ambiente e Paesaggi dei Siti d'Altura Trentini", i.e. Environment and Landscapes of Upland Sites in Trentino). APSAT is a multidisciplinary project funded by the Autonomous Province of Trento (Italy) with the aim documenting, surveying, studying, analysing and preserving mountainous and hill-top heritage sites located in the region. The project focuses on theoretical, methodological and technological aspects of the archaeological investigation of mountain landscape, considered as the product of sequences of settlements, parcelling-outs, communication networks, resources, and symbolic places. The mountain environment preserves better than others the traces of hunting and gathering, breeding, agricultural, metallurgical, symbolic activities characterised by different lengths and environmental impacts, from Prehistory to the Modern Period. Therefore the correct surveying and documentation of this heritage sites and material is very important. Within the project, the 3DOM unit of FBK is delivering all the surveying and 3D material to

  9. 2D/3D Visual Tracker for Rover Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Madison, Richard W.; Nesnas, Issa A.; Bandari, Esfandiar; Kunz, Clayton; Deans, Matt; Bualat, Maria

    2006-01-01

    A visual-tracker computer program controls an articulated mast on a Mars rover to keep a designated feature (a target) in view while the rover drives toward the target, avoiding obstacles. Several prior visual-tracker programs have been tested on rover platforms; most require very small and well-estimated motion between consecutive image frames a requirement that is not realistic for a rover on rough terrain. The present visual-tracker program is designed to handle large image motions that lead to significant changes in feature geometry and photometry between frames. When a point is selected in one of the images acquired from stereoscopic cameras on the mast, a stereo triangulation algorithm computes a three-dimensional (3D) location for the target. As the rover moves, its body-mounted cameras feed images to a visual-odometry algorithm, which tracks two-dimensional (2D) corner features and computes their old and new 3D locations. The algorithm rejects points, the 3D motions of which are inconsistent with a rigid-world constraint, and then computes the apparent change in the rover pose (i.e., translation and rotation). The mast pan and tilt angles needed to keep the target centered in the field-of-view of the cameras (thereby minimizing the area over which the 2D-tracking algorithm must operate) are computed from the estimated change in the rover pose, the 3D position of the target feature, and a model of kinematics of the mast. If the motion between the consecutive frames is still large (i.e., 3D tracking was unsuccessful), an adaptive view-based matching technique is applied to the new image. This technique uses correlation-based template matching, in which a feature template is scaled by the ratio between the depth in the original template and the depth of pixels in the new image. This is repeated over the entire search window and the best correlation results indicate the appropriate match. The program could be a core for building application programs for systems

  10. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  11. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  12. D0 silicon microstrip tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Burdin, Sergey

    2005-11-01

    The D0 Run II silicon microstrip tracker (SMT) has 3 square meters of Si area. There are 792,576 channels read out by 6192 SVXIIe chips on 912 read out modules. The SMT provides track and vertex reconstruction capabilities over the full pseudorapidity coverage of the D0 detector. The full detector has been running successfully since April 2002. This presentation covers the experience in commissioning and operating, the recent electronics upgrade which improved stability of the SMT and estimates of the radiation damage.

  13. Bell P-39D Airacobra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Bell P-39D Airacobra: After initially seeing duty in the Pacific and European theaters of operation, P-39s were supplanted, then replaced by the P-38, P-47 and P-51. Many of the Bell Fighters made their way to the Soviet Union, while others, like this P-39D, were used in the Unites States. This Airacobra was flown by the NACA in early 1943. Note the engine located in the middle of the fuselage, and the cannon in the propeller spinner.

  14. Topological strings in d < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Verlinde, Herman; Verlinde, Erik

    1991-03-01

    We calculate correlation functions in minimal topological field theories. These twisted versions of N = 2 minimal models have recently been proposed to describe d < 1 matrix models, once coupled to topological gravity. In our calculation we make use of the Landau-Ginzburg formulation of the N = 2 models, and we find a direct relation between the Landau-Ginzburg superpotential and the KdV differential operator. Using this correspondence we show that the minimal topological models are in perfect agreement with the matrix models as solved in terms of the KdV hierarchy. This proves the equivalence at tree-level of topological and ordinary string thoery in d < 1.

  15. 3D Nanostructuring of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blick, Robert

    2000-03-01

    Modern semiconductor technology allows to machine devices on the nanometer scale. I will discuss the current limits of the fabrication processes, which enable the definition of single electron transistors with dimensions down to 8 nm. In addition to the conventional 2D patterning and structuring of semiconductors, I will demonstrate how to apply 3D nanostructuring techniques to build freely suspended single-crystal beams with lateral dimension down to 20 nm. In transport measurements in the temperature range from 30 mK up to 100 K these nano-crystals are characterized regarding their electronic as well as their mechanical properties. Moreover, I will present possible applications of these devices.

  16. Does R&D pay?

    PubMed

    Cavalla, David; Minhas, Raman

    2010-03-01

    Pharmaceutical R&D is notoriously risky, lengthy and costly; moreover, it does not always produce products of blockbuster status. The conventional route of fully discovering, developing and marketing a new chemical entity is followed by the large pharmaceutical companies, whereas other organizations in the pharmaceutical sector--such as generic or specialty companies and biotechnology companies--only operate over portions of the full R&D process. Here, we compare the ten-year financial performance of these three subsectors through their price/earnings ratios and their return on capital metrics to understand which of these strategic alternatives offered the best return to investors.

  17. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  18. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  19. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and hand preference for writing in the BBC Internet Study.

    PubMed

    Manning, J T; Peters, M

    2009-09-01

    The ratio of the length of the second to the fourth digit (2D:4D) may be negatively correlated with prenatal testosterone. Hand preference has been linked with prenatal testosterone and 2D:4D. Here we show that 2D:4D is associated with hand preference for writing in a large internet sample (n>170,000) in which participants self-reported their finger lengths. We replicated a significant association between right 2D:4D and writing hand preference (low right 2D:4D associated with left hand preference) as well as a significant correlation between writing hand preference and the difference between left and right 2D:4D or Dr-l (low Dr-l associated with left hand preference). A new significant correlation between left 2D:4D and writing hand preference was also shown (high left 2D:4D associated with left hand preference). There was a clear interaction between writing hand preference and 2D:4D: The left 2D:4D was significantly larger than the right 2D:4D in male and female left-handed writers, and the right hand 2D:4D was significantly larger than the left hand 2D:4D in male and female right-handed writers.

  20. Your P.A.D. Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    ... index (ABI) test to assist, as well. TOTAL CHOLESTEROL Desirable : less than 200 mg/dL Borderline High: ... dL High : 240 mg/dL and above TOTAL CHOLESTEROL Date HDL CHOLESTEROL HDL cholesterol less than 40 ...

  1. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin ...

  2. A facile route for 3D aerogels from nanostructured 1D and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Mi; Jung, Hyun Young; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Jung, Yung Joon; Kong, Jing

    2012-11-01

    Aerogels have numerous applications due to their high surface area and low densities. However, creating aerogels from a large variety of materials has remained an outstanding challenge. Here, we report a new methodology to enable aerogel production with a wide range of materials. The method is based on the assembly of anisotropic nano-objects (one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes, nanowires, or two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets) into a cross-linking network from their colloidal suspensions at the transition from the semi-dilute to the isotropic concentrated regime. The resultant aerogels have highly porous and ultrafine three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of 1D (Ag, Si, MnO2, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) and 2D materials (MoS2, graphene, h-BN) with high surface areas, low densities, and high electrical conductivities. This method opens up a facile route for aerogel production with a wide variety of materials and tremendous opportunities for bio-scaffold, energy storage, thermoelectric, catalysis, and hydrogen storage applications.

  3. D-Amino acid dipeptide production utilizing D-alanine-D-alanine ligases with novel substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaru; Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kino, Kuniki

    2005-06-01

    D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase (Ddl) is an important enzyme in the synthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan. The genes encoding Ddls from Escherichia coli K12 (EcDdlB), Oceanobacillus iheyensis JCM 11309 (OiDdl), Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SsDdl) and Thermotoga maritima ATCC 43589 (TmDdl), the genomic DNA sequences of which have been determined, were cloned and the substrate specificities of these recombinant Ddls were investigated. Although OiDdl had a high substrate specificity for D-alanine; EcDdlB, SsDdl and TmDdl showed broad substrate specificities for D-serine, D-threonine, D-cysteine and glycine, in addition to D-alanine. Four D-amino acid dipeptides were produced using EcDdlB, and D-amino acid homo-dipeptides were successfully produced at high yields except for D-threonyl-D-threonine.

  4. 5D Data Modelling: Full Integration of 2D/3D Space, Time and Scale Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosterom, Peter; Stoter, Jantien

    This paper proposes an approach for data modelling in five dimensions. Apart from three dimensions for geometrical representation and a fourth dimension for time, we identify scale as fifth dimensional characteristic. Considering scale as an extra dimension of geographic information, fully integrated with the other dimensions, is new. Through a formal definition of geographic data in a conceptual 5D continuum, the data can be handled by one integrated approach assuring consistency across scale and time dimensions. Because the approach is new and challenging, we choose to step-wise studying several combinations of the five dimensions, ultimately resulting in the optimal 5D model. We also propose to apply mathematical theories on multidimensional modelling to well established principles of multidimensional modelling in the geo-information domain. The result is a conceptual full partition of the 3Dspace+time+scale space (i.e. no overlaps, no gaps) realised in a 5D data model implemented in a Database Management System.

  5. X-ray emissions in 3d, 4d, and 5d ranges for uranium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnelle, C.; Jonnard, P.; Barre, C.; Giorgi, G.; Bruneau, J.

    1997-05-01

    Radiative decay of nd{sup {minus}1}5f{sup m+1} excited states in UO{sub 2} induced by electron collisions is studied theoretically and experimentally. Energies, transition probabilities, and photoexcitation cross sections for the relevant configurations of U{sup 4+} are calculated by using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. Experimental observations are made in the 4d range. Direct recombination of the excited 5f electron to the 4d hole and 4d-6p emission in the presence of the spectator excited 5f electron are observed. From the theoretical results, the spectra are simulated and compared to the observed spectra in the three nd regions. The agreement is correct and describes the evolution of the coupling scheme in the nd{sup {minus}1}5f{sup 3} excited states from n=3 to n=5. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  7. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  8. D0 Project at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The D0 Project will explore 2 TeV anti pp collisions at Fermilab using a highly optimized calorimetric detector, to elucidate the new physics coming out of the SppS, and to explore the new higher energy regime. The design and physics potential of the detector system are described.

  9. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  10. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  11. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  12. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  13. D2PC sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.P.

    1992-08-01

    The Chemical Hazard Prediction Model (D2PC) developed by the US Army will play a critical role in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program by predicting chemical agent transport and dispersion through the atmosphere after an accidental release. To aid in the analysis of the output calculated by D2PC, this sensitivity analysis was conducted to provide information on model response to a variety of input parameters. The sensitivity analysis focused on six accidental release scenarios involving chemical agents VX, GB, and HD (sulfur mustard). Two categories, corresponding to conservative most likely and worst case meteorological conditions, provided the reference for standard input values. D2PC displayed a wide variety of sensitivity to the various input parameters. The model displayed the greatest overall sensitivity to wind speed, mixing height, and breathing rate. For other input parameters, sensitivity was mixed but generally lower. Sensitivity varied not only with parameter, but also over the range of values input for a single parameter. This information on model response can provide useful data for interpreting D2PC output.

