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Sample records for damage calculations upstream

  1. Application of a monotonic upstream-biased transport scheme to three-dimensional constituent transport calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Dale J.; Douglass, Anne R.; Rood, Richard B.; Guthrie, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    The application of van Leer's scheme, a monotonic, upstream-biased differencing scheme, to three-dimensional constituent transport calculations is shown. The major disadvantage of the scheme is shown to be a self-limiting diffusion. A major advantage of the scheme is shown to be its ability to maintain constituent correlations. The scheme is adapted for a spherical coordinate system with a hybrid sigma-pressure coordinate in the vertical. Special consideration is given to cross-polar flow. The vertical wind calculation is shown to be extremely sensitive to the method of calculating the divergence. This sensitivity implies that a vertical wind formulation consistent with the transport scheme is essential for accurate transport calculations. The computational savings of the time-splitting method used to solve this equation are shown. Finally, the capabilities of this scheme are illustrated by an ozone transport and chemistry model simulation.

  2. SPECTER: neutron damage calculations for materials irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Smither, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron displacement damage-energy cross sections have been calculated for 41 isotopes in the energy range from 10/sup -10/ to 20 MeV. Calculations were performed on a 100-point energy grid using nuclear cross sections from ENDF/B-V and the DISCS computer code. Elastic scattering is treated exactly including angular distributions from ENDF/B-V. Inelastic scattering calculations consider both discrete and continuous nuclear level distributions. Multiple (n,xn) reactions use a Monte Carlo technique to derive the recoil distributions. The (n,d) and (n,t) reactions are treated as (n,p) and (n,/sup 3/He) as (n,/sup 4/He). The (n,..gamma..) reaction and subsequent ..beta..-decay are also included, using a new treatment of ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidences, angular correlations, ..beta..-neutrino correlations, and the incident neutron energy. The Lindhard model was used to compute the energy available for nuclear displacement at each recoil energy. The SPECTER computer code has been developed to simplify damage calculations. The user need only specify a neutron energy spectrum. SPECTER will then calculate spectral-averaged displacements, recoil spectra, gas production, and total damage energy (Kerma). The SPECTER computer code package is readily accessible to the fusion community via the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory.

  3. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Yume; Tada, Shusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  4. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Yume; Tada, Shusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi

    2014-09-12

    WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH(-/-)) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  5. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must...

  6. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must...

  7. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must...

  8. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must...

  9. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must...

  10. Mesoscale polycrystal calculations of damage in spallation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Davis L; Bingert, John F; Livescu, Veronica; Luo, Shengnian; Bronkhorst, C A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this project is to produce a damage model for spallation in metals informed by the polycrystalline grain structure at the mesoscale. Earlier damage models addressed the continuwn macroscale in which these effects were averaged out. In this work we focus on cross sections from recovered samples examined with EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction), which reveal crystal grain orientations and voids. We seek to understand the loading histories of specific sample regions by meshing up the crystal grain structure of these regions and simulating the stress, strain, and damage histories in our hydro code, FLAG. The stresses and strain histories are the fundamental drivers of damage and must be calculated. The calculated final damage structures are compared with those from the recovered samples to validate the simulations.

  11. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  12. Calculated concrete target damage by multiple rod impact and penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P A; Murphy, M J

    2006-12-29

    The effect of enhanced crater formation has been demonstrated experimentally when multiple and delayed shaped charge jets impact and penetrate concrete. The concept for enhancement utilizes a single follow-on jet at the centerline of holes produced by multiple precursor jets penetrating the surrounding the region. Calculations of the 3D crater enhancement phenomena have been conducted with multiple rods to simulate the steady state portion of the multiple jet penetration process. It is expected that this analysis methodology will be beneficial for optimization of the multiple jet crater enhancement application. We present calculated results using ALE3D where the model uses the standard Gruneisen equation of state combined with a rate dependent strength model including material damage parameters. This study focuses on the concrete material damage model as a representation of the portion of the target that would eventually be ejected creating a large bore-hole. The calculations are compared with the experimental evidence and limitations of the modeling approach are discussed.

  13. Calculation of error bars for laser damage observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenberg, Jonathan W.

    2008-10-01

    The use of the error bar is a critical means of communicating the quality of individual data points and a processed result. Understanding the error bar for a processed measurement depends on the measurement technique being used and is the subject of many recent works, as such, the paper will confine its scope to the determination of the error bar on a single data point. Many investigators either ignore the error bar altogether or use a "one size error fits all" method, both of these approaches are poor procedure and misleading. It is the goal of this work to lift the veil of mysticism surrounding error bars for damage observations and make their description, calculation and use, easy and commonplace. This paper will rigorously derive the error bar size as a function of the experimental parameters and observed data and will concentrate on the dependent variable, the cumulative probability of damage. The paper will begin with a discussion of the error bar as a measure of data quality or reliability. The expression for the variance in the parameters is derived via standard methods and converted to a standard deviation. The concept of the coverage factor is introduced to scale the error bar to the desired confidence level, completing the derivation

  14. The PIM-2 kinase is an essential component of the ultraviolet damage response that acts upstream to E2F-1 and ATM.

    PubMed

    Zirkin, Shahar; Davidovich, Ateret; Don, Jeremy

    2013-07-26

    The oncogenic nature ascribed to the PIM-2 kinase relies mostly on phosphorylation of substrates that act as pro-survival/anti-apoptotic factors. Nevertheless, pro-survival effects can also result from activating DNA repair mechanisms following damage. In this study, we addressed the possibility that PIM-2 plays a role in the cellular response to UV damage, an issue that has never been addressed before. We found that in U2OS cells, PIM-2 expression and activity increased upon exposure to UVC radiation (2-50 mJ/cm(2)), and Pim-2-silenced cells were significantly more sensitive to UV radiation. Overexpression of PIM-2 accelerated removal of UV-induced DNA lesions over time, reduced γH2AX accumulation in damaged cells, and rendered these cells significantly more viable following UV radiation. The protective effect of PIM-2 was mediated by increased E2F-1 and activated ATM levels. Silencing E2F-1 reduced the protective effect of PIM-2, whereas inhibiting ATM activity abrogated this protective effect, irrespective of E2F-1 levels. The results obtained in this study place PIM-2 upstream to E2F-1 and ATM in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

  15. The PIM-2 kinase is an essential component of the ultraviolet damage response that acts upstream to E2F-1 and ATM.

    PubMed

    Zirkin, Shahar; Davidovich, Ateret; Don, Jeremy

    2013-07-26

    The oncogenic nature ascribed to the PIM-2 kinase relies mostly on phosphorylation of substrates that act as pro-survival/anti-apoptotic factors. Nevertheless, pro-survival effects can also result from activating DNA repair mechanisms following damage. In this study, we addressed the possibility that PIM-2 plays a role in the cellular response to UV damage, an issue that has never been addressed before. We found that in U2OS cells, PIM-2 expression and activity increased upon exposure to UVC radiation (2-50 mJ/cm(2)), and Pim-2-silenced cells were significantly more sensitive to UV radiation. Overexpression of PIM-2 accelerated removal of UV-induced DNA lesions over time, reduced γH2AX accumulation in damaged cells, and rendered these cells significantly more viable following UV radiation. The protective effect of PIM-2 was mediated by increased E2F-1 and activated ATM levels. Silencing E2F-1 reduced the protective effect of PIM-2, whereas inhibiting ATM activity abrogated this protective effect, irrespective of E2F-1 levels. The results obtained in this study place PIM-2 upstream to E2F-1 and ATM in the UV-induced DNA damage response. PMID:23760264

  16. Base damage immediately upstream from double-strand break ends is a more severe impediment to nonhomologous end joining than blocked 3′-termini

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Neumann, Ronald D.; Pastwa, Elzbieta; Winters, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are critical cytotoxic lesions that are typically repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in human cells. Our previous work indicates the highly cytotoxic DSBs formed by 125I decay possess base damage clustered within 8 to 10 bases of the break, and 3′-phosphate (P) and 3′-OH ends. This study examines the effect of such structures on NHEJ in in vitro assays employing either 125I decay-induced DSB linearized plasmid DNA, or structurally defined duplex oligonucleotides. Duplex oligonucleotides that possess either a 3′-P or 3′-phosphoglycolate (PG), or a ligateable 3′-OH end with either an AP site or an 8-oxo-dG 1 nucleotide upstream (-1n) from the 3′-terminus, have been examined for reparability. Moderate to severe end-joining inhibition was observed for modified DSB ends or 8-oxo-dG upstream from a 3′-OH end. In contrast, abolition of end joining was observed with duplexes possessing an AP site upstream from a ligateable 3′-OH end, or for a lesion combination involving 3′-P plus an upstream 8-oxo-dG. In addition, base mismatches at the -1n position are also strong inhibitors of NHEJ in this system, suggesting that destabilization of the DSB terminus as a result of base loss or improper base pairing may play a role in the inhibitory effects of these structures. Furthermore, we provide data indicating that DSB end joining is likely to occur prior to removal or repair of base lesions proximal to the DSB terminus. Our results show that base damage or base loss near a DSB end may be a severe block to NHEJ, and that complex combinations of lesions presented in the context of a DSB may be more inhibitory than the individual lesions alone. In contrast, blocked DSB 3′-ends alone, are only modestly inhibitory to NHEJ. Finally, DNA ligase activity is implicated as being responsible for these effects. PMID:21175352

  17. Calculation and analysis of the non-point source pollution in the upstream watershed of the Panjiakou Reservoir, People's Republic of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Tang, L.

    2007-05-01

    Panjiakou Reservoir is an important drinking water resource in Haihe River Basin, Hebei Province, People's Republic of China. The upstream watershed area is about 35,000 square kilometers. Recently, the water pollution in the reservoir is becoming more serious owing to the non-point pollution as well as point source pollution on the upstream watershed. To effectively manage the reservoir and watershed and develop a plan to reduce pollutant loads, the loading of non-point and point pollution and their distribution on the upstream watershed must be understood fully. The SWAT model is used to simulate the production and transportation of the non-point source pollutants in the upstream watershed of the Panjiakou Reservoir. The loadings of non-point source pollutants are calculated for different hydrologic years and the spatial and temporal characteristics of non-point source pollution are studied. The stream network and topographic characteristics of the stream network and sub-basins are all derived from the DEM by ArcGIS software. The soil and land use data are reclassified and the soil physical properties database file is created for the model. The SWAT model was calibrated with observed data of several hydrologic monitoring stations in the study area. The results of the calibration show that the model performs fairly well. Then the calibrated model was used to calculate the loadings of non-point source pollutants for a wet year, a normal year and a dry year respectively. The time and space distribution of flow, sediment and non-point source pollution were analyzed depending on the simulated results. The comparison of different hydrologic years on calculation results is dramatic. The loading of non-point source pollution in the wet year is relatively larger but smaller in the dry year since the non-point source pollutants are mainly transported through the runoff. The pollution loading within a year is mainly produced in the flood season. Because SWAT is a

  18. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Free surface correction for damage stability...) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Free Surface § 170.290 Free surface correction for damage stability calculations. (a) When doing the damage stability calculations required...

  19. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Free surface correction for damage stability...) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Free Surface § 170.290 Free surface correction for damage stability calculations. (a) When doing the damage stability calculations required...

  20. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    PubMed Central

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress–strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history. PMID:26150939

  1. Calculation of wind speeds required to damage or destroy buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Henry

    Determination of wind speeds required to damage or destroy a building is important not only for the improvement of building design and construction but also for the estimation of wind speeds in tornadoes and other damaging storms. For instance, since 1973 the U.S. National Weather Service has been using the well-known Fujita scale (F scale) to estimate the maximum wind speeds of tornadoes [Fujita, 1981]. The F scale classifies tornadoes into 13 numbers, F-0 through F-12. The wind speed (maximum gust speed) associated with each F number is given in Table 1. Note that F-6 through F-12 are for wind speeds between 319 mi/hr (mph) and the sonic velocity (approximately 760 mph; 1 mph = 1.6 km/kr). However, since no tornadoes have been classified to exceed F-5, the F-6 through F-12 categories have no practical meaning [Fujita, 1981].

  2. A damage model for rock fragmentation and comparison of calculations with blasting experiments in granite

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, B.J.

    1990-10-01

    Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried to late times. An improved damage model allows finite element calculations which remain stable at late times. Reasonable agreement between crater profiles calculated with this model using the PRONTO finite element program and excavated crater profiles from blasting experiments in granite demonstrate a successful application of this model. Detailed instructions for use of this new damage model with the PRONTO finite element programs are included. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  3. Comparison of Measured Dark Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, C. J.; Marshall, P. W.; Howe, C. L.; Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Ladbury, R.; Jordan, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distributions were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [1]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. While the nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) contributes only a small fraction of the total nonionizing damage energy, its inclusion in the shape of the damage across the array is significant. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3-5], a Geant4 [4,6] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  4. Comparison of Measured Leakage Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, C. J.; Ladbury, R.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; Howe, C.; Weller, B.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Jordan, T. M.; Fodness, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distribution were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [I]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Car10 code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. The nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) has a negligible effect on the shape of the damage distribution. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3,4], a Geant4 [4,5] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  5. Reference data file for neutron spectrum adjustment and related radiation damage calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zsolnay, E.M. ); Nolthenius, H.J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Szondi, E.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The REAL-88 interlaboratory exercise organized by IAEA resulted in a neutron metrology file. (NMF-90) comprising problem dependent data for benchmark neutron fields, furthermore, nuclear data and computer programs for neutron spectrum adjustment and radiation damage parameter calculations for the service life assessment of nuclear facilities. Calculation results of some experienced laboratories are also present. This paper describes and analyses the content of the neutron metrology file and outlines the most important problems and tasks to be solved in the field of radiation damage parameter calculations. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Monte Carlo Techniques for Calculations of Charge Deposition and Displacement Damage from Protons in Visible and Infrared Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Paul; Reed, Robert; Fodness, Bryan; Jordan, Tom; Pickel, Jim; Xapsos, Michael; Burke, Ed

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation examines motivation for Monte Carlo methods, charge deposition in sensor arrays, displacement damage calculations, and future work. The discussion of charge deposition sensor arrays includes Si active pixel sensor APS arrays and LWIR HgCdTe FPAs. The discussion of displacement damage calculations includes nonionizing energy loss (NIEL), HgCdTe NIEL calculation results including variance, and implications for damage in HgCdTe detector arrays.

  7. Calculation of Forming Limits for Sheet Metal using an Enhanced Continuous Damage Fracture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Trung; Kim, Dae-Young; Kim, Heon Young

    2011-08-01

    An enhanced continuous damage fracture model was introduced in this paper to calculate forming limits of sheet metal. The fracture model is a combination of a fracture criterion and a continuum damage constitutive law. A modified McClintock void growth fracture criterion was incorporated with a coupled damage-plasticity Gurson-type constitutive law. Also, by introducing a Lode angle dependent parameter to define the loading asymmetry condition, the shear effect was phenomenologically taken into account. The proposed fracture model was implemented using user-subroutines in commercial finite element software. The model was calibrated and correlated by the uniaxial tension, shear and notched specimens tests. Application of the fracture model for the LDH tests was discussed and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data.

  8. A non-traditional methodology for flood stage-damage calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Lee, R.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology to calculate economic losses from hypothetical, extreme flood events, such as the Probable Maximum Flood. The methodology uses economic data compiled from already-available secondary sources, such as US Census data on magnetic tapes, utilizing microcomputer and other electronic media. Estimates of land elevations are obtained from topographic maps, and flood elevations are estimated using the dam breach and flood routing (DAMBRK) model. The calculations are performed at a disaggregate spatial scale by various land use and industrial classification categories. The basic areal units are city blocks for urbanized areas, enumeration districts, and Census tracts. Depth-damage functions, which provide an estimate of damages as a proportion of the existing value of the structure, are estimated statistically. Computer software called DAMAGE is used to combine the economic, flood elevation, and depth-damage information to compute economic losses for different possible flood stages and for different inflow events. Two case studies are presented as illustrations of the method. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-23 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. Japanese experiment JP-23, which was conducted in target position G6 of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplanes was 4.4E+22 n/cm{sup 2} resulting in about 9.0 dpa in type 316 stainless steel.

  10. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the EBRII COBRA-1A irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. and Japanese COBRA-1A1 and 1A2 irradiations in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The maximum total neutron fluences at midplane were 2.0E+22 and 7.5E+22 n/cm{sup 2}, for the 1A1 and 1A2 irradiations, respectively, resulting in about 8.0 and 30.3 dpa in stainless steel.

  11. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the ATR-A1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the collaborative US/Japan ATR-A1 irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 9.4 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (5.5 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 4.6 dpa in vanadium.

  12. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-23 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment JP-23, which was conducted in target position G6 of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 4.4E+22 n/cm{sup 2} resulting in about 9.0 dpa in type 316 stainless steel.

  13. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-9, -12, and -15 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-9, -12, and -15. These experiments were conducted in target positions of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for a period of nearly four years. The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 2.6 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} (7.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 60 dpa and 3900 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  14. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-20 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment JP-20, which was conducted in a target position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 4.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (1.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 8.4 dpa and 388 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  15. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-MFE-200J-1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment MFE-200-J-, which was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 4.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (1.9 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 12 dpa and 28 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  16. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculation for the JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S./Japanese experiments JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for 238.5 EFPD. The maximum fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV was about 2.1E + 22 n/cm{sup 2} for all of the experiments resulting in about 17.3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  17. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the JP-17, 18 and 19 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-17, 18, and 19 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for two cycles resulting in 43.55 EFPD for JP-17 and 42.06 EFPD for JP-18 and 19. The maximum fast neutron fluence > 0.1 MeV was about 3.7E + 21 n/cm{sup 2} for all three irradiations, resulting in about 3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  18. Calculations of radiation damage in target, container and window materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S.; Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.; Mansur, L.K.

    1996-07-01

    Radiation damage in target, container, and window materials for spallation neutron sources is am important factor in the design of target stations for accelerator-driver transmutation technologies. Calculations are described that use the LAHET and SPECTER codes to obtain displacement and helium production rates in tungsten, 316 stainless steel, and Inconel 718, which are major target, container, and window materials, respectively. Results are compared for the three materials, based on neutron spectra for NSNS and ATW spallation neutron sources, where the neutron fluxes are normalized to give the same flux of neutrons of all energies.

  19. Correlation of theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of damage around a shaft in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Holcomb, D.J.; DeVries, K.L.; Brodsky, N.S.

    1994-12-31

    Cross-hole ultrasonic measurements were made in the immediate wall of the Air Intake Shaft of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant facility. These measurements show that compressional wave speed markedly decreases at the shaft wall and then increases with radial distance from the shaft to eventually become that of solid or undamaged salt. This behavior is indicative of deformation damage or microfractures in the salt. These in situ data are compared to both laboratory measurements of wave speed as a function of volume dilatancy and to calculations based on the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, with reasonable agreement.

  20. Energy-Deposition and Damage Calculations in Core-Vessel Inserts at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.

    2002-06-25

    Heat-deposition and damage calculations are described for core-vessel inserts in the target area of the Spallation Neutron Source. Two separate designs for these inserts (or neutron beam tubes) were studied; a single-unit insert and a multi-unit insert. The single unit contains a neutron guide; the multi unit does not. Both units are constructed of stainless steel. For the single unit, separate studies were carried out with the guide composed of stainless steel, glass, and aluminum. Results are also reported for an aluminum window on the front of the insert, a layer of nickel on the guide, a cadmium shield surrounding the guide, and a stainless steel plug in the beam-tube opening. The locations of both inserts were the most forward positions to be occupied by each design respectively thus ensuring that the calculations are conservative.

  1. Fatigue Damage Spectrum calculation in a Mission Synthesis procedure for Sine-on-Random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Andrea; Cornelis, Bram; Troncossi, Marco

    2016-09-01

    In many real-life environments, certain mechanical and electronic components may be subjected to Sine-on-Random vibrations, i.e. excitations composed of random vibrations superimposed on deterministic (sinusoidal) contributions, in particular sine tones due to some rotating parts of the system (e.g. helicopters, engine-mounted components,...). These components must be designed to withstand the fatigue damage induced by the “composed” vibration environment, and qualification tests are advisable for the most critical ones. In the case of an accelerated qualification test, a proper test tailoring which starts from the real environment (measured vibration signals) and which preserves not only the accumulated fatigue damage but also the “nature” of the excitation (i.e. sinusoidal components plus random process) is important to obtain reliable results. In this paper, the classic time domain approach is taken as a reference for the comparison of different methods for the Fatigue Damage Spectrum (FDS) calculation in case of Sine-on-Random vibration environments. Then, a methodology to compute a Sine-on-Random specification based on a mission FDS is proposed.

  2. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ''biological Bragg curve'' is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta, et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called "overkill".

  3. SPENVIS Implementation of End-of-Life Solar Cell Calculations Using the Displacement Damage Dose Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Robert; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Warmer. Keffreu J/; Messenger, Scott; Lorentzen, Justin R.; Morton, Thomas; Taylor, Stephen J.; Evans, Hugh; Heynderickx, Daniel; Lei, Fan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for using the SPENVIS on-line computational suite to implement the displacement damage dose (D(sub d)) methodology for calculating end-of-life (EOL) solar cell performance for a specific space mission. This paper builds on our previous work that has validated the D(sub d) methodology against both measured space data [1,2] and calculations performed using the equivalent fluence methodology developed by NASA JPL [3]. For several years, the space solar community has considered general implementation of the D(sub d) method, but no computer program exists to enable this implementation. In a collaborative effort, NRL, NASA and OAI have produced the Solar Array Verification and Analysis Tool (SAVANT) under NASA funding, but this program has not progressed beyond the beta-stage [4]. The SPENVIS suite with the Multi Layered Shielding Simulation Software (MULASSIS) contains all of the necessary components to implement the Dd methodology in a format complementary to that of SAVANT [5]. NRL is currently working with ESA and BIRA to include the Dd method of solar cell EOL calculations as an integral part of SPENVIS. This paper describes how this can be accomplished.

  4. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the TRIGA MARK-II reactor in Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. W.; Böck, H.; Unfried, E.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1986-02-01

    In order to improve the source characterization of the reactor, especially for recent irradiation experiments in the central irradiation thimble, neutron activation experiments were made on 16 nuclides and the neutron flux spectrum was adjusted using the computer code STAY'SL. The results for the total, thermal and fast neutron flux density at a reactor power of 250 kW are as follows: 2.1 × 10 17, 6.1 × 10 16 ( E < 0.55 eV), 7.6 × 10 16 ( E > 0.1 MeV) and 4.0 × 10 16 ( E > 1 MeV) m -2 s -1. respectively. Calculated damage energy cross sections and gas production rates are presented for selected elements.

  5. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET g or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ‘‘biological Bragg curve’’ is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called “overkill”. F. A. Cucinotta, I. Plante, A. L. Ponomarev, and M. Y. Kim, Nuclear Interactions in Heavy Ion Transport and Event

  6. Upstream waves at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1992-01-01

    Weak, about 0.15 nT, narrow band emissions at the proton gyro frequency are observed by the Phobos magnetometer MAGMA, upstream from the bow shock of Mars. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized. They may be associated with the pick up of protons from the Martian hydrogen exosphere. Strong turbulence, similar to that observed at the terrestrial bow shock, is found on occasion in the upstream region when the IMF connects to the bow shock. On two occasions this turbulence occurred when the spacecraft crossed the orbit of Phobos. This coincidence raises the possibility that material in the orbits of Phobos interacts with the solar wind in such a way to either affect the direction of the IMF or to cause instabilities in the solar wind plasma. However, since on a third occasion these waves did not occur, these waves may be shock associated rather than Phobos associated.

  7. Upstream health law.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M; McIlhattan, Kelley

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, entrepreneurs are aggressively developing new technologies and business models designed to improve individual and population health, not just to deliver specialized medical care. Consumers of these goods and services are not yet "patients"; they are simply people. As this sector of the health care industry expands, it is likely to require new forms of legal governance, which we term "upstream health law." PMID:25565619

  8. Three-Dimensional Monte Carlo Computer Code System for Calculating Radiation Damage from Ion Beams.

    1983-06-01

    Version 00 HERAD was developed to study the effect of the microstructure on the range and damage of implanted ions in materials. Helpful to those looking at differences between theory and experiment, it predicts the range and damage in homogeneous or inhomogeneous materials, e.g., materials which contain voids, precipitates or bubbles.

  9. 2. STONE ARCH BRIDGE. TIMBERS ON THE UPSTREAM FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. STONE ARCH BRIDGE. TIMBERS ON THE UPSTREAM FACE OF THE PIER PROTECTED THE STONEWORK FROM DAMAGE FROM ICE FLOWS, BARGES, ETC. - Lockport Historic District, Stone Arch Bridge, Spanning Des Plaines River at Ninth Street, Lockport, Will County, IL

  10. Propagation and damping of broadband upstream whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Thomsen, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler-shift and whistler dispersion relation indicated that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a broad band. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wide-band whistlers using the sum of 7-drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 electron data. For 2 cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra is between 5 and 7 with a sharp lower frequency cutoff corresponding to a wavelength of about one ion inertial length. When the solar wind velocity is directed largely along the wave normal of the upstream whistlers the polariztion of the right hand waves becomes reversed and low frequencies are switched to high resulting in a peaked spectrum with a strong high frequency cutoff. The overall spectral, wave and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock as well as propagation and damping properties indicate that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities.

  11. Brine release based on structural calculations of damage around an excavation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Jensen, A.L.; Webb, S.W.; DeVries, K.L.

    1996-02-01

    In a large in situ experimntal circular room, brine inflow was measured over 5 years. After correcting for evaporation losses into mine ventilation air, the measurements gave data for a period of nearly 3 years. Predicted brine accumulation based on a mechanical ``snow plow`` model of the volume swept by creep-induced damage as calculated with the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model was found to agree with experiment. Calculation suggests the damage zone at 5 years effectively exends only some 0.7 m into the salt around the room. Also, because the mecahnical model of brine release gives an adequate explanation of the measured data, the hydrological process of brine flow appears to be rapid compared to the mechanical process of brine release.

  12. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this subchapter, the virtual increase in the vessel's vertical center of gravity due to liquids in... from the vertical; or (2) Calculating the shift of the center of gravity of the liquid in the tank...

  13. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this subchapter, the virtual increase in the vessel's vertical center of gravity due to liquids in... from the vertical; or (2) Calculating the shift of the center of gravity of the liquid in the tank...

  14. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... this subchapter, the virtual increase in the vessel's vertical center of gravity due to liquids in... from the vertical; or (2) Calculating the shift of the center of gravity of the liquid in the tank...

  15. Escape of heated ions upstream of quasi-parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmiston, J. P.; Kennel, C. F.; Eichler, D.

    1982-01-01

    A simple theoretical criterion by which quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks may be distinguished is proposed on the basis of an investigation of the free escape of ions from the post-shock plasma into the region upstream of a fast collisionless shock. It was determined that the accessibility of downstream ions to the upstream region depends on upstream magnetic field shock normal angle, in addition to the upstream plasma parameters, with post-shock ions escaping upstream for shock normal angles of less than 45 deg, in agreement with the observed transition between quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shock structure. Upstream ion distribution functions resembling those of observed intermediate ions and beams are also calculated.

  16. Admissible upstream conditions for slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Krause, E.; Menne, S.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of the compressibility on the flow in slender vortices is being studied. The dependence of the breakdown of the slender-vortex approximation on the upstream conditions is demonstrated for various Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. Compatibility conditions, which have to be satisfied if the vortex is to remain slender, are discussed in detail. The general discussions are supplemented by several sample calculations.

  17. Upstream reciprocity and the evolution of gratitude

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Martin A; Roch, Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    If someone is nice to you, you feel good and may be inclined to be nice to somebody else. This every day experience is borne out by experimental games: the recipients of an act of kindness are more likely to help in turn, even if the person who benefits from their generosity is somebody else. This behaviour, which has been called ‘upstream reciprocity’, appears to be a misdirected act of gratitude: you help somebody because somebody else has helped you. Does this make any sense from an evolutionary or a game theoretic perspective? In this paper, we show that upstream reciprocity alone does not lead to the evolution of cooperation, but it can evolve and increase the level of cooperation if it is linked to either direct or spatial reciprocity. We calculate the random walks of altruistic acts that are induced by upstream reciprocity. Our analysis shows that gratitude and other positive emotions, which increase the willingness to help others, can evolve in the competitive world of natural selection. PMID:17254983

  18. Upstream reciprocity and the evolution of gratitude.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Martin A; Roch, Sébastien

    2007-03-01

    If someone is nice to you, you feel good and may be inclined to be nice to somebody else. This every day experience is borne out by experimental games: the recipients of an act of kindness are more likely to help in turn, even if the person who benefits from their generosity is somebody else. This behaviour, which has been called 'upstream reciprocity', appears to be a misdirected act of gratitude: you help somebody because somebody else has helped you. Does this make any sense from an evolutionary or a game theoretic perspective? In this paper, we show that upstream reciprocity alone does not lead to the evolution of cooperation, but it can evolve and increase the level of cooperation if it is linked to either direct or spatial reciprocity. We calculate the random walks of altruistic acts that are induced by upstream reciprocity. Our analysis shows that gratitude and other positive emotions, which increase the willingness to help others, can evolve in the competitive world of natural selection.

  19. Upstream Swimming in Microbiological Flows.

    PubMed

    Mathijssen, Arnold J T M; Shendruk, Tyler N; Yeomans, Julia M; Doostmohammadi, Amin

    2016-01-15

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centerline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed. PMID:26824571

  20. 42. VIEW OF STAGE RECORDER AT END OF UPSTREAM GUIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. VIEW OF STAGE RECORDER AT END OF UPSTREAM GUIDE WALL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. (Several hours after this view was taken, the stage recorder was hit a~d heavily damaged by a grain barge.) - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  1. Upstream reciprocity in heterogeneous networks.

    PubMed

    Iwagami, Akio; Masuda, Naoki

    2010-08-01

    Many mechanisms for the emergence and maintenance of altruistic behavior in social dilemma situations have been proposed. Indirect reciprocity is one such mechanism, where other-regarding actions of a player are eventually rewarded by other players with whom the original player has not interacted. The upstream reciprocity (also called generalized indirect reciprocity) is a type of indirect reciprocity and represents the concept that those helped by somebody will help other unspecified players. In spite of the evidence for the enhancement of helping behavior by upstream reciprocity in rats and humans, theoretical support for this mechanism is not strong. In the present study, we numerically investigate upstream reciprocity in heterogeneous contact networks, in which the players generally have different number of neighbors. We show that heterogeneous networks considerably enhance cooperation in a game of upstream reciprocity. In heterogeneous networks, the most generous strategy, by which a player helps a neighbor on being helped and in addition initiates helping behavior, first occupies hubs in a network and then disseminates to other players. The scenario to achieve enhanced altruism resembles that seen in the case of the Prisoner's Dilemma game in heterogeneous networks.

  2. Spectrum of Radiation-Induced Clustered Non-DSB Damage - A Monte Carlo Track Structure Modeling and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ritsuko; Rahmanian, Shirin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present the spectrum of initial radiation-induced cellular DNA damage [with particular focus on non-double-strand break (DSB) damage] generated by computer simulations. The radiation types modeled in this study were monoenergetic electrons (100 eV-1.5 keV), ultrasoft X-ray photons Ck, AlK and TiK, as well as some selected ions including 3.2 MeV/u proton; 0.74 and 2.4 MeV/u helium ions; 29 MeV/u nitrogen ions and 950 MeV/u iron ions. Monte Carlo track structure methods were used to simulate damage induction by these radiation types in a cell-mimetic condition from a single-track action. The simulations took into account the action of direct energy deposition events and the reaction of hydroxyl radicals on atomistic linear B-DNA segments of a few helical turns including the water of hydration. Our results permitted the following conclusions: a. The absolute levels of different types of damage [base damage, simple and complex single-strand breaks (SSBs) and DSBs] vary depending on the radiation type; b. Within each damage class, the relative proportions of simple and complex damage vary with radiation type, the latter being higher with high-LET radiations; c. Overall, for both low- and high-LET radiations, the ratios of the yields of base damage to SSBs are similar, being about 3.0 ± 0.2; d. Base damage contributes more to the complexity of both SSBs and DSBs, than additional SSB damage and this is true for both low- and high-LET radiations; and e. The average SSB/DSB ratio for low-LET radiations is about 18, which is about 5 times higher than that for high-LET radiations. The hypothesis that clustered DNA damage is more difficult for cells to repair has gained currency among radiobiologists. However, as yet, there is no direct in vivo experimental method to validate the dependence of kinetics of DNA repair on DNA damage complexity (both DSB and non-DSB types). The data on the detailed spectrum of DNA damage presented here, in particular

  3. Upstream/downstream: Issues in environmental ethics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, D.

    1991-01-01

    Upstream/Downstream reminds us that there are four issues that are more or less distinctive to environmental ethics. First, and most distinctively, environmental issues involve the standing of nonhuman living things and systems. Thus, environmental politics is only partly a clash among the interest of the parties involved; it often involves actions on behalf of the existence rights of nonhuman life forms. Second, environmental ethics concern the intergenerational distribution of benefits more explicitly than do most other ethical issues, which brings out serious weaknesses in legal frameworks that rely on claims for damages. Third, the complexity and indirectness of many environmental impacts introduces a high degree of uncertainty and thus technical as well as ethical issues of prudent behavior. Specifically, where science may not fully reveal environmental risks, should development proceed; should analysis proceed if it is known to have a Pollyanna bias Fourth, insofar as environmental damage is typically done to common property, and thus its regulation is generally a matter for governmental regulation, the obligations of private actors to make sacrifices beyond what government requires is at issue - an issue that one would expect to be taken up at length in the other volumes.

  4. Two-Dimensional Potentials of Mean Force of Nile Red in Intact and Damaged Model Bilayers. Application to Calculations of Fluorescence Spectra.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Chamberlin, Adam C; Zhekova, Hristina R; Noskov, Sergei Y; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-01-12

    Fluorescent dyes revolutionized and expanded our understanding of biological membranes. The interpretation of experimental fluorescence data in terms of membrane structure, however, requires detailed information about the molecular environment of the dyes. Nile red is a fluorescent molecule whose excitation and emission maxima depend on the polarity of the solvent. It is mainly used as a probe to study lipid microenvironments, for example in imaging the progression of damage to the myelin sheath in multiple sclerosis. In this study, we determine the position and orientation of Nile red in lipid bilayers by calculating two-dimensional Potential of Mean Force (2D-PMF) profiles in a defect-free 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer and in damaged bilayers containing two mixtures of the oxidized lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and POPC. From 2D-PMF simulations we obtain positions and orientations of Nile Red corresponding to the minimum on the binding free energy surface in three different membrane environments with increasing amounts of water, mimicking damage in biological tissue. Using representative snapshots from the simulations, we use combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) models to calculate the emission spectrum of Nile red as a function of its local solvation environment. The results of QM and QM/MM computations are in qualitative agreement with the experimentally observed shift in fluorescence for the dye moving from aqueous solution to the more hydrophobic environment of the lipid interiors. The range of the conformation dependent values of the computed absorption-emission spectra and the lack of solvent relaxation effects in the QM/MM calculations made it challenging to delineate specific differences between the intact and damaged bilayers.

  5. Upstream Waves and Particles at the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Halekas, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter presents an up-to-date catalog of Moon-related particle populations and lunar upstream waves obtained from in situ measurements at low (<˜100 km) and high altitudes, aimed at organizing and clarifying the currently available information on this complex region, where multiple categories of waves and particles coexist. It then briefly outlines the observed properties of a variety of classes of lunar upstream waves, as well as their generation mechanisms currently proposed, in association with the lunar upstream particle distributions. The lunar upstream region magnetically connected to the Moon and its wake, the fore-moon, represents a remarkably rich zoo of different classes of waves and different types of particles. Although recent observations have substantially enhanced our knowledge by revealing a number of new categories of upstream particles and waves at the Moon, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, and these are outlined in the chapter.

  6. Neutron dosimetry, damage calculations, and helium measurements for the HFIR-MFE-60J-1 and MFE-330J-1 spectral tailoring experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.; Oliver, B.M.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to provide dosimetry and damage analysis for fusion materials irradiation experiments. Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US -Japanese MFE-60J-1 and MFE-330J-1 experiments in the hafnium-lined removable beryllium (RB{sup *}) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These experiments were continuations of the ORR-6J and 7J irradiations performed in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The combination of irradiations was designed to tailor the neutron spectrum in order to achieve fusion reactor helium/dpa levels in stainless steel. These experiments produced maximum helium (appm)/dpa(displacement per atom) levels of 10.2 at 18.5 dpa for the ORR-6J and HFIR-MFE-60J-1 combination and 11.8 at 19.0 dpa for the ORR-7J and HFIR-MFE-330J-1 combination. A helium measurement in one JPCA sample was in good agreement with helium calculations.

  7. A study of pump cavitation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-11-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  8. Direct Upstream Motility in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Tolga; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We provide an experimental demonstration of positive rheotaxis (rapid and continuous upstream motility) in wild-type Escherichia coli freely swimming over a surface. This hydrodynamic phenomenon is dominant below a critical shear rate and robust against Brownian motion and cell tumbling. We deduce that individual bacteria entering a flow system can rapidly migrate upstream (>20 μm/s) much faster than a gradually advancing biofilm. Given a bacterial population with a distribution of sizes and swim speeds, local shear rate near the surface determines the dominant hydrodynamic mode for motility, i.e., circular or random trajectories for low shear rates, positive rheotaxis for moderate flow, and sideways swimming at higher shear rates. Faster swimmers can move upstream more rapidly and at higher shear rates, as expected. Interestingly, we also find on average that both swim speed and upstream motility are independent of cell aspect ratio. PMID:22500751

  9. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in Monolith Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, this work demonstrates a concept called back-end ignition for lighting-off and pre-heating a catalytic monolith in a power generation system. In this concept, a downstream heat source (e.g. a flame) or resistive heating in the downstream portion of the monolith initiates a localized catalytic reaction which subsequently propagates upstream and heats the entire monolith. The simulations used a transient numerical model of a single catalytic channel which characterizes the behavior of the entire monolith. The model treats both the gas and solid phases and includes detailed homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. An important parameter in the model for back-end ignition is upstream heat conduction along the solid. The simulations used both dry and wet CO chemistry as a model fuel for the proof-of-concept calculations; the presence of water vapor can trigger homogenous reactions, provided that gas-phase temperatures are adequately high and there is sufficient fuel remaining after surface reactions. With sufficiently high inlet equivalence ratio, back-end ignition occurs using the thermophysical properties of both a ceramic and metal monolith (coated with platinum in both cases), with the heat-up times significantly faster for the metal monolith. For lower equivalence ratios, back-end ignition occurs without upstream propagation. Once light-off and propagation occur, the inlet equivalence ratio could be reduced significantly while still maintaining an ignited monolith as demonstrated by calculations using complete monolith heating.

  10. Calculations of the displacement damage and short-circuit current degradation in proton irradiated (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C. S.; Li, S. S.; Loo, R. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical model for computing the displacement damage defect density and the short-circuit current (I sub sc) degradation in proton-irradiated (AlGa)As-GaAs p-n junction solar cells is presented. Assumptions were made with justification that the radiation induced displacement defects form an effective recombination center which controls the electron and hole lifetimes in the junction space charge region and in the n-GaAs active layer of the irradiated GaAs p-n junction cells. The degradation of I sub sc in the (AlGa)As layer was found to be negligible compared to the total degradation. In order to determine the I sub sc degradation, the displacement defect density, path length, range, reduced energy after penetrating a distance x, and the average number of displacements formed by one proton scattering event were first calculated. The I sub sc degradation was calculated by using the electron capture cross section in the p-diffused layer and the hole capture cross section in the n-base layer as well as the wavelength dependent absorption coefficients. Excellent agreement was found between the researchers calculated values and the measured I sub sc in the proton irradiated GaAs solar cells for proton energies of 100 KeV to 10 MeV and fluences from 10 to the 10th power p/square cm to 10 to the 12th power p/square cm.

  11. Upstream Structural Management Measures for an Urban Area Flooding in Turkey and their Consequences on Flood Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyurek, Z.; Bozoglu, B.; Girayhan, T.

    2015-12-01

    Flooding has the potential to cause significant impacts to economic activities as well as to disrupt or displace populations. Changing climate regimes such as extreme precipitation events increase flood vulnerability and put additional stresses on infrastructure. In this study the flood modelling in an urbanized area, namely Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is done. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2- dimensional shallow water flow modelling. 1/1000 scaled maps with the buildings for the urbanized area and 1/5000 scaled maps for the rural parts are used to obtain DTM needed in the flood modelling. The bathymetry of the river is obtained from additional surveys. The main river passing through the urbanized area has a capacity of Q5 according to the design discharge obtained by simple ungauged discharge estimation depending on catchment area only. The effects of the available structures like bridges across the river on the flooding are presented. The upstream structural measures are studied on scenario basis. Four sub-catchments of Terme River are considered as contributing the downstream flooding. The existing circumstance of the Terme River states that the meanders of the river have a major effect on the flood situation and lead to approximately 35% reduction in the peak discharge between upstream and downstream of the river. It is observed that if the flow from the upstream catchments can be retarded through a detention pond constructed in at least two of the upstream catchments, estimated Q100 flood can be conveyed by the river without overtopping from the river channel. The operation of the upstream detention ponds and the scenarios to convey Q500 without causing flooding are also presented. Structural management measures to address changes in flood characteristics in water management planning are discussed. Flood risk is obtained by using the flood hazard maps and water depth-damage functions plotted for a variety of building types and occupancies

  12. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5 - 4 Hz were studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock using data from the fluxgate magnetic field experiment on IMP-6. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a three month interval indicates that amplitudes are generally less than 1 or 2 gammas and propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 degrees with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left or right hand polarized with respect to the average field direction. It is concluded that the observed waves are right handed waves in the plasma frame of reference with wavelengths of approximately 100 km propagating upstream in the whistler mode. Doppler shifting reduces the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame and reverses the observed polarization for those waves propagating more directly upstream. Similar waves are seen ahead of most interplanetary shocks.

  13. Real-Time Continuous Response Spectra Exceedance Calculation Displayed in a Web-Browser Enables Rapid and Robust Damage Evaluation by First Responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, M.; Skolnik, D. A.; Harvey, D.; Lindquist, K.

    2014-12-01

    A novel and robust approach is presented that provides near real-time earthquake alarms for critical structures at distributed locations and large facilities using real-time estimation of response spectra obtained from near free-field motions. Influential studies dating back to the 1980s identified spectral response acceleration as a key ground motion characteristic that correlates well with observed damage in structures. Thus, monitoring and reporting on exceedance of spectra-based thresholds are useful tools for assessing the potential for damage to facilities or multi-structure campuses based on input ground motions only. With as little as one strong-motion station per site, this scalable approach can provide rapid alarms on the damage status of remote towns, critical infrastructure (e.g., hospitals, schools) and points of interests (e.g., bridges) for a very large number of locations enabling better rapid decision making during critical and difficult immediate post-earthquake response actions. Details on the novel approach are presented along with an example implementation for a large energy company. Real-time calculation of PSA exceedance and alarm dissemination are enabled with Bighorn, an extension module based on the Antelope software package that combines real-time spectral monitoring and alarm capabilities with a robust built-in web display server. Antelope is an environmental data collection software package from Boulder Real Time Technologies (BRTT) typically used for very large seismic networks and real-time seismic data analyses. The primary processing engine produces continuous time-dependent response spectra for incoming acceleration streams. It utilizes expanded floating-point data representations within object ring-buffer packets and waveform files in a relational database. This leads to a very fast method for computing response spectra for a large number of channels. A Python script evaluates these response spectra for exceedance of one or more

  14. High time resolution studies of upstream ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.; Levedahl, W. K.; Lin, R. P.; Parks, G. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of phi, the angle between the interplanetary magnetic field and the earth-sun vector on ions and electrons in the earth's bow shock, was investigated in terms of ISEE 2 data. A small phi was associated with intermediate energy upstream ions and reduced populations of low energy, about 1.6 keV, ion fluxes. The magnitude of phi was closely related to particular, constant energy levels, e.g., a phi of 40 deg and an energy of 30 keV and a phi of 75 deg and an energy of 6 keV. Ion fluxes are high in the angles form 60-80 deg and feature energies of 55-280 keV. The acceleration process up to the high energy levels in the 1-3 min interval from upstream to downstream occurs more rapidly than could be accounted for by a first-order Fermi process.

