Science.gov

Sample records for damage calculations upstream

  1. DAMCAL; Damage Reach Stage-Damage Calculation: Users Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    M AD-A273 611 US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center GENERALIZED COMPUTER PROGRAM DTIC "k ELECTE DEC 13 1993 DAMCAL A Damage Reach...Stage- Damage Calculation User’s Manual February 1979 93-30134 ApprOved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. CPD-35 93 12 100 3 8 DAMCAL Damage ...Reach Stage- Damage Calculation Accesion For User’s Manual TIS ’C&I DTIC TA.3 Juhfificatoc.n By ............. .......................... February 1979

  2. SPECTER: neutron damage calculations for materials irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Smither, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron displacement damage-energy cross sections have been calculated for 41 isotopes in the energy range from 10/sup -10/ to 20 MeV. Calculations were performed on a 100-point energy grid using nuclear cross sections from ENDF/B-V and the DISCS computer code. Elastic scattering is treated exactly including angular distributions from ENDF/B-V. Inelastic scattering calculations consider both discrete and continuous nuclear level distributions. Multiple (n,xn) reactions use a Monte Carlo technique to derive the recoil distributions. The (n,d) and (n,t) reactions are treated as (n,p) and (n,/sup 3/He) as (n,/sup 4/He). The (n,..gamma..) reaction and subsequent ..beta..-decay are also included, using a new treatment of ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidences, angular correlations, ..beta..-neutrino correlations, and the incident neutron energy. The Lindhard model was used to compute the energy available for nuclear displacement at each recoil energy. The SPECTER computer code has been developed to simplify damage calculations. The user need only specify a neutron energy spectrum. SPECTER will then calculate spectral-averaged displacements, recoil spectra, gas production, and total damage energy (Kerma). The SPECTER computer code package is readily accessible to the fusion community via the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory.

  3. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Yume; Tada, Shusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  4. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Gallagher, David C.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  5. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must be...

  6. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must be...

  7. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must be...

  8. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must be...

  9. 46 CFR 172.170 - Damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Damage stability calculations. 172.170 Section 172.170 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.170 Damage stability calculations. (a) Each tankship must be...

  10. Mesoscale polycrystal calculations of damage in spallation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Davis L; Bingert, John F; Livescu, Veronica; Luo, Shengnian; Bronkhorst, C A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this project is to produce a damage model for spallation in metals informed by the polycrystalline grain structure at the mesoscale. Earlier damage models addressed the continuwn macroscale in which these effects were averaged out. In this work we focus on cross sections from recovered samples examined with EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction), which reveal crystal grain orientations and voids. We seek to understand the loading histories of specific sample regions by meshing up the crystal grain structure of these regions and simulating the stress, strain, and damage histories in our hydro code, FLAG. The stresses and strain histories are the fundamental drivers of damage and must be calculated. The calculated final damage structures are compared with those from the recovered samples to validate the simulations.

  11. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  12. A model of the cell nucleus for DNA damage calculations.

    PubMed

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Girard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Development of a computer model of genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the human cell nucleus for DNA damage and repair calculations. The model comprises the human genomic DNA, chromosomal domains, and loops attached to factories. A model of canonical B-DNA was used to build the nucleosomes and the 30-nanometer solenoidal chromatin. In turn the chromatin was used to form the loops of factories in chromosome domains. The entire human genome was placed in a spherical nucleus of 10 micrometers diameter. To test the new target model, tracks of protons and alpha-particles were generated using Monte Carlo track structure codes PITS99 (Positive Ion Track Structure) and KURBUC. Damage sites induced in the genome were located and classified according to type and complexity. The three-dimensional structure of the genome starting with a canonical B-DNA model, nucleosomes, and chromatin loops in chromosomal domains are presented. The model was used to obtain frequencies of DNA damage induced by protons and alpha-particles by direct energy deposition, including single- and double-strand breaks, base damage, and clustered lesions. This three-dimensional model of the genome is the first such model using the full human genome for the next generation of more comprehensive modelling of DNA damage and repair. The model combines simple geometrical structures at the level of domains and factories with potentially full detail at the level of atoms in particular genes, allowing damage patterns in the latter to be simulated.

  13. Calculated concrete target damage by multiple rod impact and penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P A; Murphy, M J

    2006-12-29

    The effect of enhanced crater formation has been demonstrated experimentally when multiple and delayed shaped charge jets impact and penetrate concrete. The concept for enhancement utilizes a single follow-on jet at the centerline of holes produced by multiple precursor jets penetrating the surrounding the region. Calculations of the 3D crater enhancement phenomena have been conducted with multiple rods to simulate the steady state portion of the multiple jet penetration process. It is expected that this analysis methodology will be beneficial for optimization of the multiple jet crater enhancement application. We present calculated results using ALE3D where the model uses the standard Gruneisen equation of state combined with a rate dependent strength model including material damage parameters. This study focuses on the concrete material damage model as a representation of the portion of the target that would eventually be ejected creating a large bore-hole. The calculations are compared with the experimental evidence and limitations of the modeling approach are discussed.

  14. Radiation damage/activity calculation for CSNS target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Liang, T. J.; Yu, Q. Z.; Jia, X. J.

    2010-03-01

    The radiation damages have been performed for Chinese spallation neutron source (CSNS) target center components that relies on Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX. During the calculation, Bertini intranuclear cascade model, three level-density formulation GCCI, and multistage pre-equilibrium model MPM on which are provided within MCNPX are employed. We calculate the displacement per atom (DPA) and afterheat of the tungsten target, the stainless steel target vessel window and the aluminum alloy moderator vessel. As a hundred kW-level source, these spallation center components have the lifetime more than 5 year. We also give the activity for the T0 chopper of the beam line HIPD to get the primary data for making out a maintenance scenario.

  15. Benchmark calculations for FFTF Inner radial shield damage rates

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, A.H.; Schwarz, R.A.; Simons, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    A comparison of the damage rates calculated by Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP), with values based on a FERRET-adjusted diffusion theory flux, was made for 22 dosimeter locations in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The C/E values in the fueled region for characterizer assemblies in core locations 2101, 2402, 3404, 2503, 2603 and in the axial reflector of assembly 2101 are within 10% of unity, indicating agreement within the combined calculated and adjusted uncertainties. The comparison also shows good agreement within 20% of unity in most of the axial zones of radial reflectors in rows 7, 8, and 9, their deviation either within, or slightly outside, the combined one-sigma uncertainty. There are three relatively large C/E deviations, ranging from 30% to 45% of unity, in the lower reflector block of row 9 and the upper shield regions of rows 7 and 8. The possible reasons for the large C/E are explained.

  16. Calculation of radiation damage induced by neutrons in compound materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunéville, L.; Simeone, D.; Jouanne, C.

    2006-07-01

    Many years have been devoted to study the behaviour of solids submitted to impinging particles like ions or neutrons. The nuclear evaluations describe more and more accurately the various neutron-atom interactions. Anisotropic neutron-atom cross-sections are now available for many elements. Moreover, clear mathematical formalism now allows to calculate the number of displacements per atom in polyatomic targets in a realistic way using the binary collision approximation (BCA) framework. Even if these calculations do not take into account relaxation processes at the end of the displacement spike, they can be used to compare damages induced by different facilities like pressurized water reactors (PWR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), high temperature reactors (HTR) and fusion facilities like the European Spallation Source (ESS) and the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) on a defined material. In this paper, a formalism is presented to describe the neutron-atom cross-section and primary recoil spectra taking into account the anisotropy of nuclear reactions extracted from nuclear evaluations. Such a formalism permitted to compute displacement per atom production rate, primary and weighted recoil spectra within the BCA. The multigroup approximation has been used to calculate displacement per atom production rate and recoil spectra for a define nuclear reactor. All these informations are useful to compare recoil spectra and displacement per atom production rate produced by particle accelerator and nuclear reactor.

  17. The PIM-2 kinase is an essential component of the ultraviolet damage response that acts upstream to E2F-1 and ATM.

    PubMed

    Zirkin, Shahar; Davidovich, Ateret; Don, Jeremy

    2013-07-26

    The oncogenic nature ascribed to the PIM-2 kinase relies mostly on phosphorylation of substrates that act as pro-survival/anti-apoptotic factors. Nevertheless, pro-survival effects can also result from activating DNA repair mechanisms following damage. In this study, we addressed the possibility that PIM-2 plays a role in the cellular response to UV damage, an issue that has never been addressed before. We found that in U2OS cells, PIM-2 expression and activity increased upon exposure to UVC radiation (2-50 mJ/cm(2)), and Pim-2-silenced cells were significantly more sensitive to UV radiation. Overexpression of PIM-2 accelerated removal of UV-induced DNA lesions over time, reduced γH2AX accumulation in damaged cells, and rendered these cells significantly more viable following UV radiation. The protective effect of PIM-2 was mediated by increased E2F-1 and activated ATM levels. Silencing E2F-1 reduced the protective effect of PIM-2, whereas inhibiting ATM activity abrogated this protective effect, irrespective of E2F-1 levels. The results obtained in this study place PIM-2 upstream to E2F-1 and ATM in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

  18. Base damage immediately upstream from double-strand break ends is a more severe impediment to nonhomologous end joining than blocked 3′-termini

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Neumann, Ronald D.; Pastwa, Elzbieta; Winters, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are critical cytotoxic lesions that are typically repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in human cells. Our previous work indicates the highly cytotoxic DSBs formed by 125I decay possess base damage clustered within 8 to 10 bases of the break, and 3′-phosphate (P) and 3′-OH ends. This study examines the effect of such structures on NHEJ in in vitro assays employing either 125I decay-induced DSB linearized plasmid DNA, or structurally defined duplex oligonucleotides. Duplex oligonucleotides that possess either a 3′-P or 3′-phosphoglycolate (PG), or a ligateable 3′-OH end with either an AP site or an 8-oxo-dG 1 nucleotide upstream (-1n) from the 3′-terminus, have been examined for reparability. Moderate to severe end-joining inhibition was observed for modified DSB ends or 8-oxo-dG upstream from a 3′-OH end. In contrast, abolition of end joining was observed with duplexes possessing an AP site upstream from a ligateable 3′-OH end, or for a lesion combination involving 3′-P plus an upstream 8-oxo-dG. In addition, base mismatches at the -1n position are also strong inhibitors of NHEJ in this system, suggesting that destabilization of the DSB terminus as a result of base loss or improper base pairing may play a role in the inhibitory effects of these structures. Furthermore, we provide data indicating that DSB end joining is likely to occur prior to removal or repair of base lesions proximal to the DSB terminus. Our results show that base damage or base loss near a DSB end may be a severe block to NHEJ, and that complex combinations of lesions presented in the context of a DSB may be more inhibitory than the individual lesions alone. In contrast, blocked DSB 3′-ends alone, are only modestly inhibitory to NHEJ. Finally, DNA ligase activity is implicated as being responsible for these effects. PMID:21175352

  19. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Free surface correction for damage stability...) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Free Surface § 170.290 Free surface correction for damage stability calculations. (a) When doing the damage stability calculations required by...

  20. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Free surface correction for damage stability...) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Free Surface § 170.290 Free surface correction for damage stability calculations. (a) When doing the damage stability calculations required by...

  1. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading.

    PubMed

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress-strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history.

  2. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    PubMed Central

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress–strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history. PMID:26150939

  3. Calculation of wind speeds required to damage or destroy buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Henry

    Determination of wind speeds required to damage or destroy a building is important not only for the improvement of building design and construction but also for the estimation of wind speeds in tornadoes and other damaging storms. For instance, since 1973 the U.S. National Weather Service has been using the well-known Fujita scale (F scale) to estimate the maximum wind speeds of tornadoes [Fujita, 1981]. The F scale classifies tornadoes into 13 numbers, F-0 through F-12. The wind speed (maximum gust speed) associated with each F number is given in Table 1. Note that F-6 through F-12 are for wind speeds between 319 mi/hr (mph) and the sonic velocity (approximately 760 mph; 1 mph = 1.6 km/kr). However, since no tornadoes have been classified to exceed F-5, the F-6 through F-12 categories have no practical meaning [Fujita, 1981].

  4. Comparison of Measured Dark Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, C. J.; Marshall, P. W.; Howe, C. L.; Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Ladbury, R.; Jordan, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distributions were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [1]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. While the nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) contributes only a small fraction of the total nonionizing damage energy, its inclusion in the shape of the damage across the array is significant. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3-5], a Geant4 [4,6] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  5. Comparison of Measured Leakage Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, C. J.; Ladbury, R.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; Howe, C.; Weller, B.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Jordan, T. M.; Fodness, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distribution were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [I]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Car10 code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. The nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) has a negligible effect on the shape of the damage distribution. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3,4], a Geant4 [4,5] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  6. Reference data file for neutron spectrum adjustment and related radiation damage calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zsolnay, E.M. ); Nolthenius, H.J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Szondi, E.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The REAL-88 interlaboratory exercise organized by IAEA resulted in a neutron metrology file. (NMF-90) comprising problem dependent data for benchmark neutron fields, furthermore, nuclear data and computer programs for neutron spectrum adjustment and radiation damage parameter calculations for the service life assessment of nuclear facilities. Calculation results of some experienced laboratories are also present. This paper describes and analyses the content of the neutron metrology file and outlines the most important problems and tasks to be solved in the field of radiation damage parameter calculations. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mathematical Aids for Calculating Nuclear Damage to Extended Targets Composed of Discrete Points.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    find that Pd is given by Pd = + - n ( TjE ,.j/E.oi)I , , (19) 2 2\\/2 1 Equation (19) can be compared to equation (5). the probability of damage to a...developed here that reduce the number of calculations needed to find the target damage and that have excellent modeling potential for low-level...Description of troop incapacitation categories................................ 14 2. Coordinates of troops measured from battery centroid

  8. Monte Carlo Techniques for Calculations of Charge Deposition and Displacement Damage from Protons in Visible and Infrared Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Paul; Reed, Robert; Fodness, Bryan; Jordan, Tom; Pickel, Jim; Xapsos, Michael; Burke, Ed

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation examines motivation for Monte Carlo methods, charge deposition in sensor arrays, displacement damage calculations, and future work. The discussion of charge deposition sensor arrays includes Si active pixel sensor APS arrays and LWIR HgCdTe FPAs. The discussion of displacement damage calculations includes nonionizing energy loss (NIEL), HgCdTe NIEL calculation results including variance, and implications for damage in HgCdTe detector arrays.

  9. Calculation of the stabilization energies of oxidatively damaged guanine base pairs with guanine.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masayo; Kino, Katsuhito; Morikawa, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Takanobu; Komori, Rie; Miyazawa, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    DNA is constantly exposed to endogenous and exogenous oxidative stresses. Damaged DNA can cause mutations, which may increase the risk of developing cancer and other diseases. G:C-C:G transversions are caused by various oxidative stresses. 2,2,4-Triamino-5(2H)-oxazolone (Oz), guanidinohydantoin (Gh)/iminoallantoin (Ia) and spiro-imino-dihydantoin (Sp) are known products of oxidative guanine damage. These damaged bases can base pair with guanine and cause G:C-C:G transversions. In this study, the stabilization energies of these bases paired with guanine were calculated in vacuo and in water. The calculated stabilization energies of the Ia:G base pairs were similar to that of the native C:G base pair, and both bases pairs have three hydrogen bonds. By contrast, the calculated stabilization energies of Gh:G, which form two hydrogen bonds, were lower than the Ia:G base pairs, suggesting that the stabilization energy depends on the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, the Sp:G base pairs were less stable than the Ia:G base pairs. Furthermore, calculations showed that the Oz:G base pairs were less stable than the Ia:G, Gh:G and Sp:G base pairs, even though experimental results showed that incorporation of guanine opposite Oz is more efficient than that opposite Gh/Ia and Sp.

  10. Calculation of Forming Limits for Sheet Metal using an Enhanced Continuous Damage Fracture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Trung; Kim, Dae-Young; Kim, Heon Young

    2011-08-01

    An enhanced continuous damage fracture model was introduced in this paper to calculate forming limits of sheet metal. The fracture model is a combination of a fracture criterion and a continuum damage constitutive law. A modified McClintock void growth fracture criterion was incorporated with a coupled damage-plasticity Gurson-type constitutive law. Also, by introducing a Lode angle dependent parameter to define the loading asymmetry condition, the shear effect was phenomenologically taken into account. The proposed fracture model was implemented using user-subroutines in commercial finite element software. The model was calibrated and correlated by the uniaxial tension, shear and notched specimens tests. Application of the fracture model for the LDH tests was discussed and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data.

  11. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the ATR-A1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the collaborative US/Japan ATR-A1 irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 9.4 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (5.5 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 4.6 dpa in vanadium.

  12. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the EBRII COBRA-1A irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. and Japanese COBRA-1A1 and 1A2 irradiations in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The maximum total neutron fluences at midplane were 2.0E+22 and 7.5E+22 n/cm{sup 2}, for the 1A1 and 1A2 irradiations, respectively, resulting in about 8.0 and 30.3 dpa in stainless steel.

  13. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-23 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. Japanese experiment JP-23, which was conducted in target position G6 of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplanes was 4.4E+22 n/cm{sup 2} resulting in about 9.0 dpa in type 316 stainless steel.

  14. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-23 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment JP-23, which was conducted in target position G6 of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 4.4E+22 n/cm{sup 2} resulting in about 9.0 dpa in type 316 stainless steel.

  15. Theoretical neutron damage calculations in industrial robotic manipulators used for non-destructive imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, Joseph; Schneider, Erich; Pryor, Mitch; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    Our paper describes how to use MCNP to evaluate the rate of material damage in a robot incurred by exposure to a neutron flux. The example used in this work is that of a robotic manipulator installed in a high intensity, fast, and collimated neutron radiography beam port at the University of Texas at Austin's TRIGA Mark II research reactor. Our effort includes taking robotic technologies and using them to automate non-destructive imaging tasks in nuclear facilities where the robotic manipulator acts as the motion control system for neutron imaging tasks. Simulated radiation tests are used to analyze the radiation damage to the robot. Once the neutron damage is calculated using MCNP, several possible shielding materials are analyzed to determine the most effective way of minimizing the neutron damage. Furthermore, neutron damage predictions provide users the means to simulate geometrical and material changes, thus saving time, money, and energy in determining the optimal setup for a robotic system installed in a radiation environment.

  16. Theoretical neutron damage calculations in industrial robotic manipulators used for non-destructive imaging applications

    DOE PAGES

    Hashem, Joseph; Schneider, Erich; Pryor, Mitch; ...

    2017-01-01

    Our paper describes how to use MCNP to evaluate the rate of material damage in a robot incurred by exposure to a neutron flux. The example used in this work is that of a robotic manipulator installed in a high intensity, fast, and collimated neutron radiography beam port at the University of Texas at Austin's TRIGA Mark II research reactor. Our effort includes taking robotic technologies and using them to automate non-destructive imaging tasks in nuclear facilities where the robotic manipulator acts as the motion control system for neutron imaging tasks. Simulated radiation tests are used to analyze the radiationmore » damage to the robot. Once the neutron damage is calculated using MCNP, several possible shielding materials are analyzed to determine the most effective way of minimizing the neutron damage. Furthermore, neutron damage predictions provide users the means to simulate geometrical and material changes, thus saving time, money, and energy in determining the optimal setup for a robotic system installed in a radiation environment.« less

  17. NIEL calculations for estimating the displacement damage introduced in GaAs irradiated with charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Allam, E.; Inguimbert, C.; Addarkaoui, S.; Meulenberg, A.; Jorio, A.; Zorkani, I.

    2017-03-01

    The application of Non-Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in estimating the impact of electron, proton, and heavy ion irradiations on Gallium Arsenide is presented in this paper. The NIEL for deuteron, alpha particle, lithium ion and oxygen ion is computed using the SR-NIEL and NEMO codes. The NIEL calculations are compared with the introduction rate of displacement damage measured in n-type GaAs. Very good agreement is found between the NIEL and experimental results for protons (< 20 MeV), electrons, and a variety of ions. However, a discrepancy can be observed for high-energy protons.

  18. Correlation of theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of damage around a shaft in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Holcomb, D.J.; DeVries, K.L.; Brodsky, N.S.

    1994-12-31

    Cross-hole ultrasonic measurements were made in the immediate wall of the Air Intake Shaft of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant facility. These measurements show that compressional wave speed markedly decreases at the shaft wall and then increases with radial distance from the shaft to eventually become that of solid or undamaged salt. This behavior is indicative of deformation damage or microfractures in the salt. These in situ data are compared to both laboratory measurements of wave speed as a function of volume dilatancy and to calculations based on the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, with reasonable agreement.

  19. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-20 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment JP-20, which was conducted in a target position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 4.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (1.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 8.4 dpa and 388 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  20. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-9, -12, and -15 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-9, -12, and -15. These experiments were conducted in target positions of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for a period of nearly four years. The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 2.6 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} (7.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 60 dpa and 3900 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  1. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-MFE-200J-1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment MFE-200-J-, which was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 4.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (1.9 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 12 dpa and 28 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  2. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the JP-17, 18 and 19 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-17, 18, and 19 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for two cycles resulting in 43.55 EFPD for JP-17 and 42.06 EFPD for JP-18 and 19. The maximum fast neutron fluence > 0.1 MeV was about 3.7E + 21 n/cm{sup 2} for all three irradiations, resulting in about 3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  3. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculation for the JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S./Japanese experiments JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for 238.5 EFPD. The maximum fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV was about 2.1E + 22 n/cm{sup 2} for all of the experiments resulting in about 17.3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  4. Determination of lysine damage and calculation of lysine bio-availability in several processed foods.

    PubMed

    Erbersdobler, H F; Hupe, A

    1991-02-01

    By analyzing lysine and furosine the amount of inactivated lysine in several food systems was determined and the values for available lysine and total lysine were calculated. Considerable heat damage was found in heated cereal products, and in heated milk products, including several formula for children and hospitalized patients. Some products contained more inactivated lysine than available lysine. This may have consequences for the nutrition in low protein consuming populations and leads to errors in predicting the protein quality, e.g., by the recently proposed "Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score".

  5. Energy-Deposition and Damage Calculations in Core-Vessel Inserts at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.

    2002-06-25

    Heat-deposition and damage calculations are described for core-vessel inserts in the target area of the Spallation Neutron Source. Two separate designs for these inserts (or neutron beam tubes) were studied; a single-unit insert and a multi-unit insert. The single unit contains a neutron guide; the multi unit does not. Both units are constructed of stainless steel. For the single unit, separate studies were carried out with the guide composed of stainless steel, glass, and aluminum. Results are also reported for an aluminum window on the front of the insert, a layer of nickel on the guide, a cadmium shield surrounding the guide, and a stainless steel plug in the beam-tube opening. The locations of both inserts were the most forward positions to be occupied by each design respectively thus ensuring that the calculations are conservative.

  6. Fatigue Damage Spectrum calculation in a Mission Synthesis procedure for Sine-on-Random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Andrea; Cornelis, Bram; Troncossi, Marco

    2016-09-01

    In many real-life environments, certain mechanical and electronic components may be subjected to Sine-on-Random vibrations, i.e. excitations composed of random vibrations superimposed on deterministic (sinusoidal) contributions, in particular sine tones due to some rotating parts of the system (e.g. helicopters, engine-mounted components,...). These components must be designed to withstand the fatigue damage induced by the “composed” vibration environment, and qualification tests are advisable for the most critical ones. In the case of an accelerated qualification test, a proper test tailoring which starts from the real environment (measured vibration signals) and which preserves not only the accumulated fatigue damage but also the “nature” of the excitation (i.e. sinusoidal components plus random process) is important to obtain reliable results. In this paper, the classic time domain approach is taken as a reference for the comparison of different methods for the Fatigue Damage Spectrum (FDS) calculation in case of Sine-on-Random vibration environments. Then, a methodology to compute a Sine-on-Random specification based on a mission FDS is proposed.

  7. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ''biological Bragg curve'' is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta, et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called "overkill".

  8. SPENVIS Implementation of End-of-Life Solar Cell Calculations Using the Displacement Damage Dose Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Robert; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Warmer. Keffreu J/; Messenger, Scott; Lorentzen, Justin R.; Morton, Thomas; Taylor, Stephen J.; Evans, Hugh; Heynderickx, Daniel; Lei, Fan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for using the SPENVIS on-line computational suite to implement the displacement damage dose (D(sub d)) methodology for calculating end-of-life (EOL) solar cell performance for a specific space mission. This paper builds on our previous work that has validated the D(sub d) methodology against both measured space data [1,2] and calculations performed using the equivalent fluence methodology developed by NASA JPL [3]. For several years, the space solar community has considered general implementation of the D(sub d) method, but no computer program exists to enable this implementation. In a collaborative effort, NRL, NASA and OAI have produced the Solar Array Verification and Analysis Tool (SAVANT) under NASA funding, but this program has not progressed beyond the beta-stage [4]. The SPENVIS suite with the Multi Layered Shielding Simulation Software (MULASSIS) contains all of the necessary components to implement the Dd methodology in a format complementary to that of SAVANT [5]. NRL is currently working with ESA and BIRA to include the Dd method of solar cell EOL calculations as an integral part of SPENVIS. This paper describes how this can be accomplished.

  9. Free-Radical-Induced DNA Damage as Approached by Quantum-Mechanical and Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sonntag, Clemens

    The free-radical chemistry of DNA and its model systems has been widely studied by experimentalists as well as theoreticians. In the present paper, the important contributions of theory to a better understanding of this complex matter has been reviewed by an experimentalist with an emphasis on the following topics: modeling of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, pattern of -OH attack on DNA, ionization potentials and electron affinities of the nucleobases (reduction potentials), hole and electron transfer through DNA, tautomerization and isomerization reactions of DNA radicals, regioselectivity of -OH attack on the nucleobases, selectivity of free-radical attack at the sugar moiety, reactions of alkyl radicals, assignment of transients by quantum-chemical calculations of their electronic transitions, reduction potentials of DNA radicals, and DNA stability and repair. Some pending questions that may be tackled by theoreticians are addressed.

  10. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET g or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ‘‘biological Bragg curve’’ is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called “overkill”. F. A. Cucinotta, I. Plante, A. L. Ponomarev, and M. Y. Kim, Nuclear Interactions in Heavy Ion Transport and Event

  11. Calculation on spectrum of direct DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons including dissociative electron attachment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Liming; Champion, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    In this work, direct DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons (sub-keV) is simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The characteristics of the present simulation are to consider the new mechanism of DNA damage due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and to allow determining damage to specific bases (i.e., adenine, thymine, guanine, or cytosine). The electron track structure in liquid water is generated, based on the dielectric response model for describing electron inelastic scattering and on a free-parameter theoretical model and the NIST database for calculating electron elastic scattering. Ionization cross sections of DNA bases are used to generate base radicals, and available DEA cross sections of DNA components are applied for determining DNA-strand breaks and base damage induced by sub-ionization electrons. The electron elastic scattering from DNA components is simulated using cross sections from different theoretical calculations. The resulting yields of various strand breaks and base damage in cellular environment are given. Especially, the contributions of sub-ionization electrons to various strand breaks and base damage are quantitatively presented, and the correlation between complex clustered DNA damage and the corresponding damaged bases is explored. This work shows that the contribution of sub-ionization electrons to strand breaks is substantial, up to about 40-70%, and this contribution is mainly focused on single-strand break. In addition, the base damage induced by sub-ionization electrons contributes to about 20-40% of the total base damage, and there is an evident correlation between single-strand break and damaged base pair A-T.

  12. Damping and spectral formation of upstream whistlers

    SciTech Connect

    Orlowski, D.S.; Russell, C.T.; Krauss-Varban, D.

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler shift and the whistler dispersion relation indicate that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a finite band of frequencies. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wideband whistlers using the sum of seven drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the ISEE 1 electron data. For two cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra, is between 5 and 7. The overall spectral, wave, and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock, as well as propagation and damping properties indicated that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead, the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp, most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities. 57 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Upstream health law.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M; McIlhattan, Kelley

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, entrepreneurs are aggressively developing new technologies and business models designed to improve individual and population health, not just to deliver specialized medical care. Consumers of these goods and services are not yet "patients"; they are simply people. As this sector of the health care industry expands, it is likely to require new forms of legal governance, which we term "upstream health law."

  14. Development of an analytic procedure to calculate damage accumulation in composites during low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, E. A.; Goering, J.

    1983-01-01

    A computerized procedure was developed to model the response of a laminated composite plate subjected to low velocity impact. The methodology incorporated transient dynamics finite element analysis coupled with composite layer and interlaminar stress predictions. Damage was predicted using a stress based failure criteria and incorporated into the solution as stiffness modifications. The force-displacement relation between the impactor and plate was modelled with a nonlinear contact spring similar to Hertzian contact. Analyses performed predicted ply damage early in the impact event when the displacement fields were characteristic of high frequency flexurable response.

  15. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this subchapter, the virtual increase in the vessel's vertical center of gravity due to liquids in... from the vertical; or (2) Calculating the shift of the center of gravity of the liquid in the tank by...

  16. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this subchapter, the virtual increase in the vessel's vertical center of gravity due to liquids in... from the vertical; or (2) Calculating the shift of the center of gravity of the liquid in the tank by...

  17. 46 CFR 170.290 - Free surface correction for damage stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... this subchapter, the virtual increase in the vessel's vertical center of gravity due to liquids in... from the vertical; or (2) Calculating the shift of the center of gravity of the liquid in the tank by...

  18. Radiation Damage Calculations for the FUBR and BEATRIX Irradiations of Lithium Compounds in EBR-II and FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    LR Greenwood

    1999-06-17

    The Fusion Breeder Reactor (FUBR) and Breeder Exchange Matrix (BEATRIX) experiments were cooperative efforts by members of the International Energy Agency to investigate the irradiation behavior of solid breeder materials for tritium production to support future fusion reactors. Lithium ceramic materials including Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} with varying {sup 6}Li enrichments from 0 to 95% were irradiated in a series of experiments in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR II) and in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) over a period of about 10 years from 1982 to 1992. These experiments were characterized in terms of the nominal fast neutron fluences and measured {sup 6}Li burnup factors, as determined by either mass spectrometry or helium measurements. Radiation damage in these compounds is caused by both the {sup 6}Li-burnup reaction and by all other possible neutron reactions with the atoms in the compound materials. In this report, displacements per atom (dpa) values have been calculated for each type of material in each of the various irradiations that were conducted. Values up to 11% {sup 6}Li-burnup and 130 dpa are predicted for the longest irradiations. The dpa cross sections were calculated for each compound using the SPECOMP computer code. Details of the dpa calculations are presented in the report. Total dpa factors were determined with the SPECTER computer code by averaging the dpa cross sections over the measured or calculated neutron flux spectra for each series of irradiations. Using these new calculations, previously measured radiation damage effects in these lithium compounds can be compared or correlated with other irradiation data on the basis of the dpa factor as well as {sup 6}Li-burnup.

  19. A method for simulating the entire leaking process and calculating the liquid leakage volume of a damaged pressurized pipeline.

    PubMed

    He, Guoxi; Liang, Yongtu; Li, Yansong; Wu, Mengyu; Sun, Liying; Xie, Cheng; Li, Feng

    2017-06-15

    The accidental leakage of long-distance pressurized oil pipelines is a major area of risk, capable of causing extensive damage to human health and environment. However, the complexity of the leaking process, with its complex boundary conditions, leads to difficulty in calculating the leakage volume. In this study, the leaking process is divided into 4 stages based on the strength of transient pressure. 3 models are established to calculate the leaking flowrate and volume. First, a negative pressure wave propagation attenuation model is applied to calculate the sizes of orifices. Second, a transient oil leaking model, consisting of continuity, momentum conservation, energy conservation and orifice flow equations, is built to calculate the leakage volume. Third, a steady-state oil leaking model is employed to calculate the leakage after valves and pumps shut down. Moreover, sensitive factors that affect the leak coefficient of orifices and volume are analyzed respectively to determine the most influential one. To validate the numerical simulation, two types of leakage test with different sizes of leakage holes were conducted from Sinopec product pipelines. More validations were carried out by applying commercial software to supplement the experimental insufficiency. Thus, the leaking process under different leaking conditions are described and analyzed.

  20. Upstream of Saturn and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; André, N.; Bertucci, C. L.; Garnier, P.; Jackman, C. M.; Németh, Z.; Rymer, A. M.; Sergis, N.; Szego, K.; Coates, A. J.; Crary, F. J.

    The formation of Titan's induced magnetosphere is a unique and important example in the solar system of a plasma-moon interaction where the moon has a substantial atmosphere. The field and particle conditions upstream of Titan are important in controlling the interaction and also play a strong role in modulating the chemistry of the ionosphere. In this paper we review Titan's plasma interaction to identify important upstream parameters and review the physics of Saturn's magnetosphere near Titan's orbit to highlight how these upstream parameters may vary. We discuss the conditions upstream of Saturn in the solar wind and the conditions found in Saturn's magnetosheath. Statistical work on Titan's upstream magnetospheric fields and particles are discussed. Finally, various classification schemes are presented and combined into a single list of Cassini Titan encounter classes which is also used to highlight differences between these classification schemes.

  1. Upstream of Saturn and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; André, N.; Bertucci, C. L.; Garnier, P.; Jackman, C. M.; Németh, Z.; Rymer, A. M.; Sergis, N.; Szego, K.; Coates, A. J.; Crary, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of Titan's induced magnetosphere is a unique and important example in the solar system of a plasma-moon interaction where the moon has a substantial atmosphere. The field and particle conditions upstream of Titan are important in controlling the interaction and also play a strong role in modulating the chemistry of the ionosphere. In this paper we review Titan's plasma interaction to identify important upstream parameters and review the physics of Saturn's magnetosphere near Titan's orbit to highlight how these upstream parameters may vary. We discuss the conditions upstream of Saturn in the solar wind and the conditions found in Saturn's magnetosheath. Statistical work on Titan's upstream magnetospheric fields and particles are discussed. Finally, various classification schemes are presented and combined into a single list of Cassini Titan encounter classes which is also used to highlight differences between these classification schemes.

  2. Admissible upstream conditions for slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Krause, E.; Menne, S.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of the compressibility on the flow in slender vortices is being studied. The dependence of the breakdown of the slender-vortex approximation on the upstream conditions is demonstrated for various Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. Compatibility conditions, which have to be satisfied if the vortex is to remain slender, are discussed in detail. The general discussions are supplemented by several sample calculations.

  3. Upstream Swimming in Microbiological Flows.

    PubMed

    Mathijssen, Arnold J T M; Shendruk, Tyler N; Yeomans, Julia M; Doostmohammadi, Amin

    2016-01-15

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centerline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed.

  4. Upstream Swimming in Microbiological Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathijssen, Arnold J. T. M.; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Yeomans, Julia M.; Doostmohammadi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centerline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed.

  5. Upstream reciprocity and the evolution of gratitude

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Martin A; Roch, Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    If someone is nice to you, you feel good and may be inclined to be nice to somebody else. This every day experience is borne out by experimental games: the recipients of an act of kindness are more likely to help in turn, even if the person who benefits from their generosity is somebody else. This behaviour, which has been called ‘upstream reciprocity’, appears to be a misdirected act of gratitude: you help somebody because somebody else has helped you. Does this make any sense from an evolutionary or a game theoretic perspective? In this paper, we show that upstream reciprocity alone does not lead to the evolution of cooperation, but it can evolve and increase the level of cooperation if it is linked to either direct or spatial reciprocity. We calculate the random walks of altruistic acts that are induced by upstream reciprocity. Our analysis shows that gratitude and other positive emotions, which increase the willingness to help others, can evolve in the competitive world of natural selection. PMID:17254983

  6. 10. View to west from Jacob Meyer Park, showing upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View to west from Jacob Meyer Park, showing upstream (east) side of truss span. Bend is visible in lower portion of damaged vertical compression member third from right. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  7. 42. VIEW OF STAGE RECORDER AT END OF UPSTREAM GUIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. VIEW OF STAGE RECORDER AT END OF UPSTREAM GUIDE WALL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. (Several hours after this view was taken, the stage recorder was hit a~d heavily damaged by a grain barge.) - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  8. Upstream reciprocity in heterogeneous networks.

    PubMed

    Iwagami, Akio; Masuda, Naoki

    2010-08-07

    Many mechanisms for the emergence and maintenance of altruistic behavior in social dilemma situations have been proposed. Indirect reciprocity is one such mechanism, where other-regarding actions of a player are eventually rewarded by other players with whom the original player has not interacted. The upstream reciprocity (also called generalized indirect reciprocity) is a type of indirect reciprocity and represents the concept that those helped by somebody will help other unspecified players. In spite of the evidence for the enhancement of helping behavior by upstream reciprocity in rats and humans, theoretical support for this mechanism is not strong. In the present study, we numerically investigate upstream reciprocity in heterogeneous contact networks, in which the players generally have different number of neighbors. We show that heterogeneous networks considerably enhance cooperation in a game of upstream reciprocity. In heterogeneous networks, the most generous strategy, by which a player helps a neighbor on being helped and in addition initiates helping behavior, first occupies hubs in a network and then disseminates to other players. The scenario to achieve enhanced altruism resembles that seen in the case of the Prisoner's Dilemma game in heterogeneous networks. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  10. Determination of ultra-short laser induced damage threshold of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} crystal: Numerical calculation and experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jian; Chen, Mingjun E-mail: chowdhury.24@osu.edu; Wang, Jinghe; Xiao, Yong; Kafka, Kyle; Austin, Drake; Chowdhury, Enam E-mail: chowdhury.24@osu.edu

    2016-03-15

    Rapid growth and ultra-precision machining of large-size KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals with high laser damage resistance are tough challenges in the development of large laser systems. It is of high interest and practical significance to have theoretical models for scientists and manufacturers to determine the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of actually prepared KDP optics. Here, we numerically and experimentally investigate the laser-induced damage on KDP crystals in ultra-short pulse laser regime. On basis of the rate equation for free electron generation, a model dedicated to predicting the LIDT is developed by considering the synergistic effect of photoionization, impact ionization and decay of electrons. Laser damage tests are performed to measure the single-pulse LIDT with several testing protocols. The testing results combined with previously reported experimental data agree well with those calculated by the model. By taking the light intensification into consideration, the model is successfully applied to quantitatively evaluate the effect of surface flaws inevitably introduced in the preparation processes on the laser damage resistance of KDP crystals. This work can not only contribute to further understanding of the laser damage mechanisms of optical materials, but also provide available models for evaluating the laser damage resistance of exquisitely prepared optical components used in high power laser systems.

  11. Spectrum of Radiation-Induced Clustered Non-DSB Damage - A Monte Carlo Track Structure Modeling and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ritsuko; Rahmanian, Shirin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present the spectrum of initial radiation-induced cellular DNA damage [with particular focus on non-double-strand break (DSB) damage] generated by computer simulations. The radiation types modeled in this study were monoenergetic electrons (100 eV-1.5 keV), ultrasoft X-ray photons Ck, AlK and TiK, as well as some selected ions including 3.2 MeV/u proton; 0.74 and 2.4 MeV/u helium ions; 29 MeV/u nitrogen ions and 950 MeV/u iron ions. Monte Carlo track structure methods were used to simulate damage induction by these radiation types in a cell-mimetic condition from a single-track action. The simulations took into account the action of direct energy deposition events and the reaction of hydroxyl radicals on atomistic linear B-DNA segments of a few helical turns including the water of hydration. Our results permitted the following conclusions: a. The absolute levels of different types of damage [base damage, simple and complex single-strand breaks (SSBs) and DSBs] vary depending on the radiation type; b. Within each damage class, the relative proportions of simple and complex damage vary with radiation type, the latter being higher with high-LET radiations; c. Overall, for both low- and high-LET radiations, the ratios of the yields of base damage to SSBs are similar, being about 3.0 ± 0.2; d. Base damage contributes more to the complexity of both SSBs and DSBs, than additional SSB damage and this is true for both low- and high-LET radiations; and e. The average SSB/DSB ratio for low-LET radiations is about 18, which is about 5 times higher than that for high-LET radiations. The hypothesis that clustered DNA damage is more difficult for cells to repair has gained currency among radiobiologists. However, as yet, there is no direct in vivo experimental method to validate the dependence of kinetics of DNA repair on DNA damage complexity (both DSB and non-DSB types). The data on the detailed spectrum of DNA damage presented here, in particular

  12. Upstream waves in Saturn's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavassano Cattaneo, M. B.; Cattaneo, P.; Moreno, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis based on plasma and magnetic-field data obtained from Voyager 1 during its Saturn encounter is reported. The plasma data provided every 96 sec and magnetic-field data averaged over 48 sec are utilized. The evidence of upstream waves at Saturn are detected. The waves have a period, in the spacecraft frame, of about 550 sec and a relative amplitude larger than 0.3, are left- and right-hand elliptically polarized, and propagate at about 30 deg with respect to the average magnetic field. The appearance of the waves is correlated with the spacecraft being magnetically connected to the bow shock.

  13. Upstream/downstream: Issues in environmental ethics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, D.

    1991-01-01

    Upstream/Downstream reminds us that there are four issues that are more or less distinctive to environmental ethics. First, and most distinctively, environmental issues involve the standing of nonhuman living things and systems. Thus, environmental politics is only partly a clash among the interest of the parties involved; it often involves actions on behalf of the existence rights of nonhuman life forms. Second, environmental ethics concern the intergenerational distribution of benefits more explicitly than do most other ethical issues, which brings out serious weaknesses in legal frameworks that rely on claims for damages. Third, the complexity and indirectness of many environmental impacts introduces a high degree of uncertainty and thus technical as well as ethical issues of prudent behavior. Specifically, where science may not fully reveal environmental risks, should development proceed; should analysis proceed if it is known to have a Pollyanna bias Fourth, insofar as environmental damage is typically done to common property, and thus its regulation is generally a matter for governmental regulation, the obligations of private actors to make sacrifices beyond what government requires is at issue - an issue that one would expect to be taken up at length in the other volumes.

  14. ISEE-3/IMP-8 observations of simultaneous upstream proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Upstream 50-200 keV proton events were observed simultaneously by the low energy proton detectors on ISEE-3 and IMP-8, and the gradient from the spin averaged fluxes at the two spacecraft was calculated. The dependence of that gradient upon the angular distributions at IMP-8 was investigated as well as the distance from IMP-8 to the bow shock. The pitch angle distributions are narrow at ISEE-3 and wide and often pancake-shaped at IMP-8 with a peak near 90 degrees. This implies the existence of a weak scattering region about 5-15 earth radii upstream of the earth's bow shock.