  14. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür; Kürklüoglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the

  15. dS6K-regulated cell growth is dPKB/dPI(3)K-independent, but requires dPDK1.

    PubMed

    Radimerski, Thomas; Montagne, Jacques; Rintelen, Felix; Stocker, Hugo; van der Kaay, Jeroen; Downes, C Peter; Hafen, Ernst; Thomas, George

    2002-03-01

    Genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster underscore the importance of the insulin-signalling pathway in controlling cell, organ and animal size. Effectors of this pathway include Chico (the insulin receptor substrate homologue), dPI(3)K, dPKB, dPTEN, and dS6K. Mutations in any of these components have a striking effect on cell size and number, with the exception of dS6K. Mutants in dS6K affect cell size but not cell number, seemingly consistent with arguments that dS6K is a distal effector in the signalling pathway, directly controlled by dTOR, a downstream effector of dPI(3)K and dPKB. Unexpectedly, recent studies showed that dS6K activity is unimpaired in chico-deficient larvae, suggesting that dS6K activation may be mediated through the dPI(3)K docking sites of the Drosophila insulin receptor. Here, we show genetically, pharmacologically and biochemically that dS6K resides on an insulin signalling pathway distinct from that of dPKB, and surprisingly also from that of dPI(3)K. More striking, despite dPKB-dPI(3)K-independence, dS6K activity is dependent on the Drosophila homologue of the phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1, dPDK1, demonstrating that both dPDK1, as well as dTOR, mediated dS6K activation is phosphatidylinositide-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-independent.

  16. Vitamin D and the epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Fetahu, Irfete S.; Höbaus, Julia; Kállay, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in regulating gene expression. The main mechanisms involve methylation of DNA and covalent modifications of histones by methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, or ubiquitination. The complex interplay of different epigenetic mechanisms is mediated by enzymes acting in the nucleus. Modifications in DNA methylation are performed mainly by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins, while a plethora of enzymes, such as histone acetyltransferases (HATs), histone deacetylases (HDACs), histone methyltransferases (HMTs), and histone demethylases (HDMs) regulate covalent histone modifications. In many diseases, such as cancer, the epigenetic regulatory system is often disturbed. Vitamin D interacts with the epigenome on multiple levels. Firstly, critical genes in the vitamin D signaling system, such as those coding for vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the enzymes 25-hydroxylase (CYP2R1), 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), and 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) have large CpG islands in their promoter regions and therefore can be silenced by DNA methylation. Secondly, VDR protein physically interacts with coactivator and corepressor proteins, which in turn are in contact with chromatin modifiers, such as HATs, HDACs, HMTs, and with chromatin remodelers. Thirdly, a number of genes encoding for chromatin modifiers and remodelers, such as HDMs of the Jumonji C (JmjC)-domain containing proteins and lysine-specific demethylase (LSD) families are primary targets of VDR and its ligands. Finally, there is evidence that certain VDR ligands have DNA demethylating effects. In this review we will discuss regulation of the vitamin D system by epigenetic modifications and how vitamin D contributes to the maintenance of the epigenome, and evaluate its impact in health and disease. PMID:24808866

  17. Dynamical phase space from an SO (d ,d ) matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios

    2014-12-01

    It is shown that a matrix model with SO (d ,d ) global symmetry is derived from a generalized Yang-Mills theory on the standard Courant algebroid. This model keeps all the positive features of the well-studied type IIB matrix model, and it has many additional welcome properties. We show that it not only captures the dynamics of spacetime, but it should be associated with the dynamics of phase space. This is supported by a large set of classical solutions of its equations of motion, which corresponds to phase spaces of noncommutative curved manifolds and points to a new mechanism of emergent gravity. The model possesses a symmetry that exchanges positions and momenta, in analogy to quantum mechanics. It is argued that the emergence of phase space in the model is an essential feature for the investigation of the precise relation of matrix models to string theory and quantum gravity.

  18. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM and TEM images, and digital photographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04429h

  19. Robust 3D reconstruction with an RGB-D camera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangkan; Zhang, Guofeng; Bao, Hujun

    2014-11-01

    We present a novel 3D reconstruction approach using a low-cost RGB-D camera such as Microsoft Kinect. Compared with previous methods, our scanning system can work well in challenging cases where there are large repeated textures and significant depth missing problems. For robust registration, we propose to utilize both visual and geometry features and combine SFM technique to enhance the robustness of feature matching and camera pose estimation. In addition, a novel prior-based multicandidates RANSAC is introduced to efficiently estimate the model parameters and significantly speed up the camera pose estimation under multiple correspondence candidates. Even when serious depth missing occurs, our method still can successfully register all frames together. Loop closure also can be robustly detected and handled to eliminate the drift problem. The missing geometry can be completed by combining multiview stereo and mesh deformation techniques. A variety of challenging examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been expanded by FIU

  1. Major disruption of D'' beneath Alaska: D'' Beneath Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Daoyuan; Helmberger, Don; Miller, Meghan S.; Jackson, Jennifer M.

    2016-05-01

    D'' represents one of the most dramatic thermal and compositional layers within our planet. In particular, global tomographic models display relatively fast patches at the base of the mantle along the circum-Pacific which are generally attributed to slab debris. Such distinct patches interact with the bridgmanite (Br) to post-bridgmanite (PBr) phase boundary to generate particularly strong heterogeneity at their edges. Most seismic observations for the D'' come from the lower mantle S wave triplication (Scd). Here we exploit the USArray waveform data to examine one of these sharp transitions in structure beneath Alaska. From west to east beneath Alaska, we observed three different characteristics in D'': (1) the western region with a strong Scd, requiring a sharp δVs = 2.5% increase; (2) the middle region with no clear Scd phases, indicating a lack of D'' (or thin Br-PBr layer); and (3) the eastern region with strong Scd phase, requiring a gradient increase in δVs. To explain such strong lateral variation in the velocity structure, chemical variations must be involved. We suggest that the western region represents relatively normal mantle. In contrast, the eastern region is influenced by a relic slab that has subducted down to the lowermost mantle. In the middle region, we infer an upwelling structure that disrupts the Br-PBr phase boundary. Such an interpretation is based upon a distinct pattern of travel time delays, waveform distortions, and amplitude patterns that reveal a circular-shaped anomaly about 5° across which can be modeled synthetically as a plume-like structure rising about 400 km high with a shear velocity reduction of ~5%, similar to geodynamic modeling predictions of upwellings.

  2. 10 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Classes of Actions that Normally Require EISs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classes of Actions that Normally Require EISs D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 1021 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES Typical Classes of Actions Pt. 1021, Subpt. D, App. D Appendix D...

  3. 49 CFR Schedule D to Subpart B of... - Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139 D Schedule D... REVENUE PROCEEDINGS Intercity Bus Industry Pt. 1139, Subpt. B, Sch. D Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139... year 19__ (c) Calendar year 19__ (d) Base year actual (e) Part I.—Selected financial data...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Classes of Actions that Normally Require EISs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classes of Actions that Normally Require EISs D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 1021 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES Typical Classes of Actions Pt. 1021, Subpt. D, App. D Appendix D...

  5. 49 CFR Schedule D to Subpart B of... - Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139 D Schedule D... REVENUE PROCEEDINGS Intercity Bus Industry Pt. 1139, Subpt. B, Sch. D Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139... year 19__ (c) Calendar year 19__ (d) Base year actual (e) Part I.—Selected financial data...

  6. 49 CFR Schedule D to Subpart B of... - Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139 D Schedule D... REVENUE PROCEEDINGS Intercity Bus Industry Pt. 1139, Subpt. B, Sch. D Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139... year 19__ (c) Calendar year 19__ (d) Base year actual (e) Part I.—Selected financial data...

  7. 49 CFR Schedule D to Subpart B of... - Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139 D Schedule D... REVENUE PROCEEDINGS Intercity Bus Industry Pt. 1139, Subpt. B, Sch. D Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139... year 19__ (c) Calendar year 19__ (d) Base year actual (e) Part I.—Selected financial data...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Classes of Actions that Normally Require EISs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classes of Actions that Normally Require EISs D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 1021 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES Typical Classes of Actions Pt. 1021, Subpt. D, App. D Appendix D...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix D to Subpart D of... - Classes of Actions That Normally Require EISs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classes of Actions That Normally Require EISs D Appendix D to Subpart D of Part 1021 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES Typical Classes of Actions Pt. 1021, Subpt. D, App. D Appendix D...

  10. 49 CFR Schedule D to Subpart B of... - Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139 D Schedule D... REVENUE PROCEEDINGS Intercity Bus Industry Pt. 1139, Subpt. B, Sch. D Schedule D to Subpart B of Part 1139... year 19__ (c) Calendar year 19__ (d) Base year actual (e) Part I.—Selected financial data...

  11. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  12. Equations on knot polynomials and 3d/5d duality

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2012-09-24

    We briefly review the current situation with various relations between knot/braid polynomials (Chern-Simons correlation functions), ordinary and extended, considered as functions of the representation and of the knot topology. These include linear skein relations, quadratic Plucker relations, as well as 'differential' and (quantum) A-polynomial structures. We pay a special attention to identity between the A-polynomial equations for knots and Baxter equations for quantum relativistic integrable systems, related through Seiberg-Witten theory to 5d super-Yang-Mills models and through the AGT relation to the q-Virasoro algebra. This identity is an important ingredient of emerging a 3d- 5d generalization of the AGT relation. The shape of the Baxter equation (including the values of coefficients) depend on the choice of the knot/braid. Thus, like the case of KP integrability, where (some, so far torus) knots parameterize particular points of the Universal Grassmannian, in this relation they parameterize particular points in the moduli space of many-body integrable systems of relativistic type.