  15. Effect of upstream ponds on stream temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J.; Toran, L.; Cruz, J.

    2006-05-01

    Many tributaries feeding streams are connected to ponds that heat up during summer months; however, the influence of these ponds on receiving stream temperature was not known. Stream temperature affects microfauna and fish habitats in aquatic ecosystems. Three tributaries with headwater ponds exposed to sunlight and one tributary unassociated with a large, upstream pond were selected for study within the Pennypack Creek watershed in the Philadelphia Metropolitan Area. Temperature loggers were installed in the pond (when applicable), associated tributary, and in the Pennypack Creek up and downstream of its confluence with the tributary. Although diurnal temperature fluctuations were apparent, the study showed no significant differences in temperature up and downstream of tributary discharge to Pennypack Creek. Pond water temperatures were up to 4°C warmer than the Pennypack Creek; however, temperatures downstream and upstream of the tributaries leading out of the ponds were within 1°C of each other.

  16. Upstream Design and 1D-CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroyuki

    Recently, engineering design environment of Japan is changing variously. Manufacturing companies are being challenged to design and bring out products that meet the diverse demands of customers and are competitive against those produced by rising countries(1). In order to keep and strengthen the competitiveness of Japanese companies, it is necessary to create new added values as well as conventional ones. It is well known that design at the early stages has a great influence on the final design solution. Therefore, design support tools for the upstream design is necessary for creating new added values. We have established a research society for 1D-CAE (1 Dimensional Computer Aided Engineering)(2), which is a general term for idea, methodology and tools applicable for the upstream design support, and discuss the concept and definition of 1D-CAE. This paper reports our discussion about 1D-CAE.

  17. Upgrade of the Upstream Tracker at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Jason; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to allow it operate at higher collider luminosity without the need for a hardware trigger stage. Flavor enriched events will be selected in a software based, high level trigger, using fully reconstructed events. This presentation will describe the design, optimization and the expected performance of the Upstream Tracker (UT), which has a critical role in high level trigger scheme.

  18. Physical models implemented in the GEANT4-DNA extension of the GEANT-4 toolkit for calculating initial radiation damage at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Villagrasa, C; Francis, Z; Incerti, S

    2011-02-01

    The ROSIRIS project aims to study the radiobiology of integrated systems for medical treatment optimisation using ionising radiations and evaluate the associated risk. In the framework of this project, one research focus is the interpretation of the initial radio-induced damage in DNA created by ionising radiation (and detected by γ-H2AX foci analysis) from the track structure of the incident particles. In order to calculate the track structure of ionising particles at a nanometric level, the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit was used. Geant4 (Object Oriented Programming Architecture in C++) offers a common platform, available free to all users and relatively easy to use. Nevertheless, the current low-energy threshold for electromagnetic processes in GEANT4 is set to 1 keV (250 eV using the Livermore processes), which is an unsuitable value for nanometric applications. To lower this energy threshold, the necessary interaction processes and models were identified, and the corresponding available cross sections collected from the literature. They are mostly based on the plane-wave Born approximation (first Born approximation, or FBA) for inelastic interactions and on semi-empirical models for energies where the FBA fails (at low energies). In this paper, the extensions that have been introduced into the 9.3 release of the Geant4 toolkit are described, the so-called Geant4-DNA extension, including a set of processes and models adapted in this study and permitting the simulation of electron (8 eV-1 MeV), proton (100 eV-100 MeV) and alpha particle (1 keV-10 MeV) interactions in liquid water. PMID:21186212

  19. Upstream waves at Mars - Phobos observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1990-01-01

    The region upstream from the Mars subsolar bow shock is surveyed for the presence of MHD wave phenomena using the high temporal resolution data from the Magma magnetometer. Strong turbulence is observed when the magnetic field is connected to the Mars bow shock in such a way as to allow diffuse ions to reach the spacecraft. Also weak waves are observed at the proton gyro frequency. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized and may be associated with the pick-up of protons from the Mars hydrogen exosphere.

  20. The upstream tracker for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb collaboration is planning a comprehensive upgrade of the experiment for the long shutdown of the LHC in 2019/20. As part of this upgrade, the tracking station in front of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by a new planar four-layer silicon micro-strip detector with 40 MHz readout and silicon sensors with finer granularity and improved radiation hardness. Key design aspects of this new Upstream Tracker are described and a brief overview of the status of the project is given.

  1. Upstream waves at Mars - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Yeroshenko, Ye.

    1990-05-01

    The region upstream from the Mars subsolar bow shock is surveyed for the presence of MHD wave phenomena using the high temporal resolution data from the Magma magnetometer. Strong turbulence is observed when the magnetic field is connected to the Mars bow shock in such a way as to allow diffuse ions to reach the spacecraft. Also weak waves are observed at the proton gyro frequency. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized and may be associated with the pick-up of protons from the Mars hydrogen exosphere.

  2. Upstream waves at Mars: Phobos observations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G. ); Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W. ); Yeroshenko, Ye. )

    1990-05-01

    The region upstream from the Mars subsolar bow shock is surveyed for the presence of MHD wave phenomena using the high temporal resolution data from the MAGMA magnetometer. Strong turbulence is observed when the magnetic field is connected to the Mars bow shock in such a way as to allow diffuse ions to reach the spacecraft. On 2 occasions this turbulence occurred upon crossing the Phobos orbit. Also weak, {minus}0.15 nT, waves are observed at the proton gyro frequency. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized and may be associated with the pick-up of protons from the Mars hydrogen exosphere.

  3. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  4. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-06-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest damage. First we show that in the powder regime, although the applied impact pressures can be small, large bending moments in the tree stem can be produced due to the torque action of the blast. The impact area of the blast extends over the entire tree crown. We find that, powder clouds with velocities over 20 m s-1 can break tree stems. Second we demonstrate that intermittent granular loadings are equivalent to low-density uniform dry snow loadings under the assumption of homogeneous particle distributions. The intermittent regime seldom controls tree breakage. Third we calculate quasi-static pressures of wet snow avalanches and show that they can be much higher than pressures calculated using dynamic pressure formulas. Wet snow pressure depends both on avalanche volume and terrain features upstream of the tree.

  5. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-01-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. In the powder regime, the blast of the cloud can produce large bending moments in the tree stem because of the impact area extending over the entire tree crown. We demonstrate that intermittent granular loadings are equivalent to low-density uniform dry snow loadings under the assumption of homogeneous particle distributions. In the wet snow case, avalanche pressure is calculated using a quasi-static model accounting for the motion of plug-like wet snow flows. Wet snow pressure depends both on avalanche volume and terrain features upstream of the tree. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest damage. We find (1) powder clouds with velocities over 20 m s-1 can break tree stems, (2) the intermittent regime seldom controls tree breakage and (3) quasi-static pressures of wet snow avalanches can be much higher than pressures calculated using dynamic pressure formulas.

  6. Solar wind flow upstream of the coronal slow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1986-01-01

    Slow shocks have been predicted to exist embedded in large coronal holes at low altitude. Two or more curved slow shocks may link together to form a composite discontinuity surface around the sun which may be called the coronal slow shock (CSS). Here a solar-wind model is studied under the assumption that a standing CSS exists and cororates with the sun at a constant angular velocity. A steady, axisymmetrical one-fluid model is introduced to study the expansion of solar wind in the open-field region upstream of the CSS. The model requires that the conditions downstream of the CSS near the equatorial plane can produce a solar wind agreeable with the observations made near the earth's orbit. The paper presents an illustrative calculation in which the polar caps within 60 deg of the polar angle are assumed to be the source region of the solar wind.

  7. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  8. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-07-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  9. Moving stormwater P management upstream (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. A.; Hobbie, S. E.; Finlay, J. C.; Kalinosky, P.; Janke, B.

    2013-12-01

    Reducing stormwater phosphorus loading using current approaches, which focus on treatment at the end of the pipe, is unlikely to reduce P loads enough to restore nutrient-impaired urban lakes. An indication of this is that of the nearly 150 nutrient impaired lakes in the Twin Cities region, only one has been restored. We hypothesize that substantial reduction of eutrophication will require reductions of P inputs upstream from storm drains. Developing source reduction strategies will required a shift in thinking about system boundaries, moving upstream from the storm drain to the curb, and from the curb to the watershed. Our Prior Lake Street Sweeping Project, a 2-year study of enhanced street sweeping, will be used to illustrate the idea of moving the system boundary to the curb. This study showed that P load recovery from sweeping increases with both sweeping frequency and overhead tree canopy cover. For high canopy streets, coarse organic material (tree leaves; seed pods, etc.) comprised 42% of swept material. We estimate that P inputs from trees may be half of measured storm P yields in 8 urban catchments in St. Paul, MN. Moreover, the cost of removing P during autumn was often < 100/pound P, compared with > 1000/lb P for stormwater ponds. We can also move further upstream, to the watershed boundary. P inputs to urban watersheds that enter lawns include lawn fertilizer, polyphosphates added to water supplies (and hence to lawns via irrigation), and pet food (transformed to pet waste). Minnesota enacted a lawn P fertilizer restriction in 2003, but early reductions in stormwater P loads were modest, probably reflecting reduction in direct wash-off of applied fertilizer. Because urban soils are enriched in P, growing turf has continued to extract available soil P. When turf is mowed, cut grass decomposes, generating P in runoff. As soil P becomes depleted, P concentrations in lawn runoff will gradually decline. Preliminary modeling suggests that substantial

  10. Structural polymers in upstream production service

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, J.P.; Lustiger, A.; Chang, J.; Abrams, P.I.; Chiu, A.S.

    1993-12-31

    Polymers in the form of coatings, seals and composites for corrosion resistant and secondary load-bearing applications have been used in oilfield production operations for a number of years in specialty applications. The increasing needs of the industry for corrosion resistant piping, and for structural components combining corrosion resistance with high specific strength and weight, have now made the potential for use of polymer composites of increasing interest, for pipe and tubing and for load-bearing structural members. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of structural polymer usage in the upstream, and to highlight major application areas where there is a strong economic incentive to evaluate the benefits for applying polymer composite. In addition, the underlying science and technology affecting composite properties, application life, environmental resistance and economics are assessed, since these issues need to be addressed in considering the decision to design-in composites, as compared to commonly used metals and alloys.

  11. Dynamics of intense upstream ion events

    SciTech Connect

    Wibberenz, G.; Zoellich, F.; Fischer, H.M.; Keppler, E.

    1985-01-01

    We study temporal structures, energy spectra, and spatial gradients of 25--70 keV protons during four intense upstream ion events observed on December 3, 1977, by the medium-energy particle telescope (KED) on ISEE 2. The strong role of the bow shock connection time in controlling the absolute intensity and spectral shape of the upstream ions is confirmed. The path along which the convected magnetic field is carried on the bow shock surface has no observable influence. During the plateau phases, we determine a field-aligned gradient pointing toward the bow shock with an e-folding distance L = 6.5 +- 1.5 R/sub E/ for roughly-equal30 keV protons. The combination with anisotropy data leads to a direct determination of the mean free path lambda/sub parallel/ = 2.6 +- 0.6 R/sub E/. A gradient perpendicular to the magnetic field points toward the nose of the bow shock with a north-south component of about 6%/R/sub E/. Its conversion to a spatial scale allows to estimate the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. We conclude that lateral diffusion is not the main escape mechanism which determines the exponential energy spectrum. The control of the acceleration efficiency by local characteristics of the bow shock is suggested by various observations: (1) fluctuations on a temporal scale of about 20 min and with a peak-to-peak amplitude of about 50% superimposed on the plateau phases; (2) structured onsets of events during smoothly improving connection conditions; (3) strong intensity modulation during marginal acceleration conditions when the connection time is of the order 10 to 12 min; (4) convection of differently populated field lines across the observer.

  12. Biotic integrity of the Boise River upstream and downstream from two municipal wastewater treatment facilities, Boise, Idaho, 1995-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, William H.

    1999-01-01

    Aquatic biological communities were used to assess the biotic integrity of the Boise River upstream and downstream from the Lander Street and West Boise municipal wastewater treatment facilities (WTFs) in Boise, Idaho. Samples of epilithic periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected in late February and early March 1995, in late October 1996, and in early December 1996. Epilithic periphyton biomass, expressed as chlorophyll-a and ash-free dry weight, declined substantially between 1995 and 1996. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were higher at sites downstream from WTFs in both years, but differences in concentrations between sites upstream and downstream from WTFs were not statistically significant. High withinsite variance suggests that greater sampling intensity would improve statistical comparison. Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) scores calculated for benthic macroinvertebrates were higher for the sites upstream from WTFs in 1995 and were the same for all sites in 1996. Similarly, IBI scores calculated for fish were higher for the sites upstream from WTFs in 1995, were higher for the site upstream from the Lander Street WTF in 1996, and were the same for sites upstream and downstream from the West Boise WTF in 1996. Two species of sculpin (Cottus) were abundant at the site upstream from both WTFs but were absent at all other sites downstream from WTFs in 1995 and composed only 2 percent of the total number of fish collected downstream from the Lander Street WTF in 1996.

  13. Water stress in global transboundary river basins: significance of upstream water use on downstream stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka, M.; Wada, Y.; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analysed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world’s transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. We found that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  14. Water Stress in Global Transboundary River Basins: Significance of Upstream Water Use on Downstream Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka,M.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analyzed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world's transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. Wefound that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  15. A partnership in upstream HSE technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, R.E. Wahjosoedibjo, A.S.; Hunley, M.; Peargin, J.C.

    1996-11-01

    The oil and gas industry was for nearly two decades the dominant force in the Indonesian economy and the single largest contributor to the nation`s development. Because of the success of Indonesia`s long-term development and diversification program, this once-dominant sector today occupies a more equal but still vital position in a better-balanced economy. The Indonesian government understands the danger to the environment posed by rapid industrial expansion and has enacted laws and regulations to ensure the sustainable development of its resources while protecting its rain forest environment. In 1992, the government oil company approached Chevron and Texaco for assistance in training its Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) professionals. The upstream environment, health and safety training program was developed to transfer HSE knowledge and technology to PERTAMINA, PT Caltex Pacific Indonesia, a C&T affiliate, and indirectly, to the entire Indonesian oil and gas industry and government ministries. The four companies have demonstrated the effectiveness of a partnership approach in developing and carrying out HSE training. During 1994 and 1995, four groups, each consisting of about twenty representatives from PERTAMINA, the Directorate of Oil and Gas (MIGAS), the Indonesian Environmental Impact Management Agency (BAPEDAL), CPI, and Chevron and Texaco worldwide subsidiaries, traveled to the United States for an intensive four-month program of study in HSE best practices and technology conducted by Chevron and Texaco experts. This paper describes the development and realization of The PERTAMINA/CPI Health, Safety and Environment Training Program, outlines subjects covered and explains the methodology used to ensure the effective transfer of HSE knowledge and technology. The paper also offers an evaluation of the sessions and presents the plans developed by participant-teams for follow up on their return to Indonesia.

  16. 14. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM BETWEEN BUTTRESSES 8 AND 9, AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM BETWEEN BUTTRESSES 8 AND 9, AT COMPLETED OUTLET CHANNEL PAVING. NOTE SLIDE GATE OUTLET STRUCTURE AT UPSTREAM END OF PAVING, AND NEEDLE VALVE OUTLETS AT RIGHT. September 9, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. Low Frequency Waves at and Upstream of Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. B.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on the range of low frequency electromagnetic modes observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. It discusses a specific class of whistler mode wave observed immediately upstream of collisionless shock ramps, called a whistler precursor. Though these modes have been (and are often) observed upstream of quasi-parallel shocks, the authors limit their discussion to those observed upstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. The chapter discusses the various ion velocity distributions observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks. It also introduces some terminology and relevant instabilities for ion foreshock waves. The chapter discusses the most common ultra-low frequency (ULF) wave types, their properties, and their free energy sources. It discusses modes that are mostly Alfvénic (i.e., mostly transverse but can be compressive) in nature.

  18. Suprathermal ions observed upstream of the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, K. R.; Mccomas, D. J.; Russell, C. T.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    Suprathermal ions with arrival directions quite distinct from those of the solar wind have been detected upstream of the Venus bow shock. The possibility that these events could be caused by instrumental or spacecraft effects or that they could be either solar wind disturbances, planetary pickup ions, or suprethermal ions upstream of the Venus bow shock is examined. It is concluded that they are consistent with upstream suprathermal ions associated with the bow shock that are observed downstream from the points of intersection of their extrapolated trajectories with the shock.

  19. An analysis of pump cavitation damage. [Space Shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  20. A study of pump cavitation damage. [space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  1. 2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. NOTE BANK REINFORCEMENT ON LEFT AND SPILLWAY ON RIGHT. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  2. 65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT COMPANY'S NEISSON CREEK SAWMILL. Print No. 177, November 1903 - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  3. 18. VIEW OF SETTLING BASIN FROM UPSTREAM TRESTLE, SHOWING BULKHEAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF SETTLING BASIN FROM UPSTREAM TRESTLE, SHOWING BULKHEAD ON RIGHT AND SAND BANK ON LEFT, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  4. 41. Upstream end of emergency spillway excavation. Photographer unknown, 1929. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Upstream end of emergency spillway excavation. Photographer unknown, 1929. Source: Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR). - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a cloudless sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  6. 7. Detail view of reinforced concrete archrings comprising dam's upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view of reinforced concrete arch-rings comprising dam's upstream face. Impressions of the wooden formwork used in construction are visible in the concrete. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 3. General view of upstream face, looking northwest. Spillway is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of upstream face, looking northwest. Spillway is at the far end of the dam. The Antelope Valley is visible in center background. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL (LEFT) AND ENTRANCE TO DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL HEADWORKS (ALSO LEFT). VIEW TO WEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  9. 6. VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA, SHOWING CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA, SHOWING CONCRETE BEING PLACED. PENSTOCK OPENINGS ARE VISIBLE AT CENTER LEFT. August 24, 1926 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  11. 4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  12. 2. VIEW OF MAIN STORAGE RESERVOIR, SHOWING UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF MAIN STORAGE RESERVOIR, SHOWING UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND DISCHARGE GATE (LEFT), LOOKING SOUTHWEST (October 1991) - Bonanza Hydraulic Mining Site, Main Storage Reservoir, Swamp Gulch, Salmon, Lemhi County, ID

  13. 11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM CATWALK, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP) AND GEAR SHAFTS (BOTTOM). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  14. 5. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST, LOOKING UPSTREAM (NORTHWEST), ACROSS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST, LOOKING UPSTREAM (NORTHWEST), ACROSS THE ROADWAY OF BRIDGE 808 - Wagamon Pond Dam & Bridge, Spanning Broadkill River at State Road No. 197 (Mulberry Street), Milton, Sussex County, DE

  15. 14. VIEW NORTHEASTWARD OF THE UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW NORTHEASTWARD OF THE UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF THE PENSTOCK (HEADRACE) BRIDGE - Wagamon Pond Dam & Bridge, Spanning Broadkill River at State Road No. 197 (Mulberry Street), Milton, Sussex County, DE

  16. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWWATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOW-WATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ROCKS BRIDGE AND ST. LOUIS WATER DEPARTMENT INTAKE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  17. 7. Chandler Falls, looking upstream (from north). Golf tee of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Chandler Falls, looking upstream (from north). Golf tee of the Mesa Country Club on right. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Unit 5, upstream toward incline bridge Johnstown Local Flood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 5, upstream toward incline bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  19. Unit 6, upstream from Hickory Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 6, upstream from Hickory Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  20. Unit 3, upstream from footbridge Johnstown Local Flood Protection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 3, upstream from footbridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  1. Unit 4, upstream from Johns Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 4, upstream from Johns Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  2. 56. Upstream face of diversion dam looking east. Headgates are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Upstream face of diversion dam looking east. Headgates are partially visible at far left. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  3. 23. Upstream view of buttress and arch form work and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Upstream view of buttress and arch form work and construction. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. 50. Upstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing sluice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Upstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing sluice opening. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 19. Upstream face of arches and buttresses at west end. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Upstream face of arches and buttresses at west end. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. 30. Upstream face of construction effort. Photographer unknown, January 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Upstream face of construction effort. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: Fritz Seifritz. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. 7. DETAIL CENTRAL PIER (SKEWBACK) WITH BREAKWATER, UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL CENTRAL PIER (SKEWBACK) WITH BREAKWATER, UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDE. NOTE FRACTURES ALONG BARREL ARCH EXTRADOS. - Roaring Creek Bridge, State Road 2005 spanning Roaring Creek in Locust Township, Slabtown, Columbia County, PA

  8. 8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE COFFERDAM NEAR STATION (September 1936) - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 13, Upper Mississippi River, Fulton, Whiteside County, IL

  9. 4. SPILLWAY DRUM GATES AND CHANNEL, LOOKING NORTHEAST (upstream face ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SPILLWAY DRUM GATES AND CHANNEL, LOOKING NORTHEAST (upstream face and Control House in background) - Tieton Dam, Spillway & Drum Gates, South & East side of State Highway 12, Naches, Yakima County, WA

  10. 14. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of truss, showing connection of upper chord, laced vertical compression member, strut, counters, and laterals. - Dry Creek Bridge, Spanning Dry Creek at Cook Road, Ione, Amador County, CA

  11. 46. INTAKE DAM NO. 2, VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM. THIS WAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. INTAKE DAM NO. 2, VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM. THIS WAS FORMERLY THE MAIN INTAKE FOR THE SYSTEM. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  12. GENERAL VIEW OF CHECK DAM (UPSTREAM SIDE), CONCRETE LINED TUMALO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF CHECK DAM (UPSTREAM SIDE), CONCRETE LINED TUMALO RESERVOIR FEED CANAL, AND UPPER TUMALO RESERVOIR (IN BACKGROUND) NEAR COLLINS ROAD. LOOKING WEST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  13. 1. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING EAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, South Channel Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  14. 30. WAIALEIA STREAM CROSSING (30") LOOKING UPSTREAM. PIPE IS EXPOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. WAIALEIA STREAM CROSSING (30") LOOKING UPSTREAM. PIPE IS EXPOSED AT LEFT OF CONCRETE STRUCTURE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  15. UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND GEARING FOR CONTROLLING LOCK GATE. LOOKING WEST SOUTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Brandon Road Lock and Dam , 1100 Brandon Road, Joliet, Will County, IL

  16. DOG HOUSE AT UPSTREAM LOCK GATE. ALSO SEEN AT LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOG HOUSE AT UPSTREAM LOCK GATE. ALSO SEEN AT LEFT IN PHOTO NO. IL-164-A-23. - Illinois Waterway, La Grange Lock and Dam, 3/4 mile south of Country 795N at Illinois River, Versailles, Brown County, IL

  17. 11. Close up view of construction on the upstream face. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Close up view of construction on the upstream face. Photographer unknown, October 15, 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST OF UPSTREAM SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE FROM YOLO COUNTY SIDE OF SACRAMENTO RIVER - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM; SPILLWAY IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM; SPILLWAY IN FOREGROUND, LOCK IN BACKGROUND ON NORTH RIVER BANK. VIEW TO NORTH. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  20. 15. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION WITH TAINTER GATE SECTION OF SPILLWAY TO THE LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  1. 10. UPSTREAM SIDE OF UPPER MITER GATES SHOWING STOWED LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. UPSTREAM SIDE OF UPPER MITER GATES SHOWING STOWED LEFT WING OF UPPER GUARD GATE (FAR LEFT). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  2. Typical Framing of Bridge Ends and New Walk on Upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Framing of Bridge Ends and New Walk on Upstream Side, Typical Sway Bracing Above Upper Stringers, Typical Sway Bracing Below Floor Beams - Covered Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River, Orford, Grafton County, NH

  3. EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF UPSTREAM WATERSHED ACTIVITIES TO DOWNSTREAM STREAMFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking the impacts of upstream activities such as urban development to changes in downstream streamflow is critical to achieving a balance between economic development and environmental protection as a basis for sustainable watershed development. This paper presents a modeling a...

  4. 10. UPSTREAM EXTENSION TO 60' INFILTRATION PIPE: MISCELLANEOUS METAL DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. UPSTREAM EXTENSION TO 60' INFILTRATION PIPE: MISCELLANEOUS METAL DETAILS. Sheet A-22, November, 1940. File no. SA 342/31. - Prado Dam, Embankment, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  5. 7. VIEW WEST ALONG THE UPSTREAM SLOPE OF THE EMBANKMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW WEST ALONG THE UPSTREAM SLOPE OF THE EMBANKMENT, SHOWING ROCK PAVING IN PROGRESS.... Volume XIX, No. 7, June 24, 1940. - Prado Dam, Embankment, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  6. 26. UPSTREAM VIEW OF DISCHARGE END OF OUTLET STRUCTURE.... Volume ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. UPSTREAM VIEW OF DISCHARGE END OF OUTLET STRUCTURE.... Volume XVI, No. 17, September 29, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  7. 22. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE OUTLET CONTROL STRUCTURE AND THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE OUTLET CONTROL STRUCTURE AND THE PIER FOR THE SERVICE BRIDGE.... Volume XVIII, No. 12, January 29, 1940. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  8. 16. VIEW EASTERLY ALONG THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF THE OGEE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW EASTERLY ALONG THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF THE OGEE SECTION OF THE SPILLWAY.... Volume XVIII, No. 13, January 29, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  9. 24. UPSTREAM VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE CLOSED CONDUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. UPSTREAM VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE CLOSED CONDUIT SECTION OF OUTLET WORKS.... Volume XVI, No. 15, August 16, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  10. 10. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP), WORM GEAR SHAFTS (CENTER) AND SLIDE GATES (BOTTOM). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  11. 2. General view of Mormon Flat looking upstream. Construction activity ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. General view of Mormon Flat looking upstream. Construction activity is visible at center right. Photographer unknown, September 30, 1923. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. Emergence of Upstream Swimming via a Hydrodynamic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-kuan; Ardon, Florencia; Roy, Anubhab; Koch, Donald L.; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that upstream swimming of sperm emerges via an orientation disorder-order transition. The order parameter, the average orientation of the sperm head against the flow, follows a 0.5 power law with the deviation from the critical flow shear rate (γ -γc ). This transition is successfully explained by a hydrodynamic bifurcation theory, which extends the sperm upstream swimming to a broad class of near surface microswimmers that possess front-back asymmetry and circular motion.

  13. ULF waves upstream of the Venus bow shock - Properties of one-hertz waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter data are used here to study the properties of a class of ULF upstream waves with relatively high observed frequencies. These waves show significant similarity to 'one-Hz' waves identified at earth in the ISEE 1 and 2 observations and the whistler waves identified earlier by IMP 6 observations. The waves appear almost immediately after the spacecraft crosses the magnetic field tangent line to the bow shock surface into the region of connected field lines. The wave amplitude decreases with distance from the shock measured along the magnetic field line. Group velocities calculated using the cold plasma dispersion relation indicate that the waves have sufficient upstream velocities to propagate form the shock into the solar wind. The totality of observations seem best explained by a source of right-handed whistler mode waves at the bow shock.

  14. Microdosimetry of DNA conformations: relation between direct effect of (60)Co gamma rays and topology of DNA geometrical models in the calculation of A-, B- and Z-DNA radiation-induced damage yields.

    PubMed

    Semsarha, Farid; Raisali, Gholamreza; Goliaei, Bahram; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    In order to obtain the energy deposition pattern of ionizing radiation in the nanometric scale of genetic material and to investigate the different sensitivities of the DNA conformations, direct effects of (60)Co gamma rays on the three A, B and Z conformations of DNA have been studied. For this purpose, single-strand breaks (SSB), double-strand breaks (DSB), base damage (BD), hit probabilities and three microdosimetry quantities (imparted energy, mean chord length and lineal energy) in the mentioned DNA conformations have been calculated and compared by using GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (Geant4) toolkit. The results show that A-, B- and Z-DNA conformations have the highest yields of DSB (1.2 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)), SSB (25.2 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)) and BD (4.81 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)), respectively. Based on the investigation of direct effects of radiation, it can be concluded that the DSB yield is largely correlated to the topological characteristics of DNA models, although the SSB yield is not. Moreover, according to the comparative results of the present study, a reliable candidate parameter for describing the relationship between DNA damage yields and geometry of DNA models in the theoretical radiation biology research studies would be the mean chord length (4 V/S) of the models.

  15. Barriers impede upstream spawning migration of flathead chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, David M.; Zuellig, Robert E.; Crockett, Harry J.; Bruce, James F.; Lukacs, Paul M.; Fitzpatrick, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Many native cyprinids are declining throughout the North American Great Plains. Some of these species require long reaches of contiguous, flowing riverine habitat for drifting eggs or larvae to develop, and their declining populations have been attributed to habitat fragmentation or barriers (e.g., dams, dewatered channels, and reservoirs) that restrict fish movement. Upstream dispersal is also needed to maintain populations of species with passively drifting eggs or larvae, and prior researchers have suggested that these fishes migrate upstream to spawn. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a mark–recapture study of Flathead Chub Platygobio gracilis within a 91-km reach of continuous riverine habitat in Fountain Creek, Colorado. We measured CPUE, spawning readiness (percent of Flathead Chub expressing milt), and fish movement relative to a channel-spanning dam. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Flathead Chub migrate upstream to spawn during summer. The CPUE was much higher at the base of the dam than at downstream sites; the seasonal increases in CPUE at the dam closely tracked seasonal increases in spawning readiness, and marked fish moved upstream as far as 33 km during the spawning run. The upstream migration was effectively blocked by the dam. The CPUE of Flathead Chub was much lower upstream of the OHDD than at downstream sites, and <0.2% of fish marked at the dam were recaptured upstream. This study provides the first direct evidence of spawning migration for Flathead Chub and supports the general hypothesis that barriers limit adult dispersal of these and other plains fishes.

  16. Health and safety in small workplaces: refocusing upstream.

    PubMed

    Eakin, Joan M; Champoux, Danièle; MacEachen, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Small workplaces have particular injury risks and are enduringly difficult for the occupational health and safety (OHS) system to reach. This paper puts forward an "upstream" perspective on OHS in small workplaces that moves beyond the attributes of the workplace and those who work there. The paper draws on and synthesizes ideas and findings from emerging upstream OHS research, our own empirical investigations in Ontario and Quebec, and our collected research experience in small workplace health. Upstream structures and processes (regulations, policies, services, interventions, professional practices) are often misaligned with the conditions of work and social relations of small workplaces. Key upstream factors include regulatory exemption, subcontracting, unionization levels, the changing character of small enterprise, joint management, service and inspection constraints, competing institutional accountabilities, institutional orientation to large business, and inappropriate service and policy. Misalignment of the OHS system with the nature and practical realities of small workplaces can undermine prevention and the management of ill health and injury. To address such misalignments, the paper calls for: 1) restructuring of data collection and consultation processes to increase the visibility, voice and credibility of small workplaces; 2) "audits" of OHS-related legislation, policy and interventions to assess and address implications for small workplaces; 3) reflection on current terms and concepts that render workers invisible and capture poorly the essence and (increasing) diversity of these workplaces; and 4) extension of the upstream gaze to the global level.

  17. Health and safety in small workplaces: refocusing upstream.

    PubMed

    Eakin, Joan M; Champoux, Danièle; MacEachen, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Small workplaces have particular injury risks and are enduringly difficult for the occupational health and safety (OHS) system to reach. This paper puts forward an "upstream" perspective on OHS in small workplaces that moves beyond the attributes of the workplace and those who work there. The paper draws on and synthesizes ideas and findings from emerging upstream OHS research, our own empirical investigations in Ontario and Quebec, and our collected research experience in small workplace health. Upstream structures and processes (regulations, policies, services, interventions, professional practices) are often misaligned with the conditions of work and social relations of small workplaces. Key upstream factors include regulatory exemption, subcontracting, unionization levels, the changing character of small enterprise, joint management, service and inspection constraints, competing institutional accountabilities, institutional orientation to large business, and inappropriate service and policy. Misalignment of the OHS system with the nature and practical realities of small workplaces can undermine prevention and the management of ill health and injury. To address such misalignments, the paper calls for: 1) restructuring of data collection and consultation processes to increase the visibility, voice and credibility of small workplaces; 2) "audits" of OHS-related legislation, policy and interventions to assess and address implications for small workplaces; 3) reflection on current terms and concepts that render workers invisible and capture poorly the essence and (increasing) diversity of these workplaces; and 4) extension of the upstream gaze to the global level. PMID:20629444

  18. Clustering in large networks does not promote upstream reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Upstream reciprocity (also called generalized reciprocity) is a putative mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations with which players help others when they are helped by somebody else. It is a type of indirect reciprocity. Although upstream reciprocity is often observed in experiments, most theories suggest that it is operative only when players form short cycles such as triangles, implying a small population size, or when it is combined with other mechanisms that promote cooperation on their own. An expectation is that real social networks, which are known to be full of triangles and other short cycles, may accommodate upstream reciprocity. In this study, I extend the upstream reciprocity game proposed for a directed cycle by Boyd and Richerson to the case of general networks. The model is not evolutionary and concerns the conditions under which the unanimity of cooperative players is a Nash equilibrium. I show that an abundance of triangles or other short cycles in a network does little to promote upstream reciprocity. Cooperation is less likely for a larger population size even if triangles are abundant in the network. In addition, in contrast to the results for evolutionary social dilemma games on networks, scale-free networks lead to less cooperation than networks with a homogeneous degree distribution.

  19. Comparison of properties of upstream whistlers at different planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.

    1995-01-01

    Whistler mode waves have been recorded in the upstream region of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Saturn. They are elliptically polarized and observed typically at frequencies between 0.1 to 4 Hz. These intrinsically right handed waves can be left-handed polarized in the spaceframe as a result of strong negative Doppler shift. The waves propagate at an angle between 10 and 60 deg to the background magnetic field, with (Delta B)/B rarely exceeding 0.1. Comprehensive studies of these waves at Earth and Venus indicate that upstream whistlers are generated at the shock rather than locally in the foreshock. In this paper, we compare properties of upstream whistlers at all these planets. We also discuss the utilization of selected properties of these waves to evaluate the effective Alfvenic Mach number and the shock thickness at Mercury where solar wind measurements are not available.

  20. Upstream operators enhance repression of the lac promoter.

    PubMed

    Mossing, M C; Record, M T

    1986-08-22

    To study regulation of transcription by distant elements, a wild-type lac operator was inserted upstream of a promoter-constitutive operator control region. The upstream operator is shown to aid in repression of transcription from the mutant control region. The effectiveness of the upstream operator as a function of its distance from the mutant control region parallels the length dependence observed for DNA cyclization. A quantitative model is proposed for action-at-a-distance of DNA control sites in which protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions are mediated by DNA looping. In this model, the effective concentrations of interacting proteins that are tethered by DNA are determined by the length of the intervening DNA and by its inherent bending and torsional stiffness. This model makes a number of predictions for both eukaryotic and prokaryotic control sequences located far from their sites of action. PMID:3090685

  1. Large-eddy simulation study of upstream boundary conditions influence upon a backward-facing step flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aider, Jean-Luc; Danet, Alexandra

    2006-07-01

    We use Large Eddy Simulation to investigate the influence of upstream boundary conditions on the development of a backward facing step flow. The first inlet condition consists of a mean turbulent boundary layer velocity profile perturbed by a white noise. The second relies upon a precursor calculation where the development of a quasi-temporal turbulent boundary layer is simulated. In this case, the quasi-longitudinal vortices in the upstream turbulent boundary-layer trigger the destabilization of the shear layer just behind the step, resulting in a shortening of the recirculation length and an increase of the characteristic frequency associated to the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices. The mean flow and the characteristic frequencies of pressure fluctuations are strongly dependent of the upstream flow. It demonstrates the importance of realistic boundary conditions for the simulation of complex 3D flows or for flow control simulations. To cite this article: J.-L. Aider, A. Danet, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  2. Tachykinin acts upstream of autocrine Hedgehog signaling during nociceptive sensitization in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Im, Seol Hee; Takle, Kendra; Jo, Juyeon; Babcock, Daniel T; Ma, Zhiguo; Xiang, Yang; Galko, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Pain signaling in vertebrates is modulated by neuropeptides like Substance P (SP). To determine whether such modulation is conserved and potentially uncover novel interactions between nociceptive signaling pathways we examined SP/Tachykinin signaling in a Drosophila model of tissue damage-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity. Tissue-specific knockdowns and genetic mutant analyses revealed that both Tachykinin and Tachykinin-like receptor (DTKR99D) are required for damage-induced thermal nociceptive sensitization. Electrophysiological recording showed that DTKR99D is required in nociceptive sensory neurons for temperature-dependent increases in firing frequency upon tissue damage. DTKR overexpression caused both behavioral and electrophysiological thermal nociceptive hypersensitivity. Hedgehog, another key regulator of nociceptive sensitization, was produced by nociceptive sensory neurons following tissue damage. Surprisingly, genetic epistasis analysis revealed that DTKR function was upstream of Hedgehog-dependent sensitization in nociceptive sensory neurons. Our results highlight a conserved role for Tachykinin signaling in regulating nociception and the power of Drosophila for genetic dissection of nociception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10735.001 PMID:26575288

  3. Tachykinin acts upstream of autocrine Hedgehog signaling during nociceptive sensitization in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Im, Seol Hee; Takle, Kendra; Jo, Juyeon; Babcock, Daniel T; Ma, Zhiguo; Xiang, Yang; Galko, Michael J

    2015-11-17

    Pain signaling in vertebrates is modulated by neuropeptides like Substance P (SP). To determine whether such modulation is conserved and potentially uncover novel interactions between nociceptive signaling pathways we examined SP/Tachykinin signaling in a Drosophila model of tissue damage-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity. Tissue-specific knockdowns and genetic mutant analyses revealed that both Tachykinin and Tachykinin-like receptor (DTKR99D) are required for damage-induced thermal nociceptive sensitization. Electrophysiological recording showed that DTKR99D is required in nociceptive sensory neurons for temperature-dependent increases in firing frequency upon tissue damage. DTKR overexpression caused both behavioral and electrophysiological thermal nociceptive hypersensitivity. Hedgehog, another key regulator of nociceptive sensitization, was produced by nociceptive sensory neurons following tissue damage. Surprisingly, genetic epistasis analysis revealed that DTKR function was upstream of Hedgehog-dependent sensitization in nociceptive sensory neurons. Our results highlight a conserved role for Tachykinin signaling in regulating nociception and the power of Drosophila for genetic dissection of nociception.

  4. Transition duct with divided upstream and downstream portions

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Maldonado, Jaime Javier; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Flanagan, James Scott

    2015-07-14

    Turbine systems are provided. In one embodiment, a turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion extending from the inlet and a downstream portion extending from the outlet. The turbine system further includes a rib extending from an outer surface of the duct passage, the rib dividing the upstream portion and the downstream portion.

  5. Upstream particle events close to the bow shock and 200 earth radii upstream - ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1980-01-01

    Two energetic particle events (28 keV - 145 keV) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with two identical experiments of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland on ISEE-1 and ISEE-3. Close to the bow shock the particle distribution is more or less isotropic and indicates strong scattering of these particles in the upstream wave field. At ISEE-3 the particles move essentially scatter-free from the general bow shock direction. The temporal evolution of the particle bursts is discussed in terms of the interplanetary magnetic field topology and the scattering conditions.

  6. Laser Doppler velocity measurements of swirling flows with upstream influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rloff, K. L.; Bossel, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Swirling flow in a rotating tube is studied by flow visualization at a moderate Reynolds number, and its velocity field is measured by laser-Doppler anemometry. The tube has constant diameter, and approximately uniform initial rigid rotation of the flow is assured by passing the flow through a rotating plug of porous metal before it enters the test section. At moderate swirl values, an object mounted on the tube centerline causes a closed bubble to form upstream of the obstacle, with a clearly defined stagnation point on the axis, and recirculating flow inside the bubble. The bubble length grows upstream as the swirl is increased, until it breaks up into a Taylor column reaching all the way upstream and downstream at swirl values above a certain critical value. A vortex jump (in the sense of Benjamin) occurs downstream of the obstacle except when the Taylor column is present. Using a laser-Doppler anemometer, axial and swirl velocity profiles are obtained at several stations upstream and downstream of the bubble, and in and around the bubble.

