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Sample records for damage detection system

  1. Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Gibson, Tracy; Lane, John; Medelius, Pedro; Snyder, Sarah; Ciarlariello, Dan; Parks, Steve; Carrejo, Danny; Rojdev, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The Flat Surface Damage Detection system (FSDDS} is a sensory system that is capable of detecting impact damages to surfaces utilizing a novel sensor system. This system will provide the ability to monitor the integrity of an inflatable habitat during in situ system health monitoring. The system consists of three main custom designed subsystems: the multi-layer sensing panel, the embedded monitoring system, and the graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI LABVIEW software uses a custom developed damage detection algorithm to determine the damage location based on the sequence of broken sensing lines. It estimates the damage size, the maximum depth, and plots the damage location on a graph. Successfully demonstrated as a stand alone technology during 2011 D-RATS. Software modification also allowed for communication with HDU avionics crew display which was demonstrated remotely (KSC to JSC} during 2012 integration testing. Integrated FSDDS system and stand alone multi-panel systems were demonstrated remotely and at JSC, Mission Operations Test using Space Network Research Federation (SNRF} network in 2012. FY13, FSDDS multi-panel integration with JSC and SNRF network Technology can allow for integration with other complementary damage detection systems.

  2. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Tate, Lanetra C. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An in-situ system for detecting damage in an electrically conductive wire. The system includes a substrate at least partially covered by a layer of electrically conductive material forming a continuous or non-continuous electrically conductive layer connected to an electrical signal generator adapted to delivering electrical signals to the electrically conductive layer. Data is received and processed to identify damage to the substrate or electrically conductive layer. The electrically conductive material may include metalized carbon fibers, a thin metal coating, a conductive polymer, carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles or a combination thereof.

  3. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Tate, Lanetra; Smith, Trent; Gibson, Tracy; Medelius, Pedro; Jolley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    An In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System (ISWDDS) has been developed that is capable of detecting damage to a wire insulation, or a wire conductor, or to both. The system will allow for realtime, continuous monitoring of wiring health/integrity and reduce the number of false negatives and false positives while being smaller, lighter in weight, and more robust than current systems. The technology allows for improved safety and significant reduction in maintenance hours for aircraft, space vehicles, satellites, and other critical high-performance wiring systems for industries such as energy production and mining. The integrated ISWDDS is comprised of two main components: (1) a wire with an innermost core conductor, an inner insulation film, a conductive layer or inherently conductive polymer (ICP) covering the inner insulation film, an outermost insulation jacket; and (2) smart connectors and electronics capable of producing and detecting electronic signals, and a central processing unit (CPU) for data collection and analysis. The wire is constructed by applying the inner insulation films to the conductor, followed by the outer insulation jacket. The conductive layer or ICP is on the outer surface of the inner insulation film. One or more wires are connected to the CPU using the smart connectors, and up to 64 wires can be monitored in real-time. The ISWDDS uses time domain reflectometry for damage detection. A fast-risetime pulse is injected into either the core conductor or conductive layer and referenced against the other conductor, producing transmission line behavior. If either conductor is damaged, then the signal is reflected. By knowing the speed of propagation of the pulse, and the time it takes to reflect, one can calculate the distance to and location of the damage.

  4. Damage detection in initially nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bornn, Luke; Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is to detect structural anomalies before they reach a critical level. Because of the potential life-safety and economic benefits, SHM has been widely studied over the past decade. In recent years there has been an effort to provide solid mathematical and physical underpinnings for these methods; however, most focus on systems that behave linearly in their undamaged state - a condition that often does not hold in complex 'real world' systems and systems for which monitoring begins mid-lifecycle. In this work, we highlight the inadequacy of linear-based methodology in handling initially nonlinear systems. We then show how the recently developed autoregressive support vector machine (AR-SVM) approach to time series modeling can be used for detecting damage in a system that exhibits initially nonlinear response. This process is applied to data acquired from a structure with induced nonlinearity tested in a laboratory environment.

  5. Damage-detection system for LNG carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastandrea, J. R.; Scherb, M. V.

    1978-01-01

    System utilizes array of acoustical transducers to detect cracks and leaks in liquefied natural gas (LNG) containers onboard ships. In addition to detecting leaks, device indicates location and leak rate.

  6. Cable Damage Detection System and Algorithms Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G A; Robbins, C L; Wade, K A; Souza, P R

    2009-03-24

    This report describes the hardware system and the set of algorithms we have developed for detecting damage in cables for the Advanced Development and Process Technologies (ADAPT) Program. This program is part of the W80 Life Extension Program (LEP). The system could be generalized for application to other systems in the future. Critical cables can undergo various types of damage (e.g. short circuits, open circuits, punctures, compression) that manifest as changes in the dielectric/impedance properties of the cables. For our specific problem, only one end of the cable is accessible, and no exemplars of actual damage are available. This work addresses the detection of dielectric/impedance anomalies in transient time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements on the cables. The approach is to interrogate the cable using time domain reflectometry (TDR) techniques, in which a known pulse is inserted into the cable, and reflections from the cable are measured. The key operating principle is that any important cable damage will manifest itself as an electrical impedance discontinuity that can be measured in the TDR response signal. Machine learning classification algorithms are effectively eliminated from consideration, because only a small number of cables is available for testing; so a sufficient sample size is not attainable. Nonetheless, a key requirement is to achieve very high probability of detection and very low probability of false alarm. The approach is to compare TDR signals from possibly damaged cables to signals or an empirical model derived from reference cables that are known to be undamaged. This requires that the TDR signals are reasonably repeatable from test to test on the same cable, and from cable to cable. Empirical studies show that the repeatability issue is the 'long pole in the tent' for damage detection, because it is has been difficult to achieve reasonable repeatability. This one factor dominated the project. The two-step model-based approach is

  7. Impact detection for smart automotive damage mitigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peelamedu, Saravanan M.; Ciocanel, Constantin; Naganathan, Nagi G.

    2004-10-01

    Occupant safety and severity of vehicle damage are important factors in automotive vehicle design. Smart automobiles of the future could potentially use distributed smart material sensors and actuators in order to identify impact and take appropriate evasive or mitigative actions. This provides the motivation for this study. The first part of this study is focused on detecting the location and magnitude of impact, particularly for the case where the automotive structure is subjected to minimal damage. This is accomplished by developing a generalized algorithm using the Reissner-Mindlin plate theory, the Rayleigh-Ritz energy approach, and the Lagrangian-Hamilton principle. The level of performance of this methodology is demonstrated for impacts on a simply supported rectangular plate. Different case studies for static as well as impact loading with point as well as area contacts are presented. An algorithm using deconvolution for identifying impact location and magnitude has been developed and implemented. Additionally, the influence of damage on the structural vibratory content is studied via a frequency analysis. Modal analyses for undamaged and damaged plates, with nine different damage locations and six different damage sizes, are performed. Changes in frequency and mode shapes are observed as regards the severity of the damage.

  8. System Would Detect Foreign-Object Damage in Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed data-fusion system, to be implemented mostly in software, would further process the digitized and preprocessed outputs of sensors in a turbofan engine to detect foreign-object damage (FOD) [more precisely, damage caused by impingement of such foreign objects as birds, pieces of ice, and runway debris]. The proposed system could help a flight crew to decide what, if any, response is necessary to complete a flight safely, and could aid mechanics in deciding what post-flight maintenance action might be needed. The sensory information to be utilized by the proposed system would consist of (1) the output of an accelerometer in an engine-vibration-monitoring subsystem and (2) features extracted from a gas path analysis. ["Gas path analysis" (GPA) is a term of art that denotes comprehensive analysis of engine performance derived from readings of fuel-flow meters, shaft-speed sensors, temperature sensors, and the like.] The acceleration signal would first be processed by a wavelet-transform-based algorithm, using a wavelet created for the specific purpose of finding abrupt FOD-induced changes in noisy accelerometer signals. Two additional features extracted would be the amplitude of vibration (determined via a single- frequency Fourier transform calculated at the rotational speed of the engine), and the rate of change in amplitude due to an FOD-induced rotor imbalance. This system would utilize two GPA features: the fan efficiency and the rate of change of fan efficiency with time. The selected GPA and vibrational features would be assessed by two fuzzy-logic inference engines, denoted the "Gas Path Expert" and the "Vibration Expert," respectively (see Figure 1). Each of these inference engines would generate a "possibility" distribution for occurrence of an FOD event: Each inference engine would assign, to its input information, degrees of membership, which would subsequently be transformed into basic probability assignments for the gas path and vibration

  9. Damage Detection and Verification System (DDVS) for In-Situ Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Lewis, Mark; Szafran, J.; Shelton, C.; Ludwig, L.; Gibson, T.; Lane, J.; Trautwein, T.

    2015-01-01

    Project presentation for Game Changing Program Smart Book Release. Detection and Verification System (DDVS) expands the Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS) sensory panels damage detection capabilities and includes an autonomous inspection capability utilizing cameras and dynamic computer vision algorithms to verify system health. Objectives of this formulation task are to establish the concept of operations, formulate the system requirements for a potential ISS flight experiment, and develop a preliminary design of an autonomous inspection capability system that will be demonstrated as a proof-of-concept ground based damage detection and inspection system.

  10. A system for the non-intrusive detection of damage in underground power cables: Damage modeling and sensor system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgen, Marvin Alexander

    A system for non-intrusive sensing of underground power cable impedance is presented. The impedance sensor is used for the detection of damage to underground power cables. The system is capable of taking measurements without the need to interrupt power service. To isolate the impedance measurement from the effects of customer loading, a blocking unit is proposed which presents an open circuit to the impedance sensor in the transmission line at the point where the blocker is clamped onto the cable. Both of the proposed devices are prototyped and evaluated. The impedance sensor is demonstrated to be capable of accurate impedance measurements within a 2% error over a range from 50 to 1000 Ohms. The blocker is demonstrated to provide approximately 30 dB of attenuation over the designed ranged of measurement frequencies. The system can detect impedance changes resulting from corrosion or damage in underground power cables.

  11. The study of target damage assessment system based on image change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ping; Yang, Fan; Feng, Xinxi

    2009-10-01

    Target Damage Assessment (TDA) system is an important component of the intelligent command and control system. The method of building TDA based on Image Change Detection can greatly improve the system efficiency and accuracy, thus get a fast and precise assessment results. This paper firstly analyzes the structure of TDA system. Then studies the key technology in this system. Finally, gives an evaluation criteria based on image change detection of the target damage assessment system.

  12. Tool Life Detecting System Using Damage Sensor-Integrated Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Katsuhiko; Yamane, Yasuo; Torimoto, Ayumu

    In-process tool life detecting system has been developed. In order to detect tool life, we monitored breakage of an electrical conductive thin film band of titanium nitride (TiN) on flank faces of a ceramic insert that was an insulation material. The conductive band was parallel to the cutting edge and was broken by fracture of the cutting edge or excessive tool wear. A coil and a capacitor were connected in series to the band on an insert to make a series resonance circuit in a tool holder for turning, or in an arbor for face milling. A detecting coil with high frequency oscillator was coupled to the coil in the holder/arbor electromagnetically. An electromagnetic induction between two coils was used to take the signal from the insert. The system developed in this study showed good stability against electric noises radiated from electrical devices of machine tools.

  13. Inductively coupled transducer system for damage detection in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C. H.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-04-01

    The laminated construction of composite offers the possibility of permanently embedding sensors into structure, for example, ultrasonic transducers which can be used for NDE applications. An attractive and simple solution for probing embedded sensors wirelessly is via inductive coupling. However, before this can be achieved it is necessary to have a full understanding and proper design strategy for the inductively coupled system. This paper presents the developments of both system design procedure and a computer program for one dimensional inductively coupled transducer system mounted on a solid substrate. The design strategy in this paper mainly focuses on issues of localization of transducers, and optimizing the signal to noise level. Starting from a three coil equivalent circuit, this paper also explains how the measured impedance of a bonded piezoelectric disc is implemented into the system model representing a transducer bonded to an arbitrary solid substrate. The computer programme using this model provides immediate predictions of electrical input impedance, acoustic response and pulse-echo response. A series of experiments and calculations have been performed in order to validate the model. This has enabled the degree of accuracy required for various parameters within the model, such as mutual inductance between the coils and self-inductance of coils, to be assessed. Once validated, the model can be used as a tool to predict the effect of physical parameters, such as distance, lateral misalignment between the coils, and the coil geometry on the performance of an inductively coupled system.

  14. Two-dimensional wavelet mapping techniques for damage detection in structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amizic, Bruno; Amaravadi, Venkat; Rao, Vittal S.; Derriso, Mark M.

    2002-07-01

    Application of the wavelet transforms on the measured vibration data provides a new tool for the damage detection analysis of the two-dimensional structural systems. In this paper, a novel two-dimensional wavelet mapping technique for damage detection based on the wavelet transforms and residual mode shapes are proposed. After vibration data was collected, wavelet de-noising shrinkage was performed in order to reduce measurement noise. By performing wavelet decomposition of the residuals of mode shapes and by taking only detail coefficients, wavelet energy maps are constructed for all decomposition levels. The orthogonal property of the wavelet transforms has bee utilized to correlate energy at decomposition levels with the measured vibrational energy. After wavelet maps of interest are determined, they are mapped on top of each other to figure out damaged areas of the two-dimensional structural systems. The energy segmentation procedure is performed by using minimum homogeneity and uncertainty based thresholding methods. It has been shown that the proposed method can clearly locate the multiple damage locations on the two- dimensional structures. This method requires few sampling points, robust and independent of the type of damage or the material damaged. The proposed method is applied to detect multiple damage locations on a two-dimensional plate. The results are very satisfactory.

  15. Damage detection system with sub-microsecond resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric; Benterou, Jerry

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic grating sensors have been used to measure multi-dimensional strain, pressure, temperature, corrosion and moisture. This paper presents a method of using fiber grating sensors to measure the position and velocity of a very fast event associated with a blast wave. A chirped fiber grating of 50 mm length is placed in a highly energetic material. The action of the shock wave is to destroy the fiber grating as it propagates along it. By using a spectral filter such as a chirped fiber grating in combination with high speed detectors the position and velocity of the shock wave may be determined. A layout of a system used to experimentally verify this technique is described and results presented for two different highly energetic materials.

  16. Damage Detection System with Sub-microsecond Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Udd, E; Benterou, J

    2008-02-11

    Fiber optic grating sensors have been used to measure multi-dimensional strain, pressure, temperature, corrosion and moisture. This paper presents a method of using fiber grating sensors to measure the position and velocity of a very fast event associated with a blast wave. A chirped fiber grating of 50 mm length is placed in a highly energetic material. The action of the shock wave is to destroy the fiber grating as it propagates along it. By using a spectral filter such as a chirped fiber grating in combination with high speed detectors the position and velocity of the shock wave may be determined. A layout of a system used to experimentally verify this technique is described and results presented for two different highly energetic materials.

  17. Use of near-infrared video recording system for the detection of freeze damaged citrus leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobar, D. E.; Bowen, R. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Cooper, G. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A video recording system with a visible light blocking filter to give sensitivity in the 0.78 m to 1.1 m waveband detected freeze-damaged citrus leaves rapidly. With this technique, the time to analyze images can be decreased from about one day for conventional photography to less than one hour for video recording.

  18. Application of higher order SVD to vibration-based system identification and damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shu-Hsien; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Weng, Jian-Huang

    2012-04-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) is a powerful linear algebra tool. It is widely used in many different signal processing methods, such principal component analysis (PCA), singular spectrum analysis (SSA), frequency domain decomposition (FDD), subspace identification and stochastic subspace identification method ( SI and SSI ). In each case, the data is arranged appropriately in matrix form and SVD is used to extract the feature of the data set. In this study three different algorithms on signal processing and system identification are proposed: SSA, SSI-COV and SSI-DATA. Based on the extracted subspace and null-space from SVD of data matrix, damage detection algorithms can be developed. The proposed algorithm is used to process the shaking table test data of the 6-story steel frame. Features contained in the vibration data are extracted by the proposed method. Damage detection can then be investigated from the test data of the frame structure through subspace-based and nullspace-based damage indices.

  19. Damage detection in FRP structures using fiber Bragg grating dynamic strain sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhu, Yinian; Hui, Li; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2011-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors have become widely used for structural health monitoring in recent decades. The aim of this research is to characterize the dynamic failure signals emitted in fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) stay cable and specimens using Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and two types of interferometric demodulation systems, namely Michelson interferometer (MI) and two-wave mixing interferometer (TWMI) for detection. Due to its one-dimensional form, only one FBG and the Michelson interferometer are used for damage monitoring in a carbon FRP stay cable under various types of loading. Michelson interferometer is capable of detecting frequency contents extending up to 500 kHz, where frequency contents below 250 kHz are categorized as matrix failure and those above 300 kHz corresponded to fiber failure. Two channels of FBGs are used with the TWM interferometer to track local damage in coupon-size FRP samples. Using TWM scheme, continuous and burst acoustic emission events are detected with frequency responses extending up to 125 kHz in coupon-size GFRP specimens, limited only by the sampling rate of the data acquisition system. The experimental results suggest that both types of FBG demodulation systems may be suitable for monitoring high frequency mechanical strains in civil structures, providing a tool for local structural damage detection.

  20. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  1. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Snyder, Sarah J. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Parks, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems may provide for a structure having a plurality of interconnected panels, wherein each panel has a plurality of detection layers separated from one another by one or more non-detection layers. The plurality of detection layers may form a grid of conductive traces. Additionally, a monitor may be coupled to each grid of conductive traces, wherein the monitor is configured to detect damage to the plurality of interconnected panels in response to an electrical property change with respect to one or more of the conductive traces. In one example, the structure is part of an inflatable space platform such as a spacecraft or habitat.

  2. Rotor health monitoring and damage detection utilizing a disk spin simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes a unique, disk spin simulation system currently being utilized at NASA Glenn Research Center. The system allows for precision controlled spin tests that can facilitate the application of various sensing technologies for in-situ detection of rotor damage. In addition, the disk spin simulation system has the capability for elevated temperatures up to 540°C (1000°F). The current rotor used to simulate a bladed disk consists of a 46 cm(18 in.) diameter, titanium disk with 30 machined gear teeth. The gear design imitates the blades of a compressor or turbine disk. Operating speeds for the system can reach 1000 revolutions per minute. This allows the system to achieve circumferential velocities paralleling those seen in actual aircraft engines. For this study, a new, innovative capacitive sensing system was used to monitor blade tip clearance (i.e., gear tooth clearance). In turn, the sensor information was employed to calculate the change in the center of mass of the rotor system. T he capacitive sensor and corresponding software were analyzed by attaching a localized weight at numerous positions on the disk. Upon calculating the change in the center of mass, the sensitivities of the sensor and software were established. In the end, it is hoped that by studying the motion and position of blades as well as the change in the center of mass of a rotor system, it may be feasible to identify alterations due to damage (e.g., cracks) eitehr in the blades or the disk itself.

  3. Progressive damage detection using noncontact measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatappa, Suhas; Petro, Samer H.; EnChen, Shen; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents work in progress toward the development of a bridge condition assessment system. The system combines remote laser vibration sensing technology and a strain-energy- based damage detection algorithm. The results from vibration tests conducted on laboratory specimens with different degrees of damage are presented. The vibration signatures are acquired using Scanning Laser Vibrometers (SLV). The extracted mode shapes from these tests are then used in the damage detection algorithm. The preliminary results indicate that the strain energy differences are highly sensitive to damage, and can be used to locate and distinguish progressive damages. The combination of SLV technology and the damage detection algorithm makes remote sensing attractive for the monitoring and inspection of structures. Finite element simulation of a progressive damage at a single location is also presented to illustrate the sensitivity of the algorithm to increasing damages.

  4. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  5. Fiber optic system for deflection and damage detection in morphing wing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheerer, M.; Djinovic, Z.; Schüller, M.

    2013-04-01

    Within the EC Clean Sky - Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft initiative concepts for actuating morphing wing structures are under development. In order for developing a complete integrated system including the actuation, the structure to be actuated and the closed loop control unit a hybrid deflection and damage monitoring system is required. The aim of the project "FOS3D" is to develop and validate a fiber optic sensing system based on low-coherence interferometry for simultaneous deflection and damage monitoring. The proposed system uses several distributed and multiplexed fiber optic Michelson interferometers to monitor the strain distribution over the actuated part. In addition the same sensor principle will be used to acquire and locate the acoustic emission signals originated from the onset and growth of defects like impact damages, cracks and delamination's. Within this paper the authors present the concept, analyses and first experimental results of the mentioned system.

  6. Experimental validation of a modal flexibility-based damage detection method for a cyber-physical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Castro, Rosana E.; Eskew, Edward L.; Jang, Shinae

    2014-03-01

    The detection and localization of damage in a timely manner is critical in order to avoid the failure of structures. When a structure is subjected to an unscheduled impulsive force, the resulting damage can lead to failure in a very short period of time. As such, a monitoring strategy that can adapt to variability in the environment and that anticipates changes in physical processes has the potential of detecting, locating and mitigating damage. These requirements can be met by a cyber-physical system (CPS) equipped with Wireless Smart Sensor Network (WSSN) systems that is capable of measuring and analyzing dynamic responses in real time using on-board in network processing. The Eigenparameter Decomposition of Structural Flexibility Change (ED) Method is validated with real data and considered to be used in the computational core of this CPS. The condition screening is implemented on a damaged structure and compared to an original baseline calculation, hence providing a supervised learning environment. An experimental laboratory study on a 5-story shear building with three damage conditions subjected to an impulsive force has been chosen to validate the effectiveness of the method proposed to locate and quantify the extent of damage. A numerical simulation of the same building subject to band-limited white noise has also been developed with this purpose. The effectiveness of the ED Method to locate damage is compared to that of the Damage Index Method. With some modifications, the ED Method is capable of locating and quantifying damage satisfactorily in a shear building subject to a lower frequency content predominant excitation.

  7. Detection of insect damage in almonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soowon; Schatzki, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Pinhole insect damage in natural almonds is very difficult to detect on-line. Further, evidence exists relating insect damage to aflatoxin contamination. Hence, for quality and health reasons, methods to detect and remove such damaged nuts are of great importance in this study, we explored the possibility of using x-ray imaging to detect pinhole damage in almonds by insects. X-ray film images of about 2000 almonds and x-ray linescan images of only 522 pinhole damaged almonds were obtained. The pinhole damaged region appeared slightly darker than non-damaged region in x-ray negative images. A machine recognition algorithm was developed to detect these darker regions. The algorithm used the first order and the second order information to identify the damaged region. To reduce the possibility of false positive results due to germ region in high resolution images, germ detection and removal routines were also included. With film images, the algorithm showed approximately an 81 percent correct recognition ratio with only 1 percent false positives whereas line scan images correctly recognized 65 percent of pinholes with about 9 percent false positives. The algorithms was very fast and efficient requiring only minimal computation time. If implemented on line, theoretical throughput of this recognition system would be 66 nuts/second.

  8. Evaluation of SonicIR handheld system on composite impact damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoyan; Ar-Rasheed, Justin M.; Zhang, Ding; Lubowicki, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging has shown its capability as a fast, wide area NDE method. We have demonstrated its wide applications to different types of materials and structures. Along the path of the development of this technology, we have studied the effect of the input UT source transducer frequency, heating mechanism of different types of defects, the role coupling materials, the non-linear phenomena, the effect of crack closure, etc. The WSU team has also been developing prototypes of this technology for future in-field inspection. In this paper, we present the evaluation of the system with structured composite samples containing widespread impact damages.

  9. Laser-induced surface acoustic waves and their detection via diagnostic systems for detecting radiation damage on steel materials of nuclear devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Sin-iti; Chiba, Atsuya; Wakai, Eiichi

    2015-06-01

    The development of a non-destructive, non-contact diagnostic system to detect radiation damage is very important for measuring radioactive materials. A system using surface acoustic waves (SAWs) induced and detected by lasers was developed. The propagation velocities of SAWs on stainless steel irradiated by 20 keV He and Ar ions were investigated, and a tendency for the velocity to increase with an increase in ion irradiation was observed. This tendency may be due to surface modification. A non-linear effect on ion irradiation versus normal surface velocity in the vertical direction was confirmed.

  10. Smart accelerometer. [vibration damage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention discloses methods and apparatus for detecting vibrations from machines which indicate an impending malfunction for the purpose of preventing additional damage and allowing for an orderly shutdown or a change in mode of operation. The method and apparatus is especially suited for reliable operation in providing thruster control data concerning unstable vibration in an electrical environment which is typically noisy and in which unrecognized ground loops may exist.

  11. Damage detection using scanning laser vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shen-En; Venkatappa, Suhas; Petro, Samer H.; Gangarao, Hota V.

    1998-06-01

    A damage detection algorithm based on the principle of curvature changes has been developed at CFC-WVU. However, the algorithm requires accurate mode shapes with adequate spatial density. Existing contact sensors can not provide adequate spatial density without adding excessive mass. Hence, non-contact scanning techniques, such as scanning laser vibrometer (SLV) has adequate sensitivity and accuracy is yet to be proven. The applicability of SLV on large structures is also questionable. To assess the suitability of using SLV for damage detection, a beam specimen has been tested using an existing system. The results confirm that damage detection using vibration measurements from SLV is successful. Due to more spatial density, the SLV data is shown to be more sensitive than the contact sensor test.

  12. Damage detection in a framed building structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Pines, Darryll J.

    1999-05-01

    Interest in infrastructure health monitoring and damage detection has received a considerable amount of attention over the past two decades. Previous approaches to non- destructive evaluation of structures to assess their integrity typically involved some form of human interaction. Recent advances in smart materials and structures technology has resulted in a renewed interest in developing advanced self-diagnostic capability for assessing the state of a structure without any human interaction. The goal is to reduce human interaction while at the same time monitor the integrity of a structure. With this goal in mind, many researchers have made significant strides in developing damage detection methods for civil structures based on traditional modal analysis techniques. These techniques are of the well suited for structures which can be modeled by discrete lumped-parameter elements where the presence of damage leads to some low frequency change in the global behavior of the system. On the other hand small defects such as cracks are obscured by modal approaches since such phenomena are high frequency effects not easily discovered by examining changes in modal mass, stiffness or damping parameters. This is because at high frequency modal structural models are subject to uncertainty. This uncertainty can be reduced by increasing the spatial order of discrete model, however, this increases the computational effort of modal-based damage detection schemes. On the other hand, wave propagation models of structures have higher spatial order model fidelity. Thus, they are better suited for detecting and global wave propagation models to detect damage in a discrete model of a farmed building structure, consisting of discrete structural elements. Simulated damage in the form of mass or stiffness loss is used to determine the effect on the resonant and incident wave response of the structure. Examination of the incident transfer function response of the structure reveals the

  13. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  14. Vibration-Based Damage Detection in Rotating Machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.

    1999-06-28

    Damage detection as determined from changes in the vibration characteristics of a system has been a popular research topic for the last thirty years. Numerous damage identification algorithms have been proposed for detecting and locating damage in structural and mechanical systems. To date, these damage-detection methods have shown mixed results. A particular application of vibration-based damage detection that has perhaps enjoyed the greatest success is that of damage detection in rotating machinery. This paper summarizes the state of technology in vibration-based damage detection applied to rotating machinery. The review interprets the damage detection process in terms of a statistical pattern recognition paradigm that encompasses all vibration-based damage detection methods and applications. The motivation for the study reported herein is to identify the reasons that vibration-based damage detection has been successfully applied to rotating machinery, but has yet to show robust applications to civil engineering infrastructure. The paper concludes by comparing and contrasting the vibration-based damage detection applied to rotating machinery with large civil engineering infrastructure applications.

  15. Current Status of Hybrid Bearing Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Certo, Joseph M.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    Advances in material development and processing have led to the introduction of ceramic hybrid bearings for many applications. The introduction of silicon nitride hybrid bearings into the high pressure oxidizer turbopump, on the space shuttle main engine, led NASA to solve a highly persistent and troublesome bearing problem. Hybrid bearings consist of ceramic balls and steel races. The majority of hybrid bearings utilize Si3N4 balls. The aerospace industry is currently studying the use of hybrid bearings and naturally the failure modes of these bearings become an issue in light of the limited data available. In today s turbine engines and helicopter transmissions, the health of the bearings is detected by the properties of the debris found in the lubrication line when damage begins to occur. Current oil debris sensor technology relies on the magnetic properties of the debris to detect damage. Since the ceramic rolling elements of hybrid bearings have no metallic properties, a new sensing system must be developed to indicate the system health if ceramic components are to be safely implemented in aerospace applications. The ceramic oil debris sensor must be capable of detecting ceramic and metallic component damage with sufficient reliability and forewarning to prevent a catastrophic failure. The objective of this research is to provide a background summary on what is currently known about hybrid bearing failure modes and to report preliminary results on the detection of silicon nitride debris, in oil, using a commercial particle counter.

  16. The Need and Requirements for Validating Damage Detection Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    early detection of damage during service and in support of condition-based maintenance. At the same time, if the integrity of an aircraft component is...benefit the maintenance cost and reliability of aircraft structures through the early detection of damage during service and in support of condition...based maintenance. At the same time, if the integrity of an aircraft component is dependent upon the performance of an SHM system to detect damage

  17. Long term application of bus monitoring system to short and medium span bridges and damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ayaho; Lúcio, Válter J. G.; Emoto, Hisao; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    In this study, as one solution to the problem for condition assessment of existing short and medium span reinforced/prestressed concrete bridges, a new monitoring method using a public bus as part of a public transit system (bus monitoring system) is proposed, along with safety indices, namely, characteristic deflection, which is relatively free from the influence of dynamic disturbances due to such factors as the roughness of the road surface, and a structural anomaly parameter. A basic study was conducted by using the results of technical verification experiments and numerical analysis simulation. This paper describes the details of not only how to assess the bridge condition by public bus vibration measured in operating on Ube City bus network as a specific example for verify the system but also what kind of consideration we need to apply the system to existing bridges in overseas country.

  18. Ability of Impedance-Based Health Monitoring To Detect Structural Damage of Propulsion System Components Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Richard E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2005-01-01

    Impedance-based structural-health-monitoring uses piezoelectric (PZT) patches that are bonded onto or embedded in a structure. Each individual patch behaves as both an actuator of the surrounding structural area as well as a sensor of the structural response. The size of the excited area varies with the geometry and material composition of the structure, and an active patch is driven by a sinusoidal voltage sweep. When a PZT patch is subjected to an electric field, it produces a mechanical strain; and when it is stressed, it produces an electric charge. Since the patch is bonded to the structure, driving a patch deforms and vibrates the structure. The structure then produces a localized dynamic response. This structural system response is transferred back to the PZT patch, which in turn produces an electrical response. The electromechanical impedance method is based on the principle of electromechanical coupling between the active sensor and the structure, which allows researchers to assess local structural dynamics directly by interrogating a distributed sensor array. Because of mechanical coupling between the sensor and the host structure, this mechanical effect is picked up by the sensor and, through electromechanical coupling inside the active element, is reflected in electrical impedance measured at the sensor s terminals.

  19. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection for Surfaces and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Roberson, Luke; Medelius, Pedro; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steen; Snyder, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Current designs for inflatable or semi-rigidized structures for habitats and space applications use a multiple-layer construction, alternating thin layers with thicker, stronger layers, which produces a layered composite structure that is much better at resisting damage. Even though such composite structures or layered systems are robust, they can still be susceptible to penetration damage. The ability to detect damage to surfaces of inflatable or semi-rigid habitat structures is of great interest to NASA. Damage caused by impacts of foreign objects such as micrometeorites can rupture the shell of these structures, causing loss of critical hardware and/or the life of the crew. While not all impacts will have a catastrophic result, it will be very important to identify and locate areas of the exterior shell that have been damaged by impacts so that repairs (or other provisions) can be made to reduce the probability of shell wall rupture. This disclosure describes a system that will provide real-time data regarding the health of the inflatable shell or rigidized structures, and information related to the location and depth of impact damage. The innovation described here is a method of determining the size, location, and direction of damage in a multilayered structure. In the multi-dimensional damage detection system, layers of two-dimensional thin film detection layers are used to form a layered composite, with non-detection layers separating the detection layers. The non-detection layers may be either thicker or thinner than the detection layers. The thin-film damage detection layers are thin films of materials with a conductive grid or striped pattern. The conductive pattern may be applied by several methods, including printing, plating, sputtering, photolithography, and etching, and can include as many detection layers that are necessary for the structure construction or to afford the detection detail level required. The damage is detected using a detector or

  20. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  1. Embedded Carbon Nanotube Networks for Damage Precursor Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    part has to be repaired or replaced. Material state awareness is the process where a system will determine the vehicle health by providing...Damage detection requires the comparison of two system states : identifying the existence and location of damage and using that data to determine the...microscale that otherwise could not be detected through other detection methods. This project focuses on establishing a material state awareness

  2. Remote detection of forest damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Vogelmann, A. F.; Hoshizaki, T.; Williams, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of remote sensing to discriminate, measure, and map forest damage is evaluated. TM spectal coverage, a helicopter-mounted radiometer, and ground-based surveys were utilized to examine the responses of the spruces and firs of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont to stresses, such as pollution and trace metals. The basic spectral properties of vegetation are described. Forest damage at the site was estimated as 11.8-76.0 percent for the spruces and 19-43.8 percent for the balsam firs. Shifts in the spectra of the conifers in particular in the near IR region are analyzed, and variations in the mesophyll cell anatomy and pigment content of the spruces and firs are investigated. The relations between canopy moisture and damage is studied. The TM data are compared to aircraft data and found to be well correlated.

  3. Damage Detection Using Holography and Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews classical approaches to damage detection using laser holography and interferometry. The paper then details the modern uses of electronic holography and neural-net-processed characteristic patterns to detect structural damage. The design of the neural networks and the preparation of the training sets are discussed. The use of a technique to optimize the training sets, called folding, is explained. Then a training procedure is detailed that uses the holography-measured vibration modes of the undamaged structures to impart damage-detection sensitivity to the neural networks. The inspections of an optical strain gauge mounting plate and an International Space Station cold plate are presented as examples.

  4. Tissue damage detection by osmotic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Enyedi, Balázs; Kala, Snigdha; Nikolich-Zugich, Tijana; Niethammer, Philipp

    2013-09-01

    How tissue damage is detected to induce inflammatory responses is unclear. Most studies have focused on damage signals released by cell breakage and necrosis. Whether tissues use other cues in addition to cell lysis to detect that they are damaged is unknown. We find that osmolarity differences between interstitial fluid and the external environment mediate rapid leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue damage in zebrafish by activating cytosolic phospholipase a2 (cPLA2) at injury sites. cPLA2 initiates the production of non-canonical arachidonate metabolites that mediate leukocyte chemotaxis through a 5-oxo-ETE receptor (OXE-R). Thus, tissues can detect damage through direct surveillance of barrier integrity, with cell swelling probably functioning as a pro-inflammatory intermediate in the process.

  5. Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, K.; Allen, D. W.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

  6. Damage detection of an in-service condensation pipeline joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, Julie; Rezaei, Davood; Taheri, Farid

    2010-04-01

    The early detection of damage in structural or mechanical systems is of vital importance. With early detection, the damage may be repaired before the integrity of the system is jeopardized, resulting in monetary losses, loss of life or limb, and environmental impacts. Among the various types of structural health monitoring techniques, vibration-based methods are of significant interest since the damage location does not need to be known beforehand, making it a more versatile approach. The non-destructive damage detection method used for the experiments herein is a novel vibration-based method which uses an index called the EMD Energy Damage Index, developed with the aim of providing improved qualitative results compared to those methods currently available. As part of an effort to establish the integrity and limitation of this novel damage detection method, field testing was completed on a mechanical pipe joint on a condensation line, located in the physical plant of Dalhousie University. Piezoceramic sensors, placed at various locations around the joint were used to monitor the free vibration of the pipe imposed through the use of an impulse hammer. Multiple damage progression scenarios were completed, each having a healthy state and multiple damage cases. Subsequently, the recorded signals from the healthy and damaged joint were processed through the EMD Energy Damage Index developed in-house in an effort to detect the inflicted damage. The proposed methodology successfully detected the inflicted damages. In this paper, the effects of impact location, sensor location, frequency bandwidth, intrinsic mode functions, and boundary conditions are discussed.

  7. Ozone damage detection in cantaloupe plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.; Thomas, C. E.; Bowen, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone causes up to 90 percent of air pollution injury to vegetation in the United States; excess ozone affects plant growth and development and can cause undetected decrease in yields. Laboratory and field reflectance measurements showed that ozone-damaged cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) leaves had lower water contents and higher reflectance than did nondamaged leaves. Cantaloupe plants which were lightly, severely, and very severely ozone-damaged were distinguishable from nondamaged plants by reflectance measurements in the 1.35- to 2.5 micron near-infrared water absorption waveband. Ozone-damaged leaf areas were detected photographically 16 h before the damage was visible. Sensors are available for use with aircraft and spacecraft that possibly could be used routinely to detect ozone-damaged crops.

  8. Prototype Systems Containing Human Cytochrome P450 for High-Throughput Real-Time Detection of DNA Damage by Compounds That Form DNA-Reactive Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Brito Palma, Bernardo; Fisher, Charles W; Rueff, José; Kranendonk, Michel

    2016-05-16

    The formation of reactive metabolites through biotransformation is the suspected cause of many adverse drug reactions. Testing for the propensity of a drug to form reactive metabolites has increasingly become an integral part of lead-optimization strategy in drug discovery. DNA reactivity is one undesirable facet of a drug or its metabolites and can lead to increased risk of cancer and reproductive toxicity. Many drugs are metabolized by cytochromes P450 in the liver and other tissues, and these reactions can generate hard electrophiles. These hard electrophilic reactive metabolites may react with DNA and may be detected in standard in vitro genotoxicity assays; however, the majority of these assays fall short due to the use of animal-derived organ extracts that inadequately represent human metabolism. The current study describes the development of bacterial systems that efficiently detect DNA-damaging electrophilic reactive metabolites generated by human P450 biotransformation. These assays use a GFP reporter system that detects DNA damage through induction of the SOS response and a GFP reporter to control for cytotoxicity. Two human CYP1A2-competent prototypes presented here have appropriate characteristics for the detection of DNA-damaging reactive metabolites in a high-throughput manner. The advantages of this approach include a short assay time (120-180 min) with real-time measurement, sensitivity to small amounts of compound, and adaptability to a microplate format. These systems are suitable for high-throughput assays and can serve as prototypes for the development of future enhanced versions.

  9. Wireless Damage Location Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant Douglas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A wireless damage location sensing system uses a geometric-patterned wireless sensor that resonates in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field to generate a harmonic response that will experience a change when the sensor experiences a change in its geometric pattern. The sensing system also includes a magnetic field response recorder for wirelessly transmitting the time-varying magnetic field and for wirelessly detecting the harmonic response. The sensing system compares the actual harmonic response to a plurality of predetermined harmonic responses. Each predetermined harmonic response is associated with a severing of the sensor at a corresponding known location thereof so that a match between the actual harmonic response and one of the predetermined harmonic responses defines the known location of the severing that is associated therewith.

  10. Spiral Bevel Gear Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    2002-01-01

    A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spiral bevel gears was developed. Two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated using data fusion into a health monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on gears. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual monitoring technologies. This diagnostic tool was evaluated by collecting vibration and oil debris data from fatigue tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rigs. Data was collected during experiments performed in this test rig when pitting damage occurred. Results show that combining the vibration and oil debris measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spiral bevel gears.

  11. LADAR for structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosa, Adil G.; Fu, Gongkang

    1999-12-01

    LADAR here stands for laser radar, using laser reflectivity for measurement. This paper presents a new technique using LADAR for structure evaluation. It is experimentally investigated in the laboratory. With cooperation of the US Federal Highway Administration, a recently developed LADAR system was used to measure structural deformation. The data were then treated for reducing noise and used to derive multiple features for diagnosis. The results indicate a promising direction of nondestructive evaluation using LADAR.

  12. Damage detection of bridgelike structures using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin-Sivico, Javier; Rao, Vittal S.; Samanthula, Vasudha

    1998-06-01

    It is well known that the static and dynamic structural response of materials can indirectly indicate the health of structural systems. The changes in natural frequencies, mode shapes, and stiffness matrices due to damage are utilized for determination of occurrence, location and extent of damages. In recent years, many researchers have developed global damage detection algorithms using structural modal response. However most of these methods are off-line techniques based on frequency domain data. In this paper we have proposed real- time damage detection methods based on time domain data. In this method damages in the structure can be detected while the structure is kept on its regular use. The algorithm determines reduction in stiffness and/or damping of the structural elements, while assuming that the mass of the structure does not vary due to damage. This algorithm is based on the state space representation of the structure, which is identified from the time domain data. We have also determined a linear transformation matrix for converting the identified model into a state space representation based on physical coordinates of the structural system. The self-organization and learning capabilities of neural networks can be effectively used for structural damage detection purpose. In this paper a hybrid method for the damage detection has been proposed by combining the features of best achievable eigenvector method and neural network classification techniques for detection of location and extent of damage in the structural systems. The feasibility of the proposed method is verified by using simple three-bar truss structure and a cantilever beam test article.

  13. Open Circuit Resonant Sensors for Composite Damage Detection and Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, John J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Under the Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) program work was begun to investigate the feasibility of sensor systems for detecting and diagnosing damage to aircraft composite structures and materials. Specific interest for this study was in damage initiated by environmental storm hazards and the direct effect of lightning strikes on the material structures of a composite aircraft in flight. A series of open circuit resonant sensors was designed, fabricated, characterized, and determined to be a potentially viable means for damage detection and diagnosis of composite materials. The results of this research and development effort are documented in this report.

  14. Damage Detection in Bridges Using Modal Curvatures: Application to a Real Damage Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABDEL WAHAB, M. M.; DE ROECK, G.

    1999-09-01

    Damage detection in civil engineering constructions using the dynamic system parameters has become an important research topic. A direct, fast and inexpensive method is therefore required to evaluate and localize damage using the change in dynamic parameters between the intact and damage states. This paper investigates the application of the change in modal curvatures to detect damage in a prestressed concrete bridge. To establish the method simply supported and continuous beams containing damaged parts at different locations are tested using simulated data. Some important conclusions concerning the computation of the modal curvatures are drawn. A damage indicator called “curvature damage factor” is introduced, in which the difference in curvature mode shape for all modes can be summarized in one number for each measured point. The technique is further applied to a real structure, namely bridge Z24 which lies between the villages Koppigen and Utzenstorf and crosses the highway A1 between Bern and Zurich in Switzerland. In the framework of a Brite-Euram project, the bridge is used as a full-scale specimen and subjected to different damage scenarios in order to introduce damage.

  15. Transmission Bearing Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage to rolling element bearings in an OH-58 main rotor transmission. Two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated using data fusion into a health monitoring system for detecting bearing surface fatigue pitting damage. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual monitoring technologies. This diagnostic tool was evaluated by collecting vibration and oil debris data from tests performed in the NASA Glenn 500 hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Data was collected during experiments performed in this test rig when two unanticipated bearing failures occurred. Results show that combining the vibration and oil debris measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spiral bevel gears duplex ball bearings and spiral bevel pinion triplex ball bearings in a main rotor transmission.

  16. Earthquake damage to transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most destructive natural hazards known to man. A large magnitude earthquake near a populated area can affect residents over thousands of square kilometers and cause billions of dollars in property damage. Such an event can kill or injure thousands of residents and disrupt the socioeconomic environment for months, sometimes years. A serious result of a large-magnitude earthquake is the disruption of transportation systems, which limits post-disaster emergency response. Movement of emergency vehicles, such as police cars, fire trucks and ambulances, is often severely restricted. Damage to transportation systems is categorized below by cause including: ground failure, faulting, vibration damage, and tsunamis.

  17. Detecting Tooth Damage in Geared Drive Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a method that was developed to detect gear tooth damage that does not require a priori knowledge of the frequency characteristic of the fault. The basic idea of the method is that a few damaged teeth will cause transient load fluctuations unlike the normal tooth load fluctuations. The method attempts to measure the energy in the lower side bands of the modulated signal caused by the transient load fluctuations. The method monitors the energy in the frequency interval which excludes the frequency of the lowest dominant normal tooth load fluctuation and all frequencies above it. The method reacted significantly to the tooth fracture damage results documented in the Lewis data sets which were obtained from tests of the OH-58A transmission and tests of high contact ratio spiral bevel gears. The method detected gear tooth fractures in all four of the high contact ratio spiral bevel gear runs. Published results indicate other detection methods were only able to detect faults for three out of four runs.

  18. Damage assessment in systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Luis H

    2008-12-01

    Systemic vasculitides were initially reported as acute, progressive, severe, and life-threatening diseases. The introduction of glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide for the treatment of vasculitis improved survival dramatically, but morbidity has remained high. Damage develops as a consequence of recurrent or persistent active vasculitis or its treatment. It is defined as the accumulation of nonhealing scars that are unlikely to respond to immunosuppressive therapy. Damage assessment is essential in systemic vasculitis because it may facilitate patient stratification in clinical trials and possibly in clinical practice. Moreover, it may avoid unnecessary use of immunosuppressive therapy. The Vasculitis Damage Index, developed and validated in 1997, has been very useful in solving many matters in systemic vasculitis and is currently the only validated damage-assessment tool available. However, the vasculitis community has recognized that there is a growing need to improve the evaluation of damage in vasculitis. The development of a Combined Damage Assessment index, which would permit a more appropriate and standardized approach to disease assessment applicable to systemic vasculitis, has been proposed.

  19. Nonlinear damage detection and localization using a time domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Calla, D.-B.; Malfense Fierro, G.-P.; Ciampa, F.; Meo, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a damage detection and localization technique based on nonlinear elastic waves propagation in a damage composite laminate. The proposed method relies on the time of arrival estimation of the second harmonic nonlinear response obtained with second order phase symmetry analysis filtering and burst excitation. The Akaike Information Criterion approach was used to estimate the arrival times measured by six receiver transducers. Then, a combination of Newton's method and unconstrained optimization was employed to solve a system of nonlinear equations in order to obtain the material damage coordinates. To validate this methodology, experimental tests were carried out on a damaged composite plate. The results showed that the technique allows calculating the damage position with high accuracy (maximum error ~5 mm).

  20. Spiral-Bevel-Gear Damage Detected Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Helicopter transmission integrity is critical to helicopter safety because helicopters depend on the power train for propulsion, lift, and flight maneuvering. To detect impending transmission failures, the ideal diagnostic tools used in the health-monitoring system would provide real-time health monitoring of the transmission, demonstrate a high level of reliable detection to minimize false alarms, and provide end users with clear information on the health of the system without requiring them to interpret large amounts of sensor data. A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spiral bevel gears was developed. (Spiral bevel gears are used in helicopter transmissions to transfer power between nonparallel intersecting shafts.) Data fusion was used to integrate two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, into a health-monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on the gears.