  13. 2D and 3D Chromosome Painting in Malaria Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    George, Phillip; Sharma, Atashi; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of whole arm chromosome probes is a robust technique for mapping genomic regions of interest, detecting chromosomal rearrangements, and studying three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromosomes in the cell nucleus. The advent of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and whole genome amplification (WGA) allows obtaining large quantities of DNA from single cells. The increased sensitivity of WGA kits prompted us to develop chromosome paints and to use them for exploring chromosome organization and evolution in non-model organisms. Here, we present a simple method for isolating and amplifying the euchromatic segments of single polytene chromosome arms from ovarian nurse cells of the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. This procedure provides an efficient platform for obtaining chromosome paints, while reducing the overall risk of introducing foreign DNA to the sample. The use of WGA allows for several rounds of re-amplification, resulting in high quantities of DNA that can be utilized for multiple experiments, including 2D and 3D FISH. We demonstrated that the developed chromosome paints can be successfully used to establish the correspondence between euchromatic portions of polytene and mitotic chromosome arms in An. gambiae. Overall, the union of LCM and single-chromosome WGA provides an efficient tool for creating significant amounts of target DNA for future cytogenetic and genomic studies. PMID:24429496

  14. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  15. Low incidence of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: The Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A.; O'Brien, Kerry L.; Murphy, Michael F.; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A.; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5%±2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥28 days following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010-2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1.44%; 95%CI 0.58-2.97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 days (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  16. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  17. Projecting 2D gene expression data into 3D and 4D space.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Victor E; Katsuyama, Kaori; Snyder, Kevin A; Bowes, Jeff B; Kitayama, Atsushi; Ueno, Naoto; Vize, Peter D

    2007-04-01

    Video games typically generate virtual 3D objects by texture mapping an image onto a 3D polygonal frame. The feeling of movement is then achieved by mathematically simulating camera movement relative to the polygonal frame. We have built customized scripts that adapt video game authoring software to texture mapping images of gene expression data onto b-spline based embryo models. This approach, known as UV mapping, associates two-dimensional (U and V) coordinates within images to the three dimensions (X, Y, and Z) of a b-spline model. B-spline model frameworks were built either from confocal data or de novo extracted from 2D images, once again using video game authoring approaches. This system was then used to build 3D models of 182 genes expressed in developing Xenopus embryos and to implement these in a web-accessible database. Models can be viewed via simple Internet browsers and utilize openGL hardware acceleration via a Shockwave plugin. Not only does this database display static data in a dynamic and scalable manner, the UV mapping system also serves as a method to align different images to a common framework, an approach that may make high-throughput automated comparisons of gene expression patterns possible. Finally, video game systems also have elegant methods for handling movement, allowing biomechanical algorithms to drive the animation of models. With further development, these biomechanical techniques offer practical methods for generating virtual embryos that recapitulate morphogenesis.

  18. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  19. 3-D object recognition using 2-D views.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjing; Bebis, George; Bourbakis, Nikolaos G

    2008-11-01

    We consider the problem of recognizing 3-D objects from 2-D images using geometric models and assuming different viewing angles and positions. Our goal is to recognize and localize instances of specific objects (i.e., model-based) in a scene. This is in contrast to category-based object recognition methods where the goal is to search for instances of objects that belong to a certain visual category (e.g., faces or cars). The key contribution of our work is improving 3-D object recognition by integrating Algebraic Functions of Views (AFoVs), a powerful framework for predicting the geometric appearance of an object due to viewpoint changes, with indexing and learning. During training, we compute the space of views that groups of object features can produce under the assumption of 3-D linear transformations, by combining a small number of reference views that contain the object features using AFoVs. Unrealistic views (e.g., due to the assumption of 3-D linear transformations) are eliminated by imposing a pair of rigidity constraints based on knowledge of the transformation between the reference views of the object. To represent the space of views that an object can produce compactly while allowing efficient hypothesis generation during recognition, we propose combining indexing with learning in two stages. In the first stage, we sample the space of views of an object sparsely and represent information about the samples using indexing. In the second stage, we build probabilistic models of shape appearance by sampling the space of views of the object densely and learning the manifold formed by the samples. Learning employs the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm and takes place in a "universal," lower-dimensional, space computed through Random Projection (RP). During recognition, we extract groups of point features from the scene and we use indexing to retrieve the most feasible model groups that might have produced them (i.e., hypothesis generation). The likelihood

  20. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Can Interfere With a Common Assay for 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D in Vitamin D Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Colin P.; Schnellbacher, Sarah; Singh, Ravinder J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Vitamin D intoxication is characterized by elevated serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and suppressed serum 1,25-dihydroxvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). We evaluated two adolescents with hypercalcemia due to vitamin D intoxication; both had elevated serum 1,25(OH)2D by Diasorin RIA, but normal serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Objective: This study aimed to determine the effect of 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 on 1,25(OH)2D concentration determined using RIA and LC-MS/MS. Methods: Pools of normal serum and an artificial serum matrix were prepared and aliquots were spiked with >99% pure 25(OH)D2 or 25(OH)D3 (50–700 ng/mL). Samples were maintained at 4°C or heated to 56°C, and the concentrations of vitamin D metabolites were measured by LC-MS/MS and Diasorin RIA. Results: Median 1,25(OH)2D increased by 114% with RIA and 21% with LC-MS/MS with addition of 100 ng/mL 25(OH)D3, and 349% (RIA) and 117% (LC-MS/MS) with 700 ng/mL of 25(OH)D3. Each 1-ng/mL increase in 25(OH)D3 increased 1,25(OH)2D by 0.231 pg/mL (RIA) and 0.121 pg/mL (LC-MS/MS). Spiking with 25(OH)D2 led to similar changes. Heat inactivation of serum, and using an artificial serum matrix, were associated with similar effects of 25(OH)D on 1,25(OH)2D assays. Conclusions: Vitamin D intoxication with high serum levels of 25(OH)D2 or 25(OH)D3 can be associated with elevated levels of 1,25(OH)2D due to interference in a commonly used RIA. A similar but attenuated effect also occurs when 1,25(OH)2D is measured using LC-MS/MS but does not seem to be clinically significant. The basis for this effect on the LC-MS/MS assay is presently uncertain. PMID:26120794

  1. Membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidation of D-pentonates to 4-keto-D-pentonates, D-fructose to 5-keto-D-fructose, and D-psicose to 5-keto-D-psicose.

    PubMed

    Ano, Yoshitaka; Hours, Roque A; Akakabe, Yoshihiko; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao

    2017-02-01

    A novel oxidation of D-pentonates to 4-keto-D-pentonates was analyzed with Gluconobacter thailandicus NBRC 3258. D-Pentonate 4-dehydrogenase activity in the membrane fraction was readily inactivated by EDTA and it was reactivated by the addition of PQQ and Ca(2+). D-Pentonate 4-dehydrogenase was purified to two different subunits, 80 and 14 kDa. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme showed no typical absorbance over the visible regions. The enzyme oxidized D-pentonates to 4-keto-D-pentonates at the optimum pH of 4.0. In addition, the enzyme oxidized D-fructose to 5-keto-D-fructose, D-psicose to 5-keto-D-psicose, including the other polyols such as, glycerol, D-ribitol, D-arabitol, and D-sorbitol. Thus, D-pentonate 4-dehydrogenase was found to be identical with glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH), a major polyol dehydrogenase in Gluconobacter species. The reaction versatility of quinoprotein GLDH was notified in this study.

  2. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  3. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  4. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  5. The Astro-D mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, H.

    The X-ray astronomy mission is described in terms of the primary features and capabilities of the Astro-D with attention given to observational sensitivity. The satellite observatory is designed to support nested thin-foil X-ray mirrors, CCD cameras, and imaging gas-scintillation proportional counters. The thin-foil telescopes afford a large effective area over the energy range 1-12 keV which can image X-ray sources with a spatial resolution similar to that of the IPC at the Einstein Observatory. Improvements are noted in the CCD energy range and the background rejection rate of the spectroscopic observatory. It is concluded that the Astro-D can make significant contributions to the investigation of the cosmic X-ray background and particularly its extragalactic isotropic component.

  6. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  7. Quarkonia production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, K.A.

    1996-08-01

    We present results on inclusive J/{psi} production in the central and forward regions and {Upsilon} production in the central region using dimuon data collected with the D0 detector during the 1992-1995 Tevatron collider run. Results on inclusive single muon production in the forward region are also given. In general, the QCD predictions for charmonium and bottomonium are incomplete. In charmonium production, prompt J/{psi} production appears not to be dominated by {chi}{sub c} decay. In bottomonium production, the predicted {Upsilon} cross section in underestimated by a factor of five indicating the presence perhaps of yet unseen {chi}{sub b} 3P- or D- wave states. Finally, the inclusive single muon cross section in the forward region is a factor of four above the NLO QCD prediction. This difference is larger than that found in the central region by a factor of two. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  8. The D4A Digitiser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cuyper, J.-P.; Winter, L.

    2006-07-01

    The D4A (Digital Access to Aerial- and Astro-photographic Archives) project aims to acquire the necessary know-how, hardware and software to digitise the astro-photographic collections of the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) and the aerial-photographic collections of the National Geographic Institute and the Royal Museum of Central Africa in collaboration with AGFA-Gevaert, a world-leader in photographic matters. The final design of the ``D4A Digitiser'' that is being built by the ROB in Brussels is presented. A geometric benchmark testing of different commercial flatbed scanners is given and the results are compared with the requirements needed for the astrometric and photometric data extraction from the digitised images.

  9. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  10. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  11. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  12. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  13. Vitamin D Activities for Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Reports describing significant health risks due to inadequate vitamin D status continue to generate considerable interest amongst the medical and lay communities alike. Recent research on the various molecular activities of the vitamin D system, including the nuclear vitamin D receptor and other receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and vitamin D metabolism, provides evidence that the vitamin D system carries out biological activities across a wide range of tissues similar to other nuclear receptor hormones. This knowledge provides physiological plausibility of the various health benefits claimed to be provided by vitamin D and supports the proposals for conducting clinical trials. The vitamin D system plays critical roles in the maintenance of plasma calcium and phosphate and bone mineral homeostasis. Recent evidence confirms that plasma calcium homeostasis is the critical factor modulating vitamin D activity. Vitamin D activities in the skeleton include stimulation or inhibition of bone resorption and inhibition or stimulation of bone formation. The three major bone cell types, which are osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts, can all respond to vitamin D via the classical nuclear vitamin D receptor and metabolize 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to activate the vitamin D receptor and modulate gene expression. Dietary calcium intake interacts with vitamin D metabolism at both the renal and bone tissue levels to direct either a catabolic action on the bone through the endocrine system when calcium intake is inadequate or an anabolic action through a bone autocrine or paracrine system when calcium intake is sufficient. PMID:24790904

  14. Efficient and selective synthesis of D-arabino-, D-lyxo-, and D-xylo-phytosphingosine from D-ribo-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghee; Lee, Nakyong; Lee, Sukjin; Lee, Taeho; Lee, Yun Mi

    2008-02-15

    A new high-yield approach to the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of d-arabino-, D-lyxo-, and D-xylo-phytosphingosines from inexpensive D-ribo-phytosphingosine is described. The synthetic methodologies mainly rely on the selective configurational inversion of the stereocenter through a neighboring group participation mechanism.

  15. Vitamin D and Calcium for Fracture Prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inadequate intakes of vitamin D and calcium lead to reduced calcium absorption, higher bone-remodeling rates and increased bone loss. Vitamin D has also been linked to muscle function and risk of falling. In older men and women, higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels are associated with bette...

  16. High Resolution 3-D Wavelength Diversity Imaging.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-25

    International Microwave Symposium, Washington, D.C., May 1980. 2. N.H. Farhat, "Holography and Inverse Scattering", Presented at the First Dennis Gabor Memorial...D radiometry. 50 4. REFERENCES 1. M. Von Laue, Ann. d. Physik, Vol. 44, p. 1197 (1414). 2. D. Gabor , "Light and Information" in Progress in Optics

  17. 21 CFR 184.1950 - Vitamin D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin D. 184.1950 Section 184.1950 Food and....1950 Vitamin D. (a) Vitamin D is added to food as the following food ingredients: (1) Crystalline vitamin D2 (C28H44O, CAS Reg. No. 50-14-6), also known as ergocalciferol, is the chemical...