  15. Determination of a non-measurable quantity using information from calculations and experimental measurements: application to the damage rate determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourganel, Stéphane; Nimal, Jean-Claude

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a method dedicated to the determination of the best value of a required quantity which is estimated by calculation, using information closely related, obtained by measurements and calculations. This best value, called thereafter the "target", is not measurable in most cases. DPA and high energy neutron fluence (typically higher than 1 MeV) involved in vessel surveillance programs, using measurements of dosimeters, are some examples of application of this methodology. This methodology is applied without spectrum adjustment, but the spectrum shape is implicitly taken into account. In this article, an example is presented based on the FLUOLE-2 experimental program, which is developed and conducted by CEA. Neutron information is derived from a set of different kinds of neutron dosimeters. The objective is to estimate the best value of reaction rate values for each kind of dosimeters. All calculations are carried out using TRIPOLI-4 3D pointwise Monte Carlo code, and DARWIN/PEPIN2 depletion code.

  16. 19 CFR 351.523 - Upstream subsidies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DUTIES Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.523 Upstream subsidies. (a... countervailable subsidy rate on the input product, multiplied by the proportion of the total production costs of...—(1) Presumptions. In evaluating whether an upstream subsidy has a significant effect on the cost...

  17. Upstream Waves and Particles at the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Halekas, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter presents an up-to-date catalog of Moon-related particle populations and lunar upstream waves obtained from in situ measurements at low (<˜100 km) and high altitudes, aimed at organizing and clarifying the currently available information on this complex region, where multiple categories of waves and particles coexist. It then briefly outlines the observed properties of a variety of classes of lunar upstream waves, as well as their generation mechanisms currently proposed, in association with the lunar upstream particle distributions. The lunar upstream region magnetically connected to the Moon and its wake, the fore-moon, represents a remarkably rich zoo of different classes of waves and different types of particles. Although recent observations have substantially enhanced our knowledge by revealing a number of new categories of upstream particles and waves at the Moon, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, and these are outlined in the chapter.

  18. Neutron dosimetry, damage calculations, and helium measurements for the HFIR-MFE-60J-1 and MFE-330J-1 spectral tailoring experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.; Oliver, B.M.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to provide dosimetry and damage analysis for fusion materials irradiation experiments. Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US -Japanese MFE-60J-1 and MFE-330J-1 experiments in the hafnium-lined removable beryllium (RB{sup *}) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These experiments were continuations of the ORR-6J and 7J irradiations performed in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The combination of irradiations was designed to tailor the neutron spectrum in order to achieve fusion reactor helium/dpa levels in stainless steel. These experiments produced maximum helium (appm)/dpa(displacement per atom) levels of 10.2 at 18.5 dpa for the ORR-6J and HFIR-MFE-60J-1 combination and 11.8 at 19.0 dpa for the ORR-7J and HFIR-MFE-330J-1 combination. A helium measurement in one JPCA sample was in good agreement with helium calculations.

  19. A study of pump cavitation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-11-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  20. Damage assessment in gastric cancer treatment with adjuvant radiochemotherapy: calculation of the NTCP's from the differential HDV of the organs at risk.

    PubMed

    Wals, Amadeo; Contreras, Jorge; Macías, José; Fortes, Inmaculada; Rivas, Daniel; González, Pedro; Herruzo, Ismael

    2006-04-01

    To calculate the Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities (NTCP) for the liver, right kidney, left kidney and spinal cord, as well as the global Uncomplicated Tumour Control Probability (UTCP) in gastric cancer patients who underwent a treatment with radiotherapy after radical surgery in our environment. In April 2000, a postoperative chemotherapy (QT-RT) protocol started in the province of Malaga for Gastric Adenocarcinomas with postsurgical stage II or higher (pT3-4 and/or pN+). This clinical protocol served as a base for our NTCP and UTCP retrospective theorical study. A virtual simulation and a 3D planning were made in all cases. The differential HDV, selected for each patient were obtained for the 4 organs at risk (OR). Hystograms reduction was made by the Kutcher and Burman's Effective Volume method. NTCP calculations by Lyman's models. The following variables were calculated: maximal dose for each organ (Dmax), Effective Volume (Veff), TD50 (Veff/Vref); NTCP for each organ of the patient; global UTCP for each patient. Differences between the 2 treatment techniques were analysed (2-field versus 4-field technique). For the NTCP calculations the computer application Albireo 1.0(R) was used. 29 patients to assess with an average age of 54 +/- 10 years (range: 38-71); 65.5% men/34.5% women. The technique used was the field technique AP-PA in the 51.7% (15) and with 4 fields in 48.3% (14) of the cases. The global damage is estimated in 16% with a range between 0 and 37%. This goes up to 25% with the 2-field technique, with a wide range between 2 and 48% and it remains reduced to 4%, within a range between 0 and 12% when 4 fields are used. There were significant differences concerning the estimated damage probability (NTCP) on liver, spinal cord and left kidney, depending on the use of two or four fields. NTCP and the global UTCP values of the organs at risk allow to compare a technique net benefit from another in each particular case, although in our theoretical

  1. Calculations of the displacement damage and short-circuit current degradation in proton irradiated (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C. S.; Li, S. S.; Loo, R. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical model for computing the displacement damage defect density and the short-circuit current (I sub sc) degradation in proton-irradiated (AlGa)As-GaAs p-n junction solar cells is presented. Assumptions were made with justification that the radiation induced displacement defects form an effective recombination center which controls the electron and hole lifetimes in the junction space charge region and in the n-GaAs active layer of the irradiated GaAs p-n junction cells. The degradation of I sub sc in the (AlGa)As layer was found to be negligible compared to the total degradation. In order to determine the I sub sc degradation, the displacement defect density, path length, range, reduced energy after penetrating a distance x, and the average number of displacements formed by one proton scattering event were first calculated. The I sub sc degradation was calculated by using the electron capture cross section in the p-diffused layer and the hole capture cross section in the n-base layer as well as the wavelength dependent absorption coefficients. Excellent agreement was found between the researchers calculated values and the measured I sub sc in the proton irradiated GaAs solar cells for proton energies of 100 KeV to 10 MeV and fluences from 10 to the 10th power p/square cm to 10 to the 12th power p/square cm.

  2. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in Monolith Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, this work demonstrates a concept called back-end ignition for lighting-off and pre-heating a catalytic monolith in a power generation system. In this concept, a downstream heat source (e.g. a flame) or resistive heating in the downstream portion of the monolith initiates a localized catalytic reaction which subsequently propagates upstream and heats the entire monolith. The simulations used a transient numerical model of a single catalytic channel which characterizes the behavior of the entire monolith. The model treats both the gas and solid phases and includes detailed homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. An important parameter in the model for back-end ignition is upstream heat conduction along the solid. The simulations used both dry and wet CO chemistry as a model fuel for the proof-of-concept calculations; the presence of water vapor can trigger homogenous reactions, provided that gas-phase temperatures are adequately high and there is sufficient fuel remaining after surface reactions. With sufficiently high inlet equivalence ratio, back-end ignition occurs using the thermophysical properties of both a ceramic and metal monolith (coated with platinum in both cases), with the heat-up times significantly faster for the metal monolith. For lower equivalence ratios, back-end ignition occurs without upstream propagation. Once light-off and propagation occur, the inlet equivalence ratio could be reduced significantly while still maintaining an ignited monolith as demonstrated by calculations using complete monolith heating.

  3. Upstream Structural Management Measures for an Urban Area Flooding in Turkey and their Consequences on Flood Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyurek, Z.; Bozoglu, B.; Girayhan, T.

    2015-12-01

    Flooding has the potential to cause significant impacts to economic activities as well as to disrupt or displace populations. Changing climate regimes such as extreme precipitation events increase flood vulnerability and put additional stresses on infrastructure. In this study the flood modelling in an urbanized area, namely Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is done. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2- dimensional shallow water flow modelling. 1/1000 scaled maps with the buildings for the urbanized area and 1/5000 scaled maps for the rural parts are used to obtain DTM needed in the flood modelling. The bathymetry of the river is obtained from additional surveys. The main river passing through the urbanized area has a capacity of Q5 according to the design discharge obtained by simple ungauged discharge estimation depending on catchment area only. The effects of the available structures like bridges across the river on the flooding are presented. The upstream structural measures are studied on scenario basis. Four sub-catchments of Terme River are considered as contributing the downstream flooding. The existing circumstance of the Terme River states that the meanders of the river have a major effect on the flood situation and lead to approximately 35% reduction in the peak discharge between upstream and downstream of the river. It is observed that if the flow from the upstream catchments can be retarded through a detention pond constructed in at least two of the upstream catchments, estimated Q100 flood can be conveyed by the river without overtopping from the river channel. The operation of the upstream detention ponds and the scenarios to convey Q500 without causing flooding are also presented. Structural management measures to address changes in flood characteristics in water management planning are discussed. Flood risk is obtained by using the flood hazard maps and water depth-damage functions plotted for a variety of building types and occupancies

  4. Estimation of production losses caused by the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and calculation of an economic damage threshold in Togolese coffee plots.

    PubMed

    Wegbe, Komlan; Cilas, Christian; Decazy, Bernard; Alauzet, Claude; Dufour, Bernard

    2003-10-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), which exists in all coffee producing zones, is a major pest. The seriousness of this scolytid was assessed in Togolese plots spread over five agroclimatic zones, by determining the attack rate from a sample of coffee trees. The work was carried out over 2 yr and revealed that weight losses were proportional to the attack rates. The average infestation rates were 5.64% in the first year and 6.36% in the second year, while total production losses amounted to 2.60% and 3.18%, respectively, for the same periods. Generally speaking, attack rates in the plots were low and varied considerably within a given zone. Plantations located on plateau were more severely attacked than those in the plains. A relationship was established between total losses and the cost of insecticide treatment; this relationship was used to calculate an economic damage threshold beyond which control proves to be cost effective.

  5. Shock Excursion Due to Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Upstream Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratkiewicz, Romana E.; Barnes, A.; Molvik, G. A.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind upstream of the termination shock will cause inward and outward motions of the shock. In earlier work, Barnes analyzed such motion by calculating of the response of a planar gasdynamic shock to upstream disturbances. We now generalize this analysis to the case of a spherically symmetric shock. Our procedure is first to solve numerically the set of gasdynamic equations describing the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium to establish a dynamic equilibrium. The next step is to impose upstream fluctuations of the solar wind dynamical pressure on this equilibrium state at an inner boundary, and then to follow the subsequent shock motion.

  6. Leading edge cooling by upstream injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piva, R.

    1971-01-01

    A leading edge cooling system by upstream along the surface was investigated. The purpose of this system is to keep the leading edge below a desired temperature without excessively increasing the radius of the tip and consequently the total pressure losses. An experimental investigation was conducted to find the optimum conditions for the cooling from the point of view of upstream jet penetration and minimum shock losses. A theoretical analysis was performed to study the flow field in the mixing region between the two counterflowing streams and the results obtained compare favorably with the experimental results.

  7. Real-Time Continuous Response Spectra Exceedance Calculation Displayed in a Web-Browser Enables Rapid and Robust Damage Evaluation by First Responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, M.; Skolnik, D. A.; Harvey, D.; Lindquist, K.

    2014-12-01

    A novel and robust approach is presented that provides near real-time earthquake alarms for critical structures at distributed locations and large facilities using real-time estimation of response spectra obtained from near free-field motions. Influential studies dating back to the 1980s identified spectral response acceleration as a key ground motion characteristic that correlates well with observed damage in structures. Thus, monitoring and reporting on exceedance of spectra-based thresholds are useful tools for assessing the potential for damage to facilities or multi-structure campuses based on input ground motions only. With as little as one strong-motion station per site, this scalable approach can provide rapid alarms on the damage status of remote towns, critical infrastructure (e.g., hospitals, schools) and points of interests (e.g., bridges) for a very large number of locations enabling better rapid decision making during critical and difficult immediate post-earthquake response actions. Details on the novel approach are presented along with an example implementation for a large energy company. Real-time calculation of PSA exceedance and alarm dissemination are enabled with Bighorn, an extension module based on the Antelope software package that combines real-time spectral monitoring and alarm capabilities with a robust built-in web display server. Antelope is an environmental data collection software package from Boulder Real Time Technologies (BRTT) typically used for very large seismic networks and real-time seismic data analyses. The primary processing engine produces continuous time-dependent response spectra for incoming acceleration streams. It utilizes expanded floating-point data representations within object ring-buffer packets and waveform files in a relational database. This leads to a very fast method for computing response spectra for a large number of channels. A Python script evaluates these response spectra for exceedance of one or more

  8. Ion distributions upstream of an interplanetary shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajdic, Primoz; Hietala, Heli; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that supercritical collisionless shocks in the interplanetary (IP) space reflect part of the incoming particles (ions, electrons) in order to dissipate the kinetic energy of the upstream solar wind flow. When the conditions are right the reflected particles can escape far upstream from the shock. Their interaction with incoming ions and electrons results in the formation of the foreshock region which is populated by ultra-low frequency magnetic field fluctuations and different populations of reflected ions. Our knowledge on the latter comes mostly from observations of our planet's foreshock. However, the bow shock of the Earth typically has high Mach numbers, and the relatively small global curvature radius of the shock's shape affects the ion distribution characteristics. Interplanetary (IP) shocks, on the other hand, typically have lower Mach numbers and larger global curvature radii. In the past the majority of observed ion distributions detected upstream of IP shocks were diffuse. In only a couple of works the field-aligned ion beams were reported and even then the details of the ion distributions functions could not be determined. Here we present the first study showing clear observations of different types of ion distributions upstream of an interplanetary shock. The shock was observed on 8 October 2013 by several spacecraft, namely Wind, ACE, and the two ARTEMIS spacecraft P1 and P2. By using combined data from the Electrostatic Analyzer and the Solid State Telescope instruments onboard both ARTEMIS spacecraft we observed different types of ion distributions upstream of the shock: The distributions changed from field-aligned ion beams that were detected farthest from the shock, to intermediate and then to almost diffuse ion distributions near the shock transition. Furthermore, the observations at P1 and P2 locations also show spatial variability of the foreshock and the IP shock. The angle between the local shock normal and the upstream

  9. Upstream Design and 1D-CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroyuki

    Recently, engineering design environment of Japan is changing variously. Manufacturing companies are being challenged to design and bring out products that meet the diverse demands of customers and are competitive against those produced by rising countries(1). In order to keep and strengthen the competitiveness of Japanese companies, it is necessary to create new added values as well as conventional ones. It is well known that design at the early stages has a great influence on the final design solution. Therefore, design support tools for the upstream design is necessary for creating new added values. We have established a research society for 1D-CAE (1 Dimensional Computer Aided Engineering)(2), which is a general term for idea, methodology and tools applicable for the upstream design support, and discuss the concept and definition of 1D-CAE. This paper reports our discussion about 1D-CAE.

  10. Upstream waves at Mars: Phobos observations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G. ); Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W. ); Yeroshenko, Ye. )

    1990-05-01

    The region upstream from the Mars subsolar bow shock is surveyed for the presence of MHD wave phenomena using the high temporal resolution data from the MAGMA magnetometer. Strong turbulence is observed when the magnetic field is connected to the Mars bow shock in such a way as to allow diffuse ions to reach the spacecraft. On 2 occasions this turbulence occurred upon crossing the Phobos orbit. Also weak, {minus}0.15 nT, waves are observed at the proton gyro frequency. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized and may be associated with the pick-up of protons from the Mars hydrogen exosphere.

  11. 8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM/SPILLWAY; THE VIEW HIGHLIGHTS THE UPSTREAM APPEARANCE OF THE PIERS SUPPORTING THE MOVABLE STONEY GATES. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  12. Calculation of Tsunami Damage and preparation of Inundation Maps by 2D and 3D numerical modeling in Göcek, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer Sozdinler, C.; Arikawa, T.; Necmioglu, O.; Ozel, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Aegean and its surroundings form the most active part of the Africa-Eurasia collision zone responsible for the high level of seismicity in this region. It constitutes more than 60% of the expected seismicity in Europe up to Mw=8.2 (Moratto et al., 2007; Papazachos, 1990). Shaw and Jackson (2010) argued that the existing system of Hellenic Arc subduction-zone is capable of allowing very large but rare earthquakes on splay faults, such as the one occurred in 365, together with the contribution of small earthquakes. Based on an extensive earthquake generated tsunami scenario database, Necmioğlu and Özel (2015) showed that maximum wave heights in the Eastern Mediterranean for shallow earthquakes defined is >3 m in locations in, around and orthogonal to the Hellenic Arc. Considering the seismicity and the tsunami potential in Eastern Mediterranean, the investigation and monitoring of earthquake and tsunami hazard, and the preparation of mitigation strategies and national resilience plans would become inevitable in Turkey. Gocek town, as one of the Tsunami Forecast Points having a unique geography with many small bays and islands and a very popular touristic destination especially for yachtsmen, is selected in this study for the tsunami modeling by using high resolution bathymetric and topographic data with less than 4m grid size. The tsunami analyses are performed by the numerical codes NAMIDANCE (NAMIDANCE,2011) for 2D modeling and STOC-CADMAS (Arikawa,2014) for 3D modeling for the calculations of tsunami hydrodynamic parameters. Froude numbers, as one of the most important indicators for tsunami damage (Ozer, 2012) and the directions of current velocities inside marinas are solved by NAMIDANCE while STOC-CADMAS determines the tsunami pressure and force exerted onto the sea and land structures with 3D and non-hydrostatic approaches. The results are then used to determine the tsunami inundation and structural resilience and establish the tsunami preparedness and

  13. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  14. Upstream and Downstream Influence in STBLI Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Pino; Priebe, Stephan; Helm, Clara

    2016-11-01

    Priebe and Martín (JFM, 2012) show that the low-frequency unsteadiness in shockwave and turbulent boundary layer interactions (STBLI) is governed by an inviscid instability. Priebe, Tu, Martín and Rowley (JFM, 2016) show that the instability is an inviscid centrifugal one, i.e Görtlerlike vortices. Previous works had given differing conclusions as to whether the low-frequency unsteadiness in STBLI is caused by an upstream or downstream mechanism. In this paper, we reconcile these opposite views and show that upstream and downstream correlations co-exist in the context of the nature of Görtler vortices. We find that the instability is similar to that in separated subsonic and laminar flows. Since the turbulence is modulated but passive to the global mode, the turbulent separated flows are amenable to linear global analysis. As such, the characteristic length and time scales, and the receptivity of the global mode might be determined, and low-order models that represent the low-frequency dynamics in STBLI might be developed. The centrifugal instability persists even under hypersonic conditions. This work is funded by the AFOSR Grant Number AF9550-15-1-0284 with Dr. Ivett Leyva.

  15. Whistler mode waves upstream of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Gurnett, D. A.; Halekas, J. S.; Yates, J. N.; Kurth, W. S.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2017-01-01

    Whistler mode waves are generated within and can propagate upstream of collisionless shocks. They are known to play a role in electron thermodynamics/acceleration and, under certain conditions, are markedly observed as wave trains preceding the shock ramp. In this paper, we take advantage of Cassini's presence at 10 AU to explore the importance of whistler mode waves in a parameter regime typically characterized by higher Mach number (median of 14) shocks, as well as a significantly different interplanetary magnetic field structure, compared to near Earth. We identify electromagnetic precursors preceding a small subset of bow shock crossings with properties which are consistent with whistler mode waves. We find these monochromatic, low-frequency, and circularly polarized waves to have a typical frequency range of 0.2-0.4 Hz in the spacecraft frame. This is due to the lower ion and electron cyclotron frequencies near Saturn, between which whistler waves can develop. The waves are also observed as predominantly right handed in the spacecraft frame, the opposite sense to what is typically observed near Earth. This is attributed to the weaker Doppler shift, owing to the large angle between the solar wind velocity and magnetic field vectors at 10 AU. Our results on the low occurrence of whistler waves upstream of Saturn also underpin the predominantly supercritical bow shock of Saturn.

  16. Solar wind flow upstream of the coronal slow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1986-01-01

    Slow shocks have been predicted to exist embedded in large coronal holes at low altitude. Two or more curved slow shocks may link together to form a composite discontinuity surface around the sun which may be called the coronal slow shock (CSS). Here a solar-wind model is studied under the assumption that a standing CSS exists and cororates with the sun at a constant angular velocity. A steady, axisymmetrical one-fluid model is introduced to study the expansion of solar wind in the open-field region upstream of the CSS. The model requires that the conditions downstream of the CSS near the equatorial plane can produce a solar wind agreeable with the observations made near the earth's orbit. The paper presents an illustrative calculation in which the polar caps within 60 deg of the polar angle are assumed to be the source region of the solar wind.

  17. Moving stormwater P management upstream (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. A.; Hobbie, S. E.; Finlay, J. C.; Kalinosky, P.; Janke, B.

    2013-12-01

    Reducing stormwater phosphorus loading using current approaches, which focus on treatment at the end of the pipe, is unlikely to reduce P loads enough to restore nutrient-impaired urban lakes. An indication of this is that of the nearly 150 nutrient impaired lakes in the Twin Cities region, only one has been restored. We hypothesize that substantial reduction of eutrophication will require reductions of P inputs upstream from storm drains. Developing source reduction strategies will required a shift in thinking about system boundaries, moving upstream from the storm drain to the curb, and from the curb to the watershed. Our Prior Lake Street Sweeping Project, a 2-year study of enhanced street sweeping, will be used to illustrate the idea of moving the system boundary to the curb. This study showed that P load recovery from sweeping increases with both sweeping frequency and overhead tree canopy cover. For high canopy streets, coarse organic material (tree leaves; seed pods, etc.) comprised 42% of swept material. We estimate that P inputs from trees may be half of measured storm P yields in 8 urban catchments in St. Paul, MN. Moreover, the cost of removing P during autumn was often < 100/pound P, compared with > 1000/lb P for stormwater ponds. We can also move further upstream, to the watershed boundary. P inputs to urban watersheds that enter lawns include lawn fertilizer, polyphosphates added to water supplies (and hence to lawns via irrigation), and pet food (transformed to pet waste). Minnesota enacted a lawn P fertilizer restriction in 2003, but early reductions in stormwater P loads were modest, probably reflecting reduction in direct wash-off of applied fertilizer. Because urban soils are enriched in P, growing turf has continued to extract available soil P. When turf is mowed, cut grass decomposes, generating P in runoff. As soil P becomes depleted, P concentrations in lawn runoff will gradually decline. Preliminary modeling suggests that substantial

  18. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  19. Biotic integrity of the Boise River upstream and downstream from two municipal wastewater treatment facilities, Boise, Idaho, 1995-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, William H.

    1999-01-01

    Aquatic biological communities were used to assess the biotic integrity of the Boise River upstream and downstream from the Lander Street and West Boise municipal wastewater treatment facilities (WTFs) in Boise, Idaho. Samples of epilithic periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected in late February and early March 1995, in late October 1996, and in early December 1996. Epilithic periphyton biomass, expressed as chlorophyll-a and ash-free dry weight, declined substantially between 1995 and 1996. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were higher at sites downstream from WTFs in both years, but differences in concentrations between sites upstream and downstream from WTFs were not statistically significant. High withinsite variance suggests that greater sampling intensity would improve statistical comparison. Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) scores calculated for benthic macroinvertebrates were higher for the sites upstream from WTFs in 1995 and were the same for all sites in 1996. Similarly, IBI scores calculated for fish were higher for the sites upstream from WTFs in 1995, were higher for the site upstream from the Lander Street WTF in 1996, and were the same for sites upstream and downstream from the West Boise WTF in 1996. Two species of sculpin (Cottus) were abundant at the site upstream from both WTFs but were absent at all other sites downstream from WTFs in 1995 and composed only 2 percent of the total number of fish collected downstream from the Lander Street WTF in 1996.

  20. Water stress in global transboundary river basins: significance of upstream water use on downstream stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka, M.; Wada, Y.; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analysed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world’s transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. We found that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  1. Water Stress in Global Transboundary River Basins: Significance of Upstream Water Use on Downstream Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka,M.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analyzed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world's transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. Wefound that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  2. Water Stress in Global Transboundary River Basins: Significance of Upstream Water Use on Downstream Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka,M.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analyzed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world's transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. Wefound that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  3. Impact damage of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Hsi-Young T.; Springer, George S.

    1986-01-01

    A model is described for estimating the impact damage of fiber reinforced composite plates. The displacements and stresses are calculated by a three dimensional transient, finite element method of solution of the governing equations applicable to a linearly elastic body. The region in which damage occurs is estimated using the Tsai-Wu failure criterion. A computer code was developed which can be used to calculate the impact force, displacements and velocities of the plate and the impact body, stresses and strains in the plate, and the damage area. Sample numerical results are presented illustrating the type of information provided by the code. Comparisons between measured and calculated damage areas are also given.

  4. Developmental Origins, Epigenetics, and Equity: Moving Upstream.

    PubMed

    Wallack, Lawrence; Thornburg, Kent

    2016-05-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease and the related science of epigenetics redefines the meaning of what constitutes upstream approaches to significant social and public health problems. An increasingly frequent concept being expressed is "When it comes to your health, your zip code may be more important than your genetic code". Epigenetics explains how the environment-our zip code-literally gets under our skin, creates biological changes that increase our vulnerability for disease, and even children's prospects for social success, over their life course and into future generations. This science requires us to rethink where disease comes from and the best way to promote health. It identifies the most fundamental social equity issue in our society: that initial social and biological disadvantage, established even prior to birth, and linked to the social experience of prior generations, is made worse by adverse environments throughout the life course. But at the same time, it provides hope because it tells us that a concerted focus on using public policy to improve our social, physical, and economic environments can ultimately change our biology and the trajectory of health and social success into future generations.

  5. Whistler-mode Waves Upstream of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Halekas, J. S.; Yates, J. N.; Kurth, W. S.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Whistler-mode waves are generated within and can propagate upstream of collisionless shocks. They play a role in the dissipation process and, under certain conditions, are markedly observed as wave trains preceding the shock ramp. In this letter, we take advantage of Cassini's presence at 10 AU to explore the importance of whistler-mode waves in a new parameter regime typically characterized by higher Mach number shocks compared to near Earth. We identify electromagnetic precursors preceding a small subset of crossings with properties which are consistent with whistler-mode waves. We find these monochromatic, low-frequency, circularly-polarized waves to have a typical frequency range of 0.2 - 0.4 Hz in the spacecraft frame. The waves are observed as predominantly right-handed in the spacecraft frame, the opposite sense to what is typically observed near Earth. Our results suggest that whistlers in this parameter regime are more likely to be associated with electron acceleration than their thermal heating.

  6. 3. Credit JTL Long distance view looking upstream towards New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Credit JTL Long distance view looking upstream towards New Hampshire; commercial structures in foreground. - Bellows Falls Arch Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River, North Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  7. A Monte Carlo simulation code for calculating damage and particle transport in solids: The case for electron-bombarded solids for electron energies up to 900 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiang; Shao, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Current popular Monte Carlo simulation codes for simulating electron bombardment in solids focus primarily on electron trajectories, instead of electron-induced displacements. Here we report a Monte Carol simulation code, DEEPER (damage creation and particle transport in matter), developed for calculating 3-D distributions of displacements produced by electrons of incident energies up to 900 MeV. Electron elastic scattering is calculated by using full-Mott cross sections for high accuracy, and primary-knock-on-atoms (PKAs)-induced damage cascades are modeled using ZBL potential. We compare and show large differences in 3-D distributions of displacements and electrons in electron-irradiated Fe. The distributions of total displacements are similar to that of PKAs at low electron energies. But they are substantially different for higher energy electrons due to the shifting of PKA energy spectra towards higher energies. The study is important to evaluate electron-induced radiation damage, for the applications using high flux electron beams to intentionally introduce defects and using an electron analysis beam for microstructural characterization of nuclear materials.

  8. Phytoplankton Temperature Adaptation: Upstream or Local Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, E.; Hellweger, F. L.; Calfee, B. C.; Chandler, J. W.; Zinser, E. R.; Fredrick, N. D.

    2016-02-01

    Biogeography studies that aim to understand the role of environmental variables are typically based on local conditions. However, in cases with substantial translocation, like for planktonic organisms carried by ocean currents, selection may happen upstream and the local environmental factors may not be representative of those that shaped the local population. Here we use an agent-based model of microbes in the global surface ocean to explore this effect for temperature. We simulate up to 25 million individual cells belonging to up to 50 species with different temperature optima. Microbes are moved around the globe based on a hydrodynamic model, and grow and die based on local temperature. The optimum temperature at each location and time is defined as the optimum temperature of the most abundant species. This allows us to quantify the role of currents using the "advective temperature differential" metric, which is the optimum temperature of the model with advection minus that from the model without advection. Our results suggest that the differential depends on the location and growth rate. Poleward-flowing currents, like the Gulf Stream, generally experience cooling and the differential is positive. For slow-growing microbes like heterotrophic bacteria, the differential can be up to 4 °C in these areas. In other words, ignoring currents introduces an error of up to 4 °C in a biogeographic analysis. We compare our model to observations of optimum growth temperature for phytoplankton. Accounting for the effect of currents leads to a slightly better agreement with observations, but there is large variability in the observations and the improvement is not statistically significant. Image Description: Advective temperature differential (DTopt) across the global ocean, defined as the difference between optimum temperatures from simulation with and without advective transport. Population average growth rate = 0.14/d.

  9. Iteration SSII cancellation in DD-OFDM PON upstream scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Cheng; Liu, Na; Chen, Xue

    2016-04-01

    Iteration interference cancellation algorithm is proposed in direct detection OFDM PON upstream scheme to mitigate subcarrier to subcarrier intermixing interference (SSII) caused by dispersion and square-law photo-detection. The receiver sensitivity is improved by 1 dB in 20-Gbps, 16-QAM OFDM PON upstream experiment after 100-km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) transmission.

  10. Scalable, massively parallel approaches to upstream drainage area computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, A.; Hill, C. N.; Perron, T.

    2011-12-01

    Accumulated drainage area maps of large regions are required for several applications. Among these are assessments of regional patterns of flow and sediment routing, high-resolution landscape evolution models in which drainage basin geometry evolves with time, and surveys of the characteristics of river basins that drain to continental margins. The computation of accumulated drainage areas is accomplished by inferring the vector field of drainage flow directions from a two-dimensional digital elevation map, and then computing the area that drains to each tile. From this map of elevations we can compute the integrated, upstream area that drains to each tile of the map. Generally this last step is done with a recursive algorithm, that accumulates upstream areas sequentially. The inherently serial nature of this restricts the number of tiles that can be included, thereby limiting the resolution of continental-size domains. This is because of the requirements of both memory, which will rise proportionally to the number of tiles, N, and computing time, which is O(N2). The fundamental sequential property of this approach prohibits effective use of large scale parallelism. An alternate method of calculating accumulated drainage area from drainage direction data can be arrived at by reformulating the problem as the solution of a system of simultaneous linear equations. The equations define the relation that the total upslope area of a particular tile is the sum of all the upslope areas for tiles immediately adjacent to that tile that drain to it, and the tile's own area. Solving these equations amounts to finding the solution of a sparse, nine-diagonal matrix operating on a vector for a right-hand-side that is simply the individual tile areas and where the diagonals of the matrix are determined by the landscape geometry. We show how an iterative method, Bi-CGSTAB, can be used to solve this problem in a scalable, massively parallel manner. However, this introduces

  11. 4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  12. DOG HOUSE AT UPSTREAM LOCK GATE. ALSO SEEN AT LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOG HOUSE AT UPSTREAM LOCK GATE. ALSO SEEN AT LEFT IN PHOTO NO. IL-164-A-23. - Illinois Waterway, La Grange Lock and Dam, 3/4 mile south of Country 795N at Illinois River, Versailles, Brown County, IL

  13. UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND GEARING FOR CONTROLLING LOCK GATE. LOOKING WEST SOUTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Brandon Road Lock and Dam , 1100 Brandon Road, Joliet, Will County, IL

  14. 4. HANDRAIL AND TIMBER SIDEWALK ON NORTH (UPSTREAM) SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. HANDRAIL AND TIMBER SIDEWALK ON NORTH (UPSTREAM) SIDE OF EAST SPAN (AT MIDSPAN) - Catawissa Bridge, Spanning north branch of Susquehanna River, 3.5 miles south of Bloomsburg, Catawissa, Columbia County, PA

  15. 65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT COMPANY'S NEISSON CREEK SAWMILL. Print No. 177, November 1903 - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  16. 18. VIEW OF SETTLING BASIN FROM UPSTREAM TRESTLE, SHOWING BULKHEAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF SETTLING BASIN FROM UPSTREAM TRESTLE, SHOWING BULKHEAD ON RIGHT AND SAND BANK ON LEFT, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  17. 1. Site of Mormon Flat Dam looking upstream. Photographer unknown, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Site of Mormon Flat Dam looking upstream. Photographer unknown, 1923. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 2. General view of Mormon Flat looking upstream. Construction activity ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. General view of Mormon Flat looking upstream. Construction activity is visible at center right. Photographer unknown, September 30, 1923. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 5. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST, LOOKING UPSTREAM (NORTHWEST), ACROSS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST, LOOKING UPSTREAM (NORTHWEST), ACROSS THE ROADWAY OF BRIDGE 808 - Wagamon Pond Dam & Bridge, Spanning Broadkill River at State Road No. 197 (Mulberry Street), Milton, Sussex County, DE

  20. 14. VIEW NORTHEASTWARD OF THE UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW NORTHEASTWARD OF THE UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF THE PENSTOCK (HEADRACE) BRIDGE - Wagamon Pond Dam & Bridge, Spanning Broadkill River at State Road No. 197 (Mulberry Street), Milton, Sussex County, DE

  1. 6. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM/SPILLWAY; FOLIAGE IN FOREGROUND IS ON WASHINGTON SHORELINE. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  2. 10. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM/SPILLWAY; ELECTRICALLY-OPERATED GATE MECHANISMS ARE ON RIGHT; GANTRY CRANES ARE VISIBLE IN CENTER/LEFT. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  3. 10. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP), WORM GEAR SHAFTS (CENTER) AND SLIDE GATES (BOTTOM). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  4. 11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM CATWALK, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP) AND GEAR SHAFTS (BOTTOM). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  5. 6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL (LEFT) AND ENTRANCE TO DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL HEADWORKS (ALSO LEFT). VIEW TO WEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  6. 6. VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA, SHOWING CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA, SHOWING CONCRETE BEING PLACED. PENSTOCK OPENINGS ARE VISIBLE AT CENTER LEFT. August 24, 1926 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. 14. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of truss, showing connection of upper chord, laced vertical compression member, strut, counters, and laterals. - Dry Creek Bridge, Spanning Dry Creek at Cook Road, Ione, Amador County, CA

  8. 5. Contextual oblique view to northwest showing upstream (east) side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Contextual oblique view to northwest showing upstream (east) side of bridge in setting, with Jacob Meyer Park at right. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  9. View of upstream face of Lake Sabrina Dam showing the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Lake Sabrina Dam showing the redwood planks and base of dam from Lake Sabrina Basin, view north - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  10. View of upstream face of Lake Sabrina Dam showing redwood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Lake Sabrina Dam showing redwood planks and boulders in Lake Sabrina Basin, view north - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  11. View of Lake Sabrina Dam upstream face from ridge showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam upstream face from ridge showing spillway at lower right of photo, view southwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  12. 75. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: UPSTREAM ELEVATION, SHEET 2; OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  14. 5. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING HANDPLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING HAND-PLACED ROCK RIPRAP AND MASONRY PARAPET WALL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  15. 25. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LOWER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING HANDPLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LOWER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING HANDPLACED ROCK RIPRAP AND MASONRY PARAPET WALL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  16. 7. Chandler Falls, looking upstream (from north). Golf tee of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Chandler Falls, looking upstream (from north). Golf tee of the Mesa Country Club on right. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. DETAIL ELEVATION OF UPSTREAM PARAPET. NOTE THE CLOSED SPANDRELS WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL ELEVATION OF UPSTREAM PARAPET. NOTE THE CLOSED SPANDRELS WHERE THE BEAM BEARINGS CONTACT THE SLENDER CONCRETE PIERS. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Waikele Canal Bridge and Highway Overpass, Farrington Highway and Waikele Stream, Waipahu, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 29. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM UPSTREAM LOOKING DOWNSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND ENVIRONS, LOCATED UPSTREAM FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND ENVIRONS, LOCATED UPSTREAM FROM BOATHOUSE, DAM, AND ELECTRIC POWER GENERATING MILL RUINS - Ricks Estate, Stone Bridge, Ricks Pond, Ricks Road, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  20. 7. DETAIL CENTRAL PIER (SKEWBACK) WITH BREAKWATER, UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL CENTRAL PIER (SKEWBACK) WITH BREAKWATER, UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDE. NOTE FRACTURES ALONG BARREL ARCH EXTRADOS. - Roaring Creek Bridge, State Road 2005 spanning Roaring Creek in Locust Township, Slabtown, Columbia County, PA

  1. 41. Upstream end of emergency spillway excavation. Photographer unknown, 1929. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Upstream end of emergency spillway excavation. Photographer unknown, 1929. Source: Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR). - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. Unit 6, upstream from Hickory Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 6, upstream from Hickory Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  3. Unit 3, upstream from footbridge Johnstown Local Flood Protection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 3, upstream from footbridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  4. Unit 5, upstream toward incline bridge Johnstown Local Flood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 5, upstream toward incline bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  5. Unit 4, upstream from Johns Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 4, upstream from Johns Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  6. 3. AN IMAGE LOOKING SOUTH, TOWARD THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AN IMAGE LOOKING SOUTH, TOWARD THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF THE CENTRAL PIER AND SHOWING THE SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AND ERODED STARLING. - Cement Plant Road Bridge, Spanning Leatherwood Creek on County Road 50 South, Bedford, Lawrence County, IN

  7. OVERALL VIEW OF CASCADE CANAL COMPANY CRIB DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF CASCADE CANAL COMPANY CRIB DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM DIRECTION OF KACHESS DAM. VIEW TO NORTH - Kachess Dam, 1904 Cascade Canal Company Crib Dam, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  8. 27. UPSTREAM FACE AND PARAPET WITH LAMP STANDARDS, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. UPSTREAM FACE AND PARAPET WITH LAMP STANDARDS, LOOKING EAST ALONG LENGTH OF DAM (Control House on crest of dam in background) - Tieton Dam, South & East of State Highway 12, Naches, Yakima County, WA

  9. 4. SPILLWAY DRUM GATES AND CHANNEL, LOOKING NORTHEAST (upstream face ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SPILLWAY DRUM GATES AND CHANNEL, LOOKING NORTHEAST (upstream face and Control House in background) - Tieton Dam, Spillway & Drum Gates, South & East side of State Highway 12, Naches, Yakima County, WA

  10. 8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE COFFERDAM NEAR STATION (September 1936) - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 13, Upper Mississippi River, Fulton, Whiteside County, IL

  11. 1. View from the northeast, looking upstream (southwest) toward bridge's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View from the northeast, looking upstream (southwest) toward bridge's northeast elevation - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  12. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWWATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOW-WATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ROCKS BRIDGE AND ST. LOUIS WATER DEPARTMENT INTAKE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  13. 2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. NOTE BANK REINFORCEMENT ON LEFT AND SPILLWAY ON RIGHT. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  14. 23. Upstream view of buttress and arch form work and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Upstream view of buttress and arch form work and construction. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 30. Upstream face of construction effort. Photographer unknown, January 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Upstream face of construction effort. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: Fritz Seifritz. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 50. Upstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing sluice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Upstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing sluice opening. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 56. Upstream face of diversion dam looking east. Headgates are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Upstream face of diversion dam looking east. Headgates are partially visible at far left. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 19. Upstream face of arches and buttresses at west end. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Upstream face of arches and buttresses at west end. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 10. UPSTREAM SIDE OF UPPER MITER GATES SHOWING STOWED LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. UPSTREAM SIDE OF UPPER MITER GATES SHOWING STOWED LEFT WING OF UPPER GUARD GATE (FAR LEFT). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  20. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM; SPILLWAY IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM; SPILLWAY IN FOREGROUND, LOCK IN BACKGROUND ON NORTH RIVER BANK. VIEW TO NORTH. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  1. 15. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION WITH TAINTER GATE SECTION OF SPILLWAY TO THE LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  2. 3. VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, SHOWING OUTLET GATE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, SHOWING OUTLET GATE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Island Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.8 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  3. 5. DETAIL OF PENSTOCK OPENINGS AND HEADGATE DECK FROM UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF PENSTOCK OPENINGS AND HEADGATE DECK FROM UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE, WITH SOUTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-E) COREWALL AT RIGHT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Powerhouse, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  4. 5. UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW OF SPILLWAY, WITH COOKE DAM POND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW OF SPILLWAY, WITH COOKE DAM POND IN FOREGROUND AND NORTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-A) AT LEFT. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Spillway, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  5. 6. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF SPILLWAY SHOWING WALKWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF SPILLWAY SHOWING WALKWAY AND CONCRETE SPILLWAY PIERS. VIEW TO NORTH. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Spillway, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  6. 2. VIEW OF MAIN STORAGE RESERVOIR, SHOWING UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF MAIN STORAGE RESERVOIR, SHOWING UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND DISCHARGE GATE (LEFT), LOOKING SOUTHWEST (October 1991) - Bonanza Hydraulic Mining Site, Main Storage Reservoir, Swamp Gulch, Salmon, Lemhi County, ID

  7. 22. DETAIL, WEST ABUTMENT AND SHOE, WEST ARCH, UPSTREAM SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL, WEST ABUTMENT AND SHOE, WEST ARCH, UPSTREAM SIDE File photo, Caltrans Office of Structures Maintenance, August, 1953. Photographer unknown. Photocopy of photograph. - San Roque Canyon Bridge, State Highway 192, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. 6. View south. North elevation upstream face of east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View south. North elevation - upstream face of east pier; details of pier bearing and cantilevered link space hinge (center right). - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  9. 1. Credit JTL General view looking upstream and towards New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Credit JTL General view looking upstream and towards New Hampshire, unidentified 'crazy man' perched on top of arch. - Bellows Falls Arch Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River, North Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  10. 3. General view of upstream face, looking northwest. Spillway is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of upstream face, looking northwest. Spillway is at the far end of the dam. The Antelope Valley is visible in center background. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a cloudless sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  12. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast from the Pumping Plant. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  13. 7. Detail view of reinforced concrete archrings comprising dam's upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view of reinforced concrete arch-rings comprising dam's upstream face. Impressions of the wooden formwork used in construction are visible in the concrete. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  15. 23. UPSTREAM DETAIL OF PIER NO. 2 AND THROUGH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. UPSTREAM DETAIL OF PIER NO. 2 AND THROUGH AND DECK TRUSS END PANELS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  16. 5. A VIEW LOOKING WEST, TOWARD THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. A VIEW LOOKING WEST, TOWARD THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF THE PIER, SHOWING THE DETERIORATED SHEARWATER EDGE, THE NORTHEAST ABUTMENT AND WING WALL. - Cement Plant Road Bridge, Spanning Leatherwood Creek on County Road 50 South, Bedford, Lawrence County, IN

  17. Emergence of Upstream Swimming via a Hydrodynamic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-kuan; Ardon, Florencia; Roy, Anubhab; Koch, Donald L.; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that upstream swimming of sperm emerges via an orientation disorder-order transition. The order parameter, the average orientation of the sperm head against the flow, follows a 0.5 power law with the deviation from the critical flow shear rate (γ -γc ). This transition is successfully explained by a hydrodynamic bifurcation theory, which extends the sperm upstream swimming to a broad class of near surface microswimmers that possess front-back asymmetry and circular motion.