  1. Capacitance-based damage detection sensing for aerospace structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, P.; Yamamoto, N.; Chen, Y.; Manohara, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damage detection technology needs improvement for aerospace engineering application because detection within complex composite structures is difficult yet critical to avoid catastrophic failure. Damage detection is challenging in aerospace structures because not all the damage detection technology can cover the various defect types (delamination, fiber fracture, matrix crack etc.), or conditions (visibility, crack length size, etc.). These defect states are expected to become even more complex with future introduction of novel composites including nano-/microparticle reinforcement. Currently, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods with X-ray, ultrasound, or eddy current have good resolutions (< 0.1 mm), but their detection capabilities is limited by defect locations and orientations and require massive inspection devices. System health monitoring (SHM) methods are often paired with NDE technologies to signal out sensed damage, but their data collection and analysis currently requires excessive wiring and complex signal analysis. Here, we present a capacitance sensor-based, structural defect detection technology with improved sensing capability. Thin dielectric polymer layer is integrated as part of the structure; the defect in the structure directly alters the sensing layer's capacitance, allowing full-coverage sensing capability independent of defect size, orientation or location. In this work, capacitance-based sensing capability was experimentally demonstrated with a 2D sensing layer consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched by electrodes. These sensing layers were applied on substrate surfaces. Surface indentation damage (~1mm diameter) and its location were detected through measured capacitance changes: 1 to 250 % depending on the substrates. The damage detection sensors are light weight, and they can be conformably coated and can be part of the composite structure. Therefore it is suitable for aerospace structures such as cryogenic tanks and rocket

  2. Damage detection using frequency shift path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longqi; Lie, Seng Tjhen; Zhang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel concept called FREquency Shift (FRESH) path to describe the dynamic behavior of structures with auxiliary mass. FRESH path combines the effects of frequency shifting and amplitude changing into one space curve, providing a tool for analyzing structure health status and properties. A damage index called FRESH curvature is then proposed to detect local stiffness reduction. FRESH curvature can be easily adapted for a particular problem since the sensitivity of the index can be adjusted by changing auxiliary mass or excitation power. An algorithm is proposed to adjust automatically the contribution from frequency and amplitude in the method. Because the extraction of FRESH path requires highly accurate frequency and amplitude estimators; therefore, a procedure based on discrete time Fourier transform is introduced to extract accurate frequency and amplitude with the time complexity of O (n log n), which is verified by simulation signals. Moreover, numerical examples with different damage sizes, severities and damping are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed damage index. In addition, applications of FRESH path on two steel beams with different damages are presented and the results show that the proposed method is valid and computational efficient.

  3. System for estimating fatigue damage

    DOEpatents

    LeMonds, Jeffrey; Guzzo, Judith Ann; Liu, Shaopeng; Dani, Uttara Ashwin

    2017-03-14

    In one aspect, a system for estimating fatigue damage in a riser string is provided. The system includes a plurality of accelerometers which can be deployed along a riser string and a communications link to transmit accelerometer data from the plurality of accelerometers to one or more data processors in real time. With data from a limited number of accelerometers located at sensor locations, the system estimates an optimized current profile along the entire length of the riser including riser locations where no accelerometer is present. The optimized current profile is then used to estimate damage rates to individual riser components and to update a total accumulated damage to individual riser components. The number of sensor locations is small relative to the length of a deepwater riser string, and a riser string several miles long can be reliably monitored along its entire length by fewer than twenty sensor locations.

  4. Damage modeling and damage detection for structures using a perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Akash

    non-contact Laser-Doppler Vibrometer sensors. Assuming the damaged structure to be a linear system, the response is expressed as the summation of the responses of the corresponding undamaged structure and the response (negative response) of the damage alone. If the second part of the response is isolated, it forms what can be regarded as the damage signature. The damage signature gives a clear indication of the damage. In this thesis, the existence of the damage signature is investigated when the damaged structure is excited at one of its natural frequencies and therefore it is called "partial mode contribution". The second damage detection method is based on this new physical parameter as determined using the partial mode contribution. The physical reasoning is verified analytically, thereupon it is verified using finite element models and experiments. The limits of damage size that can be determined using the method are also investigated. There is no requirement of having a baseline data with this damage detection method. Since the partial mode contribution is a local parameter, it is thus very sensitive to the presence of damage. The parameter is also shown to be not affected by noise in the detection ambience.

  5. Time Domain Reflectometry for Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-18

    Final Report PROJECT ID: AOARD-10-4112 Title: Time Domain Reflectometry for damage detection of laminated CFRP plate Researcher: Professor Akira...From July/2010 To July/2011 Abstract Recently, high toughness Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) laminates are used to primary structures. The...tough CFRP yields small fiber breakages when delamination crack is made in many cases. This requires a detection system of fiber breakages at low cost for

  6. Beam damage detection using computer vision technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jing; Xu, Xiangjun; Wang, Jialai; Li, Gong

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, a new approach for efficient damage detection in engineering structures is introduced. The key concept is to use the mature computer vision technology to capture the static deformation profile of a structure, and then employ profile analysis methods to detect the locations of the damages. By combining with wireless communication techniques, the proposed approach can provide an effective and economical solution for remote monitoring of structure health. Moreover, a preliminary experiment is conducted to verify the proposed concept. A commercial computer vision camera is used to capture the static deformation profiles of cracked cantilever beams under loading. The profiles are then processed to reveal the existence and location of the irregularities on the deformation profiles by applying fractal dimension, wavelet transform and roughness methods, respectively. The proposed concept is validated on both one-crack and two-crack cantilever beam-type specimens. It is also shown that all three methods can produce satisfactory results based on the profiles provided by the vision camera. In addition, the profile quality is the determining factor for the noise level in resultant detection signal.

  7. Tapered Roller Bearing Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Kreider, Gary; Fichter, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage of tapered roller bearings. Tapered roller bearings are used in helicopter transmissions and have potential for use in high bypass advanced gas turbine aircraft engines. A diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting oil debris data from failure progression tests conducted using health monitoring hardware. Failure progression tests were performed with tapered roller bearings under simulated engine load conditions. Tests were performed on one healthy bearing and three pre-damaged bearings. During each test, data from an on-line, in-line, inductance type oil debris sensor and three accelerometers were monitored and recorded for the occurrence of bearing failure. The bearing was removed and inspected periodically for damage progression throughout testing. Using data fusion techniques, two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated into a health monitoring system for detecting bearing surface fatigue pitting damage. The data fusion diagnostic tool was evaluated during bearing failure progression tests under simulated engine load conditions. This integrated system showed improved detection of fatigue damage and health assessment of the tapered roller bearings as compared to using individual health monitoring technologies.

  8. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Deyu; Zhang, Zhixia; Guo, Huarong

    2012-01-01

    p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase) and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase) into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG) cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C) and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation), but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner. PMID:25585933

  9. Damage detection using modal strain energy and laser vibrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otieno, Andrew W.; Liu, Pengxiang; Rao, Vittal S.; Koval, Leslie R.

    2000-06-01

    Structural health monitoring for complex systems can contribute significantly to reduced life cycle costs. Many damage detection algorithms have been proposed in the literature for investigating the structural integrity of systems. Changes in modal strain energy have been used to detect the location and extent of damage in structures. In the previous studies, the stiffness matrix is analytically derived and assumed constant even after damage. This paper reports a study on the sensitivity of the modal strain energy method to the stiffness matrix and its accuracy in detecting the location and extent of damage. The modal strain energies for each element of the undamaged structure are computed for each mode using the original analytical matrix and measured modal data. Modal data from the damaged case is used to update the stiffness matrix by a simplified matrix update scheme. This updated matrix is used to correct the elemental matrices for the damaged system. Two case studies are presented in this work. The first is an experimental and analytical model of a cantilever beam and the second, a truss model of the European Space Agency. In the first case three identical aluminum cantilever beams are used. Damage is simulated on two of them by milling 1-inch long slots at two different locations on the beams. Modal data are obtained from experiment using Scanning Laser Vibrometer (SLV) and STAR software to extract the mode shape vectors from the experimental results. These are also compared with finite element simulations of the beams. The second case is an analytical example in which damage is simulated by reducing the area of one of the truss elements hypothetically by 50%. Results from these studies show a slight improved accuracy in determining the location of damage using an updated elemental stiffness matrix. For experimental results however, modal strain energy change method does not give an accurate location of the damages. There is need for further analysis of the

  10. A Comparison of Vibration and Oil Debris Gear Damage Detection Methods Applied to Pitting Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) must provide reliable, real-time performance monitoring of helicopter operating parameters to prevent damage of flight critical components. Helicopter transmission diagnostics are an important part of a helicopter HUMS. In order to improve the reliability of transmission diagnostics, many researchers propose combining two technologies, vibration and oil monitoring, using data fusion and intelligent systems. Some benefits of combining multiple sensors to make decisions include improved detection capabilities and increased probability the event is detected. However, if the sensors are inaccurate, or the features extracted from the sensors are poor predictors of transmission health, integration of these sensors will decrease the accuracy of damage prediction. For this reason, one must verify the individual integrity of vibration and oil analysis methods prior to integrating the two technologies. This research focuses on comparing the capability of two vibration algorithms, FM4 and NA4, and a commercially available on-line oil debris monitor to detect pitting damage on spur gears in the NASA Glenn Research Center Spur Gear Fatigue Test Rig. Results from this research indicate that the rate of change of debris mass measured by the oil debris monitor is comparable to the vibration algorithms in detecting gear pitting damage.

  11. Wavenumber imaging for damage detection and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, M. D.; Johnston, P. H.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a method for analyzing ultrasonic wavefield data using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) applied in the spatial domain. Unlike data obtained by sparse arrays of transducers, full wavefield data contains information local to the structure and can be used to obtain more detailed measurements of damage type, location, size, etc. By calculating the CWT of the wavefield in the spatial domain, the wavenumber spectrum is determined for the inspected locations. Because wavenumber is affected by the local geometry and material properties of the structure through which Lamb waves propagate, the wavenumber spectrum can be analyzed to assess the location, severity, and size of damage. The technique is first applied to experimental wavefield data obtained using a laser Doppler vibrometer and automated positioning stage. The out-of-plane velocity along the length of a composite stringer was measured to detect the presence of delaminations within the composite overwrap. Next, simulated corrosion is detected and measured within an aluminum plate using the two dimensional CWT. The experimental results show the usefulness of the technique for vehicle structure inspection applications.

  12. Wavenumber Imaging For Damage Detection and Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogge, Matthew D.; Johnson, Pat H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for analyzing ultrasonic wavefield data using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) applied in the spatial domain. Unlike data obtained by sparse arrays of transducers, full wavefield data contains information local to the structure and can be used to obtain more detailed measurements of damage type, location, size, etc. By calculating the CWT of the wavefield in the spatial domain, the wavenumber spectrum is determined for the inspected locations. Because wavenumber is affected by the local geometry and material properties of the structure through which Lamb waves propagate, the wavenumber spectrum can be analyzed to assess the location, severity, and size of damage. The technique is first applied to experimental wavefield data obtained using a laser Doppler vibrometer and automated positioning stage. The out-of-plane velocity along the length of a composite stringer was measured to detect the presence of delaminations within the composite overwrap. Next, simulated corrosion is detected and measured within an aluminum plate using the two dimensional CWT. The experimental results show the usefulness of the technique for vehicle structure inspection applications.

  13. Heat Induced Damage Detection by Terahertz (THz) Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Wu, Ziran; Xin, Hao

    2011-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) and sub-terahertz imaging and spectroscopy are becoming increasingly popular nondestructive evaluation techniques for damage detection and characterization of materials. THz radiation is being used for inspecting ceramic foam tiles used in TPS (Thermal Protection System), thick polymer composites and polymer tiles that are not good conductors of ultrasonic waves. Capability of THz electromagnetic waves in detecting heat induced damage in porous materials is investigated in this paper. Porous pumice stone blocks are subjected to long time heat exposures to produce heat induced damage in the block. The dielectric properties extracted from THz TDS (Time Domain Spectroscopy) measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure. Experimental results show noticeable and consistent change in dielectric properties with increasing levels of heat exposure, well before its melting point.

  14. Online damage inspection of optics for ATP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Jiang, Yu; Mao, Yao; Gan, Xun; Liu, Qiong

    2016-09-01

    In the Electro-Optical acquisition-tracking-pointing system (ATP), the optical components will be damaged with the several influencing factors. In this situation, the rate will increase sharply when the arrival of damage to some extent. As the complex processing techniques and long processing cycle of optical components, the damage will cause the great increase of the system development cost and cycle. Therefore, it is significant to detect the laser-induced damage in the ATP system. At present, the major research on the on-line damage detection technology of optical components is for the large optical system in the international. The relevant detection systems have complicated structures and many of components, and require enough installation space reserved, which do not apply for ATP system. To solve the problem mentioned before, This paper use a method based on machine vision to detect the damage on-line for the present ATP system. To start with, CCD and PC are used for image acquisition. Secondly, smoothing filters are used to restrain false damage points produced by noise. Then, with the shape feature included in the damage image, the OTSU Method which can define the best segmentation threshold automatically is used to achieve the goal to locate the damage regions. At last, we can supply some opinions for the lifetime of the optical components by analyzing the damage data, such as damage area, damage position. The method has the characteristics of few-detectors and simple-structures which can be installed without any changes of the original light path. With the method, experimental results show that it is stable and effective to achieve the goal of detecting the damage of optical components on-line in the ATP system.

  15. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  16. Evaluation of the damage detection capability of a sparse-array guided-wave SHM system applied to a complex structure under varying thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas; Cawley, Peter; Wilcox, Paul David; Croxford, Anthony John

    2009-12-01

    A sparse-array structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on guided waves was applied to the door of a commercial shipping container. The door comprised a corrugated steel panel approximately 2.4 m by 2.4 m surrounded by a box beam frame and testing was performed in a nonlaboratory environment. A 3-D finite element (FE) model of the corrugations was used to predict transmission coefficients for the A0 and S0 modes across the corrugations as a function of incidence angle. The S0 mode transmission across the corrugations was substantially stronger, and this mode was used in the main test series. A sparse array with 9 transducers was attached to the structure, and signals from the undamaged structure were recorded at periodic intervals over a 3-week period, and the resulting signal database was used for temperature compensation of subsequent signals. Defects in the form of holes whose diameter was increased incrementally from 1 to 10 mm were introduced at 2 different points of the structure, and signals were taken for each condition. Direct analysis of subtracted signals allowed understanding of the defect detection capability of the system. Comparison of signals transmitted between different transducer pairs before and after damage was used to give an initial indication of defect detectability. Signals from all combinations of transducers were then used in imaging algorithms, and good localization of holes with a 5-mm diameter or above was possible within the sparse array, which covered half of the area of the structure.

  17. Vibration Monitoring Techniques Applied to Detect Damage in Rotating Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2002-01-01

    Rotor health monitoring and online damage detection are increasingly gaining the interest of the manufacturers of aircraft engines. This is primarily due to the need for improved safety during operation as well as the need for lower maintenance costs. Applied techniques for detecting damage in and monitoring the health of rotors are essential for engine safety, reliability, and life prediction. The goals of engine safety are addressed within the NASA-sponsored Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). AvSP provides research and technology products needed to help the Federal Aviation Administration and the aerospace industry improve aviation safety. The Nondestructive Evaluation Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center is addressing propulsion health management and the development of propulsion-system-specific technologies intended to detect potential failures prior to catastrophe.

  18. Ultrasonic Techniques for Baseline-Free Damage Detection in Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debaditya

    This research presents ultrasonic techniques for baseline-free damage detection in structures in the context of structural health monitoring (SHM). Conventional SHM methods compare signals obtained from the pristine condition of a structure (baseline signals) with those from the current state, and relate certain changes in the signal characteristics to damage. While this approach has been successful in the laboratory, there are certain drawbacks of depending on baseline signals in real field applications. Data from the pristine condition are not available for most existing structures. Even if they are available, operational and environmental variations tend to mask the effect of damage on the signal characteristics. Most important, baseline measurements may become meaningless while assessing the condition of a structure after an extreme event such as an earthquake or a hurricane. Such events may destroy the sensors themselves and require installation of new sensors at different locations on the structure. Baseline-free structural damage detection can broaden the scope of SHM in the scenarios described above. A detailed discussion on the philosophy of baseline-free damage detection is provided in Chapter 1. Following this discussion, the research questions are formulated. The organization of this document and the major contributions of this research are also listed in this chapter. Chapter 2 describes a fully automated baseline-free technique for notch and crack detection in plates using a collocated pair of piezoelectric wafer transducers for measuring ultrasonic signals. Signal component corresponding to the damage induced mode-converted Lamb waves is extracted by processing the originally measured ultrasonic signals. The damage index is computed as a function of this mode-converted Lamb wave signal component. An over-determined system of Lamb wave measurements is used to find a least-square estimate of the measurement errors. This error estimate serves as the

  19. Damage detection of structures identified with deterministic-stochastic models using seismic data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Chih; Wang, Yen-Po; Chang, Ming-Lian

    2014-01-01

    A deterministic-stochastic subspace identification method is adopted and experimentally verified in this study to identify the equivalent single-input-multiple-output system parameters of the discrete-time state equation. The method of damage locating vector (DLV) is then considered for damage detection. A series of shaking table tests using a five-storey steel frame has been conducted. Both single and multiple damage conditions at various locations have been considered. In the system identification analysis, either full or partial observation conditions have been taken into account. It has been shown that the damaged stories can be identified from global responses of the structure to earthquakes if sufficiently observed. In addition to detecting damage(s) with respect to the intact structure, identification of new or extended damages of the as-damaged counterpart has also been studied. This study gives further insights into the scheme in terms of effectiveness, robustness, and limitation for damage localization of frame systems.

  20. Mechanistically-informed damage detection using dynamic measurements: Extended constitutive relation error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Prabhu, S.; Atamturktur, S.; Cogan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Model-based damage detection entails the calibration of damage-indicative parameters in a physics-based computer model of an undamaged structural system against measurements collected from its damaged counterpart. The approach relies on the premise that changes identified in the damage-indicative parameters during calibration reveal the structural damage in the system. In model-based damage detection, model calibration has traditionally been treated as a process, solely operating on the model output without incorporating available knowledge regarding the underlying mechanistic behavior of the structural system. In this paper, the authors propose a novel approach for model-based damage detection by implementing the Extended Constitutive Relation Error (ECRE), a method developed for error localization in finite element models. The ECRE method was originally conceived to identify discrepancies between experimental measurements and model predictions for a structure in a given healthy state. Implementing ECRE for damage detection leads to the evaluation of a structure in varying healthy states and determination of discrepancy between model predictions and experiments due to damage. The authors developed an ECRE-based damage detection procedure in which the model error and structural damage are identified in two distinct steps and demonstrate feasibility of the procedure in identifying the presence, location and relative severity of damage on a scaled two-story steel frame for damage scenarios of varying type and severity.

  1. Structural damage detection using active members and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.

    1994-06-01

    The detection of damage in structures is a topic which has considerable interest in many fields. In the past many methods for detecting damage in structures has relied on finite element model refinement methods. This note presents a structural damage methodology in which only active member transfer function data are used in conjunction with an artificial neural network to detect damage in structures. Specifically, the method relies on training a neural network using active member transfer function pole/zero information to classify damaged structure measurements and to predict the degree of damage in the structure. The method differs from many of the past damage detection algorithms in that no attempt is made to update a finite element model or to match measured data with new finite element analyses of the structure in a damaged state.

  2. Rapid and Robust Damage Detection using Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Fielding, E. J.; Simons, M.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Owen, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Under ARIA (Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis) project at JPL and Caltech, we developed a prototype algorithm and data system to rapidly detect surface change caused by natural or man-made damage using a radar remote sensing technique of InSAR coherence. We tested the algorithm with a building demolition site in the City of Pasadena, California. The results show clear signal at the demolition site, with about 150% SNR improvement compared to conventional approach. Out of fourteen strongest detected signals, we confirmed that at least eleven of them were associated with real demolition and construction projects. We applied the algorithm to the February 2011 M6.3 Christchurch earthquake in New Zealand, which killed 185 people and caused financial damage of US $16-24 billion. We produced a damage proxy map (DPM) using radar data from ALOS satellite (Figure A), where red pixels identify regions where there may have been earthquake induced building damage, landslides, and liquefaction. The distribution of the red regions agrees well with the post-earthquake assessment performed on the ground by inspectors from the New Zealand government and summarized in their damage assessment zone map (Figure B). The DPM was derived from radar data acquired 3 days after the earthquake, whereas the ground truth zone map was first published 4 months after the earthquake. In addition to all-weather and day-and-night capability of radar, the sensitivity of radar signal to surface property change is high enough for reliable damage assessment. Current and future satellite and airborne missions should keep the expected composite data acquisition latency within a day. Rapidly produced accurate damage assessment maps will help saving people, assisting effective prioritization of rescue operations at early stage of response, and significantly improve timely situational awareness for emergency management and national / international assessment for response and recovery.

  3. A damage detection technique for reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ai-Lun; Yang, Jann N.; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2012-04-01

    Civil engineering structures, such as reinforced concrete frames, exhibit nonlinear hysteretic behavior when subject to dynamic loads, such as earthquakes. The ability to detect damages in structures after a major earthquake will ensure their reliability and safety. Innovative analysis techniques for damage detection of structures have been extensively studied recently. However, practical and effective damage identification techniques remain to be developed for nonlinear structures, in particular hysteretic reinforced concrete (RC) structures. In this paper, a smooth hysteretic model with stiffness and strength degradations and with the pinching effect is used to represent the dynamic characteristics of reinforced concrete (RC) frames. A system identification method capable of detecting damages in nonlinear structures, referred to as the adaptive quadratic sum-square error with unknown inputs (AQSSE-UI), is used to detect damages in hysteretic RC frames. The performance of the AQSSE-UI technique is demonstrated by the experimental data. A 1/3 scale 2-story RC frame has been tested experimentally on the shake table at NCREE, Taiwan. This 2-story RC frame was subject to different levels of ground excitations back to back. The RC frame is firstly considered as a linear model with rotational springs and the tracking of the degradation of the stiffness parameters is carried out using the AQSSE-UI technique. Then the same RC frame is considered as a nonlinear structure with plastic hinges following a smooth hysteretic model. Experimental results show that the AQSSE-UI technique is quite effective for tracking of : (i) the stiffness degradation of linear structures, and (ii) the non-linear hysteretic parameters with stiffness and strength degradations.

  4. Nondestructive detection and assessment of damage in aging aircraft using a novel stress-strain microprobe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggag, Fahmy M.; Wang, J. A.

    1996-11-01

    Aging of current commercial and military aircraft has become a major concern as many older aircraft are reaching their original design life. Service failures due to inaccurate characterization of aging responses might result in costly repair, premature component replacement, and loss of human lives. The properties of aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and nickel-based superalloys used in aircraft structures and engines might degrade with service conditions associated with the operation of the aircraft. Important aspects of environmental conditions encountered in service cannot be accurately simulated. Thus, it will be a great advantage that the in-situ mechanical properties can be obtained nondestructively. A novel portable/in-situ stress-strain microprobe (SSM) system was developed to use an automated ball indentation technique to measure, yield strength, true- stress versus true-plastic-strain curve, strength coefficient, strain-hardening-exponent, and to estimate fracture toughness. Example test results on metallic structural components and samples are given in this paper and a video demonstration will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, potential applications of the SSM technology to assess the integrity of aging aircraft are briefly discussed.

  5. Gear Damage Detection Using Oil Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to verify, when using an oil debris sensor, that accumulated mass predicts gear pitting damage and to identify a method to set threshold limits for damaged gears. Oil debris data was collected from 8 experiments with no damage and 8 with pitting damage in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Rig. Oil debris feature analysis was performed on this data. Video images of damage progression were also collected from 6 of the experiments with pitting damage. During each test, data from an oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. The data measured from the oil debris sensor during experiments with damage and with no damage was used to identify membership functions to build a simple fuzzy logic model. Using fuzzy logic techniques and the oil debris data, threshold limits were defined that discriminate between stages of pitting wear. Results indicate accumulated mass combined with fuzzy logic analysis techniques is a good predictor of pitting damage on spur gears.

  6. Image Science and Analysis Group Spacecraft Damage Detection/Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, Ira M., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This project consisted of several tasks that could be served by an intern to assist the ISAG in detecting damage to spacecrafts during missions. First, this project focused on supporting the Micrometeoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) damage detection and assessment for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) using imagery from the last two HST Shuttle servicing missions. In this project, we used coordinates of two windows on the Shuttle Aft flight deck from where images were taken and the coordinates of three ID points in order to calculate the distance from each window to the three points. Then, using the specifications from the camera used, we calculated the image scale in pixels per inch for planes parallel to and planes in the z-direction to the image plane (shown in Table 1). This will help in the future for calculating measurements of objects in the images. Next, tabulation and statistical analysis were conducted for screening results (shown in Table 2) of imagery with Orion Thermal Protection System (TPS) damage. Using the Microsoft Excel CRITBINOM function and Goal Seek, the probabilities of detection of damage to different shuttle tiles were calculated as shown in Table 3. Using developed measuring tools, volume and area measurements will be created from 3D models of Orion TPS damage. Last, mathematical expertise was provided to the Photogrammetry Team. These mathematical tasks consisted of developing elegant image space error equations for observations along 3D lines, circles, planes, etc. and checking proofs for minimal sets of sufficient multi-linear constraints. Some of the processes and resulting equations are displayed in Figure 1.

  7. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  8. Seismic damage estimation for buried pipeline systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, W.F.

    1995-12-31

    A methodology for estimating seismic damage rates for buried pipeline systems is presented. The methodology is intended for damage estimation of buried pipeline systems in areas where use of more rigorous structural analysis techniques is not practical. Damage is estimated for areas subjected to ground shaking and permanent ground deformation. Although the methodology employs previously developed ground shaking damage algorithms, new damage algorithms are developed for permanent ground deformation. These new algorithms reflect the high levels of damage observed in areas of soil liquefaction.

  9. Passive Impact Damage Detection of Fiber Glass Composite Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-19

    PASSIVE IMPACT DAMAGE DETECTION OF FIBER GLASS COMPOSITE PANELS. By BRUNO ZAMORANO-SENDEROS A dissertation...COVERED 04-11-2012 to 10-12-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PASSIVE IMPACT DAMAGE DETECTION OF FIBER GLASS COMPOSITE PANELS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...process. .................................... 31 Figure 3-8 Sensor attached to the fiber glass fabric

  10. On-line fan blade damage detection using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberholster, A. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for monitoring the on-line condition of axial-flow fan blades with the use of neural networks. In developing this methodology, the first stage was to utilise neural networks trained on features extracted from on-line blade vibration signals measured on an experimental test structure. Results from a stationary experimental modal analysis of the structure were used for identifying global blade mode shapes and their corresponding frequencies. These in turn were used to assist in identifying vibration-related features suitable for neural network training. The features were extracted from on-line blade vibration and strain signals which were measured using a number of sensors. The second stage in the development of the methodology entails utilising neural networks trained on numerical Frequency Response Function (FRF) features obtained from a Finite Element Model (FEM) of the test structure. Frequency domain features obtained from on-line experimental measurements were used to normalise the numerical FRF features prior to neural network training. Following training, the networks were tested using experimental frequency domain features. This approach makes it unnecessary to damage the structure in order to train the neural networks. The paper shows that it is possible to classify damage for several fan blades by using neural networks with on-line vibration measurements from sensors not necessarily installed on the damaged blades themselves. The significance of this is that it proves the possibility to perform on-line fan blade damage classification using less than one sensor per blade. Even more significant is the demonstration that an on-line damage detection system for a fan can be developed without having to damage the actual structure.

  11. Subsurface damage detection and damage mechanism analysis of chemical-mechanical polished optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Yang, Wei; Bi, Guo; Yang, Ping; Guo, Yinbiao

    2014-09-01

    Detection of the subsurface damage depth in optical elements has significance on the subsequent material removal amount and improving element surface quality. The paper focuses on the subsurface damage of chemical-mechanical polished K9 specimen, and analyses the chemical-mechanical polishing mechanism and the cause of subsurface damage. A most suitable etchant is chosen and the step-by-step etching method is applied to measure the subsurface damage depth. A microscope is used to detect the damage morphology and the variation trend at different depth. Research shows that the subsurface damage caused by chemical-mechanical polishing is Hertz scratch, and the scratch quantity below surface presents a variation of zero-more-less-disappeared. The K9 specimen is polished for 3 min under the pressure of 2.5 Kgf and the spindle speed of 43139 r/min, thus resulting in a subsurface damage depth 15.3μm.

  12. Integrating Oil Debris and Vibration Gear Damage Detection Technologies Using Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    2002-01-01

    A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spur gears was developed. Two different measurement technologies, wear debris analysis and vibration, were integrated into a health monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on gears. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual measurement technologies. This diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting vibration and oil debris data from fatigue tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Test Rig. Experimental data were collected during experiments performed in this test rig with and without pitting. Results show combining the two measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spur gears.

  13. Heat induced damage detection in composite materials by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzieński, Maciej; Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2015-03-01

    In recent years electromagnetic Terahertz (THz) radiation or T-ray has been increasingly used for nondestructive evaluation of various materials such as polymer composites and porous foam tiles in which ultrasonic waves cannot penetrate but T-ray can. Most of these investigations have been limited to mechanical damage detection like inclusions, cracks, delaminations etc. So far only a few investigations have been reported on heat induced damage detection. Unlike mechanical damage the heat induced damage does not have a clear interface between the damaged part and the surrounding intact material from which electromagnetic waves can be reflected back. Difficulties associated with the heat induced damage detection in composite materials using T-ray are discussed in detail in this paper. T-ray measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure of composite specimens.

  14. Real-time vibration-based structural damage detection using one-dimensional convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Kiranyaz, Serkan; Gabbouj, Moncef; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration-based structural damage detection have been a continuous interest for civil, mechanical and aerospace engineers over the decades. Early and meticulous damage detection has always been one of the principal objectives of SHM applications. The performance of a classical damage detection system predominantly depends on the choice of the features and the classifier. While the fixed and hand-crafted features may either be a sub-optimal choice for a particular structure or fail to achieve the same level of performance on another structure, they usually require a large computation power which may hinder their usage for real-time structural damage detection. This paper presents a novel, fast and accurate structural damage detection system using 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) that has an inherent adaptive design to fuse both feature extraction and classification blocks into a single and compact learning body. The proposed method performs vibration-based damage detection and localization of the damage in real-time. The advantage of this approach is its ability to extract optimal damage-sensitive features automatically from the raw acceleration signals. Large-scale experiments conducted on a grandstand simulator revealed an outstanding performance and verified the computational efficiency of the proposed real-time damage detection method.

  15. Vibration Based Sun Gear Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Adrian; LaBerge, Kelsen; Lewicki, David; Pines, Darryll

    2013-01-01

    Seeded fault experiments were conducted on the planetary stage of an OH-58C helicopter transmission. Two vibration based methods are discussed that isolate the dynamics of the sun gear from that of the planet gears, bearings, input spiral bevel stage, and other components in and around the gearbox. Three damaged sun gears: two spalled and one cracked, serve as the focus of this current work. A non-sequential vibration separation algorithm was developed and the resulting signals analyzed. The second method uses only the time synchronously averaged data but takes advantage of the signal/source mapping required for vibration separation. Both algorithms were successful in identifying the spall damage. Sun gear damage was confirmed by the presence of sun mesh groups. The sun tooth crack condition was inconclusive.

  16. Application of Damage Detection Techniques Using Wind Turbine Modal Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, E.; Rumsey, M.; Simmermacher, T.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-12-17

    As any structure ages, its structural characteristics will also change. The goal of this work was to determine if modal response data fkom a wind turbine could be used in the detection of damage. The input stimuli to the wind turbine were from traditional modal hammer input and natural wind excitation. The structural response data was acquired using accelerometers mounted on the rotor of a parked and undamaged horizontal-axis wind turbine. The bolts at the root of one of the three blades were then loosened to simulate a damaged blade. The structural response data of the rotor was again recorded. The undamaged and damage-simulated datasets were compared using existing darnage detection algorithms. Also, a novel algorithm for combining the results of different damage detection algorithms was utilized in the assessment of the data. This paper summarizes the code development and discusses some preliminary damage detection results.

  17. Damage detection of structures with detrended fluctuation and detrended cross-correlation analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Kang; Fajri, Haikal

    2017-03-01

    Recently, fractal analysis has shown its potential for damage detection and assessment in fields such as biomedical and mechanical engineering. For its practicability in interpreting irregular, complex, and disordered phenomena, a structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) is proposed. First, damage conditions can be swiftly detected by evaluating ambient vibration signals measured from a structure through DFA. Damage locations can then be determined by analyzing the cross correlation of signals of different floors by applying DCCA. A damage index is also proposed based on multi-scale DCCA curves to improve the damage location accuracy. To verify the performance of the proposed SHM system, a four-story numerical model was used to simulate various damage conditions with different noise levels. Furthermore, an experimental verification was conducted on a seven-story benchmark structure to assess the potential damage. The results revealed that the DFA method could detect the damage conditions satisfactorily, and damage locations can be identified through the DCCA method with an accuracy of 75%. Moreover, damage locations can be correctly assessed by the damage index method with an improved accuracy of 87.5%. The proposed SHM system has promising application in practical implementations.

  18. Damage diagnosis algorithm using a sequential change point detection method with an unknown distribution for damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Hae Young; Rajagopal, Ram; Kiremidjian, Anne S.

    2012-04-01

    This paper introduces a damage diagnosis algorithm for civil structures that uses a sequential change point detection method for the cases where the post-damage feature distribution is unknown a priori. This algorithm extracts features from structural vibration data using time-series analysis and then declares damage using the change point detection method. The change point detection method asymptotically minimizes detection delay for a given false alarm rate. The conventional method uses the known pre- and post-damage feature distributions to perform a sequential hypothesis test. In practice, however, the post-damage distribution is unlikely to be known a priori. Therefore, our algorithm estimates and updates this distribution as data are collected using the maximum likelihood and the Bayesian methods. We also applied an approximate method to reduce the computation load and memory requirement associated with the estimation. The algorithm is validated using multiple sets of simulated data and a set of experimental data collected from a four-story steel special moment-resisting frame. Our algorithm was able to estimate the post-damage distribution consistently and resulted in detection delays only a few seconds longer than the delays from the conventional method that assumes we know the post-damage feature distribution. We confirmed that the Bayesian method is particularly efficient in declaring damage with minimal memory requirement, but the maximum likelihood method provides an insightful heuristic approach.

  19. On damage detection in wind turbine gearboxes using outlier analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadou, Ifigeneia; Manson, Graeme; Dervilis, Nikolaos; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Worden, Keith

    2012-04-01

    The proportion of worldwide installed wind power in power systems increases over the years as a result of the steadily growing interest in renewable energy sources. Still, the advantages offered by the use of wind power are overshadowed by the high operational and maintenance costs, resulting in the low competitiveness of wind power in the energy market. In order to reduce the costs of corrective maintenance, the application of condition monitoring to gearboxes becomes highly important, since gearboxes are among the wind turbine components with the most frequent failure observations. While condition monitoring of gearboxes in general is common practice, with various methods having been developed over the last few decades, wind turbine gearbox condition monitoring faces a major challenge: the detection of faults under the time-varying load conditions prevailing in wind turbine systems. Classical time and frequency domain methods fail to detect faults under variable load conditions, due to the temporary effect that these faults have on vibration signals. This paper uses the statistical discipline of outlier analysis for the damage detection of gearbox tooth faults. A simplified two-degree-of-freedom gearbox model considering nonlinear backlash, time-periodic mesh stiffness and static transmission error, simulates the vibration signals to be analysed. Local stiffness reduction is used for the simulation of tooth faults and statistical processes determine the existence of intermittencies. The lowest level of fault detection, the threshold value, is considered and the Mahalanobis squared-distance is calculated for the novelty detection problem.

  20. Oxidative base damage in RNA detected by reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Y; Valentine, M R; Termini, J

    1995-01-01

    Oxidative base damage in DNA and metabolic defects in the recognition and removal of such damage play important roles in mutagenesis and human disease. The extent to which cellular RNA is a substrate for oxidative damage and the possible biological consequences of RNA base oxidation, however, remain largely unexplored. Since oxidatively modified RNA may contribute to the high mutability of retroviral genomic DNA, we have been interested in developing methods for the sequence specific detection of such damage. We show here that a primer extension assay using AMV reverse transcriptase (RT) can be used to reveal oxidatively damaged sites in RNA. This finding extends the currently known range of RNA modifications detectable with AMV reverse transcriptase. Analogous assays using DNA polymerases to detect base damage in DNA substrates appear to be restricted to lesions at thymine. Oxidative base damage in the absence of any detectable chain breaks was produced by dye photosensitization of RNA. Six out of 20 dyes examined were capable of producing RT detectable lesions. RT stops were seen predominantly at purines, although many pyrimidine sites were also detected. Dye specific photofootprints revealed by RT analysis suggests differential dye binding to the RNA substrate. Some of the photoreactive dyes described here may have potential utility in RNA structural analysis, particularly in the identification of stem-loop regions in complex RNAs. Images PMID:7545285

  1. A Combat Battle Damage Assessor Expert System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Next, the requirements should receive just enough repair to allow for the battle damage assessor software it to be flown to a rear area for complete are...R’ D-Ai48 898 A COMBAT BATTLE DAMAGE ASSESSOR EXPERT SYSTEM(U) AIR 1/i FORCE WRIGHT AERONAUTICAL LABS WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB ON D E NELSON MAY 84 SBI...8217.c.sw-x -: "--..... . .. .-. :;.-...... .............. .. . .. . . .. . .. . . r74 IV A COMBAT BATTLE DAMAGE ASSESSOR EXPERT SYSTEM DAL E. NELSON

  2. Damage detection and health monitoring of operational structures

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.; Mayes, R.; Carne, T.; Reese, G.

    1994-09-01

    Initial damage detection/health monitoring experiments have been performed on three different operational structures: a fracture critical bridge, a composite wind turbine blade, and an aging aircraft. An induced damage test was performed on the Rio Grande/I40 bridge before its demolition. The composite wind turbine test was fatgued to failure with periodic modal testing performed throughout the testing. The front fuselage of a DC-9 aircraft was used as the testbed for an induced damage test. These tests have yielded important insights into techniques for experimental damage detection on real structures. Additionally, the data are currently being used with current damage detection algorithms to further develop the numerical technology. State of the art testing technologies such as, high density modal testing, scanning laser vibrometry and natural excitation testing have also been utilized for these tests.

  3. Vibration characteristics and damage detection in a suspension bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Wasanthi R.; Thambiratnam, David P.; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Nguyen, Theanh

    2016-08-01

    Suspension bridges are flexible and vibration sensitive structures that exhibit complex and multi-modal vibration. Due to this, the usual vibration based methods could face a challenge when used for damage detection in these structures. This paper develops and applies a mode shape component specific damage index (DI) to detect and locate damage in a suspension bridge with pre-tensioned cables. This is important as suspension bridges are large structures and damage in them during their long service lives could easily go un-noticed. The capability of the proposed vibration based DI is demonstrated through its application to detect and locate single and multiple damages with varied locations and severity in the cables of the suspension bridge. The outcome of this research will enhance the safety and performance of these bridges which play an important role in the transport network.

  4. Structural Damage Detection Using Slopes of Longitudinal Vibration Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Zhu, W. D.; Smith, S. A.; Cao, M. S.

    2016-03-18

    While structural damage detection based on flexural vibration shapes, such as mode shapes and steady-state response shapes under harmonic excitation, has been well developed, little attention is paid to that based on longitudinal vibration shapes that also contain damage information. This study originally formulates a slope vibration shape for damage detection in bars using longitudinal vibration shapes. To enhance noise robustness of the method, a slope vibration shape is transformed to a multiscale slope vibration shape in a multiscale domain using wavelet transform, which has explicit physical implication, high damage sensitivity, and noise robustness. These advantages are demonstrated in numerical cases of damaged bars, and results show that multiscale slope vibration shapes can be used for identifying and locating damage in a noisy environment. A three-dimensional (3D) scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the longitudinal steady-state response shape of an aluminum bar with damage due to reduced cross-sectional dimensions under harmonic excitation, and results show that the method can successfully identify and locate the damage. Slopes of longitudinal vibration shapes are shown to be suitable for damage detection in bars and have potential for applications in noisy environments.

  5. Structural Damage Detection Using Slopes of Longitudinal Vibration Shapes

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, W.; Zhu, W. D.; Smith, S. A.; ...

    2016-03-18

    While structural damage detection based on flexural vibration shapes, such as mode shapes and steady-state response shapes under harmonic excitation, has been well developed, little attention is paid to that based on longitudinal vibration shapes that also contain damage information. This study originally formulates a slope vibration shape for damage detection in bars using longitudinal vibration shapes. To enhance noise robustness of the method, a slope vibration shape is transformed to a multiscale slope vibration shape in a multiscale domain using wavelet transform, which has explicit physical implication, high damage sensitivity, and noise robustness. These advantages are demonstrated in numericalmore » cases of damaged bars, and results show that multiscale slope vibration shapes can be used for identifying and locating damage in a noisy environment. A three-dimensional (3D) scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the longitudinal steady-state response shape of an aluminum bar with damage due to reduced cross-sectional dimensions under harmonic excitation, and results show that the method can successfully identify and locate the damage. Slopes of longitudinal vibration shapes are shown to be suitable for damage detection in bars and have potential for applications in noisy environments.« less

  6. Numerical simulation of damage detection using laser-generated ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peipei; Nazirah, Ab Wahab; Sohn, Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Laser ultrasonic techniques have been widely investigated due to its high spatial resolution and capacity for remote and noncontact measurement. In this study, the laser induced ultrasonic wave on an aluminum plate is simulated, and a nonlinear feature is used to detect a micro crack introduced in the plate model. A multi-physics simulation is conducted and optimized considering the effect of thermal diffusion. A nonlinear feature, called Bhattacharyya Distance (BD), is calculated to show the crack-induced geometric difference among the state space attractors obtained from closely spaced measurement points near the crack. First, a 3D model is built, and its simulation result is compared with an experiment performed using a noncontact laser ultrasonic measurement system. Then, by creating a micro crack in the model, BD is extracted and the crack is successfully detected and visualized. Finally, the effects of BD parameters, such as embedding dimension and frequency band, on damage visualization are investigated.

  7. Large amplitude vibrations and damage detection of rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoach, Emil; Trendafilova, Irina

    2008-08-01

    In this work, geometrically nonlinear vibrations of fully clamped rectangular plates are used to study the sensitivity of some nonlinear vibration response parameters to the presence of damage. The geometrically nonlinear version of the Mindlin plate theory is used to model the plate behaviour. Damage is represented as a stiffness reduction in a small area of the plate. The plate is subjected to harmonic loading with a frequency of excitation close to the first natural frequency leading to large amplitude vibrations. The plate vibration response is obtained by a pseudo-load mode superposition method. The main results are focussed on establishing the influence of damage on the vibration response of the plate and the change in the time-history diagrams and the Poincaré maps caused by the damage. Finally, a criterion and a damage index for detecting the presence and the location of the damage is proposed. The criterion is based on analysing the points in the Poincaré sections of the damaged and healthy plate. Numerical results for large amplitude vibrations of damaged and healthy rectangular and square plates are presented and the proposed damage index for the considered cases is calculated. The criterion demonstrates quite good abilities to detect and localize damage.

  8. Detection and assessment of damage in 2D structures using measured modal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banan, Mohammad Reza; Mehdi-pour, Yousef

    2007-10-01

    Motivated by one of the concepts in the field of health monitoring for structural systems, a damage detection procedure is developed. In order to perform the system health monitoring, structural health along with sensor and actuator malfunction must be continuously checked. As a step toward developing a system health-monitoring scheme, this paper investigated structural damage detection, using a constrained eigenstructure assignment. The proposed damage detection method is constructed based on a concept of control theory and subspace rotation for two-dimensional (2D)-structural systems. To demonstrate the capabilities of the developed damage detection algorithm, the behavior of a simulated degraded braced-frame structure is studied. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the performance of the approach is evaluated. It shows that the proposed algorithm is potentially promising for application to real cases.

  9. Airframe structural damage detection: a non-linear structural surface intensity based technique.

    PubMed

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Conlon, Stephen C; Barnard, Andrew R

    2011-04-01

    The non-linear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection technique is extended to airframe applications. The selected test structure is an upper cabin airframe section from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter (Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford, CT). Structural damage is simulated through an impact resonator device, designed to simulate the induced vibration effects typical of non-linear behaving damage. An experimental study is conducted to prove the applicability of NSSI on complex mechanical systems as well as to evaluate the minimum sensor and actuator requirements. The NSSI technique is shown to have high damage detection sensitivity, covering an extended substructure with a single sensing location.

  10. Automatic Damage Detection for Sensitive Cultural Heritage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerra, D.; Tian, J.; Lysandrou, V.; Plank, S.

    2016-06-01

    The intentional damages to local Cultural Heritage sites carried out in recent months by the Islamic State (IS) have received wide coverage from the media worldwide. Earth Observation data is an important tool to assess these damages in such non-accessible areas: If a fast response is desired, automated image processing techniques would be needed to speed up the analysis. This paper shows the first results of applying fast and robust change detection techniques to sensitive areas. A map highlighting potentially damaged buildings is derived, which could help experts at timely assessing the damages to the Cultural Heritage sites in the observed images.

  11. Structural damage identification using multifunctional Bragg grating sensors: II. Damage detection results and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Daniel C.; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian

    2006-10-01

    Damage detection is an important issue in structural health monitoring. Lamb waves are the most widely used acousto-ultrasonic guided waves for damage detection. This paper gives the results of experiments carried out to study the identification of damage using Bragg grating sensors as ultrasonic receivers of Lamb waves. The experiments involve a rectangular aluminium plate. Damage was introduced into the plate by drilling a hole into the centre of the plate. In order to obtain different severity of damage, the hole diameter was increased step by step. Several signal processing tools are presented and then applied to the Lamb wave signals in order to find a parameter that corresponds to the severity of damage. The parameter that serves as the damage index has to have small cross-sensitivity to other physical parameters, e.g. temperature. Therefore, additional experiments have been carried out to study the temperature dependence of the Lamb wave signals. In order to determine the influence of the temperature on the damage detection results, the cross-sensitivity is studied within this paper.

  12. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR HARMONIC SENSORS FOR DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred E. Crouch; Alan Dean; Carl Torres; Jeff Aron

    2004-03-01

    In a joint effort with Tuboscope Pipeline Services of Houston, Texas, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) adapted its nonlinear harmonic (NLH) sensing technology for use on a new in-line inspection system (smart pig). Nonlinear harmonics, an AC magnetic method for detecting local anomalies of stress and plastic deformation, shows promise of improved characterization of mechanical damage defects such as gouged dents, even though the dents may have re-rounded. The SwRI-Tuboscope project produced a sensor design, electronic design, and sensor suspension design that are directly adaptable to a multitechnology ILI system. This report describes the NLH method, the sensor, circuit, and suspension designs, and shows results from the supporting laboratory work.

  14. Detection of moisture damage in buildings using thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyberg, Mats D.; Mattsson, Mats; Sundberg, Jorgen

    1990-03-01

    The verification of moisture in building envelopes has traditionally been carried out by testing procedures where one quantitatively determines the moisture content of the building component. Most methods have the drawback that it may take several days before the result is known. For some materials, these methods are also destructive testing procedures. Here is presented a qulitative testing procedure using thermographic methods. In buildings subjected to moisture damage, inspections have been carried out using JR-techniques. It has been investigated whether moisture damages can be detected from the interior as well as from the exterior of the buildings, whether previously verified moisture damages can be detected, whether JR-techniques can locate moisture damages other than those already detected, whether the extension of the damage can be estimated by JR-techniques, and to what extent the thermal image can explain the cause of a damage. Also, a cost comparison has been made, and operational conditions have been compared. It is concluded that JR-techniques provide an efficient way of detecting, verifying and evaluating moisture damages at a low cost.

  15. Structural Damage Detection Using Changes in Natural Frequencies: Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, K.; Zhu, W. D.