  18. Results on semileptonic D and D/sub s/ decays and evidence for non-D/bar D/ decays of the /psi/ (3770)

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1988-12-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: Observation of Cabibbo suppressed semileptonic D decays; Search for D/sub s/ semileptonic decays; and Preliminary evidence for non-D/bar D/ decays of the /psi/ (3770). 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The D0 Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Womersley, J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-10-01

    The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron began its first data taking run in May 1992. For analysis of the expected 25 pb[sup [minus]1] data sample, roughly half a million simulated events will be needed. The GEANT-based Monte Carlo program used to generate these events is described, together with comparisons to test beam data. Some novel techniques used to speed up execution and simplify geometrical input are described.

  20. The D3 Middleware Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Joan; Filman, Robert E.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Lee, Diana D.; Mak, Ron; Patel, Tarang

    2002-01-01

    DARWIN is a NASA developed, Internet-based system for enabling aerospace researchers to securely and remotely access and collaborate on the analysis of aerospace vehicle design data, primarily the results of wind-tunnel testing and numeric (e.g., computational fluid-dynamics) model executions. DARWIN captures, stores and indexes data; manages derived knowledge (such as visualizations across multiple datasets); and provides an environment for designers to collaborate in the analysis of test results. DARWIN is an interesting application because it supports high-volumes of data. integrates multiple modalities of data display (e.g., images and data visualizations), and provides non-trivial access control mechanisms. DARWIN enables collaboration by allowing not only sharing visualizations of data, but also commentary about and views of data. Here we provide an overview of the architecture of D3, the third generation of DARWIN. Earlier versions of DARWIN were characterized by browser-based interfaces and a hodge-podge of server technologies: CGI scripts, applets, PERL, and so forth. But browsers proved difficult to control, and a proliferation of computational mechanisms proved inefficient and difficult to maintain. D3 substitutes a pure-Java approach for that medley: A Java client communicates (though RMI over HTTPS) with a Java-based application server. Code on the server accesses information from JDBC databases, distributed LDAP security services, and a collaborative information system. D3 is a three tier-architecture, but unlike 'E-commerce' applications, the data usage pattern suggests different strategies than traditional Enterprise Java Beans - we need to move volumes of related data together, considerable processing happens on the client, and the 'business logic' on the server-side is primarily data integration and collaboration. With D3, we are extending DARWIN to handle other data domains and to be a distributed system, where a single login allows a user

  1. D.C.'s Braveheart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronholz, June

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Michelle Rhee's style of leadership--as steely as the sound of her peekaboo high heels on a linoleum-tile hallway--which has angered much of Washington, D.C., and baffled the rest since she arrived as schools chancellor in June 2007. But it is also helping her gain control of a school system that has defied management for…

  2. Electroweak results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons. In particular, preliminary measurements of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections with decay into final states containing electrons are shown and a status report on the determination of M{sub w}/M{sub z} is given.

  3. STS-41D Mission Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The official mission insignia for the 41-D Space Shuttle flight features the Discovery - NASA's third orbital vehicle - as it makes its maiden voyage. The ghost ship represents the orbiter's namesakes which have figured prominently in the history of exploration. The Space Shuttle Discovery heads for new horizons to extend that proud tradition. Surnames for the crewmembers of NASA's eleventh Space Shuttle mission encircle the red, white, and blue scene.

  4. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  5. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  6. Dark D-brane cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, Tomi; Wills, Danielle; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: d.e.wills@durham.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    Disformally coupled cosmologies arise from Dirac-Born-Infeld actions in Type II string theories, when matter resides on a moving hidden sector D-brane. Since such matter interacts only very weakly with the standard model particles, this scenario can provide a natural origin for the dark sector of the universe with a clear geometrical interpretation: dark energy is identified with the scalar field associated to the D-brane's position as it moves in the internal space, acting as quintessence, while dark matter is identified with the matter living on the D-brane, which can be modelled by a perfect fluid. The coupling functions are determined by the (warped) extra-dimensional geometry, and are thus constrained by the theory. The resulting cosmologies are studied using both dynamical system analysis and numerics. From the dynamical system point of view, one free parameter controls the cosmological dynamics, given by the ratio of the warp factor and the potential energy scales. The disformal coupling allows for new scaling solutions that can describe accelerating cosmologies alleviating the coincidence problem of dark energy. In addition, this scenario may ameliorate the fine-tuning problem of dark energy, whose small value may be attained dynamically, without requiring the mass of the dark energy field to be unnaturally low.

  7. Mini 3D for shallow gas reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, T. des; Enns, D.; Kuehn, H.; Parron, D.; Lafet, Y.; Van Hulle, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Mini 3D project was undertaken by TOTAL and ELF with the support of CEPM (Comite d`Etudes Petrolieres et Marines) to define an economical method of obtaining 3D seismic HR data for shallow gas assessment. An experimental 3D survey was carried out with classical site survey techniques in the North Sea. From these data 19 simulations, were produced to compare different acquisition geometries ranging from dual, 600 m long cables to a single receiver. Results show that short offset, low fold and very simple streamer positioning are sufficient to give a reliable 3D image of gas charged bodies. The 3D data allow a much more accurate risk delineation than 2D HR data. Moreover on financial grounds Mini-3D is comparable in cost to a classical HR 2D survey. In view of these results, such HR 3D should now be the standard for shallow gas surveying.

  8. DoD Pest Management Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-24

    Pest Management Program,’ to revise policy and procedures for the...DoD Pest Management Program; authorizes the publication of DoD 4150.7-R, ’DoD Pest Management Program,’ and DoD 4150.7-M, ’Plan for Certification of...DoD directive 5025.1, ’Department of Defense Directives System,’ and cancels reference (c) Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy Memorandum (DEQPPM) 80-10, ’Department of Defense Pest Management

  9. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  10. Vitamin D, Breast Cancer, and Bone Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    breast cancer subjects and those at high risk of breast cancer . Currently recommended vitamin D supplemental doses are only appropriate for patients...for those at high risk for breast cancer . Currently recommended doses of vitamin D are appropriate for subjects with normal vitamin D levels and for...sunscreen use, clothing , and increasing amount of time spent indoors or on transportation). Vitamin D and breast cancer prevention Vitamin D

  11. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  12. Characterization of D-tagatose-3-epimerase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides that converts D-fructose into D-psicose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longtao; Mu, Wanmeng; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Tao

    2009-06-01

    A non-characterized gene, previously proposed as the D-tagatose-3-epimerase gene from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 64 kDa with two identical subunits. The enzyme specificity was highest with D-fructose and decreased for other substrates in the order: D-tagatose, D-psicose, D-ribulose, D-xylulose and D-sorbose. Its activity was maximal at pH 9 and 40 degrees C while being enhanced by Mn(2+). At pH 9 and 40 degrees C, 118 g D-psicose l(-1) was produced from 700 g D-fructose l(-1) after 3 h.

  13. Evaluation d'un scenario d'apprentissage favorisant la mobilisation des habiletes reliees au processus d'enquete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Samuel F. J.

    Les resultats au Programme international pour le suivi des acquis des eleves (PISA) demontrent que les jeunes neobrunswickois francophones se classent b un niveau significativement inferieur comparaiivement aux eleves anglophones du Nouveau-Brunswick, aux eleves des autres provinces canadiennes et se classent sous la moyenne internationale de tous les pays participants quant b la culture scientifique. L'evaluation de cette culture scientifique est basee sur une serie de savoirs, de savoir-faire et de savoir-etre reliee au processus d'enquete scolaire. Le processus d'enquete scolaire est une approche b l'apprentissage ou les eleves effectuent des recherches d'informations, discutent d'idees et entreprennent des investigations pour augmenter leur comprehension d'un probleme ou d'un sujet. Les recherches demontrent que le processus d'enquete scolaire est rarement une composante pedagogique importante de la salle de classe et les recherches portant sur l'implantation du processus d'enquete scolaire recommandent de rendre ce dernier plus accessible aux enseignantes et aux enseignants. Afin de rendre le processus d'enquete plus accessible aux enseignantes et aux enseignants, notre recherche porte sur l'evaluation de la valeur pedagogique d'un scenario d'apprentissage (PhaRoboS) concu specialement pour creer un environnement dans lequel les eleves auront plusieurs occasions a mobiliser les habiletes reliees au processus d'enquete. Les retombees de cette evaluation nous permettront d'offrir des pistes de remediations afin d'aider plus d'enseignantes et d'enseignants b creer un environnement dans lequel les eleves auront plusieurs occasions b mobiliser les habiletes reliees au processus d'enquete. Cette evaluation s'est faite a partir d'une methodologie inspiree de l'evaluation pour fin d'amelioration d'un objet pedagogique. L'analyse des donnees qualitatives recueillies aupres des eleves et de leur enseignante d'une ecole francophone du Nouveau-Brunswick semble montrer que

  14. Vitamin D deficiency as a public health issue: using vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 in future fortification strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Louise R; Tripkovic, Laura; Hart, Kathryn H; Lanham-New, Susan A

    2017-03-28

    The role of vitamin D in supporting the growth and maintenance of the skeleton is robust; with recent research also suggesting a beneficial link between vitamin D and other non-skeletal health outcomes, including immune function, cardiovascular health and cancer. Despite this, vitamin D deficiency remains a global public health issue, with a renewed focus in the UK following the publication of Public Health England's new Dietary Vitamin D Requirements. Natural sources of vitamin D (dietary and UVB exposure) are limited, and thus mechanisms are needed to allow individuals to achieve the new dietary recommendations. Mandatory or voluntary vitamin D food fortification may be one of the mechanisms to increase dietary vitamin D intakes and subsequently improve vitamin D status. However, for the food industry and public to make informed decisions, clarity is needed as to whether vitamins D2 and D3 are equally effective at raising total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations as the evidence thus far is inconsistent. This review summarises the evidence to date behind the comparative efficacy of vitamins D2 and D3 at raising 25(OH)D concentrations, and the potential role of vitamin D food fortification as a public health policy to support attainment of dietary recommendations in the UK. The comparative efficacy of vitamins D2 and D3 has been investigated in several intervention trials, with most indicating that vitamin D3 is more effective at raising 25(OH)D concentrations. However, flaws in study designs (predominantly under powering) mean there remains a need for a large, robust randomised-controlled trial to provide conclusive evidence, which the future publication of the D2-D3 Study should provide (BBSRC DRINC funded: BB/I006192/1). This review also highlights outstanding questions and gaps in the research that need to be addressed to ensure the most efficacious and safe vitamin D food fortification practices are put in place. This further research, alongside cost

  15. bar{B}_{d,s} → D^{*}_{d,s} V and bar{B}_{d,s}^* → D_{d,s} V decays in QCD factorization and possible puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qin; Chen, Ling-Xin; Zhang, Yun-Yun; Sun, Jun-Feng; Yang, Yue-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by the rapid development of heavy-flavor experiments, phenomenological studies of nonleptonic bar{B}_{d,s} → D^{*}_{d,s} V and bar{B}_{d,s}^* → D_{d,s} V (V=ρ ,K^*) decays are performed within the framework of QCD factorization. Relative to the previous work, the QCD corrections to the transverse amplitudes are evaluated at next-to-leading order. The theoretical predictions of the observables are updated. For the measured bar{B}_{d,s} → D^{*}_{d,s} V decays, the tensions between theoretical results and experimental measurements, i.e. the "R_{ds}V puzzle" and "D^{*} V (or R_{V/ℓ bar{ν }_ℓ }) puzzle", are presented after detailed analyses. For the bar{B}_{d,s}^* → D_{d,s} V decays, they have relatively large branching fractions of the order ≳ O(10^{-9}) and are in the scope of Belle-II and LHCb experiments. Moreover, they also provide a way to crosscheck the possible puzzles mentioned above through the similar ratios R_{ds}^' V} and R_{V/ℓ bar{ν }_ℓ }^' }. More refined experimental measurements and theoretical efforts are required to confirm or refute such two anomalies.