  7. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a partially cloudy sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  8. 4. VIEW UPSTREAM ALONG NORTH FORK OF MIDDLE FORK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW UPSTREAM ALONG NORTH FORK OF MIDDLE FORK OF TULE RIVER, LOOKING TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE AND POWERHOUSE; FLUME AT LEFT. LOOKING EAST. 90mm lens - Tule River Hydroelectric Complex, Tule River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Middle Fork of Tule River, Springville, Tulare County, CA

  9. VIEW OF UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDES OF UPPER (EAST) END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDES OF UPPER (EAST) END OF LOCK, SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST CONTROL HOUSES, LOCK UNDER REPAIR, BUILDING NOS. 51, 52 AND SOUTHWEST CONTROL HOUSE IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS WEST-NORTHWEST - Ortona Lock, Lock No. 2, Machinery and Control Houses, Caloosahatchee River, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Ortona, Glades County, FL

  10. 11. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCH, TAKEN ON NOVEMBER 26, 1930, (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON JUNE 5, 1973, BY PHOTOGRAPHER GATSON OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Tujunga Dam, 809 West Big Tujunga Road, Sunland, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 14. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF BIG TUJUNGA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM, TAKEN ON MAY 27, 1931, (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON JUNE 5, 1973, BY PHOTOGRAPHER GATSON OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Tujunga Dam, 809 West Big Tujunga Road, Sunland, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 12. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCH, TAKEN ON JANUARY 28, 1931, (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON JUNE 5, 1973, BY PHOTOGRAPHER GATSON OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Tujunga Dam, 809 West Big Tujunga Road, Sunland, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 10. VIEW UPSTREAM OF PIPELINE SECTION AT JUNCTION OF HUME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW UPSTREAM OF PIPELINE SECTION AT JUNCTION OF HUME CEMENT PIPE AND CAST-IRON (460'). NOTE CYLINDRICAL COLLAR OF CEMENT SECTIONS AND BELL JUNCTIONS OF IRON PIPE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  14. 25. UPSTREAM VIEW OF LOWER END OF OUTLET STRUCTURE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. UPSTREAM VIEW OF LOWER END OF OUTLET STRUCTURE SHOWING FORMS IN PLACE FOR GRAVITY WALL SECTIONS.... Volume XVI, No. 16, August 16, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  15. 23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AND TOWARD LEFT ABUTMENT OF DAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AND TOWARD LEFT ABUTMENT OF DAM. NOTE FORMS FOR LEFT GRAVITY ABUTMENT AT UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PICTURE. ARCHES 3, 4, 5, AND 7 COMPLETED TO ELEVATION 1795. 5 OR 7.5 FEET BELOW TOP OF PARAPET WALL. November 29, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 14. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA. TRACK FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA. TRACK FROM AGGREGATE BARGES TO MIXING PLANT IS AT LOWER LEFT, RIGHT SPILLWAY CHUTE IS TAKING FORM AT UPPER RIGHT April 29, 1927 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD UPSTREAM END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD UPSTREAM END OF NAVIGATION LOCK #1; SOUTH END OF POWERHOUSE #1 IS VISIBLE ON RIGHT; BRADFORD SLOUGH IS VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  18. 2. VIEW OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN FROM CENTER OF THE CHANNEL FROM TWIN LAKES. VIEW LOOKING EAST. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  19. 18. Upstream face of arches, concrete placing tower is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Upstream face of arches, concrete placing tower is at far right. Tower at center was used to convey material. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 63. Upstream face of Waddell Dam as viewed from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Upstream face of Waddell Dam as viewed from the west abutment. Crane at center is used to service the penstock intake. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 11. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCH WALLS, TAKEN ON SEPTEMBER 11, 1928 (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON 6/5/1973 BY PHOTOGRAPHER GATSON OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 12. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCHES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCHES TAKEN ON NOVEMBER 21, 1928 (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON 6/5/1973 BY PHOTOGRAPHER GATSON OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 15. UPSTREAM VIEW (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN) SHOWING BIG DALTON DAM NEAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. UPSTREAM VIEW (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN) SHOWING BIG DALTON DAM NEAR FULL CAPACITY AFTER CONSTRUCTION. PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON 2-15-1973 BY PHOTOGRAPHER D. MEIER OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 14. VIEW OF THE UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF THE UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCHES NEAR THE TOP OF THE DAM TAKEN IN 1928-1929 (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON 2-15-1973 BY PHOTOGRAPHER D. MEIER OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 4. AERATOR AT 525, CONSTRUCTED 19371938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERATOR AT 525, CONSTRUCTED 1937-1938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH SCREEN REMOVED FOR CLARITY), WATER FROM INTAKE FLOWS THROUGH FLUME, THEN DAMS, AND SPILLS OVER STEPS TO MIX WITH OXYGEN, THUS REDUCING ACIDITY LEVELS. ACID INDUCES FASTER CORROSION OF PIPES AND SPOILS TASTE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  6. 9. Oblique view to southsouthwest of upstream (east) side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Oblique view to south-southwest of upstream (east) side of bridge from near north abutment in Jacob Meyer Park. Note cutwaters on piers, distinctive appearance of boxed, repaired vertical compression members as compared to original, laced compression members. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  7. PHOTO OF THE BOAT HOUSE, GATE HOUSE, UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTO OF THE BOAT HOUSE, GATE HOUSE, UPSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAYS LOOKING EAST; WATER INTAKE AND LOG BOOMS ARE SEEN ON RESERVOIR. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  8. 3. FORMER INTAKE DAM NO. 2, VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FORMER INTAKE DAM NO. 2, VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AT LEFT IS RUBBLE MASONRY COVERING INTERSECTION OF THE TWO IRON PIPES FROM NEW DAM ENTERING OLD INTAKE OPENING AT RIGHT IS BOX FLUME LEADING TO AERATOR. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  9. 2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND BRIDGE WITH ABANDONED SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND BRIDGE WITH ABANDONED SAN TAN FLOOD-WATER HEADGATE IN FOREGROUND. TAKEN FROM NORTH END OF DAM - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Sacaton Dam & Bridge, Gila River, T4S R6E S12/13, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  10. 6. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SPILLWAY OF THE POST FALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SPILLWAY OF THE POST FALLS POWERHOUSE, WITH A PARTIAL VIEW OF THE MODERN TRANSFORMER IN THE FOREGROUND, AND THE OLD SWITCHING BUILDING IN THE LEFT BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  11. 1. View looking upstream (southwest) at diversion dam. Water enters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking upstream (southwest) at diversion dam. Water enters half-round flume on right. Break in diversion structure provides a view of water flow in flume during the high water runoff in June. - Rock Creek Hydroelectric Project, Rock Creek, Baker County, OR

  12. 18. WAIKOLU STREAM CROSSING NO. 2, VIEW UPSTREAM. IRON PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. WAIKOLU STREAM CROSSING NO. 2, VIEW UPSTREAM. IRON PIPE RUNS WITHIN CONCRETE AND RUBBLE STRUCTURE AND CONTINUES BURIED UNTIL REACHING PIERS UNDER THE PALL. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  13. 68. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH (UPSTREAM) FROM LOWER ARM OF COFFERDAM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH (UPSTREAM) FROM LOWER ARM OF COFFERDAM, SHOWING STATUS OF CONSTRUCTION. NOTE CONCRETE FORMS IN DISTANCE, TIMBER PILES FOR INTERMEDIATE WALL IN CENTER, AND CONCRETE MIXING PLANT ON RIGHT. Taken September 4, 1934. - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  14. 14. Close up view of upstream side of Taintor gates ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Close up view of upstream side of Taintor gates being installed. Placement tower chute is at upper right. Photographer unknown, January 6, 1925. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM (Trashrack-structure for outlet at lower left in reservoir, spillway at upper left. Reservoir nearly empty due to drought.) - Tieton Dam, South & East of State Highway 12, Naches, Yakima County, WA

  16. 5. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE TRASH RAKES, GATES AND GATELIFTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE TRASH RAKES, GATES AND GATE-LIFTING MECHANISMS FOR THE POST FALLS DAM AND POWERHOUSE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  17. 6. AERATOR VIEWED UPSTREAM. DETAIL OF FLUSH VALVE AND VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. AERATOR VIEWED UPSTREAM. DETAIL OF FLUSH VALVE AND VIEW INTO BOX FLUME. NOTE WRENCH TO OPEN VALVE AND REMAINS OF OLD SHOVEL USED FOR MAINTENANCE. TRASH SCREEN MESH IS SEEN AT BOTTOM LEFT. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  18. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking southwest. Note the trash racks at the entrance to the penstocks. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  19. 9. UPSTREAM EXTENSION TO 60' INFILTRATION PIPE: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. UPSTREAM EXTENSION TO 60' INFILTRATION PIPE: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS OF VALVE CONTROL STRUCTURE. Sheet A-20, July, 1939. File no. SA 342/29. - Prado Dam, Embankment, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  20. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. Construction of the forebay dam, which replaced the eastern end of the original Grand Coulee Dam, was completed in 1974. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  1. 13. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of truss, showing connection of upper chord, laced vertical compression member, knee-braced strut, counters, and laterals. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  2. View of Stehr Lake from FS 502 looking upstream (northeast). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Stehr Lake from FS 502 looking upstream (northeast). Vehicle at right center is parked on earthen Upper Stehr Lake Dam. - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Stehr Lake & Dams, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  3. Extreme floods in the Mekong River Delta under climate change: combined impacts of upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Long; Nguyen Viet, Dung; Kummu, Matti; Lauri, Hannu; Koponen, Jorma; van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Supit, Iwan; Leemans, Rik; Kabat, Pavel; Ludwig, Fulco

    2016-04-01

    Extreme floods cause huge damages to human lives and infrastructure, and hamper socio-economic development in the Mekong River Delta in Vietnam. Induced by climate change, upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise are expected to further exacerbate future flood hazard and thereby posing critical challenges for securing safety and sustainability. This paper provides a probabilistic quantification of future flood hazard for the Mekong Delta, focusing on extreme events under climate change. We developed a model chain to simulate separate and combined impacts of two drivers, namely upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise on flood magnitude and frequency. Simulation results show that upstream changes and sea level rise substantially increase flood hazard throughout the whole Mekong Delta. Due to differences in their nature, two drivers show different features in their impacts on floods. Impacts of upstream changes are more dominant in floodplains in the upper delta, causing an increase of up to +0.80 m in flood depth. Sea level rise introduces flood hazard to currently safe areas in the middle and coastal delta zones. A 0.6 m rise in relative sea level causes an increase in flood depth between 0.10 and 0.70 m, depending on location by 2050s. Upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise tend to intensify each other's impacts on floods, resulting in stronger combined impacts than linearly summed impacts of each individual driver. Substantial increase of future flood hazard strongly requires better flood protection and more flood resilient development for the Mekong Delta. Findings from this study can be used as quantified physical boundary conditions to develop flood management strategies and strategic delta management plans.

  4. Vaccine production: upstream processing with adherent or suspension cell lines.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Yvonne; Rödig, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The production of viral vaccines in cell culture can be accomplished with primary, diploid, or continuous (transformed) cell lines. Each cell line, each virus type, and each vaccine preparation require the specific design of upstream and downstream processing. Media have to be selected as well as production vessels, cultivation conditions, and modes of operation. Many viruses only replicate to high titers in adherently growing cells, but similar to processes established for recombinant protein production, an increasing number of suspension cell lines is being evaluated for future use. Here, we describe key issues to be considered for the establishment of large-scale virus production in bioreactors. As an example upstream processing of cell culture-derived influenza virus production is described in more detail for adherently growing and for suspension cells. In particular, use of serum-containing, serum-free, and chemically defined media as well as choice of cultivation vessel are considered. PMID:24297427

  5. Addressing poor nutrition to promote heart health: Moving upstream

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Kim D

    2010-01-01

    Current dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention suggest dietary patterns that promote achieving healthy weight, emphasize vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, fish and nuts, substituting mono-unsaturated fats for saturated fats and restricting dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg/day. However, trends in nutrient intake and food consumption patterns suggest that the need for improvement in the dietary patterns of Canadians is clear. Influencing eating behaviour requires more than addressing nutrition knowledge and perceptions of healthy eating – it requires tackling the context within which individuals make choices. A comprehensive approach to improving nutrition includes traditional downstream strategies such as counselling to improve knowledge and skills; midstream strategies such as using the media to change social norms; and upstream strategies such as creating supportive environments through public policy including regulatory measures. While the evidence base for more upstream strategies continues to grow, key examples of comprehensive approaches to population change provide a call to action. PMID:20847988

  6. Addressing poor nutrition to promote heart health: moving upstream.

    PubMed

    Raine, Kim D

    2010-01-01

    Current dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention suggest dietary patterns that promote achieving healthy weight, emphasize vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, fish and nuts, substituting mono-unsaturated fats for saturated fats and restricting dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg/day. However, trends in nutrient intake and food consumption patterns suggest that the need for improvement in the dietary patterns of Canadians is clear. Influencing eating behaviour requires more than addressing nutrition knowledge and perceptions of healthy eating - it requires tackling the context within which individuals make choices. A comprehensive approach to improving nutrition includes traditional downstream strategies such as counselling to improve knowledge and skills; midstream strategies such as using the media to change social norms; and upstream strategies such as creating supportive environments through public policy including regulatory measures. While the evidence base for more upstream strategies continues to grow, key examples of comprehensive approaches to population change provide a call to action.

  7. 8. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER, VIEW UPSTREAM (PLANK COVER REMOVED FOR CLARITY). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER, VIEW UPSTREAM (PLANK COVER REMOVED FOR CLARITY). BOX FLUME DROPS SLIGHTLY INTO CHAMBER ON LEFT SIDE. CHAMBER IS A SERIES OF BAFFLES DESIGNED TO SLOW THE FLOW OF WATER. FLOW IS REDUCED TO ALLOW PARTICULATES TO SETTLE TO THE BOTTOM. TWO SCREENS (NOT SHOWN) FILTER LARGER DEBRIS. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  8. 12. Detail, lower chord connection point on upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail, lower chord connection point on upstream side of truss, showing pinned connection of lower chord eye bars, laced vertical compression member, diagonal eye bar tension members, turnbuckled diagonal counters, and floor beam. Note also timber floor stringers supported by floor beam, and exposed ends of timber deck members visible at left above lower chord eye bar. View to northwest. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  9. Steepened channels upstream of knickpoints: Controls on relict landscape response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Maureen M.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2009-09-01

    The morphology of a relict landscape provides important insight into erosion rates and processes prior to base level fall. Fluvial knickpoints are commonly thought to form a leak-proof moving boundary between a rejuvenated landscape below and a relict landscape above. We argue that fluvial rejuvenation may leak farther upstream, depending on the rate and style of knickpoint migration. The outer margin of a relict landscape should therefore be used with caution in tectonic geomorphology studies, as channel steepening upstream of knickpoints could reduce the relict area. We explore the response of the Roan Plateau to knickpoint retreat triggered by late Cenozoic upper Colorado River incision. Multiple knickpoints (100-m waterfalls) separate a low-relief, upper landscape from incised canyons below. Two digital elevation model data sets (10-m U.S. Geological Survey and 1-m Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) indicate steeper channels above waterfalls relative to concave channels farther upstream. The steepened reaches are several kilometers long, correspond to doubling of slope, and exhibit channel narrowing and an increase in hillslope angle. We compare two mechanisms for generating steepened reaches. The first uses a recent model for erosion amplification due to flow acceleration at the waterfall lip. The second acknowledges that waterfall lips may be limited to the outcrop of a resistant formation. Subtle structural warping of the stratigraphy can lead to lowering of the waterfall lip as it retreats, thus lowering base level for upstream channels. Results of numerical modeling experiments suggest the latter mechanism is more consistent with our observations of long, mildly steepened reaches.

  10. VIEW SOUTH SOUTHWEST LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM ENTRANCE TO LOCKS 35 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTH SOUTHWEST LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM ENTRANCE TO LOCKS 35 AND 71. THE BRIDGE IN THE VIEW IS NOTED FOR ITS EXTRAORDINARY WIDTH (475 FT.) RELATIVE TO ITS MODEST SPAN (116 FT. 10 IN.). WHEN CONSTRUCTED IN 1914 IT WAS CLAIMED TO BE THE WIDEST BRIDGE IN THE WORLD. MAIN STREET CROSSES IT DIAGONALLY, ALONG WITH TWO CROSS STREETS. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  11. Whistler wave bursts upstream of the Uranian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Wong, Hung K.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of magnetic field wave bursts upstream of the Uranian bow shock are reported which were recorded prior to the inbound shock crossing. Three wave types are identified. One exhibits a broad spectral enhancement from a few millihertz to about 50 mHz and is seen from 17 to 10 hr prior to the inbound shock crossing. It is argued that these waves are whistler waves that have propagated upstream from the shock. A second wave type has a spacecraft frame frequency between 20 and 40 mHz, is seen only within or immediately upstream of the shock pedestal, is right-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame, and has a typical burst duration of 90 s. The third wave type has a spacecraft frame frequency of about 0.15 Hz, is seen exclusively within the shock pedestal, is left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame, and has a burst duration lasting up to 4 min. It is argued that the low-frequency bursts are whistler waves with phase speed comparable to, but in excess of, the solar wind speed.

  12. Microgravity induced selective lesions in immunosignaling: Upstream targets in lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N.

    Microgravity is a novel milieu for cells where re-ordering of forces induces different responses. Human lymphocytes undergo a suppression of activation and locomotion in space and modeled microgravity. Based on recovery of activation and locomotion with the phorbol ester PMA, the lesion induced by microgravity is presumed up- stream of the level of PKC signaling. Lymphocytes cultured in ground-based microgravity analog conditions display depressed calcium independent PKC isoforms. Upstream signaling molecules such as Phospholipase C gamma were not sufficiently activated in modeled microgravity. Immunoblotting revealed LAT, which is an adaptor protein crucial for Phospholipase C gamma recruitment in T cell activation, was down regulated in lymphocytes cultured at 72 and 96 hours in modeled microgravity. Also, ZAP 70 kinase, which is a LAT activator, down- regulated (>2 fold) at 96 hours modeled microgravity culture. Microarray analysis of lymphocytes cultured in 1g and modeled microgravity revealed significant down- regulation in upstream T cell activation molecules such as Diacylglycerol kinase, serine/threonine kinases, and tyrosine kinases. All up-stream targets in T cell activation are negatively affected in microgravity. Optimal immune function is critical in the ISS era where long term space travel is inevitable. Elucidation of the key mechanisms affected by microgravity lays the foundation for development of treatments that can counter these deleterious effects.

  13. Comparison of upstream phenomena at Venus and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangeway, R. J.; Crawford, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The region upstream of a planetary bow shock, known as the foreshock, contains a variety of phenomena. Electrons and ions are reflected and energized at the shock. As these stream back upstream, they generate both VLF and ULF waves. Studies of the terrestrial foreshock have provided most of our understanding of these phenomena. However, comparisons with other planetary foreshocks are beneficial, even though the instrumentation used to provide the data may be less sophisticated than that flown on Earth orbiting spacecraft. In particular, maps of the VLF emissions upstream of the Venus bow shock, using data acquired by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter are particularly illuminating. These maps show that the tangent field line is clearly marked by the presence of plasma oscillations. Of additional interest is evidence that the emissions only extend some 15 Venus radii away from the shock, indicating that the emissions are controlled by the shock scale size. Lower frequency ion acoustic waves are observed deep in the ion foreshock. Only close to the shock do both the ion acoustic waves and ULF waves occur simultaneously. The ULF waves mark the ion foreshock boundary where ion beams should be present. The ion acoustic waves tend to be observed further downstream, where diffuse ion distributions are expected to occur. A similar mapping of the terrestrial foreshock, using data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft shows similar results for the electron foreshock. An extensions of this study to include ULF and ion acoustic waves would be helpful.

  14. Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Sensitivity to Upstream Geometric Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Laura; Helmer, David; Eaton, John

    2012-11-01

    Shock boundary layer interactions (SBLIs) can have drastic effects on the performance of external aerodynamics and propulsion systems in high speed flight vehicles. In such systems, the upstream and boundary conditions of the flow are uncertain, and the sensitivity of SBLIs to perturbations in these conditions is unknown. The sensitivity of two SBLIs - a compression corner interaction and an incident shock interaction - to small geometric perturbations was investigated using particle image velocity measurements. Tests were performed in a continuously operated, low aspect ratio, Mach 2.1 wind tunnel. The shock was generated by a 1.1mm high 20° wall-mounted compression wedge, and various configurations of small (h < 0 . 2 δ) steady bumps were introduced upstream on the opposite wall. 100 perturbed cases were tested in order to generate a dataset which is well suited for validation of CFD codes. Both SBLIs were very sensitive to perturbations in a given region and insensitive to perturbations outside of it. Depending on the location of the perturbations, the compression corner interaction could be significantly strengthened or weakened. The position of the incident SBLI was also a strong function of both the location and size of the upstream perturbations.

  15. Upstream waves simultaneously observed by ISEE and UKS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Southwood, D. J.; Smith, M. F.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements obtained in the solar wind by ISEE-2 and the United Kingdom Subsatellite (UKS) have been examined for observations of upstream waves. These data reveal that the waves in the foreshock region are enhanced at all frequencies from at least 0.003 Hz to 0.5 Hz. The wave spectra generally have a spectral peak, but this peak is usually broad and the peak frequency depends on the position of the spacecraft. Generally, the spectra seen at the two spacecraft are most similar at high frequencies and least similar at low frequencies. The geometry of the interaction is displayed in the plane containing the magnetic field, the solar wind velocity, and the spacecraft location. However, this coordinate system does not order all the observed wave properties. It does not clearly explain or order the handedness of the waves, or their direction of propagation. It is clear that the upstream region is inherently three-dimensional. The position-dependent nature of the upstream waves indicates that comparisons between ground-based measurements and in-situ observations must be undertaken with some caution.

  16. Interaction of upstream flow distortions with high Mach number cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    Features of the interaction of flow distortions, such as gusts and wakes with blade rows of advance type fans and compressors having high tip Mach numbers are modeled. A typical disturbance was assumed to have harmonic time dependence and was described, at a far upstream location, in three orthogonal spatial coordinates by a double Fourier series. It was convected at supersonic relative to a linear cascade described as an unrolled annulus. Conditions were selected so that the component of this velocity parallel to the axis of the turbomachine was subsonic, permitting interaction between blades through the upstream as well as downstream flow media. A strong, nearly normal shock was considered in the blade passages which was allowed curvature and displacement. The flows before and after the shock were linearized relative to uniform mean velocities in their respective regions. Solution of the descriptive equations was by adaption of the Wiener-Hopf technique, enabling a determination of distortion patterns through and downstream of the cascade as well as pressure distributions on the blade and surfaces. Details of interaction of the disturbance with the in-passage shock were discussed. Infuences of amplitude, wave length, and phase of the disturbance on lifts and moments of cascade configurations are presented. Numerical results are clarified by reference to an especially orderly pattern of upstream vertical motion in relation to the cascade parameters.

  17. Upstream waves simultaneously observed by ISEE and UKS

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G.; Elphic, R.C. ); Southwood, D.J. ); Smith, M.F.; Johnstone, A.D. )

    1987-07-01

    Measurements obtained in the solar wind by ISEE-2 and the United Kingdom Subsatellite (UKS) have been examined for observations of upstream waves. These data reveal that the waves in the foreshock region are enhanced at all frequencies from at least 0.003 Hz to 0.5 Hz. The wave spectra generally have a spectral peak, but this peak is usually broad and the peak frequency depends on the position of the spacecraft. Generally, the spectra seen at the two spacecraft are most similar at high frequencies and least similar at low frequencies. The geometry of the interaction is displayed in the plane containing the magnetic field, the solar wind velocity, and the spacecraft location. However, this coordinate system does not order all the observed wave properties. It does not clearly explain or order the handedness of the waves, or their direction of propagation. It is clear that the upstream region is inherently three-dimensional. The position-dependent nature of the upstream waves indicates that comparisons between ground-based measurements and in-situ observations must be undertaken with some caution.

  18. Hydraulics of floods upstream of horseshoe canyons and waterfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotre, Mathieu G. A.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2015-07-01

    Horseshoe waterfalls are ubiquitous in natural streams, bedrock canyons, and engineering structures. Nevertheless, water flow patterns upstream of horseshoe waterfalls are poorly known and likely differ from the better studied case of a one-dimensional linear step because of flow focusing into the horseshoe. This is a significant knowledge gap because the hydraulics at waterfalls controls sediment transport and bedrock incision, which can compromise the integrity of engineered structures and influence the evolution of river canyons on Earth and Mars. Here we develop new semiempirical theory for the spatial acceleration of water upstream of, and the cumulative discharge into, horseshoe canyons and waterfalls. To this end, we performed 110 numerical experiments by solving the 2-D depth-averaged shallow-water equations for a wide range of flood depths, widths and discharges, and canyon lengths, widths and bed gradients. We show that the upstream, normal flow Froude number is the dominant control on lateral flow focusing and acceleration into the canyon head and that focusing is limited when the flood width is small compared to a cross-stream backwater length scale. In addition, for sheet floods much wider than the canyon, flow focusing into the canyon head leads to reduced discharge (and drying in cases) across the canyon sidewalls, which is especially pronounced for canyons that are much longer than they are wide. Our results provide new expectations for morphodynamic feedbacks between floods and topography, and thus canyon formation.

  19. Surviving the breakup: the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jacob C; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    In response to even a single chromosomal double-strand DNA break, cells enact the DNA damage checkpoint. This checkpoint triggers cell cycle arrest, providing time for the cell to repair damaged chromosomes before entering mitosis. This mechanism helps prevent the segregation of damaged or mutated chromosomes and thus promotes genomic stability. Recent work has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying several critical steps in checkpoint activation, notably the recruitment of the upstream checkpoint kinases of the ATM and ATR families to different damaged DNA structures and the molecular events through which these kinases activate their effectors. Chromatin modification has emerged as one important component of checkpoint activation and maintenance. Following DNA repair, the checkpoint pathway is inactivated in a process termed recovery. A related but genetically distinct process, adaptation, controls cell cycle re-entry in the face of unrepairable damage.

  20. Upstream influence of numerically simulated squall-line storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovell, Robert G.

    2002-04-01

    The squall line's impact on its upstream environment is examined using traditional cloud and simplified (parametrized moisture) models. The study was motivated by the need to explain significant differences between the two dynamical frameworks. In both, the first environmental response to the convection consists of a rapidly propagating gravity wave characterized by deep tropospheric subsidence. This gravity wave accelerates the lowlevel storm inflow in its wake, with the largest effect seen near the surface. In the more sophisticated model, however, this wave is eventually followed by a shorter vertical wavelength feature, one possessing lower-tropospheric ascent. This second gravity wave, absent from the simplified model runs, substantially alters the upstream environment yet again. The gentle low-level uplift establishes the 'cool/moist tongue' ofairthat has been found to stretch well ahead of the storm in simulations. Between the second wave and the main storm updraught, the accelerated inflow is shifted from the ground to the middle troposphere where it helps to push dry air into the convecting region. This subsequent environmental adjustment responds to the establishment of a small yet persistent area of weak cooling during the early mature phase. Located in the middle troposphere at the upstream edge of the main cloud mass, this cooling is the combined effect of cloud-water evaporation and the ascent of subsaturated air. Though the cooling that excites it is of relatively small magnitude (<2 K), this wave's effect is dramatic and significant. A crude fix to the moisture parametrization served to establish a qualitatively similar tongue-like feature in the simplified model simulations, bringing the results from the two dynamical frameworks more into line.

  1. Electron plasma oscillations upstream of the solar wind termination shock.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S

    2005-09-23

    Electron plasma oscillations have been detected upstream of the solar wind termination shock by the plasma wave instrument on the Voyager 1 spacecraft. These waves were first observed on 11 February 2004, at a heliocentric radial distance of 91.0 astronomical units, and continued sporadically with a gradually increasing occurrence rate for nearly a year. The last event occurred on 15 December 2004, at 94.1 astronomical units, just before the spacecraft crossed the termination shock. Since then, no further electron plasma oscillations have been observed, consistent with the spacecraft having crossed the termination shock into the heliosheath.

  2. Hybrid simulation codes with application to shocks and upstream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid codes in which part of the plasma is represented as particles and the rest as a fluid are discussed. In the past few years such codes with particle ions and massless, fluid electrons have been applied to space plasmas, especially to collisionless shocks. All of these simulation codes are one-dimensional and similar in structure, except for how the field equations are solved. The various approaches that are used (resistive Ohm's law, predictor-corrector, Hamiltonian) are described in detail and results from the various codes are compared with examples taken from collisionless shocks and low frequency wave phenomena upstream of shocks.

  3. 2. View of Potomac River at Great Falls looking upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Potomac River at Great Falls looking upstream from Observation Tower. The majestic character of this wild and untrammeled spot is vividly shown. Scanty flow is evidenced by light colored normal water line markings on rock formation. Washington Agueduct Dam is shown in upper portion. Maryland on right and Virginia on left. Natives quoted as saying the water was as low or lower than during the drought conditions of 1930. Mr. Horyduzak, Photographer, 1943. - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal & Locks, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  4. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  5. Upstream blockage effect on the thrust force of a marine hydrokinetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliani, Giulio; Beninati, Maria Laura; Krane, Michael; Fontaine, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    The study evaluates the interaction of two model marine devices axially arranged one in front of the other, in a tandem configuration. Particular focus is given to the change that occurs in the thrust of the downstream marine hydrokinetic (MHK) device when the spatial arrangement of the two elements is varied. At critical spacing there is no thrust generation. The study is motivated by the need to predict the thrust behavior of MHK devices and determine the minimum separation distance to avoid the no thrust condition. The downstream element is a two-bladed, horizontal axis turbine, while the upstream blockage is a perforated disk with similar geometric properties intended to approximate the wake of the MHK device. Testing is conducted in the flume facility at Bucknell University. Experiments are performed for a fixed range of spacing between the perforated disk and the turbine. For each separation distance, the span-wise velocity profile upstream and downstream of the turbine is measured, as well as the device's rotational speed. The turbine's thrust coefficient is calculated. Plots of the thrust coefficient as a function of spacing depict the minimum separation distance to avoid the no thrust condition.

  6. Electron distributions upstream of the Comet Halley bow shock - Evidence for adiabatic heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Lin, R. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Reme, H.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional plasma electron (22 eV to 30 keV) observations upstream of Comet Halley bow shock, obtained by the RPA-1 COPERNIC (Reme Plasma Analyzer - Complete Positive Ion, Electron and Ram Negative Ion Measurements near Comet Halley) experiment on the Giotto spacecraft are reported. Besides electron distributions typical of the undisturbed solar wind and backstreaming electrons observed when the magnetic field line intersects the cometary bow shock, a new type of distribution, characterized by enhanced low energy (less than 100 eV) flux which peaks at 90-deg pitch angles is found. These are most prominent when the spacecraft is on field lines which pass close to but are not connected to the bow shock. The 90-deg pitch angle electrons appear to have been adiabatically heated by the increase in the magnetic field strength resulting from the compression of the upstream solar wind plasma by the cometary mass loading. A model calculation of this effect which agrees qualitatively with the observed 90-deg flux enhancements is presented.

  7. Computational sciences in the upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Thomas C

    2016-10-13

    The predominant technical challenge of the upstream oil and gas industry has always been the fundamental uncertainty of the subsurface from which it produces hydrocarbon fluids. The subsurface can be detected remotely by, for example, seismic waves, or it can be penetrated and studied in the extremely limited vicinity of wells. Inevitably, a great deal of uncertainty remains. Computational sciences have been a key avenue to reduce and manage this uncertainty. In this review, we discuss at a relatively non-technical level the current state of three applications of computational sciences in the industry. The first of these is seismic imaging, which is currently being revolutionized by the emergence of full wavefield inversion, enabled by algorithmic advances and petascale computing. The second is reservoir simulation, also being advanced through the use of modern highly parallel computing architectures. Finally, we comment on the role of data analytics in the upstream industry.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597785

  8. Computational sciences in the upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Thomas C

    2016-10-13

    The predominant technical challenge of the upstream oil and gas industry has always been the fundamental uncertainty of the subsurface from which it produces hydrocarbon fluids. The subsurface can be detected remotely by, for example, seismic waves, or it can be penetrated and studied in the extremely limited vicinity of wells. Inevitably, a great deal of uncertainty remains. Computational sciences have been a key avenue to reduce and manage this uncertainty. In this review, we discuss at a relatively non-technical level the current state of three applications of computational sciences in the industry. The first of these is seismic imaging, which is currently being revolutionized by the emergence of full wavefield inversion, enabled by algorithmic advances and petascale computing. The second is reservoir simulation, also being advanced through the use of modern highly parallel computing architectures. Finally, we comment on the role of data analytics in the upstream industry.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Upstream Source Influences on TGM Observations at Three CAMNet Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, D.; Lin, J. C.; Meng, F.; Gbor, P. K.; He, Z.; Sloan, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    Mercury is a persistent and toxic substance in the environment. Exposure to high levels of mercury can cause a range of adverse health effects, including damage to the nervous system, reproduction system and childhood development. Proper recognition and prediction of atmospheric levels of mercury can effectively avoid the adverse affect of Hg, however they cannot be achieved without accurate and quantitative identification of source influences, which is a great challenge due to the complexity of Hg in the air. The objective of this study is to present a new method to simulate Hg concentrations at the location of a monitoring site and quantitatively assess its upstream source influences. Hourly total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations at three CAMNet monitoring sites (receptors) in Ontario were predicted for four selected periods using the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model, which is capable of representing near-field influences that are not resolved by typical grid sizes in transport models. The model was modified to deal with Hg depositions and point source Hg emissions. The model-predicted Hg concentrations were compared with observations, as well as with the results from a CMAQ-Hg simulation in which the same emission and meteorology inputs were used. The comparisons show that STILT-predicted Hg concentrations agree well with observations, and are generally closer to the observations than those predicted by CMAQ-Hg. The better performance of the STILT simulation can be attributed to its ability to account for near-field influences. STILT was also applied to assess quantitatively the relative importance of different upstream source regions for the selected episodes. The assessment was made based on emission fluxes and STILT footprints, i.e., sensitivities of atmospheric concentrations to upstream surface fluxes. The results indicated that the main source regions of observed low Hg concentrations were in Northeastern Ontario, whereas

  10. Shape and shear guide sperm cells spiraling upstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Currently debated mechanisms for sperm long range travel vary from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over a wide range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilization. To rationalize these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations.

  11. From Worker Health To Citizen Health: Moving Upstream

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Martin-Jose

    2014-01-01

    New rapid growth economies, urbanization, health systems crises and “big data” are causing fundamental changes in social structures and systems including health. These forces for change have significant consequences for occupational and environmental medicine and will challenge the specialty to think beyond workers and workplaces as the principal locus of innovation for health and performance. These trends are placing great emphasis on upstream strategies for addressing the complex systems dynamics of the social determinants of health. The need to engage systems in communities for healthier workforces is a shift in orientation from worker and workplace centric to citizen and community centric. This change for occupational and environmental medicine requires extending systems approaches in the workplace to communities which are systems of systems and which require different skills, data, tools and partnerships. PMID:24284749

  12. Upstream Structures and their Effects on the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    Kinetic processes within the Earth's foreshock generate a profusion of plasma and magnetic field structures with sizes and durations ranging from the microscale (e.g. SLAMs, solitons, and density holes) to the mesoscale (e.g. foreshock cavities or boundaries, hot flow anomalies, and bubbles). Swept into the bow shock by the solar wind flow, the perturbations associated with these features batter the magnetosphere, driving a wide variety of magnetospheric effects, including large amplitude magnetopause motion, bursty reconnection and the generation of flux transfer events, enhanced pulsation activity within the magnetosphere, diffusion and energization of radiation belt particles, enhanced particle precipitation resulting in dayside aurora and riometer absorption, and the generation of field-aligned currents and magnetic impulse events in high-latitude ground magnetometers. This talk reviews the ever growing menagery of structures observed upstream from the bow shock, examines their possible interrelationships, and considers their magnetospheric consequences.

  13. Upstream Structures and Their Effects on the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic processes within the Earth's foreshock generate a profusion of plasma and magnetic field structures with sizes and durations ranging from the microscale (e.g. SLAMs, solitons, and density holes) to the mesoscale (e.g. foreshock cavities or boundaries, hot flow anomalies, and bubbles). Swept into the bow shock by the solar wind flow, the perturbations associated with these features batter the magnetosphere, driving a wide variety of magnetospheric effects, including large amplitude magnetopause motion, bursty reconnection and the generation of flux transfer events, enhanced pulsation activity within the magnetosphere, diffusion and energization of radiation belt particles, enhanced particle precipitation resulting in dayside aurora and riometer absorption, and the generation of field-aligned currents and magnetic impulse events in high-latitude ground magnetometers. This talk reviews the ever growing menagery of structures observed upstream from the bow shock, examines their possible interrelationships, and considers their magnetospheric consequences.

  14. Upstream Disaster Management to Support People Experiencing Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Sundareswaran, Madura; Ghazzawi, Andrea; O'Sullivan, Tracey L.

    2015-01-01

    The unique context of day-to-day living for people who are chronically homeless or living with housing insecurity puts them at high risk during community disasters. The impacts of extreme events, such as flooding, storms, riots, and other sources of community disruption, underscore the importance of preparedness efforts and fostering community resilience. This study is part of larger initiative focused on enhancing resilience and preparedness among high risk populations. The purpose of this study was to explore critical issues and strategies to promote resilience and disaster preparedness among people who are homeless in Canada. A sample of interviews (n=21) from key informants across Canada was analyzed to explore existing programs and supports for homeless populations. The data was selected from a larger sample of (n=43) interviews focused on programs and supports for people who are at heightened risk for negative impacts during disasters. Qualitative content analysis was used to extract emergent themes and develop a model of multi-level collaboration to support disaster resilience among people who are homeless. The results indicate there is a need for more upstream continuity planning, collaboration and communication between the emergency management sector and community service organizations that support people who are homeless. Prioritization and investment in the social determinants of health and community supports is necessary to promote resilience among this high-risk population. The findings from this study highlight the importance of acknowledging community support organizations as assets in disaster preparedness. Day-to-day resilience is an ongoing theme for people who are chronically homeless or living with housing insecurity. Upstream investment to build adaptive capacity and collaborate with community organizations is an important strategy to enhance community resilience. PMID:26346842

  15. Corporation-induced Diseases, Upstream Epidemiologic Surveillance, and Urban Health

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Corporation-induced diseases are defined as diseases of consumers, workers, or community residents who have been exposed to disease agents contained in corporate products. To study the epidemiology and to guide expanded surveillance of these diseases, a new analytical framework is proposed. This framework is based on the agent–host–environment model and the upstream multilevel epidemiologic approach and posits an epidemiologic cascade starting with government-sanctioned corporate profit making and ending in a social cost, i.e., harm to population health. Each of the framework’s levels addresses a specific level of analysis, including government, corporations, corporate conduits, the environment of the host, and the host. The explained variable at one level is also the explanatory variable at the next lower level. In this way, a causal chain can be followed along the epidemiologic cascade from the site of societal power down to the host. The framework thus describes the pathways by which corporate decisions filter down to disease production in the host and identifies opportunities for epidemiologic surveillance. Since the environment of city dwellers is strongly shaped by corporations that are far upstream and several levels away, the framework has relevance for the study of urban health. Corporations that influence the health of urban populations include developers and financial corporations that determine growth or decay of urban neighborhoods, as well as companies that use strategies based on neighborhood characteristics to sell products that harm consumer health. Epidemiological inquiry and surveillance are necessary at all levels to provide the knowledge needed for action to protect the health of the population. To achieve optimal inquiry and surveillance at the uppermost levels, epidemiologists will have to work with political scientists and other social scientists and to utilize novel sources of information. PMID:18437580

  16. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-17

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  17. Maturational steroids and gonadotropin in upstream migratory sockeye salmon.

    PubMed

    Truscott, B; Idler, D R; So, Y P; Walsh, J M

    1986-04-01

    The circulating serum concentrations of various steroid hormones in mature sockeye salmon were measured at four different developmental stages in their upstream migration to spawn at Adams River in British Columbia, Canada. In females, a high level of estradiol-17 beta was found in fish at the first location, and it persisted until immediately before reaching the spawning grounds, 485 km upstream, where it decreased to a minimal level. Free testosterone was extremely high throughout the migration but decreased significantly after spawning while its glucuronide changed reciprocally. Free and conjugated 17 alpha, 20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17 alpha, 20 beta-P) peaked at the last location before spawning with the glucuronide only 20% of the free steroid in concentration. After spawning, the concentration of free steroid declined but the glucuronide remained constant. 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone increased significantly in serum before and after the fish had spawned. During the migration 11-deoxycortisol was present in the serum at all stages but maximal levels were found in postspawned fish. Throughout the migration, the males had high serum levels of 11-ketotestosterone. Lesser amounts of free testosterone were also consistently present but the ratio of free: conjugated decreased from 1.7 at the beginning of the migration to 0.15 on the arrival at the Adams River and 0.10 in postspawned fish. Only low levels of 11 beta-hydroxytestosterone were found except in the postspawned males where the value was equal to one-half that of free testosterone. As in the females, there was a substantial increase in the levels of 17 alpha, 20 beta-P and its glucuronide in the males captured at the spawning grounds. In both sexes gonadotropin levels were low during the migration and high in the postspawned fish.

  18. Ingestion into the upstream wheelspace of an axial turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T.; Turner, A. B.

    1994-04-01

    The upstream wheelspace of an axial air turbine stage complete with nozzle guide vanes (NGVs) and rotor blades (430 mm mean diameter) has been tested with the objective of examining the combined effect of NGVs and rotor blades on the level of mainstream ingestion for different seal flow rates. A simple axial clearance seal was used with the rotor spun up to 6650 rpm by drawing air through it from atmospheric pressure with a large centrifugal compressor. The effect of rotational speed was examined for several constant mainstream flow rates by controlling the rotor speed with an air brake. The circumferential variation in hub static pressure was measured at the trailing edge of the NGVs upstream of the seal gap and was found to affect ingestion significantly. The hub static pressure distribution on the rotor blade leading edges was rotor speed dependent and could not be measured in the experiments. The Denton three-dimensional CFD computer code was used to predict the smoothed time-dependent pressure field for the rotor together with the pressure distribution downstream of the NGVs. The level and distribution of mainstream ingestion, and thus, the seal effectiveness, was determined from nitrous oxide gas concentration measurements and related to static pressure measurements made throughout the wheelspace. With the axial clearance rim seal close to the rotor the presence of the blades had a complex effect. Rotor blades in connection with NGVs were found to reduce mainstream ingestion seal flow rates significantly, but a small level of ingestion existed even for very high levels of seal flow rate.

  19. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO2 and/or H2S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  20. Assessing upstream fish passage connectivity with network analysis.

    PubMed

    McKay, S Kyle; Schramski, John R; Conyngham, Jock N; Fischenich, J Craig

    2013-09-01

    Hydrologic connectivity is critical to the structure, function, and dynamic process of river ecosystems. Dams, road crossings, and water diversions impact connectivity by altering flow regimes, behavioral cues, local geomorphology, and nutrient cycling. This longitudinal fragmentation of river ecosystems also increases genetic and reproductive isolation of aquatic biota such as migratory fishes. The cumulative effects on fish passage of many structures along a river are often substantial, even when individual barriers have negligible impact. Habitat connectivity can be improved through dam removal or other means of fish passage improvement (e.g., ladders, bypasses, culvert improvement). Environmental managers require techniques for comparing alternative fish passage restoration actions at alternative or multiple locations. Herein, we examined a graph-theoretic algorithm for assessing upstream habitat connectivity to investigate both basic and applied fish passage connectivity problems. First, we used hypothetical watershed configurations to assess general alterations to upstream fish passage connectivity with changes in watershed network topology (e.g., linear vs. highly dendritic) and the quantity, location, and passability of each barrier. Our hypothetical network modeling indicates that locations of dams with limited passage efficiency near the watershed outlet create a strong fragmentation signal but are not individually sufficient to disconnect the system. Furthermore, there exists a threshold in the number of dams beyond which connectivity declines precipitously, regardless of watershed topology and dam configuration. Watersheds with highly branched configurations are shown to be less susceptible to disconnection as measured by this metric. Second, we applied the model to prioritize barrier improvement in the mainstem of the Truckee River, Nevada, USA. The Truckee River application demonstrates the ability of the algorithm to address conditions common in fish

  1. Assessing upstream fish passage connectivity with network analysis.

    PubMed

    McKay, S Kyle; Schramski, John R; Conyngham, Jock N; Fischenich, J Craig

    2013-09-01

    Hydrologic connectivity is critical to the structure, function, and dynamic process of river ecosystems. Dams, road crossings, and water diversions impact connectivity by altering flow regimes, behavioral cues, local geomorphology, and nutrient cycling. This longitudinal fragmentation of river ecosystems also increases genetic and reproductive isolation of aquatic biota such as migratory fishes. The cumulative effects on fish passage of many structures along a river are often substantial, even when individual barriers have negligible impact. Habitat connectivity can be improved through dam removal or other means of fish passage improvement (e.g., ladders, bypasses, culvert improvement). Environmental managers require techniques for comparing alternative fish passage restoration actions at alternative or multiple locations. Herein, we examined a graph-theoretic algorithm for assessing upstream habitat connectivity to investigate both basic and applied fish passage connectivity problems. First, we used hypothetical watershed configurations to assess general alterations to upstream fish passage connectivity with changes in watershed network topology (e.g., linear vs. highly dendritic) and the quantity, location, and passability of each barrier. Our hypothetical network modeling indicates that locations of dams with limited passage efficiency near the watershed outlet create a strong fragmentation signal but are not individually sufficient to disconnect the system. Furthermore, there exists a threshold in the number of dams beyond which connectivity declines precipitously, regardless of watershed topology and dam configuration. Watersheds with highly branched configurations are shown to be less susceptible to disconnection as measured by this metric. Second, we applied the model to prioritize barrier improvement in the mainstem of the Truckee River, Nevada, USA. The Truckee River application demonstrates the ability of the algorithm to address conditions common in fish

  2. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  3. Upstream migration of two pre-spawning shortnose sturgeon passed upstream of Pinopolis Dam, Cooper River, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finney, S.T.; Isely, J.J.; Cooke, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Two shortnose sturgeon were artificially passed above the Pinopolis Lock and Dam into the Santee-Cooper Lakes in order to simulate the use of a fish-passage mechanism. Movement patterns and spawning behavior were studied to determine the potential success of future shortnose sturgeon migrations if and when a fish-migration bypass structure is installed. In addition to movement patterns, water temperature was monitored in areas that shortnose sturgeons utilized. Shortnose sturgeon migrated through a large static system to a known shortnose sturgeon spawning area more than 160 km upstream where water temperatures were consistent with known shortnose sturgeon spawning temperatures. No specific movement patterns in the reservoir system were recorded during downstream migrations.

  4. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  5. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Review of Upstream and Downstream Antioxidant Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Uttara, Bayani; Singh, Ajay V.; Zamboni, Paolo; Mahajan, R.T

    2009-01-01

    Free radicals are common outcome of normal aerobic cellular metabolism. In-built antioxidant system of body plays its decisive role in prevention of any loss due to free radicals. However, imbalanced defense mechanism of antioxidants, overproduction or incorporation of free radicals from environment to living system leads to serious penalty leading to neuro-degeneration. Neural cells suffer functional or sensory loss in neurodegenerative diseases. Apart from several other environmental or genetic factors, oxidative stress (OS) leading to free radical attack on neural cells contributes calamitous role to neuro-degeneration. Though, oxygen is imperative for life, imbalanced metabolism and excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation end into a range of disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, aging and many other neural disorders. Toxicity of free radicals contributes to proteins and DNA injury, inflammation, tissue damage and subsequent cellular apoptosis. Antioxidants are now being looked upon as persuasive therapeutic against solemn neuronal loss, as they have capability to combat by neutralizing free radicals. Diet is major source of antioxidants, as well as medicinal herbs are catching attention to be commercial source of antioxidants at present. Recognition of upstream and downstream antioxidant therapy to oxidative stress has been proved an effective tool in alteration of any neuronal damage as well as free radical scavenging. Antioxidants have a wide scope to sequester metal ions involved in neuronal plaque formation to prevent oxidative stress. In addition, antioxidant therapy is vital in scavenging free radicals and ROS preventing neuronal degeneration in post-oxidative stress scenario. PMID:19721819

  6. Nutrient spatial pattern of the upstream, mainstream and tributaries of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, YuLing; Zhang, Ping; Liu, DeFu; Yang, ZhengJian; Ji, DaoBin

    2014-10-01

    A comprehensive monitoring program was conducted to investigate the nutrient spatial pattern in the mainstream of the Yangtze River from the Baihetan Dam down to the Three Gorges Dam located at the upper region of the Yangtze River in China. Samples were taken from 33 different sites from July 30 to August 19, 2011. The nutrient patterns of the three representative tributaries of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR)--the Modao, the Daning, and the Xiangxi Rivers--were also investigated. The results show that the mainstream of the TGR has a higher concentration of nitrogen and a lower concentration of phosphorus than that of the upper mainstream before the TGR. Moreover, it was found that nitrate-nitrogen (NO₃-N) is the main nitrogen component, while particulate phosphorus predominates the total phosphorus (TP). It was found that the three representative tributaries of the TGR have lower total nitrogen (TN) concentrations compared to the corresponding sections of the mainstream TGR. Based on the nutrient spatial pattern, the nutrient flux was calculated. The total fluxes of TN, NO₃-N, TP, and orthophosphate (PO₄-P) from the upstream reach into the TGR are 2,155.06, 1,674.97, 212.98, and 83.42 t day(-1), respectively. The amount of nutrients imported from the TGR into its tributaries is more than the amount exported. It was determined that the Xiangxi River has the largest net rate of imported nitrogen at 7.66 t day(-1), whereas the Daning River has the largest net rate of imported phosphorus at 1.75 t day(-1). In addition, compared with the nutrients imported from the TGR into its tributaries, the nutrient flux from the upstream reach into the TGR contributes approximately less than 3 %.