  18. Emergence of upstream swimming via a hydrodynamic transition.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Ardon, Florencia; Roy, Anubhab; Koch, Donald L; Suarez, Susan S; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-13

    We demonstrate that upstream swimming of sperm emerges via an orientation disorder-order transition. The order parameter, the average orientation of the sperm head against the flow, follows a 0.5 power law with the deviation from the critical flow shear rate (γ-γ_{c}). This transition is successfully explained by a hydrodynamic bifurcation theory, which extends the sperm upstream swimming to a broad class of near surface microswimmers that possess front-back asymmetry and circular motion.

  19. An analysis of pump cavitation damage. [Space Shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  20. A study of pump cavitation damage. [space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  1. Microdosimetry of DNA conformations: relation between direct effect of (60)Co gamma rays and topology of DNA geometrical models in the calculation of A-, B- and Z-DNA radiation-induced damage yields.

    PubMed

    Semsarha, Farid; Raisali, Gholamreza; Goliaei, Bahram; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    In order to obtain the energy deposition pattern of ionizing radiation in the nanometric scale of genetic material and to investigate the different sensitivities of the DNA conformations, direct effects of (60)Co gamma rays on the three A, B and Z conformations of DNA have been studied. For this purpose, single-strand breaks (SSB), double-strand breaks (DSB), base damage (BD), hit probabilities and three microdosimetry quantities (imparted energy, mean chord length and lineal energy) in the mentioned DNA conformations have been calculated and compared by using GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (Geant4) toolkit. The results show that A-, B- and Z-DNA conformations have the highest yields of DSB (1.2 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)), SSB (25.2 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)) and BD (4.81 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)), respectively. Based on the investigation of direct effects of radiation, it can be concluded that the DSB yield is largely correlated to the topological characteristics of DNA models, although the SSB yield is not. Moreover, according to the comparative results of the present study, a reliable candidate parameter for describing the relationship between DNA damage yields and geometry of DNA models in the theoretical radiation biology research studies would be the mean chord length (4 V/S) of the models.

  2. Barriers impede upstream spawning migration of flathead chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, David M.; Zuellig, Robert E.; Crockett, Harry J.; Bruce, James F.; Lukacs, Paul M.; Fitzpatrick, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Many native cyprinids are declining throughout the North American Great Plains. Some of these species require long reaches of contiguous, flowing riverine habitat for drifting eggs or larvae to develop, and their declining populations have been attributed to habitat fragmentation or barriers (e.g., dams, dewatered channels, and reservoirs) that restrict fish movement. Upstream dispersal is also needed to maintain populations of species with passively drifting eggs or larvae, and prior researchers have suggested that these fishes migrate upstream to spawn. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a mark–recapture study of Flathead Chub Platygobio gracilis within a 91-km reach of continuous riverine habitat in Fountain Creek, Colorado. We measured CPUE, spawning readiness (percent of Flathead Chub expressing milt), and fish movement relative to a channel-spanning dam. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Flathead Chub migrate upstream to spawn during summer. The CPUE was much higher at the base of the dam than at downstream sites; the seasonal increases in CPUE at the dam closely tracked seasonal increases in spawning readiness, and marked fish moved upstream as far as 33 km during the spawning run. The upstream migration was effectively blocked by the dam. The CPUE of Flathead Chub was much lower upstream of the OHDD than at downstream sites, and <0.2% of fish marked at the dam were recaptured upstream. This study provides the first direct evidence of spawning migration for Flathead Chub and supports the general hypothesis that barriers limit adult dispersal of these and other plains fishes.

  3. Developing building-damage scales for lahars: application to Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Susanna F.; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Price, Rebecca; Feloy, Kate; Baxter, Peter J.; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; de Bélizal, Edouard

    2015-09-01

    Lahar damage to buildings can include burial by sediment and/or failure of walls, infiltration into the building and subsequent damage to contents. The extent to which a building is damaged will be dictated by the dynamic characteristics of the lahar, i.e. the velocity, depth, sediment concentration and grain size, as well as the structural characteristics and setting of the building in question. The focus of this paper is on quantifying how buildings may respond to impact by lahar. We consider the potential for lahar damage to buildings on Merapi volcano, Indonesia, as a result of the voluminous deposits produced during the large (VEI 4) eruption in 2010. A building-damage scale has been developed that categorises likely lahar damage levels and, through theoretical calculations of expected building resistance to impact, approximate ranges of impact pressures. We found that most weak masonry buildings on Merapi would be destroyed by dilute lahars with relatively low velocities (ca. 3 m/s) and pressures (ca. 5 kPa); however, the majority of stronger rubble stone buildings may be expected to withstand higher velocities (to 6 m/s) and pressures (to 20 kPa). We applied this preliminary damage scale to a large lahar in the Putih River on 9 January 2011, which inundated and caused extensive building damage in the village of Gempol, 16 km southwest of Merapi. The scale was applied remotely through the use of public satellite images and through field studies to categorise damage and estimate impact pressures and velocities within the village. Results were compared with those calculated independently from Manning's calculations for flow velocity and depth within Gempol village using an estimate of flow velocity at one upstream site as input. The results of this calculation showed reasonable agreement with an average channel velocity derived from travel time observations. The calculated distribution of flow velocities across the area of damaged buildings was consistent with

  4. Participation costs can suppress the evolution of upstream reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Peña, Jorge; Pestelacci, Enea; Berchtold, André; Tomassini, Marco

    2011-03-21

    Indirect reciprocity, one of the many mechanisms proposed to explain the evolution of cooperation, is the idea that altruistic actions can be rewarded by third parties. Upstream or generalized reciprocity is one type of indirect reciprocity in which individuals help someone if they have been helped by somebody else in the past. Although empirically found to be at work in humans, the evolution of upstream reciprocity is difficult to explain from a theoretical point of view. A recent model of upstream reciprocity, first proposed by Nowak and Roch (2007) and further analyzed by Iwagami and Masuda (2010), shows that while upstream reciprocity alone does not lead to the evolution of cooperation, it can act in tandem with mechanisms such as network reciprocity and increase the total level of cooperativity in the population. We argue, however, that Nowak and Roch's model systematically leads to non-uniform interaction rates, where more cooperative individuals take part in more games than less cooperative ones. As a result, the critical benefit-to-cost ratios derived under this model in previous studies are not invariant with respect to the addition of participation costs. We show that accounting for these costs can hinder and even suppress the evolution of upstream reciprocity, both for populations with non-random encounters and graph-structured populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clustering in Large Networks Does Not Promote Upstream Reciprocity

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Upstream reciprocity (also called generalized reciprocity) is a putative mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations with which players help others when they are helped by somebody else. It is a type of indirect reciprocity. Although upstream reciprocity is often observed in experiments, most theories suggest that it is operative only when players form short cycles such as triangles, implying a small population size, or when it is combined with other mechanisms that promote cooperation on their own. An expectation is that real social networks, which are known to be full of triangles and other short cycles, may accommodate upstream reciprocity. In this study, I extend the upstream reciprocity game proposed for a directed cycle by Boyd and Richerson to the case of general networks. The model is not evolutionary and concerns the conditions under which the unanimity of cooperative players is a Nash equilibrium. I show that an abundance of triangles or other short cycles in a network does little to promote upstream reciprocity. Cooperation is less likely for a larger population size even if triangles are abundant in the network. In addition, in contrast to the results for evolutionary social dilemma games on networks, scale-free networks lead to less cooperation than networks with a homogeneous degree distribution. PMID:21998641

  6. Clustering in large networks does not promote upstream reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Upstream reciprocity (also called generalized reciprocity) is a putative mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations with which players help others when they are helped by somebody else. It is a type of indirect reciprocity. Although upstream reciprocity is often observed in experiments, most theories suggest that it is operative only when players form short cycles such as triangles, implying a small population size, or when it is combined with other mechanisms that promote cooperation on their own. An expectation is that real social networks, which are known to be full of triangles and other short cycles, may accommodate upstream reciprocity. In this study, I extend the upstream reciprocity game proposed for a directed cycle by Boyd and Richerson to the case of general networks. The model is not evolutionary and concerns the conditions under which the unanimity of cooperative players is a Nash equilibrium. I show that an abundance of triangles or other short cycles in a network does little to promote upstream reciprocity. Cooperation is less likely for a larger population size even if triangles are abundant in the network. In addition, in contrast to the results for evolutionary social dilemma games on networks, scale-free networks lead to less cooperation than networks with a homogeneous degree distribution.

  7. Human Resource Local Content in Ghana's Upstream Petroleum Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benin, Papa

    Enactment of Ghana's Petroleum (Local Content and Local Participation) Regulations, 2013 (L.I. 2204) was intended to regulate the percentage of local products, personnel, financing, and goods and services rendered within Ghana's upstream petroleum industry value chain. Five years after the inception of Ghana's upstream oil and gas industry, a gap is evident between the requirements of L.I. 2204 and professional practice. Drawing on Lewin's change theory, a cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the extent of differences between the prevailing human resource local content and the requirements of L.I. 2204 in Ghana's upstream petroleum industry. The extent to which training acquired by indigenous Ghanaians seeking jobs in Ghana's oil fields affects the prevalent local content in its upstream petroleum industry was also examined. Survey data were collected from 97 management, technical, and other staff in 2 multinational petroleum companies whose oil and gas development plans have been approved by the Petroleum Commission of Ghana. To answer the research questions and test their hypotheses, one-way ANOVA was performed with staff category (management, technical, and other) as the independent variable and prevalent local content as the dependent variable. Results indicated that prevailing local content in Ghana's upstream petroleum industry meets the requirements of L.I. 2204. Further, training acquired by indigenous Ghanaians seeking jobs in Ghana's oil fields affects the prevalent local content in its offshore petroleum industry. Findings may encourage leaders within multinational oil companies and the Petroleum Commission of Ghana to organize educational seminars that equip indigenous Ghanaians with specialized skills for working in Ghana's upstream petroleum industry.

  8. Transition duct with divided upstream and downstream portions

    DOEpatents

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Maldonado, Jaime Javier; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Flanagan, James Scott

    2015-07-14

    Turbine systems are provided. In one embodiment, a turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion extending from the inlet and a downstream portion extending from the outlet. The turbine system further includes a rib extending from an outer surface of the duct passage, the rib dividing the upstream portion and the downstream portion.

  9. Emergence of upstream swimming through a hydrodynamic transition

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Chih-kuan; Ardon, Florencia; Roy, Anubhab; Koch, Donald L.; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that upstream swimming of sperm emerges via an orientation disorder-order transition. The order parameter, the average orientation of the sperm head against the flow, follows a 0.5 power law with the deviation from the critical flow shear rate (γ − γc). This transition is successfully explained by a hydrodynamic bifurcation theory, which extends the sperm upstream swimming to a broad class of near surface micro-swimmers that possess front-back asymmetry and circular motion. PMID:25815969

  10. The Martian escape rate as a function of upstream solar conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstad, R.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.; Nilsson, H.; Holmstrom, M.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate potential factors for influence on the Martian heavy ion escape rate (Q) by integrating Mars Express ASPERA-3/IMA heavy ion flux measurements in the Martian tail, taken at similar (binned) solar wind density (n), velocity (v) and EUV radiation flux (FEUV) upstream conditions. In the best sampled cases, with v and FEUV constrained, we find a statistically significant decrease in heavy ion escape rate with increased solar wind density. An empirical-analytical model for atmospheric escape is developed by fitting calculated escape rates to all sufficiently sampled solar conditions, indicating an overall negative dependence on solar wind density.

  11. Thermal performance of the SSRL beam line 6-2 upstream beryllium window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngman, B. P.; Arthur, J.

    1988-09-01

    This paper describes results of an infra-red measurement of the temperature distribution on the upstream, 0.254 millimeter thick beryllium window on SSRL Beam Line 6-2, illuminated by a 1.89 meter long 54 pole wiggler. The temperature field observed in the test was analyzed using finite element analysis and the total absorbed power determined. The analysis technique was verified by calculating the temperature field produced by a known heat load in a test conducted at the Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory.

  12. 15. UPSTREAM VIEW (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN) SHOWING BIG DALTON DAM NEAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. UPSTREAM VIEW (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN) SHOWING BIG DALTON DAM NEAR FULL CAPACITY AFTER CONSTRUCTION. PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON 2-15-1973 BY PHOTOGRAPHER D. MEIER OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 8. Upstream face of Mormon Flat, both concrete placement tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Upstream face of Mormon Flat, both concrete placement tower and 105 foot derrick are visible. Photographer unknown, June 8, 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 13. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of truss, showing connection of upper chord, laced vertical compression member, knee-braced strut, counters, and laterals. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  15. Canoe slalom boat trajectory while negotiating an upstream gate.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Adam

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how the path chosen by elite slalom paddlers influences the time taken to negotiate an upstream gate. Six trials for international men's single kayak (MK1) (n = 11) and single canoe (C1) (n = 6) paddlers were digitized for a left-hand upstream gate. Results revealed that the absolute variability of paddlers increased as their total time increased (r = 0.594), but the coefficient of variation remained constant. There was a strong correlation (r = 0.89, each individual trial; r = 0.93, mean total time for each participant) between boat trajectory and the total time. The MK1 and C1 paddlers used similar strategies to negotiate an upstream gate. There were significant differences (P < 0.05) between the boat trajectory of the fastest and slowest paddlers (average distance between paddler's head and the inside pole). These results suggest that to achieve a faster upstream gate performance, paddlers should concentrate on the distance between their head and the inside pole. However, there would be an optimal distance beyond which any further reduction in the distance would impede technique and performance.

  16. Laser Doppler velocity measurements of swirling flows with upstream influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rloff, K. L.; Bossel, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Swirling flow in a rotating tube is studied by flow visualization at a moderate Reynolds number, and its velocity field is measured by laser-Doppler anemometry. The tube has constant diameter, and approximately uniform initial rigid rotation of the flow is assured by passing the flow through a rotating plug of porous metal before it enters the test section. At moderate swirl values, an object mounted on the tube centerline causes a closed bubble to form upstream of the obstacle, with a clearly defined stagnation point on the axis, and recirculating flow inside the bubble. The bubble length grows upstream as the swirl is increased, until it breaks up into a Taylor column reaching all the way upstream and downstream at swirl values above a certain critical value. A vortex jump (in the sense of Benjamin) occurs downstream of the obstacle except when the Taylor column is present. Using a laser-Doppler anemometer, axial and swirl velocity profiles are obtained at several stations upstream and downstream of the bubble, and in and around the bubble.

  17. 4. AERATOR AT 525', CONSTRUCTED 19371938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERATOR AT 525', CONSTRUCTED 1937-1938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH SCREEN REMOVED FOR CLARITY), WATER FROM INTAKE FLOWS THROUGH FLUME, THEN DAMS, AND SPILLS OVER STEPS TO MIX WITH OXYGEN, THUS REDUCING ACIDITY LEVELS. ACID INDUCES FASTER CORROSION OF PIPES AND SPOILS TASTE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  18. 45. View of upstream face of fish screens at Dingle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. View of upstream face of fish screens at Dingle Basin, looking northwest from south side of basin. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  19. 43. View of log boom (upstream) protecting fish screens at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. View of log boom (upstream) protecting fish screens at Dingle Basin, looking southwest from north side of basin. Photo by Brian C. Morris, PUget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  20. 1. VIEW NORTH FROM UPSTREAM WITH IMPOUNDED LAKE AND (LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTH FROM UPSTREAM WITH IMPOUNDED LAKE AND (LEFT TO RIGHT): EARTHEN DIKE, HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING FACILITY, AND DAM - Middle Creek Hydroelectric Dam, On Middle Creek, West of U.S. Route 15, 3 miles South of Selinsgrove, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  1. PHOTO OF THE BOAT HOUSE, GATE HOUSE, UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTO OF THE BOAT HOUSE, GATE HOUSE, UPSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAYS LOOKING EAST; WATER INTAKE AND LOG BOOMS ARE SEEN ON RESERVOIR. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  2. 14. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA. TRACK FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA. TRACK FROM AGGREGATE BARGES TO MIXING PLANT IS AT LOWER LEFT, RIGHT SPILLWAY CHUTE IS TAKING FORM AT UPPER RIGHT April 29, 1927 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  3. DESCHUTES PROJECT – WICKIUP DAM – VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES PROJECT – WICKIUP DAM – VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE FROM RIGHT ABUTMENT. CPS CREW PLACING RIPRAP. Photocopy of historic photographs (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR Photographer, July 26, 1944 - Wickiup Dam, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  4. 9. Oblique view to southsouthwest of upstream (east) side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Oblique view to south-southwest of upstream (east) side of bridge from near north abutment in Jacob Meyer Park. Note cutwaters on piers, distinctive appearance of boxed, repaired vertical compression members as compared to original, laced compression members. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  5. VIEW OF UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDES OF UPPER (EAST) END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDES OF UPPER (EAST) END OF LOCK, SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST CONTROL HOUSES, LOCK UNDER REPAIR, BUILDING NOS. 51, 52 AND SOUTHWEST CONTROL HOUSE IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS WEST-NORTHWEST - Ortona Lock, Lock No. 2, Machinery and Control Houses, Caloosahatchee River, Cross-State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Ortona, Glades County, FL

  6. 3. FORMER INTAKE DAM NO. 2, VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FORMER INTAKE DAM NO. 2, VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AT LEFT IS RUBBLE MASONRY COVERING INTERSECTION OF THE TWO IRON PIPES FROM NEW DAM ENTERING OLD INTAKE OPENING AT RIGHT IS BOX FLUME LEADING TO AERATOR. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  7. 6. AERATOR VIEWED UPSTREAM. DETAIL OF FLUSH VALVE AND VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. AERATOR VIEWED UPSTREAM. DETAIL OF FLUSH VALVE AND VIEW INTO BOX FLUME. NOTE WRENCH TO OPEN VALVE AND REMAINS OF OLD SHOVEL USED FOR MAINTENANCE. TRASH SCREEN MESH IS SEEN AT BOTTOM LEFT. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  8. 72. VIEW OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF THE MAIN LOCK MITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VIEW OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF THE MAIN LOCK MITER GATE IN A CLOSED POSITION, SHOWING THE FIT OF CONTACT BLOCKS Photograph No. 50-398. November 28, 1950 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  9. 25. UPSTREAM VIEW OF LOWER END OF OUTLET STRUCTURE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. UPSTREAM VIEW OF LOWER END OF OUTLET STRUCTURE SHOWING FORMS IN PLACE FOR GRAVITY WALL SECTIONS.... Volume XVI, No. 16, August 16, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  10. 23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AND TOWARD LEFT ABUTMENT OF DAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AND TOWARD LEFT ABUTMENT OF DAM. NOTE FORMS FOR LEFT GRAVITY ABUTMENT AT UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PICTURE. ARCHES 3, 4, 5, AND 7 COMPLETED TO ELEVATION 1795. 5 OR 7.5 FEET BELOW TOP OF PARAPET WALL. November 29, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 5. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE TRASH RAKES, GATES AND GATELIFTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE TRASH RAKES, GATES AND GATE-LIFTING MECHANISMS FOR THE POST FALLS DAM AND POWERHOUSE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  12. 2. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM UPSTREAM OF BRIDGE IN ITS SETTING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM UPSTREAM OF BRIDGE IN ITS SETTING, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST FROM LOWER (RAILROAD) DECK OF SOUTHERN PACIFIC TRANSPORTATION COMPANY'S I STREET BRIDGE - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  13. 25. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS FROM UPSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS FROM UPSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD THE WEST (DAM-TENDER RICHARD CARL ADJUSTING THE GATES TO ALLOW 3400 CFS THROUGH). - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. 7. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING UPSTREAM SIDE OF POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING UPSTREAM SIDE OF POWERHOUSE #1; ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES ARE VISIBLE AT CENTER/LEFT WITH ELEVATOR TOWER IN LEFT BACKGROUND; GANTRY CRANE IS VISIBLE IN FAR RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Bonneville Project, Powerhouse No.1, Spanning Bradford Slough, from Bradford Island, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  15. DESCHUTES PROJECT, WICKIUP RESERVOIR, UPSTREAM SIDE OF COMPLETED EAST DIKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES PROJECT, WICKIUP RESERVOIR, UPSTREAM SIDE OF COMPLETED EAST DIKE FROM RIGHT ABUTMENT. Photocopy of historic photograph (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). R.A. Baker, photographer, August 29, 1947 - Wickiup Dam, Dikes and Spillway, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  16. 10. VIEW UPSTREAM OF PIPELINE SECTION AT JUNCTION OF HUME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW UPSTREAM OF PIPELINE SECTION AT JUNCTION OF HUME CEMENT PIPE AND CAST-IRON (460'). NOTE CYLINDRICAL COLLAR OF CEMENT SECTIONS AND BELL JUNCTIONS OF IRON PIPE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  17. 15. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING THE UPSTREAM FACADE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING THE UPSTREAM FACADE OF POWERHOUSE #1; TRANSFORMERS ARE VISIBLE ON THE RIGHT, THE GANTRY CRANE IS LEFT/CENTER, AND SWITCHING EQUIPMENT IS ON TOP OF BUILDING. - Bonneville Project, Powerhouse No.1, Spanning Bradford Slough, from Bradford Island, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  18. 63. Upstream face of Waddell Dam as viewed from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Upstream face of Waddell Dam as viewed from the west abutment. Crane at center is used to service the penstock intake. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 18. Upstream face of arches, concrete placing tower is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Upstream face of arches, concrete placing tower is at far right. Tower at center was used to convey material. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND BRIDGE WITH ABANDONED SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND BRIDGE WITH ABANDONED SAN TAN FLOOD-WATER HEADGATE IN FOREGROUND. TAKEN FROM NORTH END OF DAM - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Sacaton Dam & Bridge, Gila River, T4S R6E S12/13, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  1. 1. View looking upstream (southwest) at diversion dam. Water enters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking upstream (southwest) at diversion dam. Water enters half-round flume on right. Break in diversion structure provides a view of water flow in flume during the high water runoff in June. - Rock Creek Hydroelectric Project, Rock Creek, Baker County, OR

  2. 9. Detail, typical bearing, upstream side of west end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail, typical bearing, upstream side of west end of Bridge Number 301.85, view to east, 210mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  3. 6. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SPILLWAY OF THE POST FALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SPILLWAY OF THE POST FALLS POWERHOUSE, WITH A PARTIAL VIEW OF THE MODERN TRANSFORMER IN THE FOREGROUND, AND THE OLD SWITCHING BUILDING IN THE LEFT BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  4. 2. VIEW OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN FROM CENTER OF THE CHANNEL FROM TWIN LAKES. VIEW LOOKING EAST. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  5. UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW SHOWING SOUTH EMBANKMENT BERM AND CONCRETE COREWALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW SHOWING SOUTH EMBANKMENT BERM AND CONCRETE COREWALL AT CENTER, WITH COOKE DAM POND AT LEFT AND POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C) AND SPILLWAY (MI-98-B) IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHEAST - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, South Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  6. COOKE DAM POND AND UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF (LR) NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COOKE DAM POND AND UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF (L-R) NORTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-A), SPILLWAY (MI-98-B), PENSTOCK ENTRANCES, POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C), AND SOUTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-E). VIEW TO NORTHEAST - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  7. 18. View to southwest. Detail, bearing shoe, upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View to southwest. Detail, bearing shoe, upstream side of east pier. Copy negative made from 35mm color transparency made with with 135mm lens by John Snyder, due to lack of sufficiently long lens for 4x5 camera. - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  8. 32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM (Trashrack-structure for outlet at lower left in reservoir, spillway at upper left. Reservoir nearly empty due to drought.) - Tieton Dam, South & East of State Highway 12, Naches, Yakima County, WA

  9. 1. Upstream face of Rock Creek Diversion Dam, looking east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Upstream face of Rock Creek Diversion Dam, looking east (Overflow weir right, diversion section into Irrigation District Canal to left) - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Rock Creek Diversion Dam, One mile east of Como Dam, west of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  10. 2. Upstream face of Rock Creek Diversion Dam, looking east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Upstream face of Rock Creek Diversion Dam, looking east (Canal slide gates to left, Rock Creek diversion gate to right in raised position) - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Rock Creek Diversion Dam, One mile east of Como Dam, west of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  11. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking southwest. Note the trash racks at the entrance to the penstocks. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  12. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. Construction of the forebay dam, which replaced the eastern end of the original Grand Coulee Dam, was completed in 1974. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  13. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a partially cloudy sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  14. 12. Upstream view showing thelower log pond log chute in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Upstream view showing thelower log pond log chute in the main channel of the Hudson River. The log chute in the dam can be seen in the background. Facing southwest. - Glens Falls Dam, 100' to 450' West of U.S. Route 9 Bridge Spanning Hudson River, Glens Falls, Warren County, NY

  15. Aeroacoustic catastrophes: upstream cusp beaming in Lilley's equation.

    PubMed

    Stone, J T; Self, R H; Howls, C J

    2017-05-01

    The downstream propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves from a point source in a subsonic jet obeying Lilley's equation is well known to be organized around the so-called 'cone of silence', a fold catastrophe across which the amplitude may be modelled uniformly using Airy functions. Here we show that acoustic waves not only unexpectedly propagate upstream, but also are organized at constant distance from the point source around a cusp catastrophe with amplitude modelled locally by the Pearcey function. Furthermore, the cone of silence is revealed to be a cross-section of a swallowtail catastrophe. One consequence of these discoveries is that the peak acoustic field upstream is not only structurally stable but also at a similar level to the known downstream field. The fine structure of the upstream cusp is blurred out by distributions of symmetric acoustic sources, but peak upstream acoustic beaming persists when asymmetries are introduced, from either arrays of discrete point sources or perturbed continuum ring source distributions. These results may pose interesting questions for future novel jet-aircraft engine designs where asymmetric source distributions arise.

  16. View of Stehr Lake from FS 502 looking upstream (northeast). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Stehr Lake from FS 502 looking upstream (northeast). Vehicle at right center is parked on earthen Upper Stehr Lake Dam. - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Stehr Lake & Dams, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  17. 8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD UPSTREAM END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD UPSTREAM END OF NAVIGATION LOCK #1; SOUTH END OF POWERHOUSE #1 IS VISIBLE ON RIGHT; BRADFORD SLOUGH IS VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  18. Sampling the potential energy surface of a DNA duplex damaged by a food carcinogen: Force field parameterization by ab initio quantum calculations and conformational searching using molecular mechanics computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiangyang

    1999-07-01

    The heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo (4, 5-f) quinoline (IQ) is one of a number of carcinogens found in barbecued meat and fish. It induces tumors in mammals and is probably involved in human carcinogenesis, because of great exposure to such food carcinogens. IQ is biochemically activated to a derivative which reacts with DNA to form a covalent adduct. This adduct may deform the DNA and consequently cause a mutation. which may initiate carcinogenesis. To understand this cancer initiating event, it is necessary to obtain atomic resolution structures of the damaged DNA. No such structures are available experimentally due to synthesis difficulties. Therefore, we employ extensive molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations for this purpose. The major IQ-DNA adduct in the specific DNA sequence d(5'G1G2C G3CCA3') - d(5'TGGCGCC3') with IQ modified at G3 is studied. The d(5'G1G2C G3CC3') sequence has recently been shown to be a hot-spot for mutations when IQ modification is at G3. Although this sequence is prone to -2 deletions via a ``slippage mechanism'' even when unmodified, a key question is why IQ increases the mutation frequency of the unmodified DNA by about 104 fold. Is there a structural feature imposed by IQ that is responsible? The molecular mechanics and dynamics program AMBER for nucleic acids with the latest force field was chosen for this work. This force field has been demonstrated to reproduce well the B-DNA structure. However, some parameters, the partial charges, bond lengths and angles, dihedral parameters of the modified residue, are not available in the AMBER database. We parameterized the force field using high level ab initio quantum calculations. We created 800 starting conformations which uniformly sampled in combination at 18° intervals three torsion angles that govern the IQ-DNA orientations, and energy minimized them. The most important structures are abnormal; the IQ damaged guanine is rotated out of its standard B

  19. Upstream of the SOS response: figure out the trigger.

    PubMed

    Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-10-01

    The bacterial SOS regulon encodes a response to DNA damage that not only functions to relieve the incurred damage but also enhances adaptation through mutagenesis and the lateral spread of virulence factors. Recent papers have demonstrated that certain stimuli can indirectly generate the SOS-inducing signal by activation of endogenous DNA damage mechanisms rather than by direct DNA damage. We suggest that these endogenous triggers have been recruited by bacteria to enable adaptation to various types of stresses.

  20. Effects of channel constriction on upstream steering of flow around Locke Island, Columbia River, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loy, G. E.; Furbish, D. J.; Covey, A.

    2010-12-01

    Landsliding of the White Bluffs along the Columbia River in Washington State has constricted the width of the river on one side of Locke Island, a two-kilometer long island positioned in the middle of the channel. Associated changes in flow are thought to be causing relatively rapid erosion of Locke Island on the constricted side. This island is of cultural significance to Native American tribes of south-central Washington, so there are social as well as scientific reasons to understand how the alteration of stream channel processes resulting from the landsliding might be influencing observed erosion rates. Simple hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the constriction on one side of the island creates an upstream backwater effect. As a consequence a cross-stream pressure gradient upstream of the island results in steering of flow around the island into the unobstructed thread. This diversion of water decreases the discharge through the constriction. Therefore, flow velocities within the constriction are not necessarily expected to be higher than those in the unobstructed thread, contrary to initial reports suggesting that higher velocities within the constriction are the main cause of erosion. We set up streamtable experiments with lapse rate imaging to illustrate the backwater effects of the channel constriction and the associated cross-stream steering of flow around a model island. Our experiments are scaled by channel roughness and slope rather than geometrically, as the main focus is to understand the mechanical behavior of flow in this type of island-landslide system. In addition, we studied the stream velocities and flow steering as well as the magnitude of the backwater effect in both the constricted and unobstructed channels using tracer particles in the time-lapse images. These experimental data are compared with calculated upstream backwater distances determined from the known water-surface slope, flow depth, total discharge, and bed roughness

  1. Potential Upstream Strategies for the Mitigation of Pharmaceuticals in the Aquatic Environment: a Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Blair, Benjamin D

    2016-06-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients represent a class of pollutants of emerging concern, and there is growing evidence that these pollutants can cause damage to the aquatic environment. As regulations to address these concerns are expected in developed nations, decision-makers are looking to the scientific community for potential solutions. To inform these regulatory efforts, further information on the potential strategies to reduce the levels of pharmaceuticals entering the aquatic environment is needed. End-of-pipe (i.e., wastewater treatment) technologies that can remove pharmaceuticals exist; however, they are costly to install and operate. Thus, the goal of this brief review is to look beyond end-of-pipe solutions and present various upstream mitigation strategies discussed within the scientific literature. Programs such as pharmaceutical take-back programs currently exist to attempt to reduce pharmaceutical concentrations in the environment, although access and coverage are often limited for many programs. Other potential strategies include redesigning pharmaceuticals to minimize aquatic toxicity, increasing the percent of the pharmaceuticals metabolized in the body, selecting less harmful pharmaceuticals for use, starting new prescriptions at lower dosages, selecting pharmaceuticals with lower excretion rates, and implementing source treatment such as urine separating toilets. Overall, this brief review presents a summary of the upstream preventative recommendations to mitigate pharmaceuticals from entering the aquatic environment with an emphasis on regulatory efforts in the USA and concludes with priorities for further research.

  2. Upstream Pathways Controlling Mitochondrial Function in Major Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Pan, Alexander Yongshuai; da Silva, Tatiane Morgana; Duong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is commonly observed in bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) and may be a central feature of psychosis. These illnesses are complex and heterogeneous, which is reflected by the complexity of the processes regulating mitochondrial function. Mitochondria are typically associated with energy production; however, dysfunction of mitochondria affects not only energy production but also vital cellular processes, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, cell cycle and survival, intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and neurotransmission. In this review, we characterize the upstream components controlling mitochondrial function, including 1) mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, 2) mitochondrial dynamics, and 3) intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Characterizing and understanding the upstream factors that regulate mitochondrial function is essential to understand progression of these illnesses and develop biomarkers and therapeutics. PMID:27310240

  3. Extreme floods in the Mekong River Delta under climate change: combined impacts of upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Long; Nguyen Viet, Dung; Kummu, Matti; Lauri, Hannu; Koponen, Jorma; van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Supit, Iwan; Leemans, Rik; Kabat, Pavel; Ludwig, Fulco

    2016-04-01

    Extreme floods cause huge damages to human lives and infrastructure, and hamper socio-economic development in the Mekong River Delta in Vietnam. Induced by climate change, upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise are expected to further exacerbate future flood hazard and thereby posing critical challenges for securing safety and sustainability. This paper provides a probabilistic quantification of future flood hazard for the Mekong Delta, focusing on extreme events under climate change. We developed a model chain to simulate separate and combined impacts of two drivers, namely upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise on flood magnitude and frequency. Simulation results show that upstream changes and sea level rise substantially increase flood hazard throughout the whole Mekong Delta. Due to differences in their nature, two drivers show different features in their impacts on floods. Impacts of upstream changes are more dominant in floodplains in the upper delta, causing an increase of up to +0.80 m in flood depth. Sea level rise introduces flood hazard to currently safe areas in the middle and coastal delta zones. A 0.6 m rise in relative sea level causes an increase in flood depth between 0.10 and 0.70 m, depending on location by 2050s. Upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise tend to intensify each other's impacts on floods, resulting in stronger combined impacts than linearly summed impacts of each individual driver. Substantial increase of future flood hazard strongly requires better flood protection and more flood resilient development for the Mekong Delta. Findings from this study can be used as quantified physical boundary conditions to develop flood management strategies and strategic delta management plans.

  4. 12. Detail, lower chord connection point on upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail, lower chord connection point on upstream side of truss, showing pinned connection of lower chord eye bars, laced vertical compression member, diagonal eye bar tension members, turnbuckled diagonal counters, and floor beam. Note also timber floor stringers supported by floor beam, and exposed ends of timber deck members visible at left above lower chord eye bar. View to northwest. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  5. Steepened channels upstream of knickpoints: Controls on relict landscape response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Maureen M.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2009-09-01

    The morphology of a relict landscape provides important insight into erosion rates and processes prior to base level fall. Fluvial knickpoints are commonly thought to form a leak-proof moving boundary between a rejuvenated landscape below and a relict landscape above. We argue that fluvial rejuvenation may leak farther upstream, depending on the rate and style of knickpoint migration. The outer margin of a relict landscape should therefore be used with caution in tectonic geomorphology studies, as channel steepening upstream of knickpoints could reduce the relict area. We explore the response of the Roan Plateau to knickpoint retreat triggered by late Cenozoic upper Colorado River incision. Multiple knickpoints (100-m waterfalls) separate a low-relief, upper landscape from incised canyons below. Two digital elevation model data sets (10-m U.S. Geological Survey and 1-m Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) indicate steeper channels above waterfalls relative to concave channels farther upstream. The steepened reaches are several kilometers long, correspond to doubling of slope, and exhibit channel narrowing and an increase in hillslope angle. We compare two mechanisms for generating steepened reaches. The first uses a recent model for erosion amplification due to flow acceleration at the waterfall lip. The second acknowledges that waterfall lips may be limited to the outcrop of a resistant formation. Subtle structural warping of the stratigraphy can lead to lowering of the waterfall lip as it retreats, thus lowering base level for upstream channels. Results of numerical modeling experiments suggest the latter mechanism is more consistent with our observations of long, mildly steepened reaches.

  6. Taking the Battle Upstream: Towards a Benchmarking Role for NATO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    again in large and small Allies alike. This is where cooperative “benchmarking”—also of upstream defense planning processes—might play a uniquely...interact more with each other in cooperative ways than ever before; this direct contact is reinforcing the natural trend of defense organizations to...in Lisbon, Portugal. JALLC’s commander, Brigadier General Peter Sonneby, convened a mixed working group under the lead of Dr. Bent-Erik Bakken from

  7. Novel upstream and downstream sequence elements contribute to polyadenylation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Sarah K.; Lutz, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    Polyadenylation is a 3′ mRNA processing event that contributes to gene expression by affecting stability, export and translation of mRNA. Human polyadenylation signals (PAS) have core and auxiliary elements that bind polyadenylation factors upstream and downstream of the cleavage site. The majority of mRNAs do not have optimal upstream and downstream core elements and therefore auxiliary elements can aid in polyadenylation efficiency. Auxiliary elements have previously been identified and studied in a small number of mRNAs. We previously used a global approach to examine auxiliary elements to identify overrepresented motifs by a bioinformatic survey. This predicted information was used to direct our in vivo validation studies, all of which were accomplished using both a tandem in vivo polyadenylation assay and using reporter protein assays measured as luciferase activity. Novel auxiliary elements were placed in a test polyadenylation signal. An in vivo polyadenylation assay was used to determine the strength of the polyadenylation signal. All but one of the novel auxiliary elements enhanced the test polyadenylation signal. Effects of these novel auxiliary elements were also measured by a luciferase assay when placed in the 3′ UTR of a firefly luciferase reporter. Two novel downstream auxiliary elements and all of the novel upstream auxiliary elements showed an increase in reporter protein levels. Many well known auxiliary polyadenylation elements have been found to occur in multiple sets. However, in our study, multiple copies of novel auxiliary elements brought reporter protein levels as well as polyadenylation choice back to wild type levels. Structural features of these novel auxiliary elements may also affect the role of auxiliary elements. A MS2 structure placed upstream of the polyadenylation signal can affect polyadenylation in both the positive and negative direction. A large change in RNA structure by using novel complementary auxiliary element also

  8. 8. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER, VIEW UPSTREAM (PLANK COVER REMOVED FOR CLARITY). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER, VIEW UPSTREAM (PLANK COVER REMOVED FOR CLARITY). BOX FLUME DROPS SLIGHTLY INTO CHAMBER ON LEFT SIDE. CHAMBER IS A SERIES OF BAFFLES DESIGNED TO SLOW THE FLOW OF WATER. FLOW IS REDUCED TO ALLOW PARTICULATES TO SETTLE TO THE BOTTOM. TWO SCREENS (NOT SHOWN) FILTER LARGER DEBRIS. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  9. Effect of Toston Dam on Upstream Ice Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    1983). The Beltaos formulation for ice jam thickness is 2,u(-si) I Si ~ f ISWSJJ where t = ice cover thickness W = width of flow S = slope of energy...unlimited. 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(* 5. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) Special Report 89-16 6a. NAME OF PERFORMING...NO. 11. TITLE (Include Secudty Clasfcoffon) Effect of Toston Dam on Upstream Ice Conditions 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR( S ) Ashton, George D. 130. TYPE OF

  10. VIEW SOUTH SOUTHWEST LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM ENTRANCE TO LOCKS 35 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTH SOUTHWEST LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM ENTRANCE TO LOCKS 35 AND 71. THE BRIDGE IN THE VIEW IS NOTED FOR ITS EXTRAORDINARY WIDTH (475 FT.) RELATIVE TO ITS MODEST SPAN (116 FT. 10 IN.). WHEN CONSTRUCTED IN 1914 IT WAS CLAIMED TO BE THE WIDEST BRIDGE IN THE WORLD. MAIN STREET CROSSES IT DIAGONALLY, ALONG WITH TWO CROSS STREETS. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  11. DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Pitňa, A.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Goncharov, O.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2016-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks as typical large-scale disturbances arising from processes such as stream–stream interactions or Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) launching play a significant role in the energy redistribution, dissipation, particle heating, acceleration, etc. They can change the properties of the turbulent cascade on shorter scales. We focus on changes of the level and spectral properties of ion flux fluctuations upstream and downstream of fast forward oblique shocks. Although the fluctuation level increases by an order of magnitude across the shock, the spectral slope in the magnetohydrodynamic range is conserved. The frequency spectra upstream of IP shocks are the same as those in the solar wind (if not spoiled by foreshock waves). The spectral slopes downstream are roughly proportional to the corresponding slopes upstream, suggesting that the properties of the turbulent cascade are conserved across the shock; thus, the shock does not destroy the shape of the spectrum as turbulence passes through it. Frequency spectra downstream of IP shocks often exhibit “an exponential decay” in the ion kinetic range that was earlier reported at electron scales in the solar wind or at ion scales in the interstellar medium. We suggest that the exponential shape of ion flux spectra in this range is caused by stronger damping of the fluctuations in the downstream region.