    2011-07-01

    A vibration-based method that uses changes in natural frequencies of a structure to detect damage has advantages over conventional nondestructive tests in detecting various types of damage, including loosening of bolted joints, using minimum measurement data. Two major challenges associated with applications of the vibration-based damage detection method to engineering structures are addressed: accurate modeling of structures and the development of a robust inverse algorithm to detect damage, which are defined as the forward and inverse problems, respectively. To resolve the forward problem, new physics-based finite element modeling techniques are developed for fillets in thin-walled beams and for bolted joints, so that complex structures can be accurately modeled with a reasonable model size. To resolve the inverse problem, a logistical function transformation is introduced to convert the constrained optimization problem to an unconstrained one, and a robust iterative algorithm using a trust-region method, called the Levenberg-Marquardt method, is developed to accurately detect the locations and extent of damage. The new methodology can ensure global convergence of the iterative algorithm in solving under-determined system equations and deal with damage detection problems with relatively large modeling error and measurement noise. The vibration-based damage detection method is applied to various structures including lightning masts, a space frame structure and one of its components, and a pipeline. The exact locations and extent of damage can be detected in the numerical simulation where there is no modeling error and measurement noise. The locations and extent of damage can be successfully detected in experimental damage detection.

  16. Glycol leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, Paul; Browne, Keith; Brink, Janus; Coetzee, Christiaan J.

    2016-07-01

    MonoEthylene glycol coolant is used extensively on the Southern African Large Telescope to cool components inside the telescope chamber. To prevent coolant leaks from causing serious damage to electronics and optics, a Glycol Leak Detection System was designed to automatically shut off valves in affected areas. After two years of research and development the use of leaf wetness sensors proved to work best and is currently operational. These sensors are placed at various critical points within the instrument payload that would trigger the leak detector controller, which closes the valves, and alerts the building management system. In this paper we describe the research of an initial concept and the final accepted implementation and the test results thereof.

  17. FRF-based structural damage detection of controlled buildings with podium structures: Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Huang, Q.; Zhan, S.; Su, Z. Q.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    How to use control devices to enhance system identification and damage detection in relation to a structure that requires both vibration control and structural health monitoring is an interesting yet practical topic. In this study, the possibility of using the added stiffness provided by control devices and frequency response functions (FRFs) to detect damage in a building complex was explored experimentally. Scale models of a 12-storey main building and a 3-storey podium structure were built to represent a building complex. Given that the connection between the main building and the podium structure is most susceptible to damage, damage to the building complex was experimentally simulated by changing the connection stiffness. To simulate the added stiffness provided by a semi-active friction damper, a steel circular ring was designed and used to add the related stiffness to the building complex. By varying the connection stiffness using an eccentric wheel excitation system and by adding or not adding the circular ring, eight cases were investigated and eight sets of FRFs were measured. The experimental results were used to detect damage (changes in connection stiffness) using a recently proposed FRF-based damage detection method. The experimental results showed that the FRF-based damage detection method could satisfactorily locate and quantify damage.

  18. Damage detection using modal frequency curve and squared residual wavelet coefficients-based damage indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen; Oyadiji, S. Olutunde

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the frequency-based damage detection method has been presented in this paper. Based on the eigenvalue problem and perturbation assumption of defect in modal response, the theoretical basis of the modal frequency curve method is established. The extraction of defect characteristics from the modal frequency curve via discrete wavelet transform is illustrated. The above background leads to the development of a new multiple-mode damage indicator for damage localisation and a damage estimator for size prediction. Then, the proposed method has been applied to aluminium samples with pre-defined damage sections. Finite element modelling and experimental testing results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the method. Additionally, detectability with respect to the various mass ratios is investigated to support the ability of the method in real applications. The numerical and experimental results suggest that the use of the damage indicator provides a more robust and unambiguous damage identification than the sole use of the wavelet coefficients of the modes investigated. In addition, the damage estimator predicts the defect size to a satisfactory level.

  19. Acoustic Emission Detection of Impact Damage on Space Shuttle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia as a result of impact damage from foam debris during ascent has led NASA to investigate the feasibility of on-board impact detection technologies. AE sensing has been utilized to monitor a wide variety of impact conditions on Space Shuttle components ranging from insulating foam and ablator materials, and ice at ascent velocities to simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. Impact testing has been performed on both reinforced carbon composite leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. Results of these impact tests will be presented with a focus on the acoustic emission sensor responses to these impact conditions. These tests have demonstrated the potential of employing an on-board Shuttle impact detection system. We will describe the present plans for implementation of an initial, very low frequency acoustic impact sensing system using pre-existing flight qualified hardware. The details of an accompanying flight measurement system to assess the Shuttle s acoustic background noise environment as a function of frequency will be described. The background noise assessment is being performed to optimize the frequency range of sensing for a planned future upgrade to the initial impact sensing system.

  20. Damage detection tests of five-story steel frame with simulated damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Koichi; Teshigawara, Masaomi; Isoda, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Takuji; Mita, Akira

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents damage detection tests of five-story steel frame with simulated damages. We discuss pre-analytical study and results of experiments. Fiber brag grating (FBG) sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges and laser displacement meters are installed in this test frame. We assume damages by removing studs from only one story, loosening bolts of beams, cutting part of beams and extracting braces from only one story. From the results of pre-analytical study, we can estimate which story is damaged from the change of natural period and mode shape to some extent. We applied flexibility method which is one of a damage identification methods using modal properties. We also apply flexibility method to results of experiments. In some cases we can estimate which story is damaged, and in other cases we cannot. We also applied a method using multiple natural frequency shifts. Making use of the change in five natural frequencies due to damage, the location of damaged stories can be pinpointed. In both methods, we cannot identify damaged story in some cases. Some methods other than methods using modal properties have to be tried to apply in such cases.

  1. Impact damage detection in filament wound tubes utilizing embedded optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Anthony R.; Hayes, Simon A.; Fernando, Gerard F.; Hale, Ken F.

    1995-04-01

    Filament wound tubes are currently being used extensively in service because of their superior specific properties and the relatively simple manufacturing technique involved in their properties. However, the reinforcing fibers can suffer from low velocity impact damage (approximately 10 ms-1) during service. Such damage can result in poor post- impact properties which in certain applications can reduce the burst strength below safe working levels. This paper discusses the use of optical fiber sensors, embedded during the filament winding process, to provide information on specified levels of impact damage incurred by the tube during service. The sensors being developed use silica based optical fibers in composites made from E-glass reinforcing fibers and high temperature cure epoxy resins. Various methods of damage detection are being evaluated to select the optimum sensor arrangement. These systems detect changes in the transmission characteristics of the optical fiber. The objective being to produce a working damage detection system which provides sensitive, cheap, accurate and reliable information about the levels of impact damage sustained by the tube. This paper presents initial results from the impact damage detection systems being evaluated for use in filament wound tubes. Issues relating to chemical compatibility between optical fiber sensors and the epoxy resin system were also investigated as part of this study. These results aid selection of the correct optical fiber properties to achieve reliable and sensitive systems. The advantages of using a new profile sensor compared to an optical fiber are also discussed.

  2. Detection and damage assessment of citrus tree losses with aerial color infrared photography /ACIR/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blazquez, C. H.; Horn, F. W., Jr.; Edwards, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Detection and disease damage assessment of citrus tree losses in a Florida citrus grove were made by establishing a registration (grove site location) coordinate system, developing a damage assessment system, and testing sequential aerial color infrared (ACIR) photography at the scale of 1 in. = 333 ft (2.5 cm = 100 m) during the winter, spring, and summer seasons of 1978 and spring of 1979. Spring photography was the easiest to photo interpret, showed the greatest differences between healthy and diseased trees, and had the least shadow and background interference for photo interpretation. Trees showing slight disease damage were detected in ACIR before they were found in ground surveys.

  3. Information-theoretical noninvasive damage detection in bridge structures.

    PubMed

    Sudu Ambegedara, Amila; Sun, Jie; Janoyan, Kerop; Bollt, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Damage detection of mechanical structures such as bridges is an important research problem in civil engineering. Using spatially distributed sensor time series data collected from a recent experiment on a local bridge in Upper State New York, we study noninvasive damage detection using information-theoretical methods. Several findings are in order. First, the time series data, which represent accelerations measured at the sensors, more closely follow Laplace distribution than normal distribution, allowing us to develop parameter estimators for various information-theoretic measures such as entropy and mutual information. Second, as damage is introduced by the removal of bolts of the first diaphragm connection, the interaction between spatially nearby sensors as measured by mutual information becomes weaker, suggesting that the bridge is "loosened." Finally, using a proposed optimal mutual information interaction procedure to prune away indirect interactions, we found that the primary direction of interaction or influence aligns with the traffic direction on the bridge even after damaging the bridge.

  4. Information-theoretical noninvasive damage detection in bridge structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudu Ambegedara, Amila; Sun, Jie; Janoyan, Kerop; Bollt, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Damage detection of mechanical structures such as bridges is an important research problem in civil engineering. Using spatially distributed sensor time series data collected from a recent experiment on a local bridge in Upper State New York, we study noninvasive damage detection using information-theoretical methods. Several findings are in order. First, the time series data, which represent accelerations measured at the sensors, more closely follow Laplace distribution than normal distribution, allowing us to develop parameter estimators for various information-theoretic measures such as entropy and mutual information. Second, as damage is introduced by the removal of bolts of the first diaphragm connection, the interaction between spatially nearby sensors as measured by mutual information becomes weaker, suggesting that the bridge is "loosened." Finally, using a proposed optimal mutual information interaction procedure to prune away indirect interactions, we found that the primary direction of interaction or influence aligns with the traffic direction on the bridge even after damaging the bridge.

  5. Detecting damage in steel with scanning SQUID microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Clatterbuck, David; Morris Jr., J.W.; Shaw, T.J.; McDermott R.; Clarke, John

    2001-09-04

    A ''Holy Grail'' of NDE research is a non-destructive method for measuring fatigue damage prior to crack initiation. High-Tc scanning SQUID microscopy may be a useful tool. Because of the exceptional magnetic sensitivity of this technique, fatigue damage can be detected well before microcrack initiation, and in the absence of other obvious microstructure or property changes. Given the spatial resolution of the technique, undamaged material can be located and used to set internal standards.

  6. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that a multidisciplinary nondestructive evaluation approach for impact damage detection in composite structures can be used to produce a more efficient inspection. The multidisciplinary NDE approach relies on fast large area thermographic inspections along with detailed ultrasonic volumetric imaging. The thermal inspection technique rapidly identifies the impact damage. The ultrasonic volumetric imaging quantifies the impact generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  7. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Farley, Gary; Smith, Barry T.

    1991-01-01

    NDE results from thermographic and volumetric ultrasonic techniques are presented to illustrate the multidisciplinary NDE approach to impact-damage detection in such composite structures as are increasingly prevalent in helicopters. Attention is given to both flat-panel and 'y-stiffened' panel specimens; these were fabricated either with kevlar or carbon fiber through-the-thickness reinforcements. While thermal inspection identifies impact damage, volumetric imaging quantifies the impact-generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  8. Synthesized Synchronous Sampling Technique for Bearing Damage Detection Preprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    signature becomes one of the most reliable technique for bearing and gear incipient fault detection. On the bearing damage modeling side, one of...consequent analyzer is low, the resonant response signals are down in the noise level. The key to detecting bearing faults is to capture the low...A review of rolling Element Bearing Vibration Detection, Diagnosis and Prognosis,” DSTO-RR- 0013, DSTO Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory

  9. Optimization of control laws for damage detection in smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Laura R.; Marini, Solomon

    2000-06-01

    A prevalent method of damage detection is based on identifying changes in modal characteristics due to damage induced variations in stiffness or mass along a structure. It is known that modal frequencies can be insensitive to damage, and the open-loop sensitivity itself depends on modal properties and damage location. Here, we develop methods of designing control laws that enhance the sensitivity of modal characteristics to damage. Sensitivity enhancing control exploits the relationship between control gains and closed-loop dynamics in order to increase the observability of damage. The design methods are based on optimization of cost functions that involve the dependence of classic measures of sensitivity on design variables, which include placement of sensors and actuators and state feedback control gains. Due to the size of the design space and the unknown nature of the cost surface, genetic algorithms are used to find control laws that maximize sensitivity to specific damage types subject to control effort and stability constraints. Optimized control laws designed for sensitivity enhancement of stiffness damage in a cantilevered beam are demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  10. Optical components damage parameters database system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Jin, Yuquan; Xie, Dongmei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    Optical component is the key to large-scale laser device developed by one of its load capacity is directly related to the device output capacity indicators, load capacity depends on many factors. Through the optical components will damage parameters database load capacity factors of various digital, information technology, for the load capacity of optical components to provide a scientific basis for data support; use of business processes and model-driven approach, the establishment of component damage parameter information model and database systems, system application results that meet the injury test optical components business processes and data management requirements of damage parameters, component parameters of flexible, configurable system is simple, easy to use, improve the efficiency of the optical component damage test.

  11. Damage Detection of Structures Identified with Deterministic-Stochastic Models Using Seismic Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Chih; Wang, Yen-Po; Chang, Ming-Lian

    2014-01-01

    A deterministic-stochastic subspace identification method is adopted and experimentally verified in this study to identify the equivalent single-input-multiple-output system parameters of the discrete-time state equation. The method of damage locating vector (DLV) is then considered for damage detection. A series of shaking table tests using a five-storey steel frame has been conducted. Both single and multiple damage conditions at various locations have been considered. In the system identification analysis, either full or partial observation conditions have been taken into account. It has been shown that the damaged stories can be identified from global responses of the structure to earthquakes if sufficiently observed. In addition to detecting damage(s) with respect to the intact structure, identification of new or extended damages of the as-damaged counterpart has also been studied. This study gives further insights into the scheme in terms of effectiveness, robustness, and limitation for damage localization of frame systems. PMID:25165749

  12. Structure damage detection based on random forest recursive feature elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qifeng; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Qingqing; Yang, Fan; Luo, Linkai

    2014-05-01

    Feature extraction is a key former step in structural damage detection. In this paper, a structural damage detection method based on wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) and random forest recursive feature elimination (RF-RFE) is proposed. In order to gain the most effective feature subset and to improve the identification accuracy a two-stage feature selection method is adopted after WPD. First, the damage features are sorted according to original random forest variable importance analysis. Second, using RF-RFE to eliminate the least important feature and reorder the feature list each time, then get the new feature importance sequence. Finally, k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm, as a benchmark classifier, is used to evaluate the extracted feature subset. A four-storey steel shear building model is chosen as an example in method verification. The experimental results show that using the fewer features got from proposed method can achieve higher identification accuracy and reduce the detection time cost.

  13. Damage Detection Response Characteristics of Open Circuit Resonant (SansEC) Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L.; Szatkowski, George N.; Smith, Laura J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Wang, Chuantong; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The capability to assess the current or future state of the health of an aircraft to improve safety, availability, and reliability while reducing maintenance costs has been a continuous goal for decades. Many companies, commercial entities, and academic institutions have become interested in Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) and a growing effort of research into "smart" vehicle sensing systems has emerged. Methods to detect damage to aircraft materials and structures have historically relied on visual inspection during pre-flight or post-flight operations by flight and ground crews. More quantitative non-destructive investigations with various instruments and sensors have traditionally been performed when the aircraft is out of operational service during major scheduled maintenance. Through the use of reliable sensors coupled with data monitoring, data mining, and data analysis techniques, the health state of a vehicle can be detected in-situ. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is developing a composite aircraft skin damage detection method and system based on open circuit SansEC (Sans Electric Connection) sensor technology. Composite materials are increasingly used in modern aircraft for reducing weight, improving fuel efficiency, and enhancing the overall design, performance, and manufacturability of airborne vehicles. Materials such as fiberglass reinforced composites (FRC) and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) are being used to great advantage in airframes, wings, engine nacelles, turbine blades, fairings, fuselage structures, empennage structures, control surfaces and aircraft skins. SansEC sensor technology is a new technical framework for designing, powering, and interrogating sensors to detect various types of damage in composite materials. The source cause of the in-service damage (lightning strike, impact damage, material fatigue, etc.) to the aircraft composite is not relevant. The sensor will detect damage independent of the cause

  14. Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis for bladed wheels damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, P.; Peeters, B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bladed wheels and the fluid distributed by the stator vanes results in cyclic loading of the rotating components. Compressors and turbines wheels are subject to vibration and fatigue issues, especially when resonance conditions are excited. Even if resonance conditions can be often predicted and avoided, high cycle fatigue failures can occur, causing safety issues and economic loss. Rigorous maintenance programs are then needed, forcing the system to expensive shut-down. Blade crack detection methods are beneficial for condition-based maintenance. While contact measurement systems are not always usable in exercise conditions (e.g. high temperature), non-contact methods can be more suitable. One (or more) stator-fixed sensor can measure all the blades as they pass by, in order to detect the damaged ones. The main drawback in this situation is the short acquisition time available for each blade, which is shortened by the high rotational speed of the components. A traditional Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) analysis would result in a poor frequency resolution. A Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis (NHFA) can be executed with an arbitrary frequency resolution instead, allowing to obtain frequency information even with short-time data samples. This paper shows an analytical investigation of the NHFA method. A data processing algorithm is then proposed to obtain frequency shift information from short time samples. The performances of this algorithm are then studied by experimental and numerical tests.

  15. Integrated impedance and guided wave based damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Recently, impedance and guided wave based damage detection techniques have been widely used for structural health monitoring (SHM) and Nondestructive testing (NDT) due to their sensitivity to small structural changes. Each of these techniques has its own technical merits, making them complementary to each other. For example, the guided wave technique typically has a larger sensing range than the impedance technique while the latter has better applicability to more complex structures. In this study, a new damage detection technique, which is named as integrated impedance and guided wave (IIG) based damage detection, is developed by utilizing impedance and guided wave signals simultaneously obtained from surface-mounted piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) to enhance the performance and reliability of damage diagnosis especially under varying temperature conditions. The proposed IIG technique first divides the measured impedance signal into two parts: passive impedance only sensitive to temperature variation and active impedance closely related to the mechanical property of the host structure. Then, the temperature effects on the active impedance and guided wave signals are minimized using the passive impedance. Finally, improved damage diagnosis is performed using both impedance and guided wave signals. The applicability of the proposed IIG technique to the detection of (1) bolt loosening in a steel lap joint, (2) a notch in an aluminum specimen with a complex geometry and (3) delamination in a composite wing mock-up specimen with stringers is experimentally investigated under varying temperatures.

  16. Detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity identifies neuronal integrity in damaged rat central nervous system after application of bacterial melanin

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Tigran R.; Ter-Markosyan, Anna S.; Hovsepyan, Anna S.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to confirm the neuroregenerative effects of bacterial melanin (BM) on central nervous system injury using a special staining method based on the detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to undergo either unilateral destruction of sensorimotor cortex (group I; n = 12) or unilateral rubrospinal tract transection at the cervical level (C3–4) (group II; n = 12). In each group, six rats were randomly selected after surgery to undergo intramuscular injection of BM solution (BM subgroup) and the remaining six rats were intramuscularly injected with saline (saline subgroup). Neurological testing confirmed that BM accelerated the recovery of motor function in rats from both BM and saline subgroups. Two months after surgery, Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity detection in combination with Chilingarian’s calcium adenoside triphosphate method revealed that BM stimulated the sprouting of fibers and dilated the capillaries in the brain and spinal cord. These results suggest that BM can promote the recovery of motor function of rats with central nervous system injury; and detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity is a fast and easy method used to study the regeneration-promoting effects of BM on the injured central nervous system. PMID:27630700

  17. ASR damage detection in concrete from ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peng; Patton, Mark E.; Greve, David W.; Harley, Joel B.; Junker, Warren R.; Liu, Chang; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2014-03-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a chemical reaction that can occur between alkaline components in cement paste and reactive forms of silica in susceptible aggregates when sufficient moisture is present. The ASR product, known as ASR gel, can cause expansion and cracking that damages the structure. We pass ultrasonic signals through concrete laboratory specimens and use three different ultrasonic methods to detect the onset of ASR damage, or the presence of ASR damage while still at the microscale. Our test specimens are fabricated with aggregate known to be reactive and are then exposed to an aggressive environment to accelerate ASR development. We use swept-sine excitations and obtain pitch-catch records from specimens that have been exposed to the accelerated environment. From this data, we demonstrate an ultrasonic passband method shows high frequency components diminish faster than low frequency components, and therefore the ultrasonic passband shifts to the low frequency side due to ASR damage. The test results also show that the ultrasonic passband is logically related to specimen size. We also demonstrate a stretching factor method is able to track the progress of ASR damage in concrete very well. These methods are shown to be more reliable than attenuation spectrum or attenuation methods that do not detect the ASR damage in concrete at early stages.

  18. Nonlinear damage detection in composite structures using bispectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Pickering, Simon; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Literature offers a quantitative number of diagnostic methods that can continuously provide detailed information of the material defects and damages in aerospace and civil engineering applications. Indeed, low velocity impact damages can considerably degrade the integrity of structural components and, if not detected, they can result in catastrophic failure conditions. This paper presents a nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) method, based on ultrasonic guided waves (GW), for the detection of the nonlinear signature in a damaged composite structure. The proposed technique, based on a bispectral analysis of ultrasonic input waveforms, allows for the evaluation of the nonlinear response due to the presence of cracks and delaminations. Indeed, such a methodology was used to characterize the nonlinear behaviour of the structure, by exploiting the frequency mixing of the original waveform acquired from a sparse array of sensors. The robustness of bispectral analysis was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged carbon fibre reinforce plastic (CFRP) composite panel, and the nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy. Unlike other linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods for damage detection, this methodology does not require any baseline with the undamaged structure for the evaluation of the nonlinear source, nor a priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Moreover, bispectral analysis can be considered as a nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) technique for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  19. Lightning detection network averts damage and speeds restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, R.; Samm, R.; Cummins, K.; Pyle, R.; Tuel, J.

    1996-04-01

    This article describes new tools to track thunderstorms for advance warning, enabling utilities to reduce damage and shorten repair time. Based on an extensive survey of US power utilities, lightning is the single largest cause of outages on distribution and transmission systems in lightning prone areas. But now with the aid of a network of electromagnetic sensors, computer systems, and satellite communications, the National Lightning Detection Network{trademark} (NLDN) helps utilities prepare for storms. Utilities in the path of intense lightning storms can prepare for storms, alert repair crews, and arrange for help from neighboring utilities. Real-time lightning data has been shown to reduce maintenance costs by shortening the thunder-storm-watch period and to improve reliability by allowing prepositioning of repair crews. Also, using line failure history, designers can analyze the lightning and line historical data and prioritize line upgrades to protect them from future storms by employing additional protection. Documented evidence available from the NLDN system helps utilities prove the time and location of lightning strikes, quickly resolving insurance claims. This network is a product of two EPRI research projects (RP3669 and RP2741).

  20. Signal processing for damage detection using two different array transducers.

    PubMed

    El Youbi, F; Grondel, S; Assaad, J

    2004-04-01

    This work describes an investigation into the development of a new health monitoring system for aeronautical applications. The health monitoring system is based on the emission and reception of Lamb waves by multi-element piezoelectric transducers (i.e., arrays) bonded to the structure. The emitter array consists of three different elementary bar transducers. These transducers have the same thickness and length but different widths. The receiver array has 32 same elements. This system offers the possibility to understand the nature of the generated waves and to determine the sensitivity of each mode to possible damage. It presents two principal advantages: Firstly, by exciting all elements in phase, it is possible to generate several Lamb modes in the same time. Secondly, the two-dimensional fourier transform (2D-FT) of the received signal can be easily computed. Experimental results concerning an aluminum plate with different hole sizes will be shown. The A0-, S0-, A1-, S1- and S2-modes are generated at the same time. This study shows that the A0 mode seems particularly interesting to detect flaws of this geometrical type.

  1. Detecting Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90 deg fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  2. Detecting Damage Using Electric Field Measurements: A Computational Sensitivity Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-06

    on a range or in the Physical Scale Model ( PSM ) environment, the smallest area of damage that is detectable would depend upon measurement...sensitivities or errors along with the ability to physically create small pieces of bare metal on the PSM model. Figure 6-4. Comparison of calculated

  3. Portable modular detection system

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, James S.; Singh, Anup; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Stamps, James F.

    2009-10-13

    Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

  4. Gas Flow Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, Thomas; Ihlefeld, Curtis; Slack, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This system provides a portable means to detect gas flow through a thin-walled tube without breaking into the tubing system. The flow detection system was specifically designed to detect flow through two parallel branches of a manifold with only one inlet and outlet, and is a means for verifying a space shuttle program requirement that saves time and reduces the risk of flight hardware damage compared to the current means of requirement verification. The prototype Purge Vent and Drain Window Cavity Conditioning System (PVD WCCS) Flow Detection System consists of a heater and a temperature-sensing thermistor attached to a piece of Velcro to be attached to each branch of a WCCS manifold for the duration of the requirement verification test. The heaters and thermistors are connected to a shielded cable and then to an electronics enclosure, which contains the power supplies, relays, and circuit board to provide power, signal conditioning, and control. The electronics enclosure is then connected to a commercial data acquisition box to provide analog to digital conversion as well as digital control. This data acquisition box is then connected to a commercial laptop running a custom application created using National Instruments LabVIEW. The operation of the PVD WCCS Flow Detection System consists of first attaching a heater/thermistor assembly to each of the two branches of one manifold while there is no flow through the manifold. Next, the software application running on the laptop is used to turn on the heaters and to monitor the manifold branch temperatures. When the system has reached thermal equilibrium, the software application s graphical user interface (GUI) will indicate that the branch temperatures are stable. The operator can then physically open the flow control valve to initiate the test flow of gaseous nitrogen (GN2) through the manifold. Next, the software user interface will be monitored for stable temperature indications when the system is again at

  5. Damage detection in composite materials using Lamb wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark; Soutis, Constantinos

    2002-04-01

    Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for in situ damage detection of composite materials. Experimental results are presented for the application of Lamb wave techniques to quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy test specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and through-holes. Linear wave scans were performed on narrow laminated specimens and sandwich beams with various cores by monitoring the transmitted waves with piezoceramic sensors. Optimal actuator and sensor configurations were devised through experimentation, and various types of driving signal were explored. These experiments provided a procedure capable of easily and accurately determining the time of flight of a Lamb wave pulse between an actuator and sensor. Lamb wave techniques provide more information about damage presence and severity than previously tested methods (frequency response techniques), and provide the possibility of determining damage location due to their local response nature. These methods may prove suitable for structural health monitoring applications since they travel long distances and can be applied with conformable piezoelectric actuators and sensors that require little power.

  6. Detection of damage in welded structure using experimental modal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Husain, N.; Ouyang, H.

    2011-07-01

    A typical automotive structure could contain thousands of spot weld joints that contribute significantly to the vehicle's structural stiffness and dynamic characteristics. However, some of these joints may be imperfect or even absent during the manufacturing process and they are also highly susceptible to damage due to operational and environmental conditions during the vehicle lifetime. Therefore, early detection and estimation of damage are important so necessary actions can be taken to avoid further problems. Changes in physical parameters due to existence of damage in a structure often leads to alteration of vibration modes; thus demonstrating the dependency between the vibration characteristics and the physical properties of structures. A sensitivity-based model updating method, performed using a combination of MATLAB and NASTRAN, has been selected for the purpose of this work. The updating procedure is regarded as parameter identification which aims to bring the numerical prediction to be as closely as possible to the measured natural frequencies and mode shapes data of the damaged structure in order to identify the damage parameters (characterised by the reductions in the Young's modulus of the weld patches to indicate the loss of material/stiffness at the damage region).

  7. Structural Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for a large class of damage detection and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper starts with a brief review of PWAS physical principles and basic modelling and continues by considering the various ways in which PWAS can be used for damage detection: (a) embedded guided-wave ultrasonics, i.e., pitch-catch, pulse-echo, phased arrays, thickness mode; (b) high-frequency modal sensing, i.e., the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance method; (c) passive detection, i.e., acoustic emission and impact detection. An example of crack-like damage detection and localization with PWAS phased arrays on a small metallic plate is given. The modelling of PWAS detection of disbond damage in adhesive joints is achieved with the analytical transfer matrix method (TMM). The analytical methods offer the advantage of fast computation which enables parameter studies and carpet plots. A parametric study of the effect of crack size and PWAS location on disbond detection is presented. The power and energy transduction between PWAS and structure is studied analytically with a wave propagation method. Special attention is given to the mechatronics modeling of the complete transduction cycle from electrical excitation into ultrasonic acoustic waves by the piezoelectric effect, the transfer through the structure, and finally reverse piezoelectric transduction to generate the received electric signal. It is found that the combination of PWAS size and wave frequency/wavelength play an important role in identifying transduction maxima and minima that could be exploited to achieve an optimum power-efficient design. The multi-physics finite element method (MP-FEM), which permits fine discretization of damaged regions and complicated structural geometries, is used to study the generation of guided waves in a plate from an electrically excited transmitter PWAS and the capture of these waves as electric

  8. Long distance laser ultrasonic propagation imaging system for damage visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Shin, He-Jin; Chia, Chen Ciang; Dhital, Dipesh; Yoon, Dong-Jin; Huh, Yong-Hak

    2011-12-01

    Wind turbine blade failure is the most prominent and common type of damage occurring in operating wind turbine systems. Conventional nondestructive testing systems are not available for in situ wind turbine blades. We propose a portable long distance ultrasonic propagation imaging (LUPI) system that uses a laser beam targeting and scanning system to excite, from a long distance, acoustic emission sensors installed in the blade. An examination of the beam collimation effect using geometric parameters of a commercial 2 MW wind turbine provided Lamb wave amplitude increases of 41.5 and 23.1 dB at a distance of 40 m for symmetrical and asymmetrical modes, respectively, in a 2 mm-thick stainless steel plate. With this improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, a feasibility study of damage detection was conducted with a 5 mm-thick composite leading edge specimen. To develop a reliable damage evaluation system, the excitation/sensing technology and the associated damage visualization algorithm are equally important. Hence, our results provide a new platform based on anomalous wave propagation imaging (AWPI) methods with adjacent wave subtraction, reference wave subtraction, reference image subtraction, and the variable time window amplitude mapping method. The advantages and disadvantages of AWPI algorithms are reported in terms of reference data requirements, signal-to-noise ratios, and damage evaluation accuracy. The compactness and portability of the proposed UPI system are also important for in-field applications at wind farms.

  9. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Girolamo, D. Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-03-31

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  10. Damage Detection Based on Static Strain Responses Using FBG in a Wind Turbine Blade

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shaohua; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Xie, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The damage detection of a wind turbine blade enables better operation of the turbines, and provides an early alert to the destroyed events of the blade in order to avoid catastrophic losses. A new non-baseline damage detection method based on the Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in a wind turbine blade is developed in this paper. Firstly, the Chi-square distribution is proven to be an effective damage-sensitive feature which is adopted as the individual information source for the local decision. In order to obtain the global and optimal decision for the damage detection, the feature information fusion (FIF) method is proposed to fuse and optimize information in above individual information sources, and the damage is detected accurately through of the global decision. Then a 13.2 m wind turbine blade with the distributed strain sensor system is adopted to describe the feasibility of the proposed method, and the strain energy method (SEM) is used to describe the advantage of the proposed method. Finally results show that the proposed method can deliver encouraging results of the damage detection in the wind turbine blade. PMID:26287200

  11. Damage Detection Based on Static Strain Responses Using FBG in a Wind Turbine Blade.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaohua; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Xie, Yong

    2015-08-14

    The damage detection of a wind turbine blade enables better operation of the turbines, and provides an early alert to the destroyed events of the blade in order to avoid catastrophic losses. A new non-baseline damage detection method based on the Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in a wind turbine blade is developed in this paper. Firstly, the Chi-square distribution is proven to be an effective damage-sensitive feature which is adopted as the individual information source for the local decision. In order to obtain the global and optimal decision for the damage detection, the feature information fusion (FIF) method is proposed to fuse and optimize information in above individual information sources, and the damage is detected accurately through of the global decision. Then a 13.2 m wind turbine blade with the distributed strain sensor system is adopted to describe the feasibility of the proposed method, and the strain energy method (SEM) is used to describe the advantage of the proposed method. Finally results show that the proposed method can deliver encouraging results of the damage detection in the wind turbine blade.

  12. Analysis of shape memory alloy sensory particles for damage detection via substructure and continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielefeldt, Brent R.; Benzerga, A. Amine; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to monitor and predict the structural health of an aircraft is of growing importance to the aerospace industry. Currently, structural inspections and maintenance are based upon experiences with similar aircraft operating in similar conditions. While effective, these methods are time-intensive and unnecessary if the aircraft is not in danger of structural failure. It is imagined that future aircraft will utilize non-destructive evaluation methods, allowing for the near real-time monitoring of structural health. A particularly interesting method involves utilizing the unique transformation response of shape memory alloy (SMA) particles embedded in an aircraft structure. By detecting changes in the mechanical and/or electromagnetic responses of embedded particles, operators could detect the formation or propagation of fatigue cracks in the vicinity of these particles. This work focuses on a finite element model of SMA particles embedded in an aircraft wing using a substructure modeling approach in which degrees of freedom are retained only at specified points of connection to other parts or the application of boundary conditions, greatly reducing computational cost. Previous work evaluated isolated particle response to a static crack to numerically demonstrate and validate this damage detection method. This paper presents the implementation of a damage model to account for crack propagation and examine for the first time the effect of particle configuration and/or relative placement with respect to the ability to detect damage.

  13. A Coupled Approach for Structural Damage Detection with Incomplete Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Cao, Timothy; Kaouk, Mo; Zimmerman, David

    2013-01-01

    This historical work couples model order reduction, damage detection, dynamic residual/mode shape expansion, and damage extent estimation to overcome the incomplete measurements problem by using an appropriate undamaged structural model. A contribution of this work is the development of a process to estimate the full dynamic residuals using the columns of a spring connectivity matrix obtained by disassembling the structural stiffness matrix. Another contribution is the extension of an eigenvector filtering procedure to produce full-order mode shapes that more closely match the measured active partition of the mode shapes using a set of modified Ritz vectors. The full dynamic residuals and full mode shapes are used as inputs to the minimum rank perturbation theory to provide an estimate of damage location and extent. The issues associated with this process are also discussed as drivers of near-term development activities to understand and improve this approach.

  14. Damage detection and characterization using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Yao, Yao; Hubbell, David

    2013-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors (FOS) have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. But in addition to these advantageous performances, FOS technologies allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of structure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. These two approaches are particularly suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and to certain extent quantification and propagation, as illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: post-tensioned concrete bridge and segmented concrete pipeline. Early age cracking was detected, localized and quantified in the concrete deck of a pedestrian bridge using embedded long-gauge FOS. Post-tensioning of deck closed the cracks; however, permanent weakening in a bridge joint occurred due to cracking and it was identified and quantified. The damage was confirmed using embedded distributed FOS and a separate load test of the bridge. Real-size concrete pipeline specimens and surrounding soil were equipped with distributed FOS and exposed to permanent ground displacement in a large-scale testing facility. Two tests were performed on different pipeline specimens. The sensors bonded on the pipeline specimens successfully detected and localized rupture of pipeline joints, while the sensors embedded in the soil were able to detect and localize the failure plane. Comparison with strain-gauges installed on the pipeline and visual inspection after the test confirmed accurate damage detection and characterization.

  15. Detection Of Tornado Damage Tracks With EOS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Nair, Udaysankar; Haines, Stephanie L.

    2005-01-01

    The damage surveys conducted by the NWS in the aftermath of a reported tornadic event are used to document the location of the tornado ground damage track (path length and width) and an estimation of the tornado intensity. This study explored the possibility of using near real-time medium and high-resolution satellite imagery from the NASA EOS satellites to provide additional information for the surveys. MODIS and ASTER data were used to study the damage tracks from three tornadic storms; the La Plata, Maryland storm of 28 April 2002 and the Carter-Butler Counties and Madison County Missouri storms of 24 April 2002. These storms varied in intensity (from F0-F4) and occurred over regions with different land use. It was found that, depending on the nature of land use, tornado damage tracks from intense storms (F2 or greater) may be evident in both ASTER and MODIS satellite imagery. In areas of dense vegetation the scar patterns show up very clearly, while in areas of grassland and regions with few trees, scar patterns are not at all obvious in the satellite imagery. The detection of previously unidentified segments of a damage track caused by the 24 April 2004 Madison County, Missouri tornado demonstrates the utility of satellite imagery for damage surveys. However, the capability to detect tornado tracks in satellite imagery appears to be as much dependent on the nature of the underlying surface and land use as on the severity of the tornadic storm. The imaging sensors on the NPOESS operational satellites to be launched in 2006 will continue the unique observing capabilities of the EOS instruments.

  16. Using chaotic forcing to detect damage in a structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moniz, L.; Nichols, J.; Trickey, S.; Seaver, M.; Pecora, D.; Pecora, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we develop a numerical test for Holder continuity and apply it and another test for continuity to the difficult problem of detecting damage in structures. We subject a thin metal plate with incremental damage to the plate changes, its filtering properties, and therefore the phase space trajectories of the response chaotic excitation of various bandwidths. Damage to the plate changes its filtering properties and therefore the phase space of the response. Because the data are multivariate (the plate is instrumented with multiple sensors) we use a singular value decomposition of the set of the output time series to reduce the embedding dimension of the response time series. We use two geometric tests to compare an attractor reconstructed from data from an undamaged structure to that reconstructed from data from a damaged structure. These two tests translate to testing for both generalized and differentiable synchronization between responses. We show loss of synchronization of responses with damage to the structure. ?? 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Application of RMS for damage detection by guided elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzieński, M.; Doliński, Ł.; Krawczuk, M.; dot Zak, A.; Ostachowicz, W.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents certain results of an experimental study related with a damage detection in structural elements based on deviations in guided elastic wave propagation patterns. In order to excite guided elastic waves within specimens tested piezoelectric transducers have been applied. As excitation signals 5 sine cycles modulated by Hanning window have been used. Propagation of guided elastic waves has been monitored by a scanning Doppler laser vibrometer. The time signals recorded during measurement have been utilised to calculate the values of RMS. It has turned out that the values of RMS differed significantly in damaged areas from the values calculated for the healthy ones. In this way it has become possible to pinpoint precisely the locations of damage over the entire measured surface. All experimental investigations have been carried out for thin aluminium or composite plates. Damage has been simulated by a small additional mass attached on the plate surface or by a narrow notch cut. It has been shown that proposed method allows one to localise damage of various shapes and sizes within structural elements over the whole area under investigation.

  18. Multilayer perceptron in damage detection of bridge structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, P. C.; Barai, S. V.

    1995-02-01

    Recent developments in artificial neural networks (ANN) have opened up new possibilities in the domain of structural engineering. For inverse problems like structural identification of large civil engineerlng structures such as bridges and buildings where the in situ measured data are expected to be imprecise and often incomplete, the ANN holds greater promise. The detection of structural damage and identification of damaged element in a large complex structure is a challenging task indeed. This paper presents an application of multilayer perceptron in the damage detection of steel bridge structures. The ssues relating to the design of network and learning paradigm are addressed and network architectures have been developed with reference to trussed bridge structures. The training patterns are generated for multiple damaged zones in a structure and performance of the networks with one and two hidden layers are examined. It has been observed that the performance of the network with two hidden layers was better than that of a single-layer architecture in general. The engineering importance of the whole exercise is demonstrated from the fact that measured input at only a few locations in the structure is needed in the identification process using the ANN.

  19. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  20. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  1. A simple damage detection indicator using operational deflection shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, R. P. C.; Maia, N. M. M.; Almeida, R. A. B.; Urgueira, A. P. V.

    2016-05-01

    Catastrophic structural failure of aircrafts, bridges, buildings and other structures in modern societies has always been of primary concern because of the loss of human lifes and of negative economic impact. The aging of the structures, the growing dependency on their role in our networks of transportation, energy and comunications, the smaller construction tolerances, the bigger power demanded and the media and society awardness to catastrophic events are sufficient motivations for the growing field of structural health monitoring, which aims at assessing the actual condition of a structure and to identify incipient damage. Damage identification can be considered as a two step process, the detection and the diagnosis. The former, and fundamental step, is the confirmation of an efective damage existence. When the response is affirmative, the latter step begins with the diagnosis, and then the questions are: where?, how much?, what type?, when will it fail? In this paper the authors propose a simple method to detect and relatively quantify structural damage by using measured vibrations data, specifically the operational deflections shapes. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are presented to validate the proposed method.

  2. Offline and online detection of damage using autoregressive models and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omenzetter, Piotr; de Lautour, Oliver R.

    2007-04-01

    Developed to study long, regularly sampled streams of data, time series analysis methods are being increasingly investigated for the use of Structural Health Monitoring. In this research, Autoregressive (AR) models are used in conjunction with Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for damage detection, localisation and severity assessment. In the first reported experimental exercise, AR models were used offline to fit the acceleration time histories of a 3-storey test structure in undamaged and various damaged states when excited by earthquake motion simulated on a shake table. Damage was introduced into the structure by replacing the columns with those of a thinner thickness. Analytical models of the structure in both damaged and undamaged states were also developed and updated using experimental data in order to determine structural stiffness. The coefficients of AR models were used as damage sensitive features and input into an ANN to build a relationship between them and the remaining structural stiffness. In the second, analytical exercise, a system with gradually progressing damage was numerically simulated and acceleration AR models with exogenous inputs were identified recursively. A trained ANN was then required to trace the structural stiffness online. The results for the offline and online approach showed the efficiency of using AR coefficient as damage sensitive features and good performance of the ANNs for damage detection, localization and quantification.

  3. HC-NIDS: signatures and simulations for detecting cyber-attacks aiming to cause damage against cyber-physical energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Physical device safety is typically implemented locally using embedded controllers, while operations safety is primarily performed in control centers. Safe operations can be enhanced by correct design of device-level control algorithms, and protocols, procedures and operator training at the control-room level, but all can fail. Moreover, these elements exchange data and issue commands via vulnerable communication layers. In order to secure these gaps and enhance operational safety, we believe monitoring of command sequences must be combined with an awareness of physical device limitations and automata models that capture safety mechanisms. One way of doing this is by leveraging specification-based intrusion detection to monitor for physical constraint violations. The method can also verify that physical infrastructure state is consistent with monitoring information and control commands exchanged between field devices and control centers. This additional security layer enhances protection from both outsider attacks and insider mistakes. We implemented specification-based SCADA command analyzers using physical constraint algorithms directly in the Bro framework and Broccoli APIs for three separate scenarios: a water heater, an automated distribution system, and an over-current protection scheme. To accomplish this, we added low-level analyzers capable of examining control system-specific protocol packets for both Modbus TCP and DNP3, and also higher-level analyzers able to interpret device command and data streams within the context of each device’s physical capabilities and present operational state. Thus the software that we are making available includes the Bro/Broccoli scripts for these three scenarios, as well as simulators, written in C, of those scenarios that generate sample traffic that is monitored by the Bro/Broccoli scripts. In addition, we have also implemented systems to directly pull cyber-physical information from the OSIsoft PI historian system. We

  4. Multi-stage approach for structural damage detection problem using basis pursuit and particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerist, Saleheh; Maheri, Mahmoud R.

    2016-12-01

    In order to solve structural damage detection problem, a multi-stage method using particle swarm optimization is presented. First, a new spars recovery method, named Basis Pursuit (BP), is utilized to preliminarily identify structural damage locations. The BP method solves a system of equations which relates the damage parameters to the structural modal responses using the sensitivity matrix. Then, the results of this stage are subsequently enhanced to the exact damage locations and extents using the PSO search engine. Finally, the search space is reduced by elimination of some low damage variables using micro search (MS) operator embedded in the PSO algorithm. To overcome the noise present in structural responses, a method known as Basis Pursuit De-Noising (BPDN) is also used. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated by three numerical examples: a cantilever beam, a plane truss and a portal plane frame. The frequency response is used to detect damage in the examples. The simulation results demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method in detecting multiple damage cases and exhibit its robustness regarding noise and its advantages compared to other reported solution algorithms.

  5. Development of a Nondestructive Non-Contact Acousto-Thermal Evaluation Technique for Damage Detection in Materials (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    examples investigate accumulation of plasticity in Ti-6Al-4V, detection of incipient thermal damage in polymer matrix composite plate, and detection and...system and to evaluate damage due to plasticity. Polymer matrix composite samples were used to demonstrate the capability of the NCATS technique to...b. Heat damage in polymer matrix composite When exposed to temperatures approaching or exceeding the glass transition temperature, the strength of

  6. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Neural network based system for damage identification and location in structural and mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.; Prime, M.B.; Cornwell, P.; Kam, M.; Straser, E.G.; Hoerst, B.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Recent advances in wireless, remotely monitored data acquisition systems coupled with the development of vibration-based damage detection algorithms make the possibility of self- or remotely-monitored structures and mechanical systems appear to be within the capabilities of current technology. However, before such a system can be relied upon to perform this monitoring, the variability of the vibration properties that are the basis for the damage detection algorithm must be understood and quantified. This understanding is necessary so that the artificial intelligence/expert system that is employed to discriminate when changes in modal properties are indicative of damage will not yield false indications of damage. To this end, this project has focused on developing statistical methods for quantifying variability in identified vibration proper ties of structural and mechanical systems.

  8. Damage detection in membrane structures using non-contact laser excitation and wavelet transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Feblil; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hosoya, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a vibration testing and health monitoring system based on an impulse response excited by laser is proposed to detect damage in membrane structures. A high power Nd: YAG pulse laser is used to supply an ideal impulse to a membrane structure by generating shock waves via laser-induced breakdown in air. A health monitoring apparatus is developed with this vibration testing system and a damage detecting algorithm which only requires the vibration mode shape of the damaged membrane. Artificial damage is induced in membrane structure by cutting and tearing the membrane. The vibration mode shapes of the membrane structure extracted from vibration testing by using the laser-induced breakdown and laser Doppler vibrometer are then analyzed by 2-D continuous wavelet transformation. The location of damage is determined by the dominant peak of the wavelet coefficient which can be seen clearly by applying a boundary treatment and the concept of an iso-surface to the 2-D wavelet coefficient. The applicability of the present approach is verified by finite element analysis and experimental results, demonstrating the ability of the method to detect and identify the positions of damage induced on the membrane structure.

  9. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented.

  10. Wireless vibration monitoring for damage detection of highway bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Matthew J.; Gangone, Michael V.; Janoyan, Kerop D.; Jha, Ratneshwar

    2008-03-01

    The development of low-cost wireless sensor networks has resulted in resurgence in the development of ambient vibration monitoring methods to assess the in-service condition of highway bridges. However, a reliable approach towards assessing the health of an in-service bridge and identifying and localizing damage without a priori knowledge of the vibration response history has yet to be formulated. A two-part study is in progress to evaluate and develop existing and proposed damage detection schemes. The first phase utilizes a laboratory bridge model to investigate the vibration response characteristics induced through introduction of changes to structural members, connections, and support conditions. A second phase of the study will validate the damage detection methods developed from the laboratory testing with progressive damage testing of an in-service highway bridge scheduled for replacement. The laboratory bridge features a four meter span, one meter wide, steel frame with a steel and cement board deck composed of sheet layers to regulate mass loading and simulate deck wear. Bolted connections and elastomeric bearings provide a means for prescribing variable local stiffness and damping effects to the laboratory model. A wireless sensor network consisting of fifty-six accelerometers accommodated by twenty-eight local nodes facilitates simultaneous, real-time and high-rate acquisition of the vibrations throughout the bridge structure. Measurement redundancy is provided by an array of wired linear displacement sensors as well as a scanning laser vibrometer. This paper presents the laboratory model and damage scenarios, a brief description of the developed wireless sensor network platform, an overview of available test and measurement instrumentation within the laboratory, and baseline measurements of dynamic response of the laboratory bridge model.