  16. 78 FR 14547 - Praxedes E. Alverez Santiago, M.D., Daniel Perez Brisebois, M.D., Jorge Grillasca Palou, M.D...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Garcia Nieves, M.D., Francis M. Vazques Roura, M.D., Angel B. Rivera Santos, M.D., Cosme D. Santos Torres... M. V zquez Roura, M.D., Angel B. Rivera Santos, M.D., Cosme D. Santos Torres, M.D., and Juan...

  17. Vitamin D metabolites in captivity? Should we measure free or total 25(OH)D to assess vitamin D status?

    PubMed

    Bikle, Daniel; Bouillon, Roger; Thadhani, Ravi; Schoenmakers, Inez

    2017-01-16

    There is general consensus that serum 25(OH)D is the best biochemical marker for nutritional vitamin D status. Whether free 25(OH)D would be a better marker than total 25(OH)D is so far unclear. Free 25(OH)D can either be calculated based on the measurement of the serum concentrations of total 25(OH)D, vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), albumin, and the affinity between 25(OH)D and its binding proteins in physiological situations. Free 25(OH)D can also be measured directly by equilibrium dialysis, ultrafitration or immunoassays. During the vitamin D workshop held in Boston in March 2016, a debate was organized about the measurements and clinical value of free 25(OH)D, and this debate is summarized in the present manuscript. Overall there is consensus that most cells apart from the renal tubular cells are exposed to free rather than to total 25(OH)D. Therefore free 25(OH)D may be highly relevant for the local production and action of 1,25(OH)2D. During the debate it became clear that there is a need for standardization of measurements of serum DBP and of direct measurements of free 25(OH)D. There seems to be very limited genetic or racial differences in DBP concentrations or (probably) in the affinity of DBP for its major ligands. Therefore, free 25(OH)D is strongly correlated to total 25(OH)D in most normal populations. Appropriate studies are needed to define the clinical implications of free rather than total 25(OH)D in normal subjects and in disease states. Special attention is needed for such studies in cases of abnormal DBP concentrations or when one could expect changes in its affinity for its ligands.

  18. Combined M.D./Ph.D. and Ph.D. Training Program in Breast Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    of trainees, and the development of courses for the program. In the sixth year, we recruited Ms. Anne Miermont and Mr. Mark Markowski . Ms. Miermont...Baltimore County. Mr. Markowski , an MD/PhD student received his BS in Biochemistry and Mathematics from Georgetown University. Ms. Miermont is...currently working in the lab of her Thesis Mentor, Dr. Priscilla Furth. Mr. Markowski is currently working in the lab of Thesis Mentor Dr. Edward Gelmann

  19. Vitamin D Enhances Corneal Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaohong; Pintea, Victorina; Lin, Yanping; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) and/or its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), can enhance corneal epithelial barrier function. The authors also determined if corneas contain mRNA for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 1α-hydroxylase, the enzyme required to convert 25(OH)D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3, and measured vitamin D metabolite concentrations in aqueous and vitreous humor. Methods. RT-PCR was used to examine mouse, rabbit, and human corneal epithelial VDR and 1α-hydroxylase mRNA. Vitamin D metabolites were measured using a selective vitamin D derivatizing agent and mass spectroscopy. Barrier function experiments were performed by measuring inulin permeability (IP) and/or transepithelial resistance (TER) in control, 25(OH)D3-, and 1,25(OH)2D3-treated human and rabbit corneal epithelial monolayers cultured on permeable inserts. Ca2+ was removed, then reintroduced to the culture medium while IP and TER readings were taken. Occludin levels were examined using Western blotting. Results. All corneal samples were positive for both VDR and 1α-hydroxylase mRNA. All vitamin D metabolites except for unhydroxylated vitamin D3 were detected in aqueous and vitreous humor. Epithelial cells showed increased TER, decreased IP, and increased occludin levels when cultured with 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3. Conclusions. We conclude that corneas contain mRNA for VDR and 1α-hydroxylase as well as significant vitamin D concentrations. 25(OH)D3 and its active metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3, both enhance corneal epithelial barrier function. PMID:21715350

  20. Energy R and D in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    J.J. Dooley

    1999-08-09

    In 1997, the public and private sectors in Japan invested $90.3 billion in R and D. Japan is the second largest supporter of R and D after the United States. A very large percentage (79.4%) of all R and D in Japan is supported by the private sector. The prolonged economic recession that has plagued the Japanese economy for most of the 1990s has significantly reduced the scale of the Japanese R and D effort compared to what it would have been had the economy been more robust. The Japanese government has recently attempted to bring the economy out of this recession through the use of economic stimulus packages. These stimulus packages have contained significant new funding for R and D, although it is apparent that much of the funding is going to R and D programs and R and D construction projects with very near tern payoff and not to the support of longer term R and D. In 1998, the Japanese government devoted 13.7% of all public R and D funds to the support of energy R and D. The priority accorded to energy R and D in Japan is significantly higher than in any other industrialized nation. The Japanese energy R and D program, which was funded at $2.5 billion in 1997, is overwhelmingly focused on nuclear energy R and D. Nuclear energy R and D (fission and fusion) accounts for 75% of the total national energy R and D budget. The fission energy R and D effort has decreased nearly 24% since 1996 as the government attempts to refocus this program in the face of growing public opposition to the Japanese government's efforts to expand the nuclear power program. Energy efficiency R and D (8% of the total national energy R and D budget) and renewable energy R and D receive relatively modest support from the Japanese government.

  1. Shadow-driven 4D haptic visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hanson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Just as we can work with two-dimensional floor plans to communicate 3D architectural design, we can exploit reduced-dimension shadows to manipulate the higher-dimensional objects generating the shadows. In particular, by taking advantage of physically reactive 3D shadow-space controllers, we can transform the task of interacting with 4D objects to a new level of physical reality. We begin with a teaching tool that uses 2D knot diagrams to manipulate the geometry of 3D mathematical knots via their projections; our unique 2D haptic interface allows the user to become familiar with sketching, editing, exploration, and manipulation of 3D knots rendered as projected imageson a 2D shadow space. By combining graphics and collision-sensing haptics, we can enhance the 2D shadow-driven editing protocol to successfully leverage 2D pen-and-paper or blackboard skills. Building on the reduced-dimension 2D editing tool for manipulating 3D shapes, we develop the natural analogy to produce a reduced-dimension 3D tool for manipulating 4D shapes. By physically modeling the correct properties of 4D surfaces, their bending forces, and their collisions in the 3D haptic controller interface, we can support full-featured physical exploration of 4D mathematical objects in a manner that is otherwise far beyond the experience accessible to human beings. As far as we are aware, this paper reports the first interactive system with force-feedback that provides "4D haptic visualization" permitting the user to model and interact with 4D cloth-like objects.

  2. 2D/3D registration algorithm for lung brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonarev, P. S.; Farrell, T. J.; Hunter, R.; Wierzbicki, M.; Hayward, J. E.; Sur, R. K.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: A 2D/3D registration algorithm is proposed for registering orthogonal x-ray images with a diagnostic CT volume for high dose rate (HDR) lung brachytherapy. Methods: The algorithm utilizes a rigid registration model based on a pixel/voxel intensity matching approach. To achieve accurate registration, a robust similarity measure combining normalized mutual information, image gradient, and intensity difference was developed. The algorithm was validated using a simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms. Transfer catheters were placed inside the phantoms to simulate the unique image features observed during treatment. The algorithm sensitivity to various degrees of initial misregistration and to the presence of foreign objects, such as ECG leads, was evaluated. Results: The mean registration error was 2.2 and 1.9 mm for the simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms, respectively. The error was comparable to the interoperator catheter digitization error of 1.6 mm. Preliminary analysis of data acquired from four patients indicated a mean registration error of 4.2 mm. Conclusions: Results obtained using the proposed algorithm are clinically acceptable especially considering the complications normally encountered when imaging during lung HDR brachytherapy.

  3. Macroscopic Behavior of Nematics with D2d Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R.

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the symmetry properties and the macroscopic behavior of a nematic liquid crystal phase with D2d symmetry. Such a phase is a prime candidate for nematic phases made from banana-shaped molecules where the usual quadrupolar order coexists with octupolar (tetrahedratic) order. The resulting nematic phase is non-polar. While this phase could resemble the classic D∞h nematic in the polarizing microscope, it has many static as well as reversible and irreversible properties unknown to non-polar nematics without octupolar order. In particular, there is a linear gradient term in the free energy that selects parity leading to ambidextrously helical ground states when the molecules are achiral. In addition, there are static and irreversible coupling terms of a type only met otherwise in macroscopically chiral liquid crystals, e.g. the ambidextrous analogues of Lehmann-type effects known from cholesteric liquid crystals. Finally, we discuss certain nonlinear aspects of the dynamics related to the non-commutativity of three-dimensional finite rotations as well as other structural nonlinear hydrodynamic effects.