  12. Hydraulics of floods upstream of horseshoe canyons and waterfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotre, Mathieu G. A.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2015-07-01

    Horseshoe waterfalls are ubiquitous in natural streams, bedrock canyons, and engineering structures. Nevertheless, water flow patterns upstream of horseshoe waterfalls are poorly known and likely differ from the better studied case of a one-dimensional linear step because of flow focusing into the horseshoe. This is a significant knowledge gap because the hydraulics at waterfalls controls sediment transport and bedrock incision, which can compromise the integrity of engineered structures and influence the evolution of river canyons on Earth and Mars. Here we develop new semiempirical theory for the spatial acceleration of water upstream of, and the cumulative discharge into, horseshoe canyons and waterfalls. To this end, we performed 110 numerical experiments by solving the 2-D depth-averaged shallow-water equations for a wide range of flood depths, widths and discharges, and canyon lengths, widths and bed gradients. We show that the upstream, normal flow Froude number is the dominant control on lateral flow focusing and acceleration into the canyon head and that focusing is limited when the flood width is small compared to a cross-stream backwater length scale. In addition, for sheet floods much wider than the canyon, flow focusing into the canyon head leads to reduced discharge (and drying in cases) across the canyon sidewalls, which is especially pronounced for canyons that are much longer than they are wide. Our results provide new expectations for morphodynamic feedbacks between floods and topography, and thus canyon formation.

  13. Interaction of upstream flow distortions with high Mach number cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    Features of the interaction of flow distortions, such as gusts and wakes with blade rows of advance type fans and compressors having high tip Mach numbers are modeled. A typical disturbance was assumed to have harmonic time dependence and was described, at a far upstream location, in three orthogonal spatial coordinates by a double Fourier series. It was convected at supersonic relative to a linear cascade described as an unrolled annulus. Conditions were selected so that the component of this velocity parallel to the axis of the turbomachine was subsonic, permitting interaction between blades through the upstream as well as downstream flow media. A strong, nearly normal shock was considered in the blade passages which was allowed curvature and displacement. The flows before and after the shock were linearized relative to uniform mean velocities in their respective regions. Solution of the descriptive equations was by adaption of the Wiener-Hopf technique, enabling a determination of distortion patterns through and downstream of the cascade as well as pressure distributions on the blade and surfaces. Details of interaction of the disturbance with the in-passage shock were discussed. Infuences of amplitude, wave length, and phase of the disturbance on lifts and moments of cascade configurations are presented. Numerical results are clarified by reference to an especially orderly pattern of upstream vertical motion in relation to the cascade parameters.

  14. Density Fluctuations Upstream and Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitňa, A.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Goncharov, O.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2016-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks as typical large-scale disturbances arising from processes such as stream-stream interactions or Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) launching play a significant role in the energy redistribution, dissipation, particle heating, acceleration, etc. They can change the properties of the turbulent cascade on shorter scales. We focus on changes of the level and spectral properties of ion flux fluctuations upstream and downstream of fast forward oblique shocks. Although the fluctuation level increases by an order of magnitude across the shock, the spectral slope in the magnetohydrodynamic range is conserved. The frequency spectra upstream of IP shocks are the same as those in the solar wind (if not spoiled by foreshock waves). The spectral slopes downstream are roughly proportional to the corresponding slopes upstream, suggesting that the properties of the turbulent cascade are conserved across the shock thus, the shock does not destroy the shape of the spectrum as turbulence passes through it. Frequency spectra downstream of IP shocks often exhibit “an exponential decay” in the ion kinetic range that was earlier reported at electron scales in the solar wind or at ion scales in the interstellar medium. We suggest that the exponential shape of ion flux spectra in this range is caused by stronger damping of the fluctuations in the downstream region.

  15. Logging damage

    Treesearch

    Ralph D. Nyland

    1989-01-01

    The best commercial logging will damage at least some residual trees during all forms of partial cutting, no matter how carefully done. Yet recommendations at the end of this Note show there is much that you can do to limit damage by proper road and trail layout, proper training and supervision of crews, appropriate equipment, and diligence.

  16. The worst moment of superposed surge wave in upstream series double surge tanks of hydropower station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Y.; Yang, J. D.; Guo, W. C.; Chen, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    It is a consensus to consider the superposed working conditions when calculating the surge wave in surge tank of hydropower station with long diversion tunnel. For the hydropower station with single surge tank, the method of determining the worst superposed moment is mature. However, for the hydropower station with upstream series double surge tanks, research in this field is still blank. Based on an engineering project, this paper investigated the worst moments and the control superposed working conditions about the maximum surge level and the minimum surge level of upstream series double surge tanks using numerical simulation. In addition, the incidence relations between the worst moment of superposed surge wave and the different areal array and distance between the two surge tanks are also carried out. The results showed that: With the decrease of the distance between auxiliary surge tank and upstream reservoir, the maximum values of the highest surge levels in the two surge tanks always reach close to but a little earlier than the bigger one time when the inflowing discharges of the two surge tanks reach the maximum. It is similar to the minimum values of lowest surge levels in the two surge tanks which also reach close to but a little later than the bigger one time when the outflowing discharges of the two surges reach the maximum. Moreover, the closer the area of auxiliary surge tank to the area of main surge tank is, the closer the worst moment to the bigger one time when inflow or outflow of the two surges reach the maximum will become.

  17. Increased risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among upstream petroleum workers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Riise, Trond; Bjørge, Tone; Moen, Bente E; Bråtveit, Magne; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate cancer risk, particularly oesophageal cancer, among male upstream petroleum workers offshore potentially exposed to various carcinogenic agents. Methods Using the Norwegian Registry of Employers and Employees, 24 765 male offshore workers registered from 1981 to 2003 was compared with 283 002 male referents from the general working population matched by age and community of residence. The historical cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Results Male offshore workers had excess risk of oesophageal cancer (RR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.8) compared with the reference population. Only the adenocarcinoma type had a significantly increased risk (RR 2.7, 95% CI 1.0 to 7.0), mainly because of an increased risk among upstream operators (RR 4.3, 95% CI 1.3 to 14.5). Upstream operators did not have significant excess of respiratory system or colon cancer or mortality from any other lifestyle-related diseases investigated. Conclusion We found a fourfold excess risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among male workers assumed to have had the most extensive contact with crude oil. Due to the small number of cases, and a lack of detailed data on occupational exposure and lifestyle factors associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma, the results must be interpreted with caution. Nevertheless, given the low risk of lifestyle-related cancers and causes of death in this working group, the results add to the observations in other low-powered studies on oesophageal cancer, further suggesting that factors related to the petroleum stream or carcinogenic agents used in the production process might be associated with risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:19858535

  18. Upstream processes in antibody production: evaluation of critical parameters.

    PubMed

    Jain, Era; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibody for therapeutic and diagnostic applications is rising constantly which puts up a need to bring down the cost of its production. In this context it becomes a prerequisite to improve the efficiency of the existing processes used for monoclonal antibody production. This review describes various upstream processes used for monoclonal antibody production and evaluates critical parameters and efforts which are being made to enhance the efficiency of the process. The upstream technology has tremendously been upgraded from host cells used for manufacturing to bioreactors type and capacity. The host cells used range from microbial, mammalian to plant cells with mammalian cells dominating the scenario. Disposable bioreactors are being promoted for small scale production due to easy adaptation to process validation and flexibility, though they are limited by the scale of production. In this respect Wave bioreactors for suspension culture have been introduced recently. A novel bioreactor for immobilized cells is described which permits an economical and easy alternative to hollow fiber bioreactor at lab scale production. Modification of the cellular machinery to alter their metabolic characteristics has further added to robustness of cells and perks up cell specific productivity. The process parameters including feeding strategies and environmental parameters are being improved and efforts to validate them to get reproducible results are becoming a trend. Online monitoring of the process and product characterization is increasingly gaining importance. In total the advancement of upstream processes have led to the increase in volumetric productivity by 100-fold over last decade and make the monoclonal antibody production more economical and realistic option for therapeutic applications.

  19. Spallation Damage Experiments in Cylindrical Geometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    calculation after the onset of damage suspect. Figure 3. Calculated velocity (m/s) of liner to target impact as a function of radius (m). Figure...SPALLATION DAMAGE EXPERIMENTS IN CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRY Ann M. Kaul Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-B259 Los Alamos, NM 87544...USA) Abstract Spallation damage is the process of damage in a ductile material caused by void nucleation, growth and coalescence due to

  20. Hybrid simulation codes with application to shocks and upstream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid codes in which part of the plasma is represented as particles and the rest as a fluid are discussed. In the past few years such codes with particle ions and massless, fluid electrons have been applied to space plasmas, especially to collisionless shocks. All of these simulation codes are one-dimensional and similar in structure, except for how the field equations are solved. The various approaches that are used (resistive Ohm's law, predictor-corrector, Hamiltonian) are described in detail and results from the various codes are compared with examples taken from collisionless shocks and low frequency wave phenomena upstream of shocks.

  1. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  2. Swimming upstream: the strengths of women who survive homelessness.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, C

    1994-03-01

    A study of the strengths and personal resources of women who had overcome homelessness revealed that the experience of homelessness for these women was a temporary state of disruption resulting from an effort to free themselves from conditions associated with despair, such as abuse or addictions, and to search for a better life. Personal, interpersonal, and transpersonal categories of strengths were identified that enabled these women to move in a positive direction toward health and self-actualization. The synthesizing metaphor "swimming upstream" describes the stoic determination required to go against the overwhelming negative forces of their environment.

  3. 2. View of Potomac River at Great Falls looking upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Potomac River at Great Falls looking upstream from Observation Tower. The majestic character of this wild and untrammeled spot is vividly shown. Scanty flow is evidenced by light colored normal water line markings on rock formation. Washington Agueduct Dam is shown in upper portion. Maryland on right and Virginia on left. Natives quoted as saying the water was as low or lower than during the drought conditions of 1930. Mr. Horyduzak, Photographer, 1943. - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal & Locks, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  4. Energetic Ions and Magnetic Fields Upstream From the Kronian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Sarris, E.; Sergis, N.; Dialynas, K.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Dougherty, M.

    2008-12-01

    The existence of energetic particle events to ~200 Rs upstream and ~1300 Rs downstream of Saturn was established during the Voyager 1, 2 flybys in 1980 and 1981, respectively. The origin of the events could not be determined with certainty because of lack of particle charge state and species measurements at lower (<300 keV) energies, which dominate the spectra. High sensitivity observations of energetic ion directional intensities, energy spectra, and ion composition were obtained by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) of the MIMI instrument complement with a geometry factor of ~2.5 cm2 sr and some capability of separating light (H, He) and heavier (C, N, O) ion groups (henceforth referred to as "hydrogen" and "oxygen" respectively). Charge state information was provided where possible by the Charge-Energy-Mass-Spectrometer (CHEMS) over the range ~3 to 220 keV per charge, and magnetic field (IMF) data by the MAG instrument on Cassini. The observations revealed the presence of distinct upstream bursts of energetic hydrogen and oxygen ions whenever the IMF connected the spacecraft to the planetary bow shock, up to distances of 135 RS. The events exhibited the following characteristics: (1) Hydrogen ion bursts are observed in the energy range 3 to 220 keV (and occasionally to E > 220 keV) and oxygen ion bursts in the energy range 32 to -300 keV. (2) Particle onsets are nearly field-aligned, but the distribution tends to isotropize as the event progresses in time. (3) The duration of the ion bursts is several minutes up to 4 hrs. (4) The events are of varying composition, with some exhibiting significant fluxes of oxygen. (5) The bursts have a filamentary structure with some exhibiting distinct signatures of "velocity- filtering effects" at the edges of convecting IMF filaments. (6) Some ion bursts are accompanied by distinct diamagnetic field depressions and exhibit wave structures consistent with ion cyclotron waves for H+, and O+. Given the repeated magnetic field

  5. Upstream blockage effect on the thrust force of a marine hydrokinetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliani, Giulio; Beninati, Maria Laura; Krane, Michael; Fontaine, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    The study evaluates the interaction of two model marine devices axially arranged one in front of the other, in a tandem configuration. Particular focus is given to the change that occurs in the thrust of the downstream marine hydrokinetic (MHK) device when the spatial arrangement of the two elements is varied. At critical spacing there is no thrust generation. The study is motivated by the need to predict the thrust behavior of MHK devices and determine the minimum separation distance to avoid the no thrust condition. The downstream element is a two-bladed, horizontal axis turbine, while the upstream blockage is a perforated disk with similar geometric properties intended to approximate the wake of the MHK device. Testing is conducted in the flume facility at Bucknell University. Experiments are performed for a fixed range of spacing between the perforated disk and the turbine. For each separation distance, the span-wise velocity profile upstream and downstream of the turbine is measured, as well as the device's rotational speed. The turbine's thrust coefficient is calculated. Plots of the thrust coefficient as a function of spacing depict the minimum separation distance to avoid the no thrust condition.

  6. Upstream Density for Plasma Detachment with Conventional and Lithium Vapor-Box Divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Rj; Schwartz, Ja

    2016-10-01

    Fusion power plants are likely to require detachment of the divertor plasma from material targets. The lithium vapor box divertor is designed to achieve this, while limiting the flux of lithium vapor to the main plasma. We develop a simple model of near-detachment to evaluate the required upstream plasma density, for both conventional and lithium vapor-box divertors, based on particle and dynamic pressure balance between up- and down-stream, at near-detachment conditions. A remarkable general result is found, not just for lithium-induced detachment, that the upstream density divided by the Greenwald-limit density scales as (P 5 / 8 /B 3 / 8) Tdet1 / 2 / (ɛcool + γTdet) , with no explicit size scaling. Tdet is the temperature just before strong pressure loss, 1/2 of the ionization potential of the dominant recycling species, ɛcool is the average plasma energy lost per injected hydrogenic and impurity atom, and γ is the sheath heat transmission factor. A recent 1-D calculation agrees well with this scaling. The implication is that the plasma exhaust problem cannot be solved by increasing R. Instead significant innovation, such as the lithium vapor box divertor, will be required. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Electron distributions upstream of the Comet Halley bow shock - Evidence for adiabatic heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Lin, R. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Reme, H.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional plasma electron (22 eV to 30 keV) observations upstream of Comet Halley bow shock, obtained by the RPA-1 COPERNIC (Reme Plasma Analyzer - Complete Positive Ion, Electron and Ram Negative Ion Measurements near Comet Halley) experiment on the Giotto spacecraft are reported. Besides electron distributions typical of the undisturbed solar wind and backstreaming electrons observed when the magnetic field line intersects the cometary bow shock, a new type of distribution, characterized by enhanced low energy (less than 100 eV) flux which peaks at 90-deg pitch angles is found. These are most prominent when the spacecraft is on field lines which pass close to but are not connected to the bow shock. The 90-deg pitch angle electrons appear to have been adiabatically heated by the increase in the magnetic field strength resulting from the compression of the upstream solar wind plasma by the cometary mass loading. A model calculation of this effect which agrees qualitatively with the observed 90-deg flux enhancements is presented.

  8. Surviving the breakup: the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jacob C; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    In response to even a single chromosomal double-strand DNA break, cells enact the DNA damage checkpoint. This checkpoint triggers cell cycle arrest, providing time for the cell to repair damaged chromosomes before entering mitosis. This mechanism helps prevent the segregation of damaged or mutated chromosomes and thus promotes genomic stability. Recent work has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying several critical steps in checkpoint activation, notably the recruitment of the upstream checkpoint kinases of the ATM and ATR families to different damaged DNA structures and the molecular events through which these kinases activate their effectors. Chromatin modification has emerged as one important component of checkpoint activation and maintenance. Following DNA repair, the checkpoint pathway is inactivated in a process termed recovery. A related but genetically distinct process, adaptation, controls cell cycle re-entry in the face of unrepairable damage.

  9. A Large Eddy Simulation Study for upstream wind energy conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V.; Calaf, M.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    The wind energy industry is increasingly focusing on optimal power extraction strategies based on layout design of wind farms and yaw alignment algorithms. Recent field studies by Mikkelsen et al. (Wind Energy, 2013) have explored the possibility of using wind lidar technology installed at hub height to anticipate incoming wind direction and strength for optimizing yaw alignment. In this work we study the benefits of using remote sensing technology for predicting the incoming flow by using large eddy simulations of a wind farm. The wind turbines are modeled using the classic actuator disk concept with rotation, together with a new algorithm that permits the turbines to adapt to varying flow directions. This allows for simulations of a more realistic atmospheric boundary layer driven by a time-varying geostrophic wind. Various simulations are performed to investigate possible improvement in power generation by utilizing upstream data. Specifically, yaw-correction of the wind-turbine is based on spatio-temporally averaged wind values at selected upstream locations. Velocity and turbulence intensity are also considered at those locations. A base case scenario with the yaw alignment varying according to wind data measured at the wind turbine's hub is also used for comparison. This reproduces the present state of the art where wind vanes and cup anemometers installed behind the rotor blades are used for alignment control.

  10. Intermittency of density fluctuations upstream and downstream interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riazantseva, Maria; Budaev, Viacheslav; Rakhmanova, Lyudmila; Borodkova, Natalia; Zastenker, Georgy; Yermolaev, Yuri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Pitna, Alexander; Prech, Lubomir

    2017-04-01

    The statistical properties of density fluctuations in a turbulent solar wind flow in the vicinity of interplanetary (IP) shocks are observed. We analyze probability distribution functions (PDFs) of density fluctuations in the frequency range of 0.01-10 Hz according to measurements of the BMSW instrument on board of Spektr-R. We determine high order structure functions, their moments and scaling properties of PDFs upstream and downstream IP shocks. The experimental scaling is compared with the scaling predicted by the traditional Kolmogorov and by log-Poisson models taking into account intermittency. We produce the parameterization of scaling using She-Leveque-Dubrulle implementation of the log-Poisson model and reveal the difference in the level of intermittency. These levels can vary depending on many plasma agents, but generally, solar wind plasma shows the universal statistical properties not depending on a level of intermittency upstream and downstream IP shocks. The best agreement of experimental scaling is shown for the log-Poisson model with assumption of predominance of a filamentary geometry for singular dissipative structures.

  11. Computational sciences in the upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Thomas C

    2016-10-13

    The predominant technical challenge of the upstream oil and gas industry has always been the fundamental uncertainty of the subsurface from which it produces hydrocarbon fluids. The subsurface can be detected remotely by, for example, seismic waves, or it can be penetrated and studied in the extremely limited vicinity of wells. Inevitably, a great deal of uncertainty remains. Computational sciences have been a key avenue to reduce and manage this uncertainty. In this review, we discuss at a relatively non-technical level the current state of three applications of computational sciences in the industry. The first of these is seismic imaging, which is currently being revolutionized by the emergence of full wavefield inversion, enabled by algorithmic advances and petascale computing. The second is reservoir simulation, also being advanced through the use of modern highly parallel computing architectures. Finally, we comment on the role of data analytics in the upstream industry.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  12. ISEE/IMP Observations of simultaneous upstream ion events

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchel, D.G.; Roelof, E.C.; Sanderson, T.R.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.

    1983-07-01

    Propagation of upstream energetic (50--200 keV) ions is analyzed in sixteen events observed simulataneously by solid state detectors on ISEE 3 at approx.200 R/sub E/ and on IMP 8 at approx.35 R/sub E/ from the earth. Conclusions are based on comparisons of the pitch angle distributions observed at the two spacecraft and transformed into the solar wind frame. They are beamlike at ISEE 3 and are confined to the outward hemisphere. When IMP 8 is furtherest from the bow shock, they are also usually beamlike, or hemispheric. However, when IMP 8 is closer to the bow shock, pancakelike distributions are observed. This systematic variation in the IMP 8 pitch angle distributions delimits a scattering region l< or approx. =14 R/sub E/ upstream of the earth's bow shock (l measured along the interplanetary magnetic field) that dominates ion propagation, influences the global distribution of fluxes in the foreshock, and may play a role in acceleration of the ions. When IMP 8 is beyond lapprox.15 R/sub E/, the propagation appears to be essentially scatter-free between IMP 8 and ISEE 3; this is deduced from the absence of earthward fluxes at IMP 8 as well as the tendency for the spin-averaged fluxes to be comparable at the two spacecraft.

  13. ISEE/IMP observations of simultaneous upstream ion events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Sanderson, T. R.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1983-01-01

    Propagation of upstream energetic (50-200 keV) ions is analyzed in sixteen events observed simultaneously by solid state detectors on ISEE 3 at about 200 earth radii and on IMP 8 at about 35 earth radii from the earth. Conclusions are based on comparisons of the pitch angle distributions observed at the two spacecraft and transformed into the solar wind frame. They are beamlike at ISEE 3 and are confined to the outward hemisphere. When IMP 8 is furthest from the bow shock, they are also usually beamlike, or hemispheric. However, when IMP 8 is closer to the bow shock, pancakelike distributions are observed. This systematic variation in the IMP 8 pitch angle distributions delimits a scattering region l less than about 15 earth radii upstream of the earth's bow shock (l measured along the interplanetary magnetic field) that dominates ion propagation, influences the global distribution of fluxes in the foreshock, and may play a role in acceleration of the ions. When IMP 8 is beyond l of about 15 earth radii the propagation appears to be essentially scatter-free between IMP 8 and ISEE 3; this is deduced from the absence of earthward fluxes at IMP 8 as well as the tendency for the spin-averaged fluxes to be comparable at the two spacecraft.

  14. The effects of upstream plasma properties on Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    Cassini observations have found that the plasma and magnetic field conditions upstream of Titan are far more complex than they were thought to be after the Voyager encounter. Rymer et al., (2009) used the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) electron observations to classify the plasma conditions along Titan's orbit into 5 types (Plasma Sheet, Lobe, Mixed, Magnetosheath and Misc.). Nemeth et al., (2011) found that the CAPS ion observations could also be separated into the same plasma regions as defined by Rymer et al. Additionally the T-96 encounter found Titan in the solar wind adding a sixth classification. Understanding the effects of the variable upstream plasma conditions on Titan's plasma interaction and the evolution of Titan's ionosphere/atmosphere is one of the main objectives of the Cassini mission. To compliment the mission we perform hybrid simulations of Titan's plasma interaction to examine how the properties of the incident plasma (composition, density, temperature etc…) affect Titan's ionosphere. We examine how much ionospheric plasma is lost from Titan as well as the amount of mass and energy deposited into Titan's atmosphere.

  15. Rho1 GTPase and PKC ortholog Pck1 are upstream activators of the cell integrity MAPK pathway in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Soto, Teresa; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Viana, Raúl A; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2014-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the cell integrity pathway (CIP) orchestrates multiple biological processes like cell wall maintenance and ionic homeostasis by fine tuning activation of MAPK Pmk1 in response to various environmental conditions. The small GTPase Rho2 positively regulates the CIP through protein kinase C ortholog Pck2. However, Pmk1 retains some function in mutants lacking either Rho2 or Pck2, suggesting the existence of additional upstream regulatory elements to modulate its activity depending on the nature of the environmental stimulus. The essential GTPase Rho1 is a candidate to control the activity of the CIP by acting upstream of Pck2, whereas Pck1, a second PKC ortholog, appears to negatively regulate Pmk1 activity. However, the exact regulatory nature of these two proteins within the CIP has remained elusive. By exhaustive characterization of strains expressing a hypomorphic Rho1 allele (rho1-596) in different genetic backgrounds we show that both Rho1 and Pck1 are positive upstream regulatory members of the CIP in addition to Rho2 and Pck2. In this new model Rho1 and Rho2 control Pmk1 basal activity during vegetative growth mainly through Pck2. Notably, whereas Rho2-Pck2 elicit Pmk1 activation in response to most environmental stimuli, Rho1 drives Pmk1 activation through either Pck2 or Pck1 exclusively in response to cell wall damage. Our study reveals the intricate and complex functional architecture of the upstream elements participating in this signaling pathway as compared to similar routes from other simple eukaryotic organisms.

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Upstream Source Influences on TGM Observations at Three CAMNet Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, D.; Lin, J. C.; Meng, F.; Gbor, P. K.; He, Z.; Sloan, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    Mercury is a persistent and toxic substance in the environment. Exposure to high levels of mercury can cause a range of adverse health effects, including damage to the nervous system, reproduction system and childhood development. Proper recognition and prediction of atmospheric levels of mercury can effectively avoid the adverse affect of Hg, however they cannot be achieved without accurate and quantitative identification of source influences, which is a great challenge due to the complexity of Hg in the air. The objective of this study is to present a new method to simulate Hg concentrations at the location of a monitoring site and quantitatively assess its upstream source influences. Hourly total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations at three CAMNet monitoring sites (receptors) in Ontario were predicted for four selected periods using the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model, which is capable of representing near-field influences that are not resolved by typical grid sizes in transport models. The model was modified to deal with Hg depositions and point source Hg emissions. The model-predicted Hg concentrations were compared with observations, as well as with the results from a CMAQ-Hg simulation in which the same emission and meteorology inputs were used. The comparisons show that STILT-predicted Hg concentrations agree well with observations, and are generally closer to the observations than those predicted by CMAQ-Hg. The better performance of the STILT simulation can be attributed to its ability to account for near-field influences. STILT was also applied to assess quantitatively the relative importance of different upstream source regions for the selected episodes. The assessment was made based on emission fluxes and STILT footprints, i.e., sensitivities of atmospheric concentrations to upstream surface fluxes. The results indicated that the main source regions of observed low Hg concentrations were in Northeastern Ontario, whereas

  17. The Sensitivity of the Northeast Colorado Moist Convective Environment to Upstream Soil Moisture Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, R. T.

    2005-05-01

    Statistical evidence supports a hydro-dynamic link between severe thunderstorm activity in Northeast Colorado and antecedent snow condition in the upstream higher elevations. Two subsets of seven runoff seasons were created, based on the criteria of anomalously high and low cumulative streamflow discharge from the Colorado Rockies. Observational evidence suggests that the morning time lower atmosphere, during the months of May and June, over Denver, is cooled and moistened following an anomalously large runoff season when compared to seasons of meager runoff. Furthermore, comparison of Northeast Colorado severe thunderstorm reports reveals that severe weather occurrences of hail greater than 1 inch in diameter, tornados, and damaging thunderstorm downdrafts, occurred on average 51 minutes earlier following years of anomalously high runoff compared to the low runoff years. The character of severe weather also appears to be altered so that high runoff years yield a significantly reduced percentage of tornadic reports over the Northeast Colorado plains. The proposed mechanism put forth to explain the presumed alteration of the lee plains' convective environment and the nature of severe thunderstorm activity, links alpine surface moisture conditions to lagged thermal and moisture attributes of the downstream elevated mixed layer which caps the convective boundary layer. Moist surfaces attributed to snowpack, ponding of melt water, and saturated soils are known to increase evapotranspiration so that the coupled boundary layer is cooler and moister than would be observed under drier conditions. The nocturnal decoupling of the boundary layer from the surface forms a residual layer which is surmised to retain the attributes imparted to it according to the degree of soil moisture present during the previous day. Mean late spring/early summer prevailing wind velocity supports the likely presence of an elevated mixed layer, with similar attributes of the aforementioned

  18. The Sensitivity of the Northeast Colorado Moist Convective Environment to Upstream Soil Moisture Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, R. T.

    2004-12-01

    Statistical evidence supports a hydro-dynamic link between severe thunderstorm activity in Northeast Colorado and antecedent snow condition in the upstream higher elevations. Two subsets of seven runoff seasons were created, based on the criteria of anomalously high and low cumulative streamflow discharge from the Colorado Rockies. Observational evidence suggests that the morning time lower atmosphere, during the months of May and June, over Denver, is cooled and moistened following an anomalously large runoff season when compared to seasons of meager runoff. Furthermore, comparison of Northeast Colorado severe thunderstorm reports reveals that severe weather occurrences of hail greater than _ inch in diameter, tornados, and damaging thunderstorm downdrafts, occurred on average 51 minutes earlier following years of anomalously high runoff compared to the low runoff years. The character of severe weather also appears to be altered so that high runoff years yield a significantly reduced percentage of tornadic reports over the Northeast Colorado plains. The proposed mechanism put forth to explain the presumed alteration of the lee plains' convective environment and the nature of severe thunderstorm activity, links alpine surface moisture conditions to lagged thermal and moisture attributes of the downstream elevated mixed layer which caps the convective boundary layer. Moist surfaces attributed to snowpack, ponding of melt water, and saturated soils are known to increase evapotranspiration so that the coupled boundary layer is cooler and moister than would be observed under drier conditions. The nocturnal decoupling of the boundary layer from the surface forms a residual layer which is surmised to retain the attributes imparted to it according to the degree of soil moisture present during the previous day. Mean late spring/early summer prevailing wind velocity supports the likely presence of an elevated mixed layer, with similar attributes of the aforementioned

  19. Thinking Upstream: A 25-Year Retrospective and Conceptual Model Aimed at Reducing Health Inequities.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Patricia G

    Thinking upstream was first introduced into the nursing vernacular in 1990 with the goal of advancing broad and context-rich perspectives of health. Initially invoked as conceptual framing language, upstream precepts were subsequently adopted and adapted by a generation of thoughtful nursing scholars. Their work reduced health inequities by redirecting actions further up etiologic pathways and by emphasizing economic, political, and environmental health determinants. US health care reform has fostered a much broader adoption of upstream language in policy documents. This article includes a semantic exploration of thinking upstream and a new model, the Butterfield Upstream Model for Population Health (BUMP Health).

  20. The magnetosphere as a sufficient source for upstream ions on November 1, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.; Krimigis, S. M.; Baker, D. N.

    1988-01-01

    The source of energetic particles in two upstream events which occurred during the great magnetospheric compression of November 1, 1984 were investigated. Ten tests, which could distinguish between the Fermi and the leakage sources for upstream diffuse ion events, were applied to simultaneous magnetospheric, magnetosheath, and upstream energetic particle observations obtained during the November-1 upstream events by several spacecraft. Results showed that magnetospheric leakage satisfactorily explains these observations, while in situ Fermi acceleration does not. It is concluded that, during these two events, magnetospheric leakage was a sufficient source for upstream particles.

  1. Shape and shear guide sperm cells spiraling upstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Currently debated mechanisms for sperm long range travel vary from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over a wide range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilization. To rationalize these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations.

  2. The foreshock region upstream from the Comet Halley bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, K. A.; Balsiger, H.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Rosenbauer, H.; Shelley, E. G.

    1987-01-01

    A few hours prior to the crossing of the Comet Halley bow shock, the Giotto spacecraft intermittently encountered an electron foreshock region. The electron foreshock is characterized by magnetic connection to the cometary bow shock and increased field aligned electron heat flux directed away from the bow shock. A similar region was intermittently encountered by the ICE spacecraft prior to its crossing of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave. During periods of magnetic connection with the Halley bow shock, enhanced magnetic field fluctuations were observed. These enhancements are interpreted as indirect evidence of an ion foreshock in the electron foreshock. No clearly identifiable backstreaming protons are observed during these periods of magnetic connection, however, because it may be difficult to separate a backstreaming population from the cometary pick-up proton population already present in the upstream region.

  3. Upstream Structures and Their Effects on the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic processes within the Earth's foreshock generate a profusion of plasma and magnetic field structures with sizes and durations ranging from the microscale (e.g. SLAMs, solitons, and density holes) to the mesoscale (e.g. foreshock cavities or boundaries, hot flow anomalies, and bubbles). Swept into the bow shock by the solar wind flow, the perturbations associated with these features batter the magnetosphere, driving a wide variety of magnetospheric effects, including large amplitude magnetopause motion, bursty reconnection and the generation of flux transfer events, enhanced pulsation activity within the magnetosphere, diffusion and energization of radiation belt particles, enhanced particle precipitation resulting in dayside aurora and riometer absorption, and the generation of field-aligned currents and magnetic impulse events in high-latitude ground magnetometers. This talk reviews the ever growing menagery of structures observed upstream from the bow shock, examines their possible interrelationships, and considers their magnetospheric consequences.

  4. The foreshock region upstream from the Comet Halley bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, K. A.; Balsiger, H.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Rosenbauer, H.; Shelley, E. G.

    1987-01-01

    A few hours prior to the crossing of the Comet Halley bow shock, the Giotto spacecraft intermittently encountered an electron foreshock region. The electron foreshock is characterized by magnetic connection to the cometary bow shock and increased field aligned electron heat flux directed away from the bow shock. A similar region was intermittently encountered by the ICE spacecraft prior to its crossing of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave. During periods of magnetic connection with the Halley bow shock, enhanced magnetic field fluctuations were observed. These enhancements are interpreted as indirect evidence of an ion foreshock in the electron foreshock. No clearly identifiable backstreaming protons are observed during these periods of magnetic connection, however, because it may be difficult to separate a backstreaming population from the cometary pick-up proton population already present in the upstream region.

  5. Upstream and downstream signals of nitric oxide in pathogen defence.

    PubMed

    Gaupels, Frank; Kuruthukulangarakoola, Gitto Thomas; Durner, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is now recognised as a crucial player in plant defence against pathogens. Considerable progress has been made in defining upstream and downstream signals of NO. Recently, MAP kinases, cyclic nucleotide phosphates, calcium and phosphatidic acid were demonstrated to be involved in pathogen-induced NO-production. However, the search for inducers of NO synthesis is difficult because of the still ambiguous enzymatic source of NO. Accumulation of NO triggers signal transduction by other second messengers. Here we depict NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED 1 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as central redox switches translating NO redox signalling into cellular responses. Although the exact position of NO in defence signal networks is unresolved at last some NO-related signal cascades are emerging.

  6. Hitchhiking behaviour in the obligatory upstream migration of amphidromous snails

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    Migratory animals endure high stress during long-distance travel in order to benefit from spatio-temporally fluctuating resources, including food and shelter or from colonization of unoccupied habitats. Along with some fishes and shrimps, nerite snails in tropical to temperate freshwater systems are examples of amphidromous animals that migrate upstream for growth and reproduction after a marine larval phase. Here I report, to my knowledge, the first example of ‘hitchhiking’ behaviour in the obligatory migration of animals: the nerite snail Neritina asperulata appears to travel several kilometres as minute juveniles by firmly attaching to the shells of congeneric, subadult snails in streams of Melanesian Islands, presumably to increase the success rate of migration. PMID:19411267

  7. Numerical analysis of supersonic combustion ramjet with upstream fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, Raffaele; Pezzella, Giuseppe

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes possible fuel injection scheme for airbreathing engines that use hydrocarbon fuels. The basic idea is to inject fuel at the spike tip of the supersonic inlet to achieve mixing and combustion efficiency with a limited length combustion chamber. A numerical code, able to solve the full Navier-Stokes equations in turbulent and reacting flows, is employed to obtain numerical simulations of the thermo-fluidynamic fields at different scramjet flight conditions, at Mach numbers of M=6.5 and 8. The feasibility of the idea of the upstream injection is checked for a simple axisymmetric configuration and relatively small size. The results are discussed in connection with the potential benefits deriving from the use of new ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC).

  8. Hot, diamagnetic cavities upstream from the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bame, S. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    On eight occasions the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft registered peculiar plasma structures upstream of the earth's bow shock. The events exhibit a temporary, strong reduction in the magnitude of the magnetic field and strong enhancements of the field strength bordering the reduction zone. The low field strength regions featured temperatures from 1-10 million k and pressure an order of magnitude greater than the solar wind. The pressure gradients exceeded the magnetic tension around the structures, although the field of the cavities may be a closed structure. A model is proposed of hot, expanding diamagnetic plasma cavities with scales on the order of a few earth radii. Speculations on the interaction and origin or impetus for the cavities within the bow shock, foreshock, the magnetosphere and the solar wind are discussed. Similarities between the phenomena detected and signatures obtained with the AMPTE releases of chemicals in the solar wind are noted.

  9. High-fidelity modeling of airfoil interaction with upstream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodnick, Jacob

    To supplement past research on low speed unsteady airfoil responses to upstream disturbances, this work proposes and investigates a method to generate a turbulent momentum source to be convected downstream and interact with an SD7003 airfoil in a high-fidelity numerical simulation. A perturbation velocity field is generated from a summation of Fourier harmonics and applied to the forcing function in the momentum terms of the Navier Stokes Equations. The result is a three-dimensional, divergence-free, convected turbulent gust with applied statistical parameters. A parametric study has been done in 2D and 3D comparing the resultant flow fields and airfoil interactions for various numerical and physical parameters.

  10. The Effect of Upstream Vane Wakes on Annular Diffuser Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Erica; Padilla, Angelina; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2008-11-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the sensitivity to inlet conditions of the flow in two annular diffusers. One of the diffusers was a conservative design typical of a diffuser directly upstream of the combustor in a jet engine. The other had the same length and inlet shape as the first diffuser but a larger area ratio and was meant to operate on the verge of separation. Each diffuser was connected to two different inlets, one containing a fully-developed channel flow, the other containing wakes from a row of airfoils. Three-component velocity measurements were taken on the flow in each inlet/diffuser combination using Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry. Results will be presented on the 3D velocity fields in the two diffusers and the effect of the airfoil wakes on separation and secondary flows.

  11. Diabetes mellitus and atrial remodeling: mechanisms and potential upstream therapies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qitong; Liu, Tong; Ng, Chee Y; Li, Guangping

    2014-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, and its prevalence has increasing substantially over the last decades. Recent data suggest that there is an increased risk of AF among the patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the potential molecular mechanisms regarding DM-related AF and diabetic atrial remodeling are not fully understood. In this comprehensive review, we would like to summarize the potential relationship between diabetes and atrial remodeling, including structural, electrical, and autonomic remodeling. Also, some upstream therapies, such as thiazolidinediones, probucol, ACEI/ARBs, may play an important role in the prevention and treatment of AF. Therefore, large prospective randomized, controlled trials and further experimental studies should be challengingly continued.

  12. From worker health to citizen health: moving upstream.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Martin-Jose

    2013-12-01

    New rapid growth economies, urbanization, health systems crises, and "big data" are causing fundamental changes in social structures and systems, including health. These forces for change have significant consequences for occupational and environmental medicine and will challenge the specialty to think beyond workers and workplaces as the principal locus of innovation for health and performance. These trends are placing great emphasis on upstream strategies for addressing the complex systems dynamics of the social determinants of health. The need to engage systems in communities for healthier workforces is a shift in orientation from worker and workplace centric to citizen and community centric. This change for occupational and environmental medicine requires extending systems approaches in the workplace to communities that are systems of systems and that require different skills, data, tools, and partnerships.

  13. Upstream and downstream strategies to economize biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Hasheminejad, Meisam; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Mansourpanah, Yaghoub; Khatami far, Mahdi; Javani, Azita

    2011-01-01

    In recent years biodiesel has drawn considerable amount of attention as a clean and renewable fuel. Biodiesel is produced from renewable sources such as vegetable oils and animal fat mainly through catalytic or non-catalytic transesterification method as well as supercritical method. However, as a consequence of disadvantages of these methods, the production cost increases dramatically. This article summarizes different biodiesel production methods with a focus on their advantages and disadvantages. The downstream and upstream strategies such as using waste cooking oils, application of non-edible plant oils, plant genetic engineering, using membrane separation technology for biodiesel production, separation and purification, application of crude glycerin as an energy supplement for ruminants, glycerin ultra-purification and their consequent roles in economizing the production process are fully discussed in this article. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Upstream solutions for price-gouging on critical generic medicines.

    PubMed

    Houston, Adam R; Beall, Reed F; Attaran, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Exorbitant price increases for critical off-patent medicines have received considerable media attention in recent months, leading to an investigation by the U.S. Senate. However, much of this attention has focused upon the companies that initiated the price increases, all of whom had recently acquired the drugs in question. Overlooked are upstream interventions with the originators of these drugs to prevent generics trolling in the first place. Using the particular example of Eli Lilly and Company's efforts to divest itself of cycloserine, a flawed process that paved the way for the recent price hike by Rodelis Therapeutics, this article highlights the responsibilities of drug originators, and safeguards to ensure similar rights transfers do not affect ongoing affordable access.

  15. Upstream Swirl Effects on the Flow Inside a Labyrinth Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Johnson, Mark C.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field inside a seven cavity tooth on rotor labyrinth seal was measured using a 3D laser Doppler anemometer system. The seal was operated at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 using water as the working fluid. Swirl vanes were placed upstream of the seal to produce positive, negative, and no preswirl. It was found that the axial and radial velocities were minimally effected. The tangential velocity, both in the clearance region and the seal cavities on the rotor, were greatly altered by the preswirl. By applying negative preswirl, the tangential velocity was suppressed, even in the seventh cavity. The turbulence levels decreased as the preswirl varied from negative to positive.

  16. 5. Looking west upstream, towards the location of the erstwhile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Looking west upstream, towards the location of the erstwhile intake flume into canal from the upper reaches of the Potomac River above the Great Falls, on the old Potowmack Canal built by George Washington. The plan contemplated canal navigation around the Great Falls of the Potomac River, located on the Virginia side of the Potomac, about 15 miles above Washington, D.C. The Company was organized in 1785, and by 1802, this and three or four smaller canals were substantially completed and raft-like boats began operation with materials from the west to the city of Georgetown. 'Although the canals and locks of the Potomac Canal were considered a great engineering accomplishment, the improvements to the river channel were inadequate. Disappointment ... - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal & Locks, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  17. From Worker Health To Citizen Health: Moving Upstream

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Martin-Jose

    2014-01-01

    New rapid growth economies, urbanization, health systems crises and “big data” are causing fundamental changes in social structures and systems including health. These forces for change have significant consequences for occupational and environmental medicine and will challenge the specialty to think beyond workers and workplaces as the principal locus of innovation for health and performance. These trends are placing great emphasis on upstream strategies for addressing the complex systems dynamics of the social determinants of health. The need to engage systems in communities for healthier workforces is a shift in orientation from worker and workplace centric to citizen and community centric. This change for occupational and environmental medicine requires extending systems approaches in the workplace to communities which are systems of systems and which require different skills, data, tools and partnerships. PMID:24284749

  18. Radon variability between upstream and downstream in two catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, W. H.; Lee, J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to reveal the characteristics of temporal and spatial radon variations in upstream and downstream areas and evaluated interaction between groundwater and stream water by comparing radon concentrations in two catchments. For this purpose, we collected the data of radon concentrations and field parameters (pH, EC, DO and ORP). The studied streams are located in the middle-east region of the country where are parts of Chuncheon and Inje, Gangwon Province. Generally, radon concentrations were higher in groundwater than stream water. Therefore, when groundwater flowed into the stream water, radon concentration of stream water was higher than when stream water flowed into groundwater. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (No. NRF-2015R1A4A1041105).