  11. Neural network approach to damage detection in a building from ambient vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Mitsuru; Masri, Sami F.; Chassiakos, A. G.; Caughey, T. K.

    1998-04-01

    A neural network-based approach is presented for the detection of changes in the characteristics of structure- unknown systems. The approach relies on the use of vibration measurements from a `healthy' system to train a neural network for identification purposes. Subsequently, the trained network is fed comparable vibration measurements from the same structure under different episodes of response in order to monitor the health of the structure. It is shown, through simulation studies with linear as well as nonlinear models typically encountered in the applied mechanics field, that the proposed damage detection methodology is capable of detecting relatively small changes in the structural parameters. The methodology is applied to actual data obtained from ambient vibration measurements on a steel building structure, which was damaged under strong seismic motion during the Hyogo-Ken Nanbu Earthquake of January 17, 1995. The measurements were done before and after repairs to the damaged frame were made. A neural network is trained with data after the repairs, which represents `healthy' condition of the building. The trained network, which is subsequently fed data before the repairs, successfully identified the difference between damaged story and undamaged story. Through this study, it is shown that the proposed approach has the potential of being a practical tool for damage detection methodology, which leads to smart civil structures.

  12. Sensitivity of PZT Impedance Sensors for Damage Detection of Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaowen; Hu, Yuhang; Lu, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique for structural health monitoring (SHM) has been successfully applied to various engineering systems. However, fundamental research work on the sensitivity of the PZT impedance sensors for damage detection is still in need. In the traditional EMI method, the PZT electro-mechanical (EM) admittance (inverse of the impedance) is used as damage indicator, which is difficult to specify the effect of damage on structural properties. This paper uses the structural mechanical impedance (SMI) extracted from the PZT EM admittance signature as the damage indicator. A comparison study on the sensitivity of the EM admittance and the structural mechanical impedance to the damages in a concrete structure is conducted. Results show that the SMI is more sensitive to the damage than the EM admittance thus a better indicator for damage detection. Furthermore, this paper proposes a dynamic system consisting of a number of single-degree-of-freedom elements with mass, spring and damper components to model the SMI. A genetic algorithm is employed to search for the optimal value of the unknown parameters in the dynamic system. An experiment is carried out on a two-storey concrete frame subjected to base vibrations that simulate earthquake. A number of PZT sensors are regularly arrayed and bonded to the frame structure to acquire PZT EM admittance signatures. The relationship between the damage index and the distance of the PZT sensor from the damage is studied. Consequently, the sensitivity of the PZT sensors is discussed and their sensing region in concrete is derived. PMID:27879711

  13. Detecting ATM-Dependent Chromatin Modification in DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lope; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia–telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage. PMID:25827888

  14. An Experimental Study of DLV Method in Damage Detection of Frame Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yen-Po; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Lee, Chien-Liang

    2010-05-01

    A structural damage detection method integrating the damage locating vector (DLV) method and ARX model for system identification of frame structures from seismic acceleration responses has been explored in this paper. The concept of the DLV method is to identify the members with zero stress under some specific loading patterns derived from the changes in flexibility matrix of the structure before and after the damage state. Success of the DLV method requires clear identification of the flexibility matrix for at least the first few dominant modes. In this study, a five-storey steel frame with diagonal bracings is considered as the objective building. The damage condition of the structure is simulated by partially removing some of the diagonals. With the flexibility matrices of both the intact and damaged structure identified from seismic structural responses via shaking table tests, results indicate that the damaged locations can be successfully identified by the DLV method if sufficient modes of vibration are taken into account in the realization of the flexibility matrices. The feasibility of using DLV method for damage detection of frame structures using seismic response data is confirmed.

  15. Damage detection using the signal entropy of an ultrasonic sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, E.; Baltazar, A.; Loh, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic sensors used to propagate guided waves can potentially be implemented to inspect large areas in engineering structures. However, the inherent dispersion and noise of guided acoustic signals, multiple echoes in the structure, as well as a lack of an approximate or exact model, limit their use as a continuous structural health monitoring system. In this work, the implementation of a network of piezoelectric sensors randomly placed on a plate-like structure to detect and locate artificial damage is studied. A network of macro fiber composite (MFC) sensors working in a pitch-catch configuration was set on an aluminum thin plate 1.9 mm in thickness. Signals were analyzed in the time-scale domain using the discrete wavelet transform. The objectives of this work were threefold, namely to first develop a damage index based on the entropy distribution using short time wavelet entropy of the ultrasonic waves generated by a sensor network, second to determine the performance of an array of spare MFC sensors to detect artificial damage, and third to implement a time-of-arrival (TOA) algorithm on the gathered signals for damage location of an artificial circular discontinuity. Our preliminary test results show that the proposed methodology provides sufficient information for damage detection, which, once combined with the TOA algorithm, allows localization of the damage.

  16. Detection of damaged supports under railway track based on frequency shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longqi; Zhang, Yao; Lie, Seng Tjhen

    2017-03-01

    In railway transportation systems, the tracks are usually fastened on sleepers which are supported by the ballast. A lot of research has been conducted to guarantee the safety of railway track because of its importance, and more concern is expressed about monitoring of track itself such as railway level and alignment. The ballast and fasteners which provide strong support to the railway track are important as well whereas the detection of loose or missing fasteners and damaged ballast mainly relies on visual inspection. Although it is reliable when the fastener is missing and the damaged ballast is on the surface, it provides less help if the fastener is only loose and the damaged ballast is under the sleepers, which are however frequently observed in practice. This paper proposes an approach based on frequency shift to identify the damaged supports including the loose or missing fasteners and damaged ballast. In this study, the rail-sleeper-ballast system is modeled as an Euler beam evenly supported by a series of springs, the stiffness of which are reduced when the fastener is loose or missing and the ballast under the sleepers is damaged. An auxiliary mass is utilized herein and when it is mounted on the beam, the natural frequencies of the whole system will change with respect to the location of the auxiliary mass. The auxiliary mass induced frequency shift is analyzed and it is found the natural frequencies change periodically when the supports are undamaged, whereas the periodicity will be broken due to damaged supports. In fact, the natural frequencies drop clearly when the auxiliary mass moves over the damaged support. A special damage index only using the information of the damaged states is proposed and both numerical and experimental examples are carried out to validate the proposed method.

  17. Feasibility of detecting fatigue damage in composites with coda waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, Richard; Dayal, Vinay; Barnard, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Coda waves are the late arriving portion of bulk or guided waves, and are the result of scattering of the waves due to heterogeneities in the material. Since these waves interact with a region multiple times, the effect of otherwise undetectable changes in material and/or stress state accumulates and becomes detectable. This work examines the feasibility of detecting incipient fatigue damage in CFRP sample with coda wave analysis. Specimens are subjected to low cycle fatigue in a four-point bend set-up. Ultrasonic measurements are periodically taken perpendicular to the direction of loading during the fatiguing process after removing all loads. Detection and reception sensitivity of coda waves in composites are studied. Also studied are the effects of the coupling between the transducer and sample for a reliable and repeatable measurement.

  18. CFRP damage identification system based on FBG sensors and ELM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Jia, Lei; Sui, Qingmei; Sai, Yaozhang

    2015-02-01

    The identification of the damage state of Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) structure is the necessary information for ensuring the safety of CFRP structure. In this paper, the structural damage identification system using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and the damage identification method were investigated. FBG sensors were used to detect the structural dynamic response signal, which was generated by an active actuation way. Fourier transform and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to extract the damage characteristic. After that, the structural damage identification model was constructed based on extreme learning machine (ELM), whose input is the damage characteristic and output is the damage state. Finally, the damage identification system was established and verified on a CFRP plate with 160 mm160 mm experiment area. The experimental results showed that the identification accuracy was more than 90 %. This paper provided a reliable method for CFRP structural damage identification.

  19. Application of frequency domain ARX models and extreme value statistics to damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Sohn, Hoon; Farrar, Charles R.

    2003-08-01

    In this study, the applicability of an auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs (ARX) in the frequency domain to structural health monitoring (SHM) is explored. Damage sensitive features that explicitly consider the nonlinear system input/output relationships produced by damage are extracted from the ARX model. Furthermore, because of the non-Gaussian nature of the extracted features, Extreme Value Statistics (EVS) is employed to develop a robust damage classifier. EVS is useful in this case because the data of interest are in the tails (extremes) of the damage sensitive feature distribution. The suitability of the ARX model, combined with EVS, to nonlinear damage detection is demonstrated using vibration data obtained from a laboratory experiment of a three-story building model. It is found that the current method, while able to discern when damage is present in the structure, is unable to localize the damage to a particular joint. An impedance-based method using piezoelectric (PZT) material as both an actuator and a sensor is then proposed as a possible solution to the problem of damage localization.

  20. On impact damage detection and quantification for CFRP laminates using structural response data only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, M. T. H.; Worden, K.; Pierce, S. G.; Hickey, D.; Staszewski, W. J.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Hodzic, A.

    2011-11-01

    The overall purpose of the research is to detect and attempt to quantify impact damage in structures made from composite materials. A study that uses simplified coupon specimens made from a Carbon Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) prepreg with 11, 12 and 13 plies is presented. PZT sensors were placed at three separate locations in each test specimen to record the responses from impact events. To perform damaging impact tests, an instrumented drop-test machine was used and the impact energy was set to cover a range of 0.37-41.72 J. The response signals captured from each sensor were recorded by a data acquisition system for subsequent evaluation. The impacted specimens were examined with an X-ray technique to determine the extent of the damaged areas and it was found that the apparent damaged area grew monotonically with impact energy. A number of simple univariate and multivariate features were extracted from the sensor signals recorded during impact by computing their spectra and calculating frequency centroids. The concept of discordancy from the statistical discipline of outlier analysis is employed in order to separate the responses from non-damaging and damaging impacts. The results show that the potential damage indices introduced here provide a means of identifying damaging impacts from the response data alone.

  1. Compressive sensing for efficient health monitoring and effective damage detection of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardhana, Madhuka; Zhu, Xinqun; Liyanapathirana, Ranjith; Gunawardana, Upul

    2017-02-01

    Real world Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems consist of sensors in the scale of hundreds, each sensor generating extremely large amounts of data, often arousing the issue of the cost associated with data transfer and storage. Sensor energy is a major component included in this cost factor, especially in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). Data compression is one of the techniques that is being explored to mitigate the effects of these issues. In contrast to traditional data compression techniques, Compressive Sensing (CS) - a very recent development - introduces the means of accurately reproducing a signal by acquiring much less number of samples than that defined by Nyquist's theorem. CS achieves this task by exploiting the sparsity of the signal. By the reduced amount of data samples, CS may help reduce the energy consumption and storage costs associated with SHM systems. This paper investigates CS based data acquisition in SHM, in particular, the implications of CS on damage detection and localization. CS is implemented in a simulation environment to compress structural response data from a Reinforced Concrete (RC) structure. Promising results were obtained from the compressed data reconstruction process as well as the subsequent damage identification process using the reconstructed data. A reconstruction accuracy of 99% could be achieved at a Compression Ratio (CR) of 2.48 using the experimental data. Further analysis using the reconstructed signals provided accurate damage detection and localization results using two damage detection algorithms, showing that CS has not compromised the crucial information on structural damages during the compression process.

  2. Damage Detection in Concrete Elements with Surface Wave Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Unlimited ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, Captain, USAF Executive Officer DTTC S ELECTE JUL 0 9 1992 33 Au 92-17924 188 DAMAGE DETECTION IN CONCRETE ELEMENTS WITH...RECOMMENDATIONS ON WIDOW LENGTH 2.7 PARAMETERS INVOLVED 3. ANALYTICAL FORMULATION 37 3.1 MODAL ANALYSIS OF SIMPLE SUPPORTED BEAM USING BEAM THEORY 3.1.1...4 1.0c ooo O S . ... - - --. ............. 4".?... 02 0 2.000 le~ 4.000 le~ 6.000 le~ 3.000 le~ 1.000 2C0 FnEQ1UENC-y (HZ) Fiur .1-2 rssPoe SetrmPhse

  3. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent. PMID:22412347

  4. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  5. Spatial resolution improvement for Lamb wave-based damage detection using frequency dependency compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Bao, Jingjing; Joseph, Roshan Prakash; Huang, Liping

    2017-04-01

    In Lamb wave inspection systems, the transfer functions of the transmitter and receiver, and the attenuation as Lamb wave propagates through the structure, result in frequency dependency in the amplitude of Lamb modes. This frequency dependency in amplitude also influences the testing resolution and complicates the damage evaluation. With the goal of spatial resolution improving, a frequency dependency compensation method is proposed. In this method, an accurate estimation of the frequency-dependent amplitude is firstly obtained, then a refined inverse filter is designed and applied to the raw Lamb mode signals to compensate the frequency dependency. An experimental example is introduced to illustrate the process of the proposed method. Besides, its sensitivity to the propagation distance and Taylor expansion order is thoroughly investigated. Finally, the proposed method is employed for damage detection. Its effectiveness in testing resolution improvement and damage identification could be obviously demonstrated by the imaging result of the damage.

  6. A comparative assessment of different frequency based damage detection in unidirectional composite plates using MFC sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, Ricardo; Sartorato, Murilo; Vandepitte, Dirk; Tita, Volnei

    2016-11-01

    The basic concept of the vibration based damage identification methods is that the dynamic behaviour of a structure can change if damage occurs. Damage in a structure can alter the structural integrity, and therefore, the physical properties like stiffness, mass and/or damping may change. The dynamic behaviour of a structure is a function of these physical properties and will, therefore, directly be affected by the damage. The dynamic behaviour can be described in terms of time, frequency and modal domain parameters. The changes in these parameters (or properties derived from these parameters) are used as indicators of damage. Hence, this work has two main objectives. The first one is to provide an overview of the structural vibration based damage identification methods. For this purpose, a fundamental description of the structural vibration based damage identification problem is given, followed by a short literature overview of the damage features, which are commonly addressed. The second objective is to create a damage identification method for detection of the damage in composite structures. To aid in this process, two basic principles are discussed, namely the effect of the potential damage case on the dynamic behaviour, and the consequences involved with the information reduction in the signal processing. Modal properties from the structural dynamic output response are obtained. In addition, experimental and computational results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to composite specimens with and without damage. The excitation of the structures is performed using an impact hammer and, for measuring the output data, accelerometers as well as piezoelectric sensors. Finite element models are developed by shell elements, and numerical results are compared to experimental data, showing good correlation for the response of the specimens in some specific frequency range. Finally, FRFs are analysed using suitable metrics, including a

  7. Life detection systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitz, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Some promising newer approaches for detecting microorganisms are discussed, giving particular attention to the integration of different methods into a single instrument. Life detection methods may be divided into biological, chemical, and cytological methods. Biological methods are based on the biological properties of assimilation, metabolism, and growth. Devices for the detection of organic materials are considered, taking into account an instrument which volatilizes, separates, and analyzes a sample sequentially. Other instrumental systems described make use of a microscope and the cytochemical staining principle.

  8. Application of ARMAV models to the identification and damage detection of mechanical and civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodeux, J. B.; Golinval, J. C.

    2001-06-01

    In this paper, the application of auto-regressive moving average vector models to system identification and damage detection is investigated. These parametric models have already been applied for the analysis of multiple input-output systems under ambient excitation. Their main advantage consists in the capability of extracting modal parameters from the recorded time signals, without the requirement of excitation measurement. The excitation is supposed to be a stationary Gaussian white noise. The method also allows the estimation of modal parameter uncertainties. On the basis of these uncertainties, a statistically based damage detection scheme is performed and it becomes possible to assess whether changes of modal parameters are caused by, e.g. some damage or simply by estimation inaccuracies. The paper reports first an example of identification and damage detection applied to a simulated system under random excitation. The `Steel-Quake' benchmark proposed in the framework of COST Action F3 `Structural Dynamics' is also analysed. This structure was defined by the Joint Research Centre in Ispra (Italy) to test steel building performance during earthquakes. The proposed method gives an excellent identification of frequencies and mode shapes, while damping ratios are estimated with less accuracy.

  9. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema

    Klinger, Jeff

    2016-07-12

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  10. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  11. Detection of Incipient Thermal Damage in Polymer Matrix Composites (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Polymer matrix composite mechanical properties have been shown to decrease significantly with the presence of thermal damage. For aerospace applications, this type of damage typically occurs as a result of exposure to elevated temperatures from localized heating, such as lightning strikes, exhaust wash, or improper maintenance/repair procedures. Mechanical testing has shown that this type of damage, known as incipient damage, is present even when no visible damage is observable and can cause significant reduction in mechanical properties. Incipient damage is not

  12. Underwater laser detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Walid; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2015-02-01

    The conventional method used to detect an underwater target is by sending and receiving some form of acoustic energy. But the acoustic systems have limitations in the range resolution and accuracy; while, the potential benefits of a laserbased underwater target detection include high directionality, high response, and high range accuracy. Lasers operating in the blue-green region of the light spectrum(420 : 570nm)have a several applications in the area of detection and ranging of submersible targets due to minimum attenuation through water ( less than 0.1 m-1) and maximum laser reflection from estimated target (like mines or submarines) to provide a long range of detection. In this paper laser attenuation in water was measured experimentally by new simple method by using high resolution spectrometer. The laser echoes from different targets (metal, plastic, wood, and rubber) were detected using high resolution CCD camera; the position of detection camera was optimized to provide a high reflection laser from target and low backscattering noise from the water medium, digital image processing techniques were applied to detect and discriminate the echoes from the metal target and subtract the echoes from other objects. Extraction the image of target from the scattering noise is done by background subtraction and edge detection techniques. As a conclusion, we present a high response laser imaging system to detect and discriminate small size, like-mine underwater targets.

  13. [Preliminary research on insect damage detection in pecans using terahertz spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Wei-Li; Zhao, Chun-Jiang; Zhang, Bao-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Pecan is an important nut in US, however, the inner insect influences pecan's quality a lot. To realize the nondestructive detection of insect damage in American pecans rapidly and efficiently, preliminary research on insect damage detection in pecans was conducted based on terahertz spectroscopy. Firstly, a set of native pecan nuts were collected and were manually sliced with a thickness of about 1, 2 and 3 mm and with a size of about 2 cm(length) X 1 cm(width) for every pecan nutmeat; Pecan shell and inner separator were also cut into the same size. Secondly, the absorption spectra of the nutmeat slices, shell, and inner separator were collected using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) developed by a group of researchers at Oklahoma State University, and the spectral characteristic of the slices was analyzed. Thirdly, the absorption spectra of the alive manduca sexta and dry pecan weevil were collected, and due to the high contents in the insects, very obvious spectral characteristics were found. Finally, the transmission experiment was conducted with the whole pecans. The results from the preliminary study show a potential application of THz technology for insect damage detection. This research provides a reference for further understanding terahertz and exploring sample preparation methods, test methods, data acquisition and optical parameters calculation methods, and developing nondestructive detection system for insect damage in American pecans based on terahertz technology.

  14. Continuous dynamic monitoring of a lively footbridge for serviceability assessment and damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei-Hua; Moutinho, Carlos; Caetano, Elsa; Magalhães, Filipe; Cunha, Álvaro

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims at analyzing the feasibility of applying a vibration based damage detection approach, based on Principal Components Analysis (PCA), to eliminate environmental effects using the large amount of high quality data continuously collected by the dynamic monitoring system of Pedro e Inês footbridge since 2007. Few works describe real data, regularly collected along several years by reliable continuous dynamic monitoring systems in bridge structures. One main contribution is to show a large difference between making academic research based on numerical simulations or limited experimental samples, and making validity tests of innovative procedures using large high quality databases collected in real structures. The monitoring system, installed with the only initial objective of checking the efficiency of vibration control devices used to mitigate lateral and vertical vibrations, was therefore further developed for research purposes by implementing LabVIEW based automated signal processing and output-only modal identification routines, that enabled the analysis of the correlation of modal estimates with the temperature and the vibration level, as well as the automatic tracking of modal parameters along several years. With the final purpose of detecting potential structural damage at an early stage, the Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was employed to effectively eliminate temperature effects, whereas Novelty Analysis on the residual errors of the PCA model was used to provide a statistical indication of damage. The efficiency of this vibration based damage detection approach was verified using 3 years of measurements at Pedro e Inês footbridge under operational conditions and simulating several realistic damage scenarios affecting the boundary conditions. It is demonstrated that such a dynamic monitoring system, apart from providing relevant instantaneous dynamic information, working as an alert system associated to the verification of vibration

  15. Fractal mechanism for characterizing singularity of mode shape for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, M. S.; Ostachowicz, W.; Bai, R. B.; Radzieński, M.

    2013-11-25

    Damage is an ordinary physical phenomenon jeopardizing structural safety; damage detection is an ongoing interdisciplinary issue. Waveform fractal theory has provided a promising resource for detecting damage in plates while presenting a concomitant problem: susceptibility to false features of damage. This study proposes a fractal dimension method based on affine transformation to address this problem. Physical experiments using laser measurement demonstrate that this method can substantially eliminate false features of damage and accurately identify complex cracks in plates, providing a fundamental mechanism that brings the merits of waveform fractal theory into full play in structural damage detection applications.

  16. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  17. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2010-03-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  18. Intruder detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An intruder detection system is described. The system contains a transmitter which sends a frequency modulated and amplitude modulated signal to a remote receiver in response to a geophone detector which responds to seismic impulses created by the intruder. The signal makes it possible for an operator to determine the number of intruders and the manner of movement.

  19. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.; Lyons, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  20. Portable pathogen detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Milanovich, Fred P.; Brown, Steve B.; Vendateswaran, Kodumudi; Simon, Jonathan N.

    2005-06-14

    A portable pathogen detection system that accomplishes on-site multiplex detection of targets in biological samples. The system includes: microbead specific reagents, incubation/mixing chambers, a disposable microbead capture substrate, and an optical measurement and decoding arrangement. The basis of this system is a highly flexible Liquid Array that utilizes optically encoded microbeads as the templates for biological assays. Target biological samples are optically labeled and captured on the microbeads, which are in turn captured on an ordered array or disordered array disposable capture substrate and then optically read.

  1. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Pruett, Jr., James C.

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  2. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  3. Ultrasonic imaging in liquid sodium: topological energy for damages detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lubeigt, E.; Gobillot, G.; Mensah, S.; Chaix, J.F.; Rakotonarivo, S.

    2015-07-01

    Under-sodium imaging at high temperature is an important requirement in sodium cooled fast reactors during structural inspection. It aims at checking the integrity of immersed structures and assessing component degradation. The work presented in this paper focuses on designing an advanced ultrasound methodology for detecting damages such as deep crack defects. For that purpose, a topological imaging approach was implemented. This method takes advantage of all available prior knowledge about the environment through the integration of differential imaging and time reversal techniques. The quality of the topological energy distribution (the image) is further enhanced by applying a time gating related to each reconstructed pixel. Numerical and experimental results are presented using this method in order to confirm its reliability. These images are compared to a B-scan to emphasize the localization performances of this method. (authors)

  4. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Edward L. Reber; J. Keith Jewell; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; Kenneth W. Rohde; Edward H. Seabury

    2004-10-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  5. Novel detection of local tooth damage in gears by the wavelet bicoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combet, F.; Gelman, L.; LaPayne, G.

    2012-01-01

    A new technique, the instantaneous wavelet bicoherence (WB) is proposed and investigated. The use of the instantaneous and locally averaged WB from vibration measurements for local damage detection in gears is investigated for the first time; these bicoherences are better adapted than the classical Fourier bicoherence to the case of non-stationary signals. A new diagnostic feature based on the integrated modulus of the WB in a specific frequency range and a methodology for feature estimation are proposed. The WB techniques are applied to detection of a multiple "like natural" pitting on a back-to-back industrial spur gearbox system and natural pitting on a gear at test rig and show the possibility of early detection of local tooth faults. The detection effectiveness is evaluated by a local Fisher criterion estimated at each angular position of gear for the unpitted and pitted cases. The proposed WB-based diagnostic feature demonstrates robust experimental performance and superior detection capabilities (i.e., effective early damage detection differentially for teeth of the gear wheel) over the conventional detection methods based on the wavelet transform. The reason for this superior effectiveness is that the WB exploits the phase couplings of the wavelet transform at different frequencies, which contain useful additional information for detection of non-linear phenomena induced by local faults. The proposed approaches are compared with the two conventional approaches based on the wavelet transform.

  6. Quantification of damage detection schemes using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickey, Stephen; Seaver, Mark; Nichols, Jon

    2007-04-01

    In this work we detect damage in a composite to metal bolted joint subject to ambient vibrations and strong temperature fluctuations. Damage to the joint is considered to be a degradation of the connection strength implemented by loosening the bolts. The system is excited with a signal that conforms to the Pierson-Moskowitz distribution for wave height and represents a possible loading this component would be subject to in situ. We show that as the bolts are loosened, increasing amounts of nonlinearity are introduced in the form of impact discontinuities and stick-slip behavior. The presence of the nonlinearity, hence the damage, is detected by drawing comparisons between the response data and surrogate data conforming to the null hypothesis of an undamaged, linear system. Two metrics are used for comparison purposes: nonlinear prediction error and the bicoherence. Results are displayed using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves. The ROC curve quantifies the trade-off between false positives (type I errors) and false negatives (type II errors). Type I errors can be expressed as the probability of false alarm and 1 - type II error is the probability of detection. We demonstrate that ROC curves provide a unified quantifiable approach for directly comparing the merits of different detection schemes.

  7. Extended Kalman filter based structural damage detection for MR damper controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong; Jiang, Zhaoshuo; Christenson, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The Magneto-rheological (MR) dampers have been widely used in many building and bridge structures against earthquake and wind loadings due to its advantages including mechanical simplicity, high dynamic range, low power requirements, large force capacity, and robustness. However, research about structural damage detection methods for MR damper controlled structures is limited. This paper aims to develop a real-time structural damage detection method for MR damper controlled structures. A novel state space model of MR damper controlled structure is first built by combining the structure's equation of motion and MR damper's hyperbolic tangent model. In this way, the state parameters of both the structure and MR damper are added in the state vector of the state space model. Extended Kalman filter is then used to provide prediction for state variables from measurement data. The two techniques are synergistically combined to identify parameters and track the changes of both structure and MR damper in real time. The proposed method is tested using response data of a three-floor MR damper controlled linear building structure under earthquake excitation. The testing results show that the adaptive extended Kalman filter based approach is capable to estimate not only structural parameters such as stiffness and damping of each floor, but also the parameters of MR damper, so that more insights and understanding of the damage can be obtained. The developed method also demonstrates high damage detection accuracy and light computation, as well as the potential to implement in a structural health monitoring system.

  8. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Damage Detection and Self Healing in Structural Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-29

    system has been used to detect damage accumulation in composite laminates in situ under quasi-static uniaxial and cyclic loading conditions. Large... coating on the surface of two E-glass fibers is shown in Fig. 5. Fig. 5. (a) Carbon nanotube agglomerates on the surface of glass fibers in the...unidirectional E-glass composites in which the center ply of the laminate was cut in the middle of the specimen to promote ply delamination during tensile

  9. Research on fatigue damage detection for wind turbine blade based on high-spatial-resolution DPP-BOTDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinlong; Dong, Yongkang; Li, Hui

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a fatigue damage detection system used for wind turbine blade is successfully developed by using highspatial- resolution differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA) sensing system. A piece of polarization-maintaining optical fiber is bonded on the blade surface to form the distributed sensing network. A DPP-BOTDA system, with a spatial resolution of 20cm and sampling interval of 1cm, is adopted to measuring distributed strain and detecting fatigue damage of wind turbine blade during fatigue test using the differential pulse pair of 39.5ns/41.5ns. Strain and the Brillouin gain spectra changes from undamaged state to fatigue failure are experimentally presented. The experimental results reveal that fatigue damage changes the strain distribution especially around the high strain area, and the width, amplitude and central frequency of the Brillouin gain spectra are sensitive to fatigue damage as the stiffness degradation and accumulated cracks change local strain gradient. As the damage becomes larger, the width of the Brillouin gain spectra becomes broader. Consequently, location and size of fatigue damage could be estimated. The developed system shows its potentiality for developing highly reliable wind turbine monitoring system as the effectiveness of damage detection and distributed sensing.

  10. TECHNICAL NOTE: An unsupervised statistical damage detection method for structural health monitoring (applied to detection of delamination of a composite beam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Atsushi; Todoroki, Akira; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Hideo

    2004-10-01

    The present paper proposes a new damage diagnosis method for structural health monitoring that does not require data on damaged-state structures. Structural health monitoring is an essential technology for aged civil structures and advanced composite structures. For damage diagnostic methods, most current structural health monitoring systems adopt parametric methods based on modeling, or non-parametric methods such as artificial neural networks. The conventional methods require FEM modeling of structure or data for training the damaged-state structure. These processes require judgment by a human, resulting in high cost. The present paper proposes a new automatic damage diagnostic method for structural health monitoring that does not require these processes by using a system identification and statistical similarity test of the identified systems using an F-test. As an example of damage diagnosis using the new method, the present study describes delamination detection of a CFRP beam. System identification among the strain data measured on the surface of a composite beam is used for damage diagnosis. The results show that the new statistical damage diagnostic method successfully diagnoses damage without the use of modeling and without learning data for damaged structures.

  11. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A monitoring system developed to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water is described. A nonpathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. Detection of the marker virus consists of two major components, concentration and isolation of the marker virus, and detection of the marker virus. The concentration system involves adsorption of virus to cellulose acetate filters in the presence of trivalent cations and low pH with subsequent desorption of the virus using volumes of high pH buffer. The detection of the virus is performed by a passive immune agglutination test utilizing specially prepared polystyrene particles. An engineering preliminary design was performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation are presented. The instrument consists of reagent pump/metering system, reagent storage containers, a filter concentrator, an incubation/detector system, and an electronic readout and control system.

  12. How damage diversification can reduce systemic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of risk diversification on cascading failures in weighted complex networks, where weighted directed links represent exposures between nodes. These weights result from different diversification strategies and their adjustment allows us to reduce systemic risk significantly by topological means. As an example, we contrast a classical exposure diversification (ED) approach with a damage diversification (DD) variant. The latter reduces the loss that the failure of high degree nodes generally inflict to their network neighbors and thus hampers the cascade amplification. To quantify the final cascade size and obtain our results, we develop a branching process approximation taking into account that inflicted losses cannot only depend on properties of the exposed, but also of the failing node. This analytic extension is a natural consequence of the paradigm shift from individual to system safety. To deepen our understanding of the cascade process, we complement this systemic perspective by a mesoscopic one: an analysis of the failure risk of nodes dependent on their degree. Additionally, we ask for the role of these failures in the cascade amplification.

  13. How damage diversification can reduce systemic risk.

    PubMed

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of risk diversification on cascading failures in weighted complex networks, where weighted directed links represent exposures between nodes. These weights result from different diversification strategies and their adjustment allows us to reduce systemic risk significantly by topological means. As an example, we contrast a classical exposure diversification (ED) approach with a damage diversification (DD) variant. The latter reduces the loss that the failure of high degree nodes generally inflict to their network neighbors and thus hampers the cascade amplification. To quantify the final cascade size and obtain our results, we develop a branching process approximation taking into account that inflicted losses cannot only depend on properties of the exposed, but also of the failing node. This analytic extension is a natural consequence of the paradigm shift from individual to system safety. To deepen our understanding of the cascade process, we complement this systemic perspective by a mesoscopic one: an analysis of the failure risk of nodes dependent on their degree. Additionally, we ask for the role of these failures in the cascade amplification.

  14. Application of electromechanical impedance-based SHM for damage detection in bolted pipeline connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martowicz, Adam; Sendecki, Arkadiusz; Salamon, Marcin; Rosiek, Mateusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    The work discusses the effectiveness of the electromechanical impedance-based Structural Health Monitoring system for damage detection in a laboratory test stand - a bolted pipeline section. The impedance-based system developed by the authors and equipped with 12 piezoelectric transducers was used to acquire the data. Different damage scenarios related to loosened bolts and measurement configurations are analysed. Both point and transfer frequency response functions are applied to deterministic and stochastic damage metrics, which are used to assess the condition of the monitored structure. The thresholds levels are proposed for different measurement configurations. Moreover, the authors discuss the perspective to determine the size and localisation of a damage. As confirmed in the work, the stochastic damage metric, preferably applied with a transfer frequency response, is found as of the most practical significance for the tested structure. The carried out analyses consider an outlier removal technique, which becomes necessary to prevent from errors due to temporary variation of the acquired characteristics after initialisation of the measurements.

  15. Carbon dots based FRET for the detection of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kudr, Jiri; Richtera, Lukas; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Hynek, David; Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-02-09

    Here, we aimed our attention at the synthesis of carbon dots (C-dots) with the ability to interact with DNA to suggest an approach for the detection of DNA damage. Primarily, C-dots modified with amine moieties were synthesized using the one-step microwave pyrolysis of citric acid in the presence of diethylenetriamine. The C-dots showed strong photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 4%. In addition, the C-dots (2.8±0.8nm) possessed a good colloidal stability and exhibited a positive surface charge (ζ=36mV) at a neutral pH. An interaction study of the C-dots and the DNA fragment of λ bacteriophage was performed, and the DNA binding resulted in changes to the photoluminescent and absorption properties of the C-dots. A binding of the C-dots to DNA was also observed as a change to DNA electrophoretic mobility and a decreased ability to intercalate ethidium bromide (EtBr). Moreover, the Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the C-dots and EtBr was studied, in which the C-dots serve as an excitation energy donor and the EtBr serves as an acceptor. When DNA was damaged using ultraviolet (UV) radiation (λ=254nm) and hydroxyl radicals, the intensity of the emitted photoluminescence at 612nm significantly decreased. The concept was proved on analysis of the genomic DNA from PC-3 cells and DNA isolated from melanoma tissues.

  16. Towards damage detection using blind source separation integrated with time-varying auto-regressive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musafere, F.; Sadhu, A.; Liu, K.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, structural health monitoring (SHM) has been an indispensable subject in the field of vibration engineering. With the aid of modern sensing technology, SHM has garnered significant attention towards diagnosis and risk management of large-scale civil structures and mechanical systems. In SHM, system identification is one of major building blocks through which unknown system parameters are extracted from vibration data of the structures. Such system information is then utilized to detect the damage instant, and its severity to rehabilitate and prolong the existing health of the structures. In recent years, blind source separation (BSS) algorithm has become one of the newly emerging advanced signal processing techniques for output-only system identification of civil structures. In this paper, a novel damage detection technique is proposed by integrating BSS with the time-varying auto-regressive modeling to identify the instant and severity of damage. The proposed method is validated using a suite of numerical studies and experimental models followed by a full-scale structure.

  17. Intruder detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Moving coil geophones are utilized to develop a small, rugged, battery operated system capable of detecting seismic disturbances caused by intruders. Seismic disturbances sensed by each geophone are converted into electrical signals, amplified, and transmitted to remote receiver which provides listener with aural signal.

  18. DETECTION OR WARNING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Tillman, J E

    1953-10-20

    This patent application describes a sensitive detection or protective system capable of giving an alarm or warning upon the entrance or intrusion of any body into a defined area or zone protected by a radiation field of suitable direction or extent.

  19. Detection of Ballast Damage by In-Situ Vibration Measurement of Sleepers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, H. F.; Wong, M. T.; Keefe, R. M.

    2010-05-01

    Ballasted track is one of the most important elements of railway transportation systems worldwide. Owing to its importance in railway safety, many monitoring and evaluation methods have been developed. Current railway track monitoring systems are comprehensive, fast and efficient in testing railway track level and alignment, rail gauge, rail corrugation, etc. However, the monitoring of ballast condition still relies very much on visual inspection and core tests. Although extensive research has been carried out in the development of non-destructive methods for ballast condition evaluation, a commonly accepted and cost-effective method is still in demand. In Hong Kong practice, if abnormal train vibration is reported by the train operator or passengers, permanent way inspectors will locate the problem area by track geometry measurement. It must be pointed out that visual inspection can only identify ballast damage on the track surface, the track geometry deficiencies and rail twists can be detected using a track gauge. Ballast damage under the sleeper loading area and the ballast shoulder, which are the main factors affecting track stability and ride quality, are extremely difficult if not impossible to be detected by visual inspection. Core test is a destructive test, which is expensive, time consuming and may be disruptive to traffic. A fast real-time ballast damage detection method that can be implemented by permanent way inspectors with simple equipment can certainly provide valuable information for engineers in assessing the safety and riding quality of ballasted track systems. The main objective of this paper is to study the feasibility in using the vibration characteristics of sleepers in quantifying the ballast condition under the sleepers, and so as to explore the possibility in developing a handy method for the detection of ballast damage based on the measured vibration of sleepers.

  20. Eddy Current System and Method for Crack Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An eddy current system and method enables detection of sub-surface damage in a cylindrical object. The invention incorporates a dual frequency, orthogonally wound eddy current probe mounted on a stepper motor-controlled scanning system. The system is designed to inspect for outer surface damage from the interior of the cylindrical object.

  1. A procedure for damage detection and localization of framed buildings based on curvature variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditommaso, Rocco; Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Auletta, Gianluca; Iacovino, Chiara; Mossucca, Antonello; Nigro, Domenico; Nigro, Antonella

    2014-05-01

    Structural Health Monitoring and Damage Detection are topics of current interest in civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering. Damage Detection approach based on dynamic monitoring of structural properties over time has received a considerable attention in recent scientific literature of the last years. The basic idea arises from the observation that spectral properties, described in terms of the so-called modal parameters (eigenfrequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping), are functions of the physical properties of the structure (mass, energy dissipation mechanisms and stiffness). Structural damage exhibits its main effects in terms of stiffness and damping variation. As a consequence, a permanent dynamic monitoring system makes it possible to detect and, if suitably concentrated on the structure, to localize structural and non-structural damage occurred on the structure during a strong earthquake. In the last years many researchers are working to set-up new methodologies for Non-destructive Damage Evaluation (NDE) based on the variation of the dynamic behaviour of structures under seismic loads. Pandey et al. (1991) highlighted on the possibility to use the structural mode shapes to extract useful information for structural damage localization. In this paper a new procedure for damage detection on framed structures based on changes in modal curvature is proposed. The proposed approach is based on the use of Stockwell Transform, a special kind of integral transformation that become a powerful tool for nonlinear signal analysis and then to analyse the nonlinear behaviour of a general structure. Using this kind of approach, it is possible to use a band-variable filter (Ditommaso et al., 2012) to extract from a signal recorded on a structure (excited by an earthquake) the response related to a single mode of vibration for which the related frequency changes over time (if the structure is being damaged). İn general, by acting simultaneously in both frequency and

  2. Open Circuit Resonant (SansEC) Sensor for Composite Damage Detection and Diagnosis in Aircraft Lightning Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chuantong; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Composite materials are increasingly used in modern aircraft for reducing weight, improving fuel efficiency, and enhancing the overall design, performance, and manufacturability of airborne vehicles. Materials such as fiberglass reinforced composites (FRC) and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) are being used to great advantage in airframes, wings, engine nacelles, turbine blades, fairings, fuselage and empennage structures, control surfaces and coverings. However, the potential damage from the direct and indirect effects of lightning strikes is of increased concern to aircraft designers and operators. When a lightning strike occurs, the points of attachment and detachment on the aircraft surface must be found by visual inspection, and then assessed for damage by maintenance personnel to ensure continued safe flight operations. In this paper, a new method and system for aircraft in-situ damage detection and diagnosis are presented. The method and system are based on open circuit (SansEC) sensor technology developed at NASA Langley Research Center. SansEC (Sans Electric Connection) sensor technology is a new technical framework for designing, powering, and interrogating sensors to detect damage in composite materials. Damage in composite material is generally associated with a localized change in material permittivity and/or conductivity. These changes are sensed using SansEC. Unique electrical signatures are used for damage detection and diagnosis. NASA LaRC has both experimentally and theoretically demonstrated that SansEC sensors can be effectively used for in-situ composite damage detection.

  3. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Melvin A.; Davies, Terence J.; Morton, III, John R.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

  4. Damage Detection in Cryogenic Composites for Space Applications Using Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    arrays of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) bonded to a structure to both transmit and sense ultrasonic elastic waves for damage detection...Table 1. Table 1. Summary of PWAS damage detection methods. Wave Propagation Standing Wave Method amage D Pitch-Catch Pulse-echo Phased - Array ...conditions, and stress conditions. Results from these experiments indicate that a PWAS based array is capable of detecting low velocity impact damage

  5. Experimental study of thin film sensor networks for wind turbine blade damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, A.; Laflamme, S.; Ubertini, F.; Sauder, H.; Sarkar, P.

    2017-02-01

    Damage detection of wind turbine blades is difficult due to their complex geometry and large size, for which large deployment of sensing systems is typically not economical. A solution is to develop and deploy dedicated sensor networks fabricated from inexpensive materials and electronics. The authors have recently developed a novel skin-type strain gauge for measuring strain over very large surfaces. The skin, a type of large-area electronics, is constituted from a network of soft elastomeric capacitors. The sensing system is analogous to a biological skin, where local strain can be monitored over a global area. In this paper, we propose the utilization of a dense network of soft elastomeric capacitors to detect, localize, and quantify damage on wind turbine blades. We also leverage mature off-the-shelf technologies, in particular resistive strain gauges, to augment such dense sensor network with high accuracy data at key locations, therefore constituting a hybrid dense sensor network. The proposed hybrid dense sensor network is installed inside a wind turbine blade model, and tested in a wind tunnel to simulate an operational environment. Results demonstrate the ability of the hybrid dense sensor network to detect, localize, and quantify damage.

  6. A novel damage index for fatigue damage detection in a laminated composites using Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Daigo

    A well-established structural health monitoring (SHM) technique, the Lamb wave based approach, is used for fatigue damage identification in a laminated composite. A novel damage index, 'normalized correlation moment' (NCM) which is composed of the nth moment of the cross correlation of the baseline and comparison waves, was used as damage index for monitoring damage in composites and compared with the signal difference coefficient (SDC) which is one of the most commonly used damage indices. Composite specimens were fabricated by the hand layup method by followed by compression. Piezo electric disks mounted on composite specimens were used as actuators and sensors. Three point bending fatigue tests were carried out on an intact composite laminate and a delaminated composite laminate with [06/904/06] orientation. Finite element analysis was performed to test the validity of SDC and NCM for fatigue damage.

  7. An automatic damage detection algorithm based on the Short Time Impulse Response Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gianluca; Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco; Iacovino, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring together with all the dynamic identification techniques and damage detection techniques are increasing in popularity in both scientific and civil community in last years. The basic idea arises from the observation that spectral properties, described in terms of the so-called modal parameters (eigenfrequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping), are functions of the physical properties of the structure (mass, energy dissipation mechanisms and stiffness). Damage detection techniques traditionally consist in visual inspection and/or non-destructive testing. A different approach consists in vibration based methods detecting changes of feature related to damage. Structural damage exhibits its main effects in terms of stiffness and damping variation. Damage detection approach based on dynamic monitoring of structural properties over time has received a considerable attention in recent scientific literature. We focused the attention on the structural damage localization and detection after an earthquake, from the evaluation of the mode curvature difference. The methodology is based on the acquisition of the structural dynamic response through a three-directional accelerometer installed on the top floor of the structure. It is able to assess the presence of any damage on the structure providing also information about the related position and severity of the damage. The procedure is based on a Band-Variable Filter, (Ditommaso et al., 2012), used to extract the dynamic characteristics of systems that evolve over time by acting simultaneously in both time and frequency domain. In this paper using a combined approach based on the Fourier Transform and on the seismic interferometric analysis, an useful tool for the automatic fundamental frequency evaluation of nonlinear structures has been proposed. Moreover, using this kind of approach it is possible to improve some of the existing methods for the automatic damage detection providing stable results

  8. Amplitude Dispersion Compensation for Damage Detection Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Huang, Liping; Zhao, Ming

    2016-09-30

    Besides the phase and group velocities, the amplitude of guided wave mode is also frequency dependent. This amplitude dispersion also influences the performance of guided wave methods in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). In this paper, the effects of amplitude dispersion to the spectrum and waveform of a propagating wave-packet are investigated. It is shown that the amplitude dispersion results in distortion in the spectrum of guided wave response, and thus influences the waveform of the wave-packet. To remove these effects, an amplitude dispersion compensation method is established on the basis of Vold-Kalman filter and Taylor series expansion. The performance of that method is then investigated by experimental examples. The results show that with the application of the amplitude dispersion compensation, the time reversibility could be preserved, which ensures the applicability of the time reversal method for damage detection. Besides, through amplitude dispersion compensation, the testing resolution of guided waves could be improved, so that the structural features located in the close proximity may be separately identified.

  9. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  10. Damage Detection in Concrete Using Diffuse Ultrasound Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroo, Frederik; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Sabra, Karim

    2010-02-01

    Heterogeneities in concrete caused by the random distribution of aggregate in the cement-paste matrix lead to strong scattering of ultrasonic waves at wavelengths on the order of the aggregate. Use of these high frequencies is necessary to detect damage at an early stage, something that is not possible with conventional ultrasonic methods. The ultrasound energy density in that regime can be described by the diffusion equation. The objective of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of the effects of additional scattering sources, such as small cracks in the cement-paste matrix, on the parameters of the diffusion equation; these parameters are the diffusion and the dissipation coefficients. Applying diffusion theory, the diffusivity and dissipation coefficients are experimentally determined as functions of frequency using ultrasonic waves. The cuboid shaped samples employed are made of a Portland cement-paste matrix and regular aggregate, such as gravel and sand. The results provide a basic understanding of repeatability and consistency of diffusion measurements, with an emphasis on the nondestructive evaluation of concrete.

  11. Amplitude Dispersion Compensation for Damage Detection Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Huang, Liping; Zhao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Besides the phase and group velocities, the amplitude of guided wave mode is also frequency dependent. This amplitude dispersion also influences the performance of guided wave methods in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). In this paper, the effects of amplitude dispersion to the spectrum and waveform of a propagating wave-packet are investigated. It is shown that the amplitude dispersion results in distortion in the spectrum of guided wave response, and thus influences the waveform of the wave-packet. To remove these effects, an amplitude dispersion compensation method is established on the basis of Vold–Kalman filter and Taylor series expansion. The performance of that method is then investigated by experimental examples. The results show that with the application of the amplitude dispersion compensation, the time reversibility could be preserved, which ensures the applicability of the time reversal method for damage detection. Besides, through amplitude dispersion compensation, the testing resolution of guided waves could be improved, so that the structural features located in the close proximity may be separately identified. PMID:27706067

  12. Volatile Semiochemicals Released from Undamaged Cotton Leaves (A Systemic Response of Living Plants to Caterpillar Damage).

    PubMed Central

    Rose, USR.; Manukian, A.; Heath, R. R.; Tumlinson, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    Cotton plants (Gossypium hirsutum L.), attacked by herbivorous insects release volatile semiochemicals (chemical signals) that attract natural enemies of the herbivores to the damaged plants. We found chemical evidence that volatiles are released not only at the damaged site but from the entire cotton plant. The release of volatiles was detected from upper, undamaged leaves after 2 to 3 d of continuous larval damage on lower leaves of the same plant. Compounds released systemically were (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, (E)-[beta]-ocimene, linalool, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, (E)-[beta]-farnesene, (E,E)-[alpha]-farnesene, and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene. All systemically released compounds are known to be induced by caterpillar damage and are not released in significant amounts by undamaged plants. Other compounds, specifically indole, isomeric hexenyl butyrates, and 2-methylbutyrates, known to be released by cotton in response to caterpillar damage, were not released systemically. However, when upper, undamaged leaves of a caterpillar-damaged plant were damaged with a razor blade, they released isomeric hexenyl butyrates, 2-methylbutyrates, and large amounts of constitutive compounds in addition to the previously detected induced compounds. Control plants, damaged with a razor blade in the same way, did not release isomeric hexenyl butyrates or 2-methylbutyrates and released significantly smaller amounts of constitutive compounds. Indole was not released systemically, even after artificial damage. PMID:12226304

  13. Online Damage Detection on Metal and Composite Space Structures by Active and Passive Acoustic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheerer, M.; Cardone, T.; Rapisarda, A.; Ottaviano, S.; Ftancesconi, D.