  4. Study of Single Top Quark Production Using Bayesian Neural Networks With D0 Detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Top quark, the heaviest and most intriguing among the six known quarks, can be created via two independent production mechanisms in {\\pp} collisions. The primary mode, strong {\\ttbar} pair production from a $gtt$ vertex, was used by the {\\d0} and CDF collaborations to establish the existence of the top quark in March 1995. The second mode is the electroweak production of a single top quark or antiquark, which has been observed recently in March 2009. Since single top quarks are produced at hadron colliders through a $Wtb$ vertex, thereby provide a direct probe of the nature of $Wtb$ coupling and of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, $V_{tb}$. So this mechanism provides a sensitive probe for several, standard model and beyond standard model, parameters such as anomalous $Wtb$ couplings. In this thesis, we measure the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark in three different production modes, $s+t$, $s$ and $t$-channels using a technique based on the Bayesian neural networks. This technique is applied for analysis of the 5.4 $fb^{-1}$ of data collected by the {\\d0} detector. From a comparison of the Bayesian neural networks discriminants between data and the signal-background model using Bayesian statistics, the cross sections of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism have been measured as: \\[\\sigma(p\\bar{p}→tb+X,tqb+X) = 3.11^{+0.77}_{-0.71}\\;\\rm pb\\] \\[\\sigma(p\\bar{p}→tb+X) = 0.72^{+0.44}_{-0.43}\\;\\rm pb\\] \\[\\sigma(p\\bar{p}→tqb+X) = 2.92^{+0.87}_{-0.73}\\;\\rm pb\\] % The $s+t$-channel has a gaussian significance of $4.7\\sigma$, the $s$-channel $0.9\\sigma$ and the $t$-channel~$4.7\\sigma$. The results are consistent with the standard model predictions within one standard deviation. By combining these results with the results for two other analyses (using different MVA techniques) improved results \\[\\sigma(p\\bar{p}→tb+X,tqb+X) = 3.43^{+0.73}_{-0.74}\\;\\rm pb\\] \\[\\sigma

  5. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  6. Weak D in the Tunisian population

    PubMed Central

    Ouchari, Mouna; Romdhane, Houda; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama; Yacoub, Saloua Jemni

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 90 weak D types have been discovered to date. As there are no published data on the frequencies of weak D types in the Tunisian population, the aim of this study was to determine the composition of weak D alleles in our population. Material and methods Blood samples from 1777 D+ and 223 D− blood donors were tested for markers 809G, 1154C, 8G, 602G, 667G, 446A, and 885T relative to translation start codon by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers to estimate the frequencies of weak D type 1, weak D type 2, weak D type 3, weak D type 4, weak D type 5 and weak D type 11 in our population. Twenty-three samples with positive reactions were re-evaluated by DNA sequencing of RHD exons 1–10 and adjacent intronic sequences. Results Among the D+ donor cohort, weak D type 4 was the most prevalent allele (n=33, 1.2%) followed by weak D type 2 (n=6, 0.17%), weak D type 1 (n=4, 0.11%), and weak D type 5 (n=1, 0.28%) and weak D type 11 (n=1, 0.28%). RHD sequencing identified a weak D type 4.0 allele in all 19 samples tested. Among the D− pool, comprising 223 samples, we detected one sample with weak D type 4.0 associated with a C+c+E−e+ phenotype which had been missed by routine serological methods. Discussion Weak D type 4.0 appears to be the most prevalent weak D in our population. However, all samples must be sequenced in order to determine the exact subtype of weak D type 4, since weak D type 4.2 has considerable clinical importance, being associated with anti-D alloimmunisation. One case of weak D type 4 associated with dCe in trans had been missed by serology, so quality control of serological tests should be developed in our country. PMID:25369614

  7. Three D displays in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakalo, M.

    2009-05-01

    The evolution to 3D content is considered to be the next quantum leap in the movie industry, and is currently taking place. The prospect of the home entertainment industry adopting 3D is causing display manufacturers to develop 3D compatible products. In the past, 3D displays have often been limited by poor image quality. The current generation of 3D displays can have image quality that approaches that of their 2D counterparts. 3D content has found its way to the cinema and is seeking a way into the home, but will it have a place in the military environment? This paper discusses the current status of 3D display technology and its suitability to the military ground mobile environment. It includes an introduction to 3D visualization and examines issues such as implementation, image quality, and human factors.

  8. Vitamin D in pregnancy: A metabolic outlook

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Manila; Magon, Navneet

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a preventable health problem. Vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women is frequent in many populations over the world. Research indicates that adequate vitamin D intake in pregnancy is optimal for maternal, fetal and child health. Adverse health outcomes during pregnancy are preeclampsia; gestational diabetes mellitus and caesarean section. Consequences in newborns are low birth weight, neonatal rickets, a risk of neonatal hypocalcaemia, asthma and/or type 1 diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is the origin for a host of future perils for the child, especially effect on neurodevelopment and immune system. Some of this damage done by maternal Vitamin D deficiency gets evident after many years. Therefore, prevention of vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women is essential. The currently recommended supplementation amount of vitamin D is not sufficient to maintain a value of 25 hydroxy vitamin D above 30 ng/ml, during pregnancy. Studies are underway to establish the recommended daily doses of vitamin D in pregnant women. Clearly, further investigation is required into the effects of vitamin D, of vitamin D supplementation, and of vitamin D analogs for improvement in human health generally and mothers and children specifically. This review discusses vitamin D metabolism, dietary requirements and recommendations and implications of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:23776856

  9. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  10. Overview of Hall D Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, Eugene A.

    2016-04-01

    Hall D is a new experimental hall at Jefferson Lab, designed for experiments with a photon beam. The primary motivation for Hall D is the GlueX experiment [1,2], dedicated to meson spectroscopy. The Hall D complex consists of: An electron beam line used to extract the 5.5-pass electrons from the accelerator into the Tagger Hall. The designed beam energy is E e = 12 GeV;The Tagger Hall, where the electron beam passes through a thin radiator (~0.01% R.L.) and is deflected into the beam dump. The electrons that lost >30% of their energy in the radiator are detected with scintillator hodoscopes providing a ~0.1% energy resolution for the tagged photons. Aligned diamond radiators allow to produce linearly polarized photons via the Coherent Bremsstrahlung. The beam dump is limited to 60 kW (5 µA at 12 GeV); The Collimator Cave contains a collimator for the photon beam and dipole magnets downstream in order to remove charged particles. The 3.4 mm diameter collimator, located about 75 m downstream of the radiator, selects the central cone of the photon beam increasing its average linear polarization, up to ~40%in the coherent peak at 9 GeV; Hall D contains several elements of the photon beam line, and themain spectrometer. A Pair Spectrometer consists of a thin converter, a dipole magnet, and a two-arm detector used to measure the energy spectrum of the photon beam. The main spectrometer is based on a 2-T superconducting solenoid, 4 m long and 1.85 m bore diameter. The liquid hydrogen target is located in the front part the solenoid. The charged tracks are detected with a set of drift chambers; photons are detected with two electromagnetic calorimeters. There are also scintillator hodoscopes for triggering and time-of-flight measurements. The spectrometer is nearly hermetic in an angular range of 1° < θ < 120 •. The momentum resolution is σ p /p ~ 1 ₋ ₋3% depending on the polar angle θ. The energy resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeters is

  11. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  12. [DOHaD: epidemiological researches].

    PubMed

    Delpierre, Cyrille; Lepeule, Johanna; Cordier, Sylvaine; Slama, Remy; Heude, Barbara; Charles, Marie-Aline

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological researches in the field of DOHaD are in favor of a role of early environment, including chemical (pesticides), physical (air pollution), nutritional or psychosocial environment, on child and adult health. Disentangling the different factors of environment that may affect health, especially over time, and identifying critical periods of exposure remains a major challenge. The biological mechanisms involved remain elusive in human beings. Nevertheless, it seems that whatever the nature of the exposure, epigenetic mechanisms are currently discussed to explain how the environment may alter biological systems over time.

  13. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  14. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  15. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  16. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 151 - Appendix D to Part 151

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendix D to Part 151 D Appendix D to Part 151 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. D Appendix D to Part 151 There is set forth below...

  17. 24 CFR Appendix D to 24 Cfr Part 3400 - Appendix D to 24 CFR Part 3400

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Appendix D to 24 CFR Part 3400 D Appendix D to 24 CFR Part 3400 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFE MORTGAGE LICENSING ACT Pt. 3400, App. D Appendix D to 24 CFR Part...

  18. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 25 - Appendix D to Part 25

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendix D to Part 25 D Appendix D to Part 25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Pt. 25, App. D Appendix D to Part 25 Criteria...

  19. 24 CFR Appendix D to 24 Cfr Part 3400 - Appendix D to 24 CFR Part 3400

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Appendix D to 24 CFR Part 3400 D Appendix D to 24 CFR Part 3400 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFE MORTGAGE LICENSING ACT Pt. 3400, App. D Appendix D to 24 CFR Part...

  20. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 505 - Exemptions; Exceptions; and DoD Blanket Routine Uses

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemptions; Exceptions; and DoD Blanket Routine Uses D Appendix D to Part 505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARMY PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Pt. 505, App. D Appendix D...

  1. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 25 - Appendix D to Part 25

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix D to Part 25 D Appendix D to Part 25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Pt. 25, App. D Appendix D to Part 25 Criteria...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 151 - Appendix D to Part 151

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix D to Part 151 D Appendix D to Part 151 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. D Appendix D to Part 151 There is set forth below...

  3. 76 FR 71375 - Scott D. Fedosky, M.D.; Denial of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... Enforcement Administration Scott D. Fedosky, M.D.; Denial of Application On March 30, 2010, the Deputy... Show Cause to Scott D. Fedosky, M.D. (Respondent), of Fayetteville, Arkansas. The Show Cause Order... Scott David Fedosky, M.D. (Ark. Med. Bd. Feb. 17, 2004). On October 8, 2003, Respondent...

  4. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 505 - Exemptions; Exceptions; and DoD Blanket Routine Uses

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Exemptions; Exceptions; and DoD Blanket Routine Uses D Appendix D to Part 505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARMY PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Pt. 505, App. D Appendix D...

  5. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  6. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  7. DoD Pest Management Program,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-22

    Pest Management Program, as established under DoD Directive 4715.1, Section 125 of Title 10, United States Code, and the Joint Service Regulation, ’Joint Field Operating Agencies of the Office of The Surgeon General of the Army’ authorizes the publication of DoD 41 50.7-M, ’DoD Pest Management Training and Certification’ authorizes the publication of DoD 4150.7-P, ’DoD Plan for the Certification of Pesticide Applicators’ and designates the Secretary of the Army as the DoD Executive Agent for the Armed Forces Pest

  8. Vitamin D-induced ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 as a nongenomic action: D3 vs D2 derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won Seok; Yu, Hoon; Kim, Jin Ju; Lee, Mee Jeong; Park, Su-Kil

    2016-01-01

    As a nongenomic action, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) induces L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated extracellular Ca(2+) influx in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs), which activates a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) to cleave and shed the ectodomain of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1). In this study, we examined the potencies of other vitamin D3 and D2 analogs to stimulate the ectodomain shedding of TNFR1 in HASMCs. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3), a precursor of 1,25D3, and elocalcitol, an analog of 1,25D3, caused ectodomain shedding of TNFR1 within 30 min, whereas 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25D2) and paricalcitol, a derivative of 1,25D2, did not. Both 25D3 and elocalcitol rapidly induced extracellular Ca(2+) influx and markedly increased intracellular Ca(2+), while 1,25D2 and paricalcitol caused only small increases in intracellular Ca(2+). 25D3- and elocalcitol-induced TNFR1 ectodomain sheddings were abolished by verapamil and in Ca(2+)-free media. Both 25D3 and elocalcitol caused the translocation of ADAM10 to the cell surface, which was inhibited by verapamil, while 1,25D2 and paricalcitol did not cause ADAM10 translocation. When ADAM10 was depleted by ADAM10-siRNA, 25D3 and elocalcitol could not induce ectodomain shedding of TNFR1. The plasma membrane receptor, endoplasmic reticulum stress protein 57 (ERp57), but not the classic vitamin D receptor, mediated the nongenomic action of vitamin D to induce ectodomain shedding of TNFR1. In summary, like 1,25D3, 25D3 and elocalcitol caused ADAM10-mediated ectodomain shedding of TNFR1, whereas 1,25D2 and paricalcitol did not. The difference may depend on their affinities to ERp57 through which extracellular Ca(2+) influx is induced.