  19. Upstream Swirl Effects on the Flow Inside a Labyrinth Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Johnson, Mark C.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field inside a seven cavity tooth on rotor labyrinth seal was measured using a 3D laser Doppler anemometer system. The seal was operated at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 using water as the working fluid. Swirl vanes were placed upstream of the seal to produce positive, negative, and no preswirl. It was found that the axial and radial velocities were minimally effected. The tangential velocity, both in the clearance region and the seal cavities on the rotor, were greatly altered by the preswirl. By applying negative preswirl, the tangential velocity was suppressed, even in the seventh cavity. The turbulence levels decreased as the preswirl varied from negative to positive.

  20. Ingestion into the upstream wheelspace of an axial turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T.; Turner, A. B.

    1994-04-01

    The upstream wheelspace of an axial air turbine stage complete with nozzle guide vanes (NGVs) and rotor blades (430 mm mean diameter) has been tested with the objective of examining the combined effect of NGVs and rotor blades on the level of mainstream ingestion for different seal flow rates. A simple axial clearance seal was used with the rotor spun up to 6650 rpm by drawing air through it from atmospheric pressure with a large centrifugal compressor. The effect of rotational speed was examined for several constant mainstream flow rates by controlling the rotor speed with an air brake. The circumferential variation in hub static pressure was measured at the trailing edge of the NGVs upstream of the seal gap and was found to affect ingestion significantly. The hub static pressure distribution on the rotor blade leading edges was rotor speed dependent and could not be measured in the experiments. The Denton three-dimensional CFD computer code was used to predict the smoothed time-dependent pressure field for the rotor together with the pressure distribution downstream of the NGVs. The level and distribution of mainstream ingestion, and thus, the seal effectiveness, was determined from nitrous oxide gas concentration measurements and related to static pressure measurements made throughout the wheelspace. With the axial clearance rim seal close to the rotor the presence of the blades had a complex effect. Rotor blades in connection with NGVs were found to reduce mainstream ingestion seal flow rates significantly, but a small level of ingestion existed even for very high levels of seal flow rate.

  1. Corporation-induced Diseases, Upstream Epidemiologic Surveillance, and Urban Health

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Corporation-induced diseases are defined as diseases of consumers, workers, or community residents who have been exposed to disease agents contained in corporate products. To study the epidemiology and to guide expanded surveillance of these diseases, a new analytical framework is proposed. This framework is based on the agent–host–environment model and the upstream multilevel epidemiologic approach and posits an epidemiologic cascade starting with government-sanctioned corporate profit making and ending in a social cost, i.e., harm to population health. Each of the framework’s levels addresses a specific level of analysis, including government, corporations, corporate conduits, the environment of the host, and the host. The explained variable at one level is also the explanatory variable at the next lower level. In this way, a causal chain can be followed along the epidemiologic cascade from the site of societal power down to the host. The framework thus describes the pathways by which corporate decisions filter down to disease production in the host and identifies opportunities for epidemiologic surveillance. Since the environment of city dwellers is strongly shaped by corporations that are far upstream and several levels away, the framework has relevance for the study of urban health. Corporations that influence the health of urban populations include developers and financial corporations that determine growth or decay of urban neighborhoods, as well as companies that use strategies based on neighborhood characteristics to sell products that harm consumer health. Epidemiological inquiry and surveillance are necessary at all levels to provide the knowledge needed for action to protect the health of the population. To achieve optimal inquiry and surveillance at the uppermost levels, epidemiologists will have to work with political scientists and other social scientists and to utilize novel sources of information. PMID:18437580

  2. Corporation-induced diseases, upstream epidemiologic surveillance, and urban health.

    PubMed

    Jahiel, René I

    2008-07-01

    Corporation-induced diseases are defined as diseases of consumers, workers, or community residents who have been exposed to disease agents contained in corporate products. To study the epidemiology and to guide expanded surveillance of these diseases, a new analytical framework is proposed. This framework is based on the agent-host-environment model and the upstream multilevel epidemiologic approach and posits an epidemiologic cascade starting with government-sanctioned corporate profit making and ending in a social cost, i.e., harm to population health. Each of the framework's levels addresses a specific level of analysis, including government, corporations, corporate conduits, the environment of the host, and the host. The explained variable at one level is also the explanatory variable at the next lower level. In this way, a causal chain can be followed along the epidemiologic cascade from the site of societal power down to the host. The framework thus describes the pathways by which corporate decisions filter down to disease production in the host and identifies opportunities for epidemiologic surveillance. Since the environment of city dwellers is strongly shaped by corporations that are far upstream and several levels away, the framework has relevance for the study of urban health. Corporations that influence the health of urban populations include developers and financial corporations that determine growth or decay of urban neighborhoods, as well as companies that use strategies based on neighborhood characteristics to sell products that harm consumer health. Epidemiological inquiry and surveillance are necessary at all levels to provide the knowledge needed for action to protect the health of the population. To achieve optimal inquiry and surveillance at the uppermost levels, epidemiologists will have to work with political scientists and other social scientists and to utilize novel sources of information.

  3. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-17

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  4. Assessing upstream fish passage connectivity with network analysis.

    PubMed

    McKay, S Kyle; Schramski, John R; Conyngham, Jock N; Fischenich, J Craig

    2013-09-01

    Hydrologic connectivity is critical to the structure, function, and dynamic process of river ecosystems. Dams, road crossings, and water diversions impact connectivity by altering flow regimes, behavioral cues, local geomorphology, and nutrient cycling. This longitudinal fragmentation of river ecosystems also increases genetic and reproductive isolation of aquatic biota such as migratory fishes. The cumulative effects on fish passage of many structures along a river are often substantial, even when individual barriers have negligible impact. Habitat connectivity can be improved through dam removal or other means of fish passage improvement (e.g., ladders, bypasses, culvert improvement). Environmental managers require techniques for comparing alternative fish passage restoration actions at alternative or multiple locations. Herein, we examined a graph-theoretic algorithm for assessing upstream habitat connectivity to investigate both basic and applied fish passage connectivity problems. First, we used hypothetical watershed configurations to assess general alterations to upstream fish passage connectivity with changes in watershed network topology (e.g., linear vs. highly dendritic) and the quantity, location, and passability of each barrier. Our hypothetical network modeling indicates that locations of dams with limited passage efficiency near the watershed outlet create a strong fragmentation signal but are not individually sufficient to disconnect the system. Furthermore, there exists a threshold in the number of dams beyond which connectivity declines precipitously, regardless of watershed topology and dam configuration. Watersheds with highly branched configurations are shown to be less susceptible to disconnection as measured by this metric. Second, we applied the model to prioritize barrier improvement in the mainstem of the Truckee River, Nevada, USA. The Truckee River application demonstrates the ability of the algorithm to address conditions common in fish

  5. Upstream migration of two pre-spawning shortnose sturgeon passed upstream of Pinopolis Dam, Cooper River, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finney, S.T.; Isely, J.J.; Cooke, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Two shortnose sturgeon were artificially passed above the Pinopolis Lock and Dam into the Santee-Cooper Lakes in order to simulate the use of a fish-passage mechanism. Movement patterns and spawning behavior were studied to determine the potential success of future shortnose sturgeon migrations if and when a fish-migration bypass structure is installed. In addition to movement patterns, water temperature was monitored in areas that shortnose sturgeons utilized. Shortnose sturgeon migrated through a large static system to a known shortnose sturgeon spawning area more than 160 km upstream where water temperatures were consistent with known shortnose sturgeon spawning temperatures. No specific movement patterns in the reservoir system were recorded during downstream migrations.

  6. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  7. Statistical Analysis of Japanese Structural Damage Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    Calculated Peak Overpressure Data ......... .. 36 Figure 4. Frequency Functions for Assumed Damage Laws ............ .. 38 Figure 5. Conversions to Value of...Buildings .... .......... .. 92 Figure 20. Effect of Damage Law on Confidence Regions ............ .. 97 * Figure 21. Comparison of Confidence Limits on...Value of ad (Cumulative Log Normal Damage Law ) ...... ............ .. 99 * Figure 22. Comparison of Confidence Limits on Value of ad (Cumulative Log

  8. 46 CFR 172.205 - Local damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Local damage. 172.205 Section 172.205 Shipping COAST... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.205 Local damage. (a) Each tankship must be shown by design calculations... operation assuming that local damage extending 30 inches (76 cm) normal to the hull shell is applied at any...

  9. Flexure with damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaker, David M.; Turcotte, Donald L.; Kellogg, Louise H.

    2006-09-01

    Ductile behaviour in rocks is often associated with plasticity due to dislocation motion or diffusion under high pressures and temperatures. However, ductile behaviour can also occur in brittle materials. An example would be cataclastic flow associated with folding at shallow crustal levels. Engineers utilize damage mechanics to model the continuum deformation of brittle materials. In this paper we utilize a modified form of damage mechanics that includes a yield stress. Here, damage represents a reduction in frictional strength. We use this empirical approach to simulate bending of the lithosphere through the problem of plate flexure. We use numerical simulations to obtain quasi-static solutions to the Navier equations of elasticity. We use the program GeoFEST v. 4.5 (Geophysical Finite Element Simulation Tool), developed by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to generate solutions for each time step. When the von Mises stress exceeds the critical stress on an element we apply damage to reduce the shear modulus of the element. Damage is calculated at each time step by a power-law relationship of the ratio of the critical stress to the von Mises stress and the critical strain to the von Mises strain. This results in the relaxation of the material due to increasing damage. To test our method, we apply our damage rheology to a semi-infinite plate deforming under its own weight. Where the von Mises stress exceeds the critical stress, we simulate the formation of damage and observe the time-dependent relaxation of the stress and strain to near the yield strength. We simulate a wide range of behaviours from slow relaxation to instantaneous failure, over timescales that span six orders of magnitude. Using this method, stress relaxation produces perfectly plastic behaviour in cases where failure does not occur. For cases of failure, we observe a rapid increase in damage, analogous to the acceleration of microcrack formation and acoustic emissions prior to failure. Thus

  10. Calculator Cookery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Casey; And Others

    This valuable collection of materials was developed to incorporate the calculator as an instructional aid in ninth- and tenth-grade general and basic mathematics classes. The materials are also appropriate for grades 7 and 8. After an introductory section which teaches the use of the calculator, four games and activities are described. For these…

  11. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  12. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING DAMAGE TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING DAMAGE TO FLOOR BEAMS AND DECK OF WEST APPROACH SPAN, CAUSED WHEN CONTRACTOR'S FORCES, WORKING ON ADJACENT ABUTMENT FOR REPLACEMENT BRIDGE, DYNAMITED GRANITE BOULDERS INTO UPSTREAM SIDE OF HISTORIC BRIDGE - Middle Fork Stanislaus River Bridge, Spans Middle Fork Stanislaus River at State Highway 108, Dardanelle, Tuolumne County, CA

  13. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  14. Effects of fuel injection on mixing and upstream interactions in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qiuya

    Scramjet engine performance has been studied experimentally and computationally almost under steady-state conditions. Transients of the airflow and fueling in the scramjet's isolator or combustor create important fluid-dynamic/ combustion interactions. Spark schlieren photography was employed to study the effects of pressure rise in the combustion chamber on the isolator flow at three conditions with isolator entrance Mach number of 1.6, 1.9 and 2.5, covering the range of dual-mode combustion and transition to full scramjet operation. Heat release through combustion in the model scramjet was simulated by incrementally blocking the flow exit until upstream-interaction was induced and a shock train formed in the isolator. Theoretical predictions of the pressure rise in the isolator under separated flow conditions were calculated, which agreed well with the experimental data. The prediction is sensitive to the accurate modeling of the isolator inlet conditions and the correct selection of wall friction coefficient. Gaseous helium and argon have been transversely injected into a Mach 1.6 airflow simulating a light and a heavy fuel injection behind a thin triangular pylon placed upstream, in the isolator, which has a negligible impact on pressure losses. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to observe the penetration and mixing in the test section at three cross-sections including the recirculation region and beyond. Results were compared to the no-pylon cases, which showed the presence of the pylon resulted in improving both penetration and spreading of the jet. Simulation for shock wave/ boundary-layer interaction was conducted in Fluent for case of M=1.9 at 60% blockage by using k-ε RNG model with two different near wall treatments. In both cases, the shock ran out of isolator before the computation converged, this is different from experimental results. Proper actual wall friction force may have a very important effect on the computation, which needs

  15. Overview and quantification of the factors affecting the upstream and downstream movements of Gammarus pulex (Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Dedecker, Andy P; Goethals, Peter L; De Pauw, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Human activities have severely deteriorated the Flemish river systems, and many functions such as drinking water supply, fishing, ... are threatened. Because their restoration entails drastic social (e.g. change in habits with regard to water use and discharge, urban planning) and economical (e.g. investment in nature restoration, wastewater treatment system installation) consequences, the decisions should be taken with enough forethought. Ecosystem models can act as interesting tools to support decision-making in river restoration management. In particular models that can predict the habitat requirements of organisms are of considerable importance to ensure that the planned actions have the desired effects on the aquatic ecosystems. In preliminary studies, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were tested and optimized to obtain the best model configuration for the prediction of the habitat suitability for Gammarus pulex based on the abiotic characteristics of their aquatic environment in the Zwalm river basin (Flanders, Belgium). Although, these ANN models are in general quite robust with a rather high predictive reliability, the model performance has to be increased with regard to simulations for river restoration management. In particular, spatial-temporal expert-rules have to be included. Migration kinetics (downstream drift and upstream migration) of the organism and migration barriers along the river (weirs, impounded river sections, ...) can deliver important additional information on the effectiveness of the restoration plans, and also on the timing of the expected effects. This paper presents an overview and quantification of the factors affecting the upstream and downstream movements of Gammarus pulex. During further research, ANN models will be used to predict the habitat suitability for Gammarus pulex after several restoration options. The migration models, implemented in a Geographical Information System (GIS), are applied to calculate the migration

  16. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Review of Upstream and Downstream Antioxidant Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Uttara, Bayani; Singh, Ajay V.; Zamboni, Paolo; Mahajan, R.T

    2009-01-01

    Free radicals are common outcome of normal aerobic cellular metabolism. In-built antioxidant system of body plays its decisive role in prevention of any loss due to free radicals. However, imbalanced defense mechanism of antioxidants, overproduction or incorporation of free radicals from environment to living system leads to serious penalty leading to neuro-degeneration. Neural cells suffer functional or sensory loss in neurodegenerative diseases. Apart from several other environmental or genetic factors, oxidative stress (OS) leading to free radical attack on neural cells contributes calamitous role to neuro-degeneration. Though, oxygen is imperative for life, imbalanced metabolism and excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation end into a range of disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, aging and many other neural disorders. Toxicity of free radicals contributes to proteins and DNA injury, inflammation, tissue damage and subsequent cellular apoptosis. Antioxidants are now being looked upon as persuasive therapeutic against solemn neuronal loss, as they have capability to combat by neutralizing free radicals. Diet is major source of antioxidants, as well as medicinal herbs are catching attention to be commercial source of antioxidants at present. Recognition of upstream and downstream antioxidant therapy to oxidative stress has been proved an effective tool in alteration of any neuronal damage as well as free radical scavenging. Antioxidants have a wide scope to sequester metal ions involved in neuronal plaque formation to prevent oxidative stress. In addition, antioxidant therapy is vital in scavenging free radicals and ROS preventing neuronal degeneration in post-oxidative stress scenario. PMID:19721819

  17. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  18. Rating Curve Estimation from Local Levels and Upstream Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, M.; Mascellani, G.

    2003-04-01

    Current technology allows for low cost and easy level measurements while the discharge measurements are still difficult and expensive. Thus, these are rarely performed and usually not in flood conditions because of lack of safety and difficulty in activating the measurement team in due time. As a consequence, long series of levels are frequently available without the corresponding discharge values. However, for the purpose of planning, management of water resources and real time flood forecasting, discharge is needed and it is therefore essential to convert local levels into discharge values by using the appropriate rating curve. Over this last decade, several methods have been proposed to relate local levels at a site of interest to data recorded at a river section located upstream where a rating curve is available. Some of these methods are based on a routing approach which uses the Muskingum model structure in different ways; others are based on the entropy concepts. Lately, fuzzy logic has been applied more and more frequently in the framework of hydraulic and hydrologic problems and this has prompted to the authors to use it for synthesising the rating curves. A comparison between all these strategies is performed, highlighting the difficulties and advantages of each of them, with reference to a long reach of the Po river in Italy, where several hydrometers and the relevant rating curves are available, thus allowing for both a parameterization and validation of the different strategies.

  19. The effects of the Snowflake Divertor on upstream SOL profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, C. K.; Boedo, J. A.; Coda, S.; Labit, B.; Maurizio, R.; Nespoli, F.; Reimerdes, H.; Theiler, C.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Lunt, T.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Walkden, N.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team Team; the TCV Team Team

    2016-10-01

    The Snowflake Divertor creates separated volumes within the SOL and divertor that feature strikingly different ne, Te profiles, and decay lengths, as measured with a scanning probe. Profiles were taken at the outer midplane of TCV plasmas with snowflake divertors as well as just above the X-points within the region of enhanced βpol. Density shoulders in the far SOL in single null plasmas are relaxed by secondary X-points, while effects are more complex in the near SOL. These changes were observed whether the secondary X-point was placed in the low field side SOL, or in the high field side SOL. Additionally, target profiles measured with IR camera and Langmiur probes that were taken in the divertor leg opposite the secondary X-point also show features on the flux surface corresponding to the secondary X-point. Fluctuation statistics from the reciprocating probe as well as comparisons made between upstream and downstream measurements are considered for their implications on SOL transport. Support from EUROfusion Grant 633053 and US DOE Grant DE-SC0010529 are gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Upstream ORFs are prevalent translational repressors in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy G; Bazzini, Ariel A; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of gene expression is fundamental in establishing cellular diversity and a target of natural selection. Untranslated mRNA regions (UTRs) are key mediators of post-transcriptional regulation. Previous studies have predicted thousands of ORFs in 5'UTRs, the vast majority of which have unknown function. Here, we present a systematic analysis of the translation and function of upstream open reading frames (uORFs) across vertebrates. Using high-resolution ribosome footprinting, we find that (i)uORFs are prevalent within vertebrate transcriptomes, (ii) the majority show signatures of active translation, and (iii)uORFs act as potent regulators of translation and RNA levels, with a similar magnitude to miRNAs. Reporter experiments reveal clear repression of downstream translation by uORFs/oORFs. uORF number, intercistronic distance, overlap with the CDS, and initiation context most strongly influence translation. Evolution has targeted these features to favor uORFs amenable to regulation over constitutively repressive uORFs/oORFs. Finally, we observe that the regulatory potential of uORFs on individual genes is conserved across species. These results provide insight into the regulatory code within mRNA leader sequences and their capacity to modulate translation across vertebrates. © 2016 The Authors.

  1. Thyroid-disrupting chemicals: interpreting upstream biomarkers of adverse outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark D; Crofton, Kevin M; Rice, Deborah C; Zoeller, R Thomas

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing evidence in humans and in experimental animals for a relationship between exposure to specific environmental chemicals and perturbations in levels of critically important thyroid hormones (THs). Identification and proper interpretation of these relationships are required for accurate assessment of risk to public health. We review the role of TH in nervous system development and specific outcomes in adults, the impact of xenobiotics on thyroid signaling, the relationship between adverse outcomes of thyroid disruption and upstream causal biomarkers, and the societal implications of perturbations in thyroid signaling by xenobiotic chemicals. We drew on an extensive body of epidemiologic, toxicologic, and mechanistic studies. THs are critical for normal nervous system development, and decreased maternal TH levels are associated with adverse neuropsychological development in children. In adult humans, increased thyroid-stimulating hormone is associated with increased blood pressure and poorer blood lipid profiles, both risk factors for cardiovascular disease and death. These effects of thyroid suppression are observed even within the "normal" range for the population. Environmental chemicals may affect thyroid homeostasis by a number of mechanisms, and multiple chemicals have been identified that interfere with thyroid function by each of the identified mechanisms. Individuals are potentially vulnerable to adverse effects as a consequence of exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals. Any degree of thyroid disruption that affects TH levels on a population basis should be considered a biomarker of adverse outcomes, which may have important societal outcomes.

  2. Rheotaxis facilitates upstream navigation of mammalian sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jörn; Blayney, Martyn; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm maintain the correct swimming direction during various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Whilst chemotaxis may dominate near the ovum, it is unclear which cues guide spermatozoa on their long journey towards the egg. Hypothesized mechanisms range from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing and response to fluid flow variations (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about them. We report the first quantitative study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis, using microfluidic devices to investigate systematically swimming of human and bull sperm over a range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions, and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to stable upstream spiralling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilisation. A minimal mathematical model is presented that accounts quantitatively for the experimental observations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02403.001 PMID:24867640

  3. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, AY; Sitnov, MI; Merkin, VG; Artemyev, AV

    2013-01-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it. PMID:26167430

  4. Upstream gyrating ion events: Cluster observations and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, K.; Fraenz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Korth, A.; Mazelle, C.; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.

    2005-08-01

    Localized events of low-frequency quasi-monochromatic waves in the 30s range observed by Cluster in the upstream region of Earth are analyzed. They are associated with a gyro-motion of the two ion populations consisting of the incoming solar wind protons and the back-streaming ions from the shock. A coordinate system is chosen in which one axis is parallel to the ambient magnetic field B0 and the other one is in the vswxB0 direction. The variation of the plasma parameters is compared with the result of two-fluid Hall-MHD simulations using different beam densities and velocities. Keeping a fixed (relative) beam density (e.g. {alpha}=0.005), non-stationary 'shock-like' structures are generated if the beam velocity exceeds a certain threshold of about ten times the Alfven velocity. Below the threshold, the localized events represent stationary, nonlinear waves (oscillitons) in a beam-plasma system in which the Reynold's stresses of the plasma and beam ions are balanced by the magnetic field stress.

  5. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves upstream of Jupiter's bow shock are analyzed. The waves are found to be right circularly polarized in the solar wind frame which suggests that they are propagating in the fast magnetosonic mode. A complete spectral and minimum variance eigenvalue analysis of the data was performed. The power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations contains several peaks. The fluctuations at 2.3 mHz have a direction of minimum variance along the direction of the average magnetic field. The direction of minimum variance of these fluctuations lies at approximately 40 deg. to the magnetic field and is parallel to the radial direction. We argue that these fluctuations are waves excited by protons reflected off the Jovian bow shock. The inferred speed of the reflected protons is about two times the solar wind speed in the plasma rest frame. A linear instability analysis is presented which suggests an explanation for many of the observed features of the observations.

  6. Electron plasma waves upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacombe, C.; Mangeney, A.; Harvey, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Electrostatic waves are observed around the plasma frequency fpe in the electron foreshock, together with electrons backstreaming from the bow shock. Using data from the sounder aboard ISEE 1, it is shown that this noise, previously understood as narrow band Langmuir waves more or less widened by Doppler shift or nonlinear effects, is in fact composed of two distinct parts: one is a narrow band noise, emitted just above fpe, and observed at the upstream boundary of the electron foreshock. This component has been interpreted as Langmuir waves emitted by a beam-plasma instability. It is suggested that it is of sufficiently large amplitude and monochromatic enough to trap resonant electrons. The other is a broad band noise, more impulsive than the narrow band noise, observed well above and/or well below fpe, deeper in the electron foreshock. The broad band noise has an average spectrum with a typical bi-exponential shape; its peak frequency is not exactly equal to fpe and depends on the Deybe length. This peak frequency also depends on the velocity for which the electron distribution has maximum skew. An experimental determination of the dispersion relation of the broad band noise shows that this noise, as well as the narrow band noise, may be due to the instability of a hot beam in a plasma.

  7. Upstream and Downstream: Anthropological Contributions to River Basin Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, M.

    2003-04-01

    It is now almost 30 years since Thayer Scudder and Elizabeth Colson first focused anthropological analysis on the consequences of forced relocation of peoples from the reservoir areas upstream from large dams. The rate of large dam construction has been enormous, more than 50,000 having been built since the mid-1930s, and the total number of persons forcibly relocated has reached the many millions. Inspired by their work, my colleagues and I at the Institute for Development Anthropology began focusing on the downstream consequences of dam construction, particularly on the Senegal River, invited by the Organisation pour la Mise en Valeur du Fleuve Senegal (OMVS). The work resulted not only in an analysis, but in a proposed alternative dam-management approach that would permit hydropower generation yet substantially reduce the costs of changed flow regimes borne by the riparian peoples. In this discussion, I would like to bring the situation up-to-date. What has happened to those recommendations, initially embraced by at least some of the players involved in the river's management?

  8. Upstream oversight assessment for agrifood nanotechnology: a case studies approach.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Romanchek, James; Kokotovich, Adam

    2008-08-01

    Although nanotechnology is broadly receiving attention in public and academic circles, oversight issues associated with applications for agriculture and food remain largely unexplored. Agrifood nanotechnology is at a critical stage in which informed analysis can help shape funding priorities, risk assessment, and oversight activities. This analysis is designed to help society and policymakers anticipate and prepare for challenges posed by complicated, convergent applications of agrifood nanotechnology. The goal is to identify data, risk assessment, regulatory policy, and engagement needs for overseeing these products so they can be addressed prior to market entry. Our approach, termed upstream oversight assessment (UOA), has potential as a key element of anticipatory governance. It relies on distinct case studies of proposed applications of agrifood nanotechnology to highlight areas that need study and attention. As a tool for preparation, UOA anticipates the types and features of emerging applications; their endpoints of use in society; the extent to which users, workers, ecosystems, or consumers will be exposed; the nature of the material and its safety; whether and where the technologies might fit into current regulatory system(s); the strengths and weaknesses of the system(s) in light of these novel applications; and the possible social concerns related to oversight for them.

  9. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts.

    PubMed

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Merkin, V G; Artemyev, A V

    2013-08-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz ), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz . We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it.

  10. What's Upstream? GIS's critical role in developing nutrient ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Eutrophication due to excess levels of nitrogen and phosphorus can seriously impair ecological function in estuaries. Protective criteria for nutrients are difficult to establish because the source can vary spatially and seasonally, originate either from the watershed or the ocean, and be natural or anthropogenic. GIS tools and processes can help in developing nutrient criteria by establishing reference conditions representative of natural background nutrient levels. Along the Oregon Coast in the Pacific Northwest, the primary source of nutrients in the wet season (November-April) is generally riverine. We delineated and extracted explicit spatial data from watersheds upstream of riverine water quality monitoring stations for parametric comparison to recorded nutrient levels. The SPARROW model (Wise and Johnson, 2011) was used to estimate relative contributions of nutrient sources at each station. Both raster and vector spatial data were used and include land use / land cover, demography, geology, terrain, precipitation and forest type. The relationships of nutrients to spatial data were then explored as an approach to establishing the reference expectation. The abstract introduces Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and processes employed for research conducted under the Safe and Sustainable Water Resources (SSWR) Task 2.3A, entitled “Nutrient Management for Sustainability of Aquatic Ecosystems.” One of the goals of the EPA Office of Water is to

  11. PAK promotes morphological changes by acting upstream of Rac.

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, A; Ahmed, S; Manser, E; Yen, S C; Hall, C; Lim, L

    1998-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase p21-activated kinase (PAK) has been implicated as a downstream effector of the small GTPases Rac and Cdc42. While these GTPases evidently induce a variety of morphological changes, the role(s) of PAK remains elusive. Here we report that overexpression of betaPAK in PC12 cells induces a Rac phenotype, including cell spreading/membrane ruffling, and increased lamellipodia formation at growth cones and shafts of nerve growth factor-induced neurites. These effects are still observed in cells expressing kinase-negative or Rac/Cdc42 binding-deficient PAK mutants, indicating that kinase- and p21-binding domains are not involved. Furthermore, lamellipodia formation in all cell lines, including those expressing Rac binding-deficient PAK, is inhibited significantly by dominant-negative RacN17. Equal inhibition is achieved by blocking PAK interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor PIX using a specific N-terminal PAK fragment. We conclude that PAK, via its N-terminal non-catalytic domain, acts upstream of Rac mediating lamellipodia formation through interaction with PIX. PMID:9687501

  12. Upstream pressure variations associated with the bow shock and their effects on the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Luehr, H.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    The AMPTE IRM solar wind data are analyzed to determine the relationship between upstream pressure fluctuations and magnetospheric perturbations. It is argued that the upstream pressure variations are not inherent in the solar wind but rather are associated with the bow shock. This conclusion follows from the fact that the upstream field strength and density associated with perturbations are highly correlated with each other, while they tend to be anticorrelated in the undisturbed solar wind, and that the upstream perturbations occur within the foreshock or at its boundary. The results imply a mode of interaction between the solar wind upstream and the magnetosphere whereby density changes produced in the foreshock subsequently convect through the bow shock and impinge on the magnetosphere. Upstream pressure perturbations should create significant effects on the magnetopause and at the foot of nearby field lines that lead to the polar cusp ionosphere.

  13. Deceleration of the solar wind upstream from the earth's bow shock and the origin of diffuse upstream ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Paschmann, G.; Skopke, N.

    1980-01-01

    Observations with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Max-Planck-Institut crossed-fan solar wind ion experiment on ISEE I reveal that the solar wind is decelerated and deflected away from the direction of the earth's bow shock as it enters that portion of the upstream region populated by diffuse bow shock ions and long-period (10-60 s) waves. Typically, the average directed velocity vector changes by 7-10 km/s as it enters the wave region. At times, average speed changes as large as 25-40 km/s are observed. Superposed upon these changes in average flow speed are large amplitude (+ or - 15) fluctuations in flow speed associated with the waves themselves. The observations suggest that the solar wind deceleration is the result of momentum transfer from reflected bow shock ions to the wind via the long-period waves as the reflected ion beams go unstable. The broad angular distributions of the diffuse ions thus appear to be produced as a consequence of the disruption of reflected ion beams.

  14. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  15. "Upstream Thinking": the catchment management approach of a water provider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand-Clement, E.; Ross, M.; Smith, D.; Anderson, K.; Luscombe, D.; Le Feuvre, N.; Brazier, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    Human activities have large impacts on water quality and provision. Water companies throughout the UK are faced with the consequences of poor land management and need to find appropriate solutions to decreasing water quality. This is particularly true in the South West of England, where 93% of the drinking water is sourced from rivers and reservoirs: large areas of drained peatlands (i.e. Exmoor and Dartmoor National Parks) are responsible for a significant input of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) discolouring the water, whilst poorly managed farming activities can lead to diffuse pollution. Alongside the direct environmental implications, poor water quality is partly increasing water treatment costs and will drive significant future investment in additional water treatment, with further repercussions on customers. This highlights the need for water companies throughout the UK, and further afield, to be more involved in catchment management. "Upstream Thinking" is South West Water's (SWW) approach to catchment management, where working with stakeholders to improve water quality upstream aims to avoid increasingly costly solutions downstream. This approach has led the company to invest in two major areas of work: (1) The Farmland programme where problematic farm management practices and potential solutions are identified, typically 40% of the required investment is then offered in exchange for a legal undertaking to maintain the new farm assets in good condition for 25 years; (2) The Mires programme which involves heavy investment in peatland restoration through the blocking of open ditches in order to improve water storage and quality in the long term. From these two projects, it has been clear that stakeholder involvement of groups such as local farmers, the Westcountry Rivers Trust, the Exmoor National Park Authority, the Environment Agency, Natural England and the Exmoor Society is essential, first because it draws in catchment improvement expertise which is not

  16. Crossflow transition control by upstream flow deformation using plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörr, Philipp C.; Kloker, Markus J.

    2017-02-01

    Control of laminar-turbulent transition in a swept-wing-type boundary-layer flow, subject to primary crossflow instability, is investigated using direct numerical simulations. In our previous works, we explored a direct base-flow stabilization aimed at a spanwise homogenous flow manipulation or a direct crossflow-vortex manipulation by plasma actuators. In this paper, the technique of upstream flow deformation (UFD) is applied, needing by far the least energy input. The actuators, modeled by local volume forcing, are set to excite amplified steady crossflow vortex (CFV) control modes with a higher spanwise wavenumber than the most amplified modes. The resulting nonlinear control CFVs are spaced narrower than the naturally occurring vortices and are less unstable with respect to secondary instability. They generate a beneficial mean-flow distortion attenuating the primary crossflow instability, and thus a delay of the transition to turbulence. Unlike roughness elements for UFD, the employed dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators allow to set the force direction: Forcing against the crossflow has a direct, fundamental stabilizing effect due to a reduction of the mean crossflow, whereas forcing in the crossflow direction locally invokes the opposite due to a local increase of the mean crossflow. The differences between these settings, also with respect to forcing in streamwise direction, are discussed in detail, and it is shown that a significant transition delay can be achieved indeed with both, however with a differing efficiency and robustness. Additionally, a comparison to a set-up with an excitation of the control modes by synthetic blowing and suction is performed to clarify the role of the direct effect on the base flow.

  17. Geological nominations at UNESCO World Heritage, an upstream struggle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive-Garcia, Cécile; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Using my 10 years experience in setting up and defending a UNESCO world Heritage Geological nomination, this presentation aims to give a personal insight into this international process and the differential use of science, subjective perception (aesthetic and 'naturality'), and politics. At this point in the process, new protocols have been tested in order to improve the dialogue, accountability and transparency between the different stake-holders. These are, the State parties, the IUCN, the scientific community, and UNESCO itself. Our proposal is the Chaîne des Puys-Limagne fault ensemble, which combines tectonic, geomorphological evolution and volcanology. The project's essence is a conjunction of inseparable geological features and processes, set in the context of plate tectonics. This very unicit yof diverse forms and processes creates the value of the site. However, it is just this that has caused a problem, as the advisory body has a categorical approach of nominations that separates items to assess them in an unconnected manner.From the start we proposed a combined approach, where a property is seen in its entirety, and the constituent elements seen as interlinked elements reflecting the joint underlying phenomena. At this point, our project has received the first ever open review by an independent technical mission (jointly set up by IUCN, UNESCO and the State party). The subsequent report was broadly supportive of the project's approach and of the value of the ensemble of features. The UNESCO committee in 2016, re-referred the nomination, acknowledging the potential Outstanding Universal Value of the site and requesting the parties to continue the upstream process (e.g. collaborative work), notably on the recommendations and conclusions of the Independent Technical mission report. Meetings are continuing, and I shall provide you with the hot-off-the-press news as this ground breaking nomination progresses.

  18. Augmented reality graphic interface for upstream dam inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Jean; Lavallee, Jean

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a 3D graphic interface for the inspection of cracks along a dam. The monitoring of concrete dams is restricted by the accessibility of the various parts of the structure. Since the upstream face of a dam is not usually exposed, as in our case at Hydro- Quebec, a systematic and even ad hoc inspection become extremely complex. The piloting of a ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) underwater is like driving in a snowstorm. The view from the camera is similar to the visibility a driver would have in a snowstorm. Sensor fusion has to be performed by the operator since each sensor is specialized for its task. Even with a 2D positioning system or sonar scan, the approach to the inspection area is very tedious. A new 3D interface has been developed using augmented reality since the position and orientation of the vehicle are known. The point of view of the observer can easily be changed during a manipulation of the ROV. A shared memory based server can access the position data of the ROV and update the graphics in real time. The graphic environment can be used as well to drive the ROV with computer generated trajectories. A video card will be added to the Silicon Graphics workstation to display the view of the camera fixed to the ROV. This visual feedback will only be available when the ROV is close enough to the dam. The images will be calibrated since the position of the camera is known. The operator interface also includes a set of stereoscopic camera, hydrophonic (sound) feedback and imaging tools for measuring cracks.

  19. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in a Platinum Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, P. M.; Dietrich, D. L.; Mellish, B. P.; Miller, F. J.; T'ien, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for catalytic combustion in monolithic reactors at elevated temperatures is the start-up or "light-off" from a cold initial condition. In this work, we demonstrate a concept called "back-end catalytic ignition that potentially can be utilized in the light-off of catalytic monoliths. An external downstream flame or Joule heating raises the temperature of a small portion of the catalyst near the outlet initiating a localized catalytic reaction that propagates upstream heating the entire channel. This work uses a transient numerical model to demonstrate "back-end" ignition within a single channel which can characterize the overall performance of a monolith. The paper presents comparisons to an experiment using a single non-adiabatic channel but the concept can be extended to the adiabatic monolith case. In the model, the time scales associated with solid heat-up are typically several orders of magnitude larger than the gas-phase and chemical kinetic time-scales. Therefore, the model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase with respect to a transient solid. The gas phase is one-dimensional. Appropriate correlations, however, account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The thermally-thin solid includes axial conduction. The gas phase, however, does not include axial conduction due to the high Peclet number flows. The model includes both detailed gas-phase and catalytic surface reactions. The experiment utilizes a pure platinum circular channel oriented horizontally though which a CO/O2 mixture (equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9) flows at 2 m/s.

  20. Relict landscape resistance to dissection by upstream migrating knickpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, Gilles Y.; Willenbring, Jane K.; Miller, Thomas E.; Scatena, Frederik N.

    2016-06-01

    Expanses of subdued topographies are common at high elevation in mountain ranges. They are often interpreted as relict landscapes and are expected to be replaced by steeper topography as erosion proceeds. Preservation of such relict fragments can merely reflect the fact that it takes time to remove any preexisting topography. However, relict fragments could also possess intrinsic characteristics that make them resilient to dissection. We document here the propagation of a wave of dissection across an uplifted relict landscape in Puerto Rico. Using 10Be-26Al burial dating on cave sediments, we show that uplift started 4 Ma and that river knickpoints have since migrated very slowly across the landscape. Modern detrital 10Be erosion rates are consistent with these long-term rates of knickpoint retreat. Analysis of knickpoint distribution, combined with visual observations along the streambeds, indicates that incision by abrasion and plucking is so slow that bedrock weathering becomes a competing process of knickpoint retreat. The studied rivers flow over a massive stock of quartz diorite surrounded by an aureole of metavolcanic rocks. Earlier studies have shown that vegetation over the relict topography efficiently limits erosion, allowing for the formation of a thick saprolite underneath. Such slow erosion reduces streambed load fluxes delivered to the knickpoints, as well as bed load grain size. Both processes limit abrasion. Compounding the effect of slow abrasion, wide joint spacing in the bedrock makes plucking infrequent. Thus, the characteristics of the relict upstream landscape have a direct effect on stream incision farther downstream, reducing the celerity at which the relict, subdued landscape is dissected. We conclude that similar top-down controls on river incision rate may help many relict landscapes to persist amidst highly dissected topographies.

  1. Innovation and performance: The case of the upstream petroleum sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, A. C. Jai

    This thesis investigates innovation in the upstream crude oil and natural gas sector, a strategic part of the Canadian economy and a vital industry for North American energy trade and security. Significant interest exists in understanding innovation in this sector from a private and public policy perspective. Interest in the sector has intensified recently due to concerns about world oil supply, Canada's oil sands development, and the potential that Canada may become an "energy superpower." The study examines the factors that drive companies involved in exploration, development, and production in the upstream petroleum sector to innovate and the impact of their innovation activities through major technologies on their performance. The thesis focuses on process innovation, which involves the adoption of new or significantly improved production processes, and is distinct from product innovation, which is based on the development and commercialization of a product with improved product characteristics to deliver new services to the consumer. The thesis provides a comprehensive review of the literature and develops an investigative model framework to examine the drivers of innovation and the impact of innovation on performance in the upstream petroleum sector. The research employs a survey questionnaire that was developed to obtain data and information, which was missing in the literature or not publicly available to test key relationships of innovation and performance indicators. In addition to the survey questionnaire, a number of knowledgeable experts in the industry were also interviewed. A total of 68 respondents completed the survey questionnaire, accounting for 40 percent of the firms in the industry. This percentage goes up to over 50 percent when account is taken of extremely small firms who could not fill out the survey. Further, the 68 respondents account for most of the industry revenues, production, and employment. The respondents include most of the key

  2. Analysis of key thresholds leading to upstream dependencies in global transboundary water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munia, Hafsa Ahmed; Guillaume, Joseph; Kummu, Matti; Mirumachi, Naho; Wada, Yoshihide

    2017-04-01

    Transboundary water bodies supply 60% of global fresh water flow and are home to about 1/3 of the world's population; creating hydrological, social and economic interdependencies between countries. Trade-offs between water users are delimited by certain thresholds, that, when crossed, result in changes in system behavior, often related to undesirable impacts. A wide variety of thresholds are potentially related to water availability and scarcity. Scarcity can occur because of the country's own water use, and that is potentially intensified by upstream water use. In general, increased water scarcity escalates the reliance on shared water resources, which increases interdependencies between riparian states. In this paper the upstream dependencies of global transboundary river basins are examined at the scale of sub-basin areas. We aim to assess how upstream water withdrawals cause changes in the scarcity categories, such that crossing thresholds is interpreted in terms of downstream dependency on upstream water availability. The thresholds are defined for different types of water availability on which a sub-basin relies: - reliable local runoff (available even in a dry year), - less reliable local water (available in the wet year), - reliable dry year inflows from possible upstream area, and - less reliable wet year inflows from upstream. Possible upstream withdrawals reduce available water downstream, influencing the latter two water availabilities. Upstream dependencies have then been categorized by comparing a sub-basin's scarcity category across different water availability types. When population (or water consumption) grows, the sub-basin satisfies its needs using less reliable water. Thus, the factors affecting the type of water availability being used are different not only for each type of dependency category, but also possibly for every sub- basin. Our results show that, in the case of stress (impacts from high use of water), in 104 (12%) sub- basins out of

  3. Firewood calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Curtis, A.B.; Darwin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    Rotating cardboard discs are used to read off total tree or topwood firewood volume (tons or cords) that can be expected from trees of d.b.h. 6 to 24 inches and tree height 10 to 90 feet. One side of the calculator is used for broadleaved species with deliquescent crowns and the other side for braodleaves with excurrent crowns.