    2012-07-01

    In the frame of ESA funded programme Future Launcher Preparatory Programme Period 1 “Preparatory Activities on M&S”, Aerospace & Advanced Composites and Thales Alenia Space-Italia, have conceived and tested a structural health monitoring approach based on integrated Acoustic Emission - Active Ultrasound Damage Identification. The monitoring methods implemented in the study are both passive and active methods and the purpose is to cover large areas with a sufficient damage size detection capability. Two representative space sub-structures have been built and tested: a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) and a curved, stiffened Al-Li panel. In each structure, typical critical damages have been introduced: delaminations caused by impacts in the COPV and a crack in the stiffener of the Al-Li panel which was grown during a fatigue test campaign. The location and severity of both types of damages have been successfully assessed online using two commercially available systems: one 6 channel AE system from Vallen and one 64 channel AU system from Acellent.

  14. Seismic response and damage detection analyses of an instrumented steel moment-framed building

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodgers, J.E.; Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The seismic performance of steel moment-framed buildings has been of particular interest since brittle fractures were discovered at the beam-column connections in a number of buildings following the M 6.7 Northridge earthquake of January 17, 1994. A case study of the seismic behavior of an extensively instrumented 13-story steel moment frame building located in the greater Los Angeles area of California is described herein. Response studies using frequency domain, joint time-frequency, system identification, and simple damage detection analyses are performed using an extensive strong motion dataset dating from 1971 to the present, supported by engineering drawings and results of postearthquake inspections. These studies show that the building's response is more complex than would be expected from its highly symmetrical geometry. The response is characterized by low damping in the fundamental mode, larger accelerations in the middle and lower stories than at the roof and base, extended periods of vibration after the cessation of strong input shaking, beating in the response, elliptical particle motion, and significant torsion during strong shaking at the top of the concrete piers which extend from the basement to the second floor. The analyses conducted indicate that the response of the structure was elastic in all recorded earthquakes to date, including Northridge. Also, several simple damage detection methods employed did not indicate any structural damage or connection fractures. The combination of a large, real structure and low instrumentation density precluded the application of many recently proposed advanced damage detection methods in this case study. Overall, however, the findings of this study are consistent with the limited code-compliant postearthquake intrusive inspections conducted after the Northridge earthquake, which found no connection fractures or other structural damage. ?? ASCE.

  15. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The performance of a waste water reclamation system is monitored by introducing a non-pathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, into the waste-water prior to treatment and, thereafter, testing the reclaimed water for the presence of the marker virus. A test sample is first concentrated by absorbing any marker virus onto a cellulose acetate filter in the presence of a trivalent cation at low pH and then flushing the filter with a limited quantity of a glycine buffer solution to desorb any marker virus present on the filter. Photo-optical detection of indirect passive immune agglutination by polystyrene beads indicates the performance of the water reclamation system in removing the marker virus. A closed system provides for concentrating any marker virus, initiating and monitoring the passive immune agglutination reaction, and then flushing the system to prepare for another sample.

  16. Ultrasonic Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for detecting ultrasonic vibrations. such as those generated by a small leak in a pressurized container. vessel. pipe. or the like. comprises an ultrasonic transducer assembly and a processing circuit for converting transducer signals into an audio frequency range signal. The audio frequency range signal can be used to drive a pair of headphones worn by an operator. A diode rectifier based mixing circuit provides a simple, inexpensive way to mix the transducer signal with a square wave signal generated by an oscillator, and thereby generate the audio frequency signal. The sensitivity of the system is greatly increased through proper selection and matching of the system components. and the use of noise rejection filters and elements. In addition, a parabolic collecting horn is preferably employed which is mounted on the transducer assembly housing. The collecting horn increases sensitivity of the system by amplifying the received signals. and provides directionality which facilitates easier location of an ultrasonic vibration source.

  17. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  18. Using reflectance and photography to detect ozone damage to cantaloupe plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.; Thomas, C. E.; Bowen, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory and field reflectance measurements showed that ozone-damaged cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) leaves had lower water contents and higher reflectance than nondamaged leaves. Cantaloupe plants with lightly, severely, and very severely ozone-damaged leaves were distinguishable from nondamaged plants by reflectance measurements in the 1.35-2.5-micron near-IR water absorption band. Ozone-damaged leaf areas were detected photographically 16 hours before the damage was visible.

  19. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  20. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  1. Multi-physics modeling of multifunctional composite materials for damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujidkul, Thanyawalai

    This study presents a modeling of multifunction composite materials for damage detection with its verification and validation to mechanical behavior predictions of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer composites (CFRPs), CFRPs laminated composites, and woven SiC/SiC matrix composites that are subjected to fracture damage. Advantages of those materials are low cost, low density, high strength-to-weight ratio, and comparable specific tensile properties, the special of SiC/SiC is good environmental stability at high temperature. Resulting in, the composite has been used for many important structures such as helicopter rotors, aerojet engines, gas turbines, hot control surfaces, sporting goods, and windmill blades. Damage or material defect detection in a mechanical component can provide vital information for the prediction of remaining useful life, which will result in the prevention of catastrophic failures. Thus the understanding of the mechanical behavior have been challenge to the prevent damage and failure of composites in different scales. The damage detection methods in composites have been investigated widely in recent years. Non-destructive techniques are the traditional methods to detect the damage such as X-ray, acoustic emission and thermography. However, due to the invisible damage in composite can be occurred, to prevent the failure in composites. The developments of damage detection methods have been considered. Due to carbon fibers are conductive materials, in resulting CFRPs can be self-sensing to detect damage. As is well known, the electrical resistance has been shown to be a sensitive measure of internal damage, and also this work study in thermal resistance can detect damage in composites. However, there is a few number of different micromechanical modeling schemes has been proposed in the published literature for various types of composites. This works will provide with a numerical, analytical, and theoretical failure models in different damages to

  2. Earthquake Damage Visualization (EDV) Technique for the Rapid Detection of Earthquake-Induced Damages Using SAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ram C.; Tateishi, Ryutaro; Hara, Keitarou; Nguyen, Hoan Thanh; Gharechelou, Saeid; Nguyen, Luong Viet

    2017-01-01

    The damage of buildings and manmade structures, where most of human activities occur, is the major cause of casualties of from earthquakes. In this paper, an improved technique, Earthquake Damage Visualization (EDV) is presented for the rapid detection of earthquake damage using the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The EDV is based on the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherence change method. The normalized difference between the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherences, and vice versa, are used to calculate the forward (from pre-seismic to co-seismic) and backward (from co-seismic to pre-seismic) change parameters, respectively. The backward change parameter is added to visualize the retrospective changes caused by factors other than the earthquake. The third change-free parameter uses the average values of the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherence maps. These three change parameters were ultimately merged into the EDV as an RGB (Red, Green, and Blue) composite imagery. The EDV could visualize the earthquake damage efficiently using Horizontal transmit and Horizontal receive (HH), and Horizontal transmit and Vertical receive (HV) polarizations data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2). Its performance was evaluated in the Kathmandu Valley, which was hit severely by the 2015 Nepal Earthquake. The cross-validation results showed that the EDV is more sensitive to the damaged buildings than the existing method. The EDV could be used for building damage detection in other earthquakes as well. PMID:28134796

  3. Earthquake Damage Visualization (EDV) Technique for the Rapid Detection of Earthquake-Induced Damages Using SAR Data.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ram C; Tateishi, Ryutaro; Hara, Keitarou; Nguyen, Hoan Thanh; Gharechelou, Saeid; Nguyen, Luong Viet

    2017-01-27

    The damage of buildings and manmade structures, where most of human activities occur, is the major cause of casualties of from earthquakes. In this paper, an improved technique, Earthquake Damage Visualization (EDV) is presented for the rapid detection of earthquake damage using the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The EDV is based on the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherence change method. The normalized difference between the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherences, and vice versa, are used to calculate the forward (from pre-seismic to co-seismic) and backward (from co-seismic to pre-seismic) change parameters, respectively. The backward change parameter is added to visualize the retrospective changes caused by factors other than the earthquake. The third change-free parameter uses the average values of the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherence maps. These three change parameters were ultimately merged into the EDV as an RGB (Red, Green, and Blue) composite imagery. The EDV could visualize the earthquake damage efficiently using Horizontal transmit and Horizontal receive (HH), and Horizontal transmit and Vertical receive (HV) polarizations data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2). Its performance was evaluated in the Kathmandu Valley, which was hit severely by the 2015 Nepal Earthquake. The cross-validation results showed that the EDV is more sensitive to the damaged buildings than the existing method. The EDV could be used for building damage detection in other earthquakes as well.

  4. An Evaluation of the Applicability of Damage Tolerance to Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Le, Dy; Turnberg, Jay

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the aircraft industry have teamed together to develop methods and guidance for the safe life-cycle management of dynamic systems. Based on the success of the United States Air Force damage tolerance initiative for airframe structure, a crack growth based damage tolerance approach is being examined for implementation into the design and management of dynamic systems. However, dynamic systems accumulate millions of vibratory cycles per flight hour, more than 12,000 times faster than an airframe system. If a detectable crack develops in a dynamic system, the time to failure is extremely short, less than 100 flight hours in most cases, leaving little room for error in the material characterization, life cycle analysis, nondestructive inspection and maintenance processes. In this paper, the authors review the damage tolerant design process focusing on uncertainties that affect dynamic systems and evaluate the applicability of damage tolerance on dynamic systems.

  5. Adaptive Piezoelectric Circuitry Sensor Network with High-Frequency Harmonics Interrogation for Structural Damage Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-17

    Harmonics Interrogation for Structural Damage Detection FA9550-11-1-0072 Kon-Well Wang and Jiong Tang The Regents of the University of Michigan, 3003...Well Wang 734-764-8464 1    Adaptive Piezoelectric Circuitry Sensor Network with High-Frequency Harmonics Interrogation for Structural Damage Detection...limitations. This research explores damage identification via advancing a third type of approach: high-frequency harmonic excitation-based self

  6. Highly Sensitive and Robust Damage Detection of Periodic Structures with Piezoelectric Networking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) December 15. 2006 to May 3 1. 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Highly Sensitive and Robust Damage...localization characteristics of such periodic structures to enhance damage detection sensitivity and robustness through piezoelectric circuitry...ANSI Sid Z39 18 Adobe Professional 7.0 Highly Sensitive and Robust Damage Detection of Periodic Structures with Piezoelectric Networking GRANT

  7. How tissue damage MET metabolism: Regulation of the systemic damage response

    PubMed Central

    Kashio, Soshiro; Obata, Fumiaki; Miura, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living organisms experience tissue damage from both, the surrounding environment and from inside their bodies. Tissue repair/regeneration is triggered by local tissue injury to restore an injured, or lost, part of the body. Tissue damage results in a series of responses, not only locally but also systemically in distant tissues. In our recent publication, we established a “dual system” that induces spatiotemporal tissue damage simultaneously with gene manipulation in surrounding tissues. With this system, we demonstrated that appropriate regulation of methionine metabolism in the fat body is required for tissue repair in Drosophila wing discs, thus highlighting the importance of systemic damage response (SDR) in tissue repair. This “Extra View” aims to discuss our recent reports that propose methionine metabolism to be an essential part of SDR, together with related topics in several model organisms. PMID:27562340

  8. Vibration-based damage detection for filament wound pressure vessel filled with fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Wu, Z.; Li, H.

    2008-03-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels have been extensively used in industry and engineering. The existing damage detection and health monitoring methods for these vessels, such as X-ray and ultrasonic scan, can not meet the requirement of online damage detection; moreover optical grating fibre can only sense the local damage, but not the damage far away from the location of sensors. Vibration-based damage detection methods have the potential to meet such requirements. There methods are based on the fact that damages in a structure results in a change in structural dynamic characteristics. A damage detection method based on a residual associated with output-only subspace-based modal identification and global or focused chi^2-tests built on that residual has been proposed and successfully experimented on a variety of test cases. The purpose of this work is to describe the damage detection method and apply this method to assess the composite structure filled with fluid. The results of identification and damage detection will be presented.

  9. Heat transfer computed tomography techniques for damage detection in metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nephi R.; Lynch, Jerome P.; Jeffers, Ann E.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of damage in structures at its earliest stages has many economical and safety benefits. Permanent monitoring systems using various forms of sensor networks and analysis methods are often employed to increase the frequency and diagnostic capabilities of inspections. Some of these techniques provide spatial/volumetric information about a given area/volume of a structure. Many of the available spatial sensing techniques can be costly and cannot be permanently deployed (e.g., IR camera thermography). For this reason intricate analysis methods using permanently deployable sensors are being developed (e.g., ultrasonic piezoelectrics, sensing skins). One approach is to leverage the low cost of heaters and temperature sensors to develop an economical, permanently installable method of spatial damage detection using heat transfer. This paper presents a method similar to that of X-ray computed tomography (CT). However, the theories for Xray CT must be adapted to properly represent heat transfer as well as account for the relatively large and immobile sensors spacing used on a structure (i.e., there is a finite number of heaters/sensors permanently installed around the perimeter of the area of interest). The derivation of heat transfer computed tomography is discussed in this paper including two methods for steering the effective heat wave. A high fidelity finite element method (FEM) model is used to verify the analytical derivation of individual steps within the method as well as simulate the complete damage detection technique. Experimental results from both damaged and undamaged aluminum plate specimens are used to validate the FEM model and to justify theoretical assumptions. The simulation results are discussed along with possible improvements and modifications to the technique.

  10. Fatigue crack damage detection using subharmonic component with nonlinear boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiliang; Shen, Yanfeng; Qu, Wenzhong; Xiao, Li; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, researchers have focused on structural health monitoring (SHM) and damage detection techniques using nonlinear vibration and nonlinear ultrasonic methods. Fatigue cracks may exhibit contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) with distinctive features such as superharmonics and subharmonics in the power spectrum of the sensing signals. However, challenges have been noticed in the practical applications of the harmonic methods. For instance, superharmonics can also be generated by the piezoelectric transducers and the electronic equipment; super/subharmonics may also stem from the nonlinear boundary conditions such as structural fixtures and joints. It is hard to tell whether the nonlinear features come from the structural damage or the intrinsic nonlinear boundary conditions. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the application of nonlinear ultrasonic subharmonic method for detecting fatigue cracks with nonlinear boundary conditions. The fatigue crack was qualitatively modeled as a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with non-classical hysteretic nonlinear interface forces at both sides of the crack surfaces. The threshold of subharmonic generation was studied, and the influence of crack interface parameters on the subharmonic resonance condition was investigated. The different threshold behaviors between the nonlinear boundary condition and the fatigue crack was found, which can be used to distinguish the source of nonlinear subharmonic features. To evaluate the proposed method, experiments of an aluminum plate with a fatigue crack were conducted to quantitatively verify the subharmonic resonance range. Two surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers were used to generate and receive ultrasonic wave signals. The fatigue damage was characterized in terms of a subharmonic damage index. The experimental results demonstrated that the subharmonic component of the sensing signal can be used to detect the fatigue crack and further distinguish it from

  11. Fatigue crack damage detection using subharmonic component with nonlinear boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weiliang Qu, Wenzhong E-mail: xiaoli6401@126.com; Xiao, Li E-mail: xiaoli6401@126.com; Shen, Yanfeng Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, researchers have focused on structural health monitoring (SHM) and damage detection techniques using nonlinear vibration and nonlinear ultrasonic methods. Fatigue cracks may exhibit contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) with distinctive features such as superharmonics and subharmonics in the power spectrum of the sensing signals. However, challenges have been noticed in the practical applications of the harmonic methods. For instance, superharmonics can also be generated by the piezoelectric transducers and the electronic equipment; super/subharmonics may also stem from the nonlinear boundary conditions such as structural fixtures and joints. It is hard to tell whether the nonlinear features come from the structural damage or the intrinsic nonlinear boundary conditions. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the application of nonlinear ultrasonic subharmonic method for detecting fatigue cracks with nonlinear boundary conditions. The fatigue crack was qualitatively modeled as a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with non-classical hysteretic nonlinear interface forces at both sides of the crack surfaces. The threshold of subharmonic generation was studied, and the influence of crack interface parameters on the subharmonic resonance condition was investigated. The different threshold behaviors between the nonlinear boundary condition and the fatigue crack was found, which can be used to distinguish the source of nonlinear subharmonic features. To evaluate the proposed method, experiments of an aluminum plate with a fatigue crack were conducted to quantitatively verify the subharmonic resonance range. Two surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers were used to generate and receive ultrasonic wave signals. The fatigue damage was characterized in terms of a subharmonic damage index. The experimental results demonstrated that the subharmonic component of the sensing signal can be used to detect the fatigue crack and further distinguish it from

  12. Investigation of Fluorescence Microscopy as a Tool for Noninvasive Detection and Imaging of Damage Precursors at 351-nm

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Nostrand, M C; Staggs, M; Carr, C W; Hahn, D; Kozlowski, M R; Sheehan, L; Battersby, C; Burnham, A

    2001-11-01

    This work is an experimental investigation to evaluate the potential of fluorescence microscopy as a tool to detect surface contamination as well as reveal surface damage precursors on DKDP and SIO{sub 2} optics. To achieve these technical objectives, microscopic imaging systems were built that also incorporated in-situ damage testing capabilities. Fluorescence imaging experiments were performed using 351-nm laser excitation while damage testing was performed at relatively high laser fluences. The experimental results demonstrated the potential of this technique to address the aforementioned technical issues.

  13. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods.

  14. Damage detection by a FE model updating method using power spectral density: Numerical and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, Masoud; Esfandiari, Akbar; Khedmati, Mohammad Reza

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates the viability of damage detection using power spectral density (PSD) of structural response both numerically and experimentally. The paper establishes a sensitivity based damage detection method to use PSD. The advantages of PSD as a model updating metric are explained and its challenges are addressed. An approximate frequency response function of damaged model is used to redeem the method for the effect of incomplete measurement. The robust solution of the developed sensitivity equation is achieved through a least-squares error minimization scheme, and the challenging issues are discussed. The ability of the method in localizing and quantifying the damage and its robustness against measurement and modeling errors is investigated by a numerical example. Experimental vibration test data of a laboratory concrete beam with various level of distributed damage is used to probe the method in practical conditions. The results show that PSD of response can be used to detect damages in lower frequency ranges with acceptable accuracy.

  15. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %.

  16. Fluorescent reports for detection and measurement of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Houck, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of real populations are complicated by the inevitable coexistence of exposure to multiple agents within the target population. An alternative method for characterizing these types of exposures is to use the reactive chemical functional group as the toxic agent identify the corresponding classes (families) of damage as markers of effects. We have begun studies to develop spectrometric reporters of DNA damage that can be measured on intact DNA. The direct measurement of adducts on microgram levels of DNA from tissue biopsy may succeed because of the high sensitivity and selectivity of different reporter compounds. While one cannot readily distinguish between recent or persistent exposures, baseline values for individuals may be constructed. For example, normal oxidative metabolism and environmental radiation create oxidation processes that continually damage DNA. These reactions create lesions that can be measured with the reporter compound FABA [N- (5- fluoresceinyl), N[prime]-(3-boronatophenyl)thioureal]. We report preliminary observations with binding FABA (selective for cis, vicdiol structures) to damage sites present on intact nonirradiated and irradiated DNA from C3H10T[sub 1/2] cells. We have observed binding of 42,000 FABA per mouse tetraploid genome (9 billion base pairs) to the putative thymidylic glycol resulting from normal oxidative processes in nonirradiated DNA. Additional binding of FABA to DNA from cells exposed to 100, 300, and 500 rad shows an exponential increase in binding sites of up to 140,000 with 500 rad exposure. This damage reporter may prove useful in characterizing levels of nonovert and overt oxidative damage to DNA.

  17. SAR Remote Sensing for Urban Building Earthquake-Damage Detection and Assessment: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lixia; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Jingfa; Li, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Urban building damage detection and assessment after earthquake is crucial for effective post disaster relief actions. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a key sensor to provide vital information due to its ability to map the affected areas independently of weather conditions, day and night. Under the condition of medium resolution SAR image, change detection is usually applied to identify damaged building by comparing post-seismic to pre-seismic images based on the intensity correlation and interferometric coherence. However, the new high resolution on-orbit SAR sensors (e.g. Radarsat-2, TerraSAR-X/ TanDEM-X, COSMO-SkyMed etc.) have renewed interest in extraction information for monitoring the damage. Intensity, phase and polarimetric information are usually adopted for the damage detection and assessment. The present paper reviews the theoretical background and applications of SAR remote sensing techniques to the study of urban building damage detection and assessment by earthquake.

  18. Thermography Inspection for Early Detection of Composite Damage in Structures During Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Parker, F. Raymond; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Wright, Christopher W.; Bly, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composite structures are commonly tested under controlled loading. Understanding the initiation and progression of composite damage under load is critical for validating design concepts and structural analysis tools. Thermal nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is used to detect and characterize damage in composite structures during fatigue loading. A difference image processing algorithm is demonstrated to enhance damage detection and characterization by removing thermal variations not associated with defects. In addition, a one-dimensional multilayered thermal model is used to characterize damage. Lastly, the thermography results are compared to other inspections such as non-immersion ultrasonic inspections and computed tomography X-ray.

  19. Photoelectric detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. R.; Schansman, R. R.

    1982-03-01

    A photoelectric beam system for the detection of the arrival of an object at a discrete station wherein artificial light, natural light, or no light may be present is described. A signal generator turns on and off a signal light at a selected frequency. When the object in question arrives on station, ambient light is blocked by the object, and the light from the signal light is reflected onto a photoelectric sensor which has a delayed electrical output but is of the frequency of the signal light. Outputs from both the signal source and the photoelectric sensor are fed to inputs of an exclusively OR detector which provides as an output the difference between them. The difference signal is a small width pulse occurring at the frequency of the signal source. By filter means, this signal is distinguished from those responsive to sunlight, darkness, or 120 Hz artificial light. In this fashion, the presence of an object is positively established.

  20. Time-frequency vibration analysis for the detection of motor damages caused by bearing currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudhom, Aurelien; Antonino-Daviu, Jose; Razik, Hubert; Climente-Alarcon, Vicente

    2017-02-01

    Motor failure due to bearing currents is an issue that has drawn an increasing industrial interest over recent years. Bearing currents usually appear in motors operated by variable frequency drives (VFD); these drives may lead to common voltage modes which cause currents induced in the motor shaft that are discharged through the bearings. The presence of these currents may lead to the motor bearing failure only few months after system startup. Vibration monitoring is one of the most common ways for detecting bearing damages caused by circulating currents; the evaluation of the amplitudes of well-known characteristic components in the vibration Fourier spectrum that are associated with race, ball or cage defects enables to evaluate the bearing condition and, hence, to identify an eventual damage due to bearing currents. However, the inherent constraints of the Fourier transform may complicate the detection of the progressive bearing degradation; for instance, in some cases, other frequency components may mask or be confused with bearing defect-related while, in other cases, the analysis may not be suitable due to the eventual non-stationary nature of the captured vibration signals. Moreover, the fact that this analysis implies to lose the time-dimension limits the amount of information obtained from this technique. This work proposes the use of time-frequency (T-F) transforms to analyse vibration data in motors affected by bearing currents. The experimental results obtained in real machines show that the vibration analysis via T-F tools may provide significant advantages for the detection of bearing current damages; among other, these techniques enable to visualise the progressive degradation of the bearing while providing an effective discrimination versus other components that are not related with the fault. Moreover, their application is valid regardless of the operation regime of the machine. Both factors confirm the robustness and reliability of these tools

  1. Damage detection of metro tunnel structure through transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis using local excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Xie, Xiongyao; Wang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    In a modern metropolis, metro rail systems have become a dominant mode for mass transportation. The structural health of a metro tunnel is closely related to public safety. Many vibration-based techniques for detecting and locating structural damage have been developed in the past several decades. However, most damage detection techniques and validation tests are focused on bridge and building structures; very few studies have been reported on tunnel structures. Among these techniques, transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are two well-known diagnostic approaches. The former operates in frequency domain and the latter in time domain. Both approaches can be applied to detect and locate damage through acceleration data obtained from sensor arrays. Furthermore, the two approaches can directly utilize structural response data without requiring excitation measurement, which offers advantages in field testing on a large structure. In this research, a numerical finite element model of a metro tunnel is built and different types of structural defects are introduced at multiple locations of the tunnel. Transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are applied to perform structural damage detection and localization, based on simulated structural vibration data. Numerical results demonstrate that the introduced defects can be successfully identified and located. The sensitivity and feasibility of the two approaches have been verified when sufficient distribution of measurement locations is available. Damage detection results of the two different approaches are compared and discussed.

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  3. Alkylation damage by lipid electrophiles targets functional protein systems.

    PubMed

    Codreanu, Simona G; Ullery, Jody C; Zhu, Jing; Tallman, Keri A; Beavers, William N; Porter, Ned A; Marnett, Lawrence J; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C

    2014-03-01

    Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions.

  4. Sequential structural damage diagnosis algorithm using a change point detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, H.; Rajagopal, R.; Kiremidjian, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper introduces a damage diagnosis algorithm for civil structures that uses a sequential change point detection method. The general change point detection method uses the known pre- and post-damage feature distributions to perform a sequential hypothesis test. In practice, however, the post-damage distribution is unlikely to be known a priori, unless we are looking for a known specific type of damage. Therefore, we introduce an additional algorithm that estimates and updates this distribution as data are collected using the maximum likelihood and the Bayesian methods. We also applied an approximate method to reduce the computation load and memory requirement associated with the estimation. The algorithm is validated using a set of experimental data collected from a four-story steel special moment-resisting frame and multiple sets of simulated data. Various features of different dimensions have been explored, and the algorithm was able to identify damage, particularly when it uses multidimensional damage sensitive features and lower false alarm rates, with a known post-damage feature distribution. For unknown feature distribution cases, the post-damage distribution was consistently estimated and the detection delays were only a few time steps longer than the delays from the general method that assumes we know the post-damage feature distribution. We confirmed that the Bayesian method is particularly efficient in declaring damage with minimal memory requirement, but the maximum likelihood method provides an insightful heuristic approach.

  5. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  6. Application of atomic decomposition to gear damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Chu, Fulei

    2007-04-01

    Atomic decomposition can represent arbitrary signals in an overcomplete dictionary sparsely and adaptively, and it can match the local structure of signals very well. Therefore, it possesses advantages over traditional basis-expansion-based signal analysis methods, in extracting characteristic waveforms from complicated mechanical vibration signals. Periodic impulses characterize damaged gear vibration. In order to extract the transient features of gear vibration, atomic decomposition methods, including method of frames (MOF), best orthogonal basis (BOB), matching pursuit (MP) and basis pursuit (BP), are used in the analysis of vibration signals from both healthy and faulty gearboxes. With a compound dictionary specially designed to match the local structure of signals, the meshing frequency and its harmonics, impulses and transient phenomena of the damaged gear vibration signals are extracted simultaneously. Furthermore, from the time-frequency plots of atomic decomposition, the gear tooth damage is recognized easily according to the periodic impulses. By comparing with traditional time-frequency analysis methods, e.g. short time Fourier transform and continuous wavelet transform, it is found that atomic decomposition is more effective in simultaneously extracting the impulses and harmonic components of damaged gear vibration signals.

  7. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING A FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fiber optic biosensor assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. For this assay, a biotin-labeled capture oligonucleotide (38 mer) was immobilized to an avidin-coated quartz fiber. Hybridization of a dye-labeled complementary sequence was observed...

  8. A New Approach to Overcoming Spatial Aliasing in Structural Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Mark J.; Naser, Ahmad S.; Thyagarajan, Sunil K.; Mickens, Travluss; Pai, Frank

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft, reusable launch vehicles,unmanned aircraft, and other advanced structures are being built using lightweight composite materials/metals with design safety factors as low as 1.25. These advanced structures operate in uncertain and severe environments and are susceptible to damage such as delamination, fiber/matrix damage, hydrothermal strain in composite materials, and fatigue and cracking in metals. To ensure human safety and load-bearing integrity these structures must be inspected to detect and locate often invisible damage and faults before they become catastrophic. Conventional methods of non-destructive evaluation sometimes miss significant damage and are time consuming and expensive to perform. In contrast, vibrometry or vibration signature techniques are a global method of structural integrity monitoring that potentially can efficiently detect damage on large structures, including damage that is away from sensor locations, and in the interior of structures. However, a barrier problem in damage detection using vibration measurements is the need to measure the vibration response at a large number of points on the structure. Typically, model reduction or expansion procedures such as Guyan reduction or dynamic expansion are attempted to overcome the problem of insufficient measurements or spatial aliasing. These approaches depend on using information from the healthy model, and thus put error into the reduction used to represent the damaged structure. In this paper, a Frequency Response Function technique is used to detect damage to a fixed-free beam. The technique uses measured frequency response functions from the healthy structure as reference data, and then monitors vibration measurements during the life of the structure to detect damage. In an analytical simulation using a finite-element model of a beam, damage was located using only sparse measurements because the technique uses both rotation and translation measurements from the damaged structure.

  9. Damage Detection on Sudden Stiffness Reduction Based on Discrete Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Gan-jun; Xie, Wei-ping

    2014-01-01

    The sudden stiffness reduction in a structure may cause the signal discontinuity in the acceleration responses close to the damage location at the damage time instant. To this end, the damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction of building structures has been actively investigated in this study. The signal discontinuity of the structural acceleration responses of an example building is extracted based on the discrete wavelet transform. It is proved that the variation of the first level detail coefficients of the wavelet transform at damage instant is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the stiffness reduction. A new damage index is proposed and implemented to detect the damage time instant, location, and severity of a structure due to a sudden change of structural stiffness. Numerical simulation using a five-story shear building under different types of excitation is carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed damage index for the building at different damage levels. The sensitivity of the damage index to the intensity and frequency range of measurement noise is also investigated. The made observations demonstrate that the proposed damage index can accurately identify the sudden damage events if the noise intensity is limited. PMID:24991647

  10. Detection of Localized Heat Damage in a Polymer Matrix Composite by Thermo-Elastic Method (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2007-437 DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY THERMO-ELASTIC METHOD (PREPRINT) John Welter...GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY THERMO-ELASTIC METHOD (PREPRINT) 5c...Include Area Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 1 DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY

  11. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury.

  12. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury. PMID:28327610

  13. Intelligent Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohaghegh, Shahab D.

    2014-10-27

    apability of underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain injected CO2 for a very long time is the main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration. If a leakage from a geological CO2 sequestration site occurs, it is crucial to find the approximate amount and the location of the leak in order to implement proper remediation activity. An overwhelming majority of research and development for storage site monitoring has been concentrated on atmospheric, surface or near surface monitoring of the sequestered CO2. This study aims to monitor the integrity of CO2 storage at the reservoir level. This work proposes developing in-situ CO2 Monitoring and Verification technology based on the implementation of Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG) or “Smart Wells” along with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM). The technology attempts to identify the characteristics of the CO2 leakage by de-convolving the pressure signals collected from Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG). Citronelle field, a saline aquifer reservoir, located in the U.S. was considered for this study. A reservoir simulation model for CO2 sequestration in the Citronelle field was developed and history matched. The presence of the PDGs were considered in the reservoir model at the injection well and an observation well. High frequency pressure data from sensors were collected based on different synthetic CO2 leakage scenarios in the model. Due to complexity of the pressure signal behaviors, a Machine Learning-based technology was introduced to build an Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS). The ILDS was able to detect leakage characteristics in a short period of time (less than a day) demonstrating the capability of the system in quantifying leakage characteristics subject to complex rate behaviors. The performance of ILDS was examined under different conditions such as multiple well leakages, cap rock leakage, availability of an additional monitoring well, presence of pressure drift and noise

  14. Vibrometric Detection of Beam Damage Due to Inclusions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    fatigue cracks, thermal exposure, overstressing, etc. The central focus of SHM is to identify the presence of a change in structural integrity as...vibration monitoring for damage presence began with rotor cracking in machinery and railroad equipment, as presented by Dimaroganas (1970) and Nagy...Dousis, and Finch (1978). The latter work has been noted to explain that “the presence of cracks [in railroad wheels] causes some resonance

  15. Detection of localized fatigue damage in steel by thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medgenberg, Justus; Ummenhofer, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Fatigue damage of unalloyed steels in the high cycle regime is governed by localized cyclic plastic deformations and subsequent crack initiation. The extent of early microplastic deformations depends on the applied stress level, stress concentration at macroscopic notches, surface treatment, residual stresses etc. The onset of a nonlinear material response can be regarded as an early indicator of fatigue damage. During fatigue loading thermoelastic coupling and thermoplastic dissipation cause characteristic temperature variations in tested specimens which have been assessed by a highly sensitive infrared camera. A specialized data processing method in the time domain has been developed which allows to separate the different contributions to the measured temperature signal. In contrast to other methods - as e.g. measuring the rise of mean temperature during fatigue loading - the proposed methodology is based on measurements during the stabilized temperature regimen and offers very high spatial resolution of localized phenomena. Investigations have been made on mildly notched cylindrical and also on welded specimens. The results confirm the close relation between the local temperature signal and typical fatigue phenomena. The new methodology allows for a much better localization and quantification of effects as cyclic plasticity, crack initiation, crack growth etc. The following paper presents considerations and experimental results of an application of thermography to the local assessment of fatigue damage.

  16. Embedding damage detection algorithms in a wireless sensing unit for operational power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Jerome Peter; Sundararajan, Arvind; Law, Kincho H.; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Carryer, Ed

    2004-08-01

    A low-cost wireless sensing unit is designed and fabricated for deployment as the building block of wireless structural health monitoring systems. Finite operational lives of portable power supplies, such as batteries, necessitate optimization of the wireless sensing unit design to attain overall energy efficiency. This is in conflict with the need for wireless radios that have far-reaching communication ranges that require significant amounts of power. As a result, a penalty is incurred by transmitting raw time-history records using scarce system resources such as battery power and bandwidth. Alternatively, a computational core that can accommodate local processing of data is designed and implemented in the wireless sensing unit. The role of the computational core is to perform interrogation tasks of collected raw time-history data and to transmit via the wireless channel the analysis results rather than time-history records. To illustrate the ability of the computational core to execute such embedded engineering analyses, a two-tiered time-series damage detection algorithm is implemented as an example. Using a lumped-mass laboratory structure, local execution of the embedded damage detection method is shown to save energy by avoiding utilization of the wireless channel to transmit raw time-history data.

  17. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  18. Bridge damage detection using spatiotemporal patterns extracted from dense sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Gong, Yongqiang; Laflamme, Simon; Phares, Brent; Sarkar, Soumik

    2017-01-01

    The alarmingly degrading state of transportation infrastructures combined with their key societal and economic importance calls for automatic condition assessment methods to facilitate smart management of maintenance and repairs. With the advent of ubiquitous sensing and communication capabilities, scalable data-driven approaches is of great interest, as it can utilize large volume of streaming data without requiring detailed physical models that can be inaccurate and computationally expensive to run. Properly designed, a data-driven methodology could enable fast and automatic evaluation of infrastructures, discovery of causal dependencies among various sub-system dynamic responses, and decision making with uncertainties and lack of labeled data. In this work, a spatiotemporal pattern network (STPN) strategy built on symbolic dynamic filtering (SDF) is proposed to explore spatiotemporal behaviors in a bridge network. Data from strain gauges installed on two bridges are generated using finite element simulation for three types of sensor networks from a density perspective (dense, nominal, sparse). Causal relationships among spatially distributed strain data streams are extracted and analyzed for vehicle identification and detection, and for localization of structural degradation in bridges. Multiple case studies show significant capabilities of the proposed approach in: (i) capturing spatiotemporal features to discover causality between bridges (geographically close), (ii) robustness to noise in data for feature extraction, (iii) detecting and localizing damage via comparison of bridge responses to similar vehicle loads, and (iv) implementing real-time health monitoring and decision making work flow for bridge networks. Also, the results demonstrate increased sensitivity in detecting damages and higher reliability in quantifying the damage level with increase in sensor network density.

  19. Incipient fire detection system

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, Jr., William K.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for an incipient fire detection system that receives gaseous samples and measures the light absorption spectrum of the mixture of gases evolving from heated combustibles includes a detector for receiving gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy and determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples. The wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples are compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. The method includes receiving gaseous samples, subjecting the samples to light spectroscopy, determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples, comparing the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples to predetermined absorption wavelengths and generating a warning signal whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. In an alternate embodiment, the apparatus includes a series of channels fluidically connected to a plurality of remote locations. A pump is connected to the channels for drawing gaseous samples into the channels. A detector is connected to the channels for receiving the drawn gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy. The wavelengths of absorption are determined and compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths is provided. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths correspond.

  20. Detection of damage in multiwire cables based on wavelet entropy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Flor; Baltazar, Arturo; Mijarez, Rito

    2015-08-01

    Multiwire cables are widely used in important engineering structures. Since they are exposed to several dynamic and static loads as well as detrimental environmental conditions, their structural health can be compromised. Due to the critical role played by multiwire cables, it is necessary to develop a non-destructive health monitoring method to maintain their structure and proper performance. Ultrasonic inspection using guided waves is a promising non-destructive damage monitoring technique for rods, single and multiwire cables. However, the propagated guided waves are composed of an infinite number of dispersive vibrational modes making their analysis difficult. In this work, an entropy-based method to identify small changes in non-stationary signals is proposed. An experimental system to capture and post-process acoustic signals is implemented. The discrete wavelet transform is computed in order to obtain the reconstructed wavelet coefficients of the signals and to analyze the energy at different scales. The use of the concept of entropy evolution of non-stationary signals to detect damage in multiwire cables is evaluated. The results show that there is a correlation between the entropy value and level of damage of the cable including breaking of single wires and change in the mechanical contact conditions among the wires. It is found that the studied method has low sensitivity to signal noise and can reduce the computational complexity encountered in a typical time-frequency analysis.

  1. Detection of structural damage in multiwire cables by monitoring the entropy evolution of wavelet coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Flor; Baltazar, Arturo; Mijarez, Rito; Aranda, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Multiwire cables are widely used in important civil structures. Since they are exposed to several dynamic and static loads, their structural health can be compromised. The cables can also be submitted to mechanical contact, tension and energy propagation in addition to changes in size and material within their wires. Due to the critical role played by multiwire cables, it is necessary to develop a non-destructive health monitoring method to maintain their structure and proper performance. Ultrasonic inspection using guided waves is a promising non-destructive damage monitoring technique for rods, single wires and multiwire cables. The propagated guided waves are composed by an infinite number of vibrational modes making their analysis difficult. In this work, an entropy-based method to identify small changes in non-stationary signals is proposed. A system to capture and post-process acoustic signals is implemented. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) is computed in order to obtain the reconstructed wavelet coefficients of the signals and to analyze the energy at different scales. The feasibility of using the concept of entropy evolution of non-stationary signals to detect damage in multiwire cables is evaluated. The results show that there is a high correlation between the entropy value and damage level of the cable. The proposed method has low sensitivity to noise and reduces the computational complexity found in a typical time-frequency analysis.

  2. Damage detection and quantification in a structural model under seismic excitation using time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun-Kai; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Wu, Tzu-Hsiu

    2015-04-01

    In civil engineering, health monitoring and damage detection are typically carry out by using a large amount of sensors. Typically, most methods require global measurements to extract the properties of the structure. However, some sensors, like LVDT, cannot be used due to in situ limitation so that the global deformation remains unknown. An experiment is used to demonstrate the proposed algorithms: a one-story 2-bay reinforce concrete frame under weak and strong seismic excitation. In this paper signal processing techniques and nonlinear identification are used and applied to the response measurements of seismic response of reinforced concrete structures subject to different level of earthquake excitations. Both modal-based and signal-based system identification and feature extraction techniques are used to study the nonlinear inelastic response of RC frame using both input and output response data or output only measurement. From the signal-based damage identification method, which include the enhancement of time-frequency analysis of acceleration responses and the estimation of permanent deformation using directly from acceleration response data. Finally, local deformation measurement from dense optical tractor is also use to quantify the damage of the RC frame structure.

  3. Damage detection in aircraft structures using dynamically measured static flexibility matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, N.A.; Peterson, L.D.; James, G.H.; Doebling, S.W.

    1996-02-01

    Two methods for detecting the location of structural damage in an aircraft fuselage using modal test data are presented. Both methods use the dynamically measured static flexibility matrix, which is assembled from a combination of measured modal vectors, frequencies, and driving point residual flexibilities. As a consequence, neither method requires a mode-to-mode correlation, and both avoid tedious modal discrimination and selection. The first method detects damage as a softening in the point flexibility components, which are the diagonal entries in the flexibility matrix. The second method detects damage from the disassembled elemental stiffnesses as determined using a presumed connectivity. Vibration data from a laser vibrometer is used to measure the modal mechanics of a DC9 aircraft fuselage before and after induced weakening in a longitudinal stringer. Both methods are shown to detect the location of the damage, primarily because the normal stiffness of the reinforced shell of the fuselage is localized to a few square centimeters.

  4. Simulation of Detecting Damage in Composite Stiffened Panel Using Lamb Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Ross, Richard W.; Huang, Guo L.; Yuan, Fuh G.

    2013-01-01

    Lamb wave damage detection in a composite stiffened panel is simulated by performing explicit transient dynamic finite element analyses and using signal imaging techniques. This virtual test process does not need to use real structures, actuators/sensors, or laboratory equipment. Quasi-isotropic laminates are used for the stiffened panels. Two types of damage are studied. One type is a damage in the skin bay and the other type is a debond between the stiffener flange and the skin. Innovative approaches for identifying the damage location and imaging the damage were developed. The damage location is identified by finding the intersection of the damage locus and the path of the time reversal wave packet re-emitted from the sensor nodes. The damage locus is a circle that envelops the potential damage locations. Its center is at the actuator location and its radius is computed by multiplying the group velocity by the time of flight to damage. To create a damage image for estimating the size of damage, a group of nodes in the neighborhood of the damage location is identified for applying an image condition. The image condition, computed at a finite element node, is the zero-lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) of the time-reversed incident wave signal and the time reversal wave signal from the sensor nodes. This damage imaging process is computationally efficient since only the ZLCC values of a small amount of nodes in the neighborhood of the identified damage location are computed instead of those of the full model.

  5. Systemic DNA damage responses in aging and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ribezzo, Flavia; Shiloh, Yosef; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The genome is constantly attacked by a variety of genotoxic insults. The causal role for DNA damage in aging and cancer is exemplified by genetic defects in DNA repair that underlie a broad spectrum of acute and chronic human disorders that are characterized by developmental abnormalities, premature aging, and cancer predisposition. The disease symptoms are typically tissue-specific with uncertain genotype-phenotype correlation. The cellular DNA damage response (DDR) has been extensively investigated ever since yeast geneticists discovered DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms, several decades ago. In recent years, it has become apparent that not only cell-autonomous but also systemic DNA damage responses determine the outcome of genome instability in organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of non-cell-autonomous DNA damage responses will provide important new insights into the role of genome instability in human aging and a host of diseases including cancer and might better explain the complex phenotypes caused by genome instability. PMID:26773346

  6. Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Masanobu; Lee, Sungchil; Kim, Sehwan; Chou, Pai H.

    2011-04-01

    Early detection of pipeline damages has been highlighted in water supply industry. Water pressure change in pipeline due to a sudden rupture causes pipe to vibrate and the pressure change propagates through the pipeline. From the measurement of pipe vibration the rupture can be detected. In this paper, the field test results and observations are provided for implementing next generation of SCADA system for pipeline rupture detection. Two field tests were performed on real buried plastic and metal pipelines for rupture detection. The rupture was simulated by introducing sudden water pressure drop caused by water blow-off and valve control. The measured acceleration data at the pipe surfaces were analyzed in both time and frequency domain. In time domain, the sudden narrow increase of acceleration amplitude was used as an indication of rupture event. For the frequency domain analysis, correlation function and the short time Fourier Transform technique were adopted to trace the dominant frequency shift. The success of rupture detection was found to be dependent on several factors. From the frequency analysis, the dominant frequency of metal water pipe was shifted by the water pressure drop, however, it was hard to identify from the plastic pipeline. Also the influence of existing facility such as airvac on pipe vibrations was observed. Finally, several critical lessons learned in the viewpoint of field measurement are discussed in this paper.

  7. Electrical Resistance of Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection or inspection of a component during "down time". The correlation of damage with appropriate failure mechanism can then be applied to accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites.

  8. Smart Composite Damage Assessment System Based on the Neural Network,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-04

    sensor arrays, shape memory alloy wires, and Kohenen self-organizing neural network processors. Material damage detection is realized by embedded optical...fiber sensor arrays. High speed neural network parallel distribution processors composed of TM5320C25 high speed parallel processors and IBM PC/386’s

  9. Damage detection in plates using the electromechanical impedance technique based on decoupled measurements of piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, Hector A.; Robledo-Callejas, Leonardo; Marulanda, Dairon J.; Serpa, Alberto L.

    2016-12-01

    Electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique plays an important role in the monitoring of structures with piezoelectric transducers (PT). According to the EMI technique, diagnosis and prognosis can be carried out to detect structural modifications in an operative state. However, to develop an efficient methodology for damage detection; damage metrics and patterns should be defined using indices to quantify changes in the signals. In this study, a new approach is proposed considering the electrical impedance (EI) of PT as an array of coupled electrical impedances. It means that when a PT is bonded to a structure, the EI is governed by an electrical circuit that is assumed to be parallel and composed by electrical contributions of both, the structure and the PT. In our perspective, each free PT presents unique mechanical characteristics and those differences may influence the measured electrical signals, therefore the electrical contributions generated by each piezo-transducer are taken into account. To evaluate the electrical decoupling, two methodologies of damage detection are proposed to identify and locate an induced damage. In these methodologies, the damage metrics are based on ellipses of Gaussian confidence. Four experimental tests were performed to evaluate the methodologies, applying two damage intensities. The results show that the partial process of identification of a damage type is a feasible and applicable procedure, moreover the proposed method was able to evidence the damage location..

  10. PCA algorithm for detection, localisation and evolution of damages in gearbox bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirra, M.; Gandino, E.; Torri, A.; Garibaldi, L.; Machorro-López, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    A fundamental aspect when dealing with rolling element bearings, which often represent a key component in rotating machineries, consists in correctly identifying a degraded behaviour of a bearing with a reasonable level of confidence. This is one of the main requirements a health and usage monitoring system (HUMS) should have. This paper introduces a monitoring technique for the diagnosis of bearing faults based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This method overcomes the problem of acquiring data under different environmental conditions (hardly biasing the data) and allows accurate damage recognition, also assuring a rather low number of False Alarms (FA). In addition, a novel criterion is proposed in order to isolate the area in which the faulty bearing stands. Another useful feature of this PCA-based method concerns the capability to observe an increasing trend in the evolution of bearing degradation. The described technique is tested on an industrial rig (designed by Avio S.p.A.), consisting of a full size aeroengine gearbox. Healthy and variously damaged bearings, such as with an inner or rolling element fault, are set up and vibration signals are collected and processed in order to properly detect a fault. Finally, data collected from a test rig assembled by the Dynamics & Identification Research Group (DIRG) are used to demonstrate that the proposed method is able to correctly detect and to classify different levels of the same type of fault and also to localise it.