  7. Nutrient spatial pattern of the upstream, mainstream and tributaries of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, YuLing; Zhang, Ping; Liu, DeFu; Yang, ZhengJian; Ji, DaoBin

    2014-10-01

    A comprehensive monitoring program was conducted to investigate the nutrient spatial pattern in the mainstream of the Yangtze River from the Baihetan Dam down to the Three Gorges Dam located at the upper region of the Yangtze River in China. Samples were taken from 33 different sites from July 30 to August 19, 2011. The nutrient patterns of the three representative tributaries of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR)--the Modao, the Daning, and the Xiangxi Rivers--were also investigated. The results show that the mainstream of the TGR has a higher concentration of nitrogen and a lower concentration of phosphorus than that of the upper mainstream before the TGR. Moreover, it was found that nitrate-nitrogen (NO₃-N) is the main nitrogen component, while particulate phosphorus predominates the total phosphorus (TP). It was found that the three representative tributaries of the TGR have lower total nitrogen (TN) concentrations compared to the corresponding sections of the mainstream TGR. Based on the nutrient spatial pattern, the nutrient flux was calculated. The total fluxes of TN, NO₃-N, TP, and orthophosphate (PO₄-P) from the upstream reach into the TGR are 2,155.06, 1,674.97, 212.98, and 83.42 t day(-1), respectively. The amount of nutrients imported from the TGR into its tributaries is more than the amount exported. It was determined that the Xiangxi River has the largest net rate of imported nitrogen at 7.66 t day(-1), whereas the Daning River has the largest net rate of imported phosphorus at 1.75 t day(-1). In addition, compared with the nutrients imported from the TGR into its tributaries, the nutrient flux from the upstream reach into the TGR contributes approximately less than 3 %. PMID:24990348

  8. An unsteady vortex lattice method model of a horizontal axis wind turbine operating in an upstream rotor wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, D.; Graham, J. M. R.

    2014-12-01

    An unsteady formulation of the vortex lattice method, VLM, is presented that uses a force- free representation of the wake behind a horizontal axis wind turbine, HAWT, to calculate the aerodynamic loading on a turbine operating in the wake of an upstream rotor. A Cartesian velocity grid is superimposed over the computational domain to facilitate the representation of the atmospheric turbulence surrounding the turbine and wind shear. The wake of an upstream rotor is modelled using two methods: a mean velocity deficit with superimposed turbulence, based on experimental observations, and a purely numeric periodic boundary condition. Both methods are treated as frozen and propagated with the velocity grid. Measurements of the mean thrust and blade root bending moment on a three bladed horizontal axis rotor modelling a 5 MW HAWT at 1:250 scale were carried out in a wind tunnel. Comparisons are made between operation in uniform flow and in the wake of a similarly loaded rotor approximately 6.5 diameters upstream. The measurements were used to validate the output from the VLM simulations, assuming a completely rigid rotor. The trends in the simulation thrust predictions are found to compare well with the uniform flow case, except at low tip speed ratios where there are losses due to stall which are yet to be included in the model. The simple wake model predicts the mean deficit, whilst the periodic boundary condition captures more of the frequency content of the loading in an upstream wake. However, all the thrust loads are over-predicted. The simulation results severely overestimate the bending moment, which needs addressing. However, the reduction in bending due to the simple wake model is found to reflect the experimental data reasonably well.

  9. Harbor seal whiskers synchronize with frequency of upstream wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, Heather; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Harbor seals are able to use their whiskers to track minute water movements, such as those left in the wake of a fish. The current study is a simple representation of what the whiskers experience as the seal chases a fish. A scaled whisker model (average cross-flow diameter: dw) is first tested in a towing tank by itself and then towed behind a larger cylinder (dc = 2 . 5dw), which serves as a wake generator. A flexing plate attached to the model base allows the whisker to freely vibrate in response to the flow. Measurements from strain gages on the plate are calibrated to tip deflections. While in the cylinder wake, the whisker vibrates with an amplitude up to ten times higher than it does on its own (A /dw = 0 . 15). Also, the whisker synchronizes with the vortex shedding frequency (fs =0/. 2 U dc) of the upstream cylinder over the range of reduced velocities tested, whereas on its own, the whisker oscillates around its own natural frequency in water. Seals may use the difference in vibration amplitude and frequency between these two cases to help detect the presence of a vortex wake.

  10. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves upstream of Jupiter's bow shock are analyzed. The waves are found to be right circularly polarized in the solar wind frame which suggests that they are propagating in the fast magnetosonic mode. A complete spectral and minimum variance eigenvalue analysis of the data was performed. The power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations contains several peaks. The fluctuations at 2.3 mHz have a direction of minimum variance along the direction of the average magnetic field. The direction of minimum variance of these fluctuations lies at approximately 40 deg. to the magnetic field and is parallel to the radial direction. We argue that these fluctuations are waves excited by protons reflected off the Jovian bow shock. The inferred speed of the reflected protons is about two times the solar wind speed in the plasma rest frame. A linear instability analysis is presented which suggests an explanation for many of the observed features of the observations.

  11. Rating Curve Estimation from Local Levels and Upstream Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, M.; Mascellani, G.

    2003-04-01

    Current technology allows for low cost and easy level measurements while the discharge measurements are still difficult and expensive. Thus, these are rarely performed and usually not in flood conditions because of lack of safety and difficulty in activating the measurement team in due time. As a consequence, long series of levels are frequently available without the corresponding discharge values. However, for the purpose of planning, management of water resources and real time flood forecasting, discharge is needed and it is therefore essential to convert local levels into discharge values by using the appropriate rating curve. Over this last decade, several methods have been proposed to relate local levels at a site of interest to data recorded at a river section located upstream where a rating curve is available. Some of these methods are based on a routing approach which uses the Muskingum model structure in different ways; others are based on the entropy concepts. Lately, fuzzy logic has been applied more and more frequently in the framework of hydraulic and hydrologic problems and this has prompted to the authors to use it for synthesising the rating curves. A comparison between all these strategies is performed, highlighting the difficulties and advantages of each of them, with reference to a long reach of the Po river in Italy, where several hydrometers and the relevant rating curves are available, thus allowing for both a parameterization and validation of the different strategies.

  12. Dynamic meandering in response to upstream perturbations and floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuurman, F.; Shimizu, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    River meandering results from spatially alternating bank erosion and bar growth. Recent flume experiments and theory suggest that a continuous inflow perturbation is a requirement for sustained meandering. Furthermore, flume experiments suggest that bar-floodplain conversion is an additional requirement. Here, we tested the effects of continuous inflow perturbation and bar-floodplain conversion on meander migration using three numerical morphodynamic models: a 1D-model, and two 2D-models with one of them using adaptive moving grid. We focused on the interaction between bars and bends that leads to meander initiation, and the effect of different methods to model bank erosion and floodplain accretion processes on meander migration. The results showed that inflow perturbations have large effects on meander dynamics of high-sinuosity channels, with strong excitation when the inflow is periodically perturbed. In contrast, inflow perturbations have rather small effect in low-sinuosity channels. Steady alternate bars alone are insufficient to cause high-sinuosity meandering. For high-sinuosity meandering, bar-floodplain conversion is required that prevents chute-cutoffs and enhances flow asymmetry, whilst meandering with chute-cutoffs requires merely weak floodplain formation, and braiding occurs without floodplain formation. Thus, this study demonstrated that both dynamic upstream inflow perturbation and bar-floodplain conversion are required for sustained high-sinuosity meandering.

  13. Upstream and Downstream: Anthropological Contributions to River Basin Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, M.

    2003-04-01

    It is now almost 30 years since Thayer Scudder and Elizabeth Colson first focused anthropological analysis on the consequences of forced relocation of peoples from the reservoir areas upstream from large dams. The rate of large dam construction has been enormous, more than 50,000 having been built since the mid-1930s, and the total number of persons forcibly relocated has reached the many millions. Inspired by their work, my colleagues and I at the Institute for Development Anthropology began focusing on the downstream consequences of dam construction, particularly on the Senegal River, invited by the Organisation pour la Mise en Valeur du Fleuve Senegal (OMVS). The work resulted not only in an analysis, but in a proposed alternative dam-management approach that would permit hydropower generation yet substantially reduce the costs of changed flow regimes borne by the riparian peoples. In this discussion, I would like to bring the situation up-to-date. What has happened to those recommendations, initially embraced by at least some of the players involved in the river's management?

  14. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, AY; Sitnov, MI; Merkin, VG; Artemyev, AV

    2013-01-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it. PMID:26167430

  15. Deceleration of the solar wind upstream from the earth's bow shock and the origin of diffuse upstream ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Paschmann, G.; Skopke, N.

    1980-01-01

    Observations with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Max-Planck-Institut crossed-fan solar wind ion experiment on ISEE I reveal that the solar wind is decelerated and deflected away from the direction of the earth's bow shock as it enters that portion of the upstream region populated by diffuse bow shock ions and long-period (10-60 s) waves. Typically, the average directed velocity vector changes by 7-10 km/s as it enters the wave region. At times, average speed changes as large as 25-40 km/s are observed. Superposed upon these changes in average flow speed are large amplitude (+ or - 15) fluctuations in flow speed associated with the waves themselves. The observations suggest that the solar wind deceleration is the result of momentum transfer from reflected bow shock ions to the wind via the long-period waves as the reflected ion beams go unstable. The broad angular distributions of the diffuse ions thus appear to be produced as a consequence of the disruption of reflected ion beams.

  16. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  17. "Upstream Thinking": the catchment management approach of a water provider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand-Clement, E.; Ross, M.; Smith, D.; Anderson, K.; Luscombe, D.; Le Feuvre, N.; Brazier, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    Human activities have large impacts on water quality and provision. Water companies throughout the UK are faced with the consequences of poor land management and need to find appropriate solutions to decreasing water quality. This is particularly true in the South West of England, where 93% of the drinking water is sourced from rivers and reservoirs: large areas of drained peatlands (i.e. Exmoor and Dartmoor National Parks) are responsible for a significant input of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) discolouring the water, whilst poorly managed farming activities can lead to diffuse pollution. Alongside the direct environmental implications, poor water quality is partly increasing water treatment costs and will drive significant future investment in additional water treatment, with further repercussions on customers. This highlights the need for water companies throughout the UK, and further afield, to be more involved in catchment management. "Upstream Thinking" is South West Water's (SWW) approach to catchment management, where working with stakeholders to improve water quality upstream aims to avoid increasingly costly solutions downstream. This approach has led the company to invest in two major areas of work: (1) The Farmland programme where problematic farm management practices and potential solutions are identified, typically 40% of the required investment is then offered in exchange for a legal undertaking to maintain the new farm assets in good condition for 25 years; (2) The Mires programme which involves heavy investment in peatland restoration through the blocking of open ditches in order to improve water storage and quality in the long term. From these two projects, it has been clear that stakeholder involvement of groups such as local farmers, the Westcountry Rivers Trust, the Exmoor National Park Authority, the Environment Agency, Natural England and the Exmoor Society is essential, first because it draws in catchment improvement expertise which is not

  18. Relict landscape resistance to dissection by upstream migrating knickpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, Gilles Y.; Willenbring, Jane K.; Miller, Thomas E.; Scatena, Frederik N.

    2016-06-01

    Expanses of subdued topographies are common at high elevation in mountain ranges. They are often interpreted as relict landscapes and are expected to be replaced by steeper topography as erosion proceeds. Preservation of such relict fragments can merely reflect the fact that it takes time to remove any preexisting topography. However, relict fragments could also possess intrinsic characteristics that make them resilient to dissection. We document here the propagation of a wave of dissection across an uplifted relict landscape in Puerto Rico. Using 10Be-26Al burial dating on cave sediments, we show that uplift started 4 Ma and that river knickpoints have since migrated very slowly across the landscape. Modern detrital 10Be erosion rates are consistent with these long-term rates of knickpoint retreat. Analysis of knickpoint distribution, combined with visual observations along the streambeds, indicates that incision by abrasion and plucking is so slow that bedrock weathering becomes a competing process of knickpoint retreat. The studied rivers flow over a massive stock of quartz diorite surrounded by an aureole of metavolcanic rocks. Earlier studies have shown that vegetation over the relict topography efficiently limits erosion, allowing for the formation of a thick saprolite underneath. Such slow erosion reduces streambed load fluxes delivered to the knickpoints, as well as bed load grain size. Both processes limit abrasion. Compounding the effect of slow abrasion, wide joint spacing in the bedrock makes plucking infrequent. Thus, the characteristics of the relict upstream landscape have a direct effect on stream incision farther downstream, reducing the celerity at which the relict, subdued landscape is dissected. We conclude that similar top-down controls on river incision rate may help many relict landscapes to persist amidst highly dissected topographies.

  19. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in a Platinum Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, P. M.; Dietrich, D. L.; Mellish, B. P.; Miller, F. J.; T'ien, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for catalytic combustion in monolithic reactors at elevated temperatures is the start-up or "light-off" from a cold initial condition. In this work, we demonstrate a concept called "back-end catalytic ignition that potentially can be utilized in the light-off of catalytic monoliths. An external downstream flame or Joule heating raises the temperature of a small portion of the catalyst near the outlet initiating a localized catalytic reaction that propagates upstream heating the entire channel. This work uses a transient numerical model to demonstrate "back-end" ignition within a single channel which can characterize the overall performance of a monolith. The paper presents comparisons to an experiment using a single non-adiabatic channel but the concept can be extended to the adiabatic monolith case. In the model, the time scales associated with solid heat-up are typically several orders of magnitude larger than the gas-phase and chemical kinetic time-scales. Therefore, the model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase with respect to a transient solid. The gas phase is one-dimensional. Appropriate correlations, however, account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The thermally-thin solid includes axial conduction. The gas phase, however, does not include axial conduction due to the high Peclet number flows. The model includes both detailed gas-phase and catalytic surface reactions. The experiment utilizes a pure platinum circular channel oriented horizontally though which a CO/O2 mixture (equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9) flows at 2 m/s.

  20. Innovation and performance: The case of the upstream petroleum sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, A. C. Jai

    This thesis investigates innovation in the upstream crude oil and natural gas sector, a strategic part of the Canadian economy and a vital industry for North American energy trade and security. Significant interest exists in understanding innovation in this sector from a private and public policy perspective. Interest in the sector has intensified recently due to concerns about world oil supply, Canada's oil sands development, and the potential that Canada may become an "energy superpower." The study examines the factors that drive companies involved in exploration, development, and production in the upstream petroleum sector to innovate and the impact of their innovation activities through major technologies on their performance. The thesis focuses on process innovation, which involves the adoption of new or significantly improved production processes, and is distinct from product innovation, which is based on the development and commercialization of a product with improved product characteristics to deliver new services to the consumer. The thesis provides a comprehensive review of the literature and develops an investigative model framework to examine the drivers of innovation and the impact of innovation on performance in the upstream petroleum sector. The research employs a survey questionnaire that was developed to obtain data and information, which was missing in the literature or not publicly available to test key relationships of innovation and performance indicators. In addition to the survey questionnaire, a number of knowledgeable experts in the industry were also interviewed. A total of 68 respondents completed the survey questionnaire, accounting for 40 percent of the firms in the industry. This percentage goes up to over 50 percent when account is taken of extremely small firms who could not fill out the survey. Further, the 68 respondents account for most of the industry revenues, production, and employment. The respondents include most of the key

  1. Testicular dysgenesis/regression without campomelic dysplasia in patients carrying missense mutations and upstream deletion of SOX9.

    PubMed

    Katoh-Fukui, Yuko; Igarashi, Maki; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Horikawa, Reiko; Nagai, Toshiro; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Erina; Miyado, Mami; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Keiko; Matsubara, Yoichi; Baba, Takashi; Morohashi, Ken-Ichirou; Igarashi, Arisa; Ogata, Tsutomu; Takada, Shuji; Fukami, Maki

    2015-11-01

    SOX9 haploinsufficiency underlies campomelic dysplasia (CD) with or without testicular dysgenesis. Current understanding of the phenotypic variability and mutation spectrum of SOX9 abnormalities remains fragmentary. Here, we report three patients with hitherto unreported SOX9 abnormalities. These patients were identified through molecular analysis of 33 patients with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD). Patients 1-3 manifested testicular dysgenesis or regression without CD. Patients 1 and 2 carried probable damaging mutations p.Arg394Gly and p.Arg437Cys, respectively, in the SOX9 C-terminal domain but not in other known 46,XY DSD causative genes. These substitutions were absent from ~120,000 alleles in the exome database. These mutations retained normal transactivating activity for the Col2a1 enhancer, but showed impaired activity for the Amh promoter. Patient 3 harbored a maternally inherited ~491 kb SOX9 upstream deletion that encompassed the known 32.5 kb XY sex reversal region. Breakpoints of the deletion resided within nonrepeat sequences and were accompanied by a short-nucleotide insertion. The results imply that testicular dysgenesis and regression without skeletal dysplasia may be rare manifestations of SOX9 abnormalities. Furthermore, our data broaden pathogenic SOX9 abnormalities to include C-terminal missense substitutions which lead to target-gene-specific protein dysfunction, and enhancer-containing upstream microdeletions mediated by nonhomologous end-joining. PMID:26740947

  2. Damaged Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  3. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  4. Energetic-ion acceleration and transport in the upstream region of Jupiter: Voyager 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Long-lived upstream energetic ion events at Jupiter appear to be very similar in nearly all respects to upstream ion events at Earth. A notable difference between the two planetary systems is the enhanced heavy ion compositional signature reported for the Jovian events. This compositional feature has suggested that ions escaping from the Jovian magnetosphere play an important role in forming upstream ion populations at Jupiter. In contrast, models of energetic upstream ions at Earth emphasize in situ acceleration of reflected solar wind ions within the upstream region itself. Using Voyager 1 and 2 energetic ( approximately 30 keV) ion measurements near the magnetopause, in the magnetosheath, and immediately upstream of the bow shock, the compositional patterns are examined together with typical energy spectra in each of these regions. A model involving upstream Fermi acceleration early in events and emphasizing energetic particle escape in the prenoon part of the Jovian magnetosphere late in events is presented to explain many of the features in the upstream region of Jupiter.

  5. 3. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 301.85, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 301.85, view to east-northeast, 135mm lens. Heavy vegetation cover, steep banks, and lack of streamside footing precluded full elevation views of the upstream and downstream sides of this bridge. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  6. 4. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 324.99, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 324.99, view to northeast, 90mm lens. Heavy vegetation cover, steep banks, and lack of streamside footing precluded full elevation views of the upstream and downstream sides of this bridge. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 324.99, Milepost 324.99, Shasta Springs, Siskiyou County, CA

  7. Chaotic Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    Uses chaos theory to investigate the nonlinear phenomenon of population growth fluctuation. Illustrates the use of computers and computer programs to make calculations in a nonlinear difference equation system. (MDH)

  8. Hydrogen moderator performance calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Picton, D. J.; Beynon, T. D.; Broome, T. A.

    1997-09-01

    A comparison was made between MCNP calculations and experimental measurements of the neutron spectrum from the liquid hydrogen moderator on ISIS. The calculations were performed for varying ortho/para concentrations, and demonstrated a best fit for 100% para-hydrogen. The agreement between the measured and calculated results was good below 2Å (i.e. for energies above 20 meV) but significant deviations were seen for longer wavelengths. A second study used the MCNP code for a detailed comparison of the time distributions and neutron spectra from poisoned liquid hydrogen and liquid methane moderators. The results indicate that the replacement of a liquid methane moderator with liquid hydrogen, in order to eliminate radiation damage effects, is an option which can be seriously considered. (auth)

  9. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  10. Effects of salinity on upstream-migrating, spawning sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Martins, D.; Coimbra, J.; Antunes, C.; Wilson, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, is an anadromous, semelparous species that is vulnerable to endangered in parts of its native range due in part to loss of spawning habitat because of man-made barriers. The ability of lampreys to return to the ocean or estuary and search out alternative spawning river systems would be limited by their osmoregulatory ability in seawater. A reduction in tolerance to salinity has been documented in migrants, although the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. We examined the capacity for marine osmoregulation in upstream spawning migrants by characterizing the physiological effects of salinity challenge from a molecular perspective. Estuarine-captured migrants held in freshwater (FW) for ∼1 week (short-term acclimation) or 2 months (long-term acclimation) underwent an incremental salinity challenge until loss of equilibrium occurred and upper thresholds of 25 and 17.5, respectively, occurred. Regardless of salinity tolerance, all lamprey downregulated FW ion-uptake mechanisms [gill transcripts of Na+:Cl− cotransporter (NCC/slc12a3) and epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC/scnn1) and kidney Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) protein and activity but not transcript]. At their respective salinity limits, lamprey displayed a clear osmoregulatory failure and were unable to regulate [Na+] and [Cl−] in plasma and intestinal fluid within physiological limits, becoming osmocompromised. A >90% drop in haematocrit indicated haemolysis, and higher plasma concentrations of the cytosolic enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase indicated damage to other tissues, including liver. However, >80% of short-term FW-acclimated fish were able to osmoregulate efficiently, with less haemolysis and tissue damage. This osmoregulatory ability was correlated with significant upregulation of the secretory form of Na+:K+:2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1/slc12a2) transcript levels and the re-emergence of seawater

  11. Effects of salinity on upstream-migrating, spawning sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Martins, D; Coimbra, J; Antunes, C; Wilson, J M

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, is an anadromous, semelparous species that is vulnerable to endangered in parts of its native range due in part to loss of spawning habitat because of man-made barriers. The ability of lampreys to return to the ocean or estuary and search out alternative spawning river systems would be limited by their osmoregulatory ability in seawater. A reduction in tolerance to salinity has been documented in migrants, although the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. We examined the capacity for marine osmoregulation in upstream spawning migrants by characterizing the physiological effects of salinity challenge from a molecular perspective. Estuarine-captured migrants held in freshwater (FW) for ∼1 week (short-term acclimation) or 2 months (long-term acclimation) underwent an incremental salinity challenge until loss of equilibrium occurred and upper thresholds of 25 and 17.5, respectively, occurred. Regardless of salinity tolerance, all lamprey downregulated FW ion-uptake mechanisms [gill transcripts of Na(+):Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC/slc12a3) and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC/scnn1) and kidney Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) protein and activity but not transcript]. At their respective salinity limits, lamprey displayed a clear osmoregulatory failure and were unable to regulate [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] in plasma and intestinal fluid within physiological limits, becoming osmocompromised. A >90% drop in haematocrit indicated haemolysis, and higher plasma concentrations of the cytosolic enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase indicated damage to other tissues, including liver. However, >80% of short-term FW-acclimated fish were able to osmoregulate efficiently, with less haemolysis and tissue damage. This osmoregulatory ability was correlated with significant upregulation of the secretory form of Na(+):K(+):2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1/slc12a2) transcript levels and the re-emergence of

  12. Effects of salinity on upstream-migrating, spawning sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Martins, D; Coimbra, J; Antunes, C; Wilson, J M

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, is an anadromous, semelparous species that is vulnerable to endangered in parts of its native range due in part to loss of spawning habitat because of man-made barriers. The ability of lampreys to return to the ocean or estuary and search out alternative spawning river systems would be limited by their osmoregulatory ability in seawater. A reduction in tolerance to salinity has been documented in migrants, although the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. We examined the capacity for marine osmoregulation in upstream spawning migrants by characterizing the physiological effects of salinity challenge from a molecular perspective. Estuarine-captured migrants held in freshwater (FW) for ∼1 week (short-term acclimation) or 2 months (long-term acclimation) underwent an incremental salinity challenge until loss of equilibrium occurred and upper thresholds of 25 and 17.5, respectively, occurred. Regardless of salinity tolerance, all lamprey downregulated FW ion-uptake mechanisms [gill transcripts of Na(+):Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC/slc12a3) and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC/scnn1) and kidney Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) protein and activity but not transcript]. At their respective salinity limits, lamprey displayed a clear osmoregulatory failure and were unable to regulate [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] in plasma and intestinal fluid within physiological limits, becoming osmocompromised. A >90% drop in haematocrit indicated haemolysis, and higher plasma concentrations of the cytosolic enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase indicated damage to other tissues, including liver. However, >80% of short-term FW-acclimated fish were able to osmoregulate efficiently, with less haemolysis and tissue damage. This osmoregulatory ability was correlated with significant upregulation of the secretory form of Na(+):K(+):2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1/slc12a2) transcript levels and the re-emergence of

  13. The 'upstream wake' of swimming and flying animals and its correlation with propulsive efficiency.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O

    2008-08-01

    The interaction between swimming and flying animals and their fluid environments generates downstream wake structures such as vortices. In most studies, the upstream flow in front of the animal is neglected. In this study, we demonstrate the existence of upstream fluid structures even though the upstream flow is quiescent or possesses a uniform incoming velocity. Using a computational model, the flow generated by a swimmer (an oscillating flexible plate) is simulated and a new fluid mechanical analysis is applied to the flow to identify the upstream fluid structures. These upstream structures show the exact portion of fluid that is going to interact with the swimmer. A mass flow rate is then defined based on the upstream structures, and a metric for propulsive efficiency is established using the mass flow rate and the kinematics of the swimmer. We propose that the unsteady mass flow rate defined by the upstream fluid structures can be used as a metric to measure and objectively compare the efficiency of locomotion in water and air.

  14. The 'upstream wake' of swimming and flying animals and its correlation with propulsive efficiency.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O

    2008-08-01

    The interaction between swimming and flying animals and their fluid environments generates downstream wake structures such as vortices. In most studies, the upstream flow in front of the animal is neglected. In this study, we demonstrate the existence of upstream fluid structures even though the upstream flow is quiescent or possesses a uniform incoming velocity. Using a computational model, the flow generated by a swimmer (an oscillating flexible plate) is simulated and a new fluid mechanical analysis is applied to the flow to identify the upstream fluid structures. These upstream structures show the exact portion of fluid that is going to interact with the swimmer. A mass flow rate is then defined based on the upstream structures, and a metric for propulsive efficiency is established using the mass flow rate and the kinematics of the swimmer. We propose that the unsteady mass flow rate defined by the upstream fluid structures can be used as a metric to measure and objectively compare the efficiency of locomotion in water and air. PMID:18689420

  15. The Impact of Upstream Flow on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer in a Valley on a Mountainous Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Bianca; Kalthoff, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive measurements on the mountainous island of Corsica were used to investigate how the mountain atmospheric boundary layer (mountain ABL) in a valley downstream of the main mountain ridge was influenced by the upstream flow. The data used were mainly collected with the mobile observation platform KITcube during the first special observation period of the Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX) in 2012 and were based on various in situ, remote sensing and aircraft measurements. Two days in autumn 2012 were analyzed in detail. On these days the mountain ABL evolution was a result of convection and thermally-driven circulations as well as terrain-induced dynamically-driven flows. During periods when dynamically-driven flows were dominant, warm and dry air from aloft with a large-scale westerly wind component was transported downwards into the valley. On one day, these flows controlled the mountain ABL characteristics in a large section of the valley for several hours, while on the other day their impact was observed in a smaller section of the valley for about 1 h only. To explain the observations we considered a theoretical concept based on uniform upstream stratification and wind speed, and calculated the non-dimensional mountain height and the horizontal aspect ratio of the barrier to relate the existing conditions to diagnosed regimes of stratified flow past a ridge. On both days, wave breaking, flow splitting and lee vortices were likely to occur. Besides the upstream conditions, a reduction of stability in the valley seemed to be important for the downward transport to reach the ground. The spatio-temporal structure of such a mountain ABL over complex terrain, which was affected by various interacting flows, differed a lot from that of the classical ABL over homogeneous, flat terrain and it is stressed that the traditional ABL definitions need to be revised when applying them to complex terrain.

  16. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Damage survival. 174.320 Section 174.320 Shipping COAST... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium; and (2) Reach a height of at least 4 inches (l00mm) within the 20 degree positive range. (d)...

  17. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Damage survival. 174.320 Section 174.320 Shipping COAST... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium; and (2) Reach a height of at least 4 inches (l00mm) within the 20 degree positive range. (d)...

  18. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Damage survival. 174.320 Section 174.320 Shipping COAST... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium; and (2) Reach a height of at least 4 inches (l00mm) within the 20 degree positive range. (d)...

  19. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium... opening within, or partially within, the 20 degree range beyond the angle of equilibrium must...

  20. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium... opening within, or partially within, the 20 degree range beyond the angle of equilibrium must...

  1. 46 CFR 172.104 - Character of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... integrated tow, design calculations must show that the barge can survive damage at any location including the..., design calculations must show that the barge can survive damage— (1) At any location on the bottom of the... required, design calculations must show that a barge can survive damage at any location except on...

  2. Field-aligned ion beams upstream of the earth's bow shock Evidence for a magnetosheath source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.

    1983-01-01

    High time resolution ISEE-1 and -2 observations of upstream field-aligned ion beams at several crossings of the earth's bow shock indicate that some beams are due to high energy magnetosheath particles leaking through the shock into the upstream region. The distribution immediately downstream of these oblique shocks consists of a 'core' of directly transmitted, slightly heated ions, plus a crescent-shaped, high-velocity distribution, centered roughly on the magnetic field in the direction toward the upstream region, with a fairly well defined low velocity cutoff.

  3. Experimental demonstration of CW light injection effect in upstream traffic TDM-PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Wu, Yu-Fu; Shih, Fu-Yuan; Chi, Sien

    2010-06-01

    High capacity time-division-multiplexed passive optical network (TDM-PON) is an emerging fiber access network that deploys optical access lines between a carrier's central office (CO) and a customer sites. In this investigation, we demonstrate and analyze the continuous wave (CW) upstream effect in TDM-PONs. Besides, we also propose and design a protection apparatus in each optical network unit (ONU) to avoid a CW upstream traffic in TDM-PONs due to sudden external environment change or ONU failure. When an upstream CW injection occurs in TDM access network, the protection scheme can stop the CW effect within a few ms to maintain the entire data traffic.

  4. Rotor damage detection by using piezoelectric impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Y.; Tao, Y.; Mao, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Rotor is a core component of rotary machinery. Once the rotor has the damage, it may lead to a major accident. Thus the quantitative rotor damage detection method based on piezoelectric impedance is studied in this paper. With the governing equation of piezoelectric transducer (PZT) in a cylindrical coordinate, the displacement along the radius direction is derived. The charge of PZT is calculated by the electric displacement. Then, by the use of the obtained displacement and charge, an analytic piezoelectric impedance model of the rotor is built. Given the circular boundary condition of a rotor, annular elements are used as the analyzed objects and spectral element method is used to set up the damage detection model. The Electro-Mechanical (E/M) coupled impedance expression of an undamaged rotor is deduced with the application of a low-cost impedance test circuit. A Taylor expansion method is used to obtain the approximate E/M coupled impedance expression for the damaged rotor. After obtaining the difference between the undamaged and damaged rotor impedance, a rotor damage detection method is proposed. This method can directly calculate the change of bending stiffness of the structural elements, it follows that the rotor damage can be effectively detected. Finally, a preset damage configuration is used for the numerical simulation. The result shows that the quantitative damage detection algorithm based on spectral element method and piezoelectric impedance proposed in this paper can identify the location and the severity of the damaged rotor accurately.

  5. Evidence for specularly reflected ions upstream from the quasi-parallel bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.

    1982-01-01

    Ion velocity distributions in the form of bunches of gyrating particles traveling along helical paths have been observed moving sunward immediately upstream from quasi-parallel parts of the earth's bow shock using Los Alamos/Garching instruments on ISEE-1 and -2. These distributions have characteristics which indicate that they are produced by the nearly specular reflection at the shock of a portion of the incident solar wind ions. In particular, the guiding center motion and the gyrospeeds of the gyrating ions are quantitatively consistent with simple geometrical considerations for specular reflection. These considerations reveal that specularly reflected ions can escape upstream when the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the local shock normal is less than 45 deg but not when the angle is greater than 45 deg. These upstream gyrating ions are an important signature of one of the processes by which solar wind streaming energy is dissipated into other forms of energy at the shock.

  6. Characterization of the upstream region of the formate dehydrogenase operon of Methanobacterium formicicum.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, P S; Ferry, J G

    1988-01-01

    The fdhA and fdhB genes of Methanobacterium formicicum, which code for the alpha and beta subunits of formate dehydrogenase, were cotranscribed as part of a large transcript. By using Northern (RNA) gel blot analysis, the transcription start site was located within a 1.6-kilobase BglII-NcoI fragment 4.3 kilobases upstream from the fdhA gene. The precise transcription start site within the fragment was determined with the aid of primer extension analysis and S1 nuclease protection studies. A putative promoter sequence for structural genes of methanogenic archaebacteria is proposed based on a comparison of DNA sequences of the upstream region of methanogen operons for which transcription initiation sites are known. Comparison of the DNA sequence of the upstream region of the fdh operon of M. formicicum with the sequence upstream of the fdhF gene of Escherichia coli revealed regions of considerable identity. Images PMID:2457012

  7. Upstream Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    This analysis focuses on financial and operating trends of the oil and natural gas production business segment, often referred to as upstream operations, of 42 global oil and natural gas producing companies

  8. 8. DETAIL AT UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING 2X6 VERTICAL WOOD DECKING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL AT UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING 2X6 VERTICAL WOOD DECKING, RAIL SUPPORT, AND SCUPPER; VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Auwaiakeakua Bridge, Spanning Auwaiakekua Gulch at Mamalahoa Highway, Waikoloa, Hawaii County, HI

  9. Energetic particle diffusion coefficients upstream of quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of about 30 to 130-keV/e protons and alpha particles upstream of six quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks that passed by the ISEE 3 spacecraft during 1978-1979 were analyzed, and the values for the upstream energegic particle diffusion coefficient, kappa, in these six events were deduced for a number of energies and upstream positions. These observations were compared with predictions of Lee's (1983) theory of shock acceleration. It was found that the observations verified the prediction of the A/Q dependence (where A and Q are the particle atomic mass and ionization state, respectively) of kappa for alpha and proton particles upstream of the quasi-parallel shocks.

  10. Regulation of the human. beta. -actin promoter by upstream and intron domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sunyu )); Gunning, P.; Kedes, L. ); Liu, Shuhui National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu ); Leavitt, J. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have identified three regulatory domains of the complex human {beta}-actin gene promoter. They span a region of about 3,000 bases, from not more than {minus}2,011 bases upstream of the mRNA cap site to within the 5{prime} intron (832 bases long). A distal upstream domain contains at least one enhancer-like element. A proximal upstream domain, with a CArG (for CC(A+T rich){sub 6}GG) motif found in all known mammalian actin genes, seems to confer serum, but not growth factor, inducibility. The third domain is within the evolutionarily conserved 3{prime} region of the first intron and contains a 13 base-pair sequence, identical to the upstream sequence with the CArG motif. This domain also contains sequences that are both serum and fibroblast growth inducible.

  11. 8. UPSTREAM EXTENSION TO 60' INFILTRATION PIPE. Sheet A19, November, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. UPSTREAM EXTENSION TO 60' INFILTRATION PIPE. Sheet A-19, November, 1940. File no. SA 342/13. - Prado Dam, Embankment, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  12. Measurement of Emissions from Produced Water Ponds: Upstream Oil and Gas Study #1; Final Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant uncertainty exists regarding air pollutant emissions from upstream oil and gas production operations. Oil and gas operations present unique and challenging emission testing issues due to the large variety and quantity of potential emissions sources. This report summ...

  13. Multispacecraft observations of energetic ions upstream and downstream of the bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Moebius, E.; Kistler, L. M.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1989-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of energetic protons and alpha particles were obtained inside and outside of the magnetopause and upstream and downstream of the bow shock. In the magnetosheath, no gradient or streaming is found in the upstream direction. The present results are consistent with first-order Fermi acceleration at the bow shock and subsequent downstream convection, and exclude the possibility of a magnetospheric source for these particles.

  14. Power efficient and colorless PON upstream system using asymmetric clipping optical OFDM and TDMA technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Qiao, Yaojun; Ji, Yuefeng

    2012-04-01

    Asymmetric clipping optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) based time division multiple access (TDMA) Passive Optical Network (PON) upstream transmission architecture is proposed. The system features low power consumption, colorless, and cost effectiveness. Performance and validity of 10 Gb/s upstream transmission are studied and confirmed by simulation. Performance degradation due to interference from rogue Optical Network Unit (ONU) is also studied.

  15. 6. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 310.58, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 310.58, 135mm lens. Note ashlar stone masonry abutment built in 1886, Tunnel 15 at left. Heavy vegetation cover, steep banks, and lack of streamside footing precluded full elevation views of the upstream and downstream sides of this bridge. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 310.58, Milepost 310.58, Sims, Shasta County, CA

  16. WBGT Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Charles H.

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulate the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.

  17. WBGT Calculator

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  18. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  19. A general strategy to inhibiting viral -1 frameshifting based on upstream attenuation duplex formation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao-Teng; Cho, Che-Pei; Lin, Ya-Hui; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Viral -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) as a potential antiviral target has attracted interest because many human viral pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and coronaviruses, rely on -1 PRF for optimal propagation. Efficient eukaryotic -1 PRF requires an optimally placed stimulator structure downstream of the frameshifting site and different strategies targeting viral -1 PRF stimulators have been developed. However, accessing particular -1 PRF stimulator information represents a bottle-neck in combating the emerging epidemic viral pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Recently, an RNA hairpin upstream of frameshifting site was shown to act as a cis-element to attenuate -1 PRF with mechanism unknown. Here, we show that an upstream duplex formed in-trans, by annealing an antisense to its complementary mRNA sequence upstream of frameshifting site, can replace an upstream hairpin to attenuate -1 PRF efficiently. This finding indicates that the formation of a proximal upstream duplex is the main determining factor responsible for -1 PRF attenuation and provides mechanistic insight. Additionally, the antisense-mediated upstream duplex approach downregulates -1 PRF stimulated by distinct -1 PRF stimulators, including those of MERS-CoV, suggesting its general application potential as a robust means to evaluating viral -1 PRF inhibition as soon as the sequence information of an emerging human coronavirus is available. PMID:26612863

  20. Propagation characteristics of waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.

    1993-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel shocks are investigated by using 2D hybrid simulations. At low Alfven Mach numbers, M(A) below about 2, the shock is initially associated with upstream phase-standing whistlers. At later times, backstreaming ions excite longer-wavelength whistlers via the right-hand resonant ion/ion instability. These waves propagate along the magnetic field at a group velocity no smaller than the upstream flow speed, so that the waves remain in the upstream region. At higher MA (above about 3), these waves are convected back into the shock, causing its reformation and downstream perturbations. Shock transmitted waves mode-convert into Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves which have a wave vector along the shock normal (pointing upstream) and convect downstream. The 2D simulation results confirm our earlier suggestion that the upstream waves should be field aligned, and that their convection into the downstream is associated with linear mode conversion into the Alfven/ion-cyclotron branch.

  1. Upstream capacity upgrade in TDM-PON using RSOA based tunable fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lilin; Li, Zhengxuan; Dong, Yi; Xiao, Shilin; Chen, Jian; Hu, Weisheng

    2012-04-23

    An upstream multi-wavelength shared (UMWS) time division multiplexing passive optical network (TDM-PON) is presented by using a reflective semiconductor amplifier (RSOA) and tunable optical filter (TOF) based directly modulated fiber ring laser as upstream laser source. The stable laser operation is easily achieved no matter what the bandwidth and shape of the TOF is and it can be directly modulated when the RSOA is driven at its saturation region. In this UMWS TDM-PON system, an individual wavelength can be assigned to the user who has a high bandwidth demand by tuning the central wavelength of the TOF in its upgraded optical network unit (ONU), while others maintain their traditional ONU structure and share the bandwidth via time slots, which greatly and dynamically upgrades the upstream capacity. We experimentally demonstrated the bidirectional transmission of downstream data at 10-Gb/s and upstream data at 1.25-Gb/s per wavelength over 25-km single mode fiber (SMF) with almost no power penalty at both ends. A stable performance is observed for the upstream wavelength tuned from 1530 nm to 1595 nm. Moreover, due to the high extinction ratio (ER) of the upstream signal, the burst-mode transmitting is successfully presented and a better time-division multiplexing performance can be obtained by turning off the unused lasers thanks to the rapid formation of the laser in the fiber ring.

  2. Determination of upstream boundary points on southeastern Washington streams and rivers under the requirements of the Shoreline Management Act of 1971

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, Johnna L.

    2003-01-01

    Regulation of the shorelines of the State of Washington, as mandated by the Shoreline Management Act of 1971, requires knowledge of the locations on streams and river reaches where specific regulatory criteria are satisfied. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 1971 to determine the upstream boundary points of these reaches for many of the State's streams and rivers. Updated upstream boundary points were determined in the current study for all the streams and rivers in southeastern Washington that fall under the jurisdiction of the Shoreline Management Act of 1971. Upstream boundary point locations where the mean annual discharge equals 20 cubic feet per second were determined for 149 streams. In addition, upstream boundary point locations where the mean annual discharge equals 200 cubic feet per second or the drainage area equals 300 square miles were determined for 22 rivers. Boundary point locations were determined by application of multiple-linear-regression equations that relate mean annual discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. Southeastern Washington was divided into five hydrologically distinct regions, and a separate regression equation was developed for each region. The regression equations are based on data for gaging stations with at least 10 years of record. The number of stations in the regression analysis for each of the five regions ranged from 5 to 33. The coefficient of determination, R2, of the regression equations ranged from 0.953 to 0.997. The equation for the Upper Yakima region had the lowest standard error, ranging from -7 to +9 percent for a regression estimate of 20 cubic feet per second. The equation for the Columbia Basin to Palouse region had the highest standard error, ranging from -36 to +55 percent for a regression estimate of 20 cubic feet per second. The approximate error in the location of an upstream boundary point can be calculated using the variables mean annual precipitation of the basin upstream

  3. ANN modeling for flood prediction in the upstream Eure's catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharroubi, Ouissem; masson, Eric; Blanpain, Olivier; Lallahem, Sami

    2013-04-01

    Rainfall-Runoff relationship at basin scale is strongly depending on the catchment complexity including multi-scale interactions. In extreme events cases (i.e. floods and droughts) this relationship is even more complex and differs from average hydrological conditions making extreme runoff prediction very difficult to achieve. However, flood warning, flood prevention and flood mitigation rely on the possibility to predict both flood peak runoff and lag time. This point is crucial for decision making and flood warning to prevent populations and economical stakes to be damaged by extreme hydrological events. Since 2003 in France, a dedicated state service is in charge of producing flood warning from national level (i.e. SCHAPI) to regional level (i.e. SPC). This flood warning service is combining national weather forecast agency (i.e. Meteo France) together with a fully automated realtime hydrological network (i.e. Rainfall-Runoff) in order to produce a flood warning national map online and provide a set of hydro-meteorological data to the SPC in charge of flood prediction from regional to local scale. The SPC is in fact the flood service delivering hydrological prediction at operational level for decision making about flood alert for municipalities and first help services. Our research in collaboration with the SPC SACN (i.e. "Seine Aval et fleuves Côtiers Normands") is focused on the implementation of an Artificial Neural Network model (ANN) for flood prediction in deferent key points of the Eure's catchment and main subcatchment. Our contribution will focus on the ANN model developed for Saint-Luperce gauging station in the upstream part of the Eure's catchment. Prediction of extreme runoff at Saint-Luperce station is of high importance for flood warning in the Eure's catchment because it gives a good indicator on the extreme status and the downstream propagation of a potential flood event. Despite a good runoff monitoring since 27 years Saint Luperce flood

  4. 46 CFR 172.133 - Character of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... calculations must show that the vessel can survive damage at any location. (b) Except as provided in § 153.7 of... than 492 feet (150 meters) in length can survive damage at any location; and (2) Except as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, 492 feet (150 meters) or less in length can survive damage at any...