  9. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  10. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  11. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  12. The D4A Digitiser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cuyper, J.; Winter, L.

    2005-12-01

    The D4A (Digital Access to Aerial- and Astro-photographic Archives) project aims to acquire the necessary know-how, hardware and software to digitise the astro-photographic collections of the Royal Observatory of Belgium and the aerial-photographic collections of the National Geographic Institute and the Royal Museum of Central Africa in collaboration with AGFA-Gevaert. The D4A digitiser under construction consists of a granite based Aerotech ABL 3600 open frame air bearing XY positioning system, with custom build hardware to mount glass plates, film sheets and film rolls. The optical subsystem consists of a C-Cam Technologies CMOS camera mounted to a Schneider telecentric Xenoplan lens and will be illuminated by a computer controlled LED. The maximum scanning area is 350mm × 350mm with a speed of 6 plates (240mm × 240mm) per hour. A first benchmark of a prototype ABL 3600 was done and the proposed illumination system tested as detailed below.

  13. D2 Inertial Measurement Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Patrick; Gido, Joseph; Carroll, Joseph

    1993-06-01

    The D2 Hypervelocity Projectile is a Strategic Defense Initiative sponsored technology program that is designed to provide low endo-atmospheric, kinetic kill defense against strategic reentry vehicles. The D2 program is funded through the U.S. Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (SSDC) in Huntsville, AL and contracted through the U.S. Army Armament Research and Development Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ. In GFY 93 the program began an integration and flight demonstration phase with the Hypervelocity Fire Control System (HVFC) and the Solid Propellant Electro Thermal Chemical (SPETC) launcher. The Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) necessary to perform the autopilot and guidance data gathering must be extremely small, lightweight and shock hardened. The IMU is comprised of three Honeywell GG1308 miniature Ring Laser Gyros (RLG), and three Endevco 7290-M19 miniature silicon accelerometers. The IMU has self-contained high voltage Power Supply (HVPS) processor and memory electronics providing a complete stand alone, three axis measurement package. This Inertial Cluster Assembly (ICA) is then packaged into a cylindrical housing, approximately 1.9 inches in diameter and 1.3 inches in length.

  14. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  15. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  16. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. 2D and 3D Numerical Simulations of Flux Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancellation of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere and chromosphere has been linked observationally and theoretically to a broad range of solar activity, from filament channel formation to CME initiation. Because this phenomenon is typically measured at only a single layer in the atmosphere, in the radial (line of sight) component of the magnetic field, the actual processes behind this observational signature are ambiguous. It is clear that reconnection is involved in some way, but the location of the reconnection sites and associated connectivity changes remain uncertain in most cases. We are using numerical modeling to demystify flux cancellation, beginning with the simplest possible configuration: a subphotospheric Lundquist flux tube surrounded by a potential field, immersed in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere, spanning many orders of magnitude in plasma beta. In this system, cancellation is driven slowly by a 2-cell circulation pattern imposed in the convection zone, such that the tops of the cells are located around the beta=1 level (i.e., the photosphere) and the flows converge and form a downdraft at the polarity inversion line; note however that no flow is imposed along the neutral line. We will present the results of 2D and 3D MHD-AMR simulations of flux cancellation, in which the flux at the photosphere begins in either an unsheared or sheared state. In all cases, a low-lying flux rope is formed by reconnection at the polarity inversion line within a few thousand seconds. The flux rope remains stable and does not rise, however, in contrast to models which do not include the presence of significant mass loading.

  18. Alfven wave stability in D-III-D

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.B. ); Samec, T.K. )

    1989-09-01

    Within the framework of the global Alfven eigenmode theory in a cylindrical background plasma, I examine the excitation of global Alfven eigenmodes by intense neutral beam injection in the D III-D tokamak operating at General Atomics. I have considered two separate sets of experimental conditions, a low power'' set of cases using 10MW of hydrogen beams, and a high power'' shot of 20MW of deuterium beams. My results are particularly sensitive to the background density profile. For parabolic background density profiles, n{sub 0} {times} (1 {minus} (r/{tilde a}){sup 2}), I have determined that the plasma is stable to all toroidal and poloidal mode numbers for both high and low power cases. For density profiles which are of the form n{sub 0} {times} (1 {minus} (r/{tilde a}){sup 2}){sup {1/2}}, for the same n{sub 0}, my calculation indicates that the m = {minus}1, l = 0 mode is unstable in each case. The high power case has a considerably higher growth rate at the baseline conditions, which motivated me to study this case more extensively. The results are also sensitive to the beam source radial scalelength, L{sub s}, and the electron temperature T{sub e}. By narrowing the source from the baseline 36 cm to 20 cm, the growth rate of the (0,{minus}1) actually decreases, but the (0,{minus}2) mode appears with a substantial growth rate. If the source could be made even narrower, L{sub s} {approx} 10 cm, the (1,{minus}1) mode would appear, also with a large growth rate. 12 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Vitamin D Signaling Modulators in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of 1α,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D3, 1,25D3, calcitriol) have been demonstrated in various tumor model systems in vitro and in vivo. However, limited antitumor effects of 1,25D3 have been observed in clinical trials. This may be attributed to a variety of factors including overexpression of the primary 1,25D3 degrading enzyme, CYP24A1, in tumors, which would lead to rapid local inactivation of 1,25D3. An alternative strategy for improving the antitumor activity of 1,25D3 involves the combination with a selective CYP24A1 inhibitor. The validity of this approach is supported by numerous preclinical investigations, which demonstrate that CYP24A1 inhibitors suppress 1,25D3 catabolism in tumor cells and increase the effects of 1,25D3 on gene expression and cell growth. Studies are now required to determine whether selective CYP24A1 inhibitors+1,25D3 can be used safely and effectively in patients. CYP24A1 inhibitors plus 1,25D3 can cause dose-limiting toxicity of vitamin D (hypercalcemia) in some patients. Dexamethasone significantly reduces 1,25D3-mediated hypercalcemia and enhances the antitumor activity of 1,25D3, increases VDR-ligand binding, and increases VDR protein expression. Efforts to dissect the mechanisms responsible for CYP24A1 overexpression and combinational effect of 1,25D3/dexamethasone in tumors are underway. Understanding the cross talk between vitamin D receptor (VDR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling axes is of crucial importance to the design of new therapies that include 1,25D3 and dexamethasone. Insights gained from these studies are expected to yield novel strategies to improve the efficacy of 1,25D3 treatment.

  20. True 3d Images and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; wang@hzgeospace., zheng.

    2012-07-01

    A true 3D image is a geo-referenced image. Besides having its radiometric information, it also has true 3Dground coordinates XYZ for every pixels of it. For a true 3D image, especially a true 3D oblique image, it has true 3D coordinates not only for building roofs and/or open grounds, but also for all other visible objects on the ground, such as visible building walls/windows and even trees. The true 3D image breaks the 2D barrier of the traditional orthophotos by introducing the third dimension (elevation) into the image. From a true 3D image, for example, people will not only be able to read a building's location (XY), but also its height (Z). true 3D images will fundamentally change, if not revolutionize, the way people display, look, extract, use, and represent the geospatial information from imagery. In many areas, true 3D images can make profound impacts on the ways of how geospatial information is represented, how true 3D ground modeling is performed, and how the real world scenes are presented. This paper first gives a definition and description of a true 3D image and followed by a brief review of what key advancements of geospatial technologies have made the creation of true 3D images possible. Next, the paper introduces what a true 3D image is made of. Then, the paper discusses some possible contributions and impacts the true 3D images can make to geospatial information fields. At the end, the paper presents a list of the benefits of having and using true 3D images and the applications of true 3D images in a couple of 3D city modeling projects.

  1. Vitamin D and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lips, Paul; Eekhoff, Marelise; van Schoor, Natasja; Oosterwerff, Mirjam; de Jongh, Renate; Krul-Poel, Yvonne; Simsek, Suat

    2016-12-05

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a decreased insulin release, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. Animal studies show that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) stimulates the pancreatic β-cell to secrete insulin. The relationship between vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance could develop through inflammation, as vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased inflammatory markers. In addition, genetic polymorphisms of vitamin D -related genes may predispose to impaired glycemic control and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiologic studies showed an association between low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) concentration and an increased risk for the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. This may be partly explained by an increased fat mass. A possible causal relationship between vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes should be proven by randomized clinical trials showing that either type 2 diabetes can be prevented or insulin release and insulin sensitivity can be improved by vitamin D supplements. The results of randomized clinical trials on the effect of vitamin D versus placebo, sometimes combined with calcium, in patients with impaired glucose tolerance ("prediabetes") or type 2 diabetes are inconsistent. Some studies showed a slight decrease of fasting plasma glucose or improvement of insulin resistance, but often only in posthoc analyses. These effects are mainly visible in patients with vitamin D deficiency and impaired glucose tolerance at baseline. Meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials in general did not show significant effects of vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control. Currently, several large scale randomized clinical trials with vitamin D supplementation in doses of 1600-4000IU/d are ongoing with glycemic control or incidence of diabetes mellitus as outcome. Vitamin D deficiency needs to be prevented or cured, but until the results of these trials are published, high

  2. Recognition and management of vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bordelon, Paula; Ghetu, Maria V; Langan, Robert C

    2009-10-15

    Vitamin D deficiency affects persons of all ages. Common manifestations of vitamin D deficiency are symmetric low back pain, proximal muscle weakness, muscle aches, and throbbing bone pain elicited with pressure over the sternum or tibia. A 25-hydroxyvitamin D level should be obtained in patients with suspected vitamin D deficiency. Deficiency is defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of less than 20 ng per mL (50 nmol per L), and insufficiency is defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 20 to 30 ng per mL (50 to 75 nmol per L). The goal of treatment is to normalize vitamin D levels to relieve symptoms and decrease the risk of fractures, falls, and other adverse health outcomes. To prevent vitamin D deficiency, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants and children receive at least 400 IU per day from diet and supplements. Evidence shows that vitamin D supplementation of at least 700 to 800 IU per day reduces fracture and fall rates in adults. In persons with vitamin D deficiency, treatment may include oral ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) at 50,000 IU per week for eight weeks. After vitamin D levels normalize, experts recommend maintenance dosages of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) at 800 to 1,000 IU per day from dietary and supplemental sources.