  11. Simulation Based Investigation of Hidden Delamination Damage Detection in CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Guided wave (GW) based damage detection methods have shown promise in structural health monitoring (SHM) and hybrid SHM-nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. Much previous GW work in the aerospace field has been primarily focused on metallic materials, with a growing focus on composite materials. The work presented in this paper demonstrates how realistic three-dimensional (3D) GW simulations can aid in the development of GW based damage characterization techniques for aerospace composites. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique is implemented to model GW interaction with realistic delamination damage. A local wavenumber technique is applied to simulation data in order to investigate the detectability of hidden delamination damage to enable accurate characterization of damage extent.

  12. Damage detection of concrete masonry structures by enhancing deformation measurement using DIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhassani, Mohammad; Rajaram, Satish; Hamid, Ahmad A.; Kontsos, Antonios; Bartoli, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on deformability and damage detection of a concrete masonry wall. It employed point-to-point traditional strain gages and full-field measurement technique using digital image correlation (DIC) to investigate the damage and deformability of a partially grouted (PG) reinforced masonry wall. A set of ungrouted and grouted assemblages and full-scale concrete masonry shear wall were constructed and tested under displacement control loading. The wall was constructed according with masonry standards joint committee (MSJC 2013) and tested under constant vertical compression load and horizontal lateral load using quasi-static displacement procedure. The DIC method was used to determine non-uniform strain contours on the assemblages. This method was verified by comparing strains along the selected directions with traditional TML gage results. After a successful comparison, the method was used to investigate the state of damage and deformability of the wall specimen. Panel deformation, crack pattern, displacement at the top, and the base strain of the wall were captured using full-field measurement and results were in a good agreement with traditional strain gages. It is concluded that full-filed measurements using DIC is promising especially when the test specimens experience inelastic deformation and high degree of damage. The ability to characterize and anticipate failure mechanisms of concrete masonry systems by depicting strain distribution, categorizing structural cracks and investigating their effects on the behavior of the wall were also shown using DIC. In addition to monitoring strains across the gage length, the DIC method provided full-field strain behavior of the test specimens and revealed strain hotspots at locations that corresponded to failure.

  13. Damage detection using transient trajectories in phase-space with extended random decrement technique under non-stationary excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Mao, Zhu; Todd, Michael

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a damage detection method based on the geometrical variation of transient trajectories in phase-space, and the proposed methodology is compatible with non-stationary excitations (e.g., earthquake-induced ground motion). The work presented assumes zero-mean non-stationary excitation, and extends the random decrement technique to convert non-stationary response signals of the structure into free-vibration data. Transient trajectories of the structure are reconstructed via the embedding theorem from the converted free-vibration data, and trajectories are mapped successively into phase-space to enhance statistical analysis. Based upon the characterized system dynamics in terms of phase-space, the time prediction error is adopted as the damage index. To identify the presence and severity of damage in a statistically rigorous way, receiver operating characteristic curves and the Bhattacharyya distance are employed. The results from both numerical simulations and experiments validate the proposed framework, when the test structures are subject to non-stationary excitations. The extension achieved in this paper enables the phase-space damage detection approach to be compatible with non-stationary scenarios, such as traffic, wind, and earthquake loadings. Moreover, the results indicate that this phase-state-based method is able to identify damage-induced nonlinearity in response, which is an intrinsic characteristic associated with most structural damage types.

  14. Efficient baseline gathering and damage detection in guided wave structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, A. J.; Putkis, O.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring (SHM) has been proposed as a technique to allow permanently attached sensors to provide information about the state of a structure. Typical approaches rely on gathering information about the baseline state of the structure and using this data with subtraction to highlight changes to the system. This relies on the baseline data accurately representing the conditions that the system will experience. In reality this is difficult to ensure and may result in either large periods out of service or poor performance. In addition the size of the baseline set can become prohibitively large. This paper describes an alternative approach that produces an efficient continuously evolving baseline. The paper considers how damage detection performance can be characterized within this framework and presents a series of metrics to do this. The result is a new way of considering the baseline problem with practical applications to the long term inspection of structures.

  15. Detection of damaged urban areas using interferometric SAR coherence change with PALSAR-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Manabu; Thapa, Rajesh Bahadur; Ohsumi, Tsuneo; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Yonezawa, Chinatsu; Tomii, Naoya; Suzuki, Sinichi

    2016-07-01

    The interferometric SAR coherence-change technique with coherence filter and polarization (HH and HV) has been used to detect the parts of buildings damaged by the 2015 Gorkha Earthquake. A survey of the building damage was conducted in every house to evaluate the detection accuracy in the Khokana and Sankhu urban areas in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal. The damaged parts of the urban area were adequately detected using coherence-change (∆ γ) values obtained before the earthquake ( γ pre) and during the inter-seismic stage of the earthquake ( γ int). The use of a coherence filter effectively increased overall accuracy by ~2.1 to 7.0 % with HH polarization. The incorporation of HV polarization marginally increased the accuracy (~0.9 to 1.2 %). It was confirmed that road damage due to liquefaction was also observed using the interferometric SAR coherence-change detection technique. The classification accuracy was lower (27.1-35.1 %) for areas that were damaged. However, higher accuracy (97.8-99.2 %) was achieved for areas that were damage-free, in ∆ γ obtained from HH and HV polarization with a coherence filter. This helped to identify the damaged urban areas (using this technique) immediately after occurrence of an earthquake event.

  16. Detection and characterization of impact damage in composite panels using multiple ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2015-03-01

    Abrupt impacts to solid laminate composite panels often produce internal damage that is not visible on the impacted surface. It is important that such damage be promptly detected since it can compromise the strength of composite structures. Ultrasonic C-scan imaging has been extensively used to detect and characterize impact damage using both pulse-echo and through-transmission methods. More recently developed guided wave imaging methods, such as sparse array imaging with baseline subtraction and wavefield imaging, have also been used to successfully detect damage in composite panels; however, their performance is generally not comparable to that achieved with bulk wave C-scans. For this study, various force impacts were used to create defect conditions ranging from barely detectable damage to extensive damage that was visible on the impact surface. Guided wave signals were recorded from an attached sparse transducer array before and after the impacts, and panels were scanned using both conventional ultrasonic C-scan methods and acoustic wavefield imaging. For each method, imaging results are presented and compared in terms of their ability to locate and characterize impact damage.

  17. Lymphocyte DNA damage in Turkish asphalt workers detected by the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Bacaksiz, Aysegul; Kayaalti, Zeliha; Soylemez, Esma; Tutkun, Engin; Soylemezoglu, Tulin

    2014-01-01

    Asphalt has a highly complex structure and it contains several organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds. In this study, comet assay was used to detect the DNA damage in blood lymphocytes of 30 workers exposed to asphalt fumes and 30 nonexposed controls. This is the first report on Turkish asphalt workers' investigated DNA damage using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). The DNA damage was evaluated by the percentage of DNA in the comet tail (% tail DNA) for each cell. According to our results, workers exposed to asphalt fumes had higher DNA damage than the control group (p < 0.01). The present study showed that asphalt fumes caused a significant increase in DNA damage and the comet assay is a suitable method for determining DNA damage in asphalt workers.

  18. Evolutionary Algorithms Approach to the Solution of Damage Detection Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Pinto, Pedro Yoajim; Begambre, Oscar

    2010-09-01

    In this work is proposed a new Self-Configured Hybrid Algorithm by combining the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The aim of the proposed strategy is to increase the stability and accuracy of the search. The central idea is the concept of Guide Particle, this particle (the best PSO global in each generation) transmits its information to a particle of the following PSO generation, which is controlled by the GA. Thus, the proposed hybrid has an elitism feature that improves its performance and guarantees the convergence of the procedure. In different test carried out in benchmark functions, reported in the international literature, a better performance in stability and accuracy was observed; therefore the new algorithm was used to identify damage in a simple supported beam using modal data. Finally, it is worth noting that the algorithm is independent of the initial definition of heuristic parameters.

  19. Hand held explosives detection system

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sensitive hand-held explosives detection device capable of detecting the presence of extremely low quantities of high explosives molecules, and which is applicable to sampling vapors from personnel, baggage, cargo, etc., as part of an explosives detection system.

  20. Prestorm estimation of hurricane damage to electric power distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Guikema, Seth D; Quiring, Steven M; Han, Seung-Ryong

    2010-12-01

    Hurricanes frequently cause damage to electric power systems in the United States, leading to widespread and prolonged loss of electric service. Restoring service quickly requires the use of repair crews and materials that must be requested, at considerable cost, prior to the storm. U.S. utilities have struggled to strike a good balance between over- and underpreparation largely because of a lack of methods for rigorously estimating the impacts of an approaching hurricane on their systems. Previous work developed methods for estimating the risk of power outages and customer loss of power, with an outage defined as nontransitory activation of a protective device. In this article, we move beyond these previous approaches to directly estimate damage to the electric power system. Our approach is based on damage data from past storms together with regression and data mining techniques to estimate the number of utility poles that will need to be replaced. Because restoration times and resource needs are more closely tied to the number of poles and transformers that need to be replaced than to the number of outages, this pole-based assessment provides a much stronger basis for prestorm planning by utilities. Our results show that damage to poles during hurricanes can be assessed accurately, provided that adequate past damage data are available. However, the availability of data can, and currently often is, the limiting factor in developing these types of models in practice. Opportunities for further enhancing the damage data recorded during hurricanes are also discussed.

  1. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  2. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  3. Damage Detection with Streamlined Structural Health Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Deng, Jun; Xie, Weizhi

    2015-01-01

    The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM) systems often overwhelms the systems’ capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compression, interactive sensor data retrieval, and structural knowledge discovery, which aim to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and robustness of on-line SHM systems. Adoption of this new concept will enable the design of an on-line SHM system with more uniform data generation and data handling capacity for its subsystems. To examine this concept in the context of vibration-based SHM systems, real sensor data from an on-line SHM system comprising a scaled steel bridge structure and an on-line data acquisition system with remote data access was used in this study. Vibration test results clearly demonstrated the prominent performance characteristics of the proposed integrated SHM system including rapid data access, interactive data retrieval and knowledge discovery of structural conditions on a global level. PMID:25884788

  4. Detection of bearing damage by statistic vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The condition of bearings, which are essential components in mechanisms, is crucial to safety. The analysis of the bearing vibration signal, which is always contaminated by certain types of noise, is a very important standard for mechanical condition diagnosis of the bearing and mechanical failure phenomenon. In this paper the method of rolling bearing fault detection by statistical analysis of vibration is proposed to filter out Gaussian noise contained in a raw vibration signal. The results of experiments show that the vibration signal can be significantly enhanced by application of the proposed method. Besides, the proposed method is used to analyse real acoustic signals of a bearing with inner race and outer race faults, respectively. The values of attributes are determined according to the degree of the fault. The results confirm that the periods between the transients, which represent bearing fault characteristics, can be successfully detected.

  5. Locating Damage Using Integrated Global-Local Approach with Wireless Sensing System and Single-Chip Impedance Measurement Device

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Shih-Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study developed an integrated global-local approach for locating damage on building structures. A damage detection approach with a novel embedded frequency response function damage index (NEFDI) was proposed and embedded in the Imote2.NET-based wireless structural health monitoring (SHM) system to locate global damage. Local damage is then identified using an electromechanical impedance- (EMI-) based damage detection method. The electromechanical impedance was measured using a single-chip impedance measurement device which has the advantages of small size, low cost, and portability. The feasibility of the proposed damage detection scheme was studied with reference to a numerical example of a six-storey shear plane frame structure and a small-scale experimental steel frame. Numerical and experimental analysis using the integrated global-local SHM approach reveals that, after NEFDI indicates the approximate location of a damaged area, the EMI-based damage detection approach can then identify the detailed damage location in the structure of the building. PMID:24672359

  6. Enhancement of the Feature Extraction Capability in Global Damage Detection Using Wavelet Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Ponnaluru, Gopi Krishna

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the specific capabilities of the defect energy parameter technique for global damage detection developed by Saleeb and coworkers. The feature extraction is the most important capability in any damage-detection technique. Features are any parameters extracted from the processed measurement data in order to enhance damage detection. The damage feature extraction capability was studied extensively by analyzing various simulation results. The practical significance in structural health monitoring is that the detection at early stages of small-size defects is always desirable. The amount of changes in the structure's response due to these small defects was determined to show the needed level of accuracy in the experimental methods. The arrangement of fine/extensive sensor network to measure required data for the detection is an "unlimited" ability, but there is a difficulty to place extensive number of sensors on a structure. Therefore, an investigation was conducted using the measurements of coarse sensor network. The white and the pink noises, which cover most of the frequency ranges that are typically encountered in the many measuring devices used (e.g., accelerometers, strain gauges, etc.) are added to the displacements to investigate the effect of noisy measurements in the detection technique. The noisy displacements and the noisy damage parameter values are used to study the signal feature reconstruction using wavelets. The enhancement of the feature extraction capability was successfully achieved by the wavelet theory.

  7. Infra-red imaging technology for detection of bruise damages of Shingo pear

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bruise damage on pears is one of the most crucial internal quality factors that needs to be detected in postharvest quality sorting processes. Development of sensitive detection methods for the defects including fruit bruise is necessary to ensure accurate quality assessment. Infra-red imaging tech...

  8. Hyperspectral near-infrared imaging for the detection of physical damages of pear

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bruise damage on pears is one of the most crucial internal quality factors, which needs to be detected in postharvest quality sorting processes. Thus, a reliable non-destructive detection method for the fruit defects including bruises is necessary to ensure accurate quality assessment. Infra-red ima...

  9. Protein detection system

    DOEpatents

    Fruetel, Julie A.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; McIlroy, Andrew

    2009-05-05

    The present embodiment describes a miniature, microfluidic, absorption-based sensor to detect proteins at sensitivities comparable to LIF but without the need for tagging. This instrument utilizes fiber-based evanescent-field cavity-ringdown spectroscopy, in combination with faceted prism microchannels. The combination of these techniques will increase the effective absorption path length by a factor of 10.sup.3 to 10.sup.4 (to .about.1-m), thereby providing unprecedented sensitivity using direct absorption. The coupling of high-sensitivity absorption with high-performance microfluidic separation will enable real-time sensing of biological agents in aqueous samples (including aerosol collector fluids) and will provide a general method with spectral fingerprint capability for detecting specific bio-agents.

  10. Signal processing and damage detection in a frame structure excited by chaotic input force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvino, Liming W.; Pines, Darryll J.; Todd, Michael D.; Nichols, Jonathan

    2003-07-01

    This paper discusses the development of a general time-frequency data analysis method, the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert Spectrum, and its application to structural health monitoring. The focus of this work is on feature extraction from structural response time series data. This is done by tracking unique characteristics of the adaptive decomposition components and developing a damage index based on previously introduced fundamental relationships connecting the instantaneous phase of a measured time series to the structural mass and stiffness parameters. Damage detection applications are investigated for a laboratory experiment of a simple frame (a model of a multi-story building) where damage is incurred by removing bolts at various locations. The frame is excited by a low dimensional deterministic chaos input as well as by broadband random signal. The time series output of the frame response is then analyzed with the EMD method. The time-frequency features and instantaneous phase relationships are extracted and examined for changes which may occur due to damage. These results are compared to results from other newly developed detection algorithms based on geometric properties of a chaotic attractor. Our results illustrate that the EMD and instantaneous phase detection approach, based on time-frequency analysis along with simple physics-based models, can be used to determine the presence and location of structural damage and permits the development of a reliable damage detection methodology.

  11. Detection of DNA damage induced by space radiation in Mir and space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Ohnishi, Ken; Takahashi, Akihisa; Taniguchi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Masaru; Nakano, Tamotsu; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2002-12-01

    Although physical monitoring of space radiation has been accomplished, we aim to measure exact DNA damage as caused by space radiation. If DNA damage is caused by space radiation, we can detect DNA damage dependent on the length of the space flight periods by using post-labeling methods. To detect DNA damage caused by space radiation, we placed fixed human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in the Russian Mir space station for 40 days and in an American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by enzymatic incorporation of [3H]-dATP with terminal deoxyribo-nucleotidyl transferase (TdT). We detected DNA damage as many grains on fixed silver emulsion resulting from beta-rays emitted from 3H-atoms in the nuclei of the cells placed in the Mir-station (J/Mir mission, STS-89), but detected hardly any in the ground control sample. In the space shuttle samples (S/MM-8), the number of cells having many grains was lower than that in the J/Mir mission samples. These results suggest that DNA damage is caused by space radiation and that it is dependent on the length of the space flight.

  12. A hybrid method for damage detection and quantification in advanced X-COR composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neerukatti, Rajesh Kumar; Rajadas, Abhishek; Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Huff, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced composite structures, such as foam core carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites, are increasingly being used in applications which require high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and low weight. However, the presence of in situ damage due to manufacturing defects and/or service conditions can complicate the failure mechanisms and compromise their strength and reliability. In this paper, the capability of detecting damages such as delaminations and foam-core separations in X-COR composite structures using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques is investigated. Two NDE techniques, flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics, were used to detect and quantify the damage size and locations. Macro fiber composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors to study the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations and foam-core separations. The results indicate that both flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics were capable of detecting damage in X-COR sandwich structures, although low frequency ultrasonic methods were capable of detecting through thickness damages more accurately than flash thermography. It was also observed that the presence of foam-core separations significantly changes the wave behavior when compared to delamination, which complicates the use of wave based SHM techniques. Further, a wave propagation model was developed to model the wave interaction with damages at different locations on the X-COR sandwich plate.

  13. Regularized discriminant analysis for multi-sensor decision fusion and damage detection with Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Spandan; Vanli, O. Arda; Huffer, Fred W.; Jung, Sungmoon

    2016-04-01

    In this study we propose a regularized linear discriminant analysis approach for damage detection which does not require an intermediate feature extraction step and therefore more efficient in handling data with high-dimensionality. A robust discriminant model is obtained by shrinking of the covariance matrix to a diagonal matrix and thresholding redundant predictors without hurting the predictive power of the model. The shrinking and threshold parameters of the discriminant function (decision boundary) are estimated to minimize the classification error. Furthermore, it is shown how the damage classification achieved by the proposed method can be extended to multiple sensors by following a Bayesian decision-fusion formulation. The detection probability of each sensor is used as a prior condition to estimate the posterior detection probability of the entire network and the posterior detection probability is used as a quantitative basis to make the final decision about the damage.

  14. Application of electromagnetic waves in damage detection of concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Maria Q.; De Flaviis, Franco; Kim, Yoo J.; Diaz, Rodolfo E.

    2000-04-01

    Jacketing technology using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites is being applied for seismic retrofit of reinforced concrete (RC) columns designed and constructed under older specifications. In this study, the authors develop an electromagnetic (EM) imaging technology for detecting voids and debonding between the jacket and the column, which may significantly weaken the structural performance of the column otherwise attainable by jacketing. This technology is based on the reflection analysis of a continuous EM wave sent toward and reflected from layered FRP-adhesive-concrete medium: Poor bonding conditions including voids and debonding will generate air gaps which produce additional reflections of the EM wave. In this study, dielectric properties of various materials involved in the FRP-jacketed RC column were first measured. Second, the measured properties were used for a computer simulation of the proposed EM imaging technology. The simulation demonstrated the difficulty in detecting imperfect bonding conditions by using plane waves, as the scattering contribution from the voids and debonding is very small compared to that from the jacketed column. Third, in order to alleviate this difficulty, a special dielectric lens was designed and fabricated to focus the EM wave on the bonding interface. Furthermore, the time gating technique is used in order to reduce the noise resulting from various uncertainties associated with the jacketed columns. Finally, three concrete columns were constructed and wrapped with glass-FRP jackets with various voids and debonding condition artificially introduced in the bonding interface. Using the proposed EM imaging technology with the lens especially designed and installed, these voids and debonding condition were successfully detected.

  15. A Protection And Detection Surface (PADS) for damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Prasad, Chunchu B.; Biggers, Sherrill B.

    1990-01-01

    A protection and detection surface (PADS) concept was studied for application to composite primary aircraft structures. A Kevlar-epoxy woven face sheet with a Rohacell foam core was found to be the most effective PADS configuration among the configurations evaluated. The weight of the PADS configuration was estimated to be approximately 17 pct of the structural weight. The PADS configuration was bonded to graphite-epoxy base laminates, and up to a 70 pct improvement in compression-after-impact failure strains was observed.

  16. Rotor anisotropy as a blade damage indicator for wind turbine structural health monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcherniak, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Structural damage of a rotor blade causes structural anisotropy of the rotor. In rotor dynamic, the anisotropy affects the symmetry of the rotor mode shapes, and the latter can be utilized to detect the blade damage. The mode shape symmetry can be characterized by relative blades' magnitude and phase. The study examines the potential use of these parameters as rotor damage indicators. Firstly the indicators are studied analytically using a simple 6 degrees-of-freedom model of a rotating rotor. Floquet analysis is used due to the time periodic nature of the considered system. Floquet analysis allows one to perform analytical modal decomposition of the system and study the sensitivity of the damage indicators to the amount of damage. Secondly, operational modal analysis (OMA) is involved to extract the same damage indicators from simulated experimental data, which was synthesized via numerical simulations. Finally, the same procedure was applied to operating Vestas V27 wind turbine, first using the simulated experimental data obtained by using aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2 and then using the data acquired during the measurement campaign on a real wind turbine. The study demonstrates that the proposed damage indicators are significantly more sensitive than the commonly used changes in natural frequency, and in contrast to the latter, can also pinpoint the faulty blade. It is also demonstrated that these indicators can be derived from blades vibration data obtained from real life experiment.

  17. Particle detection systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  18. An improved modal strain energy method for damage detection in offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingchao; Wang, Shuqing; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Chunmei

    2016-06-01

    The development of robust damage detection methods for offshore structures is crucial to prevent catastrophes caused by structural failures. In this research, we developed an Improved Modal Strain Energy (IMSE) method for detecting damage in offshore platform structures based on a traditional modal strain energy method (the Stubbs index method). The most significant difference from the Stubbs index method was the application of modal frequencies. The goal was to improve the robustness of the traditional method. To demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed IMSE method, both numerical and experimental studies were conducted for different damage scenarios using a jacket platform structure. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of the IMSE method in damage location when only limited, spatially incomplete, and noise-polluted modal data is available. Comparative studies showed that the IMSE index outperformed the Stubbs index and exhibited stronger robustness, confirming the superiority of the proposed approach.

  19. A technique for autonomous structural damage detection with smart wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Y.; Mao, Y. K.; Tang, Y. L.; Wang, J. X.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a distributed structural damage detection approach is proposed for large size structures under limited input and output measurements. A large size structure is decomposed into small size substructures based on its finite element formulation. Interaction effect between adjacent substructures is considered as 'additional unknown inputs' to each substructure. By sequentially utilizing the extended Kalman estimator for the extended state vector and the least squares estimation for the unmeasured inputs, the approach can not only estimate the 'additional unknown inputs' based on their formulations but also identify structural dynamic parameters, such as the stiffness and damping of each substructure. Local structural damage in the large size structure can be detected by tracking the changes in the identified values of structural dynamic parameters at element level, e.g., the degrading of stiffness parameters. Numerical example of detecting structural local damages in a large-size plane truss bridge illustrates the efficiency of the proposed approach. A new smart wireless sensor network is developed by the authors to combine with the proposed approach for autonomous structural damage detection of large size structures. The distributed structural damage detection approach can be embedded into the smart wireless sensor network based on its two-level cluster-tree topology architecture and the distributed computation capacity of each cluster head.

  20. Thermography Inspection for Detection and Tracking of Composite Cylinder Damage During Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Seebo, J. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations in a cylinder under different loads. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to nonimmersion ultrasonic results.

  1. Thermography inspection for detection and tracking of composite cylinder damage during load testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.; Seebo, J. P.

    2011-06-23

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to non-immersion ultrasonic results.

  2. Structural damage detection using extended Kalman filter combined with statistical process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong

    2015-04-01

    Traditional modal-based methods, which identify damage based upon changes in vibration characteristics of the structure on a global basis, have received considerable attention in the past decades. However, the effectiveness of the modalbased methods is dependent on the type of damage and the accuracy of the structural model, and these methods may also have difficulties when applied to complex structures. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm which has the capability to estimate parameters and catch abrupt changes, is currently used in continuous and automatic structural damage detection to overcome disadvantages of traditional methods. Structural parameters are typically slow-changing variables under effects of operational and environmental conditions, thus it would be difficult to observe the structural damage and quantify the damage in real-time with EKF only. In this paper, a Statistical Process Control (SPC) is combined with EFK method in order to overcome this difficulty. Based on historical measurements of damage-sensitive feathers involved in the state-space dynamic models, extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm is used to produce real-time estimations of these features as well as standard derivations, which can then be used to form control ranges for SPC to detect any abnormality of the selected features. Moreover, confidence levels of the detection can be adjusted by choosing different times of sigma and number of adjacent out-of-range points. The proposed method is tested using simulated data of a three floors linear building in different damage scenarios, and numerical results demonstrate high damage detection accuracy and light computation of this presented method.

  3. Damage Detection and Mitigation in Open Collaboration Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative functionality is changing the way information is amassed, refined, and disseminated in online environments. A subclass of these systems characterized by "open collaboration" uniquely allow participants to "modify" content with low barriers-to-entry. A prominent example and our case study, English Wikipedia,…

  4. Vibration based structural health monitoring of an arch bridge: From automated OMA to damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, F.; Cunha, A.; Caetano, E.

    2012-04-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of approaches based on modal parameters tracking for structural health monitoring of bridges, in September of 2007, a dynamic monitoring system was installed in a concrete arch bridge at the city of Porto, in Portugal. The implementation of algorithms to perform the continuous on-line identification of modal parameters based on structural responses to ambient excitation (automated Operational Modal Analysis) has permitted to create a very complete database with the time evolution of the bridge modal characteristics during more than 2 years. This paper describes the strategy that was followed to minimize the effects of environmental and operational factors on the bridge natural frequencies, enabling, in a subsequent stage, the identification of structural anomalies. Alternative static and dynamic regression models are tested and complemented by a Principal Components Analysis. Afterwards, the identification of damages is tried with control charts. At the end, it is demonstrated that the adopted processing methodology permits the detection of realistic damage scenarios, associated with frequency shifts around 0.2%, which were simulated with a numerical model.

  5. A Method to have Multi-Layer Thermal Insulation Provide Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Jones, Thomas W.; Shams, Qamar A.; Lyons, Frankel; Henderson, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Design and testing of a multi-layer thermal insulation system that also provides debris and micrometeorite damage detection is presented. One layer of the insulation is designed as an array of passive open-circuit electrically conductive spiral trace sensors. The sensors are a new class of sensors that are electrically open-circuits that have no electrical connections thereby eliminating one cause of failure to circuits. The sensors are powered using external oscillating magnetic fields. Once electrically active, they produce their own harmonic magnetic fields. The responding field frequency changes if any sensor is damaged. When the sensors are used together in close proximity, the inductive coupling between sensors provides a means of telemetry. The spiral trace design using reflective electrically conductive material provides sufficient area coverage for the sensor array to serves as a layer of thermal insulation. The other insulation layers are designed to allow the sensor s magnetic field to permeate the insulation layers while having total reflective surface area to reduce thermal energy transfer. Results of characterizing individual sensors and the sensor array s response to punctures are presented. Results of hypervelocity impact testing using projectiles of 1-3.6 millimeter diameter having speeds ranging from 6.7-7.1 kilometers per second are also presented.

  6. Preliminary Results of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Detection with Object-Based Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabuncu, A.; Uca Avci, Z. D.; Sunar, F.

    2016-06-01

    Earthquakes are the most destructive natural disasters, which result in massive loss of life, infrastructure damages and financial losses. Earthquake-induced building damage detection is a very important step after earthquakes since earthquake-induced building damage is one of the most critical threats to cities and countries in terms of the area of damage, rate of collapsed buildings, the damage grade near the epicenters and also building damage types for all constructions. Van-Ercis (Turkey) earthquake (Mw= 7.1) was occurred on October 23th, 2011; at 10:41 UTC (13:41 local time) centered at 38.75 N 43.36 E that places the epicenter about 30 kilometers northern part of the city of Van. It is recorded that, 604 people died and approximately 4000 buildings collapsed or seriously damaged by the earthquake. In this study, high-resolution satellite images of Van-Ercis, acquired by Quickbird-2 (Digital Globe Inc.) after the earthquake, were used to detect the debris areas using an object-based image classification. Two different land surfaces, having homogeneous and heterogeneous land covers, were selected as case study areas. As a first step of the object-based image processing, segmentation was applied with a convenient scale parameter and homogeneity criterion parameters. As a next step, condition based classification was used. In the final step of this preliminary study, outputs were compared with streetview/ortophotos for the verification and evaluation of the classification accuracy.

  7. Colorimetric detection of DNA damage by using hemin-graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Zhang, D. M.; Yin, L. H.; Pu, Y. P.; Liu, S. Q.

    2013-04-01

    A colorimetric method for detection of DNA damage was developed by using hemin-graphene nanosheets (H-GNs). H-GNs were skillfully synthesized by adsorping of hemin on graphene through π-π interactions. The as-prepared H-GNs possessed both the ability of graphene to differentiate the damage DNA from intact DNA and the catalytic action of hemin. The damaged DNA made H-GNs coagulated to different degrees from the intact DNA because there were different amount of negative charge exposed on their surface, which made a great impact on the solubility of H-GNs. As a result, the corresponding centrifugal supernatant of H-GNs solution showed different color in the presence of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2, which could be discriminated by naked eyes or by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometer. Based on this, the damaged effects of styrene oxide (SO), NaAsO2 and UV radiation on DNA were studied. Results showed that SO exerted most serious damage effect on DNA although all of them damaged DNA seriously. The new method for detection of DNA damage showed good prospect in the evaluation of genotoxicity of new compounds, the maximum limit of pesticide residue, food additives, and so on, which is important in the fields of food science, pharmaceutical science and pesticide science.

  8. Active sensing and damage detection using piezoelectric zinc oxide-based nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Frederick N; Loh, Kenneth J; Dodds, John S; Baltazar, Arturo

    2013-05-10

    This study investigated the design and performance of piezoelectric nanocomposite-based interdigitated transducers (IDTs) for active sensing and damage detection. First, thin films that are highly piezoelectric and mechanically flexible were designed by embedding zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) piezo-polymer matrix. Second, the suspended nanoparticle solutions were then spin coated onto patterned comb electrodes to fabricate the IDTs. The films were then poled to align their electric domains and to increase their permanent piezoelectricity. Upon IDT fabrication, its sensing and actuation of Lamb waves on an aluminum pipe was validated. These results were also compared to data obtained from commercial Macro Fiber Composite IDT transducers. In the last phase of this work, damage detection was demonstrated by mounting these nanocomposite sensors and actuators (using a pitch-catch setup) onto an aluminum pipe and plate. Damage was simulated by tightening a band clamp around the pipe and by drilling holes in the plate. A damage index calculation was used to compare results corresponding to different levels of damage applied to the plate (i.e., different drilled hole depths), and good correlation was observed. Thus, ZnO/PVDF-TrFE transducers were shown to have the potential for use as piezoelectric transducers for structural health monitoring and damage detection.

  9. Active sensing and damage detection using piezoelectric zinc oxide-based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Frederick N.; Loh, Kenneth J.; Dodds, John S.; Baltazar, Arturo

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the design and performance of piezoelectric nanocomposite-based interdigitated transducers (IDTs) for active sensing and damage detection. First, thin films that are highly piezoelectric and mechanically flexible were designed by embedding zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) piezo-polymer matrix. Second, the suspended nanoparticle solutions were then spin coated onto patterned comb electrodes to fabricate the IDTs. The films were then poled to align their electric domains and to increase their permanent piezoelectricity. Upon IDT fabrication, its sensing and actuation of Lamb waves on an aluminum pipe was validated. These results were also compared to data obtained from commercial Macro Fiber Composite IDT transducers. In the last phase of this work, damage detection was demonstrated by mounting these nanocomposite sensors and actuators (using a pitch-catch setup) onto an aluminum pipe and plate. Damage was simulated by tightening a band clamp around the pipe and by drilling holes in the plate. A damage index calculation was used to compare results corresponding to different levels of damage applied to the plate (i.e., different drilled hole depths), and good correlation was observed. Thus, ZnO/PVDF-TrFE transducers were shown to have the potential for use as piezoelectric transducers for structural health monitoring and damage detection.

  10. Detection of glaucomatous damage in patients with osteo-odontokeratoprosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Falcinelli, G C; Falsini, B; Taloni, M; Piccardi, M; Falcinelli, G

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Osteo-odontokeratoprosthesis (OOKP) is an autologous transplantation procedure in which the cornea is replaced by an optical cylinder glued to a biological support. Patients undergoing OOKP surgery may develop a secondary glaucoma whose diagnosis, by means of standard diagnostic procedures, is often doubtful. METHODS--In the present study pattern electroretinograms (PERGs), visual evoked potentials (VEPs), contrast sensitivity, and automated threshold perimetry (Humphrey 30-2) were evaluated in 19 OOKP treated patients with postoperative visual acuities > or = 0.8. Nine patients had had a preoperative secondary glaucoma, while the remaining 10 had no history of glaucoma and normal posterior pole. RESULTS--Results were compared with those obtained from either normal control subjects or from ordinary glaucoma patients. PERG amplitudes and contrast and perimetric sensitivities were reduced in both groups of OOKP patients when compared with normal controls. However, these losses were significantly greater in OOKP patients with glaucoma compared with those with normal posterior pole. VEPs were reduced, compared with controls, only in OOKP patients with glaucoma. These VEP losses were similar to those found in ordinary glaucoma patients. CONCLUSION--Among the tests employed, VEPs showed the best accuracy (79%) in discriminating between glaucomatous and non-glaucomatous OOKP treated eyes. The present results suggest a possible use of the VEP technique for detecting glaucomatous dysfunction after OOKP. Images PMID:7696231

  11. A modified alkaline Comet assay for in vivo detection of oxidative DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Shukla, A K; Pragya, P; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2011-12-24

    Modifications to the alkaline Comet assay by using lesion-specific endonucleases, such as formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (ENDOIII, also known as Nth), can detect DNA bases with oxidative damage. This modified assay can be used to assess the genotoxic/carcinogenic potential of environmental chemicals. The goal of this study was to validate the ability of this modified assay to detect oxidative stress-induced genotoxicity in Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R(+)). In this study, we used three well known chemical oxidative stress inducers: hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) and copper sulfate (CuSO(4)). Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed various concentrations of the test chemicals (50-200μM) mixed with a standard Drosophila food for 24h. Alkaline Comet assays with and without the FPG and ENDOIII enzymes were performed with midgut cells that were isolated from the control and treated larvae. Our results show a concentration-dependent increase (p<0.05-0.001) in the migration of DNA from the treated larvae. ENDOIII treatment detected more oxidative DNA damage (specifically pyrimidine damage) in the H(2)O(2) exposed larvae compared to FPG or no enzyme treatment (buffer only). In contrast, FPG treatment detected more oxidative DNA damage (specifically purine damage) in CuSO(4) exposed larvae compared to ENDOIII. Although previously reported to be a potent genotoxic agent, CdCl(2) did not induce more oxidative DNA damage than the other test chemicals. Our results show that the modified alkaline Comet assay can be used to detect oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in D. melanogaster and thus may be applicable for in vivo genotoxic assessments of environmental chemicals.

  12. Thermomechanical analysis of a damaged thermal protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Wei Heok

    Research on the effects of damage on the thermomechanical performance and structural integrity of thermal protection systems (TPS) has been limited. The objective of this research is to address this need by conducting experiments and finite element (FE) analysis on damaged TPS. The TPS selected for study is the High-Temperature Reusable Insulation (HRSI) tiles that are used extensively on NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter. The TPS considered, which consists of a LI-900 tile, the strain isolator pad and the underlying structure, is subjected to the thermal loading and re-entry static pressure of the Access to Space reference vehicle. The damage to the TPS emulates hypervelocity-impact-type damage, which is approximated in the current research by a cylindrical hole ending with a spherical cap. Preliminary FE analysis using several simplifying assumptions, was conducted to determine the accuracy of using an approximate axisymmetric model compared to a complete three-dimensional model for both heat transfer and thermal stress analyses. Temperature results from the two models were found to be reasonable close; however, thermal stress results displayed significant differences. The sensitivity of the FE results to the various simplifying assumptions was also examined and it was concluded that for reliable results, the simplifying assumptions were not acceptable. Subsequently, an exact three-dimensional model was developed and validated by comparison with experimental data. Re-entry static pressures and temperatures were simulated using a high-temperature experimental facility that consists of a quartz radiant heater and a vacuum chamber with appropriate instrumentation. This facility was developed during the course of this dissertation. Temperatures on the top and bottom surfaces of the TPS specimen as well as strains in the underlying structure were recorded for FE model validation. The validated FE model was then combined with improved thermal loads based on the interactions

  13. NORSAR Detection Processing System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-31

    systems have been reliable. NTA/Lillestrom and Hamar will take a new initiative medio April regarding 04C. The line will be remeasured and if a certain...estimate of the ambient noise level at the site of the FINESA array, ground motion spectra were calculated for four time intervals. Two intervals were

  14. Remote Voice Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-25

    back to the laser Doppler vibrometer and the digital camera, respectively. Mechanical beam steering mirror modules, such as galvanometer steering...mirror module 43 in accordance with this invention. An appropriate galvanometer -based tracker system has been used for tracking eye motion during laser

  15. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  16. Robust structural damage detection and localization based on joint approximate diagonalization technique in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shancheng; Ouyang, Huajiang

    2017-01-01

    The structural characteristic deflection shapes (CDS’s) such as mode shapes and operational deflection shapes are highly sensitive to structural damage in beam- or plate-type structures. Nevertheless, they are vulnerable to measurement noise and could result in unacceptable identification errors. In order to increase the accuracy and noise robustness of damage identification based on CDS’s using vibration responses of random excitation, joint approximate diagonalization (JAD) technique and gapped smoothing method (GSM) are combined to form a sensitive and robust damage index (DI), which can simultaneously detect the existence of damage and localize its position. In addition, it is possible to apply this approach to damage identification of structures under ambient excitation. First, JAD method which is an essential technique of blind source separation is investigated to simultaneously diagonalize a set of power spectral density matrices corresponding to frequencies near a certain natural frequency to estimate a joint unitary diagonalizer. The columns of this joint diagonalizer contain dominant CDS’s. With the identified dominant CDS’s around different natural frequencies, GSM is used to extract damage features and a robust damage identification index is then proposed. Numerical and experimental examples of beams with cracks are used to verify the validity and noise robustness of JAD based CDS estimation and the proposed DI. Furthermore, damage identification using dominant CDS’s estimated by JAD method is demonstrated to be more accurate and noise robust than by the commonly used singular value decomposition method.

  17. Detection and localization of damage using empirical mode decomposition and multilevel support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushyanth, N. D.; Suma, M. N.; Latte, Mrityanjaya V.

    2016-03-01

    Damage in the structure may raise a significant amount of maintenance cost and serious safety problems. Hence detection of the damage at its early stage is of prime importance. The main contribution pursued in this investigation is to propose a generic optimal methodology to improve the accuracy of positioning of the flaw in a structure. This novel approach involves a two-step process. The first step essentially aims at extracting the damage-sensitive features from the received signal, and these extracted features are often termed the damage index or damage indices, serving as an indicator to know whether the damage is present or not. In particular, a multilevel SVM (support vector machine) plays a vital role in the distinction of faulty and healthy structures. Formerly, when a structure is unveiled as a damaged structure, in the subsequent step, the position of the damage is identified using Hilbert-Huang transform. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated in both simulation and experimental tests on a 6061 aluminum plate with dimensions 300 mm × 300 mm × 5 mm which accordingly yield considerable improvement in the accuracy of estimating the position of the flaw.

  18. Baseline Signal Reconstruction for Temperature Compensation in Lamb Wave-Based Damage Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Xiao, Yingchun; Zhang, Hua; Ren, Gexue

    2016-08-11

    Temperature variations have significant effects on propagation of Lamb wave and therefore can severely limit the damage detection for Lamb wave. In order to mitigate the temperature effect, a temperature compensation method based on baseline signal reconstruction is developed for Lamb wave-based damage detection. The method is a reconstruction of a baseline signal at the temperature of current signal. In other words, it compensates the baseline signal to the temperature of current signal. The Hilbert transform is used to compensate the phase of baseline signal. The Orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) is used to compensate the amplitude of baseline signal. Experiments were conducted on two composite panels to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method could effectively work for temperature intervals of at least 18 °C with the baseline signal temperature as the center, and can be applied to the actual damage detection.

  19. Early damage detection in epoxy matrix using cyclobutane-based polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jin; Liu, Yingtao; Shan, Bohan; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Dai, Lenore L.

    2014-09-01

    Identification of early damage in polymer composites is of great importance. We have incorporated cyclobutane-containing cross-linked polymers into an epoxy matrix, studied the effect on thermal and mechanical properties, and, more importantly, demonstrated early damage detection through mechanically induced fluorescence generation. Two cinnamate derivatives, 1,1,1-tris(cinnamoyloxymethyl) ethane (TCE) and poly(vinyl cinnamate) (PVCi), were photoirradiated to produce cyclobutane-containing polymer. The effects on the thermal and mechanical properties with the addition of cyclobutane-containing polymer into epoxy matrix were investigated. The emergence of cracks was detected by fluorescence at a strain level just beyond the yield point of the polymer blends, and the fluorescence intensified with accumulation of strain. Overall, the results show that damage can be detected through fluorescence generation along crack propagation.

  20. Baseline Signal Reconstruction for Temperature Compensation in Lamb Wave-Based Damage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoqiang; Xiao, Yingchun; Zhang, Hua; Ren, Gexue

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations have significant effects on propagation of Lamb wave and therefore can severely limit the damage detection for Lamb wave. In order to mitigate the temperature effect, a temperature compensation method based on baseline signal reconstruction is developed for Lamb wave-based damage detection. The method is a reconstruction of a baseline signal at the temperature of current signal. In other words, it compensates the baseline signal to the temperature of current signal. The Hilbert transform is used to compensate the phase of baseline signal. The Orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) is used to compensate the amplitude of baseline signal. Experiments were conducted on two composite panels to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method could effectively work for temperature intervals of at least 18 °C with the baseline signal temperature as the center, and can be applied to the actual damage detection. PMID:27529245

  1. Microfluidic array for simultaneous detection of DNA oxidation and DNA-adduct damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Boya; Shen, Min; Jiang, Di; Malla, Spundana; Mosa, Islam M; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Rusling, James F

    2016-10-21

    Exposure to chemical pollutants and pharmaceuticals may cause health issues caused by metabolite-related toxicity. This paper reports a new microfluidic electrochemical sensor array with the ability to simultaneously detect common types of DNA damage including oxidation and nucleobase adduct formation. Sensors in the 8-electrode screen-printed carbon array were coated with thin films of metallopolymers osmium or ruthenium bipyridyl-poly(vinylpyridine) chloride (OsPVP, RuPVP) along with DNA and metabolic enzymes by layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly. After a reaction step in which test chemicals and other necessary reagents flow over the array, OsPVP selectively detects oxidized guanines on the DNA strands, and RuPVP detects DNA adduction by metabolites on nucleobases. We demonstrate array performance for test chemicals including 17β-estradiol (E2), its metabolites 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2), catechol, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF). Results revealed DNA-adduct and oxidation damage in a single run to provide a metabolic-genotoxic chemistry screen. The array measures damage directly in unhydrolyzed DNA, and is less expensive, faster, and simpler than conventional methods to detect DNA damage. The detection limit for oxidation is 672 8-oxodG per 10(6) bases. Each sensor requires only 22 ng of DNA, so the mass detection limit is 15 pg (∼10 pmol) 8-oxodG.

  2. Moisture damage in home associates with systemic inflammation in children.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, K; Karvonen, A M; Kirjavainen, P; Roponen, M; Schaub, B; Hyvärinen, A; Frey, U; Renz, H; Pfefferle, P I; Genuneit, J; Vaarala, O; Pekkanen, J

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the association between confirmed moisture damage in homes and systemic subclinical inflammation in children. Home inspections were performed in homes of 291 children at the age of 6 years. Subclinical inflammation at the age of 6 years was assessed by measuring the circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and leukocytes in peripheral blood and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured in unstimulated, and in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin (PI), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or peptidoglycan (PPG)-stimulated whole blood. Major moisture damage in the child's main living areas (living room, kitchen, or child's bedroom) and moisture damage with mold in the bathroom were associated with increased levels of CRP and stimulated production of several proinflammatory cytokines. There were no significant associations between moisture damage/visible mold and leukocyte or FeNO values. The results suggest that moisture damage or mold in home may be associated with increased systemic subclinical inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine responsiveness.

  3. Finite Element Based Structural Damage Detection Using Artificial Boundary Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    ER, barp, shape, error, a_cp, modep , ap, % modelabelp, FOMABClabelp, FOMPLUSlabelp % abc_con, abc_conT % ABC, base % plus_con, plus_conT...error = round(rel_freqERROR(ER:ER+15)*100)/100; a_cp = 1; for modep = 1:3 %3 sets of modes per boundry condition ap = [a_cp...int2str(a_cp:a_cp+4); FOMABC = int2str(FOM_ABC5per(intervelp+ modep )); FOMABClabelp = sprintf(’System FOM = %s’, FOMABC

  4. Power line detection system

    DOEpatents

    Latorre, Victor R.; Watwood, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard.

  5. Power line detection system

    DOEpatents

    Latorre, V.R.; Watwood, D.B.

    1994-09-27

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard. 4 figs.

  6. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  7. Detection of transport and age induced damages on artwork: an advanced concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawitz, M.; Hein, N.; Alexeenko, I.; Wilke, M.; Pedrini, G.; Krekel, C.; Osten, W.

    2013-05-01

    For the society it is of great interest to make cultural heritage accessible to the general public. The subsequent increase of museum loan services increases the risk of accelerated degeneration. Hence, in addition to the age related deterioration, transportation can be another source of damage. Despite modern packaging technologies, vibrations and environmental climate change can add up and damage the transported object. Besides obvious mechanical influencing quantities, a main concern is the detection of climate induced damages. Changes in the relative humidity cause inner strain, which may lead to defect formations and damages. White light fringe projection was applied to detect object changes due to variations of the relative humidity. First measurements indicated a sensitivity down to a relative humidity change of 6 %. Recently, the Stuppach Madonna, a painting by Matthias Grunewald (painted 1514 - 1516), was investigated with shearography after the return from an exhibition. The obtained shearograms revealed a variety of defects like bubbles, delaminations and tunnels caused by wood worms. Even the planking of the wooden panel and existing putty could be detected. This paper describes the first steps of a project with the aim of investigating and implementing a method to detect and classify transport related damages on works of art.

  8. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Whited, R.C.

    A system for obtaining improved resolution in relatively thick semiconductor radiation detectors, such as HgI/sub 2/, which exhibit significant hole trapping. Two amplifiers are used: the first measures the charge collected and the second the contribution of the electrons to the charge collected. The outputs of the two amplifiers are utilized to unfold the total charge generated within the detector in response to a radiation event.