  5. A Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Using Physically Realizable Upstream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afsar, Mohammed Z.; Leib, Stewart J.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of previous work in which a generalized Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) formulation was used to model low-frequency trailing-edge noise. The research was motivated by proposed next-generation aircraft configurations where the exhaust system is tightly integrated with the airframe. Data from recent experiments at NASA on the interaction between high-Reynolds-number subsonic jet flows and an external flat plate showed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the far-field pressure underwent considerable amplification at low frequencies. For example, at the 90deg observation angle, the low-frequency noise could be as much as 10 dB greater than the jet noise itself. In this paper, we present predictions of the noise generated by the interaction of a rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a semi-infinite flat plate. The calculations are based on a formula for the acoustic spectrum of this noise source derived from an exact formal solution of the linearized Euler equations involving (in this case) one arbitrary convected scalar quantity and a Rayleigh equation Green's function. A low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the Green's function based on a two-dimensional mean flow is used in the calculations along with a physically realizable upstream turbulence spectrum, which includes a finite decorrelation region. Numerical predictions of the sound field, based on three-dimensional RANS solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length and time scales, for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets and nozzle aspect ratios are compared with experimental data. Comparisons of the RANS results with flow data are also presented for selected cases. We find that a finite decorrelation region in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency thereby producing much closer agreement with noise data for Strouhal

  6. A Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Using Physically Realizable Upstream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afsar, Mohammed Z.; Leib, Stewart J.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of previous work in which a generalized Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) formulation was used to model low-frequency trailing-edge noise. The research was motivated by proposed next-generation aircraft configurations where the exhaust system is tightly integrated with the airframe. Data from recent experiments at NASA on the interaction between high-Reynolds-number subsonic jet flows and an external flat plate showed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the far-field pressure underwent considerable amplification at low frequencies. For example, at the 900 observation angle, the low-frequency noise could be as much as 10dB greater than the jet noise itself. In this paper, we present predictions of the noise generated by the interaction of a rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a semi-infinite flat plate. The calculations are based on a formula for the acoustic spectrum of this noise source derived from an exact formal solution of the linearized Euler equations involving (in this case) one arbitrary convected scalar quantity and a Rayleigh equation Green's function. A low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the Green's function based on a two-dimensional mean flow is used in the calculations along with a physically realizable upstream turbulence spectrum, which includes a finite de-correlation region. Numerical predictions, based on three-dimensional RANS solutions for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets and nozzle aspect ratios are compared with experimental data. Comparisons of the RANS results with flow data are also presented for selected cases. We find that a finite decorrelation region increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low frequency "rolloff") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency thereby producing much closer agreement with noise data for Strouhal numbers less than 0.1. Secondly, the large-aspectratio theory is able to predict the low-frequency amplification due to the jet

  7. Observations of a new foreshock region upstream of a foreshock bubble's shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Terry Z.; Hietala, Heli; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Turner, Drew L.

    2016-05-01

    Earth's foreshock is a region within the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock filled with backstreaming solar wind particles reflected at the shock. Within this region, when the interplanetary field is approximately radial, foreshock bubbles (FBs) can be formed when the backstreaming particles interact with approaching discontinuities embedded in the solar wind. Foreshock bubbles can grow to 5-10 RE in scale, well upstream of the bow shock. Having a high concentration of thermalized upstream ions and slow, or even sunward, speeds within them, these transient phenomena deflect the solar wind by forming a new shock ahead of them. Although FBs eventually succumb to solar wind dynamic pressure and crash onto Earth's bow shock and magnetopause, they may last long enough to allow solar wind reflection at their own shocks, which forms a new FB foreshock region upstream of them. The FB shock may be of different obliquity than the parent bow shock providing new and diverse opportunities for particle acceleration. Using a case study from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, we demonstrate that ions and electrons are reflected at the FB shock, where they acquire energies consistent with shock acceleration theory. These are the first definitive observations of a new ion and electron foreshock region upstream of the FB shock with implications for shock acceleration in general.

  8. Upstream dispersal of an invasive crayfish aided by a fish passage facility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Loughman, Zachary J.

    2015-01-01

    Fish passage facilities for reservoir dams have been used to restore habitat connectivity within riverine networks by allowing upstream passage for native species. These facilities may also support the spread of invasive species, an unintended consequence and potential downside of upstream passage structures. We documented dam passage of the invasive virile crayfish, Orconectes virilis (Hagen, 1870), at fish ladders designed for upstream passage of American eels, Anguilla rostrata (Lesueur, 1817), in the Shenandoah River drainage, USA. Ladder use and upstream passage of 11 virile crayfish occurred from 2007–2014 during periods of low river discharge (<30 m3s–1) and within a wide range of water temperatures from 9.0–28.6 °C. Virile crayfish that used the eel ladders were large adults with a mean carapace length and width of 48.0 mm and 24.1 mm, respectively. Our data demonstrated the use of species-specific fish ladders by a non-target non-native species, which has conservation and management implications for the spread of aquatic invasive species and upstream passage facilities. Specifically, managers should consider implementing long-term monitoring of fish passage facilities with emphasis on detection of invasive species, as well as methods to reduce or eliminate passage of invasive species. 

  9. Upstream AUGs in embryonic proinsulin mRNA control its low translation level

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Catalina; Mansilla, Alicia; de la Rosa, Enrique J.; Pollerberg, G.Elisabeth; Martínez-Salas, Encarna; de Pablo, Flora

    2003-01-01

    Proinsulin is expressed prior to development of the pancreas and promotes cell survival. Here we study the mechanism affecting the translation efficiency of a specific embryonic proinsulin mRNA. This transcript shares the coding region with the pancreatic form, but presents a 32 nt extended leader region. Translation of proinsulin is markedly reduced by the presence of two upstream AUGs within the 5′ extension of the embryonic mRNA. This attenuation is lost when the two upstream AUGs are mutated to AAG, leading to translational efficiency similar to that of the pancreatic mRNA. The upstream AUGs are recognized as initiator codons, because expression of upstream ORF is detectable from the embryonic transcript, but not from the mutated or the pancreatic mRNAs. Strict regulation of proinsulin biosynthesis appears to be necessary, since exogenous proinsulin added to embryos in ovo decreased apoptosis and generated abnormal developmental traits. A novel mechanism for low level proinsulin expression thus relies on upstream AUGs within a specific form of embryonic proinsulin mRNA, emphasizing its importance as a tightly regulated developmental signal. PMID:14532130

  10. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators.

  11. Spatial distribution of upstream magnetospheric geq50 keV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Argyropoulos, G.; Kaliabetsos, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present for the first time a statistical study of geq50 keV ion events of a magnetospheric origin upstream from Earth's bow shock. The statistical analysis of the 50-220 keV ion events observed by the IMP-8 spacecraft shows: (1) a dawn-dusk asymmetry in ion distributions, with most events and lower intensities upstream from the quasi-parallel pre-dawn side (4 LT-6 LT) of the bow shock, (2) highest ion fluxes upstream from the nose/dusk side of the bow shock under an almost radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) configuration, and (3) a positive correlation of the ion intensities with the solar wind speed and the index of geomagnetic index Kp, with an average solar wind speed as high as 620 km s-1 and values of the index Kp > 2. The statistical results are consistent with (1) preferential leakage of sim50 keV magnetospheric ions from the dusk magnetopause, (2) nearly scatter free motion of sim50 keV ions within the magnetosheath, and (3) final escape of magnetospheric ions from the quasi-parallel dawn side of the bow shock. An additional statistical analysis of higher energy (290-500 keV) upstream ion events also shows a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the occurrence frequency of these events, with the occurrence frequency ranging between sim16%-sim34% in the upstream region.

  12. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators. PMID:27279737

  13. [Estimation of topographical factors in revised universal soil loss model based on maximum up-stream flow path].

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Ma, You-xin; Liu, Wen-jun; Li, Hong-mei

    2010-05-01

    By using maximum upstream flow path, a self-developed new method for calculating slope length value based on Arc Macro Language (AML), five groups of DEM data for different regions in Bijie Prefecture of Guizhou Province were extracted to compute the slope length and topographical factors in the Prefecture. The time cost for calculating the slope length and the values of the topographical factors were analyzed, and compared with those by iterative slope length method based on AML (ISLA) and on C++ (ISLC). The results showed that the new method was feasible to calculate the slope length and topographical factors in revised universal soil loss model, and had the same effect as iterative slope length method. Comparing with ISLA, the new method had a high computing efficiency and greatly decreased the time consumption, and could be applied to a large area to estimate the slope length and topographical factors based on AML. Comparing with ISLC, the new method had the similar computing efficiency, but its coding was easily to be written, modified, and debugged by using AML. Therefore, the new method could be more broadly used by GIS users. PMID:20707099

  14. Multiple spacecraft observations of interplanetary shocks: Characteristics of the upstream ULF turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    All interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3 and either ISEE-1 or ISEE-2 or both in 1978 and 1979 are examined for evidence of upstream waves. In order to characterize the properties of these shocks it is necessary to determine accurate shock normals. An overdetermined set of equations were inverted to obtain shock normals, velocities and error estimates for all these shocks. Tests of the method indicate it is quite reliable. Using these normals the Mach number and angle were between the interplanetary magnetic field and the shock normal for each shock. The upstream waves were separated into two classes: whistler mode precursors which occur at low Mach numbers and upstream turbulence whose amplitude at Mach numbers greater than 1.5 is controlled by the angle of the field to the shock normal. The former waves are right hand circularly polarized and quite monochromatic. The latter waves are more linearly polarized and have a broadband featureless spectrum.

  15. Upstream effects of a reservoir on fish assemblages 45 years following impoundment.

    PubMed

    Franssen, N R; Tobler, M

    2013-05-01

    Fish assemblage structure, rarefied species richness, species diversity and evenness of assemblages upstream of a reservoir in Oklahoma, U.S.A., were compared pre and post-impoundment as well as in contemporary collections from streams above and below the reservoir. There were significant shifts in assemblage structure between historical and contemporary collections above the reservoir but not between contemporary assemblages above and below the impoundment. Indicator species analysis revealed that the sand shiner Notropis stramineus and fathead minnow Pimephales promelas have declined, whereas largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis have increased in relative abundance in assemblages upstream of the impoundment. Species richness was lower in contemporary assemblages compared with historical assemblages. Furthermore, contemporary assemblages below the dam had lower species richness, diversity and evenness compared with contemporary collections above the dam. These results highlight the spatial and temporal extent of reservoirs altering fish assemblages upstream of impoundments. PMID:23639160

  16. Possible leakage of energetic particles from the magnetosphere into the upstream region on June 7, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudela, K.; Sibeck, D. G.; Belian, R. D.; Fischer, S.; Lutsenko, V.

    1990-01-01

    Prognoz 10 observed a series of energetic ion (E not less than 10 KeV) and electron (E not less than 30 KeV) bursts whilst upstream of the dusk bow shock from 2000-2200 UT on June 7, 1985. The particles streamed away from the bow shock along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during periods when the IMF connected the spacecraft to the bow shock/magnetosphere. Both ions and electrons were observed when the IMF connected the spacecraft to the subsolar bow shock, but only ions were observed when the IMF connected the spacecraft to the dusk bow shock. Simultaneous ground and magnetospheric observations are presented which indicate the onset of geomagnetic activity and an increase in magnetospheric energetic particle flux levels just prior to the series of particle bursts observed by Prognoz 10 upstream of the bow shock. The combined observations are consistent with a magnetospheric source for these upstream particle events.

  17. An experimental and numerical study of wave motion and upstream influence in a stratified fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurdis, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    A system consisting of two superimposed layers of liquid of different densities, with a thin transition layer at the interface, provides a good laboratory model of an ocean thermocline or of an atmospheric inversion layer. This research was to gain knowledge about the propagation of disturbances within these two geophysical systems. The technique used was to observe the propagation of internal waves and of upstream influence within the density-gradient region between the two layers of liquid. The disturbances created by the motion of a vertical flat plate, which was moved longitudinally through this region, were examined both experimentally and numerically. An upstream influence, which resulted from a balance of inertial and gravitational forces, was observed, and it was possible to predict the behavior of this influence with the numerical model. The prediction included a description of the propagation of the upstream influence to steadily increasing distances from the flat plate and the shapes and magnitudes of the velocity profiles.

  18. Integrated upstream parasitic event building architecture for BTeV level 1 pixel trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin-Yuan; Wang, M.; Gottschalk, E.; Christian, D.; Li, X.; Shi, Z.; Pavlicek, V.; Cancelo, G.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    Contemporary event building approaches use data switches, either homemade or commercial off-the-shelf ones, to merge data from different channels and distribute them among processor nodes. However, in many trigger and DAQ systems, the merging and distributing functions can often be performed in pre-processing stages. By carefully integrating these functions into the upstream pre-processing stages, the events can be built without dedicated switches. In addition to the cost reducing, extra benefits are gain when the event is built early upstream. In this document, an example of the integrated upstream parasitic event building architecture that has been studied for the BTeV level 1 pixel trigger system is described. Several design considerations that experimentalists of other projects might be interested in are also discussed.

  19. Non-hominid TP63 lacks retroviral LTRs but contains a novel conserved upstream exon.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Ulrike; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-06-15

    We have recently identified novel isoforms of human p63, with specific expression in testicular germ cells. The synthesis of these p63 mRNA species is driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the endogenous retrovirus ERV9. This LTR was inserted upstream of the previously known TP63 exons roughly 15 million years ago, leading to the expression of novel exons and the synthesis of germline-specific transactivating p63 (GTAp63) isoforms in humans and great apes (Beyer et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011; 108:3624-9). However, this study did not reveal whether similar upstream exons can also be found in the TP63 genes of non-hominid animals. Here we performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to identify a novel upstream exon of murine TP63, located in the 5' position from the previously described start of transcription. This exon, termed "exon U3" in our previous publication, is conserved within a broad range of mammalian species, including hominids. However, in contrast to the human TP63 gene structure, the murine exon U3 represented the most upstream transcribed sequence of TP63. Murine exon U3 is then alternatively spliced to acceptor sites within exon 1 or upstream of exon 2, resulting in two different available translational start sites. p63 mRNAs comprising exon U3 are detectable in various tissues, with no particular preference for testicular cells. Thus, whereas the retroviral LTR in hominid species results in strictly germline-associated p63 isoforms, the upstream exon in non-hominids fails to confer this tissue specificity. This notion strongly supports the concept that the synthesis of a testis-specific p63 isoform is a recently acquired, unique feature of humans and great apes.

  20. Thin layered interference mirrors to reduce radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Csonka, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Calculations have been performed which show that damage induced by radiation of wavelength lambda, incident on mirrors (and other optical elements) can be significantly reduced by a multilayered construction, in which the layers most sensitive to radiation damage have thickness d << lambda. The layers may or may not be free-standing. The threshold to radiation damage in certain cases is calculated to increase by a factor approx. = 10/sup 2/.

  1. Plasma wave turbulence associated with an interplanetary shock. [wave in solar wind upstream of magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Neubauer, F. M.; Schwenn, R.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with interplanetary shocks, detected and analyzed to date, from the Helios 1 and 2 spacecraft in eccentric solar orbits. The plasma wave turbulence associated with the shock observed on March 30, 1976 is studied in detail. This event is of particular interest because it represents a clearly defined burst of turbulence against a quiet solar wind background both upstream and downstream of the shock. The shock itself is an oblique shock with upstream parameters characterized by a low Mach number, a low beta, and an abnormally large electron to ion temperature ratio. The types of plasma wave detected are discussed.

  2. Association of low-frequency waves with suprathermal ions in the upstream solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Gosling, J. T.; Russell, C. T.; Greenstadt, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations obtained upstream of the earth's bowshock with the LASL/MPI plasma instruments and the UCLA magnetometers on ISEE-1 and 2 have revealed a striking relationship between the presence of low-frequency fluctuations in solar wind density and field strength and the different types of distribution functions of upstream ions. Waves are absent when the ions have the beamlike distribution of the 'reflected' ions. Large-amplitude waves are present only in conjunction with the 'diffuse' ions, which are characterized by flat energy spectra and broad angular distributions. The waves are largely compressive, showing very good correlation between oscillations in magnetic field strength and plasma density.

  3. Voyager energetic particle observations at interplanetary shocks and upstream of planetary bow shocks - 1977-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 vehicles include instrumentation that makes comprehensive electron and ion measurements in several energy channels with good energy, temporal, and compositional resolution. Data gathered from 1977 to 1988, including observations downstream and upstream of four planetary bow shocks (earth, Saturn, Uranus, Jupiter) and numerous interplanetary shocks to about 30 AU, are analyzed in the context of the Fermi and shock drift acceleration models. Overall results indicate that electrons and ions observed upstream of planetary bow shocks have their source inside the parent magnetosphere, with first order Fermi acceleration playing a secondary role at best.

  4. The design and commissioning of the MICE upstream time-of-flight system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, R.; Blondel, A.; Bonesini, M.; Cecchet, G.; de Bari, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Karadzhov, Y.; Rayner, M.; Rusinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Terzo, S.; Verguilov, V.

    2010-03-01

    In the MICE experiment at RAL the upstream time-of-flight detectors are used for particle identification in the incoming muon beam, for the experiment trigger and for a precise timing (σt˜50 ps) with respect to the accelerating RF cavities working at 201 MHz. The construction of the upstream section of the MICE time-of-flight system and the tests done to characterize its individual components are shown. Detector timing resolutions ˜50-60 ps were achieved. Test beam performance and preliminary results obtained with beam at RAL are reported.

  5. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  6. Method and system for control of upstream flowfields of vehicle in supersonic or hypersonic atmospheric flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Inventor); Pritchett, II, Victor E. (Inventor); Wang, Ten-See (Inventor); Farr, Rebecca Ann (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The upstream flowfield of a vehicle traveling in supersonic or hypersonic atmospheric flight is actively controlled using attribute(s) experienced by the vehicle. Sensed attribute(s) include pressure along the vehicle's outer mold line, temperature along the vehicle's outer mold line, heat flux along the vehicle's outer mold line, and/or local acceleration response of the vehicle. A non-heated, non-plasma-producing gas is injected into an upstream flowfield of the vehicle from at least one surface location along the vehicle's outer mold line. The pressure of the gas so-injected is adjusted based on the attribute(s) so-sensed.

  7. Effect of a curved duct upstream on performance of small centrifugal compressors for automobile turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shigeta; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    Since the automobile turbochargers are installed in an engine compartment with limited space, the ducts upstream of the turbocharger compressor may be curved in a complex manner. In the present paper, the effect of a curved duct upstream on performance of small centrifugal compressors for automobile turbochargers is discussed. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a turbocharger compressor validated for the compressor model with the straight pipe applied to the compressor with the curved pipe are executed, and the deterioration of the performance for the curved pipe is confirmed. It is also found that the deterioration of compressor performance is caused by the interaction of the secondary flow and the impeller.

  8. Impact damage characterization of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkmaz, Yesim

    2002-04-01

    Impact damage in structural composites depends on their material properties, component geometry and a variety of impact parameters and experimental determination of their detailed characteristics requires prohibitively large test matrices. The effects of some of these parameters can be understood through simulation models that complement experimental results. In this dissertation a series of finite element models are developed using MSC/NASTRAN for calculating contact laws and progressive damage (e.g., matrix cracking, delamination and fiber break) in graphite/epoxy laminates subject to low and intermediate velocity impact. The validity of the computational models is supported by theoretical calculations involving idealized cases. The effects of laminate geometry as well as the impact parameters on the nature and degree of damage are studied. The global force-time and displacement-time responses of the laminate during impact are also studied. The results of this research can be used for damage growth prediction in composite structural components subject to impact loads.

  9. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... condition of loading and operation, assuming the damage specified in § 172.230. (b) When doing the calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  10. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... condition of loading and operation, assuming the damage specified in § 172.230. (b) When doing the calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMAGED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Dehaven, M; McClelland, M; Chidester, S; Maienschein, J L

    2006-06-23

    Thermal damage experiments were conducted on LX-04, LX-10, and LX-17 at high temperatures. Both pristine and damaged samples were characterized for their material properties. A pycnometer was used to determine sample true density and porosity. Gas permeability was measured in a newly procured system (diffusion permeameter). Burn rate was measured in the LLNL strand burner. Weight losses upon thermal exposure were insignificant. Damaged pressed parts expanded, resulting in a reduction of bulk density by up to 10%. Both gas permeabilities and burn rates of the damaged samples increased by several orders of magnitude due to higher porosity and lower density. Moduli of the damaged materials decreased significantly, an indication that the materials became weaker mechanically. Damaged materials were more sensitive to shock initiation at high temperatures. No significant sensitization was observed when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature.

  12. Experimental demonstration of a scalable transmitter frontend technique in IMDD-OFDMA-PON upstream scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Cheng; Liu, Na; Wang, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Xue

    2016-11-01

    Scalable transmitter frontend scheme is proposed to reduce the sampling rate of digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and the complexity of digital signal processing (DSP) in intensity modulation and direct detection (IMDD) OFDMA-PON upstream scenarios. The hardware cost of each ONU is substantially decreased. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is experimentally demonstrated.

  13. Asymmetric dispersal allows an upstream region to control population structure throughout a species' range.

    PubMed

    Pringle, James M; Blakeslee, April M H; Byers, James E; Roman, Joe

    2011-09-13

    In a single well-mixed population, equally abundant neutral alleles are equally likely to persist. However, in spatially complex populations structured by an asymmetric dispersal mechanism, such as a coastal population where larvae are predominantly moved downstream by currents, the eventual frequency of neutral haplotypes will depend on their initial spatial location. In our study of the progression of two spatially separate, genetically distinct introductions of the European green crab (Carcinus maenas) along the coast of eastern North America, we captured this process in action. We documented the shift of the genetic cline in this species over 8 y, and here we detail how the upstream haplotypes are beginning to dominate the system. This quantification of an evolving genetic boundary in a coastal system demonstrates that novel genetic alleles or haplotypes that arise or are introduced into upstream retention zones (regions whose export of larvae is not balanced by import from elsewhere) will increase in frequency in the entire system. This phenomenon should be widespread when there is asymmetrical dispersal, in the oceans or on land, suggesting that the upstream edge of a species' range can influence genetic diversity throughout its distribution. Efforts to protect the upstream edge of an asymmetrically dispersing species' range are vital to conserving genetic diversity in the species. PMID:21876126

  14. Trends in U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Upstream Costs

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Average 2015 well drilling and completion costs in five onshore areas decline 25% and 30% below their level in 2012 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) commissioned IHS Global Inc. (IHS) to perform a study of upstream drilling and production costs. The IHS report assesses capital and operating costs associated with drilling, completing, and operating wells and facilities.

  15. Upstream movement of residual hatchery steelhead into areas containing bull trout and cutthroat trout.

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A. ); Pearsons, Todd N.

    2000-11-01

    Hatchery-reared steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss that do not emigrate as smolts shortly after release may negatively impact wild fish communities through ecological interactions. We used systematic, stratified snorkeling surveys to document the relative abundance of wild rainbow trout O. mykiss, bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi as well as the upstream limit of residual hatchery steelhead (hatchery-reared steelhead that had failed to emigrate before June 1). Our objective was to determine whether residual hatchery steelhead had migrated upstream from their release point into an area containing a threatened population of bull trout and cutthroat trout. Hatchery steelhead made up a larger portion of the salmonid community in the sites near their release location (mean= 52.5%, range= 29-79%), and constituted a lower proportion (mean= 4.8%, range= 0-14%) of the salmonid community as distance upstream of the release location increased. However, residual hatchery steelhead had migrated over 12 km upstream into an area containing a threatened stock of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi.

  16. Multispacecraft observations of energetic ions upstream and downstream of the bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Scholer, M.; Mobius, E.; Kistler, L. M.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1989-06-01

    We present simultaneous measurements of energetic protons and alpha particles inside and outside of the magnetopause, immediately upstream, and downstream as well as further upstream of the bow shock. A comparison between the intensity at the bow shock and further upstream results in an e-folding distance at 30 keV of /similar to/6.2 R/sub E/. After transformation of the angular distribution into the solar wind frame a diffusion coefficeint of kappa/sub /parallel///similar to/3 R/sub E/ is obtained from the anisotropy and the intensity gradient. Immediately downstream of the bow shock the anisotropy in the shock frame is directed toward the magnetopause. After transformation into the plasma rest frame the distribution is isotropic. The intensity in the magnetosheath just outside the magnetopause is smaller than the intensity behind the bow shock. Thus, in the magnetosheath there is no gradient or streaming in the upstream direction. The spectra, intensities, and relative abundances in the magnetosheath and inside the magnetosphere are totally different. These observations are consistent with first order Fermi acceleration at the bow shock and subsequent downstream convection, and exclude a magnetospheric source for these particles. /copyright/ American Geophysical Union 1989

  17. Upstream structural management measures for an urban area flooding in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyurek, Z.; Bozoğlu, B.; Sürer, S.; Mumcu, H.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, flooding has become an increasing concern across many parts of the world of both the general public and their governments. The climate change inducing more intense rainfall events occurring in short period of time lead flooding in rural and urban areas. In this study the flood modelling in an urbanized area, namely Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is performed. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2-dimensional shallow water flow modelling. 1 × 1000-1 scaled maps with the buildings for the urbanized area and 1 × 5000-1 scaled maps for the rural parts are used to obtain DTM needed in the flood modelling. The bathymetry of the river is obtained from additional surveys. The main river passing through the urbanized area has a capacity of 500 m3 s-1 according to the design discharge obtained by simple ungauged discharge estimation depending on catchment area only. The upstream structural base precautions against flooding are modelled. The effect of four main upstream catchments on the flooding in the downstream urban area are modelled as different scenarios. It is observed that if the flow from the upstream catchments can be retarded through a detention pond constructed in one of the upstream catchments, estimated Q100 flood can be conveyed by the river without overtopping from the river channel. The operation of the upstream detention ponds and the scenarios to convey Q500 without causing flooding are also presented. Structural management measures to address changes in flood characteristics in water management planning are discussed.

  18. Numerical Investigation of Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor with Large Upstream Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohieldin, T. O.; Tiwari, S. N.; Reubush, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Dual-mode scramjet combustor configuration with significant upstream interaction is investigated numerically, The possibility of scaling the domain to accelerate the convergence and reduce the computational time is explored. The supersonic combustor configuration was selected to provide an understanding of key features of upstream interaction and to identify physical and numerical issues relating to modeling of dual-mode configurations. The numerical analysis was performed with vitiated air at freestream Math number of 2.5 using hydrogen as the sonic injectant. Results are presented for two-dimensional models and a three-dimensional jet-to-jet symmetric geometry. Comparisons are made with experimental results. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional results show substantial oblique shock train reaching upstream of the fuel injectors. Flow characteristics slow numerical convergence, while the upstream interaction slowly increases with further iterations. As the flow field develops, the symmetric assumption breaks down. A large separation zone develops and extends further upstream of the step. This asymmetric flow structure is not seen in the experimental data. Results obtained using a sub-scale domain (both two-dimensional and three-dimensional) qualitatively recover the flow physics obtained from full-scale simulations. All results show that numerical modeling using a scaled geometry provides good agreement with full-scale numerical results and experimental results for this configuration. This study supports the argument that numerical scaling is useful in simulating dual-mode scramjet combustor flowfields and could provide an excellent convergence acceleration technique for dual-mode simulations.

  19. Statistical analysis of diffuse ion events upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Mobius, E.; Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hilchenbach, M.; Luehr, H.

    1994-01-01

    A statistical study of diffuse energetic ion events and their related waves upstream of the Earth's bow shock was performed using data from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module (AMPTE/IRM) satellite over two 5-month periods in 1984 and 1985. The data set was used to test the assumption in the self-consistent model of the upstream wave and particle populations by Lee (1982) that the particle acceleration through hydromagnetic waves and the wave generation are directly coupled. The comparison between the observed wave power and the wave power predicted on the observed energetic particle energy density and solar wind parameters results in a high correlation coefficient of about 0.89. The intensity of diffuse ions falls off approximately exponentially with the distance upstream from the bow shock parallel to the magnetic field with e-folding distances which vary from approximately 3.3 R(sub E) to approximately 11.7 R(sub E) over the energy range from 10 keV/e to 67.3 keV/e for both protons and alpha particles. After normalizing the upstream particle densities to zero bow shock distance by using these exponential variations, a good correlation (0.7) of the density of the diffuse ions with the solar wind density was found. This supports the suggestion that the solar wind is the source of the diffuse ions. Furthermore, the spectral slope of the diffuse ions correlates well with the solar wind velocity component in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (0.68 and 0.66 for protons and alpha particles) which concurs with the notion that the solar wind plays an important role in the acceleration of the upstream particles.

  20. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  1. Eco-Design of River Fishways for Upstream Passage: Application for Hanfeng Dam, Pengxi River, China

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Rainey, William S.

    2012-05-20

    This paper provides a scientific approach to eco-design of river fishways to allow upstream movement of fish past new and existing dams in China. This eco-design approach integrates principles of fish ecology/behavior and engineering, a scientific field also known as bio-engineering or eco-hydraulics. We define a fishway as a structure or mechanism to convey fish upstream past a dam. Man-made or natural stream beds can be part of the fishway mechanism. Fish include bony and non-bony fishes, and upstream passage is the concern here, not downstream passage. The problem is dams block access to upstream habitat used for spawning, rearing, and refuge, i.e., dams decrease habitat connectivity. A solution to alleviate this problem is to design fishways, preferably while the dam is being designed, but if necessary, as retrofits afterward to provide a route that fish can and will use to pass safely upstream without undue delay. Our eco-design approach for fishways involves eight steps: 1) identify the primary species of importance; 2) understand basic ecology and behavior of these fish; 3) characterize the environmental conditions where passage is or will be blocked; 4 identify fishway alternatives and select a preferred alternative; 5) establish eco-design criteria for the fishway, either from management agencies or, if necessary, developed specifically for the given site; 6) where needed, identify and perform research required to resolve critical uncertainties and finalize the eco-design criteria; 7) apply the eco-design criteria and site-specific considerations to design the fishway, involving peer-review by local stakeholders in the process; 8) build the fishway, monitor its effectiveness, and apply the lessons learned. Example fishways are described showing a range of eco-designs depending on the dam site and fish species of concern. We apply the eco-design principles to recommend an approach and next steps for a fishway to pass fish upstream at Hanfeng Dam, an

  2. A common polymorphism in the 5' UTR of ERCC5 creates an upstream ORF that confers resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Somers, Joanna; Wilson, Lindsay A; Kilday, John-Paul; Horvilleur, Emilie; Cannell, Ian G; Pöyry, Tuija A A; Cobbold, Laura C; Kondrashov, Alexander; Knight, John R P; Puget, Stéphanie; Grill, Jacques; Grundy, Richard G; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E

    2015-09-15

    We show that a common polymorphic variant in the ERCC5 5' untranslated region (UTR) generates an upstream ORF (uORF) that affects both the background expression of this protein and its ability to be synthesized following exposure to agents that cause bulky adduct DNA damage. Individuals that harbor uORF1 have a marked resistance to platinum-based agents, illustrated by the significantly reduced progression-free survival of pediatric ependymoma patients treated with such compounds. Importantly, inhibition of DNA-PKcs restores sensitivity to platinum-based compounds by preventing uORF1-dependent ERCC5 expression. Our data support a model in which a heritable 5' noncoding mRNA element influences individuals' responses to platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:26338418

  3. Manifold learning-based subspace distance for machinery damage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuang; Zhang, Zhousuo; He, Zhengjia; Shen, Zhongjie; Chen, Binqiang

    2016-03-01

    Damage assessment is very meaningful to keep safety and reliability of machinery components, and vibration analysis is an effective way to carry out the damage assessment. In this paper, a damage index is designed by performing manifold distance analysis on vibration signal. To calculate the index, vibration signal is collected firstly, and feature extraction is carried out to obtain statistical features that can capture signal characteristics comprehensively. Then, manifold learning algorithm is utilized to decompose feature matrix to be a subspace, that is, manifold subspace. The manifold learning algorithm seeks to keep local relationship of the feature matrix, which is more meaningful for damage assessment. Finally, Grassmann distance between manifold subspaces is defined as a damage index. The Grassmann distance reflecting manifold structure is a suitable metric to measure distance between subspaces in the manifold. The defined damage index is applied to damage assessment of a rotor and the bearing, and the result validates its effectiveness for damage assessment of machinery component.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance in Aeromonas Upstream and Downstream of a Water Resource Recovery Facility

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Samantha K.; Askew, Maegan L.; Risenhoover, Hollie G.; McAndrews, Chrystle R.; Kennedy, S. Dawn; Paine, C. Sue

    2014-01-01

    Aeromonas strains isolated from sediments upstream and downstream of a water resource recovery facility (WRRF) over a two-year time period were tested for susceptibility to thirteen antibiotics. Incidence of resistance to antibiotics, antibiotic resistance phenotypes, and diversity (based on resistance phenotypes) were compared in the two populations. At the beginning of the study, the upstream and downstream Aeromonas populations were different for incidence of antibiotic resistance (p < 0.01), resistance phenotypes (p < 0.005), and diversity. However, these differences declined over time and were not significant at the end of the study. These results (1) indicate that antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas in stream sediments fluctuates considerably over time and (2) suggest that WRRF effluent does not, when examined over the long term, affect antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas in downstream sediment. PMID:25327024

  5. Observations of a new class of upstream waves with periods near 3 seconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of ULF waves with periods near 3 s in the earth's upstream region is found by examining the high time resolution magnetic field data from the ISEE spacecraft. These waves are observed in the part of the upstream region which is magnetically connected to the bow shock, but only when the solar wind plasma beta is high (greater than 1). The waves are always right-handed, nearly circularly polarized in the spacecraft frame. The directions of the wave vectors are in the general direction of the average magnetic field, and the waves are convected downstream in the spacecraft frame. This study of these waves has shown that they appear to be intrinsically left-handed ion cyclotron waves in the plasma rest frame.

  6. Structure of medium Mach number quasi-parallel shocks - Upstream and downstream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.

    1991-01-01

    The transition from steady low-Mach-number to unsteady high-Mach-number quasi-parallel shocks was investigated by performing large-scale 1D hybrid code simulations at increasing Mach numbers. It was found that only at very low Mach number shocks the steepening is limited by upstream phase-standing whistlers, as predicted by the classical theory (Tidman and Northrop, 1968). In the intermediate region of Mach numbers between 1.5 and 3.5, a very diverse behavior is observed. Backstreaming ions generate fast magnetosonic waves which dominate the upstream, with wavelengths longer than phase-standing whistlers. At increasing Mach numbers, the phase and group velocities of the dominant waves are reduced until they point back toward the shock; when there is sufficient energy flux in these waves, they lead to unsteady shock behavior and eventually to shock reformation.

  7. Antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas upstream and downstream of a water resource recovery facility.

    PubMed

    Cisar, Cindy R; Henderson, Samantha K; Askew, Maegan L; Risenhoover, Hollie G; McAndrews, Chrystle R; Kennedy, S Dawn; Paine, C Sue

    2014-09-01

    Aeromonas strains isolated from sediments upstream and downstream of a water resource recovery facility (WRRF) over a two-year time period were tested for susceptibility to 13 antibiotics. Incidence of resistance to antibiotics, antibiotic resistance phenotypes, and diversity (based on resistance phenotypes) were compared in the two populations. At the beginning of the study, the upstream and downstream Aeromonas populations were different for incidence of antibiotic resistance (p < 0.01), resistance phenotypes (p < 0.005), and diversity. However, these differences declined over time and were not significant at the end of the study. These results (1) indicate that antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas in stream sediments fluctuates considerably over time and (2) suggest that WRRF effluent does not, when examined over the long- term, affect antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas in downstream sediment.

  8. Shock Characteristics Measured Upstream of Both a Forward-Swept and an Aft-Swept Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Krupar, Martin J.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Horvath, Csaba

    2007-01-01

    Three different types of diagnostic data-blade surface flow visualization, shroud unsteady pressure, and laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV)--were obtained on two fans, one forward-swept and one aft-swept, in order to learn more about the shocks which propagate upstream of these rotors when they are operated at transonic tip speeds. Flow visualization data are presented for the forward-swept fan operating at 13831 rpm(sub c), and for the aft-swept fan operating at 12500 and 13831 rpm(sub c) (corresponding to tip rotational Mach numbers of 1.07 and 1.19, respectively). The flow visualization data identify where the shocks occur on the suction side of the rotor blades. These data show that at the takeoff speed, 13831 rpm(sub c), the shocks occurring in the tip region of the forward-swept fan are further downstream in the blade passage than with the aft-swept fan. Shroud unsteady pressure measurements were acquired using a linear array of 15 equally-spaced pressure transducers extending from two tip axial chords upstream to 0.8 tip axial chords downstream of the static position of the tip leading edge of each rotor. Such data are presented for each fan operating at one subsonic and five transonic tip speeds. The unsteady pressure data show relatively strong detached shocks propagating upstream of the aft-swept rotor at the three lowest transonic tip speeds, and weak, oblique pressure disturbances attached to the tip of the aft-swept fan at the two highest transonic tip speeds. The unsteady pressure measurements made with the forward-swept fan do not show strong shocks propagating upstream of that rotor at any of the tested speeds. A comparison of the forward-swept and aft-swept shroud unsteady pressure measurements indicates that at any given transonic speed the pressure disturbance just upstream of the tip of the forward-swept fan is much weaker than that of the aft-swept fan. The LDV data suggest that at 12500 and 13831 rpm(sub c), the forward-swept fan swallowed the

  9. Suppression of interference in quantum Hall Mach-Zehnder geometry by upstream neutral modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gefen, Yuval; Goldstein, Moshe

    Mach-Zehnder interferometry has been suggested as a probe for anyonic quasiparticles in fractional quantum Hall states. However, all experimental attempts to measure such an interference signal have failed to date, despite the high visibility of interference fringes in the integer quantum Hall case. In our work we have studied the relation between this null result and another recent surprising experimental finding, namely the detection of upstream neutral modes in virtually all fractional quantum Hall states (including, e.g., filling 1/3), not only in hole-like filling factors (such as 2/3). We have found that the excitation of upstream modes makes the interference visibility in the Mach-Zehnder geometry decay exponentially with the total length of the interferometer arms, even when the lengths are exactly equal. We also suggest ways to overcome this suppression.

  10. Manipulation of upstream rotor leading edge vortex and its effects on counter rotating propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Becky

    1993-01-01

    The leading edge vortex of a counter rotating propeller (CRP) model was altered by using shrouds and by turning the upstream rotors to a forward sweep configuration. Performance, flow, and acoustic data were used to determine the effect of vortex impingement on the noise signature of the CRP system. Forward sweep was found to eliminate the leading edge vortex of the upstream blades. Removal of the vortex had little effect on the tone noise at the forward and rear blade passing frequencies (BPF's) but significantly altered both the sound pressure level and directivity of the interaction tone which occurs at the sum of the two BPF's. A separate manipulation of the leading edge vortex performed by installing shrouds of various inlet length on the CRP verified that diverting the vortex path increases the noise level of the interaction tone. An unexpected link has been established between the interaction tone and the leading edge vortex-blade interaction phenomenon.

  11. Upstream energetic ions and electrons - Bow shock-associated or magnetospheric origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is made of 35 proton bursts observed with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on ISEE 3 far upstream of the earth's bow shock. These upstream bursts are found to fall into two distinctive groups. The first is accompanied by energetic electrons (more than about 75 keV), and the proton spectrum extends up to energies greater than about 300 keV and higher and bends over toward lower energies (less than about 30 keV). The second group, which is unaccompanied by energetic electron bursts, exhibits spectra which can be represented extremely well by exponentials in energy with a mean e-folding energy of approximately 15 keV. The first group is thought to be of a magnetospheric origin, and the second to be bow-shock associated.

  12. Upstream waves and particles /Tutorial Lecture/. [from shocks in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Hoppe, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    The plasma waves, MHD waves, energetic electrons and ions associated with the proximity of the region upstream from terrestrial, planetary and interplanetary shocks are discussed in view of observations and current theories concerning their origin. These waves cannot be separated from the study of shock structure. Since the shocks are supersonic, they continually overtake any ULF waves created in the plasma in front of the shock. The upstream particles and waves are also of intrinsic interest because they provide a plasma laboratory for the study of wave-particle interactions in a plasma which, at least at the earth, is accessible to sophisticated probing. Insight may be gained into interstellar medium cosmic ray acceleration through the study of these phenomena.

  13. MESSENGER Magnetic Field Observations of Upstream Ultra-Low Frequency Waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Boardsen, S.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Anderosn, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2012-01-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth's is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. The Mercury's bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by low Mach number solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. Previous observations of Mercury upstream ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves came exclusively from two Mercury flybys of Mariner 10. The MESSENGER orbiter data enable us to study of upstream waves in the Mercury's foreshock in depth. This paper reports an overview of upstream ULF waves in the Mercury's foreshock using high-time resolution magnetic field data, 20 samples per second, from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The most common foreshock waves have frequencies near 2 Hz, with properties similar to the I-Hz waves in the Earth's foreshock. They are present in both the flyby data and in every orbit of the orbital data we have surveyed. The most common wave phenomenon in the Earth's foreshock is the large-amplitude 30-s waves, but similar waves at Mercury have frequencies at near 0.1 Hz and occur only sporadically with short durations (a few wave cycles). Superposed on the "30-s" waves, there are spectral peaks at near 0.6 Hz, not reported previously in Mariner 10 data. We will discuss wave properties and their occurrence characteristics in this paper.

  14. The role of the ionosphere in coupling upstream ULF wave power into the dayside magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretson, M.J. ); Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Arnoldy, R.L. ); Anderson, B.J. ); Rosenberg, T.J. ); Carpenter, D.L.; Inan, U.S. ); Eather, R.H. )

    1991-02-01

    A series of recent studies of Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the dayside outer magnetosphere has given new insights into the possible mechanisms of entry of ULF wave power into the magnetosphere from a bow shock related upstream source. In this paper, the authors first review many of these new observational results by presenting a comparison of data from two 10-hour intervals on successive days in April 1986 and then present a possible model for transmission of pulsation signals from the magnetosheath into the dayside magnetosphere. Simultaneous multi-instrument observations at South Pole Station, located below the cusp/cleft ionosphere near local noon, magnetic field observations by the AMPTE CCE satellite in the dayside outer magnetosphere, and upstream magnetic field observations by the IMP 8 satellite show clear interplanetary magnetic field field magnitude control of dayside resonant harmonic pulsations and band-limited very high latitude pulsations, as well as pulsation-modulated precipitation of what appear to be magnetosheath/boundary layer electrons. They believe that this modulated precipitation may be responsible for the propagation of upstream wave power in the Pc 3 frequency band into the high-latitude ionosphere, from whence it may be transported throughout the dayside outer magnetosphere by means of an ionospheric transistor. In this model, modulations in ionospheric conductivity caused by cusp/cleft precipitation cause varying ionospheric currents with frequency spectra determined by the upstream waves; these modulations will be superimposed on the Birkeland currents, which close via these ionospheric currents. Modulated region 2 Birkeland currents will in turn provide a narrow-band source of wave energy to a wide range of dayside local times in the outer magnetosphere.