  4. 4. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 324.99, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 324.99, view to northeast, 90mm lens. Heavy vegetation cover, steep banks, and lack of streamside footing precluded full elevation views of the upstream and downstream sides of this bridge. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 324.99, Milepost 324.99, Shasta Springs, Siskiyou County, CA

  5. 3. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 301.85, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 301.85, view to east-northeast, 135mm lens. Heavy vegetation cover, steep banks, and lack of streamside footing precluded full elevation views of the upstream and downstream sides of this bridge. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  6. Energetic-ion acceleration and transport in the upstream region of Jupiter: Voyager 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Long-lived upstream energetic ion events at Jupiter appear to be very similar in nearly all respects to upstream ion events at Earth. A notable difference between the two planetary systems is the enhanced heavy ion compositional signature reported for the Jovian events. This compositional feature has suggested that ions escaping from the Jovian magnetosphere play an important role in forming upstream ion populations at Jupiter. In contrast, models of energetic upstream ions at Earth emphasize in situ acceleration of reflected solar wind ions within the upstream region itself. Using Voyager 1 and 2 energetic ( approximately 30 keV) ion measurements near the magnetopause, in the magnetosheath, and immediately upstream of the bow shock, the compositional patterns are examined together with typical energy spectra in each of these regions. A model involving upstream Fermi acceleration early in events and emphasizing energetic particle escape in the prenoon part of the Jovian magnetosphere late in events is presented to explain many of the features in the upstream region of Jupiter.

  7. Floods, Habitat Hydraulics and Upstream Migration of Neritina virginea (Gastropoda: Neritidae) in Northeastern Puerto Rico.

    Treesearch

    JUAN F. BLANCO; FREDERICK N. SCATENA

    2005-01-01

    Massive upstream migrations of neritid snails (Neritidae: Gastropoda) occur in tropical and subtropical streams worldwide, but their seasonality and proximate causes are unknown. We monitored massive upstream migrations of Neritina virginea for 99 weeks, and conducted a detailed study of snail density, size, and hydraulic descriptors in lower Río Mameyes, northeastern...

  8. Upstream proton cyclotron waves at Venus near solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delva, M.; Bertucci, C.; Volwerk, M.; Lundin, R.; Mazelle, C.; Romanelli, N.

    2015-01-01

    magnetometer data of Venus Express are analyzed for the occurrence of waves at the proton cyclotron frequency in the spacecraft frame in the upstream region of Venus, for conditions of rising solar activity. The data of two Venus years up to the time of highest sunspot number so far (1 Mar 2011 to 31 May 2012) are studied to reveal the properties of the waves and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions under which they are observed. In general, waves generated by newborn protons from exospheric hydrogen are observed under quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity, as is expected from theoretical models. The present study near solar maximum finds significantly more waves than a previous study for solar minimum, with an asymmetry in the wave occurrence, i.e., mainly under antiparallel conditions. The plasma data from the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms instrument aboard Venus Express enable analysis of the background solar wind conditions. The prevalence of waves for IMF in direction toward the Sun is related to the stronger southward tilt of the heliospheric current sheet for the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24, i.e., the "bashful ballerina" is responsible for asymmetric background solar wind conditions. The increase of the number of wave occurrences may be explained by a significant increase in the relative density of planetary protons with respect to the solar wind background. An exceptionally low solar wind proton density is observed during the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24. At the same time, higher EUV increases the ionization in the Venus exosphere, resulting in higher supply of energy from a higher number of newborn protons to the wave. We conclude that in addition to quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity direction, the higher relative density of Venus exospheric protons with respect to the background solar wind proton density is the key parameter for the higher number of

  9. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  10. Toxic effects of wastewaters collected at upstream and downstream sites of a purification station in cultures of rainbow trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Risso-de Faverney, C; Devaux, A; Lafaurie, M; Girard, J P; Rahmani, R

    2001-08-01

    The toxic effects of wastewater samples, collected in December 1998, from upstream (U) and downstream (D) sites of the purification station of the town of Nice (South-East France on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea) were assessed undiluted and at various dilutions (75%, 50%, and 25% of collected water sample), on trout hepatocyte cultures treated for 48 or 72 h. Chemical contamination (PCBs, PAHs, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) was also evaluated by chemical analysis. The water samples from the upstream site were more cytotoxic than those from the downstream site. The induction of CYP1A enzyme and metallothioneins (MTs) were selected as specific indicators of exposure to organic contaminants and metals, respectively. CYP1A-related EROD activity as well as protein expression were found to be greatly induced after 72 h exposure of the hepatocytes to the undiluted water samples (U(100%) and D(100%)), but CYP1A1 mRNA was significantly overexpressed only by samples from the upstream site. Maximal MT levels were reached after 48 h of treatment with the least concentrated water samples (U(25%) and D(25%)). Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were similarly increased under the same conditions. On the other hand, there was no significant glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity response. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed by using as markers both the fragmentation of the nuclear DNA into oligonucleosomal-length fragments recognized as a "DNA ladder" and the activation of DEVD (Asp-Glu-Val-Asp)-dependent protease considered as the central mediator of programmed cell death. Significant DNA cleavage was only detectable after 72-h exposure to the most concentrated water samples from upstream sites (U(75%) and U(100%)). DEVD-dependent protease activities were significantly increased, mainly in cells exposed to U(75%) and D(25%) for 72 h. In addition, pollution-related DNA damage assessed by using the Comet assay was approximatively 1.5 times greater than that of the control level

  11. Calculation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    MathSoft Plus 5.0 is a calculation software package for electrical engineers and computer scientists who need advanced math functionality. It incorporates SmartMath, an expert system that determines a strategy for solving difficult mathematical problems. SmartMath was the result of the integration into Mathcad of CLIPS, a NASA-developed shell for creating expert systems. By using CLIPS, MathSoft, Inc. was able to save the time and money involved in writing the original program.

  12. Prediction of turbine blade vibratory response due to upstream vane distress

    SciTech Connect

    Panovsky, J.; Carson, S.M.

    1998-07-01

    Turbine blades and vanes operate in a hostile environment, which leads to deterioration of these components over time. This paper describes detailed calculations to predict the vibratory response of a high-pressure turbine blade due to the excitation produced by a single distressed upstream vane in a modern turbofan engine. The approach includes detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the steady flowfield produced by the distressed vane, Fourier decomposition of the flow variables to determine the harmonic content, unsteady CFD analysis to determine the resulting vibratory response of the blade, and crack propagation analysis to determine blade life. Predictions of vibratory stress and threshold crack size are summarized as functions of vane distress level. The results, which indicate that this type of vane distress can indeed be a significant excitation source for the blades, are shown to be in good agreement with engine experience. The method provides, for the first time, a quantitative approach to setting limits for acceptable levels of vane distress in the field.

  13. The thermal and mechanical deformation study of up-stream pumping mechanical seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. L.; Xu, C.; Zuo, M. Z.; Wu, Q. B.

    2015-01-01

    Taking the viscosity-temperature relationship of the fluid film into consideration, a 3-D numerical model was established by ANSYS software which can simulate the heat transfer between the upstream pumping mechanical seal stationary and rotational rings and the fluid film between them as well as simulate the thermal deformation, structure deformation and the coupling deformation of them. According to the calculation result, thermal deformation causes the seal face expansion and the maximum thermal deformation appears at the inside of the seal ring. Pressure results in a mechanical deformation, the maximum deformation occurs at the top of the spiral groove and the overall trend is inward the mating face, opposite to the thermal deformation. The coupling deformation indicate that the thermal deformation can be partly counteracted by pressure deformation. Using this model, the relationship between deformation and shaft speed and the sealing liquid pressure was studied. It's found that the shaft speed will both enhance the thermal and structure deformation and the fluid pressure will enhance the structure deformation but has little to do with the thermal deformation. By changing the sealing material, it's found that material with low thermal expansion coefficient and low elastic modulus will suffer less thermal-pressure deformation.

  14. A synthesized pheromone induces upstream movement in female sea lamprey and summons them into traps.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas S; Yun, Sang-Seon; Thompson, Henry T; Brant, Cory O; Li, Weiming

    2009-01-27

    Female insect pheromone blends induce robust tracking responses in males and direct them into traps. In vertebrates, pheromones that induce strong and precise tracking responses in natural habitats have rarely been described. Here, we show in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a vertebrate invader of the Laurential Great Lakes, that a synthesized component of the male mating pheromone, 7alpha, 12alpha, 24-trihydroxy-5alpha-cholan-3-one 24-sulfate (3kPZS), when released into a stream to reach concentrations of 10(-14), 10(-13), 10(-12), 10(-11), or 10(-10) M, triggers robust upstream movement in ovulated females drawing approximately 50% into baited traps. Experiments conducted in diverse stream segments demonstrate the level of behavioral response was not affected by habitat conditions and is effective over hundreds of meters. 3kPZS is equally effective at luring ovulated females as the whole pheromone blend released by males between 10(-14) and 10(-11) M. 3kPZS diverts ovulated females away from and disrupts orientation to male washings when applied at concentrations higher than washings. Indeed, a single pheromone compound is able to redirect female sea lampreys away from a natural pheromone source and lure them into traps, which should be more effective than targeting males when applied in population control. Our findings may spur the discovery of other potent and environmentally benign agents to combat biological invasion, a process accelerated by globalization, exacerbated by climate change, and costing the global economy US$ 1.4 trillion of damage annually.

  15. A synthesized pheromone induces upstream movement in female sea lamprey and summons them into traps

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Yun, Sang-Seon; Thompson, Henry T.; Brant, Cory O.; Li, Weiming

    2009-01-01

    Female insect pheromone blends induce robust tracking responses in males and direct them into traps. In vertebrates, pheromones that induce strong and precise tracking responses in natural habitats have rarely been described. Here, we show in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a vertebrate invader of the Laurential Great Lakes, that a synthesized component of the male mating pheromone, 7α, 12α, 24-trihydroxy-5α-cholan-3-one 24-sulfate (3kPZS), when released into a stream to reach concentrations of 10−14, 10−13, 10−12, 10−11, or 10−10 M, triggers robust upstream movement in ovulated females drawing ≈50% into baited traps. Experiments conducted in diverse stream segments demonstrate the level of behavioral response was not affected by habitat conditions and is effective over hundreds of meters. 3kPZS is equally effective at luring ovulated females as the whole pheromone blend released by males between 10−14 and 10−11 M. 3kPZS diverts ovulated females away from and disrupts orientation to male washings when applied at concentrations higher than washings. Indeed, a single pheromone compound is able to redirect female sea lampreys away from a natural pheromone source and lure them into traps, which should be more effective than targeting males when applied in population control. Our findings may spur the discovery of other potent and environmentally benign agents to combat biological invasion, a process accelerated by globalization, exacerbated by climate change, and costing the global economy US$ 1.4 trillion of damage annually. PMID:19164592

  16. Damaged Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  17. Radioprotection calculations for MEGAPIE.

    PubMed

    Zanini, L

    2005-01-01

    The MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) liquid lead-bismuth spallation neutron source will commence operation in 2006 at the SINQ facility of the Paul Scherrer Institut. Such an innovative system presents radioprotection concerns peculiar to a liquid spallation target. Several radioprotection issues have been addressed and studied by means of the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. The dose rates in the room above the target, where personnel access may be needed at times, from the activated lead-bismuth and from the volatile species produced were calculated. Results indicate that the dose rate level is of the order of 40 mSv h(-1) 2 h after shutdown, but it can be reduced below the mSv h(-1) level with slight modifications to the shielding. Neutron spectra and dose rates from neutron transport, of interest for possible damage to radiation sensitive components, have also been calculated.

  18. WBGT Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Charles H.

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulate the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.

  19. Effects of salinity on upstream-migrating, spawning sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Martins, D.; Coimbra, J.; Antunes, C.; Wilson, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, is an anadromous, semelparous species that is vulnerable to endangered in parts of its native range due in part to loss of spawning habitat because of man-made barriers. The ability of lampreys to return to the ocean or estuary and search out alternative spawning river systems would be limited by their osmoregulatory ability in seawater. A reduction in tolerance to salinity has been documented in migrants, although the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. We examined the capacity for marine osmoregulation in upstream spawning migrants by characterizing the physiological effects of salinity challenge from a molecular perspective. Estuarine-captured migrants held in freshwater (FW) for ∼1 week (short-term acclimation) or 2 months (long-term acclimation) underwent an incremental salinity challenge until loss of equilibrium occurred and upper thresholds of 25 and 17.5, respectively, occurred. Regardless of salinity tolerance, all lamprey downregulated FW ion-uptake mechanisms [gill transcripts of Na+:Cl− cotransporter (NCC/slc12a3) and epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC/scnn1) and kidney Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) protein and activity but not transcript]. At their respective salinity limits, lamprey displayed a clear osmoregulatory failure and were unable to regulate [Na+] and [Cl−] in plasma and intestinal fluid within physiological limits, becoming osmocompromised. A >90% drop in haematocrit indicated haemolysis, and higher plasma concentrations of the cytosolic enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase indicated damage to other tissues, including liver. However, >80% of short-term FW-acclimated fish were able to osmoregulate efficiently, with less haemolysis and tissue damage. This osmoregulatory ability was correlated with significant upregulation of the secretory form of Na+:K+:2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1/slc12a2) transcript levels and the re-emergence of seawater

  20. The 'upstream wake' of swimming and flying animals and its correlation with propulsive efficiency.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O

    2008-08-01

    The interaction between swimming and flying animals and their fluid environments generates downstream wake structures such as vortices. In most studies, the upstream flow in front of the animal is neglected. In this study, we demonstrate the existence of upstream fluid structures even though the upstream flow is quiescent or possesses a uniform incoming velocity. Using a computational model, the flow generated by a swimmer (an oscillating flexible plate) is simulated and a new fluid mechanical analysis is applied to the flow to identify the upstream fluid structures. These upstream structures show the exact portion of fluid that is going to interact with the swimmer. A mass flow rate is then defined based on the upstream structures, and a metric for propulsive efficiency is established using the mass flow rate and the kinematics of the swimmer. We propose that the unsteady mass flow rate defined by the upstream fluid structures can be used as a metric to measure and objectively compare the efficiency of locomotion in water and air.

  1. The Impact of Upstream Flow on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer in a Valley on a Mountainous Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Bianca; Kalthoff, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive measurements on the mountainous island of Corsica were used to investigate how the mountain atmospheric boundary layer (mountain ABL) in a valley downstream of the main mountain ridge was influenced by the upstream flow. The data used were mainly collected with the mobile observation platform KITcube during the first special observation period of the Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX) in 2012 and were based on various in situ, remote sensing and aircraft measurements. Two days in autumn 2012 were analyzed in detail. On these days the mountain ABL evolution was a result of convection and thermally-driven circulations as well as terrain-induced dynamically-driven flows. During periods when dynamically-driven flows were dominant, warm and dry air from aloft with a large-scale westerly wind component was transported downwards into the valley. On one day, these flows controlled the mountain ABL characteristics in a large section of the valley for several hours, while on the other day their impact was observed in a smaller section of the valley for about 1 h only. To explain the observations we considered a theoretical concept based on uniform upstream stratification and wind speed, and calculated the non-dimensional mountain height and the horizontal aspect ratio of the barrier to relate the existing conditions to diagnosed regimes of stratified flow past a ridge. On both days, wave breaking, flow splitting and lee vortices were likely to occur. Besides the upstream conditions, a reduction of stability in the valley seemed to be important for the downward transport to reach the ground. The spatio-temporal structure of such a mountain ABL over complex terrain, which was affected by various interacting flows, differed a lot from that of the classical ABL over homogeneous, flat terrain and it is stressed that the traditional ABL definitions need to be revised when applying them to complex terrain.

  2. Suppression of heterogeneous bubble nucleation by upstream subcooled liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Peterson, G. P.

    2006-05-01

    The threshold levels for quasi-steady-state bubble nucleation on a smooth platinum surface located in a microchannel, both with and without liquid flow, are explored. The measured threshold for motionless liquid compares well with the theoretical value as calculated from the classical kinetics of nucleation. The measured threshold for the case of flow in the microchannel exceeds the measured value for motionless liquid and even exceeds the theoretical value. The observed phenomena suggest that in the absence of impurities, classical theory can accurately predict the heterogeneous nucleation. In addition, subcooled fluids were found to suppress bubble nucleation.

  3. 46 CFR 172.103 - Damage stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Damage stability. 172.103 Section 172.103 Shipping COAST... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.103 Damage stability. Each tank barge must be shown by design calculations to meet the survival conditions in § 172.110 assuming the damage specified in § 172.104 to the hull...

  4. Reducing numerical diffusion for incompressible flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Neely, G. M.; Syed, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A number of approaches for improving the accuracy of incompressible, steady-state flow calculations are examined. Two improved differencing schemes, Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) and Skew-Upwind Differencing (SUD), are applied to the convective terms in the Navier-Stokes equations and compared with results obtained using hybrid differencing. In a number of test calculations, it is illustrated that no single scheme exhibits superior performance for all flow situations. However, both SUD and QUICK are shown to be generally more accurate than hybrid differencing.

  5. 46 CFR 172.205 - Local damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.205 Local damage. (a) Each tankship must be shown by design calculations... angle at which restoration of propulsion and steering, and use of the ballast system is precluded....

  6. 46 CFR 172.205 - Local damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.205 Local damage. (a) Each tankship must be shown by design calculations... angle at which restoration of propulsion and steering, and use of the ballast system is precluded....

  7. 46 CFR 172.205 - Local damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.205 Local damage. (a) Each tankship must be shown by design calculations... angle at which restoration of propulsion and steering, and use of the ballast system is precluded....

  8. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium... opening within, or partially within, the 20 degree range beyond the angle of equilibrium must...

  9. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium... opening within, or partially within, the 20 degree range beyond the angle of equilibrium must...

  10. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium... opening within, or partially within, the 20 degree range beyond the angle of equilibrium must...

  11. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium... opening within, or partially within, the 20 degree range beyond the angle of equilibrium must...

  12. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... calculated after damage must: (1) Have a minimum positive range of 20 degrees beyond the angle of equilibrium... opening within, or partially within, the 20 degree range beyond the angle of equilibrium must...

  13. 83. R.W. Oliver 8 April 1936 UPSTREAM SIDE OF PIERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. R.W. Oliver 8 April 1936 UPSTREAM SIDE OF PIERS, SOUTH HALF OF MAIN DAM. PLACEMENT OF SECOND STEP COFFERDAM UNDERWAY. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  14. Regulation of the human. beta. -actin promoter by upstream and intron domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sunyu )); Gunning, P.; Kedes, L. ); Liu, Shuhui National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu ); Leavitt, J. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have identified three regulatory domains of the complex human {beta}-actin gene promoter. They span a region of about 3,000 bases, from not more than {minus}2,011 bases upstream of the mRNA cap site to within the 5{prime} intron (832 bases long). A distal upstream domain contains at least one enhancer-like element. A proximal upstream domain, with a CArG (for CC(A+T rich){sub 6}GG) motif found in all known mammalian actin genes, seems to confer serum, but not growth factor, inducibility. The third domain is within the evolutionarily conserved 3{prime} region of the first intron and contains a 13 base-pair sequence, identical to the upstream sequence with the CArG motif. This domain also contains sequences that are both serum and fibroblast growth inducible.

  15. Upstream Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    This analysis focuses on financial and operating trends of the oil and natural gas production business segment, often referred to as upstream operations, of 42 global oil and natural gas producing companies

  16. Measurement of Emissions from Produced Water Ponds: Upstream Oil and Gas Study #1; Final Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant uncertainty exists regarding air pollutant emissions from upstream oil and gas production operations. Oil and gas operations present unique and challenging emission testing issues due to the large variety and quantity of potential emissions sources. This report summ...

  17. Measurement of Emissions from Produced Water Ponds: Upstream Oil and Gas Study #1; Final Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant uncertainty exists regarding air pollutant emissions from upstream oil and gas production operations. Oil and gas operations present unique and challenging emission testing issues due to the large variety and quantity of potential emissions sources. This report summ...

  18. 46 CFR 172.103 - Damage stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Damage stability. 172.103 Section 172.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.103 Damage stability. Each tank barge must be shown by design calculations...

  19. 46 CFR 172.103 - Damage stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Damage stability. 172.103 Section 172.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.103 Damage stability. Each tank barge must be shown by design calculations...

  20. 46 CFR 172.103 - Damage stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Damage stability. 172.103 Section 172.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.103 Damage stability. Each tank barge must be shown by design calculations...

  1. 46 CFR 172.103 - Damage stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Damage stability. 172.103 Section 172.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.103 Damage stability. Each tank barge must be shown by design calculations...

  2. 6. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 310.58, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Oblique view of upstream side of Bridge Number 310.58, 135mm lens. Note ashlar stone masonry abutment built in 1886, Tunnel 15 at left. Heavy vegetation cover, steep banks, and lack of streamside footing precluded full elevation views of the upstream and downstream sides of this bridge. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 310.58, Milepost 310.58, Sims, Shasta County, CA

  3. Pollutant discharges to coastal areas: Improving upstream source estimates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rohmann, S.O.

    1989-10-01

    The report describes a project NOAA's Strategic Environmental Assessments Division began to improve the estimates of pollutant discharges carried into coastal areas by rivers and streams. These estimates, termed discharges from upstream sources, take into account all pollution discharged by industries, sewage treatment plants, farms, cities, and other pollution-generating operations, as well as natural phenomena such as erosion and weathering which occur inland or upstream of the coastal US.

  4. Disturbances from Shock/Boundary-Layer Interactions Affecting Upstream Hypersonic Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    2180, NASA, 1983. 11. J. L. Stollery. Some Viscous Interactions Affecting the Design of Hypersonic Intakes and Nozzles. Advances in Hypersonics ...affecting upstream hypersonic flow F49620-03-1-0030 Craig Ryan Skoch Purdue University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics none Air Force Office of...separations from propagating upstream. hypersonic laminar-turbulent transition, quiet wind tunnels, shock/boundary-layer interaction U U U Unlimited 132

  5. The effect of upstream buildings on near-field pollutant dispersion in the built environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajra, B.; Stathopoulos, T.; Bahloul, A.

    2011-09-01

    This paper examines the effects of near-field pollutant dispersion characteristics of upstream buildings in the built environment and compares them to the ASHRAE 2007 model. Wind tunnel simulations were performed for nine different building configurations for three exhaust momentum ratios ( M) and three stack heights ( hs). The effect of spacing ( S) between the buildings and stack location from the upwind edge of the emitting building ( X) were also investigated. Measurements of gas concentrations were performed on the roof and leeward wall of the emitting and upstream buildings. Data show that within the recirculation zone a change in along wind dimension of the upstream building has a negligible effect on the dilution of emissions from the downwind building. However, spacing between buildings and the height of the upstream building were found to be critical parameters in assessing plume dilution. The plume geometry is largely governed by the upwind dimensions of the upstream building. ASHRAE (2007) predicts lower dilution for all cases examined, leading to conservative or very conservative design. However, the ASHRAE 2007 cannot model the effect of upstream buildings, thus further investigation of its formulations is required. Guidelines for placement of intake and stack on the roof of the building to avoid problems of re-ingestion are discussed.

  6. A general strategy to inhibiting viral −1 frameshifting based on upstream attenuation duplex formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao-Teng; Cho, Che-Pei; Lin, Ya-Hui; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Viral −1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) as a potential antiviral target has attracted interest because many human viral pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and coronaviruses, rely on −1 PRF for optimal propagation. Efficient eukaryotic −1 PRF requires an optimally placed stimulator structure downstream of the frameshifting site and different strategies targeting viral −1 PRF stimulators have been developed. However, accessing particular −1 PRF stimulator information represents a bottle-neck in combating the emerging epidemic viral pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Recently, an RNA hairpin upstream of frameshifting site was shown to act as a cis-element to attenuate −1 PRF with mechanism unknown. Here, we show that an upstream duplex formed in-trans, by annealing an antisense to its complementary mRNA sequence upstream of frameshifting site, can replace an upstream hairpin to attenuate −1 PRF efficiently. This finding indicates that the formation of a proximal upstream duplex is the main determining factor responsible for −1 PRF attenuation and provides mechanistic insight. Additionally, the antisense-mediated upstream duplex approach downregulates −1 PRF stimulated by distinct −1 PRF stimulators, including those of MERS-CoV, suggesting its general application potential as a robust means to evaluating viral −1 PRF inhibition as soon as the sequence information of an emerging human coronavirus is available. PMID:26612863

  7. Upstream capacity upgrade in TDM-PON using RSOA based tunable fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lilin; Li, Zhengxuan; Dong, Yi; Xiao, Shilin; Chen, Jian; Hu, Weisheng

    2012-04-23

    An upstream multi-wavelength shared (UMWS) time division multiplexing passive optical network (TDM-PON) is presented by using a reflective semiconductor amplifier (RSOA) and tunable optical filter (TOF) based directly modulated fiber ring laser as upstream laser source. The stable laser operation is easily achieved no matter what the bandwidth and shape of the TOF is and it can be directly modulated when the RSOA is driven at its saturation region. In this UMWS TDM-PON system, an individual wavelength can be assigned to the user who has a high bandwidth demand by tuning the central wavelength of the TOF in its upgraded optical network unit (ONU), while others maintain their traditional ONU structure and share the bandwidth via time slots, which greatly and dynamically upgrades the upstream capacity. We experimentally demonstrated the bidirectional transmission of downstream data at 10-Gb/s and upstream data at 1.25-Gb/s per wavelength over 25-km single mode fiber (SMF) with almost no power penalty at both ends. A stable performance is observed for the upstream wavelength tuned from 1530 nm to 1595 nm. Moreover, due to the high extinction ratio (ER) of the upstream signal, the burst-mode transmitting is successfully presented and a better time-division multiplexing performance can be obtained by turning off the unused lasers thanks to the rapid formation of the laser in the fiber ring. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  8. Errors in infiltration volume calculations in volume balance models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volume balance models of surface irrigation calculate the infiltrated volume at a given time as a product of the stream length, upstream infiltration, and shape factors. The best known expression of this type was derived by combining the Lewis-Milne equation with empirical power-law expressions for ...

  9. Heliospheric Termination Shock Motion Due to Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Upstream Conditions: Spherically Symmetric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratkiewicz, R.; Barnes, A.; Molvik, G. A.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind plasma upstream of the heliospheric termination shock (TS) will cause inward and outward motions of the shock. Using numerical techniques, we extend an earlier strictly one-dimensional (planar) analytic gas dynamic model to spherical symmetry to investigate the features of global behavior of shock motion. Our starting point is to establish a steady numerical solution of the gasdynamic equations describing the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. We then introduce disturbances of the solar wind dynamic pressure at an inner boundary, and follow the subsequent evolution of the system, especially the motion of the termination shock. Our model solves spherically symmetric gasdynamic equations as an initial-boundary value problem. The equations in conservative form are solved using a fully implicit Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) upwind scheme with Roe-type Riemann solver. Boundary conditions are given by the solar wind parameters on an inner spherical boundary, where they are allowed to vary with time for unsteady calculations, and by a constant pressure (roughly simulating the effect of the local interstellar medium) on an outer boundary. We find that immediately after the interaction, the shock moves with speeds given by the earlier analogous analytic models. However, as the termination shock propagates it begins to slow down, seeking a new equilibrium position. In addition, the disturbance transmitted through the TS, either a shock or rarefaction wave, will encounter the heliopause boundary and be reflected back. The reflected signal will encounter the TS, causing it to oscillate. The phenomenon may be repeated for a number of reflections, resulting in a "ringing" of the outer heliosphere.

  10. Determination of upstream boundary points on southeastern Washington streams and rivers under the requirements of the Shoreline Management Act of 1971

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, Johnna L.

    2003-01-01

    Regulation of the shorelines of the State of Washington, as mandated by the Shoreline Management Act of 1971, requires knowledge of the locations on streams and river reaches where specific regulatory criteria are satisfied. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 1971 to determine the upstream boundary points of these reaches for many of the State's streams and rivers. Updated upstream boundary points were determined in the current study for all the streams and rivers in southeastern Washington that fall under the jurisdiction of the Shoreline Management Act of 1971. Upstream boundary point locations where the mean annual discharge equals 20 cubic feet per second were determined for 149 streams. In addition, upstream boundary point locations where the mean annual discharge equals 200 cubic feet per second or the drainage area equals 300 square miles were determined for 22 rivers. Boundary point locations were determined by application of multiple-linear-regression equations that relate mean annual discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. Southeastern Washington was divided into five hydrologically distinct regions, and a separate regression equation was developed for each region. The regression equations are based on data for gaging stations with at least 10 years of record. The number of stations in the regression analysis for each of the five regions ranged from 5 to 33. The coefficient of determination, R2, of the regression equations ranged from 0.953 to 0.997. The equation for the Upper Yakima region had the lowest standard error, ranging from -7 to +9 percent for a regression estimate of 20 cubic feet per second. The equation for the Columbia Basin to Palouse region had the highest standard error, ranging from -36 to +55 percent for a regression estimate of 20 cubic feet per second. The approximate error in the location of an upstream boundary point can be calculated using the variables mean annual precipitation of the basin upstream

  11. Direct connectivity between upstream and downstream promotes rapid response of lower coastal-plain rivers to land-use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattheus, Christopher R.; Rodriguez, Antonio B.; McKee, Brent A.

    2009-10-01

    Low-relief fluvial systems that originate in the lower coastal plain and discharge into estuaries are common along passive margins. These watersheds are thought to be disconnected from their termini by floodplains, which buffer the sediment-routing system by sequestration. Here, we present a detailed study of the Newport River, a typical lower coastal-plain system, which reveals high connectivity between watershed and delta. Connectivity is measured as the time lag between initiation of a silviculture operation, which increased landscape erosion, and when the sediment appeared at the bay-head delta. The time lag, measured from aerial photographs and sedimentation rates calculated from 210Pb- and 137Cs-activities in cores from the watershed and delta, is <3 years. Most lower coastal-plain rivers are steeper and have less floodplain accommodation available for storage than their larger counterparts that originate landward of the fall line, which promotes higher connectivity between upstream and downstream.

  12. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  13. ANN modeling for flood prediction in the upstream Eure's catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharroubi, Ouissem; masson, Eric; Blanpain, Olivier; Lallahem, Sami

    2013-04-01

    Rainfall-Runoff relationship at basin scale is strongly depending on the catchment complexity including multi-scale interactions. In extreme events cases (i.e. floods and droughts) this relationship is even more complex and differs from average hydrological conditions making extreme runoff prediction very difficult to achieve. However, flood warning, flood prevention and flood mitigation rely on the possibility to predict both flood peak runoff and lag time. This point is crucial for decision making and flood warning to prevent populations and economical stakes to be damaged by extreme hydrological events. Since 2003 in France, a dedicated state service is in charge of producing flood warning from national level (i.e. SCHAPI) to regional level (i.e. SPC). This flood warning service is combining national weather forecast agency (i.e. Meteo France) together with a fully automated realtime hydrological network (i.e. Rainfall-Runoff) in order to produce a flood warning national map online and provide a set of hydro-meteorological data to the SPC in charge of flood prediction from regional to local scale. The SPC is in fact the flood service delivering hydrological prediction at operational level for decision making about flood alert for municipalities and first help services. Our research in collaboration with the SPC SACN (i.e. "Seine Aval et fleuves Côtiers Normands") is focused on the implementation of an Artificial Neural Network model (ANN) for flood prediction in deferent key points of the Eure's catchment and main subcatchment. Our contribution will focus on the ANN model developed for Saint-Luperce gauging station in the upstream part of the Eure's catchment. Prediction of extreme runoff at Saint-Luperce station is of high importance for flood warning in the Eure's catchment because it gives a good indicator on the extreme status and the downstream propagation of a potential flood event. Despite a good runoff monitoring since 27 years Saint Luperce flood

  14. A Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Using Physically Realizable Upstream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afsar, Mohammed Z.; Leib, Stewart J.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of previous work in which a generalized Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) formulation was used to model low-frequency trailing-edge noise. The research was motivated by proposed next-generation aircraft configurations where the exhaust system is tightly integrated with the airframe. Data from recent experiments at NASA on the interaction between high-Reynolds-number subsonic jet flows and an external flat plate showed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the far-field pressure underwent considerable amplification at low frequencies. For example, at the 90deg observation angle, the low-frequency noise could be as much as 10 dB greater than the jet noise itself. In this paper, we present predictions of the noise generated by the interaction of a rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a semi-infinite flat plate. The calculations are based on a formula for the acoustic spectrum of this noise source derived from an exact formal solution of the linearized Euler equations involving (in this case) one arbitrary convected scalar quantity and a Rayleigh equation Green's function. A low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the Green's function based on a two-dimensional mean flow is used in the calculations along with a physically realizable upstream turbulence spectrum, which includes a finite decorrelation region. Numerical predictions of the sound field, based on three-dimensional RANS solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length and time scales, for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets and nozzle aspect ratios are compared with experimental data. Comparisons of the RANS results with flow data are also presented for selected cases. We find that a finite decorrelation region in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency thereby producing much closer agreement with noise data for Strouhal

  15. A Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Using Physically Realizable Upstream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afsar, Mohammed Z.; Leib, Stewart J.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of previous work in which a generalized Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) formulation was used to model low-frequency trailing-edge noise. The research was motivated by proposed next-generation aircraft configurations where the exhaust system is tightly integrated with the airframe. Data from recent experiments at NASA on the interaction between high-Reynolds-number subsonic jet flows and an external flat plate showed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the far-field pressure underwent considerable amplification at low frequencies. For example, at the 900 observation angle, the low-frequency noise could be as much as 10dB greater than the jet noise itself. In this paper, we present predictions of the noise generated by the interaction of a rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a semi-infinite flat plate. The calculations are based on a formula for the acoustic spectrum of this noise source derived from an exact formal solution of the linearized Euler equations involving (in this case) one arbitrary convected scalar quantity and a Rayleigh equation Green's function. A low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the Green's function based on a two-dimensional mean flow is used in the calculations along with a physically realizable upstream turbulence spectrum, which includes a finite de-correlation region. Numerical predictions, based on three-dimensional RANS solutions for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets and nozzle aspect ratios are compared with experimental data. Comparisons of the RANS results with flow data are also presented for selected cases. We find that a finite decorrelation region increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low frequency "rolloff") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency thereby producing much closer agreement with noise data for Strouhal numbers less than 0.1. Secondly, the large-aspectratio theory is able to predict the low-frequency amplification due to the jet

  16. A Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Using Physically Realizable Upstream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afsar, Mohammed Z.; Leib, S. J.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of previous work in which a generalized Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) formulation was used to model low-frequency trailing-edge noise. The research was motivated by proposed next-generation aircraft configurations where the exhaust system is tightly integrated with the airframe. Data from recent experiments at NASA on the interaction between high-Reynolds-number subsonic jet flows and an external flat plate showed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the far-field pressure underwent considerable amplification at low frequencies. For example, at the 900 observation angle, the low-frequency noise could be as much as 10dB greater than the jet noise itself. In this paper, we present predictions of the noise generated by the interaction of a rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a semi-infinite flat plate. The calculations are based on a formula for the acoustic spectrum of this noise source derived from an exact formal solution of the linearized Euler equations involving (in this case) one arbitrary convected scalar quantity and a Rayleigh equation Green's function. A low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the Green's function based on a two-dimensional mean flow is used in the calculations along with a physically realizable upstream turbulence spectrum, which includes a finite de-correlation region. Numerical predictions, based on three-dimensional RANS solutions for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets and nozzle aspect ratios are compared with experimental data. Comparisons of the RANS results with flow data are also presented for selected cases. We find that a finite decorrelation region increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low frequency "rolloff") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency thereby producing much closer agreement with noise data for Strouhal numbers less than 0.1. Secondly, the large-aspectratio theory is able to predict the low-frequency amplification due to the jet

  17. Why do some turbidity currents create upstream migrating bedforms while others do not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellinga, Age; Cartigny, Matthieu; Clare, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Turbidity currents are the dominant process for transporting sediment from continental shelves to the deep sea via submarine canyons. The small density contrast between turbidity currents and ambient seawater means that many of these currents are in the Froude-supercritical flow regime. Froude-supercritical flows in open channel flows form upstream migrating bedforms such as antidunes and cyclic steps. Turbidity currents have been shown to create similar upstream migrating bedforms in submarine canyons and on steep delta slopes, on a scale of tens of to hundreds metres; but curiously such bedforms are not always observed. Here, using a novel depth-resolved numerical model, we explore the physical controls on upstream migrating bedform development. Why do some turbidity currents create upstream migrating bedforms, and others do not? A series of turbidity currents, with different initial concentrations, flow velocities, and thicknesses are simulated using a computational fluid-dynamics model. The sediment bed, initially with a random rugosity, is free to be reworked by turbidity currents. Contrary to expectations, we found that Froude-supercritical turbidity currents do not necessarily create upstream migrating bedforms. In isolation, the densimetric Froude number is a poor predictor for the formation of upstream migrating bedforms, unlike in open channel flows. Density stratification instead appears to be more important. The mixing intensity of the flow, as characterised by the gradient Richardson number, is used to quantify the degree of stratification and appears to be a primary control on upstream bedform migration. In the model runs, all flows that created upstream migrating bedforms where stratified, whereas none of the well-mixed flows created these bedforms. All flows that created bedforms had a denser basal layer with a densimetric Froude number above unity, and a mean velocity maximum over a threshold values (1.4 m/s in this case). Our results show that

  18. Upstream dispersal of an invasive crayfish aided by a fish passage facility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Loughman, Zachary J.

    2015-01-01

    Fish passage facilities for reservoir dams have been used to restore habitat connectivity within riverine networks by allowing upstream passage for native species. These facilities may also support the spread of invasive species, an unintended consequence and potential downside of upstream passage structures. We documented dam passage of the invasive virile crayfish, Orconectes virilis (Hagen, 1870), at fish ladders designed for upstream passage of American eels, Anguilla rostrata (Lesueur, 1817), in the Shenandoah River drainage, USA. Ladder use and upstream passage of 11 virile crayfish occurred from 2007–2014 during periods of low river discharge (<30 m3s–1) and within a wide range of water temperatures from 9.0–28.6 °C. Virile crayfish that used the eel ladders were large adults with a mean carapace length and width of 48.0 mm and 24.1 mm, respectively. Our data demonstrated the use of species-specific fish ladders by a non-target non-native species, which has conservation and management implications for the spread of aquatic invasive species and upstream passage facilities. Specifically, managers should consider implementing long-term monitoring of fish passage facilities with emphasis on detection of invasive species, as well as methods to reduce or eliminate passage of invasive species. 

  19. Observations of a New Foreshock Region Upstream of a Foreshock Bubble's Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. Z.; Hietala, H.; Angelopoulos, V.; Turner, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's foreshock is a region within the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock filled with back-streaming solar wind particles reflected at the shock. Within this region, when the interplanetary field is approximately radial, foreshock bubbles (FBs) can be formed when the back-streaming particles interact with approaching discontinuities embedded in the solar wind. Foreshock bubbles can grow to 5-10 RE in scale, well upstream of the bow shock. Having a high concentration of thermalized upstream ions and slow, or even sunward, speeds within them, these transient phenomena deflect the solar wind by forming a new shock ahead of them. Although FBs eventually succumb to solar wind dynamic pressure and crash onto Earth's bow-shock and magnetopause, they may last long enough to allow solar wind reflection at their own shocks, which forms a new FB foreshock region upstream of them. The FB shock may be of different obliquity than the parent bow-shock providing new and diverse opportunities for particle acceleration. Using a case study from THEMIS, we demonstrate that ions and electrons are reflected at the FB shock, where they acquire energies consistent with shock acceleration theory. These are the first definitive observations of a new ion and electron foreshock region upstream of the FB shock with implications for shock acceleration in general.

  20. Magnetospheric particle injection and the upstream ion event of September 5, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Energetic particle data from the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft in the outer dayside magnetosphere are examined during the period of an upstream ion event observed by the AMPTE Ion Release Module (IRM) spacecraft on September 5, 1984. The CCE data reveal the following: (1) an ion enhancement was observed at about 0040 UT in near coincidence with a substorm onset at about 0035 UT, approximately 15 minutes prior to the onset of the event upstream of the shock; (b) ions of both solar-wind - H(2+) Fe-group - and ionospheric O(+) - origin over a broad energy range (about 20 keV to greater than 1350 keV) were injected at substorm onset; (3) the time evolution of the H(+), He(2+), and O(+) pitch angle distributions markedly differed, with O(+) exhibiting mostly enhancements at off-90-deg angles for the first hour after injection; (4) an enhancement in the Fe-group ions inside the magnetosphere at L = about 6.4 occurred simultaneously with the appearance of an O(+) burst upstream of the shock. The CCE observations, taken together with the simultaneously observed IRM ion event, suggest that a plausible explanation for the appearance of upstream ions is leakage from the magnetosphere into the upstream region, rather than the alternative explanation which requires in situ acceleration of solar wind ions via the Fermi Mechanims.

  1. Acoustical interaction between vibrating lips, downstream air column, and upstream airways in trombone performance.

    PubMed

    Fréour, Vincent; Scavone, Gary P

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents experimental results on the acoustical influence of the vocal tract in trombone performance. The experimental approach makes use of measurements at the interface between the player and instrument, allowing a relative comparison between upstream airways and the downstream air column impedances, as well as an estimation of the phase of the impedance of the upstream and downstream systems. Measurements were conducted over the full traditional range of playing, during sustained tones with varying dynamic, as well as in special effects such as pitch bending. Subjects able to play over the full range demonstrated significant upstream influence in the higher register of the instrument. These players were categorized in two groups according to their ability to control the phase of the upstream impedance and their ability to generate powerful downstream acoustic energy. Sustained tones played with varying dynamics showed a general tendency of a decrease in vocal-tract support with increase in loudness. Although pitch bends did not involve significant upstream influence at f0, results suggest modification of the lip behavior during bending. Vocal-tract tuning at tone transitions was also investigated and found to potentially contribute to slur articulations.