  9. Single-pixel hyperspectral imaging for real-time cancer detection: detecting damage in ex vivo porcine tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peller, Joseph; Farahi, Faramarz; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing a single-pixel hyperspectral imaging system based on compressive sensing that acquires spatial and spectral information simultaneously. Our spectral imaging system uses autofluorescencent emission from collagen (400 nm) and NAD(P)H (475 nm), as well as, differences in the optical reflectance spectra as diagnostics for differentiating between healthy and diseased tissue. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of our imaging system to discriminate between healthy and damaged porcine epidermal tissue. Healthy porcine epidermal tissue samples (n=11) were imaged ex vivo using our hyperspectral system. The amount of NAD(P)H emission and the reflectance properties were approximately constant across the surface of healthy tissue samples. The tissue samples were then thermally damaged using an 1850 nm thulium fiber laser and re-imaged after laser irradiation. The damaged regions were clearly visible in the hyperspectral images as the thermal damage altered the fluorescent emission of NAD(P)H and changed the scattering properties of the tissue. The extent of the damaged regions was determined based on the hyperspectral images and these estimates were compared to damage extents measured in white light images acquired with a traditional camera. The extent of damage determined via hyperspectral imaging was in good agreement with estimates based on white light imaging indicating that our system is capable of differentiating between healthy and damaged tissue. Possible applications of our single pixel hyperspectral imaging system range from real-time determination of tumor margins during surgery to the use of this technique in the pathology lab to aid with cancer diagnosis and staging.

  10. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  11. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  12. Diversified transmission multichannel detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Tournois, P.; Engelhard, P.

    1984-07-03

    A detection system for imaging by sonar or radar signals. The system associates diversified transmissions with an interferometric base. This base provides an angular channel formation means and each signal formed in this way is processed by matched filtering in a circuit containing copy signals characterizing the space coloring obtained by the diversified transmission means. The invention is particularly applicable to side or front looking detection sonars.

  13. Evaluation of modal-based damage detection techniques for composite aircraft sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Composite sandwich structures are important as structural components in modern lightweight aircraft, but are susceptible to catastrophic failure without obvious forewarning. Internal damage, such as disbonding between skin and core, is detrimental to the structures' strength and integrity and thus must be detected before reaching critical levels. However, highly directional low density cores, such as Nomex honeycomb, make the task of damage detection and health monitoring difficult. One possible method for detecting damage in composite sandwich structures, which seems to have received very little research attention, is analysis of global modal parameters. This study will investigate the viability of modal analysis techniques for detecting skin-core disbonds in carbon fiber-Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels through laboratory testing. A series of carbon fiber prepreg and Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels-representative of structural components used in lightweight composite airframes-were fabricated by means of autoclave co-cure. All panels were of equal dimensions and two were made with predetermined sizes of disbonded areas, created by substituting areas of Teflon release film in place of epoxy film adhesive during the cure. A laser vibrometer was used to capture frequency response functions (FRF) of all panels, and then real and imaginary FRFs at different locations on each plate and operating shapes for each plate were compared. Preliminary results suggest that vibration-based techniques hold promise for damage detection of composite sandwich structures.

  14. Damage detection of engine bladed-disks using multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Tang, J.

    2006-03-01

    The timely detection of damage in aero-engine bladed-disks is an extremely important and challenging research topic. Bladed-disks have high modal density and, particularly, their vibration responses are subject to significant uncertainties due to manufacturing tolerance (blade-to-blade difference or mistuning), operating condition change and sensor noise. In this study, we present a new methodology for the on-line damage detection of engine bladed-disks using their vibratory responses during spin-up or spin-down operations which can be measured by blade-tip-timing sensing technique. We apply a principle component analysis (PCA)-based approach for data compression, feature extraction, and denoising. The non-model based damage detection is achieved by analyzing the change between response features of the healthy structure and of the damaged one. We facilitate such comparison by incorporating the Hotelling's statistic T2 analysis, which yields damage declaration with a given confidence level. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by case studies.

  15. Damage detection in composite materials using PZT actuators and sensors for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, Michelle DuBose

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of bridges, buildings, aircrafts, and spacecraft using a network of sensors has gained popularity over recent years. In this thesis, the use of piezoelectric actuators and sensors is described for detecting damage in a composite panel. The composite panels are fabricated using the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process. The panels are cut into small coupons (254 mm x 25.4 mm) to test various properties of the composite. A piezoelectric actuator is surface mounted on the composite coupon to generate Lamb waves while a surface mounted piezoelectric sensor measures the response. Data is collected from an undamaged composite coupon, and then the process is repeated for a damaged coupon. The existing damage is quantified by comparing the response of the damaged and undamaged composite coupons.

  16. Experimental Study on Damage Detection in Timber Specimens Based on an Electromechanical Impedance Technique and RMSD-Based Mahalanobis Distance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dansheng; Wang, Qinghua; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-10-22

    In the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method, the PZT patch performs the functions of both sensor and exciter. Due to the high frequency actuation and non-model based characteristics, the EMI method can be utilized to detect incipient structural damage. In recent years EMI techniques have been widely applied to monitor the health status of concrete and steel materials, however, studies on application to timber are limited. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the EMI technique for damage detection in timber specimens. In addition, the conventional damage index, namely root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to evaluate the level of damage. On that basis, a new damage index, Mahalanobis distance based on RMSD, is proposed to evaluate the damage severity of timber specimens. Experimental studies are implemented to detect notch and hole damage in the timber specimens. Experimental results verify the availability and robustness of the proposed damage index and its superiority over the RMSD indexes.

  17. Experimental Study on Damage Detection in Timber Specimens Based on an Electromechanical Impedance Technique and RMSD-Based Mahalanobis Distance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dansheng; Wang, Qinghua; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    In the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method, the PZT patch performs the functions of both sensor and exciter. Due to the high frequency actuation and non-model based characteristics, the EMI method can be utilized to detect incipient structural damage. In recent years EMI techniques have been widely applied to monitor the health status of concrete and steel materials, however, studies on application to timber are limited. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the EMI technique for damage detection in timber specimens. In addition, the conventional damage index, namely root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to evaluate the level of damage. On that basis, a new damage index, Mahalanobis distance based on RMSD, is proposed to evaluate the damage severity of timber specimens. Experimental studies are implemented to detect notch and hole damage in the timber specimens. Experimental results verify the availability and robustness of the proposed damage index and its superiority over the RMSD indexes. PMID:27782088

  18. Application of time-series-based damage detection algorithms to structures under ambient excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Chan, Chuan-Kai; Lee, Chung-Hsien

    2016-04-01

    Operational modal analysis (OMA) is to extract the dynamic characteristics of structures based on vibration responses of structures without considering the excitation measurement. In this study both modal-based and signal-based system identification and feature extraction techniques are used to study the nonlinear inelastic response of a test structure ( a 3- story steel frame subjected to a series of earthquake and white noise excitations back to back) using both input and output response data or output only measurement and identify the damage location. For the modal-based identification, the multi-variant autoregressive model (MV-AR model) is used to identify the dynamic characteristics of structure. The MV-AR model parameters are then used to develop the vectors of autoregressive model and Mahalanobis distance, and then to identify the damage features and locate the damage. From the signal-based feature identification two damage features will be discussed: (1) the enhancement of time-frequency analysis of acceleration responses, and (2) WPT based energy damage indices. Discussion on the correlation of the extract local damage features from measurements with the global damage indices, such as null-space and subspace damage indices, is also made.

  19. Multiscale Models of Multifunctional Composites for On-Board Damage Detection and Failure Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-08

    Lett. 98, 245501 (2007). 4. Z. H. Xia and W. A. Curtin, “ Fatigue in CFRPs detected using electrical resistance”, to appear in Comp. Sci. Tech... CFRP ) composites, so as to make electrical resistance measurement a tool for damage detection and prognosis in CFRP components. The models show...the remaining fatigue life after overload cycles can be accurately determined, and that the statistical distribution of electrical resistance changes

  20. Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP Structures using Electric Pulse Wave Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-05

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT For laminated CFRP structures, it is quite difficult to detect internal damage such as delamination, matrix cracks, and...unclassified Abstract. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) laminates are applied to many aerospace structures. For these laminated CFRP ...Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) has been increasingly applied to the aerospace primary structures because of its high specific strength and

  1. Detecting and Segregating Black Tip-Damaged Wheat Kernels Using Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of individual wheat kernels with black tip symptom (BTS) and black tip damage (BTD) was demonstrated using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) and silicon light-emitting-diode (LED) based instruments. The two instruments tested, a single kernel near-infrared spectroscopy instrume...

  2. On-orbit damage detection and health monitoring of large space trusses - Status and critical issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashangaki, Thomas A.-L.

    1991-01-01

    The literature in the fields of structural identification, mode shape expansion and orthogonalization, and on-orbit damage location of large space trusses is reviewed. The use of a Dynamic Scale Model Technology (DSMT) hybrid scale model for damage location research and as a universal test bed for other damage location methods is proposed as a means of comparing and evaluating existing and newly developed methods in the named areas. Issues concerning on-orbit data acquisition, data accuracy, and data quality relevant to structural dynamic system identification which require extensive research are identified.

  3. Spatial Fourier Analysis of a Free-Free Beam for Structural Damage Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Mihir; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2014-07-01

    Free-free beams (FFB) are used to model many structures, such as missiles, rockets, MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems), etc. This paper aims to illustrate a novel structural health monitoring method-Fourier analysis of mode shapes of damaged beams-and extend it to the case of FFB. The damaged mode shapes of FFB are obtained by a finite element model and then studied using spatial Fourier analysis. The effect of noise in the mode shape data is considered and it is found that the Fourier coefficients provide a useful indication about the location and size of damage.

  4. Application of PZT sensors for detection of damage severity and location in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabet Divsholi, Bahador; Yang, Yaowen

    2008-12-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) based electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique has been applied for structural health monitoring (SHM) of various engineering systems. However, study on identification of damage severity and location is still in need. In the EMI method, the PZT electromechanical (EM) admittance is used as a damage indicator. Statistical techniques such as root mean square deviation (RMSD) have been employed to associate the damage level with the changes in the EM admittance signature. To achieve high sensitivity to damage, high frequency signatures (>200 kHz) have been used to monitor the region close to the PZT location. It has been reported that the use of RMSD as the damage indicator is difficult to specify the damage location and severity due to the inconsistency in the RMSD results. This paper proposes the use of large frequency (30-400 kHz) range and the RMSD values of sub-frequency intervals to eliminate the inconsistency in the results. An experiment is carried out on a real size concrete structure subjected to artificial damages. The PZT admittance signatures in a frequency range of 30 to 400 kHz for various structural damages have been recorded and the RMSD values of sub-frequency intervals of 10 kHz are calculated. Results show less inconsistency and uncertainties compared to the traditional method using limited high frequency range. It is observed that the damage close to the PZT changes the RMSD at high frequency range significantly; however the damage far away from the PZT changes the RMSD at low frequency range significantly.

  5. Dof-based submatrix scaling factors for damage detection in reinforced concrete bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyeongtaek; Torbol, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the system identification and the damage detection of reinforced concrete bridges using neural network algorithm, eigenvalue analysis and parallel computing. First, autoregressive coefficients (ARCs) of both temporal output and forced input of the real structure are computed. The ARCs are used for the eigen-system realization algorithm (ERA) to obtain the modal parameters of the structure. Second, the ARCs are utilized as the input variable of the neural network algorithm while the outputs are the submatrix scaling factors that contain information about the degeneration of each element and each mode within the element. However, the neural network algorithm requires training to output reliable results. The training is the most challenging task of this study and finite element analysis is used to compute the modal parameters of the model built around the neural network outputs. The model is compared with the ERA results to update the neural network coefficients. Due to the scale of the neural network used parallel computing is necessary to reduce the computational time to a reasonable amount.

  6. Statistical analysis and ground-based testing of the on-orbit Space Shuttle damage detection sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Brian H.; Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Carter, John P.; Kamerman, Gary W.; Schwartz, Robert

    2005-05-01

    The loss of Space Shuttle Columbia and her crew led to the creation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB), which concluded that a piece of external fuel tank insulating foam impacted the Shuttle"s wing leading edge. The foam created a hole in the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) insulating material which gravely compromised the Shuttle"s thermal protection system (TPS). In response to the CAIB recommendation, the upcoming Return to Flight Shuttle Mission (STS-114) NASA will include a Shuttle deployed sensor suite which, among other sensors, will include two laser sensing systems, Sandia National Lab"s Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) and Neptec"s Laser Camera System (LCS) to collect 3-D imagery of the Shuttle"s exterior. Herein is described a ground-based statistical testing procedure that will be used by NASA as part of a damage detection performance assessment studying the performance of each of the two laser radar systems in detecting and identifying impact damage to the Shuttle. A statistical framework based on binomial and Bayesian statistics is used to describe the probability of detection and associated statistical confidence. A mock-up of a section of Shuttle wing RCC with interchangeable panels includes a random pattern of 1/4" and 1" diameter holes on the simulated RCC panels and is cataloged prior to double-blind testing. A team of ladar sensor operators will acquire laser radar imagery of the wing mock-up using a robotic platform in a laboratory at Johnson Space Center to execute linear image scans of the wing mock-up. The test matrix will vary robotic platform motion to simulate boom wobble and alter lighting and background conditions at the 6.5 foot and 10 foot sensor-wing stand-off distances to be used on orbit. A separate team of image analysts will process and review the data and characterize and record the damage that is found. A suite of software programs has been developed to support hole location definition, damage disposition

  7. Ultraviolet Radiation Damages Self Noncoding RNA And Is Detected By TLR3

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jamie J; Cowing-Zitron, Christopher; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Muehleisen, Beda; Muto, Jun; Borkowski, Andrew W; Martinez, Laisel; Greidinger, Eric L; Yu, Benjamin D; Gallo, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation from the sun can result in sunburn, premature aging and carcinogenesis, but the mechanism responsible for acute inflammation of the skin is not well understood. Here we show that RNA is released from keratinocytes after UVB exposure and that this stimulates production of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) from nonirradiated keratinocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Whole-transcriptome sequencing revealed that UVB irradiation of keratinocytes induced alterations in the double-stranded domains of some noncoding RNAs. We found that this UVB-damaged RNA was sufficient to induce cytokine production from nonirradiated cells, as UVB irradiation of a purified noncoding RNA (U1 RNA) reproduced the same response as the one we observed to UVB-damaged keratinocytes. The responses to both UVB-damaged self-RNAs and UVB-damaged keratinocytes were dependent on Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and Toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 1 (TRIF). In response to UVB exposure, Tlr3−/− mice did not upregulate TNF-α in the skin. Moreover, TLR3 was also necessary for UVB-radiation–induced immune suppression. These findings establish that UVB damage is detected by TLR3 and that self-RNA is a damage-associated molecular pattern that serves as an endogenous signal of solar injury. PMID:22772463

  8. Detecting sparse earthquake damages in high density urban settlements by VHR SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anniballe, R.; Bignami, C.; Chini, M.; Pierdicca, N.; Stramondo, S.

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays, space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, can achieve spatial resolutions in the order of 1 m. However, the exploitation of SAR at very high resolution (VHR) for detecting sparse and isolated damages in urban areas, caused by earthquakes, is still a challenging task. Within urban settlements, the scattering mechanisms are extremely complex and simple change detection analyses or classification procedures can hardly be performed. In this work the 2009, L'Aquila (Italy), earthquake has been considered as case study. Despite about 300 people were killed by the earthquake, few buildings were completely collapsed, and many others were heavily/partially damaged, resulting in a quite sparse damage distribution. We have visually analyzed pairs of VHR SAR data acquired by COSMO-SkyMed satellites, in SPOTLIGHT mode, before and after the earthquake. Such analyses were performed to understand the SAR response of damaged structures surrounded by unaffected buildings, with the aim to identify possible strategies to map the damaged buildings by using an automatic classification procedure. The preliminary analyses based on RGB images, generated by combining pre- and post-event backscattering images, allowed us to figure out how the completely collapsed and the partially damaged buildings are characterized in the SAR response. These outcomes have been taken into account to set up a decision tree algorithm (DTA). Decision rules and related thresholds were identified by statistically analyzing the values of backscattering and derived features. This study point out that many pieces of information and discrimination rules must be exploited to obtain reliable results when dealing with non-extensive and sparse damage within a dense urban settlement.

  9. Satellite detection of vegetative damage and alteration caused by pollutants emitted by a zinc smelter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Fritz, E. L.; Pennypacker, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Field observations and data collected by low flying aircraft were used to verify the accuracy of maps produced from the satellite data. Although areas of vegetation as small as six acres can accurately be detected, a white pine stand that was severely damaged by sulfur dioxide could not be differentiated from a healthy white pine stand because spectral differences were not large enough. When winter data were used to eliminate interference from herbaceous and deciduous vegetation, the damage was still undetectable. The analysis was able to produce a character map that accurately delineated areas of vegetative alteration due to high zinc levels accumulating in the soil. The map depicted a distinct gradient of less damage and alteration as the distance from the smelter increased. Although the satellite data will probably not be useful for detecting small acreages of damaged vegetation, it is concluded that the data may be very useful as an inventory tool to detect and delineate large vegetative areas possessing differing spectral signatures.

  10. Structural Health Monitoring and Impact Detection Using Neural Networks for Damage Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    Detection of damage due to foreign object impact is an important factor in the development of new aerospace vehicles. Acoustic waves generated on impact can be detected using a set of piezoelectric transducers, and the location of impact can be determined by triangulation based on the differences in the arrival time of the waves at each of the sensors. These sensors generate electrical signals in response to mechanical motion resulting from the impact as well as from natural vibrations. Due to electrical noise and mechanical vibration, accurately determining these time differentials can be challenging, and even small measurement inaccuracies can lead to significant errors in the computed damage location. Wavelet transforms are used to analyze the signals at multiple levels of detail, allowing the signals resulting from the impact to be isolated from ambient electromechanical noise. Data extracted from these transformed signals are input to an artificial neural network to aid in identifying the moment of impact from the transformed signals. By distinguishing which of the signal components are resultant from the impact and which are characteristic of noise and normal aerodynamic loads, the time differentials as well as the location of damage can be accurately assessed. The combination of wavelet transformations and neural network processing results in an efficient and accurate approach for passive in-flight detection of foreign object damage.

  11. A Universal Fast Algorithm for Sensitivity-Based Structural Damage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Q. W.; Liu, J. K.; Li, C. H.; Liang, C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Structural damage detection using measured response data has emerged as a new research area in civil, mechanical, and aerospace engineering communities in recent years. In this paper, a universal fast algorithm is presented for sensitivity-based structural damage detection, which can quickly improve the calculation accuracy of the existing sensitivity-based technique without any high-order sensitivity analysis or multi-iterations. The key formula of the universal fast algorithm is derived from the stiffness and flexibility matrix spectral decomposition theory. With the introduction of the key formula, the proposed method is able to quickly achieve more accurate results than that obtained by the original sensitivity-based methods, regardless of whether the damage is small or large. Three examples are used to demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the proposed method. It has been shown that the universal fast algorithm is simple to implement and quickly gains higher accuracy over the existing sensitivity-based damage detection methods. PMID:24453815

  12. Automatic Building Damage Detection Method Using High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images and 3d GIS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jihui; Sui, Haigang; Feng, Wenqing; Song, Zhina

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a novel approach of building damaged detection is proposed using high resolution remote sensing images and 3D GIS-Model data. Traditional building damage detection method considers to detect damaged building due to earthquake, but little attention has been paid to analyze various building damaged types(e.g., trivial damaged, severely damaged and totally collapsed.) Therefore, we want to detect the different building damaged type using 2D and 3D feature of scenes because the real world we live in is a 3D space. The proposed method generalizes that the image geometric correction method firstly corrects the post-disasters remote sensing image using the 3D GIS model or RPC parameters, then detects the different building damaged types using the change of the height and area between the pre- and post-disasters and the texture feature of post-disasters. The results, evaluated on a selected study site of the Beichuan earthquake ruins, Sichuan, show that this method is feasible and effective in building damage detection. It has also shown that the proposed method is easily applicable and well suited for rapid damage assessment after natural disasters.

  13. Systemic inflammation regulates microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Davalos, Dimitrios; Biswas, Dipankar; Swanger, Sharon A.; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel; Loth, Francis; Akassoglou, Katerina; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, exist in either a “resting” state associated with physiological tissue surveillance or an “activated” state in neuroinflammation. We recently showed that ATP is the primary chemoattractor to tissue damage in vivo and elicits opposite effects on the motility of activated microglia in vitro through activation of adenosine A2A receptors. However, whether systemic inflammation affects microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo remains largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon imaging of mice, we show that injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at levels that can produce both clear neuroinflammation and some features of sepsis significantly reduced the rate of microglial response to laser-induced ablation injury in vivo. Under pro-inflammatory conditions, microglial processes initially retracted from the ablation site, but subsequently moved toward and engulfed the damaged area. Analyzing the process dynamics in 3D cultures of primary microglia indicated that only A2A, but not A1 or A3 receptors, mediate process retraction in LPS-activated microglia. The A2A receptor antagonists caffeine and preladenant reduced adenosine-mediated process retraction in activated microglia in vitro. Finally, administration of preladenant before induction of laser ablation in vivo accelerated the microglial response to injury following systemic inflammation. The regulation of rapid microglial responses to sites of injury by A2A receptors could have implications for their ability to respond to the neuronal death occurring under conditions of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24807189

  14. On-orbit damage detection and health monitoring of large space trusses: Status and critical issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1991-01-01

    The long lifetimes, delicate nature and stringent pointing requirements of large space structures such as Space Station Freedom and geostationary Earth sciences platforms might require that these spacecraft be monitored periodically for possible damage to the load carrying structures. A review of the literature in damage detection and health monitoring of such structures is presented, along with a candidate structure to be used as a testbed for future work in this field. A unified notation and terminology is also proposed to facilitate comparisons between candidate methods.

  15. Hearing aid malfunction detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessinger, R. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A malfunction detection system for detecting malfunctions in electrical signal processing circuits is disclosed. Malfunctions of a hearing aid in the form of frequency distortion and/or inadequate amplification by the hearing aid amplifier, as well as weakening of the hearing aid power supply are detectable. A test signal is generated and a timed switching circuit periodically applies the test signal to the input of the hearing aid amplifier in place of the input signal from the microphone. The resulting amplifier output is compared with the input test signal used as a reference signal. The hearing aid battery voltage is also periodically compared to a reference voltage. Deviations from the references beyond preset limits cause a warning system to operate.

  16. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, Doug; Versteeg, Roelof; Herman, Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude - from an autonomous robotic perspective - the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  17. Portable Microleak-Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Sikora, Joseph G.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    2007-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts a portable microleak-detection system that has been built especially for use in testing hydrogen tanks made of polymer-matrix composite materials. (As used here, microleak signifies a leak that is too small to be detectable by the simple soap-bubble technique.) The system can also be used to test for microleaks in tanks that are made of other materials and that contain gases other than hydrogen. Results of calibration tests have shown that measurement errors are less than 10 percent for leak rates ranging from 0.3 to 200 cm3/min. Like some other microleak-detection systems, this system includes a vacuum pump and associated plumbing for sampling the leaking gas, and a mass spectrometer for analyzing the molecular constituents of the gas. The system includes a flexible vacuum chamber that can be attached to the outer surface of a tank or other object of interest that is to be tested for leakage (hereafter denoted, simply, the test object). The gas used in a test can be the gas or vapor (e.g., hydrogen in the original application) to be contained by the test object. Alternatively, following common practice in leak testing, helium can be used as a test gas. In either case, the mass spectrometer can be used to verify that the gas measured by the system is the test gas rather than a different gas and, hence, that the leak is indeed from the test object.

  18. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Few; Roelof Versteeg; Herman Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, a countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude – from an autonomous robotic perspective – the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  19. NMR detection of thermal damage in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Brady, Steven K; Conradi, Mark S; Vaccaro, Christopher M

    2005-02-01

    Composite materials of epoxy resins reinforced by carbon fibers are increasingly being used in the construction of aircraft. In these applications, the material may be thermally damaged and weakened by jet blast and accidental fires. The feasibility of using proton NMR relaxation times T1, T1rho, and T2 to detect and quantify the thermal damage is investigated. In conventional spectrometers with homogeneous static magnetic fields, T1rho is readily measured and is found to be well correlated with thermal damage. This suggests that NMR measurements of proton T1rho may be used for non-destructive evaluation of carbon fiber-epoxy composites. Results from T1rho measurements in the inhomogeneous static and RF magnetic fields of an NMR-MOUSE are also discussed.

  20. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    SciTech Connect

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombination when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.

  1. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    DOE PAGES

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; ...

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombinationmore » when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.« less

  2. Damage Detection in Rotorcraft Composite Structures Using Thermography and Laser-Based Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    New rotorcraft structural composite designs incorporate lower structural weight, reduced manufacturing complexity, and improved threat protection. These new structural concepts require nondestructive evaluation inspection technologies that can potentially be field-portable and able to inspect complex geometries for damage or structural defects. Two candidate technologies were considered: Thermography and Laser-Based Ultrasound (Laser UT). Thermography and Laser UT have the advantage of being non-contact inspection methods, with Thermography being a full-field imaging method and Laser UT a point scanning technique. These techniques were used to inspect composite samples that contained both embedded flaws and impact damage of various size and shape. Results showed that the inspection techniques were able to detect both embedded and impact damage with varying degrees of success.

  3. LED-Induced fluorescence and image analysis to detect stink bug damage in cotton bolls

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stink bugs represent a major agricultural pest complex attacking more than 200 wild and cultivated plants, including cotton in the southeastern US. Stink bug feeding on developing cotton bolls will cause boll abortion or lint staining and thus reduced yield and lint value. Current methods for stink bug detection involve manual harvesting and cracking open of a sizable number of immature cotton bolls for visual inspection. This process is cumbersome, time consuming, and requires a moderate level of experience to obtain accurate estimates. To improve detection of stink bug feeding, we present here a method based on fluorescent imaging and subsequent image analyses to determine the likelihood of stink bug damage in cotton bolls. Results Damage to different structures of cotton bolls including lint and carpal wall can be observed under blue LED-induced fluorescence. Generally speaking, damaged regions fluoresce green, whereas non-damaged regions with chlorophyll fluoresce red. However, similar fluorescence emission is also observable on cotton bolls that have not been fed upon by stink bugs. Criteria based on fluorescent intensity and the size of the fluorescent spot allow to differentiate between true positives (fluorescent regions associated with stink bug feeding) and false positives (fluorescent regions due to other causes). We found a detection rates with two combined criteria of 87% for true-positive marks and of 8% for false-positive marks. Conclusions The imaging technique presented herein gives rise to a possible detection apparatus where a cotton boll is imaged in the field and images processed by software. The unique fluorescent signature left by stink bugs can be used to determine with high probability if a cotton boll has been punctured by a stink bug. We believe this technique, when integrated in a suitable device, could be used for more accurate detection in the field and allow for more optimized application of pest control. PMID:23421982

  4. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2009-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear tooth pitting fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4) were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters performed average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant amount of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  5. Efficient interpretation algorithm for embedded Bragg gratings for damage detection in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhugoud, Mohanraj; Peters, Kara J.

    2003-07-01

    The goal of a structural health monitoring system is to detect, locate, and identify damages in a structure during its lifetime. The concept of structural health monitoring is particularly important for fiber reinforced composites due to the complexity of the possible failure mechanisms. The goal of this work is to simulate the response of optical fiber Bragg grating sensors to multi-component loading for their implementation in structural health monitoring algorithms for composites. A simulation method is presented to determine the effects of axial, bending and shear loading on an embedded optical fiber Bragg grating sensor. The effect of fiber bending on the Bragg grating sensor is experimentally verified by embedding the sensor in a solid cone, clamped at the base and subjected to a point load at the apex. Next, a numerically efficient method to calculate the response of sensors embedded in a unidirectional composite is developed using both finite element analysis and optimal shear-lag theory and taking into account the above effects. The limitations of the optimal shear-lag theory are derived through comparison with the finite element results. The application of this method is demonstrated through a numerical example, simulating the response of sensors embedded in one fiber layer to a transverse crack.

  6. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  7. Tape Cassette Bacteria Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an automatic bacteria detection system with a zero-g capability and based on the filter-capsule approach is described. This system is intended for monitoring the sterility of regenerated water in a spacecraft. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the action of bacterial porphyrins (i.e., catalase, cytochromes, etc.) on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Since viable as well as nonviable organisms initiate this luminescence, viable organisms are detected by comparing the signal of an incubated water sample with an unincubated control. Higher signals for the former indicate the presence of viable organisms. System features include disposable sealed sterile capsules, each containing a filter membrane, for processing discrete water samples and a tape transport for moving these capsules through a processing sequence which involves sample concentration, nutrient addition, incubation, a 4 Molar Urea wash and reaction with luminol-hydrogen peroxide in front of a photomultiplier tube. Liquids are introduced by means of a syringe needle which pierces a rubber septum contained in the wall of the capsule. Detection thresholds obtained with this unit towards E. coli and S. marcescens assuming a 400 ml water sample are indicated.

  8. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of DNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Hájková, Andrea; Barek, Jiří; Vyskočil, Vlastimil

    2017-03-01

    A simple electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was prepared by adsorbing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) onto the GCE surface and subsequently used for the detection of dsDNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals. Investigation of the mutual interaction between hydroxyl radicals and dsDNA was conducted using a combination of several electrochemical detection techniques: square-wave voltammetry for direct monitoring the oxidation of dsDNA bases, and cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as indirect electrochemical methods making use of the redox-active indicator [Fe(CN)6](4-/3-). Hydroxyl radicals were generated electrochemically on the surface of a boron-doped diamond electrode and chemically (via the Fenton's reaction or the auto-oxidation of Fe(II)). The extent of dsDNA damage by electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals depended on the current density applied to the generating electrode: by applying 5, 10, and 50mAcm(-2), selected relative biosensor responses decreased after 3min incubation from 100% to 38%, 27%, and 3%, respectively. Chemically generated hydroxyl radicals caused less pronounced dsDNA damage, and their damaging activity depended on the form of Fe(II) ions: decreases to 49% (Fenton's reaction; Fe(II) complexed with EDTA) and 33% (auto-oxidation of Fe(II); Fe(II) complexed with dsDNA) were observed after 10min incubation.

  9. Mechanochromic Fluorescent Probe Molecules for Damage Detection in Aerospace Polymers and Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivola, Ryan E.

    The detection of damage in aerospace composites can be improved by incorporation of mechanochromic fluorescent probe molecules into the polymers used in composite parts. This study focuses on a novel series of mechanochromic probes, AJNDE15 and AJNDE17, which are incorporated in structural epoxy resin DGEBA-DETA. Chapter 1 details the characterization of the DGEBA-DETA epoxy system used in this study. The important characteristics of DGEBA-DETA's response to mechanical loading will be discussed within the larger field of glassy amorphous polymer deformation. The mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of DGEBA-DETA relevant to this work will be measured using standardized techniques and instrumentation. Chapters 2 and 3 focus on the mechanochromic probes AJNDE15 and AJNDE17 in the DGEBA-DETA system. Chapter 2 presents research designed to identify the mechanism through which the probes display mechanochromism. The possible mechanochromic mechanisms are introduced in a literature review. Research on these probes in DGEBA-DETA will be presented and discussed with respect to the possible mechanisms, and the mechanism that best fits the results will be identified as a mechanochemical reaction. Chapter 3 continues the analysis of the mechanochromism of the probes in DGEBA-DETA. The kinetics of the mechanochromic reaction will be studied and compared with the current understanding of glassy polymer deformation. Possible models for the molecular interactions responsible for mechanochromism in this system will be put forward. Research will be presented to evaluate the mechanochromism kinetics and for comparison with the behavior predicted by the models.

  10. Progressive damage detection using the reusable electromechanical impedance method for metal structures with a possibility of weight loss identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Wongi S.

    2016-05-01

    Damage accumulation in structures may result in a structural failure which is a serious problem when ensuring public safety. Although various non-destructive techniques are available to seek for the existence of damage at an early stage, most of these techniques rely on the experience of the experts. To date, automated structural health monitoring systems have been extensively researched and one of the methods, known as the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method, has shown promising results. However, the EMI method is a local method requiring a large number of sensors for covering large areas such as in bridges and buildings. In addition, attaching these sensors onto a surface can be time consuming since adhesives are used for attaching the sensors where its curing time increases the setting up time even further. In this study, the performance of the reusable piezoelectric (PZT) device for metal structures is examined against two different types of progressive damage scenarios. Overall, the reusable PZT device shown in this study has successfully identified damage with a possibility of weight loss detection.

  11. An energy-based sparse representation of ultrasonic guided-waves for online damage detection of pipelines under varying environmental and operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eybpoosh, Matineh; Berges, Mario; Noh, Hae Young

    2017-01-01

    abnormality in an operating hot-water piping system, under multiple varying EOCs, such as temperature, water flow rate, and inner pressure; and (4) detecting a structural abnormality as the ratio of the damaged pipe's signals in the reference dataset increases.

  12. Thermographic detection of fatigue damage of pressure vessel steels at 1,000 Hz and 20 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Wang, H.; Jiang, L.; Yang, B.; Huang, J.Y.; Kuo, R.C.; Huang, J.G.

    2000-01-31

    Fatigue behavior is strongly affected by the environment, materials, and loading conditions. The process of fatigue can be categorized into three stages: crack initiation, growth, and final fracture. Nondestruction evaluation (NDE) of fatigue damage is of critical importance for life assessments and structural integrity evaluations. Several NDE methods, including ultrasonics, acoustic emission, and thermography, have been used to monitor fatigue damage. However, relatively little work has been conducted to assess fatigue characteristics using thermographic infrared techniques. In this paper, a thermographic infrared imaging system was used to detect the heat conditions of fatigued pressure vessel steels at 1,000 Hz and 20 Hz. Moreover, the fatigue behavior has been investigated at 1,000 Hz using an advanced electrohydraulic machine.

  13. Detection of exposure damage in composite materials using Fourier transform infrared technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Duvall, Randy L.

    2010-09-01

    Goal: to detect the subtle changes in laminate composite structures brought about by thermal, chemical, ultraviolet, and moisture exposure. Compare sensitivity of an array of NDI methods, including Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), to detect subtle differences in composite materials due to deterioration. Inspection methods applied: ultrasonic pulse echo, through transmission ultrasonics, thermography, resonance testing, mechanical impedance analysis, eddy current, low frequency bond testing & FTIR. Comparisons between the NDI methods are being used to establish the potential of FTIR to provide the necessary sensitivity to non-visible, yet significant, damage in the resin and fiber matrix of composite structures. Comparison of NDI results with short beam shear tests are being used to relate NDI sensitivity to reduction in structural performance. Chemical analyses technique, which measures the infrared intensity versus wavelength of light reflected on the surface of a structure (chemical and physical information via this signature). Advances in instrumentation have resulted in hand-held portable devices that allow for field use (few seconds per scan). Shows promise for production quality assurance and in-service applications on composite aircraft structures (scarfed repairs). Statistical analysis on frequency spectrums produced by FTIR interrogations are being used to produce an NDI technique for assessing material integrity. Conclusions are: (1) Use of NDI to assess loss of composite laminate integrity brought about by thermal, chemical, ultraviolet, and moisture exposure. (2) Degradation trends between SBS strength and exposure levels (temperature and time) have been established for different materials. (3) Various NDI methods have been applied to evaluate damage and relate this to loss of integrity - PE UT shows greatest sensitivity. (4) FTIR shows promise for damage detection and calibration to predict structural integrity (short beam shear). (5

  14. Damage Precursor Detection in Polymer Matrix Composites Using Novel Smart Composite Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-20

    was obtained upon the evaporation of the solvent from the organic layer. The insoluble solids were removed via the application of hot ethanol. The...Cyclic loading parameter in tensile fatigue test. Compression test: The goal for the application of cyclobutane-based polymer in its solid state was...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0328 Damage Precursor Detection in Polymer Matrix Composites Using Novel Smart Composite Particles Aditi Chattopadhyay ARIZONA

  15. Open Circuit Resonant (SansEC) Sensor Technology for Lightning Mitigation and Damage Detection and Diagnosis for Composite Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Smith, Laura J.; Wang, Chuantong; Ticatch, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional methods to protect composite aircraft from lightning strike damage rely on a conductive layer embedded on or within the surface of the aircraft composite skin. This method is effective at preventing major direct effect damage and minimizes indirect effects to aircraft systems from lightning strike attachment, but provides no additional benefit for the added parasitic weight from the conductive layer. When a known lightning strike occurs, the points of attachment and detachment on the aircraft surface are visually inspected and checked for damage by maintenance personnel to ensure continued safe flight operations. A new multi-functional lightning strike protection (LSP) method has been developed to provide aircraft lightning strike protection, damage detection and diagnosis for composite aircraft surfaces. The method incorporates a SansEC sensor array on the aircraft exterior surfaces forming a "Smart skin" surface for aircraft lightning zones certified to withstand strikes up to 100 kiloamperes peak current. SansEC sensors are open-circuit devices comprised of conductive trace spiral patterns sans (without) electrical connections. The SansEC sensor is an electromagnetic resonator having specific resonant parameters (frequency, amplitude, bandwidth & phase) which when electromagnetically coupled with a composite substrate will indicate the electrical impedance of the composite through a change in its resonant response. Any measureable shift in the resonant characteristics can be an indication of damage to the composite caused by a lightning strike or from other means. The SansEC sensor method is intended to diagnose damage for both in-situ health monitoring or ground inspections. In this paper, the theoretical mathematical framework is established for the use of open circuit sensors to perform damage detection and diagnosis on carbon fiber composites. Both computational and experimental analyses were conducted to validate this new method and system for

  16. Nonlinear ultrasonics for in situ damage detection during high frequency fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anish; Torbet, Christopher J.; Jones, J. Wayne; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we report the use of the feedback signal of an ultrasonic fatigue system to dynamically deduce fatigue damage accumulation via changes in the nonlinear ultrasonic parameter. The applicability of this parameter in comparison to the resonant frequency for assessment of fatigue damage accumulation in a wrought aluminum alloy has been demonstrated, without the need for coupling fluids or independent generation of incident ultrasonic waves. The ultrasonic nonlinearity increased and the resonant frequency of the system decreased with initiation and propagation of the major crack. The nonlinear ultrasonic parameter shows greater sensitivity to damage accumulation than the resonant frequency. The number of cycles for crack propagation, estimated based on the changes in the nonlinear ultrasonic parameter, is in very good agreement with calculated crack growth rates based on the fractography studies.

  17. Detection of sudden structural damage using blind source separation and time-frequency approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morovati, V.; Kazemi, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    Seismic signal processing is one of the most reliable methods of detecting the structural damage during earthquakes. In this paper, the use of the hybrid method of blind source separation (BSS) and time-frequency analysis (TFA) is explored to detect the changes in the structural response data. The combination of the BSS and TFA is applied to the seismic signals due to the non-stationary nature of them. Firstly, the second-order blind identification technique is used to decompose the response signal of structural vibration into modal coordinate signals which will be mono-components for TFA. Then each mono-component signal is analyzed to extract instantaneous frequency of structure. Numerical simulations and a real-world seismic-excited structure with time-varying frequencies show the accuracy and robustness of the developed algorithm. TFA of extracted sources shows that used method can be successfully applied to structural damage detection. The results also demonstrate that the combined method can be used to identify the time instant of structural damage occurrence more sharply and effectively than by the use of TFA alone.

  18. Air-coupled impact-echo damage detection in reinforced concrete using wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, Tyler; Cha, Young-Jin

    2017-02-01

    Internal damage detection of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is a challenging field that has garnered increasing attention over the past decades due to a decline in the state of infrastructure in North America. As a nondestructive testing mode, the impact-echo method is currently a promising approach. However, it requires intensive testing to cover large-scale civil RC structures with point-by-point inspection. In order to partially overcome this limitation, this study proposes a new impact-echo analysis method using wavelet transforms with dual microphones with 20 kHz resolution to improve damage detection capability. The signals recorded from the microphones are processed to recover spectral data that are further analyzed using percentage of energy information to determine the condition of the specimen and detect in situ damages. In order to validate the performance of the proposed method, the results from traditional signal processing using FFT and wavelet transforms are compared. The proposed wavelet transform based approach showed better accuracy when covering broader areas, which can contribute to reduce testing time significantly when monitoring large-scale civil RC structures.

  19. Damage detection using high order longitudinal guided waves (HOLGW) in the anchorage zone of stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-dong; Jin, Jian; Yang, Feng; Chen, Wei-zhen

    2017-02-01

    High order longitudinal guided waves (HOLGW) are studied for the damage detection in the anchorage zone of stayed cable through the theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental validation. First, based on the theory of elastic wave propagation in cylinder, the dispersion curves of longitudinal modes were obtained and calculated analytically and the high-frequency such as 5MHz corresponding to the higher order longitudinal guided wave modes are identified for the damage detection. Then, the ultrasonic guided waves propagating in a steel wire with or without defects were simulated by using the finite element method and the effects of defect depth and length on the reflection coefficient are studied. Finally, the free wires and a tested cable were studied experimentally. The results show that the finite element method is able to model the high-order guided wave propagation in the steel wire. The agreement between the experiment and theory has demonstrated that the HOLGW is a potential candidate for the damage detection in anchorage zones of stayed-cables.

  20. Enhanced nonlinear crack-wave interactions for structural damage detection based on Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziedziech, Kajetan; Pieczonka, Lukasz; Kijanka, Piotr; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents a novel damage detection method that combines Lamb wave propagation with nonlinear acoustics. Low-frequency excitation is used to modulate Lamb waves in the presence of fatigue cracks. The work presented shows that the synchronization of the interrogating high-frequency Lamb wave with the low-frequency vibration is a key element of the proposed method. The main advantages of the proposed method are the lack of necessity for baseline measurements representing undamaged condition and lack of sensitivity to temperature variations. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements are performed to demonstrate the application of the proposed method to detect fatigue crack in aluminum beam.

  1. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  2. Optimal Artificial Boundary Condition Configurations for Sensitivity-Based Model Updating and Damage Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    DETECTION ................................1 B . BACKGROUND...5 A. ANALYTICAL AND OMITTED COORDINATE SETS ...........................6 B ...31 B . SPATIALLY INCOMPLETE UNDERDETERMINED SYSTEMS........32 1. Using Individual

  3. Detecting transition in agricultural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neary, P. J.; Coiner, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Remote sensing of agricultural phenomena has been largely concentrated on analysis of agriculture at the field level. Concern has been to identify crop status, crop condition, and crop distribution, all of which are spatially analyzed on a field-by-field basis. A more general level of abstraction is the agricultural system, or the complex of crops and other land cover that differentiate various agricultural economies. The paper reports on a methodology to assist in the analysis of the landscape elements of agricultural systems with Landsat digital data. The methodology involves tracing periods of photosynthetic activity for a fixed area. Change from one agricultural system to another is detected through shifts in the intensity and periodicity of photosynthetic activity as recorded in the radiometric return to Landsat. The Landsat-derived radiometric indicator of photosynthetic activity appears to provide the ability to differentiate agricultural systems from each other as well as from conterminous natural vegetation.

  4. Errors, error detection, error correction and hippocampal-region damage: data and theories.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Donald G; Johnson, Laura W

    2013-11-01

    This review and perspective article outlines 15 observational constraints on theories of errors, error detection, and error correction, and their relation to hippocampal-region (HR) damage. The core observations come from 10 studies with H.M., an amnesic with cerebellar and HR damage but virtually no neocortical damage. Three studies examined the detection of errors planted in visual scenes (e.g., a bird flying in a fish bowl in a school classroom) and sentences (e.g., I helped themselves to the birthday cake). In all three experiments, H.M. detected reliably fewer errors than carefully matched memory-normal controls. Other studies examined the detection and correction of self-produced errors, with controls for comprehension of the instructions, impaired visual acuity, temporal factors, motoric slowing, forgetting, excessive memory load, lack of motivation, and deficits in visual scanning or attention. In these studies, H.M. corrected reliably fewer errors than memory-normal and cerebellar controls, and his uncorrected errors in speech, object naming, and reading aloud exhibited two consistent features: omission and anomaly. For example, in sentence production tasks, H.M. omitted one or more words in uncorrected encoding errors that rendered his sentences anomalous (incoherent, incomplete, or ungrammatical) reliably more often than controls. Besides explaining these core findings, the theoretical principles discussed here explain H.M.'s retrograde amnesia for once familiar episodic and semantic information; his anterograde amnesia for novel information; his deficits in visual cognition, sentence comprehension, sentence production, sentence reading, and object naming; and effects of aging on his ability to read isolated low frequency words aloud. These theoretical principles also explain a wide range of other data on error detection and correction and generate new predictions for future test.

  5. Structural damage detection in wind turbine blades based on time series representations of dynamic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, Simon; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2015-03-01

    The development of large wind turbines that enable to harvest energy more efficiently is a consequence of the increasing demand for renewables in the world. To optimize the potential energy output, light and flexible wind turbine blades (WTBs) are designed. However, the higher flexibilities and lower buckling capacities adversely affect the long-term safety and reliability of WTBs, and thus the increased operation and maintenance costs reduce the expected revenue. Effective structural health monitoring techniques can help to counteract this by limiting inspection efforts and avoiding unplanned maintenance actions. Vibration-based methods deserve high attention due to the moderate instrumentation efforts and the applicability for in-service measurements. The present paper proposes the use of cross-correlations (CCs) of acceleration responses between sensors at different locations for structural damage detection in WTBs. CCs were in the past successfully applied for damage detection in numerical and experimental beam structures while utilizing only single lags between the signals. The present approach uses vectors of CC coefficients for multiple lags between measurements of two selected sensors taken from multiple possible combinations of sensors. To reduce the dimensionality of the damage sensitive feature (DSF) vectors, principal component analysis is performed. The optimal number of principal components (PCs) is chosen with respect to a statistical threshold. Finally, the detection phase uses the selected PCs of the healthy structure to calculate scores from a current DSF vector, where statistical hypothesis testing is performed for making a decision about the current structural state. The method is applied to laboratory experiments conducted on a small WTB with non-destructive damage scenarios.

  6. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  7. An optimal baseline selection methodology for data-driven damage detection and temperature compensation in acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Arredondo, M.-A.; Sierra-Pérez, Julián; Cabanes, Guénaël

    2016-05-01

    The process of measuring and analysing the data from a distributed sensor network all over a structural system in order to quantify its condition is known as structural health monitoring (SHM). For the design of a trustworthy health monitoring system, a vast amount of information regarding the inherent physical characteristics of the sources and their propagation and interaction across the structure is crucial. Moreover, any SHM system which is expected to transition to field operation must take into account the influence of environmental and operational changes which cause modifications in the stiffness and damping of the structure and consequently modify its dynamic behaviour. On that account, special attention is paid in this paper to the development of an efficient SHM methodology where robust signal processing and pattern recognition techniques are integrated for the correct interpretation of complex ultrasonic waves within the context of damage detection and identification. The methodology is based on an acousto-ultrasonics technique where the discrete wavelet transform is evaluated for feature extraction and selection, linear principal component analysis for data-driven modelling and self-organising maps for a two-level clustering under the principle of local density. At the end, the methodology is experimentally demonstrated and results show that all the damages were detectable and identifiable.