  15. Upstream migration of Pacific lampreys in the John Day River, Oregon: Behavior, timing, and habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Bayer, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Adult Pacific lamprey migration and habitat preferences for over-winter holding and spawning, and larval rearing in tributaries to the Columbia River are not well understood. The John Day River is one such tributary where larval and adult stages of this species have been documented, and its free-flowing character provided the opportunity to study migration of Pacific lampreys unimpeded by passage constraints. Forty-two adult Pacific lampreys were captured in the John Day River near its mouth during their upstream migration. Pacific lampreys were surgically implanted with radio transmitters and released onsite, and tracked by fixed-site, aerial, and terrestrial telemetry methods for nearly one year. Adults moved upstream exclusively at night, with a mean rate of 11.1 ?? 6.3 km/day. They halted upstream migration by September, and held a single position for approximately six months in the lateral margins of riffles and glides, using boulders for cover. More than half of Pacific lampreys resumed migration in March before ending movement in early May. Pacific lampreys that resumed migration in spring completed a median of 87% of their upstream migration before over-winter holding. Upon completing migration. Pacific lampreys briefly held position before beginning downstream movement at the end of May. Though not directly observed, halting migration and movement downstream were likely the result of spawning and death. Gains in adult Pacific lamprey passage through the Columbia River hydrosystem and tributaries may be made by improvements that would expedite migration during spring and summer and increase the quantity and variety of cover and refuge opportunities. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  16. The Giant Mottled Eel, Anguilla marmorata, Uses Blue-Shifted Rod Photoreceptors during Upstream Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Fu, Wen-Chun; Wang, I-Li

    2014-01-01

    Catadromous fishes migrate between ocean and freshwater during particular phases of their life cycle. The dramatic environmental changes shape their physiological features, e.g. visual sensitivity, olfactory ability, and salinity tolerance. Anguilla marmorata, a catadromous eel, migrates upstream on dark nights, following the lunar cycle. Such behavior may be correlated with ontogenetic changes in sensory systems. Therefore, this study was designed to identify changes in spectral sensitivity and opsin gene expression of A. marmorata during upstream migration. Microspectrophotometry analysis revealed that the tropical eel possesses a duplex retina with rod and cone photoreceptors. The λmax of rod cells are 493, 489, and 489 nm in glass, yellow, and wild eels, while those of cone cells are 508, and 517 nm in yellow, and wild eels, respectively. Unlike European and American eels, Asian eels exhibited a blue-shifted pattern of rod photoreceptors during upstream migration. Quantitative gene expression analyses of four cloned opsin genes (Rh1f, Rh1d, Rh2, and SWS2) revealed that Rh1f expression is dominant at all three stages, while Rh1d is expressed only in older yellow eel. Furthermore, sequence comparison and protein modeling studies implied that a blue shift in Rh1d opsin may be induced by two known (N83, S292) and four putative (S124, V189, V286, I290) tuning sites adjacent to the retinal binding sites. Finally, expression of blue-shifted Rh1d opsin resulted in a spectral shift in rod photoreceptors. Our observations indicate that the giant mottled eel is color-blind, and its blue-shifted scotopic vision may influence its upstream migration behavior and habitat choice. PMID:25101636

  17. Transfer of nitric oxide by blood from upstream to downstream resistance vessels causes microvascular dilation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X.; Unthank, J. L.; Miller, S. J.; Bills, R.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that hemoglobin, albumin, and glutathione carry and release nitric oxide (NO) may have consequences for movement of NO by blood within microvessels. We hypothesize that NO in plasma or bound to proteins likely survives to downstream locations. To confirm this hypothesis, there must be a finite NO concentration ([NO]) in arteriolar blood, and upstream resistance vessels must be able to increase the vessel wall [NO] of downstream arterioles. Arteriolar blood NO was measured with NO-sensitive microelectrodes, and vessel wall [NO] was consistently 25–40% higher than blood [NO]. Localized suppression of NO production in large arterioles over 500–1,000 μm with l-nitroarginine reduced the [NO] ∼40%, indicating as much as 60% of the wall NO was from blood transfer. Flow in mesenteric arteries was elevated by occlusion of adjacent arteries to induce a flow-mediated increase in arterial NO production. Both arterial wall and downstream arteriolar [NO] increased and the arterioles dilated as the blood [NO] was increased. To study receptor-mediated NO generation, bradykinin was locally applied to upstream large arterioles and NO measured there and in downstream arterioles. At both sites, [NO] increased and both sets of vessels dilated. When isoproterenol was applied to the upstream vessels, they dilated, but neither the [NO] or diameter downstream arterioles increased. These observations indicate that NO can move in blood from upstream to downstream resistance vessels. This mechanism allows larger vessels that generate large [NO] to influence vascular tone in downstream vessels in response to both flow and receptor stimuli. PMID:19666847

  18. The giant mottled eel, Anguilla marmorata, uses blue-shifted rod photoreceptors during upstream migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Fu, Wen-Chun; Wang, I-Li; Yan, Hong Young; Wang, Tzi-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Catadromous fishes migrate between ocean and freshwater during particular phases of their life cycle. The dramatic environmental changes shape their physiological features, e.g. visual sensitivity, olfactory ability, and salinity tolerance. Anguilla marmorata, a catadromous eel, migrates upstream on dark nights, following the lunar cycle. Such behavior may be correlated with ontogenetic changes in sensory systems. Therefore, this study was designed to identify changes in spectral sensitivity and opsin gene expression of A. marmorata during upstream migration. Microspectrophotometry analysis revealed that the tropical eel possesses a duplex retina with rod and cone photoreceptors. The λmax of rod cells are 493, 489, and 489 nm in glass, yellow, and wild eels, while those of cone cells are 508, and 517 nm in yellow, and wild eels, respectively. Unlike European and American eels, Asian eels exhibited a blue-shifted pattern of rod photoreceptors during upstream migration. Quantitative gene expression analyses of four cloned opsin genes (Rh1f, Rh1d, Rh2, and SWS2) revealed that Rh1f expression is dominant at all three stages, while Rh1d is expressed only in older yellow eel. Furthermore, sequence comparison and protein modeling studies implied that a blue shift in Rh1d opsin may be induced by two known (N83, S292) and four putative (S124, V189, V286, I290) tuning sites adjacent to the retinal binding sites. Finally, expression of blue-shifted Rh1d opsin resulted in a spectral shift in rod photoreceptors. Our observations indicate that the giant mottled eel is color-blind, and its blue-shifted scotopic vision may influence its upstream migration behavior and habitat choice.

  19. Experimental study to control the upstream migration of invasive alien fish species by submerged weir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Masami; Kunimatsu, Fumihiro; Tsuchiya, Taku; Kawamura, Makiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    Largemouth bass and Bluegill, major invasive alien fish species in Japan, have been extending their habitat ranges over not only Lake Biwa and the lagoons but also surrounding waters connected to them through small rivers and canals. Their increasing number is bringing about the reduction in the number of native fish species. To prevent the spread of these alien species through small rivers and canals during breeding season of the native fish (crucian carp), this study experimentally examined the effect of a submerged weir on controlling upstream migration of the alien species and the native fish. As a result of the experiment, the ratio of the alien species migrating upstream decreased as the weir height rose, whereas the ratio did not show the same trend in the case of the native fish. The ratio of the alien species also decreased as the overflow velocity over the weir rose. On the other hand, the ratio of the native fish increased as the overflow velocity rose up to 1.0m/s and decreased thereafter. These results suggest that the submerged weir may control upstream migration of the alien species to surrounding waters through small rivers and canals without interfering with the reproductive migration of the native fish.

  20. Effect of wakes from moving upstream rods on boundary layer separation from a high lift airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph J.

    2011-11-01

    Highly loaded airfoils in turbines allow power generation using fewer airfoils. High loading, however, can cause boundary layer separation, resulting in reduced lift and increased aerodynamic loss. Separation is affected by the interaction between rotating blades and stationary vanes. Wakes from upstream vanes periodically impinge on downstream blades, and can reduce separation. The wakes include elevated turbulence, which can induce transition, and a velocity deficit, which results in an impinging flow on the blade surface known as a ``negative jet.'' In the present study, flow through a linear cascade of very high lift airfoils is studied experimentally. Wakes are produced with moving rods which cut through the flow upstream of the airfoils, simulating the effect of upstream vanes. Pressure and velocity fields are documented. Wake spacing and velocity are varied. At low Reynolds numbers without wakes, the boundary layer separates and does not reattach. At high wake passing frequencies separation is largely suppressed. At lower frequencies, ensemble averaged velocity results show intermittent separation and reattachment during the wake passing cycle. Supported by NASA.

  1. Spatial and temporal patterns of micropollutants upstream and downstream of 24 WWTPs across Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spycher, Barbara; Deuber, Fabian; Kistler, David; Burdon, Frank; Reyes, Marta; Alder, Alfredo C.; Joss, Adriano; Eggen, Rik; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Treated wastewater is an important source of micropollutants in many streams. These chemicals consist of very diverse set of compounds that may vary in space and time. In order to improve our understanding of such spatio-temporal patterns of micropollutants in surface waters, we compared upstream and downstream locations at 24 sites across the Swiss Plateau and Jura (12 sites in the 2013 campaign, 12 sites during the 2014 campaign). Each site represents the most upstream treatment plant in the corresponding catchment. This survey is part of the interdisciplinary, Eawag-wide research project EcoImpact that aims at elucidating the ecological effects of micropollutants on stream ecosystems. In 2013, a broad analytical screening was applied to samples collected during winter (January) and summer conditions (June). Based in these results, the bi-monthly samples obtained in 2014 were analysed for a set of about 60 selected organic micropollutants and 10 heavy metals. The screening results demonstrate that generally pharmaceuticals, artificial sweeteners and corrosion inhibitors make up the largest part of the organic micropollutants. Pesticides including biocides and plant protection products are also regularly found but at lower concentrations. This presentation will analyse the variability of the micropollutant patterns across the different sites and how upstream conditions and the wastewater composition changes with season.

  2. Environmental correlates of upstream migration of yellow-phase American eels in the Potomac River drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Heather L. Liller,

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the relationships between upstream migration and environmental variables is important to understanding the ecology of yellow-phase American Eels Anguilla rostrata. During an American Eel migration study within the lower Shenandoah River (Potomac River drainage), we counted and measured American Eels at the Millville Dam eel ladder for three periods: 14 May–23 July 2004, 7–30 September 2004, and 1 June–31 July 2005. Using generalized estimating equations, we modeled each time series of daily American Eel counts by fitting time-varying environmental covariates of lunar illumination (LI), river discharge (RD), and water temperature (WT), including 1-d and 2-d lags of each covariate. Information-theoretic approaches were used for model selection and inference. A total of 4,847 American Eels (19–74 cm total length) used the ladder during the three periods, including 2,622 individuals during a 2-d span following a hurricane-induced peak in river discharge. Additive-effects models of RD + WT, a 2-d lag of LI + RD, and LI + RD were supported for the three periods, respectively. Parameter estimates were positive for river discharge for each time period, negative for lunar illumination for two periods and positive for water temperature during one period. Additive-effects models supported synergistic influences of environmental variables on the upstream migration of yellow-phase American Eels, although river discharge was consistently supported as an influential correlate of upstream migration.

  3. Added noise due to the effect of an upstream wake on a propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takallu, M. A.; Spence, P. L.; Block, P. J. W.

    1987-10-01

    An analytical/computational study has been conducted to predict the effect of an upstream wing or pylon on the noise of an operating propeller. The wing trailing edge was placed at variable distances (0.1 and 0.3 chord) upstream of a scaled model propeller (SR-2). The wake was modeled using a similarity formulation. The instantaneous pressure distribution on the propeller blades during the passage through the wake was formulated in terms of a time-dependent variation of each blade section's angle of attack and in terms of the shed vortices from the blade trailing edge. It was found that the final expressions for the unsteady loads considerably altered the radiated noise pattern. Predicted noise for various observer positions, rotational speeds, and propeller/pylon distances were computed and are presented in terms of the pressure time history, harmonics of the Fourier analysis, and overall sound pressure levels (OASPL). The addition of the tangential stress due to skin friction was found to have a damping effect on the acoustic pressure time history and the resulting spectrum of the generated noise. It is shown that the positioning of a pylon upstream of a propeller indeed increases the overall noise.

  4. Effects of optimal initial errors on predicting the seasonal reduction of the upstream Kuroshio transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Qiang; Mu, Mu; Liang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    With the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), we realistically simulated the transport variations of the upstream Kuroshio (referring to the Kuroshio from its origin to the south of Taiwan), particularly for the seasonal transport reduction. Then, we investigated the effects of the optimal initial errors estimated by the conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) approach on predicting the seasonal transport reduction. Two transport reduction events (denoted as Event 1 and Event 2) were chosen, and CNOP1 and CNOP2 were obtained for each event. By examining the spatial structures of the two types of CNOPs, we found that the dominant amplitudes are located around (128°E, 17°N) horizontally and in the upper 1000 m vertically. For each event, the two CNOPs caused large prediction errors. Specifically, at the prediction time, CNOP1 (CNOP2) develops into an anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddy-like structure centered around 124°E, leading to the increase (decrease) of the upstream Kuroshio transport. By investigating the time evolution of the CNOPs in Event 1, we found that the eddy-like structures originating from east of Luzon gradually grow and simultaneously propagate westward. The eddy-energetic analysis indicated that the errors obtain energy from the background state through barotropic and baroclinic instabilities and that the latter plays a more important role. These results suggest that improving the initial conditions in east of Luzon could lead to better prediction of the upstream Kuroshio transport variation.

  5. Simulating the effects of upstream turbulence on dispersion around a building

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.Q.; Arya, S.P.S.; Huber, A.H.; Snyder, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of high turbulence versus no turbulence in a sheared boundary-layer flow approaching a building are being investigated by a turbulent kinetic energy/dissipation model (TEMPEST). The effects on both the mean flow and the concentration field around a cubical building are presented. The numerical simulations demonstrate significant effects due to the differences in the incident flow. The addition of upstream turbulence results in a reduced size of the cavity directly behind the building. The velocity deficits in the wake strongly depend on the upstream turbulence intensities. The accuracy of numerical simulations is verified by comparing the predicted mean flow and concentration fields with the wind tunnel measurements of Castro and Robins (1977) and Robins and Castro (1977, 1975). Comparing the results with experimental data, the authors show that the TEMPEST model can reasonably simulate the mean flow. The numerical simulations of the concentration fields due to a source on the roof-top of the building are presented. Both the value and the position of the maximum ground-level concentration are changed dramatically due to the effects of the upstream level of turblence.

  6. Upstream open reading frames regulate the expression of the nuclear Wnt13 isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Tao; Rector, Kyle; Barnett, Corey D.; Mao, Catherine D.

    2008-02-22

    Wnt proteins control cell survival and cell fate during development. Although Wnt expression is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal manner, the mechanisms involved both at the transcriptional and translational levels are poorly defined. We have identified a downstream translation initiation codon, AUG(+74), in Wnt13B and Wnt13C mRNAs responsible for the expression of Wnt13 nuclear forms. In this report, we demonstrate that the expression of the nuclear Wnt13C form is translationally regulated in response to stress and apoptosis. Though the 5'-leaders of both Wnt13C and Wnt13B mRNAs have an inhibitory effect on translation, they did not display an internal ribosome entry site activity as demonstrated by dicistronic reporter assays. However, mutations or deletions of the upstream AUG(-99) and AUG(+1) initiation codons abrogate these translation inhibitory effects, demonstrating that Wnt13C expression is controlled by upstream open reading frames. Since long 5'-untranslated region with short upstream open reading frames characterize other Wnt transcripts, our present data on the translational control of Wnt13 expression open the way to further studies on the translation control of Wnt expression as a modulator of their subcellular localization and activity.

  7. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO. Conclusion Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease. PMID:26208283

  8. The influence of upstream boundary conditions on swirling flows undergoing vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukes, Lothar; Sieber, Moritz; Oberleithner, Kilian; Paschereit, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    Swirling jets undergoing vortex breakdown are common in research and technology. In part this is because swirling jets are widely used to anchor the flame position in gas turbines. Recently, the benefit in terms of flashback safety of axial air injection via a center body in the upstream mixing tube of a simplified premixed burner was demonstrated, Reichel (ASME Turbo Expo 2014). However, the presence of a center body alone alters the upstream boundary conditions for the downstream swirling flow. This study investigates how different upstream conditions modify the downstream swirling jet in a more generic setup. A swirling jet facility is used, consisting of a swirler, a pipe, a nozzle and an unconfined part. The focus lies on two large-scale flow features: the precessing vortex core (PVC) and the recirculation bubble. The flow field is measured with Particle Image Velocimetry and proper orthogonal decomposition is conducted to extract the dominant coherent structures. Additionally, a feature tracking approach is used to track the instantaneous shape and position of the recirculation bubble. We find that different center bodies modify the inflow profiles of the unconfined part of the flow in a specific way. This leads to significant differences in the large scale dynamics. Financial support from the German Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. The role of the ionosphere in coupling upstream ULF wave power into the dayside magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of recent studies of Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the dayside outer magnetosphere has given new insights into the possible mechanisms of entry of ULF wave power into the magnetosphere from a bow shock-related upstream source. A comparison is made of data from two 10-hour intervals on successive days in April 1986 and then a possible model for transmission of pulsation signals from the magnetosheath into the dayside magnetosphere is presented. Clear interplanetary magnetic field magnitude control of dayside resonant harmonic pulsations and band-limited very high latitude pulsations, as well as pulsation-modulated precipitation of what appear to be magnetosheath/boundary layer electrons are shown. It is believed that this modulated precipitation may be responsible for the propagation of upstream wave power in the Pc 3 frequency band into the high-latitude ionosphere, from whence it may be transported throughout the dayside outer magnetosphere by means of an 'ionospheric transistor'. In this model, modulations in ionospheric conductivity caused by cusp/cleft precipitation cause varying ionospheric currents with frequency spectra determined by the upstream waves; these modulations will be superimposed on the Birkeland currents, which close via these ionospheric currents. Modulated region 2 Birkeland currents will in turn provide a narrow-band source of wave energy to a wide range of dayside local times in the outer magnetosphere.

  10. Formation Flight: Upstream Influence of a Wing on a Streamwise Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Chris; Rockwell, Donald; Lehigh University Fluids Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in formation can experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex of the leader wing on the trailer wing can increase the lift to drag ratio L/D and the unsteady loading on the trailer wing. These increases are sensitive to the impingement location of the vortex on the wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine patterns of velocity and vorticity on successive crossflow planes along the vortex, which lead to volume representations and thereby characterization of the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure as it approaches the trailer wing. This evolution of the incident vortex is affected by the upstream influence of the trailer wing, and is highly dependent on the location of vortex impingement. As the spanwise impingement location of the vortex moves from outboard of the wing tip to inboard, the upstream influence on the development of the vortex increases. For spanwise locations close to or intersecting the vortex core, the effects of upstream influence of the wing on the vortex are to: increase the streamwise velocity deficit; decrease the streamwise vorticity; increase the in-plane vorticity; decrease the downwash; and increase the root-mean-square of both streamwise velocity and vorticity.

  11. A Conserved Upstream Motif Orchestrates Autonomous, Germline-Enriched Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans piRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Day, Amanda M.; Chun, Sang Young; Khivansara, Vishal; Kim, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) fulfill a critical, conserved role in defending the genome against foreign genetic elements. In many organisms, piRNAs appear to be derived from processing of a long, polycistronic RNA precursor. Here, we establish that each Caenorhabditis elegans piRNA represents a tiny, autonomous transcriptional unit. Remarkably, the minimal C. elegans piRNA cassette requires only a 21 nucleotide (nt) piRNA sequence and an ∼50 nt upstream motif with limited genomic context for expression. Combining computational analyses with a novel, in vivo transgenic system, we demonstrate that this upstream motif is necessary for independent expression of a germline-enriched, Piwi-dependent piRNA. We further show that a single nucleotide position within this motif directs differential germline enrichment. Accordingly, over 70% of C. elegans piRNAs are selectively expressed in male or female germline, and comparison of the genes they target suggests that these two populations have evolved independently. Together, our results indicate that C. elegans piRNA upstream motifs act as independent promoters to specify which sequences are expressed as piRNAs, how abundantly they are expressed, and in what germline. As the genome encodes well over 15,000 unique piRNA sequences, our study reveals that the number of transcriptional units encoding piRNAs rivals the number of mRNA coding genes in the C. elegans genome. PMID:23516384

  12. Rearrangement of Upstream Regulatory Elements Leads to Ectopic Expression of the Drosophila Mulleri Adh-2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Falb, D.; Fischer, J.; Maniatis, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Adh-2 gene of Drosophila mulleri is expressed in the larval fat body and the adult fat body and hindgut, and a 1500-bp element located 2-3 kb upstream of the Adh-2 promoter is necessary for maximal levels of transcription. Previous work demonstrated that deletion of sequences between this upstream element and the Adh-2 promoter results in Adh-2 gene expression in a novel larval tissue, the middle midgut. In this study we show that the upstream element possesses all of the characteristics of a transcriptional enhancer: its activity is independent of orientation, it acts on a heterologous promoter, and it functions at various positions both 5' and 3' to the Adh-2 gene. Full enhancer function can be localized to a 750-bp element, although other regions possess some redundant activity. The ectopic expression pattern is dependent on the proximity of at least two sequence elements. Thus, tissue-specific transcription can involve complex proximity-dependent interactions among combinations of regulatory elements. PMID:1459428

  13. MAGNETIC VARIANCES AND PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING TIMES UPSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano E-mail: gaetano.zimbardo@fis.unical.it

    2012-07-20

    Recent observations of power-law time profiles of energetic particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks have shown the possibility of anomalous, superdiffusive transport for energetic particles throughout the heliosphere. Those findings call for an accurate investigation of the magnetic field fluctuation properties at the resonance frequencies upstream of the shock's fronts. Normalized magnetic field variances, indeed, play a crucial role in the determination of the pitch-angle scattering times and then of the transport regime. The present analysis investigates the time behavior of the normalized variances of the magnetic field fluctuations, measured by the Ulysses spacecraft upstream of corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks, for those events which exhibit superdiffusion for energetic electrons. We find a quasi-constant value for the normalized magnetic field variances from about 10 hr to 100 hr from the shock front. This rules out the presence of a varying diffusion coefficient and confirms the possibility of superdiffusion for energetic electrons. A statistical analysis of the scattering times obtained from the magnetic fluctuations upstream of the CIR events has also been performed; the resulting power-law distributions of scattering times imply long range correlations and weak pitch-angle scattering, and the power-law slopes are in qualitative agreement with superdiffusive processes described by a Levy random walk.

  14. Numerical simulation of upstream disturbance on flows around a slender body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, David; Tobak, Murray

    1993-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the thin-layer approximation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations have been obtained for flows around an ogive-cylinder body with and without a small fixed disturbance placed upstream of the body tip. Locating the disturbance at positions in the flow field upstream of the tip provokes the same range of behavior of the asymmetric flow that was numerically produced earlier by use of a geometrical disturbance on the body tip. Results remain consistent with the presence of a convective instability mechanism, and demonstrate the potential for a precise mapping of the body's receptivity to fixed disturbances in the flow field. Numerical solutions were also obtained for the flow-field responses to impulsive upstream disturbances to determine whether there is a growing response to an asymmetric impulsive disturbance that is consistent with presence of a convective instability mechanism. Results for surface pressure are interpreted with the aid of a mathematical model. The model suggests that the observed growth of surface pressure gradient with time and distance along a ray in response to an asymmetnc impulsive disturbance is in accord with the solution of a Ginzberg-Landau equation, with distinguishing features of the solution being consistent with the convective instability mode of behavior.

  15. Improving Flood Damage Assessment Models in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, M.; Mysiak, J.; Carrera, L.; Koks, E.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Stage-Damage Curve (SDC) models is prevalent in ex-ante assessments of flood risk. To assess the potential damage of a flood event, SDCs describe a relation between water depth and the associated potential economic damage over land use. This relation is normally developed and calibrated through site-specific analysis based on ex-post damage observations. In some cases (e.g. Italy) SDCs are transferred from other countries, undermining the accuracy and reliability of simulation results. Against this background, we developed a refined SDC model for Northern Italy, underpinned by damage compensation records from a recent flood event. Our analysis considers both damage to physical assets and production losses from business interruptions. While the first is calculated based on land use information, production losses are measured through the spatial distribution of Gross Value Added (GVA). An additional component of the model assesses crop-specific agricultural losses as a function of flood seasonality. Our results show an overestimation of asset damage from non-calibrated SDC values up to a factor of 4.5 for tested land use categories. Furthermore, we estimate that production losses amount to around 6 per cent of the annual GVA. Also, maximum yield losses are less than a half of the amount predicted by the standard SDC methods.

  16. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  17. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  18. Turbulence Analysis Upstream of a Wind Turbine: a LES Approach to Improve Wind LIDAR Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaf, M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally wind turbines learn about the incoming wind conditions by means of a wind vane and a cup anemometer. This approach presents two major limitations: 1) because the measurements are done at the nacelle, behind the rotor blades, the wind observations are perturbed inducing potential missalignement and power losses; 2) no direct information of the incoming turbulence is extracted, limiting the capacity to timely adjust the wind turbine against strong turbulent intensity events. Recent studies have explored the possibility of using wind LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) to overcome these limitations (Angelou et al. 2010 and Mikelsen et al., 2013). By installing a wind LIDAR at the nacelle of a wind turbine one can learn about the incoming wind and turbulent conditions ahead of time to timely readjust the turbine settings. Yet several questions remain to be answered such as how far upstream one should measure and what is the appropriate averaging time to extract valuable information. In light of recent results showing the relevance of atmospheric stratification in wind energy applications, it is expected that different averaging times and upstream scanning distances are advised for wind LIDAR measurements. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) study exploring the use of wind LIDAR technology within a wind farm has been developed. The wind farm consists of an infinite array of horizontal axis wind turbines modeled using the actuator disk with rotation. The model also allows the turbines to dynamically adjust their yaw with the incoming wind vector. The flow is forced with a constant geostrophic wind and a time varying surface temperature reproducing a realistic diurnal cycle. Results will be presented showing the relevance of the averaging time for the different flow characteristics as well as the effect of different upstream scanning distances. While it is observed that within a large wind farm there are no-significant gains in power output by scanning further

  19. Foreign Object Damage Identification in Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, William; Zhang, Desheng; Turso, James; Pavlik, William; Lopez, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the collective work of a five-person team from different organizations examining the problem of detecting foreign object damage (FOD) events in turbofan engines from gas path thermodynamic and bearing accelerometer sensors, and determining the severity of damage to each component (diagnosis). Several detection and diagnostic approaches were investigated and a software tool (FODID) was developed to assist researchers detect/diagnose FOD events. These approaches include (1) fan efficiency deviation computed from upstream and downstream temperature/ pressure measurements, (2) gas path weighted least squares estimation of component health parameter deficiencies, (3) Kalman filter estimation of component health parameters, and (4) use of structural vibration signal processing to detect both large and small FOD events. The last three of these approaches require a significant amount of computation in conjunction with a physics-based analytic model of the underlying phenomenon the NPSS thermodynamic cycle code for approaches 1 to 3 and the DyRoBeS reduced-order rotor dynamics code for approach 4. A potential application of the FODID software tool, in addition to its detection/diagnosis role, is using its sensitivity results to help identify the best types of sensors and their optimum locations within the gas path, and similarly for bearing accelerometers.

  20. War Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During and after the Persian Gulf war, hundreds of "oil lakes" were created in Kuwait by oil released from damaged wells. The lakes are a hazard to the Kuwait atmosphere, soil and ground water and must be carefully monitored. Boston University Center for Remote Sensing, assisted by other organizations, has accurately mapped the lakes using Landsat and Spot imagery. The war damage included the formation of over 300 oil lakes, oil pollution and sand dune movement. Total damage area is over 5,400 square kilometers - 30 percent of Kuwait's total surface area.

  1. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  2. Predicting bulk damage in NIF triple harmonic generators

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J; Runkel, M; Williams, W

    1998-09-18

    Recently reported experiments have investigated the statistics of laser damage in KDP and KD*P. Automated damage tests have allowed cumulative failure and damage probability distributions to be constructed. Large area tests have investigated the feasibility of on-line laser conditioning and damage evolution for tripler harmonic generation (THG) crystals on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These tests have shown that there is a nonzero probability of damage at NIF redline fluence (14.3 J/cm2, 351 nm, 3 ns) and that the damage pinpoint density evolves exponentially with fluence. In this paper, the results of these tests are used in conjunction with model spatial profiles of the NIP beam to predict the level of damage created in the THG crystal. A probabilistic calculation based on the overlap of the beam fluence and damage probabiity distribution shows that the overall damage probability is less than 3% for well-conditioned, high quality KDP/KD*P crystals of conventional or rapid growth. The number density of generated pinpoints has been calculated by mapping the damage evolution curves onto the NlF model profile. This shows that the number of damage pinpoints generated in high fluence portions of the NIF beam will be low for well-conditioned THG crystals. In contrast, unconditioned triplers of the same material will exhibit an increase in pinpoint density of greater than 20x. To test the validity of these calculations a 37 cm, conventionally grown KD*P tripler from the Beamlet laser was scatter mapped for bulk damage. The tripler had been exposed to NE-like fluences during its operational lifetime on Beamlet and exhibited very low levels of bulk pinpoint damage, essentially supporting the predictions based on tests and modeling.

  3. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  4. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  5. Composite heat damage assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Wachter, E.A.; Philpot, H.E.; Powell, G.L.

    1993-12-31

    The effects of heat damage were determined on the residual mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of IM6/3501-6 laminates, and potential nondestructive techniques to detect and assess material heat damage were evaluated. About one thousand preconditioned specimens were exposed to elevated temperatures, then cooled to room temperature and tested in compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, shore-D hardness, weight loss, and change in thickness. Specimens experienced significant and irreversible reduction in their residual properties when exposed to temperatures exceeding the material upper service temperature of this material (350{degrees}F). The Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Laser-Pumped Fluorescence techniques were found to be capable of rapid, in-service, nondestructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501- 6. These techniques also have the potential applicability to detect and assess heat damage effects in other polymer matrix composites.

  6. LSD and Genetic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  7. Tunable self-seeding Fabry-Pérot laser diode for upstream multiwavelength shared ethernet passive optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Xiao, Shilin; Zhou, Zhao; Bi, Meihua

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel upstream multiwavelength shared ethernet passive optical network architecture, based on a proposed self-seeding Fabry-Pérot laser diode (FP-LD) at the optical network unit. The performances of the wavelength and power stability, side-mode suppression ratio, and tuning range for the proposed tunable self-seeding laser module are experimentally investigated. The bit-error-rate measurement is performed with direct modulation on FP-LD of 1.25 Gbps upstream data. The performance benefits from the upstream wavelengths sharing are showed via simulations.

  8. Observations on communities of brook and brown trout separated by an upstream movement barrier on the Firehole River

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeding, L.R.

    1980-07-01

    Division of a fluvial fish community by stream impoundment can give rise to dissimilar upstream and downstream assemblages which may themselves differ from the original community. These changes are often ascribed to the modification of physical habitat or water quality. Less well documented are effects on fluvial fish communities of an upstream-1 movement barrier alone. Observations were made on contrasting communities of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) separated by Kepler Cascades in the Firehole River of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, a series of waterfalls that form an upstream-movement barrier. (ACR)

  9. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  10. Self-formed meandering river created in the laboratory using an upstream migrating boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, W. M.; van de Lageweg, W. I.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Braided rivers are relatively easily formed in the laboratory, whereas self-formed meandering rivers in the lab have proven very difficult to form, indicating a lack of understanding of the necessary and sufficient conditions for meandering. Our objective is to create self-formed dynamic meandering rivers and floodplains in a laboratory. Early experiments attempted to initiate meandering with upstream inflow at a fixed angle different from the general flow direction. The resulting bends were fixed at one position, which is not the dynamic meandering observed in nature. Another important condition for meandering is to have banks stronger than the non-cohesive bed sediment, which has been attained by growing vegetation. Furthermore, finer or light-weight sediment has been used to let chute channels fill up where otherwise multi-thread channels would have evolved, which is braiding. Yet the fixed-angle inflow kept meander migration and channel belt width and complexity limited. We accomplished dynamic meandering in the laboratory by using an upstream migrating boundary, which simulates a meander migrating into the flume. Our experiments were conducted in a circulated flume of 11x6 meter, with a constant discharge and sediment feed consisting of a sediment mixture ranging from silt to fine gravel (Kleinhans et al., 2010, this conference). The downstream boundary is a lake into which the river built a branched fan delta (Van de Lageweg et al., 2010, this conference). The morphology was recorded by high-resolution (0.5 mm) line-laser scanning and digital Single Lens Reflex (SLR) camera used for channel-floodplain segmentation and particle size estimation, at an interval of 8 hours. Furthermore a large number of smaller-scale auxiliary experiments were conducted to explore meandering tendency in a large range of parameters. Initial alternate ‘forced’ bars were formed at fixed positions with low sinuosity when the upstream boundary was at one fixed position. Migration

  11. Use of Displacement Damage Dose in an Engineering Model of GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, T. L.; Chock, R.; Long, K. J.; Bailey, S.; Messenger, S. R.; Walters, R. J.; Summers, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    Current methods for calculating damage to solar cells are well documented in the GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook (JPL 96-9). An alternative, the displacement damage dose (D(sub d)) method, has been developed by Summers, et al. This method is currently being implemented in the SAVANT computer program.

  12. Saturn's Magnetosphere and Properties of Upstream Flow at Titan: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Lipatov, A.; Bertucci, C.; Coates, A. J.; Arridge, C.; Szego, K.; Shappirio, M.; Simipson, D. G.; Tokar, R.; Young, D. T.

    2009-01-01

    Using Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) measurements, we present the ion fluid properties and its ion composition of the upstream flow for Titan's interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere. A 3D ion moments algorithm is used which is essentially model independent with only requirement is that ion flow is within the CAPS IMS 2(pi) steradian field-of-view (FOV) and that the ion 'velocity distribution function (VDF) be gyrotropic. These results cover the period from TA flyby (2004 day 300) to T22 flyby (2006 363). Cassini's in situ measurements of Saturn's magnetic field show it is stretched out into a magnetodisc configuration for Saturn Local Times (SLT) centered about midnight local time. Under those circumstances the field is confined near the equatorial plane with Titan either above or below the magnetosphere current sheet. Similar to Jupiter's outer magnetosphere where a magnetodisc configuration applies, one expects the heavy ions within Saturn's outer magnetosphere to be confined within a few degrees of the current sheet while at higher magnetic latitudes protons should dominate. We show that when Cassini is between dusk-midnight-dawn local time and spacecraft is not within the current sheet that light ions (H, 142) tend to dominate the ion composition for the upstream flow. If true, one may expect the interaction between Saturn's magnetosphere, locally devoid of heavy ions and Titan's upper atmosphere and exosphere to be significantly different from that for Voyager 1, TA and TB when heavy ions were present in the upstream flow. We also present observational evidence for Saturn's magnetosphere interaction with Titan's extended H and H2 corona which can extend approx. 1 Rs from Titan.

  13. Novel Paradigms for Dialysis Vascular Access: Upstream Hemodynamics and Vascular Remodeling in Dialysis Access Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ene-Iordache, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Failure of hemodialysis access is caused mostly by venous intimal hyperplasia, a fibro-muscular thickening of the vessel wall. The pathogenesis of venous neointimal hyperplasia in primary arteriovenous fistulae consists of processes that have been identified as upstream and downstream events. Upstream events are the initial events producing injury of the endothelial layer (surgical trauma, hemodynamic shear stress, vessel wall injury due to needle punctures, etc.). Downstream events are the responses of the vascular wall at the endothelial injury that consist of a cascade of processes including leukocyte adhesion, migration of smooth muscle cells from the media to the intimal layer, and proliferation. In arteriovenous fistulae, the stenoses occur in specific sites, consistently related to the local hemodynamics determined by the vessel geometry and blood flow pattern. Recent findings that the localization of these sites matches areas of disturbed flow may add new insights into the pathogenesis of neointimal hyperplasia in the venous side of vascular access after the creation of the anastomosis. The detailed study of fluid flow motion acting on the vascular wall in anastomosed vessels and in the arm vasculature at the patient-specific level may help to elucidate the role of hemodynamics in vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia formation. These computational approaches may also help in surgical planning for the amelioration of clinical outcome. This review aims to discuss the role of the disturbed flow condition in acting as upstream event in the pathogenesis of venous intimal hyperplasia and in producing subsequent local vascular remodeling in autogenous arteriovenous fistulae used for hemodialysis access. The potential use of blood flow analysis in the management of vascular access is also discussed. PMID:23990161

  14. Developmental approach to prevent adolescent suicides: research pathways to effective upstream preventive interventions.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    The 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention expands the current suicide prevention paradigm by including a strategic direction aimed at promoting healthy populations. Childhood and adolescence are key suicide prevention window periods, yet knowledge of suicide prevention pathways through universal interventions is limited (Aspirational Goal 11). Epidemiologic evidence suggests that prevention programs in normative social systems such as schools are needed for broad suicide prevention impact. Prevention trial results show that current universal prevention programs for children and young adolescents are effective in reducing adolescent emotional and behavioral problems that are risk factors for suicidal behavior, and in the case of the Good Behavior Game, suicide attempts. A developmentally sequenced upstream suicide prevention approach is proposed: (1) childhood programs to strengthen a broad set of self-regulation skills through family and school-based programs, followed by (2) adolescent programs that leverage social influences to prevent emerging risk behaviors such as substance abuse and strengthen relationships and skills. Key knowledge breakthroughs needed are evidence linking specific intervention strategies to reduced suicidal behaviors and mortality and their mechanisms of action. Short- and long-term objectives to achieve these breakthroughs include combining evidence from completed prevention trials, increasing motivators for prevention researchers to assess suicide-related outcome, and conducting new trials of upstream interventions in populations using efficient designs acceptable to communities. In conclusion, effective upstream prevention programs have been identified that modify risk and protective factors for adolescent suicide, and key knowledge breakthroughs can jump-start progress in realizing the suicide prevention potential of specific strategies. PMID:25145747

  15. Sporadic loss of plasma from Mars, Venus and Titan caused by upstream variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, N. J.; Nilsson, H.; Wahlund, J.; Agren, K.; Andrews, D. J.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Stenberg, G.; Lester, M.; Cowley, S. W.; Fraenz, M.; Luhmann, J. G.; McEnulty, T.; Barabash, S.; Coates, A. J.; Zhang, T.

    2012-12-01

    We present results on ionospheric escape from Mars, Venus and Titan during times when the upstream density, velocity and magnetic field are changing. During the current solar minimum we search the ACE, Mars Express and Venus Express data for high-pressure events in the solar wind, such as corotating interaction regions and coronal mass ejections, that will impact on Mars and Venus. Venus Express and Mars Express measurements are used to compare the anti-sunward fluxes of heavy planetary ions during the passage of these events to the fluxes during quiet solar wind conditions. The planetary ion fluxes are observed to increase by a factor of ~1.9 at Venus and by a factor of ~2.5 at Mars, on average. Taking into account the occurrence rate and duration of these events at each planet we find that 30% of the total outflow from Mars and 50% of the total outflow from Venus occurs when solar wind pressure pulses impact on the planets. We also predict how similar processes of sporadic plasma escape can occur at Titan due to the changing upstream conditions of Saturn's corotating magnetosphere. We discuss the importance of the increased upstream dynamic pressure as well as sudden rotations of the impinging magnetic field that drapes around the unmagnetised bodies in terms of causing enhanced escape rates. The increased dynamic pressure means that solar wind plasma can penetrate deeper into the ionosphere and more effectively erode plasma. The magnetic field rotation causes the induced magnetospheres to reconfigure and change polarity, which could occur through substorm-like processes. During such processes plasma can be accelerated in the downstream direction through electrodynamical effects.

  16. Upstream Distal Regulatory Elements Contact the Lmo2 Promoter in Mouse Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Anandi; Chen, Chih-Yu; Ho, Sara; Mitchell, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    The Lim domain only 2 (Lmo2) gene encodes a transcriptional cofactor critical for the development of hematopoietic stem cells. Several distal regulatory elements have been identified upstream of the Lmo2 gene in the human and mouse genomes that are capable of enhancing reporter gene expression in erythroid cells and may be responsible for the high level transcription of Lmo2 in the erythroid lineage. In this study we investigate how these elements regulate transcription of Lmo2 and whether or not they function cooperatively in the endogenous context. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) experiments show that chromatin-chromatin interactions exist between upstream regulatory elements and the Lmo2 promoter in erythroid cells but that these interactions are absent from kidney where Lmo2 is transcribed at twelve fold lower levels. Specifically, long range chromatin-chromatin interactions occur between the Lmo2 proximal promoter and two broad regions, 3–31 and 66–105 kb upstream of Lmo2, which we term the proximal and distal control regions for Lmo2 (pCR and dCR respectively). Each of these regions is bound by several transcription factors suggesting that multiple regulatory elements cooperate in regulating high level transcription of Lmo2 in erythroid cells. Binding of CTCF and cohesin which support chromatin loops at other loci were also found within the dCR and at the Lmo2 proximal promoter. Intergenic transcription occurs throughout the dCR in erythroid cells but not in kidney suggesting a role for these intergenic transcripts in regulating Lmo2, similar to the broad domain of intergenic transcription observed at the human β-globin locus control region. Our data supports a model in which the dCR functions through a chromatin looping mechanism to contact and enhance Lmo2 transcription specifically in erythroid cells. Furthermore, these chromatin loops are supported by the cohesin complex recruited to both CTCF and transcription factor bound regions. PMID

  17. Macrophage nitric oxide synthase gene: two upstream regions mediate induction by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, C J; Alley, E W; Raval, P; Snowman, A M; Snyder, S H; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1993-01-01

    The promoter region of the mouse gene for macrophage-inducible nitric oxide synthase (mac-NOS; EC 1.14.13.39) has been characterized. A putative TATA box is 30 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Computer analysis reveals numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors, many of them associated with stimuli that induce mac-NOS expression. To localize functionally important portions of the regulatory region, we constructed deletion mutants of the mac-NOS 5' flanking region and placed them upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, when transfected with a minimal promoter construct, expresses little luciferase activity when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or both. Maximal expression depends on two discrete regulatory regions upstream of the putative TATA box. Region I (position -48 to -209) increases luciferase activity approximately 75-fold over the minimal promoter construct. Region I contains LPS-related responsive elements, including a binding site for nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and the kappa B binding site for NF-kappa B, suggesting that this region regulates LPS-induced expression of the mac-NOS gene. Region II (position -913 to -1029) alone does not increase luciferase expression, but together with region I it causes an additional 10-fold increase in expression. Together the two regions increase expression 750-fold over activity obtained from a minimal promoter construct. Region II contains motifs for binding IFN-related transcription factors and thus probably is responsible for IFN-mediated regulation of LPS-induced mac-NOS. Delineation of these two cooperative regions explains at the level of transcription how IFN-gamma and LPS act in concert to induce maximally the mac-NOS gene and, furthermore, how IFN-gamma augments the inflammatory response to LPS. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7692452

  18. Beyond police crisis intervention: moving "upstream" to manage cases and places of behavioral health vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jennifer D; Beierschmitt, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Law enforcement officers continue to serve on the front lines as mental health interventionists, and as such have been subject to a wave of "first generation" reform designed to enhance their crisis response capabilities. Yet, this focus on crisis intervention has not answered recent calls to move "upstream" and bolster early intervention in the name of long-term recovery. This paper reports on findings from an action research project in Philadelphia aimed at exploring opportunities for enhanced upstream engagement. Study methods include spatial analyses of police mental health transportations from an eight year period (2004-2011) and qualitative data from twenty-three "framing conversations" with partners and other stakeholders, seven focus groups with police and outreach workers, five key informant interviews as well as document reviews of the service delivery system in Philadelphia. Recommendations include the need to move beyond a focus on what police can do to a wider conception of city agencies and business stakeholders who can influence vulnerable people and vulnerable spaces of the city. We argue for the need to develop shared principles and rules of engagement that clarify roles and stipulate how best to enlist city resources in a range of circumstances. Since issues of mental health, substance use and disorder are so tightly coupled, we stress the importance of establishing a data-driven approach to crime and disorder reduction in areas of the city we term "hotspots of vulnerability". In line with a recovery philosophy, such an approach should reduce opportunities for anti-social behavior among the "dually labeled" in ways consistent with "procedural justice". Furthermore, crime and disorder data flowing from police and security to behavioral health analysts could contribute to a more focused case management of "repeat utilizers" across the two systems. Our central argument is that a twin emphasis on "case management" and "place management" may provide

  19. 2-D Three Fluid Simulation of Upstreaming Ions Above Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielides, M. A.; Lummerzheim, D.; Otto, A.; Stevens, R. J.