  2. Upstream Binding of Idling RNA Polymerase Modulates Transcription Initiation from a Nearby Promoter*

    PubMed Central

    Gerganova, Veneta; Maurer, Sebastian; Stoliar, Liubov; Japaridze, Aleksandre; Dietler, Giovanni; Nasser, William; Kutateladze, Tamara; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial gene regulatory regions often demonstrate distinctly organized arrays of RNA polymerase binding sites of ill-defined function. Previously we observed a module of closely spaced polymerase binding sites upstream of the canonical promoter of the Escherichia coli fis operon. FIS is an abundant nucleoid-associated protein involved in adjusting the chromosomal DNA topology to changing cellular physiology. Here we show that simultaneous binding of the polymerase at the canonical fis promoter and an upstream transcriptionally inactive site stabilizes a RNAP oligomeric complex in vitro. We further show that modulation of the upstream binding of RNA polymerase affects the fis promoter activity both in vivo and in vitro. The effect of the upstream RNA polymerase binding on the fis promoter activity depends on the spatial arrangement of polymerase binding sites and DNA supercoiling. Our data suggest that a specific DNA geometry of the nucleoprotein complex stabilized on concomitant binding of RNA polymerase molecules at the fis promoter and the upstream region acts as a topological device regulating the fis transcription. We propose that transcriptionally inactive RNA polymerase molecules can act as accessory factors regulating the transcription initiation from a nearby promoter. PMID:25648898

  3. Observations of a new foreshock region upstream of a foreshock bubble's shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Terry Z.; Hietala, Heli; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Turner, Drew L.

    2016-05-01

    Earth's foreshock is a region within the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock filled with backstreaming solar wind particles reflected at the shock. Within this region, when the interplanetary field is approximately radial, foreshock bubbles (FBs) can be formed when the backstreaming particles interact with approaching discontinuities embedded in the solar wind. Foreshock bubbles can grow to 5-10 RE in scale, well upstream of the bow shock. Having a high concentration of thermalized upstream ions and slow, or even sunward, speeds within them, these transient phenomena deflect the solar wind by forming a new shock ahead of them. Although FBs eventually succumb to solar wind dynamic pressure and crash onto Earth's bow shock and magnetopause, they may last long enough to allow solar wind reflection at their own shocks, which forms a new FB foreshock region upstream of them. The FB shock may be of different obliquity than the parent bow shock providing new and diverse opportunities for particle acceleration. Using a case study from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, we demonstrate that ions and electrons are reflected at the FB shock, where they acquire energies consistent with shock acceleration theory. These are the first definitive observations of a new ion and electron foreshock region upstream of the FB shock with implications for shock acceleration in general.

  4. The upstream-propagating Alfvénic fluctuations with power law spectra in the upstream region of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart

    2015-05-01

    Based on theories, the beam instability induced by shock-accelerated ions can generate upstream-propagating Alfvén waves (UPAWs) with a power spectral bump near 0.03 Hz, while the nonlinear wave-wave interaction favors an inverse cascade to create a power law spectrum. Here we present the first observational evidence for the upstream-propagating Alfvénic fluctuations (UPAFs) with power law spectra. We utilize a new criterion to identify the upstream-propagating Alfvénic intervals: the propagation direction is opposite to that of solar wind strahl electron outflow. Besides 35 UPAWs, we find 47 UPAFs with power law spectra, and ˜47% of these UPAFs are associated with energetic ion events (>30 keV). These UPAWs and UPAFs are mostly observed in the slow solar wind. However, their occurrence rate and power behave differently in dependence on the radial distance from the Earth. These results provide new clues on understanding the dynamic equilibrium between the nonlinear inverse cascade and the linear ion beam instability.

  5. [Estimation of topographical factors in revised universal soil loss model based on maximum up-stream flow path].

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Ma, You-xin; Liu, Wen-jun; Li, Hong-mei

    2010-05-01

    By using maximum upstream flow path, a self-developed new method for calculating slope length value based on Arc Macro Language (AML), five groups of DEM data for different regions in Bijie Prefecture of Guizhou Province were extracted to compute the slope length and topographical factors in the Prefecture. The time cost for calculating the slope length and the values of the topographical factors were analyzed, and compared with those by iterative slope length method based on AML (ISLA) and on C++ (ISLC). The results showed that the new method was feasible to calculate the slope length and topographical factors in revised universal soil loss model, and had the same effect as iterative slope length method. Comparing with ISLA, the new method had a high computing efficiency and greatly decreased the time consumption, and could be applied to a large area to estimate the slope length and topographical factors based on AML. Comparing with ISLC, the new method had the similar computing efficiency, but its coding was easily to be written, modified, and debugged by using AML. Therefore, the new method could be more broadly used by GIS users.

  6. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity due to a liquid in a space must be determined by calculating either— (1) The free surface effect of... separated from the damaged space by watertight bulkheads and no progressive flooding of these intact spaces...

  7. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity due to a liquid in a space must be determined by calculating either— (1) The free surface effect of... separated from the damaged space by watertight bulkheads and no progressive flooding of these intact spaces...

  8. Suppression of Interference in Quantum Hall Mach-Zehnder Geometry by Upstream Neutral Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Moshe; Gefen, Yuval

    2016-12-01

    Mach-Zehnder interferometry has been proposed as a probe for detecting the statistics of anyonic quasiparticles in fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states. Here, we focus on interferometers made of multimode edge states with upstream modes. We find that the interference visibility is suppressed due to downstream-upstream mode entanglement; the latter serves as a "which path" detector to the downstream interfering trajectories. Our analysis tackles a concrete realization of a filling factor of ν =2 /3 , but its applicability goes beyond that specific case, and encompasses the recent observation of the ubiquitous emergence of upstream neutral modes in FQH states. The latter, according to our analysis, goes hand in hand with the failure to observe Mach-Zehnder anyonic interference in fractional states. We point out how charge-neutral mode disentanglement will resuscitate the interference signal.

  9. Parameter estimation for the superdiffusion of energetic particles upstream of heliospheric shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Zimbardo, Gaetano; Fichtner, Horst; Perri, Silvia

    Recently, in-situ spacecraft observations have suggested that the diffusion of energetic particles accelerated at heliospheric shocks could be anomalous. In particular, a new technique of analysis has allowed to derive particle transport properties from energetic particle time profiles upstream of interplanetary shocks. Indeed, the time/spatial power-laws of the differential intensity far upstream of the shock are indicative of superdiffusion. Assuming spatial homogeneity of the background plasma, the power-law behaviour has been derived in principle both from a propagator formalism and a fractional transport equation. However, a precise determination of the key parameters, namely of the power-law index, the superdiffusion coefficient, and the related transition scale from a relatively flat spatial variation close to the shock to a steeper asymptotic power-law behaviour far upstream remains an open problem. We address this issue by studying typical shock observations and by comparing them to detailed modeling of superdiffusion.

  10. Measurement of turbulent flow upstream and downstream of a circular pipe bend

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, Jun; Machida, Nobuteru

    2012-04-15

    We measured velocity distribution in cross sections of a fully developed turbulent pipe flow upstream and downstream of a 90 degree sign bend by synchronizing two sets of a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. Unsteady undulation of Dean vortices formed downstream from the bend was characterized by the azimuthal position of the stagnation point found on the inner and outer sides of the bend. Linear stochastic estimation was applied to capture the upstream flow field conditioned by the azimuthal location of the stagnation point downstream from the bend. When the inner-side stagnation point stayed below (above) the symmetry plane, the conditional streamwise velocity upstream from the bend exhibited high-speed streaks extended in a quasi-streamwise direction on the outer side of the curvature above (below) the symmetry plane.

  11. Observational evidence on the origin of ions upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Schwartz, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The kinematic formalism described by Schwartz et al. (1983) is used to quantitatively compare the zeroth order predicted energies for four different source hypotheses for ions detected upstream of the earth's bow shock with previously published observations of upstream field-aligned beams and gyrating ion events. Specular reflection of a fraction of the incident solar wind is found to be the most credible explanation of gyrating ion events observed upstream of shocks ranging from quasi-parallel to nearly perpendicular. The recent hypothesis that field-aligned beams are the result of leakage from the magnetosheath of ions which were originally specularly reflected at quasi-perpendicular portions of the shock provides good agreement with observed energies of many field-aligned beams. Only magnetic moment conserving reflection of solar wind ions is capable of accounting for two very energetic beam events.

  12. Upstream-advancing waves generated by a current over a sinusoidal bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyotoh, Harumichi; Fukushima, Masaki

    1997-07-01

    Upstream-advancing waves are observed in open channel flows over a fixed sinusoidal bed with large amplitude, when the Froude number is less than the resonant value, at which stream velocity is equal to the celerity of the wave with wavelength equal to that of the bottom surface. Their wavelength is about 3-6 times as long as the bottom wavelength and the celerity is close to that obtained from potential flow theory. Therefore, the wavelength of upstream-advancing waves is determined by linear stability analyses assuming that they are induced by the Benjamin-Feir-type instability of steady flow. Here, two formulas for the wavelength with different scaling are introduced and compared with experiment. In addition, the mechanisms of upstream-advancing waves are investigated qualitatively using the forced Schrödinger equation.

  13. Distortion in turbulence upstream of a flat plate and induced pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, J.-P.; Arbey, H.; Rey, C.

    1983-01-01

    Wind tunnel trials involving air flow over a flat plate were performed in order to test the feasibility of extending Hunt's (1973) theory of the location of the stagnation point, the pressure distribution, and the turbulence induced upstream from a circular cylinder to other cases. A flow velocity of 10 m/sec was used, with a grid of 0.3 solidity placed 40 mesh sizes upstream. A pressure sensor was placed above the plate, which was progressively drawn downstream during the experiment. The X-wire sensor permitted measurement of longitudinal and transversal velocity disturbances, and a microphone was placed at the stagnation point to measure pressure fluctuations. As Hunt predicted, the low frequency turbulence spectra increased upstream from the plate. A cut-off frequency was found, above which the turbulence decreased.

  14. 46 CFR 172.133 - Character of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... calculations must show that the vessel can survive damage at any location. (b) Except as provided in § 153.7 of... than 492 feet (150 meters) in length can survive damage at any location; and (2) Except as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, 492 feet (150 meters) or less in length can survive damage at any...

  15. 46 CFR 172.133 - Character of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... calculations must show that the vessel can survive damage at any location. (b) Except as provided in § 153.7 of... than 492 feet (150 meters) in length can survive damage at any location; and (2) Except as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, 492 feet (150 meters) or less in length can survive damage at any...

  16. 46 CFR 172.133 - Character of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... calculations must show that the vessel can survive damage at any location. (b) Except as provided in § 153.7 of... than 492 feet (150 meters) in length can survive damage at any location; and (2) Except as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, 492 feet (150 meters) or less in length can survive damage at any...

  17. Non-hominid TP63 lacks retroviral LTRs but contains a novel conserved upstream exon.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Ulrike; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-06-15

    We have recently identified novel isoforms of human p63, with specific expression in testicular germ cells. The synthesis of these p63 mRNA species is driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the endogenous retrovirus ERV9. This LTR was inserted upstream of the previously known TP63 exons roughly 15 million years ago, leading to the expression of novel exons and the synthesis of germline-specific transactivating p63 (GTAp63) isoforms in humans and great apes (Beyer et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011; 108:3624-9). However, this study did not reveal whether similar upstream exons can also be found in the TP63 genes of non-hominid animals. Here we performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to identify a novel upstream exon of murine TP63, located in the 5' position from the previously described start of transcription. This exon, termed "exon U3" in our previous publication, is conserved within a broad range of mammalian species, including hominids. However, in contrast to the human TP63 gene structure, the murine exon U3 represented the most upstream transcribed sequence of TP63. Murine exon U3 is then alternatively spliced to acceptor sites within exon 1 or upstream of exon 2, resulting in two different available translational start sites. p63 mRNAs comprising exon U3 are detectable in various tissues, with no particular preference for testicular cells. Thus, whereas the retroviral LTR in hominid species results in strictly germline-associated p63 isoforms, the upstream exon in non-hominids fails to confer this tissue specificity. This notion strongly supports the concept that the synthesis of a testis-specific p63 isoform is a recently acquired, unique feature of humans and great apes.

  18. Comment on - 'Upstream energetic ions under radial IMF - A critical test of the Fermi model'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    A criticism is offered by Fusilier of the conclusion by Sarris and Krimigis (SK, 1988) that the failure to observe energetic ions continuously under near radial interplanetary magnetic field conditions contradicts a fundamental prediction of the Fermi mechanism for the origin of the upstream ions. It is argued that both events reported by SK fall short of critical tests of the Fermi mechanism because the magnetic turbulence required by the Fermi process is not guaranteed to be present. Sarris replies that the ad hoc limit on the local angle between the magnetic field and the shock normal imposed by Fusilier is not a relevant consideration to upstream ion activity.

  19. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  20. The dependence of upstream wave periods on the interplanetary magnetic field strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Hoppe, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    It has long been known that the periods of Pc 3, 4 pulsations on the ground correlate with the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field. This fact has been used to argue for an exogenic source for these pulsations. Particularly attractive candidates for the source of pulsations in this frequency range are the upstream waves of similar frequencies which are associated with populations of ions reflected from the bow shock. However, the dependence of the period of these waves on the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field has never been checked. This paper performs such a check and confirms that the upstream waves have the proper functional relationship.

  1. Effect of a curved duct upstream on performance of small centrifugal compressors for automobile turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shigeta; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    Since the automobile turbochargers are installed in an engine compartment with limited space, the ducts upstream of the turbocharger compressor may be curved in a complex manner. In the present paper, the effect of a curved duct upstream on performance of small centrifugal compressors for automobile turbochargers is discussed. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a turbocharger compressor validated for the compressor model with the straight pipe applied to the compressor with the curved pipe are executed, and the deterioration of the performance for the curved pipe is confirmed. It is also found that the deterioration of compressor performance is caused by the interaction of the secondary flow and the impeller.

  2. Hydrodynamic Surface Interactions Enable Escherichia Coli to Seek Efficient Routes to Swim Upstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Jane; Kalkanci, Ozge; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Koser, Hur

    2007-02-01

    Escherichia coli in shear flow near a surface are shown to exhibit a steady propensity to swim towards the left (within the relative coordinate system) of that surface. This phenomenon depends solely on the local shear rate on the surface, and leads to cells eventually aligning and swimming upstream preferentially along a left sidewall or crevice in a wide range of flow conditions. The results indicate that flow-assisted translation and upstream swimming along surfaces might be relevant in various models of bacterial transport, such as in pyelonephritis and bacterial migration in wet soil and aquatic environments in general.

  3. Upstream-advancing waves generated by three-dimensional moving disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Joon; Grimshaw, Roger H. J.

    1990-02-01

    The wave field resulting from a surface pressure or a bottom topography in a horizontally unbounded domain is studied. Upstream-advancing waves successively generated by various forcing disturbances moving with near-resonant speeds are found by numerically solving a forced Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (fKP) equation, which shows in its simplest form the interplay of a basic linear wave operator, longitudinal and transverse dispersion, nonlinearity, and forcing. Curved solitary waves are found as a slowly varying similarity solution of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, and are favorably compared with the upstream-advancing waves numerically obtained.

  4. Pioneer 10 and 11 observations of waves upstream of interplanetary corotating shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavassano, Bruno; Smith, Edward J.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    An extended region of enhanced magnetic field fluctuations is found upstream of some of the corotating shocks observed by Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 between 1 and 5 AU. This perturbed region is present when the corotating shock, generally quasi-perpendicular, becomes oblique or quasi-parallel due to a temporary out-of-spiral direction of the upstream magnetic field. The observed waves are almost not compressional. Their amplitude is a large fraction of the ambient field, and their frequency is around 1 mHz in the spacecraft frame. A brief discussion of the possible mechanisms of generation is given.

  5. Method and system for control of upstream flowfields of vehicle in supersonic or hypersonic atmospheric flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Inventor); Pritchett, II, Victor E. (Inventor); Wang, Ten-See (Inventor); Farr, Rebecca Ann (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The upstream flowfield of a vehicle traveling in supersonic or hypersonic atmospheric flight is actively controlled using attribute(s) experienced by the vehicle. Sensed attribute(s) include pressure along the vehicle's outer mold line, temperature along the vehicle's outer mold line, heat flux along the vehicle's outer mold line, and/or local acceleration response of the vehicle. A non-heated, non-plasma-producing gas is injected into an upstream flowfield of the vehicle from at least one surface location along the vehicle's outer mold line. The pressure of the gas so-injected is adjusted based on the attribute(s) so-sensed.

  6. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  7. Prenatal radiation exposure: dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Scharwächter, C; Röser, A; Schwartz, C A; Haage, P

    2015-05-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero x-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties. • Radiation exposure of the unborn child can result in both deterministic as well as stochastic damage und hitherto should be avoided or reduced to a minimum

  8. 46 CFR 172.175 - Character of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., design calculations must show that the vessel can survive damage at any location. (b) If a type IIG hull... length can survive damage at any location; and (2) 492 feet (150 meters) or less in length can survive... space is calculated as a single floodable compartment. (c) If a vessel has independent tanks type C...

  9. 46 CFR 172.175 - Character of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., design calculations must show that the vessel can survive damage at any location. (b) If a type IIG hull... length can survive damage at any location; and (2) 492 feet (150 meters) or less in length can survive... space is calculated as a single floodable compartment. (c) If a vessel has independent tanks type C...

  10. Variation in reach-scale bankfull discharge of the Jingjiang Reach undergoing upstream and downstream boundary controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Junqiang; Zhou, Meirong; Lin, Fenfen; Deng, Shanshan; Lu, Jinyou

    2017-04-01

    Remarkable channel degradation has occurred in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River, since the operation of the Three Gorges Project, which has caused significant geomorphic adjustments, including the variation in bankfull discharge. Bankfull discharge is a key indicator of flood-discharge capacity in the Jingjiang Reach, which can adjust in response to the altered water and sediment conditions and local base-level changes. Therefore, it is important to investigate the variation in reach-scale bankfull discharge, because of longitudinal variability in channel geometry and bankfull discharge in the study reach. In this study, a general method to calculate the section-scale bankfull discharge using the simulated stage-discharge relation is outlined briefly, and an integrated method is then presented for estimating the reach-scale bankfull discharge. The post-flood reach-scale bankfull discharges in the study reach from 2002 to 2015 were calculated, using the proposed method, based on surveyed post-flood profiles at 171 sections and measured hydrological data at three hydrometric sections and eight water gauge sections. The calculated results indicate that: (i) the reach-scale bankfull discharge in the Jingjiang Reach ranged between 32,731 and 38,949 m3/s over this period, with the average bankfull discharge in the Upper Jingjiang Reach being generally greater than the value in the Lower Jingjiang Reach; (ii) the magnitude of the reach-scale bankfull discharge responded well to the cumulative effect of incoming flow and sediment conditions at the inlet boundary, as well as the change of local base level at the outlet boundary; and (iii) the flood-discharge capacity of the reach was controlled by both the upstream and downstream boundary conditions, and the reach-scale bankfull discharge was expressed by an empirical function of the previous five-year average fluvial erosion intensity during flood seasons at Zhicheng, and the difference between the flood

  11. Effects of Upstream Turbulence on Measurement Uncertainty of Flow Rate by Venturi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungho; Yoon, Seok Ho; Yu, Cheong-Hwan; Park, Sang-Jin; Chung, Chang-Hwan

    2010-06-01

    Venturi has been widely used for measuring flow rate in a variety of engineering applications since pressure loss is relatively small compared with other measuring method. The current study focuses on making detailed estimation of measured uncertainties as the upstream turbulence affects uncertainty levels of the water flows in the closed-loop testing. Upstream turbulences can be controlled by selecting 9 different swirl generators. Measurement uncertainty of flow rate has been estimated by a quantitative uncertainty analysis which is based on the ANSI/ASME PTC 19.1-2005 standard. The best way to reduce error in measuring flow rate was investigated for evaluating its measurement uncertainty. The results of flow rate uncertainty analysis show that the case with systematic error has higher than that without systematic error. Especially the result with systematic error exhibits that the uncertainty of flow rate was gradually increased by upstream turbulence. Uncertainty of flow rate measurement can be mainly affected by differential pressure and discharge coefficient. Flow disturbance can be also reduced by increasing of the upstream straight length of Venturi.

  12. Upstream movement of residual hatchery steelhead into areas containing bull trout and cutthroat trout.

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A. ); Pearsons, Todd N.

    2000-11-01

    Hatchery-reared steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss that do not emigrate as smolts shortly after release may negatively impact wild fish communities through ecological interactions. We used systematic, stratified snorkeling surveys to document the relative abundance of wild rainbow trout O. mykiss, bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi as well as the upstream limit of residual hatchery steelhead (hatchery-reared steelhead that had failed to emigrate before June 1). Our objective was to determine whether residual hatchery steelhead had migrated upstream from their release point into an area containing a threatened population of bull trout and cutthroat trout. Hatchery steelhead made up a larger portion of the salmonid community in the sites near their release location (mean= 52.5%, range= 29-79%), and constituted a lower proportion (mean= 4.8%, range= 0-14%) of the salmonid community as distance upstream of the release location increased. However, residual hatchery steelhead had migrated over 12 km upstream into an area containing a threatened stock of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi.

  13. INDIRECT UPSTREAM EFFECTS OF DAMS: CONSEQUENCES OF MIGRATORY CONSUMER EXTIRPATION IN PUERTO RICO

    Treesearch

    EFFIE A. GREATHOUSE; CATHERINE M. PRINGLE; WILLIAM H. MCDOWELL; JEFF G. HOLMQUIST

    2006-01-01

    Large dams degrade the integrity of a wide variety of ecosystems, yet direct downstream effects of dams have received the most attention from ecosystem managers and researchers. We investigated indirect upstream effects of dams resulting from decimation of migratory freshwater shrimp and fish populations in Puerto Rico, USA, in both high- and low-gradient streams. In...

  14. Trends in U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Upstream Costs

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Average 2015 well drilling and completion costs in five onshore areas decline 25% and 30% below their level in 2012 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) commissioned IHS Global Inc. (IHS) to perform a study of upstream drilling and production costs. The IHS report assesses capital and operating costs associated with drilling, completing, and operating wells and facilities.

  15. Pressure-velocity correlations in a flow upstream of a forward-facing step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David; Goulart, Paul; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Imperial College Flow Control Group Team

    2011-11-01

    The 2-dimensional velocity field upstream of a forward step was determined experimentally using Particle Image Velocimetry. A total of 4 seconds of data was acquired at 8000 Hz . The flow velocity was 10ms-1 with an Reh of 20000, where h = 0 . 03 m is the step height. The boundary layer thickness relative to step height was δ / h = 1 . 6 . The upstream surface pressure fluctuations were simultaneously measured using an array of 9 microphones embedded in tunnel floor. These pressure fluctuations are shown to have a direct linear correlation to the velocity perturbations. The correlation has a maximum of approximately 0.3 at upstream stations x / h > 2 and reduces toward background noise levels as the flow approaches separation at 0 . 5 < x / h < 1 . 5 . It is also shown that large pressure fluctuations upstream correlate to changes in shape and structure of the separation region at the step. This data demonstrates the ability to estimate some flow characteristics at the step face from the oncoming boundary layer, through the use of pressure measurements at the wall.

  16. Dynamism in the upstream invasion edge of a freshwater fish exposes range boundary constraints.

    PubMed

    Rubenson, Erika S; Olden, Julian D

    2017-06-01

    Studying the dynamics of species' borders can provide insight into the mechanisms limiting or promoting range expansion in response to environmental change. In the John Day River, Oregon (USA), rising stream temperatures are facilitating the upstream expansion of invasive smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu. Here, where smallmouth bass occupy the upstream limit of its thermal tolerance, we explore population structure and seasonal movement patterns to elucidate the environmental conditions and individual traits that define front edge (where individuals reside year-round) and leading edge (where individuals colonize, but may not establish) limits to its upstream distribution. Reporting on a multi-year, spatially extensive riverscape survey, our results show dramatic ebbs and flows of seasonal occupancies due to individual movement with an overall trend of upstream expansion. We revealed distinct front and leading edge invasion extents, each constrained by different ecological conditions. The front edge is largely constrained by the ability for juveniles to survive an overwinter starvation period, whereas the leading edge is associated with adult growth potential and seasonal hydrological conditions. We also found key morphological traits associated with more mobile individuals. By providing mechanistic insight into the factors that promote or limit range expansion of an invasive riverine species, our study enhances the ability to predict future range shifts and provides critical information to managers tasked with restricting further expansion.

  17. Experimental demonstration of a scalable transmitter frontend technique in IMDD-OFDMA-PON upstream scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Cheng; Liu, Na; Wang, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Xue

    2016-11-01

    Scalable transmitter frontend scheme is proposed to reduce the sampling rate of digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and the complexity of digital signal processing (DSP) in intensity modulation and direct detection (IMDD) OFDMA-PON upstream scenarios. The hardware cost of each ONU is substantially decreased. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is experimentally demonstrated.

  18. Statistical analysis of diffuse ion events upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Mobius, E.; Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hilchenbach, M.; Luehr, H.

    1994-01-01

    A statistical study of diffuse energetic ion events and their related waves upstream of the Earth's bow shock was performed using data from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module (AMPTE/IRM) satellite over two 5-month periods in 1984 and 1985. The data set was used to test the assumption in the self-consistent model of the upstream wave and particle populations by Lee (1982) that the particle acceleration through hydromagnetic waves and the wave generation are directly coupled. The comparison between the observed wave power and the wave power predicted on the observed energetic particle energy density and solar wind parameters results in a high correlation coefficient of about 0.89. The intensity of diffuse ions falls off approximately exponentially with the distance upstream from the bow shock parallel to the magnetic field with e-folding distances which vary from approximately 3.3 R(sub E) to approximately 11.7 R(sub E) over the energy range from 10 keV/e to 67.3 keV/e for both protons and alpha particles. After normalizing the upstream particle densities to zero bow shock distance by using these exponential variations, a good correlation (0.7) of the density of the diffuse ions with the solar wind density was found. This supports the suggestion that the solar wind is the source of the diffuse ions. Furthermore, the spectral slope of the diffuse ions correlates well with the solar wind velocity component in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (0.68 and 0.66 for protons and alpha particles) which concurs with the notion that the solar wind plays an important role in the acceleration of the upstream particles.

  19. Numerical Investigation of Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor with Large Upstream Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohieldin, T. O.; Tiwari, S. N.; Reubush, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Dual-mode scramjet combustor configuration with significant upstream interaction is investigated numerically, The possibility of scaling the domain to accelerate the convergence and reduce the computational time is explored. The supersonic combustor configuration was selected to provide an understanding of key features of upstream interaction and to identify physical and numerical issues relating to modeling of dual-mode configurations. The numerical analysis was performed with vitiated air at freestream Math number of 2.5 using hydrogen as the sonic injectant. Results are presented for two-dimensional models and a three-dimensional jet-to-jet symmetric geometry. Comparisons are made with experimental results. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional results show substantial oblique shock train reaching upstream of the fuel injectors. Flow characteristics slow numerical convergence, while the upstream interaction slowly increases with further iterations. As the flow field develops, the symmetric assumption breaks down. A large separation zone develops and extends further upstream of the step. This asymmetric flow structure is not seen in the experimental data. Results obtained using a sub-scale domain (both two-dimensional and three-dimensional) qualitatively recover the flow physics obtained from full-scale simulations. All results show that numerical modeling using a scaled geometry provides good agreement with full-scale numerical results and experimental results for this configuration. This study supports the argument that numerical scaling is useful in simulating dual-mode scramjet combustor flowfields and could provide an excellent convergence acceleration technique for dual-mode simulations.

  20. The dimensions of latent ion damage tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the formation of ion damage tracks in dielectric solids permits the dimensions of the microscopic structure of the latent tracks to be calculated. In this model the formation of the damage is initiated at separate points along the track by the Auger decay of vacancies produced by the ion in inner electronic shells of atoms of the insulator. Each decay produces an intense, localized source of charge, whose interaction with the more uniform ionization of the loosely bound electrons along the ion's path causes the atomic motion that results in the damage. Available data on cellulose triacetate and mica are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the model.

  1. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  2. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  3. Eco-Design of River Fishways for Upstream Passage: Application for Hanfeng Dam, Pengxi River, China

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Rainey, William S.

    2012-05-20

    This paper provides a scientific approach to eco-design of river fishways to allow upstream movement of fish past new and existing dams in China. This eco-design approach integrates principles of fish ecology/behavior and engineering, a scientific field also known as bio-engineering or eco-hydraulics. We define a fishway as a structure or mechanism to convey fish upstream past a dam. Man-made or natural stream beds can be part of the fishway mechanism. Fish include bony and non-bony fishes, and upstream passage is the concern here, not downstream passage. The problem is dams block access to upstream habitat used for spawning, rearing, and refuge, i.e., dams decrease habitat connectivity. A solution to alleviate this problem is to design fishways, preferably while the dam is being designed, but if necessary, as retrofits afterward to provide a route that fish can and will use to pass safely upstream without undue delay. Our eco-design approach for fishways involves eight steps: 1) identify the primary species of importance; 2) understand basic ecology and behavior of these fish; 3) characterize the environmental conditions where passage is or will be blocked; 4 identify fishway alternatives and select a preferred alternative; 5) establish eco-design criteria for the fishway, either from management agencies or, if necessary, developed specifically for the given site; 6) where needed, identify and perform research required to resolve critical uncertainties and finalize the eco-design criteria; 7) apply the eco-design criteria and site-specific considerations to design the fishway, involving peer-review by local stakeholders in the process; 8) build the fishway, monitor its effectiveness, and apply the lessons learned. Example fishways are described showing a range of eco-designs depending on the dam site and fish species of concern. We apply the eco-design principles to recommend an approach and next steps for a fishway to pass fish upstream at Hanfeng Dam, an

  4. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1.

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, J; Sancar, G B

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. We report here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 upstream repression sequence, that together regulate induction of PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. A prominent feature of the foot-printed region is a 22-base-pair palindrome. Deletion of the PHR1 upstream repression sequence increased the basal level expression of PHR1 in vivo and decreased induction after exposure of cells to UV radiation or methyl methanesulfonate, whereas insertion of the PRP binding site between the CYC1 upstream activation sequence and "TATA" sequence reduced basal level expression and conferred damage responsiveness upon a reporter gene. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription. Images PMID:1763039

  5. Using wavelength-tunable self-seeding Fabry-Perot laser for upstream transmission in hybrid WDM/TDM PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Xiao, Shilin; Guo, Wei; Bi, Meihua; Zhou, Zhao; Jin, Yaohui; Hu, Weisheng

    2010-12-01

    We propose a simple configuration of wavelength-tunable self-seeding Fabry-Perot fiber laser at ONUs for upstream transmission in hybrid WDM/TDM PON. The performances of the side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR), tuning range, wavelength and power stability for the proposed laser module are experimentally investigated. The performance benefits from the upstream wavelengths sharing are showed via simulations.

  6. EMG telemetry studies on upstream migration of chum salmon in the Toyohira River, Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Makiguchi, Yuya; Konno, Yoshifumi; Konishi, Koji; Miyoshi, Koji; Sakashita, Taku; Nii, Hisaya; Nakao, Katsuya; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    The movements of 28 adult chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta (Walbaum) tagged with electromyogram (EMG) transmitters were tracked along the Toyohira river, Hokkaido, Japan, in October of 2007 and 2008 to investigate and evaluate the upstream migratory behavior through the protection bed and fishway of ground sills. The approach time of fish that ascended successfully through the protection bed and fishway was shorter than that of unsuccessful fish. The unsuccessful fish were observed to swim in currents with high water velocity and shallow water depth at swimming speeds that exceeded their critical swimming speed (U (crit)) during the approach to these structures. In consequence, unsuccessful fish frequently alternated between burst and maximum sustained speeds without ever ascending the fishway, and eventually became exhausted. It is important that fishway are constructed to enable chum salmon to find a passage way easily, so that they can migrate upstream rapidly without wasting excessive energy.

  7. Upstream waves and particles /Tutorial Lecture/. [from shocks in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Hoppe, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    The plasma waves, MHD waves, energetic electrons and ions associated with the proximity of the region upstream from terrestrial, planetary and interplanetary shocks are discussed in view of observations and current theories concerning their origin. These waves cannot be separated from the study of shock structure. Since the shocks are supersonic, they continually overtake any ULF waves created in the plasma in front of the shock. The upstream particles and waves are also of intrinsic interest because they provide a plasma laboratory for the study of wave-particle interactions in a plasma which, at least at the earth, is accessible to sophisticated probing. Insight may be gained into interstellar medium cosmic ray acceleration through the study of these phenomena.

  8. Essential roles of caspases and their upstream regulators in rotenone-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Jihjong; Huang, M.-S.; Yang, I-C.; Lai, T.-C.; Wang, J.-L.; Pang, V.F.; Hsiao, M. Kuo, M.Y.P.

    2008-06-20

    In the present study, we examined whether caspases and their upstream regulators are involved in rotenone-induced cytotoxicity. Rotenone significantly inhibited the proliferation of oral cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner compared to normal oral mucosal fibroblasts. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content showed that rotenone treatment induced apoptosis following G2/M arrest. Western blotting showed activation of both the caspase-8 and caspase-9 pathways, which differed from previous studies conducted in other cell types. Furthermore, p53 protein and its downstream pro-apoptotic target, Bax, were induced in SAS cells after treatment with rotenone. Rotenone-induced apoptosis was inhibited by antioxidants (glutathione, N-acetylcysteine, and tiron). In conclusion, our results demonstrate significant involvement of caspases and their upstream regulators in rotenone-induced cytotoxicity.

  9. Upstream transients and their influence on the bow shock and magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz

    2017-04-01

    We will present results of the GI Cluster project "Upstream transients and their influence on the bow shock and magnetosheath". We study the main characteristics of upstream transients (cavitons and SHFA), and discuss how they can modify the solar wind, the bow shock structure, and the magnetosheath. The use of Cluster positioned at short separation distances will allow us to determine in detail the 3D morphology of structures such as cavitons, and determine how they evolve as they approach the shock and interact with other foreshock phenomena. We also want to study in more detail the formation of SHFA and their internal micro structure. Other point of interest is to understand how these transients can contribute to processes such as shock reformation and shock rippling.

  10. Compilation and analysis of sequences upstream from the translational start site in eukaryotic mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, M

    1984-01-01

    5-Noncoding sequences have been tabulated for 211 messenger RNAs from higher eukaryotic cells. The 5'-proximal AUG triplet serves as the initiator codon in 95% of the mRNAs examined. The most conspicuous conserved feature is the presence of a purine (most often A) three nucleotides upstream from the AUG initiator codon; only 6 of the mRNAs in the survey have a pyrimidine in that position. There is a predominance of C in positions -1, -2, -4 and -5, just upstream from the initiator codon. The sequence CCAGCCAUG (G) thus emerges as a consensus sequence for eukaryotic initiation sites. The extent to which the ribosome binding site in a given mRNA matches the -1 to -5 consensus sequence varies: more than half of the mRNAs in the tabulation have 3 or 4 nucleotides in common with the CCACC consensus, but only ten mRNAs conform perfectly. PMID:6694911

  11. Shock Characteristics Measured Upstream of Both a Forward-Swept and an Aft-Swept Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Krupar, Martin J.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Horvath, Csaba

    2007-01-01

    Three different types of diagnostic data-blade surface flow visualization, shroud unsteady pressure, and laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV)--were obtained on two fans, one forward-swept and one aft-swept, in order to learn more about the shocks which propagate upstream of these rotors when they are operated at transonic tip speeds. Flow visualization data are presented for the forward-swept fan operating at 13831 rpm(sub c), and for the aft-swept fan operating at 12500 and 13831 rpm(sub c) (corresponding to tip rotational Mach numbers of 1.07 and 1.19, respectively). The flow visualization data identify where the shocks occur on the suction side of the rotor blades. These data show that at the takeoff speed, 13831 rpm(sub c), the shocks occurring in the tip region of the forward-swept fan are further downstream in the blade passage than with the aft-swept fan. Shroud unsteady pressure measurements were acquired using a linear array of 15 equally-spaced pressure transducers extending from two tip axial chords upstream to 0.8 tip axial chords downstream of the static position of the tip leading edge of each rotor. Such data are presented for each fan operating at one subsonic and five transonic tip speeds. The unsteady pressure data show relatively strong detached shocks propagating upstream of the aft-swept rotor at the three lowest transonic tip speeds, and weak, oblique pressure disturbances attached to the tip of the aft-swept fan at the two highest transonic tip speeds. The unsteady pressure measurements made with the forward-swept fan do not show strong shocks propagating upstream of that rotor at any of the tested speeds. A comparison of the forward-swept and aft-swept shroud unsteady pressure measurements indicates that at any given transonic speed the pressure disturbance just upstream of the tip of the forward-swept fan is much weaker than that of the aft-swept fan. The LDV data suggest that at 12500 and 13831 rpm(sub c), the forward-swept fan swallowed the

  12. Upstream turbulence and the particle spectrum at CME-driven Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Li Gang; Hu, Q.; Zank, G.P.

    2005-08-01

    Particle spectra at a CME-driven shock often exhibit a power law to certain energies, then roll over exponentially beyond. However, there are cases where a spectrum evolves to another power law above a certain energy (e.g. the Oct. 29th, 2003 event). Here we introduce an effective 'loss term' into the particle transport equation and study the consequent particle spectra behavior at a CME-driven shock. The loss term represents the effect of particle leaking out from a finite shock and is related to the turbulence power at and near the shock. We show that the shape of particle spectra are tightly related to the form of upstream turbulence. Under certain circumstances, broken power-law spectrum can be obtained. The physical meaning of the 'loss term' and its relationship to the upstream turbulence is discussed.

  13. Manipulation of upstream rotor leading edge vortex and its effects on counter rotating propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Becky

    1993-01-01

    The leading edge vortex of a counter rotating propeller (CRP) model was altered by using shrouds and by turning the upstream rotors to a forward sweep configuration. Performance, flow, and acoustic data were used to determine the effect of vortex impingement on the noise signature of the CRP system. Forward sweep was found to eliminate the leading edge vortex of the upstream blades. Removal of the vortex had little effect on the tone noise at the forward and rear blade passing frequencies (BPF's) but significantly altered both the sound pressure level and directivity of the interaction tone which occurs at the sum of the two BPF's. A separate manipulation of the leading edge vortex performed by installing shrouds of various inlet length on the CRP verified that diverting the vortex path increases the noise level of the interaction tone. An unexpected link has been established between the interaction tone and the leading edge vortex-blade interaction phenomenon.

  14. The dynamic response of upstream DNA to transcription-generated torsional stress.

    PubMed

    Kouzine, Fedor; Liu, Juhong; Sanford, Suzanne; Chung, Hye-Jung; Levens, David

    2004-11-01

    The torsional stress caused by counter-rotation of the transcription machinery and template generates supercoils in a closed topological domain, but has been presumed to be too short-lived to be significant in an open domain. This report shows that transcribing RNA polymerases dynamically sustain sufficient torsion to perturb DNA structure even on linear templates. Assays to capture and measure transcriptionally generated torque and to trap short-lived perturbations in DNA structure and conformation showed that the transient forces upstream of active promoters are large enough to drive the supercoil-sensitive far upstream element (FUSE) of the human c-myc into single-stranded DNA. An alternative non-B conformation of FUSE found in stably supercoiled DNA is not accessible dynamically. These results demonstrate that dynamic disturbance of DNA structure provides a real-time measure of ongoing genetic activity.

  15. Analysis of the genetic diversity of the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance gene 5' upstream region.

    PubMed

    Myrick, Alissa; Sarr, Ousmane; Dieng, Therese; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Wirth, Dyann F

    2005-02-01

    Recent findings indicating a low level of polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum genome have led to the hypothesis that existent polymorphisms are likely to have functional significance. We tested this hypothesis by developing a map of the polymorphism in the P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) gene 5' upstream region and assaying its correlation with drug resistance in a sample of field isolates from Dakar, Senegal. A comparison of six geographically diverse laboratory strains showed that the 1.94-kb 5'-untranslated region is highly monomorphic, with a total of four unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) being identified. All of the mutations were localized to a 462-basepair region proximal to the transcription start point. Analysis of this region in field isolates shows the prevalence of one SNP throughout the entire population of parasites, irrespective of drug resistance status. The SNP frequency of the pfmdr1 upstream region is lower than that found in the noncoding region of other genes.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of upstream plasma condition for SST-1 X-Divertor configuration with SOLPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himabindu, M.; Tyagi, Anil K.; Sharma, Deepti; Sharma, Devendra; Srinivasan, R.

    2017-04-01

    Extensive power exhausts and target heat loads are anticipated in reactor grade fusion devices. Prototyping of an X-Divertor based power exhaust scheme is being attempted by means of simulations of Scrape-off Layer plasma transport in the diverted plasma equilibria of SST-1 tokamak using SOLPS5.1. Evaluation of the relative advantages of an X-Divertor configuration involves simulating the SST-1 standard divertor scheme plasma transport for the reference and then achieving equivalent upstream plasma conditions in the X-divertor equilibrium to ensure equivalent core plasma in both the cases. The first optimization is to be achieved by simulating effects of an external gas puff in the SOL region for controlling separatrix density in the X-divertor configuration with visible modifications in the downstream plasma conditions. The present work analyzes sensitivity of the upstream SOL plasma conditions to the gas puff intensity and its effect on the plasma neutral transport in the divertor region

  17. Upstream waves and particles /Tutorial Lecture/. [from shocks in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Hoppe, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    The plasma waves, MHD waves, energetic electrons and ions associated with the proximity of the region upstream from terrestrial, planetary and interplanetary shocks are discussed in view of observations and current theories concerning their origin. These waves cannot be separated from the study of shock structure. Since the shocks are supersonic, they continually overtake any ULF waves created in the plasma in front of the shock. The upstream particles and waves are also of intrinsic interest because they provide a plasma laboratory for the study of wave-particle interactions in a plasma which, at least at the earth, is accessible to sophisticated probing. Insight may be gained into interstellar medium cosmic ray acceleration through the study of these phenomena.

  18. Antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas upstream and downstream of a water resource recovery facility.

    PubMed

    Cisar, Cindy R; Henderson, Samantha K; Askew, Maegan L; Risenhoover, Hollie G; McAndrews, Chrystle R; Kennedy, S Dawn; Paine, C Sue

    2014-09-01

    Aeromonas strains isolated from sediments upstream and downstream of a water resource recovery facility (WRRF) over a two-year time period were tested for susceptibility to 13 antibiotics. Incidence of resistance to antibiotics, antibiotic resistance phenotypes, and diversity (based on resistance phenotypes) were compared in the two populations. At the beginning of the study, the upstream and downstream Aeromonas populations were different for incidence of antibiotic resistance (p < 0.01), resistance phenotypes (p < 0.005), and diversity. However, these differences declined over time and were not significant at the end of the study. These results (1) indicate that antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas in stream sediments fluctuates considerably over time and (2) suggest that WRRF effluent does not, when examined over the long- term, affect antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas in downstream sediment.