  3. [Recent advances on vitamin D (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Monnier, L; Colette, C; Mirouze, J

    1980-06-01

    Our knowledge of vitamin D metabolism has undergone major advances within the last few years. The vitamin D3 produced by the skin or absorbed across the intestine is converted successively to 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 by the liver and to 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) by the kidney. The latter metabolite is also the most active on three types of target tissue: gut, bone and kidney. The mechanism of action of 1,25-(OH2D3 has been investigated mostly in the intestinal tract, where it increased calcium absorption by stimulating the synthesis of such transfer proteins as the calcium binding protein (Ca BP). Although the level of 1,25 (OH)2D3 is regulated by vitamin D intake, it depends mainly on renal hydroxylation, the limiting step which controls 1,25-(OH)2D3 production. Both parathyroid hormone and calcium or phosphorus depletion stimulate renal 1-alpha-hydroxylase; 1,25-(OH)2D3 is also regulated directly or indirectly (through its action on the parathyroid glands) by a feedback system. In some diseases such as hepatic insufficiency and chronic renal failure, a profound impairment in endogenous synthesis of the biologically active metabolites of vitamin D results in sever calcium and skeletal disese. During the last decade, the therapeutic possibilities in vitamin D deficiency have been greatly improved by the synthesis of new derivatives of vitamin D and by a better knowledge of their bioavailability

  4. Vitamin D, sunlight and cancer connection.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    It has been more than 100 years when it was first appreciated that increased sun exposure reduced risk of dying of cancer. The most beneficial effect of sun exposure is the production of vitamin D in the skin. Recent evidence suggests that most cells in the body not only have a vitamin D receptor but also have the capacity to convert 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Once formed 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D can inhibit cellular proliferation, induce cellular maturation, inhibit angiogenesis and ultimately cause apoptosis to prevent malignancy. A multitude of studies have associated improved vitamin D status with decreased risk for developing several deadly cancers including colon, breast, pancreatic and ovarian cancers. Patients with cancer are at high risk for vitamin D deficiency. Sensible sun exposure, vitamin D fortification and vitamin D supplementation should be encouraged to improve the vitamin D status of children and adults not only for bone health but for reducing risk of developing and dying of cancer. The goal is to achieve a blood level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D of 40-60 ng/mL. This can be accomplished by children taking 600-1000 and adults 1500-2000 international units (IU) vitamin D daily from diet and supplements along with sensible sun exposure when the sun is capable of producing vitamin D in the skin.

  5. Crouzon syndrome associated with acanthosis nigricans: prenatal 2D and 3D ultrasound findings and postnatal 3D CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, Pernille; Hagen, Casper Petri; Hove, Hanne; Dunø, Morten; Nissen, Kamilla Rothe; Kreiborg, Sven; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2012-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans (CAN) is a very rare condition with an approximate prevalence of 1 per 1 million newborns. We add the first report on prenatal 2D and 3D ultrasound findings in CAN. In addition we present the postnatal 3D CT findings. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular testing. PMID:23986840

  6. [Population database on: D1S1656, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, D8S1179, D10S1248, D22S1045, D12S391, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA loci included in NGM system based on one thousand unrelated individuals from Lodz region of Central Poland].

    PubMed

    Jacewicz, Renata; Markiewicz, Beata; Wojtkiewicz, Rafał; Jędrzejczyk, Maciej; Berent, Jarosław

    A population data obtained on the basis of sample of 1000 unrelated individuals of Polish ancestry living in Lodz region of Central Poland with use of fluorescent multiplex-PCR and capillary electrophoresis were presented. Evaluation included 15 polymorphic loci DNA - STR from NGM multiplex-PCR set, ie. D1S1656, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, D8S1179, D10S1248, D12S391, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, D22S1045, FGA, TH01, vWA. The allele frequency distribution and crucial statistical parameters for the investigated markers and the whole set were calculated. The compliance of the studied population with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, independence of inheritance and high parameters of the usefulness in forensic genetics have been demonstrated. The interpopulation comparison performed by the "neighbor-joining" method as well as multidimensional scaling depicted the genetic distances dividing the examined Polish population from other populations of Poland, Europe and the world.

  7. Ablation d'un film d'or par laser à excimère

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentis, M.; Hermann, J.; Pereira, A.; Delaporte, Ph.; Marine, W.; Perrière, J.; Bianchi, L.; Galli, R.

    2003-06-01

    Ces travaux de recherche ont été réalisés dans le cadre du projet de développement du Laser MégaJoule (LMJ). Parmi les expériences d'interaction laser - matière à très haut flux, certaines conduiront à un dépôt de particules d'or sur les éléments internes de la chambre d'interaction. Pour nettoyer ce dépôt de particules, la possibilité d'utiliser un procédé automatisé basé sur l'ablation laser a été étudiée. Un modèle numérique simplifié a été développé et une étude expérimentale réalisée sur des échantillons d'acier inoxydable ou de B4C recouverts d'un film d'or d'une épaisseur de ~20 nm déposés par PVD. Ces travaux montrent que plus de 95 % du film d'or peuvent être enlevés avec quelques tirs d'un laser XeCI dès que la densité d'énergie dépasse 3 J/cm^2.

  8. Interior building details of Building D, Room D101 to Room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building D, Room D-101 to Room D-101c partition wall with multi-pane wood sash; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  9. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0-->D(*)+/-D+/- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Buono, L Del; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Marco, E Di; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-23

    We present a first measurement of CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to D+D-, and updated CP asymmetry measurements in decays to D(*+)D- and D(*-)D+. We use fully reconstructed decays collected in a data sample of (232+/-3) x 10(6) gamma(4S)-->BB events in the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We determine the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be SD(*+)(D-)=-0.54+/-0.35+/-0.07, CD(*+)(D-)=0.09+/-0.25+/-0.06, SD(*-)(D+)=-0.29+/-0.33+/-0.07, CD(*-)(D+)=0.17+/-0.24+/-0.04, SD+(D-)=-0.29+/-0.63+/-0.06, and CD+(D-)=0.11+/-0.35+/-0.06, where in each case the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  10. [3D emulation of epicardium dynamic mapping].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Yang, Cui-Wei; Fang, Zu-Xiang

    2005-03-01

    In order to realize epicardium dynamic mapping of the whole atria, 3-D graphics are drawn with OpenGL. Some source codes are introduced in the paper to explain how to produce, read, and manipulate 3-D model data.

  11. Vitamin D, light and mental health.

    PubMed

    Humble, Mats B

    2010-11-03

    Vitamin D receptors and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are present in the central nervous system. Calcitriol (the active vitamin D hormone) affects numerous neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors, relevant for mental disorders. In the case of depressive disorders, considerable evidence supports a role of suboptimal vitamin D levels. However, the data are not conclusive and further studies are necessary. Especially, the relative importance of the pineal-melatonin system versus the vitamin D-endocrine system for the pathogenesis of seasonal affective disorders is presently unresolved. Two diagnoses, schizophrenia and autism, have been hypothetically linked to developmental (prenatal) vitamin D deficiency, however, also in adult patients, low levels have been reported, supporting the notion that vitamin D deficiency may not only be a predisposing developmental factor but also relate to the adult patients' psychiatric state. Two cases are described, whose psychiatric improvement coincided with effective treatment of vitamin D deficiency.

  12. An interactive multiview 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Zhang, Mei; Dong, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The progresses in 3D display systems and user interaction technologies will help more effective 3D visualization of 3D information. They yield a realistic representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them. In this paper, we describe an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system with capability of real-time user interaction. Design principle of this autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system is presented, together with the details of its hardware/software architecture. A prototype is built and tested based upon multi-projectors and horizontal optical anisotropic display structure. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of this novel 3D display and user interaction system.

  13. [Vitamin D: skeletal and muscular effects].

    PubMed

    Thomas, Thierry; Briot, Karine

    2013-10-01

    Insufficient serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is a risk factor for osteoporosis. A new paradigm is emerging with the locally synthesized 1,25(OH)2D within osteoblasts and osteoclasts as the essential pathway for the effects of 25(OH)D in regulating bone remodeling via direct or indirect activation of the specific receptor VDR. Vitamin D has positive effects on fracture risk, muscular function and risk of falls; these effects are observed when serum levels of 25(OH)D are above 30 ng/ml (75 nmol/l). Vitamin D dosing interval may be relevant for reducing the risk of fracture, with evidence suggesting positive effects with short intervals of 3 months or less. It is recommended to maintain an optimal serum level of 25(OH)D when managing patients with osteoporosis or at risk of this bone disease.

  14. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Donkena, Krishna Vanaja; Young, Charles Y. F.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR-regulated genes. Although laboratory studies including the use of animal models have shown that vitamin D has antiprostate cancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be inconclusive and an intensively studied subject. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory and epidemiology studies on the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer prevention. PMID:21991434

  15. Role of vitamin D in female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Shahrokhi, Seyedeh Zahra; Ghaffari, Firouzeh; Kazerouni, Faranak

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that belongs to the family of steroid hormones. The biological actions of vitamin D are exerted through a soluble protein, the vitamin D receptor (VDR). VDR is a transcription factor located in the nuclei of target cells that mediates the genomic action of the active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3). This transcription factor is distributed in various tissues, including the reproductive system. The presence of VDR in female reproductive tissue suggests that vitamin D is involved in female reproduction. The present article reviews the impact of vitamin D on anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), as an ovarian reserve marker, and ovarian steroidogenesis. This article also discusses the impact of vitamin D as a factor that influences infertility and the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF), insulin resistance (IR), hyperandrogenism, endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

  16. Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters February 3, 2014 Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression Among people ... sclerosis (MS), those with higher blood levels of vitamin D had better outcomes during 5 years of ...

  17. LANDSAT-D Mission Operations Review (MOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The integrated LANDSAT-D systems operation plan is presented and discussed with respect to functional elements, personnel, and procedures. Specifically, a review of the LANDSAT-D program, mission requirements and management, and flight operations is given.

  18. Vitamin D metabolites in idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, N D; Snodgrass, G J; Cohen, R D; Porteous, C E; Coldwell, R D; Trafford, D J; Makin, H L

    1985-01-01

    Metabolites of vitamin D were measured in plasma from 83 patients with idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia syndrome who were mentally handicapped but had normal calcium values at the time of the study. No significant difference was detected in the mean plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, or 25,26-dihydroxyvitamin D3 between patients and age matched controls. The mean plasma concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was significantly lower in patients than controls but this may be a secondary phenomenon related to less sunlight exposure. In addition, two hypercalcaemic patients with this syndrome were studied during the first year of life, and were found to have normal concentrations of vitamin D metabolites. These findings do not support a role for abnormal vitamin D metabolism in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. PMID:3879160

  19. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  20. Vitamin D, cardiovascular disease and mortality.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; März, Winfried; Drechsler, Christiane; Ritz, Eberhard; Zittermann, Armin; Cavalier, Etienne; Pieber, Thomas R; Lappe, Joan M; Grant, William B; Holick, Michael F; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2011-11-01

    A poor vitamin D status, i.e. low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], is common in the general population. This finding is of concern not only because of the classic vitamin D effects on musculoskeletal outcomes, but also because expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes in the heart and blood vessels suggests a role of vitamin D in the cardiovascular system. VDR-knockout mice suffer from cardiovascular disease (CVD), and various experimental studies suggest cardiovascular protection by vitamin D, including antiatherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory and direct cardio-protective actions, beneficial effects on classic cardiovascular risk factors as well as suppression of parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. In epidemiological studies, low levels of 25(OH)D are associated with increased risk of CVD and mortality. Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are sparse and have partially, but not consistently, shown some beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. arterial hypertension). We have insufficient data on vitamin D effects on cardiovascular events, but meta-analyses of RCTs indicate that vitamin D may modestly reduce all-cause mortality. Despite accumulating data suggesting that a sufficient vitamin D status may protect against CVD, we still must wait for results of large-scale RCTs before raising general recommendations for vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of CVD. In current clinical practice, the overall risks and costs of vitamin D supplementation should be weighed against the potential adverse consequences of untreated vitamin D deficiency.