    2006-12-01

    The ionosphere is a rich reservoir of charged particles from which a variable fraction is transported to the magnetosphere. An important transport phenomena is the formation of upward ion flow above auroral structure. A primary region of the outflow is not known, but contributions come from polar cap, dayside cusp/cleft region, auroral oval, or even from mid-latitudes. In the past global magnetospheric models and fluid codes were used to simulate large scale ion outflow above, e.g., the polar-cap aurora. However, satellites orbiting at low- altitudes have repeatingly detected localized ion outflow above the auroral oval. Ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling simulations gave first insides into the small-scale dynamics of aurora. The aim of this study is the investigation of coupled plasma and neutral dynamics in smaller scale aurora to explain the generation, structure, and dynamics of vertical ion upstream. We consider auroral electron precipitation at ionospheric heights in a 2-D three fluid ionospheric-magnetospheric coupling code (Otto and Zhu, 2003). Specially we examine the effects of the electron precipitation, heat conduction and heating in field- aligned current through coulomb collisions or turbulence causing: i) electron heating, ii) electron pressure gradients, and iii) upstreaming of ions through a resulting ambipolar electric field. Our first case studies are performed for different boundary conditions and for different auroral electron precipitation parameters (variation in characteristic auroral energy, auroral energy flux and horizontal scale). The results shall clarify how auroral precipitation can drive ions upwards. Finally we discuss the effect of ion drag and the interaction of the upstreaming ions with a stable neutral constituent. Otto, O. and H. Zhu, Fluid plasma simulation of coupled systems: Ionosphere and magnetosphere, Space Plasma Simulation. Edited by J. Buechner, C. Dum, and M. Scholer., Lecture Notes in Physics, vol. 615, p.193

  20. Light regulation of plant gene expression by an upstream enhancer-like element.

    PubMed

    Timko, M P; Kausch, A P; Castresana, C; Fassler, J; Herrera-Estrella, L; Van den Broeck, G; Van Montagu, M; Schell, J; Cashmore, A R

    Light regulates many varied physiological and developmental phenomena during plant growth and differentiation, including the formation of a photosynthetically competent chloroplast from a proplastid. The expression of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) genes is regulated by light in a development- and tissue-specific manner2,3. In some plant species, phytochrome has been demonstrated to mediate this response, and photoregulation of rbcS expression occurs at least in part at the level of transcription. We have shown previously that a 5'-noncoding fragment (4-973 base pairs (bp) upstream of the messenger RNA cap site) of the pea rbcS ss3.6 gene contains all of the nucleotide sequence information necessary to direct the photoregulated expression of a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene in tobacco. Consistent with these findings, Morelli et al.11 have shown by deletion analysis of a second rbcS gene promoter, that the sequences required for photoregulated expression of rbcS E9 reside within the 5'-noncoding region. They identified an upstream region of approximately 700 bp needed for maximum transcription but not light-dark regulation, and a region from -35 to -2 bp which included the TATA box and contained the necessary information for light responsiveness. We now demonstrate that regulatory sequences 5' distal to the rbcS ss3.6 TATA box and transcriptional start site not only contain the information necessary for maximum expression, but also confer photoregulation. These upstream regulatory sequences function independently of orientation when fused to their homologous promoter or a heterologous promoter.

  1. Electron beam excitation of upstream waves in the whistler mode frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Hung K.; Smith, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine whistler mode instabilities arising from electron beams in interplanetary space at 1 AU. Both parallel and obliquely propagating solutions are considered. We demonstrate that the generation of two simultaneous whistler mode waves is possible, and even reasonably likely, for beam parameters frequently encountered upstream of the Earth's bow shock and at interplanetary shocks. We also explore the generation of left-hand polarized waves at whistler mode frequencies under these same conditions. We offer both parametric variations derived from numerical solutions of the various instabilities as well as an analytical treatment of the problem which succeeds in unifying the various numerical results.

  2. Comparison of picked-up protons and water group ions upstream of Comet Halley's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Coates, A. J.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1990-01-01

    The similarities and differences between the picked-up cometary protons and water-group (WG) ions upstream of the bow shock of Comet Halley are examined using measurements obtained by the ion mass spectrometer and plasma analyzer experiments on board Giotto. It was found that the dependencies of the pitch angle and the energy diffusion rates of the cometary protons and WG ions on the ion densities and on the angle alpha between the interplanetary field and the solar wind velocity vector were very different. This finding could not be explained in terms of presently available theories and models.

  3. Tolerance of Mach 2.50 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlets to upstream flow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choby, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the tolerances of two Mach 2.50 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlets to upstream flow variations was conducted. Tolerances of each inlet to angle of attack as a function of decreasing free-stream Mach number were obtained. A local region of overcompression was formed on the leeward side of the inlet at maximum angle of attack before unstart. This region of overcompression corresponded to local subsonic flow conditions ahead of the geometric throat. A uniform Mach number gradient of 0.10 at the cowl lip plane did not affect the inlet's pressure recovery, mass flow ratio, or diffuser exit total-pressure distortion.

  4. Spectral characteristics of low-frequency plasma turbulence upstream of Comet P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, K.-H.; Coates, A. J.; Acuna, M. H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Johnstone, A. D.; Neubauer, F. M.; Reme, H.

    1989-01-01

    Two upstream regions have been identified in Giotto spacecraft magnetic field and plasma measurements subjected to cross-spectral analyses, in order to determine this cometary environment's low-frequency plasma turbulence spectral characteristics. One region's solar wind magnetic field was approximately parallel, and the other's perpendicular, to the solar wind flow velocity direction. Additional divergences relate to the regions having magnetic field lines that are either connected or disconnected to the cometary bow shock wave in either the quasi-parallel or quasi-perpendicular regions.

  5. Parameter estimation of superdiffusive motion of energetic particles upstream of heliospheric shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano; Effenberger, Frederic; Fichtner, Horst

    2015-06-01

    Context. In-situ spacecraft observations recently suggested that the transport of energetic particles accelerated at heliospheric shocks can be anomalous, i.e. the mean square displacement can grow non-linearly in time. In particular, a new analysis technique has permitted the study of particle transport properties from energetic particle time profiles upstream of interplanetary shocks. Indeed, the time/spatial power laws of the differential intensity upstream of several shocks are indicative of superdiffusion. Aims: A complete determination of the key parameters of superdiffusive transport comprises the power-law index, the superdiffusion coefficient, the related transition scale at which the energetic particle profiles turn to decay as power laws, and the energy spectral index of the shock accelerated particles. Methods: Assuming large-scale spatial homogeneity of the background plasma, the power-law behaviour can been derived from both a (microscopic) propagator formalism and a (macroscopic) fractional transport equation. We compare the two approaches and find a relation between the diffusion coefficients used in the two formalisms. Based on the assumption of superdiffusive transport, we quantitatively derive these parameters by studying energetic particle profiles observed by the Ulysses and Voyager 2 spacecraft upstream of shocks in the heliosphere, for which a superdiffusive particle transport has previously been observed. Further, we have jointly studied the electron energy spectra, comparing the values of the spectral indices observed with those predicted by the standard diffusive shock acceleration theory and by a model based on superdiffusive transport. Results: For a number of interplanetary shocks and for the solar wind termination shock, for the first time we obtain the anomalous diffusion constants and the scale at which the probability of particle free paths changes to a power-law. The investigation of the particle energy spectra indicates that a

  6. Minimum cost maximum flow algorithm for upstream bandwidth allocation in OFDMA passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yating; Kuang, Bin; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Qianwu; Wang, Min

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a minimum cost maximum flow (MCMF) based upstream bandwidth allocation algorithm, which supports differentiated QoS for orthogonal frequency division multiple access passive optical networks (OFDMA-PONs). We define a utility function as the metric to characterize the satisfaction degree of an ONU on the obtained bandwidth. The bandwidth allocation problem is then formulated as maximizing the sum of the weighted total utility functions of all ONUs. By constructing a flow network graph, we obtain the optimized bandwidth allocation using the MCMF algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme improves the performance in terms of mean packet delay, packet loss ratio and throughput.

  7. Asymmetry Effects in Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Flows with Upstream Separated Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper studies the numerical simulation of flows with shock/boundary-layer upstream interaction, under conditions of symmetry in geometry, boundary conditions, and grid. For this purpose, a series of two- and three-dimensional numerical test-cases were carried out. The tests showed that standard numerical schemes, which appear to be symmetry-preserving under most flow configurations, produce nonsymmetric perturbations when large separated regions are present. These perturbations are amplified when the core flow is under compression. If the flow-blockage due to separation is sufficiently large, the symmetry of the flow may collapse altogether. Experimental evidence of this numerical behavior is also considered.

  8. The role of upstream distal electrodes in mitigating electrochemical degradation of ionic liquid ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brikner, Natalya; Lozano, Paulo C.

    2012-11-01

    Ionic liquid ion sources produce molecular ions from micro-tip emitters wetted with room-temperature molten salts. When a single ion polarity is extracted, counterions accumulate and generate electrochemical reactions that limit the source lifetime. The dynamics of double layer formation are reviewed and distal electrode contacts are introduced to resolve detrimental electrochemical decomposition effects at the micro-tip apex. By having the emitter follow the ionic liquid potential, operation can be achieved for an extended period of time with no apparent degradation of the material, indicating that electrochemistry can be curtailed and isolated to the upstream distal electrode.

  9. The control of the upstream movement of fish with pulsated direct current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLain, Alberton L.

    1957-01-01

    In the Silver River, 78,648 fish comprising 21 species were taken from the trap of the direct-current diversion device. The total kill of fish moving upstream, including 289 sea lampreys, was 1,016, or 1.3 percent. This river had presented a serious problem in the operation of an alternating-current control device during previous seasons. In 1955, 85.5 percent of three important species of fish were killed at the control structure. During 1956, this mortality was reduced to 8.1 percent by the operation of the direct-current equipment.

  10. Comparative CFD study of the effect of the presence of downstream turbines on upstream ones using a rotational speed control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, S.-P.; Nilsson, K.; Ivanell, S.; Olivares-Espinosa, H.; Masson, C.; Dufresne, L.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a downstream turbine on the production of a turbine located upstream of the latter is studied in this work. This is done through the use of two CFD simulation codes, namely OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D, which solve the Navier-Stokes equations in their incompressible form using a finite volume approach. In both EllipSys3D and OpenFoam, the LES (Large Eddy Simulation) technique is used for modelling turbulence. The wind turbine rotors are modelled as actuator disks whose loading is determined through the use of tabulated airfoil data by applying the blade-element method. A generator torque controller is used in both simulation methods to ensure that the simulated turbines adapt, in terms of rotational velocity, to the inflow conditions they are submited to. Results from both simulation codes, although they differ slightly, show that the downstream turbine affects the upstream one when the spacing between the turbines is small. This is also suggested to be the case looking at measurements performed at the Lillgrund offshore wind farm, whose turbines are located unusually close to each other. However, for distances used in today's typical wind farms, this effect is shown by our calculations not to be significant.

  11. 7 CFR 760.506 - Payment calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS Tree Assistance Program § 760.506 Payment calculations. (a) Payment to an eligible orchardist or nursery tree grower for the cost of replanting or rehabilitating trees, bushes, or vines damaged or lost due to a natural disaster, in excess of 15 percent...

  12. 7 CFR 760.506 - Payment calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS Tree Assistance Program § 760.506 Payment calculations. (a) Payment to an eligible orchardist or nursery tree grower for the cost of replanting or rehabilitating trees, bushes, or vines damaged or lost due to a natural disaster, in excess of 15 percent...

  13. 7 CFR 760.506 - Payment calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS Tree Assistance Program § 760.506 Payment calculations. (a) Payment to an eligible orchardist or nursery tree grower for the cost of replanting or rehabilitating trees, bushes, or vines damaged or lost due to a natural disaster, in excess of 15 percent...

  14. 7 CFR 760.506 - Payment calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS Tree Assistance Program § 760.506 Payment calculations. (a) Payment to an eligible orchardist or nursery tree grower for the cost of replanting or rehabilitating trees, bushes, or vines damaged or lost due to a natural disaster, in excess of 15 percent...

  15. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  16. Monte Carlo Treatment of Displacement Damage in Bandgap Engineered HgCdTe Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodness, Bryan C.; Marshall, Paul W.; Reed, Robert A.; Jordan, Thomas M.; Pickel, James C.; Jun, Insoo; Xapsos, Michael A.; Burke, Edward A.

    2003-01-01

    The conclusion are: 1. Description of NIEL calculation for short, mid, and longwave HgCdTe material compositions. 2. Full recoil spectra details captured and analyzed Importance of variance in high Z materials. 3. Can be applied directly to calculate damage distributions in arrays. 4. Future work will provide comparisons of measured array damage with calculated NIEL and damage energy distributions. 5. Technique to assess the full recoil spectrum behavior is extendable to other materials.

  17. Tyrosine 370 phosphorylation of ATM positively regulates DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-Jen; Lan, Li; Peng, Guang; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Cheng, Chien-Chia; Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Chang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Hsin-Wei; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Lavin, Martin; Ang, K Kian; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) mediates DNA damage response by controling irradiation-induced foci formation, cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis. However, how upstream signaling regulates ATM is not completely understood. Here, we show that upon irradiation stimulation, ATM associates with and is phosphorylated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Tyr370 (Y370) at the site of DNA double-strand breaks. Depletion of endogenous EGFR impairs ATM-mediated foci formation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. Moreover, pretreatment with an EGFR kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, blocks EGFR and ATM association, hinders CHK2 activation and subsequent foci formation, and increases radiosensitivity. Thus, we reveal a critical mechanism by which EGFR directly regulates ATM activation in DNA damage response, and our results suggest that the status of ATM Y370 phosphorylation has the potential to serve as a biomarker to stratify patients for either radiotherapy alone or in combination with EGFR inhibition. PMID:25601159

  18. Turning off the G2 DNA damage checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Calonge, Teresa M.; O'Connell, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate checkpoints to delay cell cycle progression and allow time for completion of DNA repair before commitment to S-phase or mitosis. During G2, many proteins collaborate to activate Chk1, an effector protein kinase that ensures the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase remains in an inactive state. This checkpoint is ancient in origin and highly conserved from fission yeast to humans. Work from many groups has led to a detailed description of the spatiotemporal control of signaling events leading to Chk1 activation. However, to survive DNA damage in G2, the checkpoint must be inactivated to allow resumption of cell cycling and entry into mitosis. Though only beginning to be understood, here we review current data regarding checkpoint termination signals acting on Chk1 and its' upstream regulators. PMID:17851138

  19. Contaminants of emerging concern: Mass balance and comparison of wastewater effluent and upstream sources in a mixed-use watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the sources, transport, and spatiotemporal variability of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) is important for understanding risks and developing monitoring and mitigation strategies. This study compared CEC loading and transport from a wastewater treatment plant and upstream areas...

  20. Spatial dependence of the local diffusion coefficient measured upstream of the November 12, 1978 interplanetary traveling shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics of wuprathermal particles accelerated by quasi-parallel interplanetary traveling shocks have been generally explained in terms of a first order Fermi mechanism. Such models require diffusive scattering of particles upstream of the shock. This scattering is characterized by a local diffusion coefficient, kappa, which is determined by the local power density of waves in the upstream region. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient of suprathermal upstream protons on distance from the November 12, 1978 interplanetary traveling shock using a different approach is studied. Unlike previous studies this method, which is based on measurements of particle streaming and intensity gradients, does not rely on predictions. The local spatial variations of Kappa upstream of the November 12, 1978 shock have been chosen for study because the characteristics of this quasi-parallel shock have been extensively studied, and also because of its favorable geometry (i.e. B field nearly radial).

  1. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  2. Reducing Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2006-06-05

    This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

  3. Profiling of conserved non-coding elements upstream of SHOX and functional characterisation of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape

    PubMed Central

    Verdin, Hannah; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Janssens, Sandra; Callewaert, Bert; Waele, Kathleen De; Schepper, Jean De; François, Inge; Menten, Björn; Heath, Karen E.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Baere, Elfride De

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects such as copy number variations (CNVs) in non-coding regions containing conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) outside the transcription unit of their target gene, can underlie genetic disease. An example of this is the short stature homeobox (SHOX) gene, regulated by seven CNEs located downstream and upstream of SHOX, with proven enhancer capacity in chicken limbs. CNVs of the downstream CNEs have been reported in many idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, however, only recently have a few CNVs of the upstream enhancers been identified. Here, we set out to provide insight into: (i) the cis-regulatory role of these upstream CNEs in human cells, (ii) the prevalence of upstream CNVs in ISS, and (iii) the chromatin architecture of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape in chicken and human cells. Firstly, luciferase assays in human U2OS cells, and 4C-seq both in chicken limb buds and human U2OS cells, demonstrated cis-regulatory enhancer capacities of the upstream CNEs. Secondly, CNVs of these upstream CNEs were found in three of 501 ISS patients. Finally, our 4C-seq interaction map of the SHOX region reveals a cis-regulatory domain spanning more than 1 Mb and harbouring putative new cis-regulatory elements. PMID:26631348

  4. Some Finite Difference Solutions of the Laminar Compressible Boundary Layer Showing the Effects of Upstream Transpiration Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1959-01-01

    Three numerical solutions of the partial differential equations describing the compressible laminar boundary layer are obtained by the finite difference method described in reports by I. Flugge-Lotz, D.C. Baxter, and this author. The solutions apply to steady-state supersonic flow without pressure gradient, over a cold wall and over an adiabatic wall, both having transpiration cooling upstream, and over an adiabatic wall with upstream cooling but without upstream transpiration. It is shown that for a given upstream wall temperature, upstream transpiration cooling affords much better protection to the adiabatic solid wall than does upstream cooling without transpiration. The results of the numerical solutions are compared with those of approximate solutions. The thermal results of the finite difference solution lie between the results of Rubesin and Inouye, and those of Libby and Pallone. When the skin-friction results of one finite difference solution are used in the thermal analysis of Rubesin and Inouye, improved agreement between the thermal results of the two methods of solution is obtained.

  5. On the origin of the energetic ion events measured upstream the Earth's bow shock by STEREO, Cluster and Geotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Elena; Bucik, Radoslav; Haaland, Stein E.; Klecker, Berndt; Keika, Kunihiro; Desai, Mihir; Daly, Patrick; Yamauchi, M.; Gomez-Herrero, Raul; Lui, Anthony

    The observations of upstream events up to distance of 3800 RE from Earth's bow shock were reported during the declining phase of the solar cycle in 2007. These upstream events mainly occurred after corotating interaction region (CIR) passed the Earth's magnetosphere. We study the relation between the upstream events observed from about 70 to 1750 RE away from the Earth and observations in the vicinity of the terrestrial bow shock (up to 30 RE). For this purpose, simultaneous measurements of energetic ions from STEREO-A, STEREO-B (far upstream region), and from Cluster and Geotail (near the bow shock) are used. In almost all cases the energetic ions far upstream are associated with the upstream events near the bow shock. The latter often coincide with sunward directed electron bursts, increased AE index (¿200 nT), intermittent sunward ion flows and the presence of the O+ ions, all of which imply a magnetospheric origin. We investigate possible mechanisms of CIR -magnetosphere interactions triggering acceleration and / or release of energetic particles.

  6. Correlation between the He/H ratios in upstream particle events and in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Gosling, J. T.; Scholer, M.

    1984-01-01

    The ratio of helium to proton differential intensities at a fixed energy per charge in the diffuse ion population during long-lived upstream particle events is compared with the simultaneously measured solar wind He/H ratio. It is found that the He/H intensity ratio at about 30 keV in upstream events is highly correlated with and on the average directly proportional to the He/H ratio in the solar wind, and larger than the He/H ratio in the solar wind by an average factor of 1.6. It is concluded that the solar wind is the parent population for the diffuse ions. The He abundance in the diffuse component is on average observed to be larger than in the solar wind. The observations are consistent with the predictions of Fermi acceleration models for a seed particle population drawn from the solar wind with little compositional bias and moderately enhanced in He during the acceleration process.

  7. Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, H.; Hubbartt, J.; Kubendran, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Values of three mean velocity components and six turbulence stresses measured in a turbulent shear layer upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture and immediately downstream of the start of the juncture are presented nd discussed. Two single-sensor hot-wire probes were used in the measurements. The separated region just upstream of the wing contains an area of reversed flow near the fuselage surface where the turbulence level is high. Outside of this area the flow skews as it passes around the body, and in this skewed region the magnitude and distribution of the turbulent normal and shear stresses within the shear layer are modified slightly by the skewing and deceleration of the flow. A short distance downstream of the wing leading edge the secondary flow vortext is tightly rolled up and redistributes both mean flow and turbulence in the juncture. The data acquisition technique employed here allows a hot wire to be used in a reversed flow region to indicate flow direction.

  8. Novel Strategies for Upstream and Downstream Processing of Tannin Acyl Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Durán, Luis V.; Valdivia-Urdiales, Blanca; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C.; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N.

    2011-01-01

    Tannin acyl hydrolase also referred as tannase is an enzyme with important applications in several science and technology fields. Due to its hydrolytic and synthetic properties, tannase could be used to reduce the negative effects of tannins in beverages, food, feed, and tannery effluents, for the production of gallic acid from tannin-rich materials, the elucidation of tannin structure, and the synthesis of gallic acid esters in nonaqueous media. However, industrial applications of tannase are still very limited due to its high production cost. Thus, there is a growing interest in the production, recovery, and purification of this enzyme. Recently, there have been published a number of papers on the improvement of upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. These papers dealt with the search for new tannase producing microorganisms, the application of novel fermentation systems, optimization of culture conditions, the production of the enzyme by recombinant microorganism, and the design of efficient protocols for tannase recovery and purification. The present work reviews the state of the art of basic and biotechnological aspects of tannin acyl hydrolase, focusing on the recent advances in the upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. PMID:21941633

  9. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Pablo D; Sonawane, Prashant D; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of upstream miRNA regulatory motifs in Caenorhabditis.

    PubMed

    Jovelin, Richard; Krizus, Aldis; Taghizada, Bakhtiyar; Gray, Jeremy C; Phillips, Patrick C; Claycomb, Julie M; Cutter, Asher D

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) comprise a class of short noncoding RNA molecules that play diverse developmental and physiological roles by controlling mRNA abundance and protein output of the vast majority of transcripts. Despite the importance of miRNAs in regulating gene function, we still lack a complete understanding of how miRNAs themselves are transcriptionally regulated. To fill this gap, we predicted regulatory sequences by searching for abundant short motifs located upstream of miRNAs in eight species of Caenorhabditis nematodes. We identified three conserved motifs across the Caenorhabditis phylogeny that show clear signatures of purifying selection from comparative genomics, patterns of nucleotide changes in motifs of orthologous miRNAs, and correlation between motif incidence and miRNA expression. We then validated our predictions with transgenic green fluorescent protein reporters and site-directed mutagenesis for a subset of motifs located in an enhancer region upstream of let-7 We demonstrate that a CT-dinucleotide motif is sufficient for proper expression of GFP in the seam cells of adult C. elegans, and that two other motifs play incremental roles in combination with the CT-rich motif. Thus, functional tests of sequence motifs identified through analysis of molecular evolutionary signatures provide a powerful path for efficiently characterizing the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:27140965

  11. Seasonal variation of upstream energetic electrons as observed by COSTEP/SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, A.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Heber, B.

    2009-04-01

    We have analyzed 219 electron bursts at energies above 0.25 MeV observed with the EPHIN/COSTEP instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft far upstream of the Earth's bow-shock at the libration point L1 from 1996 through 2008. Most of the bursts were observed during low solar activity (in 1996-1997 and in 2005-2008) and all 219 bursts were not associated with solar particle events. It is shown that some upstream events are detected at energies above 0.7 MeV. We find that the event occurrence number shows a distinct seasonal variation with maxima around equinoxes and minima near solstices. This together with a close correspondence between the event occurrence number with maxima in solar wind speed (V sw), geomagnetic activity index (Ap) and in the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component (Bz) indicates that the observed events can be explained in terms of leakage of magnetospheric particles during enhanced geoactivity rather than by acceleration at the Earth's bow-shock.

  12. COSTEP/SOHO observations of energetic electrons far upstream of the Earth's bow-shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, A.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Böhm, E.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Heber, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.

    2008-05-01

    We have analyzed 124 electron bursts at energies above 0.25 MeV observed with the EPHIN/COSTEP instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft far upstream of the Earth's bow-shock at the libration point L1 from 1996 through 2005. Most of the bursts were observed during low solar activity (in 1996-1997 and in 2005) and all 124 bursts were not associated with solar particle events. It is shown that some upstream events are detected at energies above 0.7 MeV. We find that the event occurrence number shows a distinct seasonal variation with maxima around equinoxes and minima near solstices. This together with a close correspondence between the event occurrence number with maxima in solar wind speed (Vsw), geomagnetic activity index (Ap) and in the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component (Bz) indicates that the observed events can be explained in terms of leakage of magnetospheric particles during enhanced geoactivity rather than by acceleration at the Earth's bow-shock.

  13. VIP gene transcription is regulated by far upstream enhancer and repressor elements.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Krajniak, K; Chun, D; Sena, M; Casillas, R; Lelièvre, V; Nguyen, T; Bravo, D; Colburn, S; Waschek, J A

    2001-06-01

    SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma subclones differ widely in basal and second messenger induction of the gene encoding the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These differences were recapitulated by a chimeric gene which consisted of 5.2 kb of the human VIP gene 5' flanking sequence fused to a reporter. Subsequent gene deletion experiments revealed several regulatory regions on the gene, including a 645-bp sequence located approximately 4.0 upstream from the transcription start site. Here we examined this upstream region in detail. Inhibitory sequences were found to be present on each end of the 645-bp fragment. When removed, basal transcription increased more than 50-fold. Subsequent deletion/mutation analysis showed that the 213-bp fragment contained at least two enhancer elements. One of these was localized to an AT-rich 42-bp sequence shown by others to bind Oct proteins in neuroblastoma cells, while the other corresponded to a composite AP-1/ets element. In addition to these enhancers, a 28-bp sequence on the 213-bp fragment with no apparent homology to known silencers inhibited transcription. The studies provide molecular details of a complex regulatory region on the VIP gene that is likely to be used to finely tune the level of gene transcription in vivo.

  14. Identifying emerging smart grid impacts to upstream and midstream natural gas operations.

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Annie

    2010-09-01

    The Smart Grid has come to describe a next-generation electrical power system that is typified by the increased use of communications and information technology in the generation, delivery and consumption of electrical energy. Much of the present Smart Grid analysis focuses on utility and consumer interaction. i.e. smart appliances, home automation systems, rate structures, consumer demand response, etc. An identified need is to assess the upstream and midstream operations of natural gas as a result of the smart grid. The nature of Smart Grid, including the demand response and role of information, may require changes in upstream and midstream natural gas operations to ensure availability and efficiency. Utility reliance on natural gas will continue and likely increase, given the backup requirements for intermittent renewable energy sources. Efficient generation and delivery of electricity on Smart Grid could affect how natural gas is utilized. Things that we already know about Smart Grid are: (1) The role of information and data integrity is increasingly important. (2) Smart Grid includes a fully distributed system with two-way communication. (3) Smart Grid, a complex network, may change the way energy is supplied, stored, and in demand. (4) Smart Grid has evolved through consumer driven decisions. (5) Smart Grid and the US critical infrastructure will include many intermittent renewables.

  15. MAVEN observation of an obliquely propagating low-frequency wave upstream of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhunusiri, Suranga; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; McFadden, J. P.; Mazelle, C.; Brain, D.; Collinson, G.; Harada, Y.; Larson, D. E.; Mitchell, D. L.; Livi, R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission observations of a large amplitude low-frequency plasma wave that propagated oblique to the ambient magnetic field upstream of Mars along with a non-solar-wind plasma component that had a flow velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field. We consider nine possibilities for this wave that include various combinations of its propagation direction, polarization in the solar wind frame, and ion source responsible for its generation. Using the observed wave parameters and the measured plasma parameters as constraints, we uniquely identify the wave by systematically discarding these possibilities. We determine that the wave is a right-hand polarized wave that propagated upstream in the solar wind frame. We find two possibilities for the ion source that can be responsible for this wave generation. They are either newly born pickup protons or reflected solar wind protons from the bow shock. We determine that the observed non-solar-wind component is not responsible for the wave generation, and it is likely that the non-solar-wind component was merely perturbed by the passage of the wave.

  16. Comparing effects of oligotrophication and upstream hydropower dams on plankton and productivity in perialpine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, David; Schmid, Martin; Wüest, Alfred

    2007-12-01

    In recent decades, many perialpine lakes have been affected by oligotrophication due to efficient sewage treatment and by altered water turbidity due to upstream hydropower operations. Such simultaneous environmental changes often lead to public debate on the actual causes of observed productivity reductions. We evaluate the effects of those two changes by a combined approach of modeling and data interpretation for a case study on Lake Brienz (Switzerland), a typical oligotrophic perialpine lake, located downstream of several hydropower reservoirs. A physical k-ɛ scheme and a biogeochemical advection-diffusion-reaction model were implemented and applied for several hypothetical scenarios with different nutrient loads and different particle input dynamics. The simulation results are compared to long-term biotic data collected from 1999 to 2004. The analysis shows that enhanced nutrient supply increases the nutritious value of algae, stimulating zooplankton growth, while phytoplankton growth is limited by stronger top-down control. Annually integrated productivity is only slightly influenced by altered turbidity, as phosphorous limitation prevails. Simulations indicate that the spring production peak is delayed because of increased turbidity in winter caused by upstream hydropower operation. As a consequence, the entire nutrient cycle is seasonally delayed, creating an additional stress for zooplankton and fish in the downstream lake.

  17. prdm1a functions upstream of itga5 in zebrafish craniofacial development

    PubMed Central

    LaMonica, Kristi; Ding, Hai-lei; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2015-01-01

    Cranial neural crest cells are specified and migrate into the pharyngeal arches where they subsequently interact with the surrounding environment. Signaling and transcription factors, such as prdm1a regulate this interaction, but it remains unclear which specific factors are required for posterior pharyngeal arch development. Previous analysis suggests that prdm1a is required for posterior ceratobranchial cartilages in zebrafish and microarray analysis between wildtype and prdm1a mutants at 25 hours post fertilization demonstrated that integrin α5 (itga5) is differentially expressed in prdm1a mutants. Here, we further investigate the interaction between prdm1a and itga5 in zebrafish craniofacial development. In situ hybridization for itga5 demonstrates that expression of itga5 is decreased in prdm1a mutants between 18- 31 hpf and itga5 expression overlaps with prdm1a in the posterior arches, suggesting a temporal window for interaction. Double mutants for prdm1a;itga5 have an additive viscerocranium phenotype more similar to prdm1a mutants, suggesting that prdm1a acts upstream of itga5. Consistent with this, loss of posterior pharyngeal arch expression of dlx2a, ceratobranchial cartilage 2-5, and cell proliferation in prdm1a mutants can be rescued with itga5 mRNA injection. Taken together, these data suggest that prdm1a acts upstream of itga5 and are both necessary for posterior pharyngeal arch development in zebrafish. PMID:25810090

  18. Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Frehlich

    2012-10-30

    New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

  19. Sustainability of Water Resources in the Upstream Watershed- Based Community Engagement and Multistakeholder Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotosusilo, Agus; Utari, Dyah; Agung Satria, Afrizal

    2016-02-01

    The communities engagement become the backbone of the conservation in the Citanduy upstream watershed. It functioning as a major deal and the first one in keeping his own Watershed. This paper based on Community Engagement Grants (CEGs). Program Society-based empowerment approach is also emphasized in the viewpoint of environmental law that is useful to set governance and sanctions in watershed management. The type of activity to be undertaken are the expansion of awareness programs communities of the existence and condition of the watershed Citanduy, the formation of a cadre of conservationists environment that is primarily directed to children and women, the institutionalization of customary law environment, and afforestation by planting 100,000 prolific trees, tree conservationists, and Sunda endemic tree in the land surrounding the watershed upstream Citanduy. The Program involves several partners and stakeholders who helped in substance and operational support activities in the field.. Result of program shows that Community Engagement Grants need cooperation among stakeholders by positioning the community as main subject of changing, not as subject who does not understand their needs to change.

  20. Upstream waves at Mercury, Venus and earth - Comparison of the properties of one Hertz waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Crawford, G. K.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Venus foreshock region contains low-frequency upstream waves similar to those in the terrestrial foreshock, but perhaps with different amplitudes than at earth. This paper compares the properties of a second class of upstream waves, analogous to the so-called 1 Hz waves at earth. The waves observed at Mercury, Venus, and earth have very similar properties, i.e., propagation angles less than 55 degrees to the magnetic field and less than 35 degrees to the solar wind flow direction. The waves occur exclusively on the field lines connected to the bow shock. They are most commonly left-hand elliptically polarized with similar fractional amplitudes, approximately 0.1 of the background field strength. Their amplitudes decrease with increasing distance from the shock. The observed frequencies are similar for Mercury, Venus, and earth when scaled by the interplanetary magnetic field. If, as generally assumed at earth, these waves arise in regions of backstreaming electrons, these results imply that similar electron foreshocks occur at earth, Venus and Mercury despite differences in bow shock size and the nature of the obstacle to the solar wind.

  1. Upstream proton cyclotron waves at Venus observed by Venus Express magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delva, Magda; Volwerk, Martin; Bertucci, Cesar; Mazelle, Christian; Romanelli, Norberto; Voeroes, Zoltan

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the observations of proton cyclotron waves (PCWs) upstream of the Venus bow shock from the magnetometer data on Venus Express is given. The first detection of this specific type of upstream waves proved that newborn planetary ions from the upper exosphere are directly picked up by the instreaming solar wind. Their occurrence up to large distances (~ 9 Rv) from the planet raises the question of the existence of an extended reservoir of planetary neutral hydrogen. Also, the loss of exospheric hydrogen directly to the solar wind has implications for the evolution of the planetary atmosphere over the age of the solar system. The successful long duration of the Venus Express mission allows to study the occurrence of PCWs under solar minimum and solar maximum conditions. Results of long term studies for both cases are presented and compared. Explanations for the differences are found in the unusual nature of the current solar maximum, which was characterized by low sunspot numbers, low density and mainly moderate speed.

  2. Reservoir Sedimentation and Upstream Sediment Sources: Perspectives and Future Research Needs on Streambank and Gully Erosion.

    PubMed

    Fox, G A; Sheshukov, A; Cruse, R; Kolar, R L; Guertault, L; Gesch, K R; Dutnell, R C

    2016-05-01

    The future reliance on water supply and flood control reservoirs across the globe will continue to expand, especially under a variable climate. As the inventory of new potential dam sites is shrinking, construction of additional reservoirs is less likely compared to simultaneous flow and sediment management in existing reservoirs. One aspect of this sediment management is related to the control of upstream sediment sources. However, key research questions remain regarding upstream sediment loading rates. Highlighted in this article are research needs relative to measuring and predicting sediment transport rates and loading due to streambank and gully erosion within a watershed. For example, additional instream sediment transport and reservoir sedimentation rate measurements are needed across a range of watershed conditions, reservoir sizes, and geographical locations. More research is needed to understand the intricate linkage between upland practices and instream response. A need still exists to clarify the benefit of restoration or stabilization of a small reach within a channel system or maturing gully on total watershed sediment load. We need to better understand the intricate interactions between hydrological and erosion processes to improve prediction, location, and timing of streambank erosion and failure and gully formation. Also, improved process-based measurement and prediction techniques are needed that balance data requirements regarding cohesive soil erodibility and stability as compared to simpler topographic indices for gullies or stream classification systems. Such techniques will allow the research community to address the benefit of various conservation and/or stabilization practices at targeted locations within watersheds.

  3. A complex androgen-responsive enhancer resides 2 kilobases upstream of the mouse Slp gene.

    PubMed Central

    Loreni, F; Stavenhagen, J; Kalff, M; Robins, D M

    1988-01-01

    Neighboring genes encoding the mouse sex-limited protein (Slp) and fourth component of complement (C4) show extensive homology. In contrast to C4, however, Slp is regulated by androgen. One region of the Slp gene capable of hormonal response following transfection was located about 2 kilobases upstream of the transcription start site, where the C4 and Slp sequences diverge. This region, delimited here to a 0.75-kilobase fragment, showed cryptic promoter activity as well as androgen responsiveness in either orientation in front of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase coding region. When this fragment was placed upstream of a viral long terminal repeat, increased chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression derived from the viral promoter. Proteins from nuclear extracts specifically bound to four sequences within the region, near sites that are DNase I hypersensitive in vivo and reflect the hormonal and developmental regulation of Slp. Like several other cellular enhancers, this androgen-responsive element seems to be modular in nature and complex in its function. Images PMID:3165490

  4. Reservoir Sedimentation and Upstream Sediment Sources: Perspectives and Future Research Needs on Streambank and Gully Erosion.

    PubMed

    Fox, G A; Sheshukov, A; Cruse, R; Kolar, R L; Guertault, L; Gesch, K R; Dutnell, R C

    2016-05-01

    The future reliance on water supply and flood control reservoirs across the globe will continue to expand, especially under a variable climate. As the inventory of new potential dam sites is shrinking, construction of additional reservoirs is less likely compared to simultaneous flow and sediment management in existing reservoirs. One aspect of this sediment management is related to the control of upstream sediment sources. However, key research questions remain regarding upstream sediment loading rates. Highlighted in this article are research needs relative to measuring and predicting sediment transport rates and loading due to streambank and gully erosion within a watershed. For example, additional instream sediment transport and reservoir sedimentation rate measurements are needed across a range of watershed conditions, reservoir sizes, and geographical locations. More research is needed to understand the intricate linkage between upland practices and instream response. A need still exists to clarify the benefit of restoration or stabilization of a small reach within a channel system or maturing gully on total watershed sediment load. We need to better understand the intricate interactions between hydrological and erosion processes to improve prediction, location, and timing of streambank erosion and failure and gully formation. Also, improved process-based measurement and prediction techniques are needed that balance data requirements regarding cohesive soil erodibility and stability as compared to simpler topographic indices for gullies or stream classification systems. Such techniques will allow the research community to address the benefit of various conservation and/or stabilization practices at targeted locations within watersheds. PMID:26885658

  5. Comparative genomic analysis reveals a distant liver enhancer upstream of the COUP-TFII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Baroukh, Nadine; Ahituv, Nadav; Chang, Jessie; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-08-20

    COUP-TFII is a central nuclear hormone receptor that tightly regulates the expression of numerous target lipid metabolism genes in vertebrates. However, it remains unclear how COUP-TFII itself is transcriptionally controlled since studies with its promoter and upstream region fail to recapitulate the genes liver expression. In an attempt to identify liver enhancers in the vicinity of COUP-TFII, we employed a comparative genomic approach. Initial comparisons between humans and mice of the 3,470kb gene poor region surrounding COUP-TFII revealed 2,023 conserved non-coding elements. To prioritize a subset of these elements for functional studies, we performed further genomic comparisons with the orthologous pufferfish (Fugu rubripes) locus and uncovered two anciently conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) upstream of COUP-TFII (CNS-62kb and CNS-66kb). Testing these two elements using reporter constructs in liver (HepG2) cells revealed that CNS-66kb, but not CNS-62kb, yielded robust in vitro enhancer activity. In addition, an in vivo reporter assay using naked DNA transfer with CNS-66kb linked to luciferase displayed strong reproducible liver expression in adult mice, further supporting its role as a liver enhancer. Together, these studies further support the utility of comparative genomics to uncover gene regulatory sequences based on evolutionary conservation and provide the substrates to better understand the regulation and expression of COUP-TFII.

  6. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Pablo D.; Sonawane, Prashant D.; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P.; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  7. Microdistribution patterns of macroinvertebrate communities upstream and downstream of organic effluents.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cabria, Mario; Barquín, José; Juanes, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The present study analyses the distribution patterns of macroinvertebrate communities in four microhabitats (riffles, glides, leaf litter and bank roots) upstream and downstream of two waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents in northern Spain rivers. Macroinvertebrate communities were analysed in November 2006 by taking 5 samples from each of the microhabitats under unaffected (upstream WWTP) and affected (downstream WWTP) conditions, respectively. Water velocity, depth, substrate coarseness and hydraulic stress by means of the Froude number were also estimated at all sampling locations. Under unaffected conditions, the abundance and presence/absence of certain macroinvertebrate taxa were mainly determined by hydraulic characteristics (water velocity and Froude number) and feeding resource availability. However, neither macroinvertebrate richness nor abundance were neither significantly correlated with hydraulic stress nor substrate coarseness, although the number of macroinvertebrate taxa increased in microhabitats with high structural complexity. Macroinvertebrate abundance increased downstream of both WWTPs, while macroinvertebrate richness was not adversely affected by the organic enrichment of water. The structure and composition of macroinvertebrate communities occurring in riffles was similar under unaffected and affected conditions, while communities from leaf litter and submerged bank roots showed important changes above and below the WWTPs, indicating that they are probably the most appropriate communities for water quality assessment. PMID:21168894

  8. Performance of upstream interaction region detectors for the FIRST experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Anelli, M.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Finck, C.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le F{èvre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2012-02-01

    The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at GSI has been designed to study carbon fragmentation, measuring 12C double differential cross sections (∂2σ/∂θ∂E) for different beam energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/u. The experimental setup integrates newly designed detectors in the, so called, Interaction Region around the graphite target. The Interaction Region upstream detectors are a 250 μm thick scintillator and a drift chamber optimized for a precise measurement of the ions interaction time and position on the target. In this article we review the design of the upstream detectors along with the preliminary results of the data taking performed on August 2011 with 400 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at GSI. Detectors performances will be reviewed and compared to those obtained during preliminary tests, performed with 500 MeV electrons (at the BTF facility in the INFN Frascati Laboratories) and 80 MeV/u protons and carbon ions (at the INFN LNS Laboratories in Catania).

  9. Dynamics in phosphorus retention in wetlands upstream of Delavan Lake, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Elder, John F.; Goddard, Gerald L.; James, William F.

    2009-01-01

    A phosphorus budget was constructed for Delavan Lake Inlet, a perennial riverine wetland with submersed and floating aquatic vegetation in southeastern Wisconsin, to better understand the phosphorus dynamics in natural wetlands and the role of wetlands in lake-rehabilitation efforts. During the growing season, the inlet served as a net source of phosphorus, primarily due to the release of phosphorus from the sediments. More phosphorus was released from the sediments of the inlet (600 kg) than was input from the upstream watershed (460 kg). This release was caused by high pH associated with high photosynthetic activity. During the remainder of the year, the inlet served as a net sink for phosphorus, retaining 6% of die phosphorus input from the watershed. Over the entire year, this wetland was a net source of over 500 kg of phosphorus to downstream Delavan Lake. A constructed riverine wetland upstream of Delavan Lake Inlet demonstrated a similar periodic release of phosphorus. However, in this case, the summer release of phosphorus was less than that trapped during the remainder of the year. The constructed wetland served as a net sink for approximately 20% of the input phosphorus on an annual time scale. The role of existing and constructed wetlands as phosphorus traps is complex. Wetlands can act as a source or a sink for phosphorus depending on the ambient conditions in die wetland. Howa wetland fits into a rehabilitation plan depends upon its net retention efficiency and the importance of the periodic releases of phosphorus to downstream waters.

  10. Reservoir Sedimentation and Upstream Sediment Sources: Perspectives and Future Research Needs on Streambank and Gully Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, G. A.; Sheshukov, A.; Cruse, R.; Kolar, R. L.; Guertault, L.; Gesch, K. R.; Dutnell, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    The future reliance on water supply and flood control reservoirs across the globe will continue to expand, especially under a variable climate. As the inventory of new potential dam sites is shrinking, construction of additional reservoirs is less likely compared to simultaneous flow and sediment management in existing reservoirs. One aspect of this sediment management is related to the control of upstream sediment sources. However, key research questions remain regarding upstream sediment loading rates. Highlighted in this article are research needs relative to measuring and predicting sediment transport rates and loading due to streambank and gully erosion within a watershed. For example, additional instream sediment transport and reservoir sedimentation rate measurements are needed across a range of watershed conditions, reservoir sizes, and geographical locations. More research is needed to understand the intricate linkage between upland practices and instream response. A need still exists to clarify the benefit of restoration or stabilization of a small reach within a channel system or maturing gully on total watershed sediment load. We need to better understand the intricate interactions between hydrological and erosion processes to improve prediction, location, and timing of streambank erosion and failure and gully formation. Also, improved process-based measurement and prediction techniques are needed that balance data requirements regarding cohesive soil erodibility and stability as compared to simpler topographic indices for gullies or stream classification systems. Such techniques will allow the research community to address the benefit of various conservation and/or stabilization practices at targeted locations within watersheds.