  19. Antibiotic Resistance in Aeromonas Upstream and Downstream of a Water Resource Recovery Facility

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Samantha K.; Askew, Maegan L.; Risenhoover, Hollie G.; McAndrews, Chrystle R.; Kennedy, S. Dawn; Paine, C. Sue

    2014-01-01

    Aeromonas strains isolated from sediments upstream and downstream of a water resource recovery facility (WRRF) over a two-year time period were tested for susceptibility to thirteen antibiotics. Incidence of resistance to antibiotics, antibiotic resistance phenotypes, and diversity (based on resistance phenotypes) were compared in the two populations. At the beginning of the study, the upstream and downstream Aeromonas populations were different for incidence of antibiotic resistance (p < 0.01), resistance phenotypes (p < 0.005), and diversity. However, these differences declined over time and were not significant at the end of the study. These results (1) indicate that antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas in stream sediments fluctuates considerably over time and (2) suggest that WRRF effluent does not, when examined over the long term, affect antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas in downstream sediment. PMID:25327024

  20. Upstream and downstream wave packets associated with low-Mach number interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, O.; Å afránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Přech, L.; PitÅa, A.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2014-11-01

    Wave packets are frequently observed upstream and/or downstream of shocks in a magnetized plasma. We present a comparison of Wind and Spektr-R observations of 27 interplanetary low-Mach number (<5.5) shocks that reveals that (1) the wavelengths of both upstream and downstream waves conserve over the spacecraft separation, (2) in the frequency range of 0.5-5 Hz, their wavelengths are directly proportional to the shock ramp thickness that is controlled by the ion thermal gyroradius, and (3) the phase shift between density and temperature variations within downstream wave packets is about 90°. These results emphasize a role of kinetic processes in the formation of low-Mach number shocks.

  1. Manipulation of upstream rotor leading edge vortex and its effects on counter rotating propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Becky

    1993-01-01

    The leading edge vortex of a counter rotating propeller (CRP) model was altered by using shrouds and by turning the upstream rotors to a forward sweep configuration. Performance, flow, and acoustic data were used to determine the effect of vortex impingement on the noise signature of the CRP system. Forward sweep was found to eliminate the leading edge vortex of the upstream blades. Removal of the vortex had little effect on the tone noise at the forward and rear blade passing frequencies (BPF's) but significantly altered both the sound pressure level and directivity of the interaction tone which occurs at the sum of the two BPF's. A separate manipulation of the leading edge vortex performed by installing shrouds of various inlet length on the CRP verified that diverting the vortex path increases the noise level of the interaction tone. An unexpected link has been established between the interaction tone and the leading edge vortex-blade interaction phenomenon.

  2. The giant mottled eel, Anguilla marmorata, uses blue-shifted rod photoreceptors during upstream migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Fu, Wen-Chun; Wang, I-Li; Yan, Hong Young; Wang, Tzi-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Catadromous fishes migrate between ocean and freshwater during particular phases of their life cycle. The dramatic environmental changes shape their physiological features, e.g. visual sensitivity, olfactory ability, and salinity tolerance. Anguilla marmorata, a catadromous eel, migrates upstream on dark nights, following the lunar cycle. Such behavior may be correlated with ontogenetic changes in sensory systems. Therefore, this study was designed to identify changes in spectral sensitivity and opsin gene expression of A. marmorata during upstream migration. Microspectrophotometry analysis revealed that the tropical eel possesses a duplex retina with rod and cone photoreceptors. The λmax of rod cells are 493, 489, and 489 nm in glass, yellow, and wild eels, while those of cone cells are 508, and 517 nm in yellow, and wild eels, respectively. Unlike European and American eels, Asian eels exhibited a blue-shifted pattern of rod photoreceptors during upstream migration. Quantitative gene expression analyses of four cloned opsin genes (Rh1f, Rh1d, Rh2, and SWS2) revealed that Rh1f expression is dominant at all three stages, while Rh1d is expressed only in older yellow eel. Furthermore, sequence comparison and protein modeling studies implied that a blue shift in Rh1d opsin may be induced by two known (N83, S292) and four putative (S124, V189, V286, I290) tuning sites adjacent to the retinal binding sites. Finally, expression of blue-shifted Rh1d opsin resulted in a spectral shift in rod photoreceptors. Our observations indicate that the giant mottled eel is color-blind, and its blue-shifted scotopic vision may influence its upstream migration behavior and habitat choice.

  3. New waves at multiples of the plasma frequency upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1986-01-01

    The first observations of waves at harmonics higher than the second of the electron plasma frequency are reported. The observations were made by the ISEE 1 spacecraft upstream of the earth's bow shock. The waves are interpreted as electromagnetic radiation at the fundamental and up to the fifth harmonic of the plasma frequency, with effective temperatures decreasing from 5 x 10 to the 17th K to 10 billion K over this range. Two models are proposed for the emission of the waves.

  4. MESSENGER Magnetic Field Observations of Upstream Ultra-Low Frequency Waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Boardsen, S.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Anderosn, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2012-01-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth's is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. The Mercury's bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by low Mach number solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. Previous observations of Mercury upstream ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves came exclusively from two Mercury flybys of Mariner 10. The MESSENGER orbiter data enable us to study of upstream waves in the Mercury's foreshock in depth. This paper reports an overview of upstream ULF waves in the Mercury's foreshock using high-time resolution magnetic field data, 20 samples per second, from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The most common foreshock waves have frequencies near 2 Hz, with properties similar to the I-Hz waves in the Earth's foreshock. They are present in both the flyby data and in every orbit of the orbital data we have surveyed. The most common wave phenomenon in the Earth's foreshock is the large-amplitude 30-s waves, but similar waves at Mercury have frequencies at near 0.1 Hz and occur only sporadically with short durations (a few wave cycles). Superposed on the "30-s" waves, there are spectral peaks at near 0.6 Hz, not reported previously in Mariner 10 data. We will discuss wave properties and their occurrence characteristics in this paper.

  5. Upstream migration of Pacific lampreys in the John Day River, Oregon: Behavior, timing, and habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Bayer, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Adult Pacific lamprey migration and habitat preferences for over-winter holding and spawning, and larval rearing in tributaries to the Columbia River are not well understood. The John Day River is one such tributary where larval and adult stages of this species have been documented, and its free-flowing character provided the opportunity to study migration of Pacific lampreys unimpeded by passage constraints. Forty-two adult Pacific lampreys were captured in the John Day River near its mouth during their upstream migration. Pacific lampreys were surgically implanted with radio transmitters and released onsite, and tracked by fixed-site, aerial, and terrestrial telemetry methods for nearly one year. Adults moved upstream exclusively at night, with a mean rate of 11.1 ?? 6.3 km/day. They halted upstream migration by September, and held a single position for approximately six months in the lateral margins of riffles and glides, using boulders for cover. More than half of Pacific lampreys resumed migration in March before ending movement in early May. Pacific lampreys that resumed migration in spring completed a median of 87% of their upstream migration before over-winter holding. Upon completing migration. Pacific lampreys briefly held position before beginning downstream movement at the end of May. Though not directly observed, halting migration and movement downstream were likely the result of spawning and death. Gains in adult Pacific lamprey passage through the Columbia River hydrosystem and tributaries may be made by improvements that would expedite migration during spring and summer and increase the quantity and variety of cover and refuge opportunities. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence of Asian carp spawning upstream of a key choke point in the Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Knights, Brent C.; McCalla, Sunnie; Monroe, Emy; Tuttle-Lau, Maren T.; Chapman, Duane C.; George, Amy E.; Vallazza, Jon; Amberg, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Bighead Carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, Silver Carp H. molitrix, and Grass Carp Ctenopharyngodon idella(collectively termed “Asian carp”) were introduced into North America during the 1960s and 1970s and have become established in the lower Mississippi River basin. Previously published evidence for spawning of these species in the upper Mississippi River has been limited to an area just downstream of Dam 22 (near Saverton, Missouri). In 2013 and 2014, we sampled ichthyoplankton at 18 locations in the upper Mississippi River main stem from Dam 9 through Dam 19 and in four tributaries of the Mississippi River (Des Moines, Skunk, Iowa, and Wisconsin rivers). We identified eggs and larvae by using morphological techniques and then used genetic tools to confirm species identity. The spawning events we observed often included more than one species of Asian carp and in a few cases included eggs that must have been derived from more than one upstream spawning event. The upstream extent of genetically confirmed Grass Carp ichthyoplankton was the Wisconsin River, while Bighead Carp and Silver Carp ichthyoplankton were observed in Pool 16. In all these cases, ichthyoplankton likely drifted downstream for several hours prior to collection. Higher water velocities (and, to a lesser extent, higher temperatures) were associated with an increased likelihood of observing eggs or larvae, although the temperature range we encountered was mostly above 17°C. Several major spawning events were detected in 2013, but no major spawning events were observed in 2014. The area between Dam 15 and Dam 19 appears to be the upstream edge of spawning activity for both Silver Carp and Bighead Carp, suggesting that this area could be a focal point for management efforts designed to limit further upstream movement of these species..

  7. Testing the Stability of Three-Dimensional Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion with Large Upstream Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymer, Eric; Blondin, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients (SFXTs) are a subclass of high mass X-ray binaries exhibiting luminosities as high as 1037 erg/s, a dynamic range of 104 erg/s, and a duty cycle lasting only hours to days. The outburst mechanism responsible for SFXT flaring is currently unknown. Potential mechanisms include the accretion of a clumpy wind produced by wind instabilities in the donor star, accretion from an anisotropic wind such as a Be star disk wind, or hydrodynamic instabilities intrinsic to the accretion process. We seek to test these mechanisms through numerical simulations of Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion (HLA), which describes the gravitational accretion of a supersonic ideal gas onto a compact object. HLA has been shown to be dynamically unstable in two-dimensional planar simulations. By contrast, three-dimensional HLA is remarkably stable in the presence of a uniform upstream flow. It has yet to be determined what upstream conditions would be sufficient to disrupt this stability and produce bursts of mass accretion with magnitudes corresponding to those seen in SFXT flares. To probe the stability in the presence of large upstream density and velocity gradients, we extend the model of Blondin & Raymer (2012), which utilizes spherical overset grids to achieve previously unmatched spatial resolutions. For an ideal gas with an adiabatic index of 5/3, the presence of 20% and 100% gradients across the upstream accretion column can induce intermittent rotational flow that occurs behind a deformed bow shock. These transient vortices are frequently interrupted by brief periods of chaotic flow, during which slightly enhanced mass accretion can occur. The net effect of the rotational flow is to inhibit the mass accretion rate, which is less than the Hoyle-Lyttleton prediction by up to an order of magnitude.

  8. Mountain Waves over the Hohe Tauern: Influence of Upstream Diabatic Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-10

    here as a ‘cold start’) in contrast to the control simulation that uses an incremental data assimilation procedure , contains an even larger wavelength...on the gravity- wave response forced by the relatively narrow Alpine ridge rather than on upstream blocking. An incremental update data assimilation ... procedure that enables mesoscale phe- nomena to be retained in the analysis increment � elds is used to initialize the real-data simulations. The

  9. The Giant Mottled Eel, Anguilla marmorata, Uses Blue-Shifted Rod Photoreceptors during Upstream Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Fu, Wen-Chun; Wang, I-Li

    2014-01-01

    Catadromous fishes migrate between ocean and freshwater during particular phases of their life cycle. The dramatic environmental changes shape their physiological features, e.g. visual sensitivity, olfactory ability, and salinity tolerance. Anguilla marmorata, a catadromous eel, migrates upstream on dark nights, following the lunar cycle. Such behavior may be correlated with ontogenetic changes in sensory systems. Therefore, this study was designed to identify changes in spectral sensitivity and opsin gene expression of A. marmorata during upstream migration. Microspectrophotometry analysis revealed that the tropical eel possesses a duplex retina with rod and cone photoreceptors. The λmax of rod cells are 493, 489, and 489 nm in glass, yellow, and wild eels, while those of cone cells are 508, and 517 nm in yellow, and wild eels, respectively. Unlike European and American eels, Asian eels exhibited a blue-shifted pattern of rod photoreceptors during upstream migration. Quantitative gene expression analyses of four cloned opsin genes (Rh1f, Rh1d, Rh2, and SWS2) revealed that Rh1f expression is dominant at all three stages, while Rh1d is expressed only in older yellow eel. Furthermore, sequence comparison and protein modeling studies implied that a blue shift in Rh1d opsin may be induced by two known (N83, S292) and four putative (S124, V189, V286, I290) tuning sites adjacent to the retinal binding sites. Finally, expression of blue-shifted Rh1d opsin resulted in a spectral shift in rod photoreceptors. Our observations indicate that the giant mottled eel is color-blind, and its blue-shifted scotopic vision may influence its upstream migration behavior and habitat choice. PMID:25101636

  10. An in situ Comparison of Electron Acceleration at Collisionless Shocks under Differing Upstream Magnetic Field Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Sulaiman, A. H.; Stawarz, Ł.; Reville, B.; Sergis, N.; Fujimoto, M.; Burgess, D.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2017-07-01

    A leading explanation for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays is acceleration at high-Mach number shock waves in the collisionless plasma surrounding young supernova remnants. Evidence for this is provided by multi-wavelength non-thermal emission thought to be associated with ultrarelativistic electrons at these shocks. However, the dependence of the electron acceleration process on the orientation of the upstream magnetic field with respect to the local normal to the shock front (quasi-parallel/quasi-perpendicular) is debated. Cassini spacecraft observations at Saturn’s bow shock have revealed examples of electron acceleration under quasi-perpendicular conditions, and the first in situ evidence of electron acceleration at a quasi-parallel shock. Here we use Cassini data to make the first comparison between energy spectra of locally accelerated electrons under these differing upstream magnetic field regimes. We present data taken during a quasi-perpendicular shock crossing on 2008 March 8 and during a quasi-parallel shock crossing on 2007 February 3, highlighting that both were associated with electron acceleration to at least MeV energies. The magnetic signature of the quasi-perpendicular crossing has a relatively sharp upstream-downstream transition, and energetic electrons were detected close to the transition and immediately downstream. The magnetic transition at the quasi-parallel crossing is less clear, energetic electrons were encountered upstream and downstream, and the electron energy spectrum is harder above ˜100 keV. We discuss whether the acceleration is consistent with diffusive shock acceleration theory in each case, and suggest that the quasi-parallel spectral break is due to an energy-dependent interaction between the electrons and short, large-amplitude magnetic structures.

  11. Corrosion Damage Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell H.

    2002-11-30

    Corrosion damage can lead to reduced operational lifetimes. Often this damage is not as obvious as general corrosion but takes the form of pits, intergranular corrosion, crevice corrosion and hydrogen absorption. These types of corrosion damage lead to stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking and corrosion fatigue. A critical step in defining a corrosion damage function is determining the relationship between the corrosion damage, the resulting crack propagation mechanism and component lifetimes. The sequence of events is often some localized corrosion event such as pitting, transition of the pit to a planar crack, propagation of this short crack, transition of the short crack to long crack conditions and continued propagation through Stage I, II, and III of the long crack SCC regimes. A description of critical corrosion damage processes and examples of the transition to long crack SCC conditions will be discussed.

  12. The influence of upstream boundary conditions on swirling flows undergoing vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukes, Lothar; Sieber, Moritz; Oberleithner, Kilian; Paschereit, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    Swirling jets undergoing vortex breakdown are common in research and technology. In part this is because swirling jets are widely used to anchor the flame position in gas turbines. Recently, the benefit in terms of flashback safety of axial air injection via a center body in the upstream mixing tube of a simplified premixed burner was demonstrated, Reichel (ASME Turbo Expo 2014). However, the presence of a center body alone alters the upstream boundary conditions for the downstream swirling flow. This study investigates how different upstream conditions modify the downstream swirling jet in a more generic setup. A swirling jet facility is used, consisting of a swirler, a pipe, a nozzle and an unconfined part. The focus lies on two large-scale flow features: the precessing vortex core (PVC) and the recirculation bubble. The flow field is measured with Particle Image Velocimetry and proper orthogonal decomposition is conducted to extract the dominant coherent structures. Additionally, a feature tracking approach is used to track the instantaneous shape and position of the recirculation bubble. We find that different center bodies modify the inflow profiles of the unconfined part of the flow in a specific way. This leads to significant differences in the large scale dynamics. Financial support from the German Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Upstream watershed condition predicts rural children's health across 35 developing countries.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Diego; Ellis, Alicia; Fisher, Brendan; Golden, Christopher D; Johnson, Kiersten; Mulligan, Mark; Pfaff, Alexander; Treuer, Timothy; Ricketts, Taylor H

    2017-10-09

    Diarrheal disease (DD) due to contaminated water is a major cause of child mortality globally. Forests and wetlands can provide ecosystem services that help maintain water quality. To understand the connections between land cover and childhood DD, we compiled a database of 293,362 children in 35 countries with information on health, socioeconomic factors, climate, and watershed condition. Using hierarchical models, here we find that higher upstream tree cover is associated with lower probability of DD downstream. This effect is significant for rural households but not for urban households, suggesting differing dependence on watershed conditions. In rural areas, the effect of a 30% increase in upstream tree cover is similar to the effect of improved sanitation, but smaller than the effect of improved water source, wealth or education. We conclude that maintaining natural capital within watersheds can be an important public health investment, especially for populations with low levels of built capital.Globally diarrheal disease through contaminated water sources is a major cause of child mortality. Here, the authors compile a database of 293,362 children in 35 countries and find that upstream tree cover is linked to a lower probability of diarrheal disease and that increasing tree cover may lower mortality.

  14. Effect of wakes from moving upstream rods on boundary layer separation from a high lift airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph J.

    2011-11-01

    Highly loaded airfoils in turbines allow power generation using fewer airfoils. High loading, however, can cause boundary layer separation, resulting in reduced lift and increased aerodynamic loss. Separation is affected by the interaction between rotating blades and stationary vanes. Wakes from upstream vanes periodically impinge on downstream blades, and can reduce separation. The wakes include elevated turbulence, which can induce transition, and a velocity deficit, which results in an impinging flow on the blade surface known as a ``negative jet.'' In the present study, flow through a linear cascade of very high lift airfoils is studied experimentally. Wakes are produced with moving rods which cut through the flow upstream of the airfoils, simulating the effect of upstream vanes. Pressure and velocity fields are documented. Wake spacing and velocity are varied. At low Reynolds numbers without wakes, the boundary layer separates and does not reattach. At high wake passing frequencies separation is largely suppressed. At lower frequencies, ensemble averaged velocity results show intermittent separation and reattachment during the wake passing cycle. Supported by NASA.

  15. Added noise due to the effect of an upstream wake on a propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takallu, M. A.; Spence, P. L.; Block, P. J. W.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical/computational study has been conducted to predict the effect of an upstream wing or pylon on the noise of an operating propeller. The wing trailing edge was placed at variable distances (0.1 and 0.3 chord) upstream of a scaled model propeller (SR-2). The wake was modeled using a similarity formulation. The instantaneous pressure distribution on the propeller blades during the passage through the wake was formulated in terms of a time-dependent variation of each blade section's angle of attack and in terms of the shed vortices from the blade trailing edge. It was found that the final expressions for the unsteady loads considerably altered the radiated noise pattern. Predicted noise for various observer positions, rotational speeds, and propeller/pylon distances were computed and are presented in terms of the pressure time history, harmonics of the Fourier analysis, and overall sound pressure levels (OASPL). The addition of the tangential stress due to skin friction was found to have a damping effect on the acoustic pressure time history and the resulting spectrum of the generated noise. It is shown that the positioning of a pylon upstream of a propeller indeed increases the overall noise.

  16. Propagation of ULF waves from the upstream region to the midnight sector of the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Hartinger, Michael D.; Malaspina, David M.; Smith, Charles W.; Koga, Kiyokazu; Singer, Howard J.; Frühauff, Dennis; Baishev, Dmitry G.; Moiseev, Alexey V.; Yoshikawa, Akimasa

    2016-09-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves generated in the ion foreshock are a well-known source of Pc3-Pc4 waves (7-100 mHz) observed in the dayside magnetosphere. We use data acquired on 10 April 2013 by multiple spacecraft to demonstrate that ULF waves of upstream origin can propagate to the midnight sector of the inner magnetosphere. At 1130-1730 UT on the selected day, the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft and the geostationary ETS-VIII satellite detected compressional 20 to 40 mHz magnetic field oscillations between L ˜ 4 and L ˜ 7 in the midnight sector, along with other spacecraft located closer to noon. Upstream origin of the oscillations is concluded from the wave frequency that matches a theoretical model, globally coherent amplitude modulation, and duskward propagation that is consistent with expected entry of the upstream wave energy through the dawnside flank under the observed interplanetary magnetic field. The oscillations are attributed to magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves based on their propagation velocity of ˜300 km/s and the relationship between the electric and magnetic field perturbations. The magnitude of the azimuthal wave number is estimated to be ˜30. There is no evidence that the oscillations propagated to the ground in the midnight sector.

  17. Effects of optimal initial errors on predicting the seasonal reduction of the upstream Kuroshio transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Qiang; Mu, Mu; Liang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    With the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), we realistically simulated the transport variations of the upstream Kuroshio (referring to the Kuroshio from its origin to the south of Taiwan), particularly for the seasonal transport reduction. Then, we investigated the effects of the optimal initial errors estimated by the conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) approach on predicting the seasonal transport reduction. Two transport reduction events (denoted as Event 1 and Event 2) were chosen, and CNOP1 and CNOP2 were obtained for each event. By examining the spatial structures of the two types of CNOPs, we found that the dominant amplitudes are located around (128°E, 17°N) horizontally and in the upper 1000 m vertically. For each event, the two CNOPs caused large prediction errors. Specifically, at the prediction time, CNOP1 (CNOP2) develops into an anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddy-like structure centered around 124°E, leading to the increase (decrease) of the upstream Kuroshio transport. By investigating the time evolution of the CNOPs in Event 1, we found that the eddy-like structures originating from east of Luzon gradually grow and simultaneously propagate westward. The eddy-energetic analysis indicated that the errors obtain energy from the background state through barotropic and baroclinic instabilities and that the latter plays a more important role. These results suggest that improving the initial conditions in east of Luzon could lead to better prediction of the upstream Kuroshio transport variation.

  18. Upstream to downstream: stormwater quality in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Wengrove, Meagan E; Ballestero, Thomas P

    2012-08-01

    The focus of this research was upon consequences of urban stormwater runoff entering two streams in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico. Mayagüez is the largest urban area of the western side of the island of Puerto Rico and provides an excellent point of reference to monitor the affects of urban development on water quality in a tropical climate. The two monitored streams were Quebrada del Oro and Cano Majagual. The research hypothesis asks, "Does stormwater runoff from urban development measurably affect the water quality of downstream receiving water by raising the conductivity, temperature, and flow quantity characteristics during storm events in comparison to upstream water quality?" In essence, the results for Quebrada del Oro agreed with the hypothesis of this project, while Cano Majagual produced results different from the hypothesis primarily due to the absence of non-urbanized land use for both upstream and downstream sections as well as the buffering capacity of a large wetland just upstream of the downstream instrument location of Cano Majagual. Both streams showed signs of stream impairment according to the temperature criteria (32°C or 90°F) set by the Junta de Calidad Ambiental and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Dissolved oxygen levels of the streams were severely affected by water temperature and oxygen-consuming matter within these stream systems, making dissolved oxygen and temperature important water quality parameters for tropical climates.

  19. Correction of upstream flow and hydraulic state with data assimilation in the context of flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, S.; Piacentini, A.; Thual, O.; Le Pape, E.; Jonville, G.

    2010-11-01

    The present study describes the assimilation of river water level observations and the resulting improvement of the river flood forecast. The BLUE algorithm was built on top of the one-dimensional hydraulics model MASCARET. The assimilation algorithm folds in two steps: the first one is based on the assumption that the upstream flow can be adjusted using a three-parameter correction, the second one consists in directly correcting the hydraulic state. This procedure is applied on a four-day sliding window over the whole flood event. The background error covariances for water level and discharge are represented with asymmetric correlation functions where the upstream correlation length is bigger than the downstream correlation length. This approach is motivated by the implementation of a Kalman Filter algorithm on top of an advection-diffusion toy model. The assimilation study with MASCARET is carried out on the Adour and the Marne Vallage (France) catchments. The correction of the upstream flow as well as the control of the hydraulic state along the flood event leads to a significant improvement of the water level and discharge in analysis and forecast modes.

  20. Spatial and temporal patterns of micropollutants upstream and downstream of 24 WWTPs across Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spycher, Barbara; Deuber, Fabian; Kistler, David; Burdon, Frank; Reyes, Marta; Alder, Alfredo C.; Joss, Adriano; Eggen, Rik; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Treated wastewater is an important source of micropollutants in many streams. These chemicals consist of very diverse set of compounds that may vary in space and time. In order to improve our understanding of such spatio-temporal patterns of micropollutants in surface waters, we compared upstream and downstream locations at 24 sites across the Swiss Plateau and Jura (12 sites in the 2013 campaign, 12 sites during the 2014 campaign). Each site represents the most upstream treatment plant in the corresponding catchment. This survey is part of the interdisciplinary, Eawag-wide research project EcoImpact that aims at elucidating the ecological effects of micropollutants on stream ecosystems. In 2013, a broad analytical screening was applied to samples collected during winter (January) and summer conditions (June). Based in these results, the bi-monthly samples obtained in 2014 were analysed for a set of about 60 selected organic micropollutants and 10 heavy metals. The screening results demonstrate that generally pharmaceuticals, artificial sweeteners and corrosion inhibitors make up the largest part of the organic micropollutants. Pesticides including biocides and plant protection products are also regularly found but at lower concentrations. This presentation will analyse the variability of the micropollutant patterns across the different sites and how upstream conditions and the wastewater composition changes with season.

  1. MAGNETIC VARIANCES AND PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING TIMES UPSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano E-mail: gaetano.zimbardo@fis.unical.it

    2012-07-20

    Recent observations of power-law time profiles of energetic particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks have shown the possibility of anomalous, superdiffusive transport for energetic particles throughout the heliosphere. Those findings call for an accurate investigation of the magnetic field fluctuation properties at the resonance frequencies upstream of the shock's fronts. Normalized magnetic field variances, indeed, play a crucial role in the determination of the pitch-angle scattering times and then of the transport regime. The present analysis investigates the time behavior of the normalized variances of the magnetic field fluctuations, measured by the Ulysses spacecraft upstream of corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks, for those events which exhibit superdiffusion for energetic electrons. We find a quasi-constant value for the normalized magnetic field variances from about 10 hr to 100 hr from the shock front. This rules out the presence of a varying diffusion coefficient and confirms the possibility of superdiffusion for energetic electrons. A statistical analysis of the scattering times obtained from the magnetic fluctuations upstream of the CIR events has also been performed; the resulting power-law distributions of scattering times imply long range correlations and weak pitch-angle scattering, and the power-law slopes are in qualitative agreement with superdiffusive processes described by a Levy random walk.

  2. Added noise due to the effect of an upstream wake on a propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takallu, M. A.; Spence, P. L.; Block, P. J. W.

    1987-10-01

    An analytical/computational study has been conducted to predict the effect of an upstream wing or pylon on the noise of an operating propeller. The wing trailing edge was placed at variable distances (0.1 and 0.3 chord) upstream of a scaled model propeller (SR-2). The wake was modeled using a similarity formulation. The instantaneous pressure distribution on the propeller blades during the passage through the wake was formulated in terms of a time-dependent variation of each blade section's angle of attack and in terms of the shed vortices from the blade trailing edge. It was found that the final expressions for the unsteady loads considerably altered the radiated noise pattern. Predicted noise for various observer positions, rotational speeds, and propeller/pylon distances were computed and are presented in terms of the pressure time history, harmonics of the Fourier analysis, and overall sound pressure levels (OASPL). The addition of the tangential stress due to skin friction was found to have a damping effect on the acoustic pressure time history and the resulting spectrum of the generated noise. It is shown that the positioning of a pylon upstream of a propeller indeed increases the overall noise.

  3. The role of the ionosphere in coupling upstream ULF wave power into the dayside magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of recent studies of Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the dayside outer magnetosphere has given new insights into the possible mechanisms of entry of ULF wave power into the magnetosphere from a bow shock-related upstream source. A comparison is made of data from two 10-hour intervals on successive days in April 1986 and then a possible model for transmission of pulsation signals from the magnetosheath into the dayside magnetosphere is presented. Clear interplanetary magnetic field magnitude control of dayside resonant harmonic pulsations and band-limited very high latitude pulsations, as well as pulsation-modulated precipitation of what appear to be magnetosheath/boundary layer electrons are shown. It is believed that this modulated precipitation may be responsible for the propagation of upstream wave power in the Pc 3 frequency band into the high-latitude ionosphere, from whence it may be transported throughout the dayside outer magnetosphere by means of an 'ionospheric transistor'. In this model, modulations in ionospheric conductivity caused by cusp/cleft precipitation cause varying ionospheric currents with frequency spectra determined by the upstream waves; these modulations will be superimposed on the Birkeland currents, which close via these ionospheric currents. Modulated region 2 Birkeland currents will in turn provide a narrow-band source of wave energy to a wide range of dayside local times in the outer magnetosphere.

  4. Several different upstream promoter elements can potentiate transactivation by the BPV-1 E2 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ham, J; Dostatni, N; Arnos, F; Yaniv, M

    1991-01-01

    The enhancer and upstream promoter regions of RNA polymerase II transcribed genes modulate the rate of transcription initiation and establish specific patterns of gene expression. Both types of region consist of clusters of DNA binding sites for nuclear proteins. To determine how efficiently the same factor can activate transcription when acting as an enhancer or promoter factor, we have studied transactivation by the BPV-1 E2 protein, a papillomavirus transcriptional regulator. By cotransfecting a BPV-1 E2 expression vector and a series of reporter plasmids containing well-defined chimeric promoters we have found that whilst E2 can strongly stimulate complex promoters such as that of the HSV tk gene, it does not efficiently activate constructions containing only a TATA box and initiation site. We show that insertion of upstream promoter elements, but not of spacer DNA, between E2 binding sites and the TATA box greatly increases E2 activation. This effect was observed with more than one type of upstream promoter element, is not related to the strength of the promoter and is unlikely to result from co-operative DNA binding by E2 and the transcription factors tested. These results would suggest that E2 has the properties of an enhancer rather than promoter factor and that in certain cases promoter and enhancer factors may affect different steps in the process of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:1655407

  5. Formation Flight: Upstream Influence of a Wing on a Streamwise Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Chris; Rockwell, Donald; Lehigh University Fluids Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in formation can experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex of the leader wing on the trailer wing can increase the lift to drag ratio L/D and the unsteady loading on the trailer wing. These increases are sensitive to the impingement location of the vortex on the wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine patterns of velocity and vorticity on successive crossflow planes along the vortex, which lead to volume representations and thereby characterization of the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure as it approaches the trailer wing. This evolution of the incident vortex is affected by the upstream influence of the trailer wing, and is highly dependent on the location of vortex impingement. As the spanwise impingement location of the vortex moves from outboard of the wing tip to inboard, the upstream influence on the development of the vortex increases. For spanwise locations close to or intersecting the vortex core, the effects of upstream influence of the wing on the vortex are to: increase the streamwise velocity deficit; decrease the streamwise vorticity; increase the in-plane vorticity; decrease the downwash; and increase the root-mean-square of both streamwise velocity and vorticity.

  6. Experimental study to control the upstream migration of invasive alien fish species by submerged weir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Masami; Kunimatsu, Fumihiro; Tsuchiya, Taku; Kawamura, Makiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    Largemouth bass and Bluegill, major invasive alien fish species in Japan, have been extending their habitat ranges over not only Lake Biwa and the lagoons but also surrounding waters connected to them through small rivers and canals. Their increasing number is bringing about the reduction in the number of native fish species. To prevent the spread of these alien species through small rivers and canals during breeding season of the native fish (crucian carp), this study experimentally examined the effect of a submerged weir on controlling upstream migration of the alien species and the native fish. As a result of the experiment, the ratio of the alien species migrating upstream decreased as the weir height rose, whereas the ratio did not show the same trend in the case of the native fish. The ratio of the alien species also decreased as the overflow velocity over the weir rose. On the other hand, the ratio of the native fish increased as the overflow velocity rose up to 1.0m/s and decreased thereafter. These results suggest that the submerged weir may control upstream migration of the alien species to surrounding waters through small rivers and canals without interfering with the reproductive migration of the native fish.

  7. Environmental correlates of upstream migration of yellow-phase American eels in the Potomac River drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Heather L. Liller,

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the relationships between upstream migration and environmental variables is important to understanding the ecology of yellow-phase American Eels Anguilla rostrata. During an American Eel migration study within the lower Shenandoah River (Potomac River drainage), we counted and measured American Eels at the Millville Dam eel ladder for three periods: 14 May–23 July 2004, 7–30 September 2004, and 1 June–31 July 2005. Using generalized estimating equations, we modeled each time series of daily American Eel counts by fitting time-varying environmental covariates of lunar illumination (LI), river discharge (RD), and water temperature (WT), including 1-d and 2-d lags of each covariate. Information-theoretic approaches were used for model selection and inference. A total of 4,847 American Eels (19–74 cm total length) used the ladder during the three periods, including 2,622 individuals during a 2-d span following a hurricane-induced peak in river discharge. Additive-effects models of RD + WT, a 2-d lag of LI + RD, and LI + RD were supported for the three periods, respectively. Parameter estimates were positive for river discharge for each time period, negative for lunar illumination for two periods and positive for water temperature during one period. Additive-effects models supported synergistic influences of environmental variables on the upstream migration of yellow-phase American Eels, although river discharge was consistently supported as an influential correlate of upstream migration.

  8. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO. Conclusion Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease. PMID:26208283

  9. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  10. Bifurcation analysis of hydro-turbine regulating system with saturation nonlinearity for hydropower station with upstream and downstream surge chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. P.; Yang, J. D.; Guo, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    A nonlinear mathematical model of hydraulic turbine regulating system is applied to describe hydropower stations with upstream and downstream surge chambers. This model features saturation nonlinearity including pipeline system and turbine regulating system used in stability analysis. First, the existence conditions and direction of Hopf bifurcation are obtained. Second, based on the algebraic criteria for the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation, the stability domain is drawn in a coordinate system, where the proportional gain Kp is the abscissa and the integral gain Ki is the ordinate. Third, the nonlinear dynamic behaviour of a regulating system with different state parameters are analyzed, and the variations of the system stability around the two sides of the bifurcation point are numerically calculated. Based on this work we conclude that the Hopf bifurcation of system is supercritical. The bifurcation parameters that are far from the bifurcation point would be advantageous to the rapid system regulation needed to sustain equilibrium. Furthermore, it is established that using a PID controller is more conducive to stability than a PI controller. The unit stability regulation gets worse by taking into account the saturation nonlinearity.

  11. Translational control of the Xenopus laevis connexin-41 5'-untranslated region by three upstream open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Meijer, H A; Dictus, W J; Keuning, E D; Thomas, A A

    2000-10-06

    The Xenopus laevis Connexin-41 (Cx41) mRNA contains three upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR). We analyzed the translation efficiency of constructs containing the Cx41 5'-UTR linked to the green fluorescent protein reporter after injection of transcripts into one-cell stage Xenopus embryos. The translational efficiency of the wild-type Cx41 5'-UTR was only 2% compared with that of the beta-globin 5'-UTR. Mutation of each of the three uAUGs into AAG codons enhanced translation 82-, 9-, and 4-fold compared with the wild-type Cx41 5'-UTR. Based on these increased translation efficiencies, the percentages of ribosomes that recognized the uAUGs were calculated. Only 0.03% of the ribosomes that entered at the cap structure scanned the entire 5'-UTR and translated the main ORF. The results indicate that all uAUGs are recognized by the majority of the scanning ribosomes and that the three uAUGs strongly modulate translation efficiency in Xenopus laevis embryos. Based on these data, a model of ribosomal flow along the mRNA is postulated. We conclude that the three uORFs may play an important role in the regulation of Cx41 expression.

  12. Continuum damage mechanics (CDM) modelling demonstrates that ligament fatigue damage accumulates by different mechanisms than creep damage.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Timothy D; Johnston, Clifton R; Oxland, Thomas R; Thornton, Gail M

    2007-01-01

    Ligaments can be subjected to creep and fatigue damage when loaded to higher than normal stresses due to injury of a complementary joint restraint. Continuum damage mechanics (CDM) assumes that diffuse damage accumulates in a material, thereby reducing the effective cross-sectional area and leading to eventual rupture. The objective of this study was to apply CDM modelling to ligament creep and fatigue to reveal mechanisms of damage. Fatigue was modelled by cyclically varying the stress in the creep model. A few novel approaches were used. First, area reduction was not assumed equal to modulus reduction; thus, allowing damaged fibres to potentially contribute to load-bearing through the extracellular matrix. Modulus ratio was related to area reduction using residual strength. Second, damage rate was not assumed constant but rather was determined directly from the modulus ratio change with respect to time. Third, modulus ratio was normalized to maximum modulus to avoid artificial calculation of negative damage. With this approach, the creep time-to-rupture was predicted with -4% error at 60% UTS and -13% error at 30% UTS. At 15% UTS, no test was undertaken experimentally for a duration as long as the 24 days predicted theoretically. Oscillating the time-dependent damage in the creep model could not completely explain the fatigue behaviour because the fatigue time-to-rupture was predicted with over 1300% error at all stresses. These results suggest that a cycle-dependent damage mechanism, in addition to a time-dependent one, was responsible for fatigue rupture. Cycle-dependent damage may be an important consideration for rehabilitation activities following injury of a complementary ligament restraint.

  13. Manifold learning-based subspace distance for machinery damage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuang; Zhang, Zhousuo; He, Zhengjia; Shen, Zhongjie; Chen, Binqiang

    2016-03-01

    Damage assessment is very meaningful to keep safety and reliability of machinery components, and vibration analysis is an effective way to carry out the damage assessment. In this paper, a damage index is designed by performing manifold distance analysis on vibration signal. To calculate the index, vibration signal is collected firstly, and feature extraction is carried out to obtain statistical features that can capture signal characteristics comprehensively. Then, manifold learning algorithm is utilized to decompose feature matrix to be a subspace, that is, manifold subspace. The manifold learning algorithm seeks to keep local relationship of the feature matrix, which is more meaningful for damage assessment. Finally, Grassmann distance between manifold subspaces is defined as a damage index. The Grassmann distance reflecting manifold structure is a suitable metric to measure distance between subspaces in the manifold. The defined damage index is applied to damage assessment of a rotor and the bearing, and the result validates its effectiveness for damage assessment of machinery component.

  14. Turbulence Analysis Upstream of a Wind Turbine: a LES Approach to Improve Wind LIDAR Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaf, M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally wind turbines learn about the incoming wind conditions by means of a wind vane and a cup anemometer. This approach presents two major limitations: 1) because the measurements are done at the nacelle, behind the rotor blades, the wind observations are perturbed inducing potential missalignement and power losses; 2) no direct information of the incoming turbulence is extracted, limiting the capacity to timely adjust the wind turbine against strong turbulent intensity events. Recent studies have explored the possibility of using wind LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) to overcome these limitations (Angelou et al. 2010 and Mikelsen et al., 2013). By installing a wind LIDAR at the nacelle of a wind turbine one can learn about the incoming wind and turbulent conditions ahead of time to timely readjust the turbine settings. Yet several questions remain to be answered such as how far upstream one should measure and what is the appropriate averaging time to extract valuable information. In light of recent results showing the relevance of atmospheric stratification in wind energy applications, it is expected that different averaging times and upstream scanning distances are advised for wind LIDAR measurements. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) study exploring the use of wind LIDAR technology within a wind farm has been developed. The wind farm consists of an infinite array of horizontal axis wind turbines modeled using the actuator disk with rotation. The model also allows the turbines to dynamically adjust their yaw with the incoming wind vector. The flow is forced with a constant geostrophic wind and a time varying surface temperature reproducing a realistic diurnal cycle. Results will be presented showing the relevance of the averaging time for the different flow characteristics as well as the effect of different upstream scanning distances. While it is observed that within a large wind farm there are no-significant gains in power output by scanning further

  15. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  16. Animal damage to birch

    Treesearch

    James S. Jordan; Francis M. Rushmore

    1969-01-01

    A relatively few animal species are responsible for most of the reported damage to the birches. White-tailed deer, yellow-bellied sapsuckers, porcupines, moose, and hares are the major animals involved. We will review reports of damage, discuss the underlying causes, and describe possible methods of control. For example, heavy deer browsing that eliminates birch...

  17. Radiation damage annealing kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Various spectral response studies are reported that assess lithium doping effects on the recovery process of electron damaged silicon solar cells. Measurements of both the minority carrier lifetimes and the energy level spectrum of the defects are used to predict lifetime damage constants and carrier removal rates relevant to the operation of the solar lithium-doped cell and its annealing kinetics.

  18. Animal damage management handbook.

    Treesearch

    Hugh C. Black

    1994-01-01

    This handbook treats animal damage management (ADM) in the West in relation to forest, range, and recreation resources; predator management is not addressed. It provides a comprehensive reference of safe, effective, and practical methods for managing animal damage on National Forest System lands. Supporting information is included in references after each chapter and...

  19. Damage and intensity survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reagor, G.; Brewer, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    A field team (the tuhors) from the National Earthquake Information Center (USGS) conducted a damage survey of the epicentral area in the week following the earthquakes. Detailed information about damage and where and how strongly the earthquakes were felt was obtained through interviews with local residents and personal observations. 

  20. Squirrel Damage to Pines

    Treesearch

    USDA Forest Service

    1981-01-01

    Flagging (dead branch tips) on jack pine and red pine may be caused by insects, diseases, or mechanical damage. In the Lake States, flagging is often the result of mechanical damage, sometimes girdling, caused when the cones are torn off by red squirrels.