  11. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  12. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during

  13. Crumpling Damaged Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Giordanelli, I.; Mendoza, M.; Andrade Jr., J. S.; Gomes, M. A. F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties. PMID:27173442

  14. Crumpling Damaged Graphene.

    PubMed

    Giordanelli, I; Mendoza, M; Andrade, J S; Gomes, M A F; Herrmann, H J

    2016-05-13

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties.

  15. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  16. Crumpling Damaged Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordanelli, I.; Mendoza, M.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.; Gomes, M. A. F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties.

  17. A Bioinformatics Approach Identifies Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 and Checkpoint Kinase 1 as Upstream Regulators of Kidney Injury Molecule-1 after Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ajay, Amrendra Kumar; Kim, Tae-Min; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Victoria; Park, Peter J.; Frank, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1)/T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing protein-1 (TIM-1) is upregulated more than other proteins after AKI, and it is highly expressed in renal damage of various etiologies. In this capacity, KIM-1/TIM-1 acts as a phosphatidylserine receptor on the surface of injured proximal tubular epithelial cells, mediating phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and it may also act as a costimulatory molecule for immune cells. Despite recognition of KIM-1 as an important therapeutic target for kidney disease, the regulators of KIM-1 transcription in the kidney remain unknown. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified upstream regulators of KIM-1 after AKI. In response to tubular injury in rat and human kidneys or oxidant stress in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HPTECs), KIM-1 expression increased significantly in a manner that corresponded temporally and regionally with increased phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and STAT3. Both ischemic and oxidant stress resulted in a dramatic increase in reactive oxygen species that phosphorylated and activated Chk1, which subsequently bound to STAT3, phosphorylating it at S727. Furthermore, STAT3 bound to the KIM-1 promoter after ischemic and oxidant stress, and pharmacological or genetic induction of STAT3 in HPTECs increased KIM-1 mRNA and protein levels. Conversely, inhibition of STAT3 using siRNAs or dominant negative mutants reduced KIM-1 expression in a kidney cancer cell line (769-P) that expresses high basal levels of KIM-1. These observations highlight Chk1 and STAT3 as critical upstream regulators of KIM-1 expression after AKI and may suggest novel approaches for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24158981

  18. Assessing the implications of water harvesting intensification on upstream-downstream ecosystem services: A case study in the Lake Tana basin.

    PubMed

    Dile, Yihun Taddele; Karlberg, Louise; Daggupati, Prasad; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Wiberg, David; Rockström, Johan

    2016-01-15

    Water harvesting systems have improved productivity in various regions in sub-Saharan Africa. Similarly, they can help retain water in landscapes, build resilience against droughts and dry spells, and thereby contribute to sustainable agricultural intensification. However, there is no strong empirical evidence that shows the effects of intensification of water harvesting on upstream-downstream social-ecological systems at a landscape scale. In this paper we develop a decision support system (DSS) for locating and sizing water harvesting ponds in a hydrological model, which enables assessments of water harvesting intensification on upstream-downstream ecosystem services in meso-scale watersheds. The DSS was used with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for a case-study area located in the Lake Tana basin, Ethiopia. We found that supplementary irrigation in combination with nutrient application increased simulated teff (Eragrostis tef, staple crop in Ethiopia) production up to three times, compared to the current practice. Moreover, after supplemental irrigation of teff, the excess water was used for dry season onion production of 7.66 t/ha (median). Water harvesting, therefore, can play an important role in increasing local- to regional-scale food security through increased and more stable food production and generation of extra income from the sale of cash crops. The annual total irrigation water consumption was ~4%-30% of the annual water yield from the entire watershed. In general, water harvesting resulted in a reduction in peak flows and an increase in low flows. Water harvesting substantially reduced sediment yield leaving the watershed. The beneficiaries of water harvesting ponds may benefit from increases in agricultural production. The downstream social-ecological systems may benefit from reduced food prices, reduced flooding damages, and reduced sediment influxes, as well as enhancements in low flows and water quality. The benefits of water

  19. Assessing the implications of water harvesting intensification on upstream-downstream ecosystem services: A case study in the Lake Tana basin.

    PubMed

    Dile, Yihun Taddele; Karlberg, Louise; Daggupati, Prasad; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Wiberg, David; Rockström, Johan

    2016-01-15

    Water harvesting systems have improved productivity in various regions in sub-Saharan Africa. Similarly, they can help retain water in landscapes, build resilience against droughts and dry spells, and thereby contribute to sustainable agricultural intensification. However, there is no strong empirical evidence that shows the effects of intensification of water harvesting on upstream-downstream social-ecological systems at a landscape scale. In this paper we develop a decision support system (DSS) for locating and sizing water harvesting ponds in a hydrological model, which enables assessments of water harvesting intensification on upstream-downstream ecosystem services in meso-scale watersheds. The DSS was used with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for a case-study area located in the Lake Tana basin, Ethiopia. We found that supplementary irrigation in combination with nutrient application increased simulated teff (Eragrostis tef, staple crop in Ethiopia) production up to three times, compared to the current practice. Moreover, after supplemental irrigation of teff, the excess water was used for dry season onion production of 7.66 t/ha (median). Water harvesting, therefore, can play an important role in increasing local- to regional-scale food security through increased and more stable food production and generation of extra income from the sale of cash crops. The annual total irrigation water consumption was ~4%-30% of the annual water yield from the entire watershed. In general, water harvesting resulted in a reduction in peak flows and an increase in low flows. Water harvesting substantially reduced sediment yield leaving the watershed. The beneficiaries of water harvesting ponds may benefit from increases in agricultural production. The downstream social-ecological systems may benefit from reduced food prices, reduced flooding damages, and reduced sediment influxes, as well as enhancements in low flows and water quality. The benefits of water

  20. Stochastic damage evolution in textile laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenis, Yuris A.; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic model utilizing random material characteristics to predict damage evolution in textile laminates is presented. Model is based on a division of each ply into two sublaminas consisting of cells. The probability of cell failure is calculated using stochastic function theory and maximal strain failure criterion. Three modes of failure, i.e. fiber breakage, matrix failure in transverse direction, as well as matrix or interface shear cracking, are taken into account. Computed failure probabilities are utilized in reducing cell stiffness based on the mesovolume concept. A numerical algorithm is developed predicting the damage evolution and deformation history of textile laminates. Effect of scatter of fiber orientation on cell properties is discussed. Weave influence on damage accumulation is illustrated with the help of an example of a Kevlar/epoxy laminate.

  1. Natural frequency behavior of damaged composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, M. B.; Ochoa, O. O.

    1992-11-01

    Attention is given to characterizing the effect of material system, geometry, and stacking sequence on the vibration response of damaged plates of fiber-reinforced composite. Plate layups are fashioned from various composite materials and subjected to four damage cycles, and a signal analyzer is employed to study the frequency response function (FRF) of the materials. The materials employed include the AS4/3501-6, IM7/E7T1-2, and IM7/977-2 families, and numerical analyses are used for comparison. Frequencies are obtained from the experimentally established FRFs, and natural frequencies tend to decrease in the presence of extensive localized damage. The fiber is argued to dominate the response of the plate, and the experimental data are confirmed in some cases by the results of finite-element calculations.

  2. Unsteady Analysis of Blade and Tip Heat Transfer as Influenced by the Upstream Momentum and Thermal Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Rigby, David L.; Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Heidmann, James D.; Fabian, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the upstream wake on the blade heat transfer has been numerically examined. The geometry and the flow conditions of the first stage turbine blade of GE s E3 engine with a tip clearance equal to 2 percent of the span was utilized. Based on numerical calculations of the vane, a set of wake boundary conditions were approximated, which were subsequently imposed upon the downstream blade. This set consisted of the momentum and thermal wakes as well as the variation in modeled turbulence quantities of turbulence intensity and the length scale. Using a one-blade periodic domain, the distributions of unsteady heat transfer rate on the turbine blade and its tip, as affected by the wake, were determined. Such heat transfer coefficient distribution was computed using the wall heat flux and the adiabatic wall temperature to desensitize the heat transfer coefficient to the wall temperature. For the determination of the wall heat flux and the adiabatic wall temperatures, two sets of computations were required. The results were used in a phase-locked manner to compute the unsteady or steady heat transfer coefficients. It has been found that the unsteady wake has some effect on the distribution of the time averaged heat transfer coefficient on the blade and that this distribution is different from the distribution that is obtainable from a steady computation. This difference was found to be as large as 20 percent of the average heat transfer on the blade surface. On the tip surface, this difference is comparatively smaller and can be as large as four percent of the average.

  3. Autistic Savant Calendar Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, Paul J.

    This study identified 10 savants with developmental disabilities and an exceptional ability to calculate calendar dates. These "calendar calculators" were asked to demonstrate their abilities, and their strategies were analyzed. The study found that the ability to calculate dates into the past or future varied widely among these calculators. Three…

  4. A new method to assess damage to RCMRFs from period elongation and Park-Ang damage index using IDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghagholizadeh, Mehrdad; Massumi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Despite a significant progress in loading and design codes of seismic resistant structures and technology improvements in building structures, the field of civil engineering is still facing critical challenges. An example of those challenges is the assessment of the state of damage that has been imposed to a structure after earthquakes of different intensities. To determine the operability of a structure and its resistance to probable future earthquakes, quick assessment of damages and determining the operability of a structure after an earthquake are crucial. Present methods to calculate damage to structures are time consuming and do not accurately provide the rate of damage. Damage estimation is important task in the fields of structural health monitoring and decision-making. This study examines the relationship between period elongation and the Park-Ang damage index. A dynamic non-linear analysis is employed with IDARC program to calculate the amount of damage and period of the current state. This new method is shown to be a quick and accurate technique for damage assessment. It is easy to calculate the period of an existing structure and changes in the period which reflects changes in the stiffness matrix.

  5. A new method to assess damage to RCMRFs from period elongation and Park-Ang damage index using IDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghagholizadeh, Mehrdad; Massumi, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Despite a significant progress in loading and design codes of seismic resistant structures and technology improvements in building structures, the field of civil engineering is still facing critical challenges. An example of those challenges is the assessment of the state of damage that has been imposed to a structure after earthquakes of different intensities. To determine the operability of a structure and its resistance to probable future earthquakes, quick assessment of damages and determining the operability of a structure after an earthquake are crucial. Present methods to calculate damage to structures are time consuming and do not accurately provide the rate of damage. Damage estimation is important task in the fields of structural health monitoring and decision-making. This study examines the relationship between period elongation and the Park-Ang damage index. A dynamic non-linear analysis is employed with IDARC program to calculate the amount of damage and period of the current state. This new method is shown to be a quick and accurate technique for damage assessment. It is easy to calculate the period of an existing structure and changes in the period which reflects changes in the stiffness matrix.

  6. Progressive damage state evolution and quantification in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Subir; Banerjee, Sourav

    2016-04-01

    Precursor damage state quantification can be helpful for safety and operation of aircraft and defense equipment's. Damage develops in the composite material in the form of matrix cracking, fiber breakages and deboning, etc. However, detection and quantification of the damage modes at their very early stage is not possible unless modifications of the existing indispensable techniques are conceived, particularly for the quantification of multiscale damages at their early stage. Here, we present a novel nonlocal mechanics based damage detection technique for precursor damage state quantification. Micro-continuum physics is used by modifying the Christoffel equation. American society of testing and materials (ASTM) standard woven carbon fiber (CFRP) specimens were tested under Tension-Tension fatigue loading at the interval of 25,000 cycles until 500,000 cycles. Scanning Acoustic Microcopy (SAM) and Optical Microscopy (OM) were used to examine the damage development at the same interval. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) velocity profile on a representative volume element (RVE) of the specimen were calculated at the regular interval of 50,000 cycles. Nonlocal parameters were calculated form the micromorphic wave dispersion curve at a particular frequency of 50 MHz. We used a previously formulated parameter called "Damage entropy" which is a measure of the damage growth in the material calculated with the loading cycle. Damage entropy (DE) was calculated at every pixel on the RVE and the mean of DE was plotted at the loading interval of 25,000 cycle. Growth of DE with fatigue loading cycles was observed. Optical Imaging also performed at the interval of 25,000 cycles to investigate the development of damage inside the materials. We also calculated the mean value of the Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) velocity and plotted with fatigue cycle which is correlated further with Damage Entropy (DE). Statistical analysis of the Surface Acoustic Wave profile (SAW) obtained at different

  7. Comparison of accelerated ion populations observed upstream of the bow shocks at Venus and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Futaana, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Frahm, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.; Dubinin, E.; Lundin, R.; Barabash, S.; Holmström, M.; Mazelle, C.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Zhang, T. L.; Baumjohann, W.; Coates, A. J.; Fraenz, M.

    2011-03-01

    Foreshock ions are compared between Venus and Mars at energies of 0.6~20 keV using the same ion instrument, the Ion Mass Analyser, on board both Venus Express and Mars Express. Venus Express often observes accelerated protons (2~6 times the solar wind energy) that travel away from the Venus bow shock when the spacecraft location is magnetically connected to the bow shock. The observed ions have a large field-aligned velocity compared to the perpendicular velocity in the solar wind frame, and are similar to the field-aligned beams and intermediate gyrating component of the foreshock ions in the terrestrial upstream region. Mars Express does not observe similar foreshock ions as does Venus Express, indicating that the Martian foreshock does not possess the intermediate gyrating component in the upstream region on the dayside of the planet. Instead, two types of gyrating protons in the solar wind frame are observed very close to the Martian quasi-perpendicular bow shock within a proton gyroradius distance. The first type is observed only within the region which is about 400 km from the bow shock and flows tailward nearly along the bow shock with a similar velocity as the solar wind. The second type is observed up to about 700 km from the bow shock and has a bundled structure in the energy domain. A traversal on 12 July 2005, in which the energy-bunching came from bundling in the magnetic field direction, is further examined. The observed velocities of the latter population are consistent with multiple specular reflections of the solar wind at the bow shock, and the ions after the second reflection have a field-aligned velocity larger than that of the de Hoffman-Teller velocity frame, i.e., their guiding center has moved toward interplanetary space out from the bow shock. To account for the observed peculiarity of the Martian upstream region, finite gyroradius effects of the solar wind protons compared to the radius of the bow shock curvature and effects of cold ion

  8. The Bastille Day Magnetic Clouds and Upstream Shocks: Near Earth Interplanetary Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kasper, J.; Desch, M. D.; Wu, C.-C.; Reames, D. V.; Singer, H. J.; Singer, H. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The energetic charged particle, interplanetary magnetic field, and plasma characteristics of the 'Bastille Day' shock and ejecta/magnetic cloud events at 1 AU occurring over the days 14-16 July 2000 are described. Profiles of MeV (WIND/LEMT) energetic ions help to organize the overall sequence of events from the solar source to 1 AU. Stressed are analyses of an outstanding magnetic cloud (MC2) starting late on 15 July and its upstream shock about 4 hours earlier in WIND magnetic field and plasma data. Also analyzed is a less certain, but likely, magnetic cloud (MC1) occurring early on 15 July; this was separated from MC2 by its upstream shock and many heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings. Other HCS crossings occurred throughout the 3-day period. Overall this dramatic series of interplanetary events caused a large multi-phase magnetic storm with min Dst lower than -300 nT. The very fast solar wind speed (greater than or equal to 1100 km/s) in and around the front of MC2 (for near average densities) was responsible for a very high solar wind ram pressure driving in the front of the magnetosphere to geocentric distances estimated to be as low as approx. 5 R(sub E), much lower than the geosynchronous orbit radius. This was consistent with magnetic field observations from two GOES satellites which indicated they were in the magnetosheath for extended times. A static force free field model is used to fit the two magnetic cloud profiles providing estimates of the clouds' physical and geometrical properties. MC2 was much larger than MCI, but their axes were nearly antiparallel, and their magnetic fields had the same left-handed helicity. MC2's axis and its upstream shock normal were very close to being perpendicular to each other, as might be expected if the cloud were driving the shock at the time of observation. The estimated axial magnetic flux carried by MC2 was 52 x 10(exp 20) Mx, which is about 5 times the typical magnetic flux estimated for other magnetic

  9. Coping with brain damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, W.

    1974-01-01

    Two neurological disorders, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain damage as from an accident, are considered. The discussion covers the incidence of disabilities, their characteristics, and what is now being done to deal with them, particularly in reference to areas in which the capabilities of the engineer can be effectively applied.

  10. Loss and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Saleemul; Roberts, Erin; Fenton, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    Loss and damage is a relative newcomer to the climate change agenda. It has the potential to reinvigorate existing mitigation and adaptation efforts, but this will ultimately require leadership from developed countries and enhanced understanding of several key issues, such as limits to adaptation.

  11. Modifying Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanghee; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation leaves a fairly characteristic footprint in biological materials, but this is rapidly all but obliterated by the canonical biological responses to the radiation damage. The innate immune recognition systems that sense “danger” through direct radiation damage and through associated collateral damage set in motion a chain of events that, in a tissue compromised by radiation, often unwittingly result in oscillating waves of molecular and cellular responses as tissues attempt to heal. Understanding “nature’s whispers” that inform on these processes will lead to novel forms of intervention targeted more precisely towards modifying them in an appropriate and timely fashion so as to improve the healing process and prevent or mitigate the development of acute and late effects of normal tissue radiation damage, whether it be accidental, as a result of a terrorist incident, or of therapeutic treatment of cancer. Here we attempt to discuss some of the non-free radical scavenging mechanisms that modify radiation responses and comment on where we see them within a conceptual framework of an evolving radiation-induced lesion. PMID:20583981

  12. Damage Evolution On Mechanical Parts Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestriez, P.; Bogard, F.; Shan, J. L.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a fatigue damage model, based on the continuum damage mechanics and general thermodynamic theory, proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche, for rolling bearings under very numerous loading cycles. A flow surface of fatigue using the Sines criterion is adopted. The coupling between the hardening plasticity and damage effects is considered in the constitutive equations. An explicit algorithm of weak coupling leads to a calculation very fast. This fatigue damage model is implemented into Abaqus/Explicit using a Vumat user's subroutine. Moreover, the damage variable in function of time is transformed into a function of number of cycles. An algorithm of cycle jump, with a criterion for choosing the number increment of cycles, is proposed, which allows to largely reduce the CPU time. The present damage simulation allows to determine the lifetime of mechanical parts under cyclic loading.

  13. Investigation of Sideband Index Response to Prototype Gear Tooth Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the ability of gear condition indicators (CI) to detect contact fatigue damage on spiral bevel gear teeth. Tests were performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig on eight prototype gear sets (pinion/gear). Damage was initiated and progressed on the gear and pinion teeth. Vibration data was measured during damage progression at varying torque values while varying damage modes to the gear teeth were observed and documented with inspection photos. Sideband indexes (SI) and root mean square (RMS) CIs were calculated from the time synchronous averaged vibration data. Results found that both CIs respond differently to varying torque levels, damage levels and damage modes

  14. Microfluidics for the upstream pipeline of DNA sequencing--a worthy application?

    PubMed

    Coupland, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Technological advances and economic investment into DNA sequencing during this decade has provided the industry of genome sequencing with a suite of dedicated sequencing machines capable of rapidly generating vast quantities of sequence data. This next generation of equipment for DNA sequencing is freely available and is utilised more commonly; this has lead to the traditional bottle-neck in the sequencing pipeline transferring from the sequencing process, i.e. reading the bases on the older capillary based machines, to the upstream processes of sample preparation, i.e. creating the DNA libraries that are to be read. Essentially, advancement in sequencing technology is running faster than the equivalent for sample preparation technology and, without a remedy, we will no longer be able to provide samples quick enough to keep the sequencing machines running at full capacity. PMID:20162226

  15. Effects of steady flow heating by arc discharge upstream of non-slender bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schülein, E.; Zheltovodov, A.

    2011-08-01

    The influence of steady energy addition into the flow by a low-voltage DC-arc discharge located upstream of conically nosed and spherically blunted bodies was investigated experimentally in the Ludwieg-Tube Facility at Mach 5. The results include drag force measurements and shadowgraph flow visualizations. The flow-field structure, arising due to the bow-shock/heated-wake interaction, as well as the bow-shock intensity and heating power effects on the drag reduction is analyzed in this paper. The results demonstrate the existence of an optimum heating rate, providing a maximum effectiveness of energy addition and showing distinct drag reductions up to 70% dependent on test conditions and model geometries.

  16. Plasma and energetic particle structure upstream of a quasi-parallel interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Scarf, F. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Russell, C. T.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Sanderson, T. R.; Van Nes, P.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    ISEE 1, 2 and 3 data from 1978 on interplanetary magnetic fields, shock waves and particle energetics are examined to characterize a quasi-parallel shock. The intense shock studied exhibited a 640 km/sec velocity. The data covered 1-147 keV protons and electrons and ions with energies exceeding 30 keV in regions both upstream and downstream of the shock, and also the magnitudes of ion-acoustic and MHD waves. The energetic particles and MHD waves began being detected 5 hr before the shock. Intense halo electron fluxes appeared ahead of the shock. A closed magnetic field structure was produced with a front end 700 earth radii from the shock. The energetic protons were cut off from the interior of the magnetic bubble, which contained a markedly increased density of 2-6 keV protons as well as the shock itself.

  17. Energetic ions upstream of the earth's bow shock during an energetic storm particle event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of low-energy protons and alpha particles from ISEE 3 far upstream and from ISEE 1 close to the earth's bow shock during the passage of an interplanetary shock wave with its associated energetic storm particles are presented. Intensities, spectra, and anisotropies of the energetic storm particles are modified due to the interaction of these particles with the earth's bow shock. An intensity spike observed at ISEE 1 during the passage of the interplanetary shock is interpreted as being due to postacceleration of energetic storm particles at the bow shock by the first-order Fermi mechanism. The spikes observed at ISEE 1 after the passage of the interplanetary shock are most probably due to reflection of the energetic storm particles at the bow shock.

  18. Observations of low-energy electrons upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of electron fluxes with a lunar-based electron spectrometer when the moon was upstream of the earth have shown that a subset of observed fluxes are strongly controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The fluxes occur only when the IMF lines connect back to the earth's bow shock. Observed densities and temperatures were in the ranges 2-4 x 0,001/cu cm and 1.7-2.8 x 1,000,000 K. It is shown that these electrons can account for increases in effective solar wind electron temperatures on bow-shock connected field lines which have been observed previously by other investigators. It is further shown that if a model of the bow shock with an electrostatic potential barrier is assumed, the potential can be estimated to be 500 volts.

  19. Ion distributions in the Earth's foreshock upstream from the bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of suprathermal and energetic ion distributions are found upstream from shocks. Some distributions, such as field-aligned beams, are generated directly at the shock either through reflection processes or through leakage from the hotter downstream region. Other distributions, such as intermediate distributions, evolve from these parent distributions through wave-particle interactions. This paper reviews our current understanding of the creation and evolution of suprathermal distributions at shocks. Examples of suprathermal ion distributions are taken from observations at the Earth's bow shock. Particular emphasis is placed on the creation of field-aligned beams and specularly reflected ion distributions and on the evolution of these distributions in the Earth's ion foreshock. However, the results from this heavily studied region are applicable to interplanetary shocks, bow shocks at other planets, and comets.

  20. Microfluidics for the upstream pipeline of DNA sequencing--a worthy application?

    PubMed

    Coupland, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Technological advances and economic investment into DNA sequencing during this decade has provided the industry of genome sequencing with a suite of dedicated sequencing machines capable of rapidly generating vast quantities of sequence data. This next generation of equipment for DNA sequencing is freely available and is utilised more commonly; this has lead to the traditional bottle-neck in the sequencing pipeline transferring from the sequencing process, i.e. reading the bases on the older capillary based machines, to the upstream processes of sample preparation, i.e. creating the DNA libraries that are to be read. Essentially, advancement in sequencing technology is running faster than the equivalent for sample preparation technology and, without a remedy, we will no longer be able to provide samples quick enough to keep the sequencing machines running at full capacity.

  1. Composition of Upstream Flow for Titan's Interaction with Saturn's Magnetosphere during T9 Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Lipatov, A; Bertucci, C.; Coates, A.; Szego, K.; Shappirio, Mark D.; Simpson, David G.

    2008-01-01

    As described in Bertucci et al. [2007] Saturn's magnetic field is stretched out into a magnetodisk configuration where the field is confined near the equatorial plane with Titan below the current sheet. As discussed in Maurice et al. [1996] for Jupiter's outer magnetosphere where magnetodisk configuration applies the heavy ions are confined within 2 deg of the current sheet and at higher latitudes protons dominate. We show compositional evidence from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) that protons dominate the ion composition for the upstream flow, while in pickup region H2+ and protons dominate. If true, then we expect a far different interaction between Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's upper atmosphere and exosphere, where heavy ions are essentially absent.

  2. Effects of upstream-biased third-order space correction terms on multidimensional Crowley advection schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The impact of upstream-biased corrections for third-order spatial truncation error on the stability and phase error of the two-dimensional Crowley combined advective scheme with the cross-space term included is analyzed, putting primary emphasis on phase error reduction. The various versions of the Crowley scheme are formally defined, and their stability and phase error characteristics are intercompared using a linear Fourier component analysis patterned after Fromm (1968, 1969). The performances of the schemes under prototype simulation conditions are tested using time-dependent numerical experiments which advect an initially cone-shaped passive scalar distribution in each of three steady nondivergent flows. One such flow is solid rotation, while the other two are diagonal uniform flow and a strongly deformational vortex.

  3. Upstream regulators and downstream effectors of NF-κB in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhe-Min; Han, Ya-Wei; Han, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Kun; Chang, Ya-Nan; Hu, Zhi-Mei; Qi, Hai-Xia; Ting, Chen; Zhen, Zhang; Hong, Wei

    2016-07-15

    Since Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming the prevalent dementia in the whole world, more underlying mechanisms are emerging. Long time has the transcription factor NF-κB been identified to participate in AD pathogenesis, various studies have focused on the causes and effects of AD that are linked to NF-κB. In this review we discuss diverse environmental stimuli including oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and metabolism, involved signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT, MAPK and AGE/RAGE/GSK-3 and newly found ncRNAs that mediate neuron toxicity or neuron protection through NF-κB activation and the following response associated with the same factors in AD. These may provide future orientation of investigation at transcription level and support efficient treatment to AD by a better understanding of the upstream regulators and downstream effectors of NF-κB. PMID:27288790

  4. A spider tRNA(Ala) requires a far upstream sequence element for expression.

    PubMed

    Cintrón, I; Capó, L; Plazaola, A; Arroyo, G; Candelas, G C

    1999-04-29

    Within the series of timed differential accumulations of small RNAs we have shown to prelude the synthesis of fibroin in the large ampullate glands of Nephila clavipes (Nc), we are currently directing our attention to the alanine tRNAs. This work reports the subcloning of the members of a tRNAAla gene cluster and the optimization of their transcription in a heterologous cell-free system derived from Bombyx mori (Bm) silkglands. Our data show that the heterologous cell-free system supports the faithful and differential transcription of the individual spider alanine tRNA genes. We are thus making use of the extract to characterize the individual genes with respect to flank-contained regulatory elements through cell-free transcription of gene derivatives. The work has been initiated with pNTA3 because of its high transcriptional activity. Interestingly, the transcription of this gene requires a far upstream sequence, an uncommon modality in tRNA genes.

  5. e(sup +/-) Pair Loading and the Origin of the Upstream Magnetic Field in GRB Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, Christian B.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate here the effects of plasma instabilities driven by rapid e(sup +/-) pair cascades, which arise in the environment of GRB sources as a result of back-scattering of a seed fraction of their original spectrum. The injection of e(sup +/-) pairs induces strong streaming motions in the ambient medium. One therefore expects the pair-enriched medium ahead of the forward shock to be strongly sheared on length scales comparable to the radiation front thickness. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we show that plasma instabilities driven by these streaming e(sup +/-) pairs are responsible for the excitation of near-equipartition, turbulent magnetic fields. Our results reveal the importance of the electromagnetic filamentation instability in ensuring an effective coupling between e(sup +/-) pairs and ions, and may help explain the origin of large upstream fields in GRB shocks.

  6. e+/- Pair Loading and the Origin of the Upstream Field in GRB Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, Christian B.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate here the effects of plasma instabilities driven by rapid e(sup plus or minus) pair cascades, which arise in the environment of GRB sources as a result of back-scattering of a seed fraction of their original spectrum. The injection of e(sup plus or minus) pairs induces strong streaming motions in the ambient medium. One therefore expects the pair-enriched medium ahead of the forward shock to be strongly sheared on length scales comparable to the radiation front thickness. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we show that plasma instabilities driven by these streaming e(sup plus or minus) pairs are responsible for the excitation of near-equipartition, turbulent magnetic fields. Our results reveal the importance of the electromagnetic filamentation instability in ensuring an effective coupling between e(sup plus or minus) pairs and ions, and may help explain the origin of large upstream fields in GRB shocks.

  7. Temporal development of composition, spectra, and anisotropies during upstream particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Scholer, M.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of the temporal development of particle intensity, composition, and anisotropies during diffuse particle events. The observations were made with an ultra-low energy charge analyzer (ULECA) sensor. ULECA basically consists of an electrostatic deflection system and an array of solid state detectors. The simultaneous measurement of energy per charge and total energy makes it possible to determine the charge state of a particle. Spectra are derived by an iterative technique involving the numerical integration of particle spectra with the energy response functions of the individual detectors. The presented data are explained in terms of temporal and spatial structures in the upstream region. The temporal structures during the event onset are consistent with a time-dependent first-order Fermi acceleration model, as discussed by Scholer et al. (1980).

  8. An observational study of MHD wave-induced density fluctuations upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven; Fey, Alan; Anderson, Gregory; Fuselier, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of plasma density fluctations upstream of the earth's bow shock and their association with MHD waves is reported. The normalized density fluctuation was 14 percent on a day when the plasma beta was less than unity and the waves were circularly polarized and of relatively low amplitude, and 17 percent on a day when the plasma beta was in excess of unity and the waves were elliptically polarized and of large fractional amplitude. On both days there was a feature of the density power spectrum at the MHD carrier wave frequency attributable to oblique propagation of the waves with propagation angles of a few degrees with respect to the mean field. Ponderomotive effects due to spatial gradient in the MHD wave energy density are proposed as responsible for a correlation betweeen density and transverse wave intensity on both days. Generation of density fluctuations by linear polarized MHD waves is not an important contributor to the observed density fluctuations.

  9. Moving upstream: why rehabilitative justice in military discharge proceedings serves a public health interest.

    PubMed

    Seamone, Evan R; McGuire, James; Sreenivasan, Shoba; Clark, Sean; Smee, Daniel; Dow, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    The cultural divide between US military and civilian institutions amplifies the consequences of military discharge status on public health and criminal justice systems in a manner that is invisible to a larger society. Prompt removal of problematic wounded warriors through retributive justice is more expedient than lengthy mental health treatment. Administrative and punitive discharges usually preclude Department of Veterans Affairs eligibility, posing a heavy public health burden. Moving upstream--through military rehabilitative justice addressing military offenders' mental health needs before discharge--will reduce the downstream consequences of civilian maladjustment and intergenerational transmission of mental illness. The public health community can play an illuminating role by gathering data about community effect and by advocating for policy change at Department of Veterans Affairs and community levels.

  10. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  11. MAVEN observations of gyrotropic electron distributions upstream of Mars bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, Karim; McFadden, James; Hamza, A. M.; Mazelle, Christian; Jakosky, Bruce; Mitchell, David; Halekas, Jasper; Espley, Jared; Connerney, J. E. D.

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations upstream from the Martian bow shock by the MAVEN Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) experiment are presented. Flux enhancements of electrons with energies 70-400 eV are always observed when MAVEN spacecraft is magnetically connected to the shock. A detailed examination of the pitch angle distribution shows that the enhanced fluxes are associated with electrons moving away from Mars. In the full 3-D angular distribution, the electrons appear in an 'annulus' centered along the IMF direction. Moreover, the gyrotropic character is observed over a large range of shock geometry from quasi-parallel to quasi-perpendicular. These signatures in the electron distribution function strongly suggest that the reflection off the shock is the main mechanism for the production of Martian foreshock electrons. A quantitative analysis of electron distributions is carried out in order to probe the characteristics of the Martian bow shock.

  12. Interaction of a circumferentially varying stator row upstream of a propeller in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, John; Amitay, Michael; Beal, David; Huyer, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    A propuslor capable of producing maneuvering forces in all directions effectively eliminates the need for additional control surfaces. Side forces can be generated by the propeller through the variation of the inflow swirl velocity to a conventional propeller. These control forces are generated based on the same geometric principles as a helicopter swash-plate. Instead of cyclically adjusting the propeller blade pitch angle, the relative pitch angle of a fixed pitch propeller is cyclically altered through a pre-swirled inflow generated by an upstream stator row. Wind tunnel and water tunnel experiments were conducted where surface static pressure, forces and moments, and stereoscopic PIV measurements were conducted on a simplified propulsor model. From these measurements a better understanding of the fluidic interactions of the complex propeller system was achieved.

  13. An uncertainty analysis of the flood-stage upstream from a bridge.

    PubMed

    Sowiński, M

    2006-01-01

    The paper begins with the formulation of the problem in the form of a general performance function. Next the Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) technique--a modified version of the Monte Carlo method is briefly described. The essential uncertainty analysis of the flood-stage upstream from a bridge starts with a description of the hydraulic model. This model concept is based on the HEC-RAS model developed for subcritical flow under a bridge without piers in which the energy equation is applied. The next section contains the characteristic of the basic variables including a specification of their statistics (means and variances). Next the problem of correlated variables is discussed and assumptions concerning correlation among basic variables are formulated. The analysis of results is based on LHS ranking lists obtained from the computer package UNCSAM. Results fot two examples are given: one for independent and the other for correlated variables. PMID:16532737

  14. Translation initiation in Drosophila melanogaster is reduced by mutations upstream of the AUG initiator codon

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yue; Gunter, L.E.; Organ, E.L.; Cavener, D.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The importance to in vivo translation of sequences immediately upstream of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) start codon was examined at two developmental stages. Mutations were introduced into the Adh gene in vitro, and the mutant gene was inserted into the genome via germ line transformation. An A-to-T substitution at the [minus]3 position did not affect relative translation of ADH at the adult stage. A second mutant gene, containing five mutations in the region [minus]1 to [minus]9, was designed to completely block translation initiation. However, transformant lines bearing these mutations still exhibit detectable ADH, albeit at substantially reduced levels. The average fold reduction at the second-instar larval stage was 5.9, while at the adult stage a 12.5-fold reduction was observed.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A VIRTUAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUE FOR THE UPSTREAM OIL INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Iraj A. Salehi; Shahab D. Mohaghegh; Samuel Ameri

    2004-09-01

    The objective of the research and development work reported in this document was to develop a Virtual Intelligence Technique for optimization of the Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) for the upstream oil industry. The work included the development of a software tool for identification and optimization of the most influential parameters in upstream common practices as well as geological, geophysical and reservoir engineering studies. The work was performed in cooperation with three independent producing companies--Newfield Exploration, Chesapeake Energy, and Triad Energy--operating in the Golden Trend, Oklahoma. In order to protect data confidentiality, these companies are referred to as Company One, Two, Three in a randomly selected order. These producing companies provided geological, completion, and production data on 320 wells and participated in frequent technical discussions throughout the project. Research and development work was performed by Gas Technology Institute (GTI), West Virginia University (WVU), and Intelligent Solutions Inc. (ISI). Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association (OIPA) participated in technology transfer and data acquisition efforts. Deliverables from the project are the present final report and a user-friendly software package (Appendix D) with two distinct functions: a characterization tool that identifies the most influential parameters in the upstream operations, and an optimization tool that seeks optimization by varying a number of influential parameters and investigating the coupled effects of these variations. The electronic version of this report is also included in Appendix D. The Golden Trend data were used for the first cut optimization of completion procedures. In the subsequent step, results from soft computing runs were used as the guide for detailed geophysical and reservoir engineering studies that characterize the cause-and-effect relationships between various parameters. The general workflow and the main

  16. Production of Magnetic Turbulence by Cosmic Rays Drifting Upstream of Supernova Remnant Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroman, Thomas; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Nishikawa, Ken-ichi

    2008-01-01

    I will present results of our recent two- and three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations of magnetic-turbulence production by cosmic-ray ions drifting upstream of supernova remnant shocks. These studies' aim is twofold: test recent predictions of strong amplification in short wavelength, non-resonant wave modes, and study the subsequent evolution of the magnetic turbulence, including its backreaction on cosmic-ray trajectories. We confirm that the drifting cosmic rays give rise to a turbulent magnetic field, but show that an oblique filamentary mode grows more rapidly than the non-resonant parallel modes found in analytical theory. The field perturbations grow more slowly than estimated using a quasi-linear analytical approach for the parallel plane-wave mode, and saturate in amplitude at deltaB/B approximately equal to 1. The backreaction of the magnetic turbulence on the particles leads to an alignment of the bulk-flow velocities of the cosmic rays and the background medium. This is an essential characteristic of cosmic ray-modified shocks: the upstream flow speed is continuously changed by the cosmic rays. The reduction of relative drift between cosmic rays and background medium accounts for the saturation of the instability at only moderate magnetic-field amplitudes. It is possible that the prolonged magnetic field growth observed in recent MHD simulations results from a cosmic-ray current assumed to be constant and thus immune to the backreaction from the turbulent field. We speculate that the parallel plane-wave mode found in analytical treatments very quickly leads co filamentation, which we observe in our PIC modeling and is also apparent in the MHD simulations.

  17. Differences in sedge fen vegetation upstream and downstream from a managed impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalski, Kurt P.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed the restoration of wetlands impacted by a series of drainage ditches and pools located in an extensive undeveloped peatland in the Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Michigan. This study examined the nature and extent of degradation to the Marsh Creek wetlands caused by alteration of natural hydrology by a water-storage pool (C-3 Pool) that intersects the Marsh Creek channel. We tested the hypothesis that a reduction in moderate-intensity disturbance associated with natural water-level fluctuations below the C-3 dike contributed to lower species richness, reduced floristic quality and a larger tree and shrub component than vegetation upstream from the pool. Wetland plant communities were sampled quantitatively and analyzed for species richness, floristic quality and physiognomy. Aerial photographs, GIS databases and GPS data contributed to the characterization and analysis of the Marsh Creek wetlands. Results showed that there was lower species richness in vegetated areas downstream from the pool, but not the anticipated growth in shrubs. Wetland vegetation upstream and downstream from the pool had similar floristic quality, except for a greater number of weedy taxa above the pool. Seepage through the pool dike and localized ground-water discharge created conditions very similar to those observed around beaver dams in Marsh Creek. In essence, the dike containing the C-3 Pool affected hydrology and wetland plant communities in a manner similar to an enormous beaver dam, except that it did not allow seasonal flooding episodes to occur. Management actions to release water from the pool into the original Marsh Creek channel at certain times and in certain amounts that mimic the natural flow regime would be expected to promote greater plant species richness and minimize the negative impacts of the dike.

  18. A bow-shaped thermal structure traveling upstream of the zonal wind flow of Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Makoto; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Imamura, Takeshi; Kouyama, Toru; Nakamura, Masato; Sato, Takao M.; Ueno, Munetaka; Suzuki, Makoto; Iwagami, Naomoto; Sato, Mitsuteru; Hashimoto, George L.; Takagi, Seiko; Akatsuki Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Longwave Infrared Camera (LIR) onboard the Japanese Venus orbiter Akatsuki acquires a snap shot of Venus in the middle infrared region, and provides a brightness temperature distribution at the cloud-top altitudes of about 65 km. Hundreds of images taken by LIR have been transferred to the ground since the successful Venus orbit insertion of Akatsuki on Dec. 7, 2015. Here we report that a bow shaped thermal structure extending from the northern high latitudes to the southern high latitudes was found in the brightness temperature map on Dec. 7, 2015, and that it lasted for four days at least surprisingly at almost same geographical position. The bow shape structure looks symmetrical with the equator, and consists of a high temperature region in east or upstream of the background strong westward wind or the super rotation of the Venus atmosphere followed by a low temperature region in west with an amplitude of 5 K. It appeared close to the evening terminator in the dayside, and seems not to have stayed in the same local time rather to have co-rotated with the slowly rotating ground where the western part of Aphrodite Continent was below the center of the bow shape. Meridionally aligned dark filaments similar to the bow shape structure in shape but in much smaller scale were also identified in the brightness temperature map on Dec. 7, and they propagated upstream of the zonal wind as well. The bow shape structure disappeared when LIR observed the same local time and longitude in the earliest opportunity on Jan. 16, 2016. Similar events, though their amplitudes were less than 1 K, were found on Apr. 15 and 26, 2016, but they appeared in different local times and longitudes. A simulation of a gravity wave generated in the lower atmosphere and propagating upward reproduces the observed bow shape structure. The bow shape structure could be a signature of transferring momentum from the ground to the upper atmosphere.

  19. Energy optimization for upstream data transfer in 802.15.4 beacon-enabled star formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua; Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    2008-08-01

    Energy saving is one of the major concerns for low rate personal area networks. This paper models energy consumption for beacon-enabled time-slotted media accessing control cooperated with sleeping scheduling in a star network formulation for IEEE 802.15.4 standard. We investigate two different upstream (data transfer from devices to a network coordinator) strategies: a) tracking strategy: the devices wake up and check status (track the beacon) in each time slot; b) non-tracking strategy: nodes only wake-up upon data arriving and stay awake till data transmitted to the coordinator. We consider the tradeoff between energy cost and average data transmission delay for both strategies. Both scenarios are formulated as optimization problems and the optimal solutions are discussed. Our results show that different data arrival rate and system parameters (such as contention access period interval, upstream speed etc.) result in different strategies in terms of energy optimization with maximum delay constraints. Hence, according to different applications and system settings, different strategies might be chosen by each node to achieve energy optimization for both self-interested view and system view. We give the relation among the tunable parameters by formulas and plots to illustrate which strategy is better under corresponding parameters. There are two main points emphasized in our results with delay constraints: on one hand, when the system setting is fixed by coordinator, nodes in the network can intelligently change their strategies according to corresponding application data arrival rate; on the other hand, when the nodes' applications are known by the coordinator, the coordinator can tune the system parameters to achieve optimal system energy consumption.

  20. Travel times, streamflow velocities, and dispersion rates in the Missouri River upstream from Canyon Ferry Lake, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whiteman, Aroscott

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, initiated a dye-tracer study to determine travel times, streamflow velocities, and longitudinal dispersion rates for the Missouri River upstream from Canyon Ferry Lake. For this study, rhodamine WT (RWT) dye was injected at two locations, Missouri River Headwaters State Park in early September and Broadwater-Missouri Dam (Broadwater Dam) in late August 2010. Dye concentrations were measured at three sites downstream from each dye-injection location. The study area was a 41.2-mile reach of the Missouri River from Trident, Montana, at the confluence of the Jefferson, Madison, and Gallatin Rivers (Missouri River Headwaters) at river mile 2,319.40 downstream to the U.S. Route 12 Bridge (Townsend Bridge), river mile 2,278.23, near Townsend, Montana. Streamflows were reasonably steady and ranged from 3,070 to 3,700 cubic feet per second. Mean velocities were calculated for each subreach between measurement sites for the leading edge, peak concentration, centroid, and trailing edge at 10 percent of the peak concentration of the dye plume. Calculated velocities for the centroid of the dye plume ranged from 0.80 to 3.02 feet per second within the study reach from Missouri River Headwaters to Townsend Bridge, near Townsend. The mean velocity of the dye plume for the entire study reach, excluding the subreach between the abandoned Milwaukee Railroad bridge at Lombard, Montana (Milwaukee Bridge) and Broadwater-Missouri Dam (Broadwater Dam), was 2.87 feet per second. The velocity of the centroid of the dye plume for the subreach between Milwaukee Bridge and Broadwater Dam (Toston Reservoir) was 0.80 feet per second. The residence time for Toston Reservoir was 8.2 hours during this study. Estimated longitudinal dispersion rates of the dye plume for this study ranged from 0.72 feet per second for the subreach from Milwaukee Bridge to Broadwater Dam to 2.26 feet per second for