  8. A hybrid approach for damage detection of structures under operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel Miguel, Leandro Fleck; Holdorf Lopez, Rafael; Fadel Miguel, Letícia Fleck

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a hybrid stochastic/deterministic optimisation algorithm to solve the target optimisation problem of vibration-based damage detection. The use of a numerical solution of the representation formula to locate the region of the global solution, i.e., to provide a starting point for the local optimiser, which is chosen to be the Nelder-Mead algorithm (NMA), is proposed. A series of numerical examples with different damage scenarios and noise levels was performed under impact and ambient vibrations. Thereafter, an experimental study of three cantilever beams with several different damage scenarios was conducted. To test the accuracy and efficiency of the optimisation algorithm, its results were compared to previous procedures available in the literature, which employed different solutions such as the genetic algorithm (GA), the harmony search algorithm (HS) and the particle swarm optimisation (PSO) algorithm. The performance of the proposed optimisation scheme was more accurate and required a lower computational cost than the GA, HS and PSO algorithms, emphasising the capacity of the proposed methodology for its use in damage diagnosis and assessment. In addition, the methodology was able to handle incomplete measurements and truncated mode shapes, which is of paramount importance for dealing with operational conditions in long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) applications.

  9. Vibration-based damage detection in plates by using time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, Irina; Manoach, Emil

    2008-07-01

    This paper deals with the problem of vibration health monitoring (VHM) in structures with nonlinear dynamic behaviour. It aims to introduce two viable VHM methods that use large amplitude vibrations and are based on nonlinear time series analysis. The methods suggested explore some changes in the state space geometry/distribution of the structural dynamic response with damage and their use for damage detection purposes. One of the methods uses the statistical distribution of state space points on the attractor of a vibrating structure, while the other one is based on the Poincaré map of the state space projected dynamic response. In this paper both methods are developed and demonstrated for a thin vibrating plate. The investigation is based on finite element modelling of the plate vibration response. The results obtained demonstrate the influence of damage on the local dynamic attractor of the plate state space and the applicability of the proposed strategies for damage assessment. The approach taken in this study and the suggested VHM methods are rather generic and permit development and applications for other more complex nonlinear structures.

  10. Compensated intruder-detection systems

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, David R.; Miller, William R.

    1984-01-01

    Intruder-detection systems in which intruder-induced signals are transmitted through a medium also receive spurious signals induced by changes in a climatic condition affecting the medium. To combat this, signals received from the detection medium are converted to a first signal. The system also provides a reference signal proportional to climate-induced changes in the medium. The first signal and the reference signal are combined for generating therefrom an output signal which is insensitive to the climatic changes in the medium. An alarm is energized if the output signal exceeds a preselected value. In one embodiment, an acoustic cable is coupled to a fence to generate a first electrical signal proportional to movements thereof. False alarms resulting from wind-induced movements of the fence (detection medium) are eliminated by providing an anemometer-driven voltage generator to provide a reference voltage proportional to the velocity of wind incident on the fence. An analog divider receives the first electrical signal and the reference signal as its numerator and denominator inputs, respectively, and generates therefrom an output signal which is insensitive to the wind-induced movements in the fence.

  11. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  12. Damage detection and characterization using long-gauge and distributed fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišić, Branko; Hubbell, David; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea Hoeg; Yao, Yao

    2013-08-01

    Fiber optic strain sensors have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. In addition to these benefits, fiber optic (FO) techniques allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of civil structures and infrastructure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors, and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. The FO techniques that enable these two approaches are based on fiber Bragg-gratings and Brillouin optical time-domain analysis. The aim of this paper is to present both FO techniques and both structural assessment approaches, and to validate them through large-scale applications. Although many other currently applied methods fail to detect the damage in real, on-site conditions, the presented approaches were proven to be suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and, to certain extent, quantification. This is illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: the first on a post-tensioned concrete bridge and the second on segmented concrete pipeline.

  13. Application of immunohistochemical staining to detect antigen destruction as a measure of tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Onul, Abdullah; Colvard, Michael D; Paradise, William A; Elseth, Kim M; Vesper, Benjamin J; Gouvas, Eftychia; Deliu, Zane; Garcia, Kelly D; Pestle, William J; Radosevich, James A

    2012-09-01

    Electrocautery and directed energy devices (DEDs) such as lasers, which are used in surgery, result in tissue damage that cannot be readily detected by traditional histological methods, such as hematoxylin and eosin staining. Alternative staining methods, including 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) to stain live tissue, have been reported. Despite providing superior detection of damaged tissue relative to the hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method, the MTT method possesses a number of drawbacks, most notably that it must be carried out on live tissue samples. Herein, we report the development of a novel staining method, "antigen destruction immunohistochemistry" (ADI), which can be carried out on paraffin-embedded tissue. The ADI method takes advantage of epitope loss to define the area of tissue damage and provides many of the benefits of live tissue MTT staining without the drawbacks inherent to that method. In addition, the authors provide data to support the use of antibodies directed at a number of gene products for use in animal tissue for which there are no species-specific antibodies commercially available, as well as an example of a species-specific direct antibody. Data are provided that support the use of this method in many tissue models, as well as evidence that ADI is comparable to the live tissue MTT method.

  14. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  15. Oxidative damage of the male reproductive system induced by paraquat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jin-Yan; Lu, Xiao-Ning; Zheng, Peng-Sheng; Xue, Xiang

    2016-10-20

    The effects of paraquat (PQ) on the male reproductive system are unclear. In this study, male rats were divided into four groups (0, 0.5, 2, and 8 mg/kg) and treated with PQ by oral gavage for 8 weeks. At the end of the experiment, a significant decline in sperm count, motility, and viability and an increase in teratospermia were observed in the PQ-treated group (P < 0.05). Further investigation found that PQ resulted in enhanced lipid peroxidation and more apoptosis in the testis tissues, and apoptosis was likely to be associated with activation of the mitochondrial pathway. In summary, our study demonstrated oxidative damage due to PQ on the male reproductive system.

  16. Damage detection in a cantilever beam under dynamic conditions using a distributed, fast, and high spatial resolution Brillouin interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motil, A.; Davidi, R.; Bergman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Hahami, M.; Tur, M.

    2016-05-01

    The ability of Brillouin-based fiber-optic sensing to detect damage in a moving cantilever beam is demonstrated. A fully computerized, distributed and high spatial resolution (10cm) Fast-BOTDA interrogator (50 full-beam Brillouin-gain-spectra per second) successfully directly detected an abnormally stiffened (i.e., `damaged') 20cm long segment in a 6m Aluminum beam, while the beam was in motion. Damage detection was based on monitoring deviations of the measured strain distribution along the beam from that expected in the undamaged case.

  17. Autonomous pathogen detection system 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R G; Wang, A; Colston, B; Masquelier, D; Jones, L; Venkateswaran, K S; Nasarabadi, S; Brown, S; Ramponi, A; Milanovich, F P

    2001-01-09

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and field-demonstrate a fully Autonomous Pathogen Detector (identifier) System (APDS). This will be accomplished by integrating a proven flow cytometer and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detector with sample collection, sample preparation and fluidics to provide a compact, autonomously operating instrument capable of simultaneously detecting multiple pathogens and/or toxins. The APDS will be designed to operate in fixed locations, where it continuously monitors air samples and automatically reports the presence of specific biological agents. The APDS will utilize both multiplex immuno and nucleic acid assays to provide ''quasi-orthogonal'', multiple agent detection approaches to minimize false positives and increase the reliability of identification. Technical advancements across several fronts must first be made in order to realize the full extent of the APDS. Commercialization will be accomplished through three progressive generations of instruments. The APDS is targeted for domestic applications in which (1) the public is at high risk of exposure to covert releases of bioagent such as in major subway systems and other transportation terminals, large office complexes, and convention centers; and (2) as part of a monitoring network of sensors integrated with command and control systems for wide area monitoring of urban areas and major gatherings (e.g., inaugurations, Olympics, etc.). In this latter application there is potential that a fully developed APDS could add value to Defense Department monitoring architectures.

  18. On Using Residual Voltage to Estimate Electrode Model Parameters for Damage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ashwati; Kelly, Shawn K.

    2016-01-01

    Current technology has enabled a significant increase in the number of electrodes for electrical stimulation. For large arrays of electrodes, it becomes increasingly difficult to monitor and detect failures at the stimulation site. In this paper, we propose the idea that the residual voltage from a biphasic electrical stimulation pulse can serve to recognize damage at the electrode-tissue interface. We use a simple switch circuit approach to estimate the relaxation time constant of the electrode model, which essentially models the residual voltage in biphasic electrical stimulation, and compare it with standard electrode characterization techniques. Out of 15 electrodes in a polyimide-based SIROF array, our approach highlights 3 damaged electrodes, consistent with measurements made using cyclic voltammetry and electrode impedance spectroscopy. PMID:27231725

  19. Sensitive detection of PDT-induced cell damages with luminescent oxygen nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Ru; Peng, Hong-shang; You, Fang-tian; Ping, Jian-tao; Zhou, Chao; Guo, Lan-ying

    2016-09-01

    In this work luminescent nanosensors specifically created for intracellular oxygen (ic-O2) were utilized to assess photodynamic therapy (PDT) -induced cell damages. Firstly, ic-O2 was demonstrated to be consumed much faster than extracellular O2 with respective O2 nanosensors. Using the ic-O2 nanosensors, PDT-treated cells with different degree of impairment were then resolved according to the oxygen consumption rate (OCR). The evolving trend of cytotoxicity derived from OCRs was in agreement with cell viability obtained from 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Moreover, the direct damage of PDT on cell mitochondria was successfully detected by monitoring respiration instantly after PDT treatment, which is actually beyond the scope of MTT assay. These results suggest that fluorescence sensing of ic-O2-associated cell respiration is promising and even may become a standardized method, complementary to MTT assay, to evaluate PDT-induced cytotoxicity.

  20. Review of approaches to the detection of genetic damage in the human fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, R.B.

    1987-10-01

    Studies in experimental animals links between genetic damage to the fetus and the etiology of several disorders, including fetal loss, teratogenesis, and cancer. Methods for measuring genetic damage directly in the human fetus could provide epidemiologists and clinical researchers with powerful tools for investigating similar associations in humans. Current methods potentially available for such studies include assays for mutagenic substances in human body fluids and for measuring modifications to genetic material at the three levels of organization of genetic material: the chromosome, the gene or specific locus, and chemical DNA. Results of studies using fetal tissues to investigate each of these end points are reviewed, emphasizing studies of chemical modifications to DNA nucleotides detected in the human plancenta.

  1. Detection of DNA damage by space radiation in human fibroblasts flown on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Gaza, Ramona; Stoffle, Nicholas; Wang, Huichen; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2017-02-01

    Although charged particles in space have been detected with radiation detectors on board spacecraft since the discovery of the Van Allen Belts, reports on the effects of direct exposure to space radiation in biological systems have been limited. Measurement of biological effects of space radiation is challenging due to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the radiation environment, and due to the difficulty in distinguishing the radiation effects from microgravity and other space environmental factors. In astronauts, only a few changes, such as increased chromosome aberrations in their lymphocytes and early onset of cataracts, are attributed primarily to their exposure to space radiation. In this study, cultured human fibroblasts were flown on the International Space Station (ISS). Cells were kept at 37°C in space for 14 days before being fixed for analysis of DNA damage with the γ-H2AX assay. The 3-dimensional γ-H2AX foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. Quantitative analysis revealed several foci that were larger and displayed a track pattern only in the Day 14 flight samples. To confirm that the foci data from the flight study was actually induced from space radiation exposure, cultured human fibroblasts were exposed to low dose rate γ rays at 37°C. Cells exposed to chronic γ rays showed similar foci size distribution in comparison to the non-exposed controls. The cells were also exposed to low- and high-LET protons, and high-LET Fe ions on the ground. Our results suggest that in G1 human fibroblasts under the normal culture condition, only a small fraction of large size foci can be attributed to high-LET radiation in space.

  2. Detection of DNA Damage by Space Radiation in Human Fibroblasts Flown on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Gaza, Ramona; Stoffle, Nicholas; Wang, Huichen; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Although charged particles in space have been detected with radiation detectors on board spacecraft since the discovery of the Van Allen Belts, reports on the effects of direct exposure to space radiation in biological systems have been limited. Measurement of biological effects of space radiation is challenging due to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the radiation environment, and due to the difficulty in distinguishing the radiation effects from microgravity and other space environmental factors. In astronauts, only a few changes, such as increased chromosome aberrations in their lymphocytes and early onset of cataracts, are attributed primarily to their exposure to space radiation. In this study, cultured human fibroblasts were flown on the International Space Station (ISS). Cells were kept at 37 degrees Centigrade in space for 14 days before being fixed for analysis of DNA damages with the gamma-H2AX assay. The 3-dimensional gamma-H2AX foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. Quantitative analysis revealed several foci that were larger and displayed a track pattern only in the Day 14 flight samples. To confirm that the foci data from the flight study was actually induced from space radiation exposure, cultured human fibroblasts were exposed to low dose rate gamma rays at 37 degrees Centigrade. Cells exposed to chronic gamma rays showed similar foci size distribution in comparison to the non-exposed controls. The cells were also exposed to low- and high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) protons, and high-LET Fe ions on the ground. Our results suggest that in G1 human fibroblasts under the normal culture condition, only a small fraction of large size foci can be attributed to high-LET radiation in space.

  3. Detection of DNA damage by space radiation in human fibroblasts flown on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Gaza, Ramona; Stoffle, Nicholas; Wang, Huichen; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2017-02-01

    Although charged particles in space have been detected with radiation detectors on board spacecraft since the discovery of the Van Allen Belts, reports on the effects of direct exposure to space radiation in biological systems have been limited. Measurement of biological effects of space radiation is challenging due to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the radiation environment, and due to the difficulty in distinguishing the radiation effects from microgravity and other space environmental factors. In astronauts, only a few changes, such as increased chromosome aberrations in their lymphocytes and early onset of cataracts, are attributed primarily to their exposure to space radiation. In this study, cultured human fibroblasts were flown on the International Space Station (ISS). Cells were kept at 37 °C in space for 14 days before being fixed for analysis of DNA damage with the γ-H2AX assay. The 3-dimensional γ-H2AX foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. Quantitative analysis revealed several foci that were larger and displayed a track pattern only in the Day 14 flight samples. To confirm that the foci data from the flight study was actually induced from space radiation exposure, cultured human fibroblasts were exposed to low dose rate γ rays at 37 °C. Cells exposed to chronic γ rays showed similar foci size distribution in comparison to the non-exposed controls. The cells were also exposed to low- and high-LET protons, and high-LET Fe ions on the ground. Our results suggest that in G1 human fibroblasts under the normal culture condition, only a small fraction of large size foci can be attributed to high-LET radiation in space.

  4. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  5. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  6. Optical fibre gas detections systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This tutorial review covers the principles of and prospects for fibre optic sensor technology in gas detection. Many of the potential benefits common to fibre sensor technology also apply in the context of gas sensing - notably long distance - many km - access to multiple remote measurement points; invariably intrinsic safety; access to numerous important gas species and often uniquely high levels of selectivity and/or sensitivity. Furthermore, the range of fibre sensor network architectures - single point, multiple point and distributed - enable unprecedented flexibility in system implementation. Additionally, competitive technologies and regulatory issues contribute to final application potential.

  7. Structural damage detection using sparse sensors installation by optimization procedure based on the modal flexibility matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Hosseinzadeh, A.; Ghodrati Amiri, G.; Seyed Razzaghi, S. A.; Koo, K. Y.; Sung, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting a novel and effective method to detect and estimate structural damage by introducing an efficient objective function which is based on Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) and modal flexibility matrix. The main strategy in the proposed objective function relies on searching a geometrical correlation between two vectors. Democratic Particle Swarm Optimization (DPSO) algorithm, a modified version of original PSO approach, is used to minimize the objective function resulting in the assessment of damage in different structure types. Finally, the presented method is generalized for a condition in which a limited number of sensors are installed on the structure using Neumann Series Expansion-based Model Reduction (NSEMR) approach. To evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method, different damage patterns in three numerical examples of engineering structures are simulated and the proposed method is employed for damage identification. Moreover, the stability of the method is investigated by considering the effects of a number of important challenges such as effects of different locations for sensor installation, prevalent modeling errors and presence of random noises in the input data. It is followed by different comparative studies to evaluate not only the robustness of the proposed method, but also the necessity of using introduced techniques for problem solution. Finally, the applicability of the presented method in real conditions is also verified by an experimental study of a five-story shear frame on a shaking table utilizing only three sensors. All of the obtained results demonstrate that the proposed method precisely identifies damages by using only the first several modes' data, even when incomplete noisy modal data are considered as input data.

  8. 3D Mapping of plasma effective areas via detection of cancer cell damage induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Liu, Yueing; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, a nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used for irradiation of oral cancer cells. Since cancer cells are very susceptible to plasma treatment, they can be used as a tool for detection of APPJ-effective areas, which extended much further than the visible part of the APPJ. An immunofluorescence assay was used for DNA damage identification, visualization and quantification. Thus, the effective damage area and damage level were determined and plotted as 3D images.

  9. An Improved Method of Parameter Identification and Damage Detection in Beam Structures under Flexural Vibration Using Wavelet Multi-Resolution Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ravanfar, Seyed Alireza; Abdul Razak, Hashim; Ismail, Zubaidah; Monajemi, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a two-step approach for optimally determining the location and severity of damage in beam structures under flexural vibration. The first step focuses on damage location detection. This is done by defining the damage index called relative wavelet packet entropy (RWPE). The damage severities of the model in terms of loss of stiffness are assessed in the second step using the inverse solution of equations of motion of a structural system in the wavelet domain. For this purpose, the connection coefficient of the scaling function to convert the equations of motion in the time domain into the wavelet domain is applied. Subsequently, the dominant components based on the relative energies of the wavelet packet transform (WPT) components of the acceleration responses are defined. To obtain the best estimation of the stiffness parameters of the model, the least squares error minimization is used iteratively over the dominant components. Then, the severity of the damage is evaluated by comparing the stiffness parameters of the identified model before and after the occurrence of damage. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and effective for the determination of damage location and accurate estimation of the loss in stiffness due to damage. PMID:26371005

  10. Infrared trace element detection system

    DOEpatents

    Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Matthew, Michael W.

    1988-01-01

    An infrared trace element detection system including an optical cell into which the sample fluid to be examined is introduced and removed. Also introduced into the optical cell is a sample beam of infrared radiation in a first wavelength band which is significantly absorbed by the trace element and a second wavelength band which is not significantly absorbed by the trace element for passage through the optical cell through the sample fluid. The output intensities of the sample beam of radiation are selectively detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The intensities of a reference beam of the radiation are similarly detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The sensed output intensity of the sample beam in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other and similarly, the intensity of the reference beam of radiation in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other. The normalized sample beam intensity and normalized reference beam intensity are then compared to provide a signal from which the amount of trace element in the sample fluid can be determined.

  11. Infrared trace element detection system

    DOEpatents

    Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.; Matthew, M.W.

    1988-11-15

    An infrared trace element detection system includes an optical cell into which the sample fluid to be examined is introduced and removed. Also introduced into the optical cell is a sample beam of infrared radiation in a first wavelength band which is significantly absorbed by the trace element and a second wavelength band which is not significantly absorbed by the trace element for passage through the optical cell through the sample fluid. The output intensities of the sample beam of radiation are selectively detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The intensities of a reference beam of the radiation are similarly detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The sensed output intensity of the sample beam in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other and similarly, the intensity of the reference beam of radiation in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other. The normalized sample beam intensity and normalized reference beam intensity are then compared to provide a signal from which the amount of trace element in the sample fluid can be determined. 11 figs.

  12. Explosives detection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Reber, Edward L.; Jewell, James K.; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Seabury, Edward H.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Edwards, Andrew J.; Derr, Kurt W.

    2007-12-11

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  13. Damage detection of fatigue cracks under nonlinear boundary condition using subharmonic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengyang; Xiao, Li; Qu, Wenzhong; Lu, Ye

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the nonlinear ultrasonic technique has been widely utilized for detecting fatigue crack, one of the most common forms of damage. However, one of limitations associated with this technique is that nonlinearities can be produced not only by damage but also by various intrinsic effects such as boundary conditions. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the application of a nonlinear ultrasonic subharmonic method for detecting fatigue cracks with nonlinear boundary conditions. The fatigue crack was qualitatively modeled as two elastic, frictionless half spaces that enter into contact during vibration and where the contact obeys the basic Hertz contact law. The nonlinear ordinary differential equation drawn from the developed model was solved with the method of multiple scales. The threshold of subharmonic generation was studied. Different threshold behaviors between the nonlinear boundary condition and the fatigue crack were found that can be used to distinguish the source of nonlinear subharmonic features. To evaluate the proposed method, experiments using an aluminum plate with a fatigue crack were conducted to quantitatively verify the subharmonic resonance range. Two surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers were used to generate and receive ultrasonic wave signals. The experimental results demonstrated that the subharmonic component of the sensing signal could be used to detect the fatigue crack and further to distinguish it from inherent nonlinear boundary conditions.

  14. Detection of localized cable damage using a preionized gas technique. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, R.A.; Jacobus, M.J.; Bustard, L.

    1994-10-01

    Because of the absence of a nearby, well-defined ground plane, performing electrical tests on unshielded cables installed in conduits is difficult. Experiments were run to develop a preionized gas troubleshooting technique to detect localized degradation of unshielded cables in conduits. This was achieved by introducing a readily ionizable gas like helium (or argon) in the conduit air space and then applying a moderately high voltage to the test cable, thus ionizing the gas surrounding the cable. Breakdown testing was performed on various types of damaged and undamaged cables. Other parameters necessary for practical implementation of the technique were also examined, including gas type, position of the cable with respect to the conduit wall, length of cable, conduit configuration, conduit size, and gas propagation in conduits. High potential testing of cables in the presence of preionized helium gas provides essentially the same information as high potential testing in water. A test criterion of 30 kVdc or 10 kVac would detect when 5-mils of insulation remain on one particular tested cable. No undamaged cable was noted to break down at these voltages. A high concentration of helium is required to perform the test, but this is easily attained with straightforward preparations. A cable with through-wall damage can easily be detected with a test criterion of approximately 1.5 kvac.

  15. Geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements by terrestrial laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Liu, Yu-Wei; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, three-dimensional (3D) terrestrial laser scanning technologies with higher precision and higher capability are developing rapidly. The growing maturity of laser scanning has gradually approached the required precision as those have been provided by traditional structural monitoring technologies. Together with widely available fast computation for massive point cloud data processing, 3D laser scanning can serve as an efficient structural monitoring alternative for civil engineering communities. Currently most research efforts have focused on integrating/calculating the measured multi-station point cloud data, as well as modeling/establishing the 3D meshes of the scanned objects. Very little attention has been spent on extracting the information related to health conditions and mechanical states of structures. In this study, an automated numerical approach that integrates various existing algorithms for geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements were established. Specifically, adaptive meshes were employed for classifying the point cloud data of the structural elements, and detecting the associated damages from the calculated eigenvalues in each area of the structural element. Furthermore, kd-tree was used to enhance the searching efficiency of plane fitting which were later used for identifying the boundaries of structural elements. The results of geometric identification were compared with M3C2 algorithm provided by CloudCompare, as well as validated by LVDT measurements of full-scale reinforced concrete beams tested in laboratory. It shows that 3D laser scanning, through the established processing approaches of the point cloud data, can offer a rapid, nondestructive, remote, and accurate solution for geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements.

  16. PREFACE: Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuigan, Kevin G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual meeting of the COST P9 Action `Radiation damage in biomolecular systems' took place from 19-22 June 2007 in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, in Dublin. The conference was structured into 5 Working Group sessions: Electrons and biomolecular interactions Ions and biomolecular interactions Radiation in physiological environments Theoretical developments for radiation damage Track structure in cells Each of the five working groups presented two sessions of invited talks. Professor Ron Chesser of Texas Tech University, USA gave a riveting plenary talk on `Mechanisms of Adaptive Radiation Responses in Mammals at Chernobyl' and the implications his work has on the Linear-No Threshold model of radiation damage. In addition, this was the first RADAM meeting to take place after the Alexander Litvenenko affair and we were fortunate to have one of the leading scientists involved in the European response Professor Herwig Paretzke of GSF-Institut für Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg, Germany, available to speak. The remaining contributions were presented in the poster session. A total of 72 scientific contributions (32 oral, 40 poster), presented by 97 participants from 22 different countries, gave an overview on the current progress in the 5 different subfields. A 1-day pre-conference `Early Researcher Tutorial Workshop' on the same topic kicked off on 19 June attended by more than 40 postgrads, postdocs and senior researchers. Twenty papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. All the contributions in this volume were fully refereed, and they represent a sample of the courses, invited talks and contributed talks presented during RADAM07. The interdisciplinary RADAM07 conference brought together researchers from a variety of different fields with a common interest in biomolecular radiation damage. This is reflected by the disparate backgrounds of the authors of the papers presented in these proceedings

  17. Uncertainty in Damage Detection, Dynamic Propagation and Just-in-Time Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-03

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0216 Uncertainty in Damage Detection, Dynamic Propagation and Just-in- Time Networks Harvey Banks North Carolina State University...ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for... Time Networks 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0188 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Harvey Banks 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  18. Combined analytical FEM approach for efficient simulation of Lamb wave damage detection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Lamb waves have been widely explored as a promising inspection tool for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). This article presents a combined analytical finite element model (FEM) approach (CAFA) for the accurate, efficient, and versatile simulation of 2-D Lamb wave propagation and interaction with damage. CAFA used a global analytical solution to model wave generation, propagation, scattering, mode conversion, and detection, while the wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local FEM with non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The analytical procedure was coded using MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The methodology of obtaining WDICs from local FEM was presented. Case studies were carried out for Lamb wave propagation in a pristine plate and a damaged plate. CAFA predictions compared well with full scale multi-physics FEM simulations and experiments with scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (SLDV), while achieving remarkable performance in computational efficiency and computer resource saving compared with conventional FEM.

  19. A decentralized receptance-based damage detection strategy for wireless smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shinae; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.; Sim, Sung-Han

    2012-05-01

    Various structural health monitoring strategies have been proposed recently that can be implemented in the decentralized computing environment intrinsic to wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN). Many are based on changes in the experimentally determined flexibility matrix for the structure under consideration. However, the flexibility matrix contains only static information; much richer information is available by considering the dynamic flexibility, or receptance, of the structure. Recently, the stochastic dynamic damage locating vector (SDDLV) method was proposed based on changes of dynamic flexibility matrices employing centrally collected output-only measurements. This paper investigates the potential of the SDDLV method for implementation on a network of wireless smart sensors, where a decentralized, hierarchical, in-network processing approach is used to address issues of scalability of the SDDLV algorithm. Two approaches to aggregate results are proposed that provide robust estimates of damage locations. The efficacy of the developed strategy is first verified using wired sensors emulating a wireless sensor network. Subsequently, the decentralized damage detection strategy is implemented on MEMSIC’s Imote2 smart sensor platform and validated experimentally on a laboratory scale truss bridge.

  20. Detection of drug-induced, superoxide-mediated cell damage and its prevention by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Horáková, K; Sovcíková, A; Seemannová, Z; Syrová, D; Busányová, K; Drobná, Z; Ferencík, M

    2001-03-15

    The mode of the cytotoxic activity of three benzo(c)fluorene derivatives was characterized. The observed morphological changes of lysosomes or variations of mitochondrial activity are assumed to be the consequence of cell protection against oxidative damage and/or the part of the damage process. To establish the relationship between the quantity of superoxide (O2*-) generated and the degree of damage resulting from O2*-, a simple system based on measurement of 3-(4-iodophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride (INT) reductase activity in the presence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was used. The functionality of the chosen battery of in vitro tests was proved using several known superoxide inducers: cyclosporin A (CsA) and benzo(a)pyrene (BP), as well as noninducers: citrinin (CT) and cycloheximide (CH). From the results followed that the cell growth tests are much better indices of toxicity than the other tests. The model system for the evaluation of the protective capacity of antioxidants against superoxide-induced cytotoxicity included simultaneous exposure of HeLa cells to cytotoxic drugs and to quercetin (Qe), an antioxidant of plant origin. The complete abolishment of the inhibition of cell proliferation and clonogenic survival was concluded to be due to the protective effect of the antioxidant. These observations correlated with the decrease of superoxide content as estimated by the INT-reductase assay in the presence of SOD using the same model system, as well as with the increase of intracellular SOD content and its activity.

  1. Object-based change detection: dimension of damage in residential areas of Abu Suruj, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demharter, Timo; Michel, Ulrich; Ehlers, Manfred; Reinartz, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Given the importance of Change Detection, especially in the field of crisis management, this paper discusses the advantage of object-based Change Detection. This project and the used methods give an opportunity to coordinate relief actions strategically. The principal objective of this project was to develop an algorithm which allows to detect rapidly damaged and destroyed buildings in the area of Abu Suruj. This Sudanese village is located in West-Darfur and has become the victim of civil war. The software eCognition Developer was used to per-form an object-based Change Detection on two panchromatic Quickbird 2 images from two different time slots. The first image shows the area before, the second image shows the area after the massacres in this region. Seeking a classification for the huts of the Sudanese town Abu Suruj was reached by first segmenting the huts and then classifying them on the basis of geo-metrical and brightness-related values. The huts were classified as "new", "destroyed" and "preserved" with the help of a automated algorithm. Finally the results were presented in the form of a map which displays the different conditions of the huts. The accuracy of the project is validated by an accuracy assessment resulting in an Overall Classification Accuracy of 90.50 percent. These change detection results allow aid organizations to provide quick and efficient help where it is needed the most.

  2. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear-tooth-pitting-fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4 [Ed. 's note: See Appendix A-Definitions D were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters perfomu:d average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant 8lDOunt of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  3. Preparing a new data set for earthquake damage detection in SAR imagery: the Christchurch example I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuny, S.; Hammer, Horst; Schulz, K.

    2014-10-01

    As the introducing first part of this paper, the data set of Christchurch, New Zealand, is outlined with regard to its purpose: the detection of earthquake damages. The aim is to produce simulated SAR images that are realistic enough to function successfully as pre-event images in a change detection effort. To this end, some modifications to the input 3D city model are introduced and discussed. This includes the use of a GIS map, for a realistic modelling of the radiometric variety, and the insertion of high vegetation to the model, so as to achieve a realistic occlusion of building corners. A detailed description of the impact, these modifications have on the simulation, is given and a comparison between the simulations and corresponding real data is drawn.

  4. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  5. A Portable Infrasonic Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Burkett, Cecil G.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Lawrenson, Christopher C.; Masterman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    During last couple of years, NASA Langley has designed and developed a portable infrasonic detection system which can be used to make useful infrasound measurements at a location where it was not possible previously. The system comprises an electret condenser microphone, having a 3-inch membrane diameter, and a small, compact windscreen. Electret-based technology offers the lowest possible background noise, because Johnson noise generated in the supporting electronics (preamplifier) is minimized. The microphone features a high membrane compliance with a large backchamber volume, a prepolarized backplane and a high impedance preamplifier located inside the backchamber. The windscreen, based on the high transmission coefficient of infrasound through matter, is made of a material having a low acoustic impedance and sufficiently thick wall to insure structural stability. Close-cell polyurethane foam has been found to serve the purpose well. In the proposed test, test parameters will be sensitivity, background noise, signal fidelity (harmonic distortion), and temporal stability. The design and results of the compact system, based upon laboratory and field experiments, will be presented.

  6. Planetary system detection by POINTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The final report and semiannual reports 1, 2, and 3 in response to the study of 'Planetary System Detection by POINTS' is presented. The grant covered the period from 15 Jun. 1988 through 31 Dec. 1989. The work during that period comprised the further development and refinement of the POINTS concept. The status of the POINTS development at the end of the Grant period was described by Reasenberg in a paper given at the JPL Workshop on Space Interferometry, 12-13 Mar. 1990, and distributed as CfA Preprint 3138. That paper, 'POINTS: a Small Astrometric Interferometer,' follows as Appendix-A. Our proposal P2276-7-09, dated July 1990, included a more detailed description of the state of the development of POINTS at the end of the tenure of Grant NAGW-1355. That proposal, which resulted in Grant NAGW-2497, is included by reference.

  7. Photoelectric detection system. [manufacturing automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Schansman, R. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A photoelectric beam system for the detection of the arrival of an object at a discrete station wherein artificial light, natural light, or no light may be present is described. A signal generator turns on and off a signal light at a selected frequency. When the object in question arrives on station, ambient light is blocked by the object, and the light from the signal light is reflected onto a photoelectric sensor which has a delayed electrical output but is of the frequency of the signal light. Outputs from both the signal source and the photoelectric sensor are fed to inputs of an exclusively OR detector which provides as an output the difference between them. The difference signal is a small width pulse occurring at the frequency of the signal source. By filter means, this signal is distinguished from those responsive to sunlight, darkness, or 120 Hz artificial light. In this fashion, the presence of an object is positively established.

  8. Optimal filtering of gear signals for early damage detection based on the spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combet, F.; Gelman, L.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a methodology for the enhancement of small transients in gear vibration signals in order to detect local tooth faults, such as pitting, at an early stage of damage. We propose to apply the optimal denoising (Wiener) filter based on the spectral kurtosis (SK). The originality is to estimate and apply this filter to the gear residual signal, as classically obtained after removing the mesh harmonics from the time synchronous average (TSA). This presents several advantages over the direct estimation from the raw vibration signal: improved signal/noise ratio, reduced interferences from other stages of the gearbox and easier detection of excited structural resonance(s) within the range of the mesh harmonic components. From the SK-based filtered residual signal, called SK-residual, we define the local power as the smoothed squared envelope, which reflects both the energy and the degree of non-stationarity of the fault-induced transients. The methodology is then applied to an industrial case and shows the possibility of detection of relatively small tooth surface pitting (less than 10%) in a two-stage helical reduction gearbox. The adjustment of the resolution for the SK estimation appears to be optimal when the length of the analysis window is approximately matched with the mesh period of the gear. The proposed approach is also compared to an inverse filtering (blind deconvolution) approach. However, the latter turns out to be more unstable and sensitive to noise and shows a lower degree of separation, quantified by the Fisher criterion, between the estimated diagnostic features in the pitted and unpitted cases. Thus, the proposed optimal filtering methodology based on the SK appears to be well adapted for the early detection of local tooth damage in gears.

  9. Three-dimensional structural damage localization system and method using layered two-dimensional array of capacitance sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Mark A (Inventor); Senibi, Simon D (Inventor); Banks, David L (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for detecting damage to a structure is provided. The system includes a voltage source and at least one capacitor formed as a layer within the structure and responsive to the voltage source. The system also includes at least one sensor responsive to the capacitor to sense a voltage of the capacitor. A controller responsive to the sensor determines if damage to the structure has occurred based on the variance of the voltage of the capacitor from a known reference value. A method for sensing damage to a structure involves providing a plurality of capacitors and a controller, and coupling the capacitors to at least one surface of the structure. A voltage of the capacitors is sensed using the controller, and the controller calculates a change in the voltage of the capacitors. The method can include signaling a display system if a change in the voltage occurs.

  10. Impact resonance method for damage detection in RC beams strengthened with composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Catalin; Rhazi, Jamal E.; Labossiere, Pierre

    2005-05-01

    There are numerous successful applications of fibre-reinforced composites for strengthening the civil engineering infrastructure. Most of these repairs are being continuously or intermittently monitored for assessing their effectiveness and safety. The impact resonance method (IRM), a non-destructive technique, utilized in civil engineering exclusively for determining the dynamic concrete properties, could be a valuable and viable damage detection tool for structural elements. The IRM gives useful information about the dynamic characteristics of rectangular and circular concrete members such as beams and columns. In this experimental program, a 1.2-m-long reinforced concrete beam strengthened with a carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) plate has been employed. The CFRP-strengthened beam has been loaded in fatigue for two million cycles at 3 Hz. The load amplitude was from 15 to 35% of the anticipated yielding load of the beam. Throughout fatigue testing the cycling was stopped for IRM measurements to be taken. The obtained data provided information about changes in modal properties such as natural frequencies of vibration. These results have shown the successful use of the IRM for detecting fatigue damage in concrete members strengthened with composites.

  11. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. PMID:26692152

  12. Pipe wall damage detection by electromagnetic acoustic transducer generated guided waves in absence of defect signals.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Milos; Kundu, Tribikram; Grill, Wolfgang; Twerdowski, Evgeny

    2008-05-01

    Most investigators emphasize the importance of detecting the reflected signal from the defect to determine if the pipe wall has any damage and to predict the damage location. However, often the small signal from the defect is hidden behind the other arriving wave modes and signal noise. To overcome the difficulties associated with the identification of the small defect signal in the time history plots, in this paper the time history is analyzed well after the arrival of the first defect signal, and after different wave modes have propagated multiple times through the pipe. It is shown that the defective pipe can be clearly identified by analyzing these late arriving diffuse ultrasonic signals. Multiple reflections and scattering of the propagating wave modes by the defect and pipe ends do not hamper the defect detection capability; on the contrary, it apparently stabilizes the signal and makes it easier to distinguish the defective pipe from the defect-free pipe. This paper also highlights difficulties associated with the interpretation of the recorded time histories due to mode conversion by the defect. The design of electro-magnetic acoustic transducers used to generate and receive the guided waves in the pipe is briefly described in the paper.

  13. Three variables are better than one: detection of european winter windstorms causing important damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroche, M.-S.; Choux, M.; Codron, F.; Yiou, P.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for detecting potentially damaging European winter windstorms from a multi-variable perspective. European winter windstorms being usually associated with extra-tropical cyclones (ETCs), there is a coupling between the intensity of the surface wind speeds and other meso-scale and large-scale features characteristic of ETCs. Here we focus on the relative vorticity at 850 hPa and the sea level pressure anomaly, which are also used in ETC detection studies, along with the ratio of the 10 m wind speed to its 98th percentile. When analysing 10 events known by the insurance industry to have caused extreme damages, we find that they share an intense signature in each of the 3 fields. This shows that the relative vorticity and the mean sea level pressure have a predictive value of the intensity of the generated windstorms. The 10 major events are not the most intense in any of the 3 variables considered separately, but we show that the combination of the 3 variables is an efficient way of extracting these events from a reanalysis data set.

  14. Multi-objective optimization strategies for damage detection using cloud model theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Mita, Akira; Li, Rongshuai

    2012-04-01

    Cloud model is a new mathematical representation of linguistic concepts, which shows potentials for uncertainty mediating between the concept of a fuzzy set and that of a probability distribution. This paper utilizes cloud model theory as an uncertainty analyzing tool for noise-polluted signals, which formulates membership degree functions of residual errors that quantify the difference between the prediction from simulated model and the actual measured time history at each time interval. With membership degree functions a multi-objective optimization strategy is proposed, which minimizes multiple error terms simultaneously. Its non-domination-based convergence provides a stronger constraint that enables robust identification of damages with lower damage negative false. Simulation results of a structural system under noise polluted signals are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Ultrasound detection of damage in complex carbon fibre/metal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thursby, G. J.; MacLean, A.; Hogg, H.; Culshaw, B.

    2006-03-01

    We describe work carried out to monitor the structural health of a complex structure comprising both carbon fibre and metal components using ultrasound techniques. The work is designed to be used in a high performance car, but could find applications in other areas such as the aerospace industry. There are two different types of potential problem that need to be examined; the first is damage (e.g. holes, delaminations) to carbon fibre structure, and the second is damage to joints either between two carbon fibre components or between a carbon fibre component and a metallic one. The techniques used are based around the use of PZT transducers for both the generation and detection of ultrasonic Lamb waves. To date we have been carrying out experiments on mock-up samples, but are due to conduct tests on an actual vehicle. Lamb waves propagate in modes whose order is determined by the frequency thickness product. Their properties, such as phase and amplitude can be modified by the presence of damage, such as holes and delaminations. If we record the response of a healthy structure, we can then compare it with signals obtained on subsequent occasions to determine if any significant change has taken place. It is essential, however, to be able to differentiate between the effects of damage and those of environmental changes such as temperature. For this reason we have monitored the response of a sample at different temperatures both before and after drilling a hole in it to simulate damage. Depending on the positions of the transducers with respect to the damaged area, it is possible to detect either attenuation of the entire signal or changes in a specific portion of the signal produced by reflections. Results from these experiments will be presented at the conference. Signal processing techniques for separating damage from the effects of temperature will also be discussed. We also look at the deterioration of joints, which can either be epoxy bonded (carbon fibre to

  16. Evaluation of Oxidation Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method based on the technique of dilatometry has been established to quantitatively evaluate the interfacial damage due to the oxidation in a thermal barrier coating system. Strain isolation and adhesion coefficients have been proposed to characterize the thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance based on its thermal expansion behavior. It has been found that, for a thermal barrier coating system consisting of ZrO2-8%Y2O3/FeCrAlY/4140 steel substrate, the oxidation of the bond coat and substrate significantly reduced the ceramic coating adherence, as inferred from the dilatometry measurements. The in-situ thermal expansion measurements under 30 deg C to 700 deg C thermal cycling in air showed that the adhesion coefficient, A(sub i) decreased by 25% during the first 35 oxidation cycles. Metallography showed that delamination occurred at both the ceramic/bond coat and bond coat/substrate interfaces. In addition, the strain isolation effect has been improved by increasing the FeCrAlY bond coat thickness. The strain isolation coefficient, Si, increased from about 0.04 to 0.25, as the bond coat thickness changed from 0.1 mm to 1.0 mm. It may be possible to design optimum values of strain isolation and interface adhesion coefficients to achieve the best TBC performance.

  17. Role of metallothionein-III following central nervous system damage.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Javier; Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, Mercedes; Camats, Jordi; Molinero, Amalia; Campbell, Iain L; Palmiter, Richard D; Hidalgo, Juan

    2003-06-01

    We evaluated the physiological relevance of metallothionein-III (MT-III) in the central nervous system following damage caused by a focal cryolesion onto the cortex by studying Mt3-null mice. In normal mice, dramatic astrogliosis and microgliosis and T-cell infiltration were observed in the area surrounding the lesioned tissue, along with signs of increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. There was also significant upregulation of cytokines/growth factors such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 alpha/beta, and IL-6 as measured by ribonuclease protection assay. Mt3-null mice did not differ from control mice in these responses, in sharp contrast to results obtained in Mt1- Mt2-null mice. In contrast, Mt3-null mice showed increased expression of several neurotrophins as well as of the neuronal sprouting factor GAP-43. Thus, unlike MT-I and MT-II, MT-III does not affect the inflammatory response elicited in the central nervous system by a cryoinjury, nor does it serve an important antioxidant role, but it may influence neuronal regeneration during the recovery process.

  18. Bladed wheels damage detection through Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis improved algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, P.

    2017-05-01

    Recent papers introduced the Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis for bladed wheels damage detection. This technique showed its potential in estimating the frequency of sinusoidal signals even when the acquisition time is short with respect to the vibration period, provided that some hypothesis are fulfilled. Anyway, previously proposed algorithms showed severe limitations in cracks detection at their early stage. The present paper proposes an improved algorithm which allows to detect a blade vibration frequency shift due to a crack whose size is really small compared to the blade width. Such a technique could be implemented for condition-based maintenance, allowing to use non-contact methods for vibration measurements. A stator-fixed laser sensor could monitor all the blades as they pass in front of the spot, giving precious information about the wheel health. This configuration determines an acquisition time for each blade which become shorter as the machine rotational speed increases. In this situation, traditional Discrete Fourier Transform analysis results in poor frequency resolution, being not suitable for small frequency shift detection. Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis instead showed high reliability in vibration frequency estimation even with data samples collected in a short time range. A description of the improved algorithm is provided in the paper, along with a comparison with the previous one. Finally, a validation of the method is presented, based on finite element simulations results.

  19. The Effects of Foam Thermal Protection System on the Damage Tolerance Characteristics of Composite Sandwich Structures for Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hodge, A. J.; Jackson, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    For any structure composed of laminated composite materials, impact damage is one of the greatest risks and therefore most widely tested responses. Typically, impact damage testing and analysis assumes that a solid object comes into contact with the bare surface of the laminate (the outer ply). However, most launch vehicle structures will have a thermal protection system (TPS) covering the structure for the majority of its life. Thus, the impact response of the material with the TPS covering is the impact scenario of interest. In this study, laminates representative of the composite interstage structure for the Ares I launch vehicle were impact tested with and without the planned TPS covering, which consists of polyurethane foam. Response variables examined include maximum load of impact, damage size as detected by nondestructive evaluation techniques, and damage morphology and compression after impact strength. Results show that there is little difference between TPS covered and bare specimens, except the residual strength data is higher for TPS covered specimens.

  20. Detection of DNA Damage by Space Radiation in Human Fibroblasts Flown on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Gaza, Ramona; Stoffle, Nicholas; Wang, Huichen; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation consists of energetic charged particles of varying charges and energies. Exposure of astronauts to space radiation on future long duration missions to Mars, or missions back to the Moon, is expected to result in deleterious consequences such as cancer and comprised central nervous system (CNS) functions. Space radiation can also cause mutation in microorganisms, and potentially influence the evolution of life in space. Measurement of the space radiation environment has been conducted since the very beginning of the space program. Compared to the quantification of the space radiation environment using physical detectors, reports on the direct measurement of biological consequences of space radiation exposure have been limited, due primarily to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the environment. Most of the biological assays fail to detect the radiation effects at acute doses that are lower than 5 centiSieverts. In a recent study, we flew cultured confluent human fibroblasts in mostly G1 phase of the cell cycle to the International Space Station (ISS). The cells were fixed in space after arriving on the ISS for 3 and 14 days, respectively. The fixed cells were later returned to the ground and subsequently stained with the gamma-H2AX (Histone family, member X) antibody that are commonly used as a marker for DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks, induced by both low-and high-linear energy transfer radiation. In our present study, the gamma-H2AX (Histone family, member X) foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. To confirm that some large track-like foci were from space radiation exposure, we also exposed, on the ground, the same type of cells to both low-and high-linear energy transfer protons, and high-linear energy transfer Fe ions. In addition, we exposed the cells to low dose rate gamma rays, in order to rule out the possibility that the large track-like foci can be induced by chronic low-linear energy transfer

  1. Generalized Detectability for Discrete Event Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shaolong; Lin, Feng

    2011-01-01

    In our previous work, we investigated detectability of discrete event systems, which is defined as the ability to determine the current and subsequent states of a system based on observation. For different applications, we defined four types of detectabilities: (weak) detectability, strong detectability, (weak) periodic detectability, and strong periodic detectability. In this paper, we extend our results in three aspects. (1) We extend detectability from deterministic systems to nondeterministic systems. Such a generalization is necessary because there are many systems that need to be modeled as nondeterministic discrete event systems. (2) We develop polynomial algorithms to check strong detectability. The previous algorithms are based on observer whose construction is of exponential complexity, while the new algorithms are based on a new automaton called detector. (3) We extend detectability to D-detectability. While detectability requires determining the exact state of a system, D-detectability relaxes this requirement by asking only to distinguish certain pairs of states. With these extensions, the theory on detectability of discrete event systems becomes more applicable in solving many practical problems. PMID:21691432

  2. Ultrasound detects joint damage and bleeding in haemophilic arthropathy: a proposal of a score.

    PubMed

    Melchiorre, D; Linari, S; Innocenti, M; Biscoglio, I; Toigo, M; Cerinic, M M; Morfini, M

    2011-01-01

    Haemarthrosis triggers haemophilic arthropathy (HA) because bleeding starts synovitis immediately, damages cartilage and leads to loss of function and disability. The aim of our study was to investigate the capacity of ultrasonography (US) in detecting bleeding and joint damage in HA. The joints of 62 patients (pts) with haemophilia A or haemophilia B were consecutively evaluated and scored (score ranging from 0 to 21) for effusion (E), bone remodelling (BR), cartilage damage (CD), synovial hypertrophy (SH), haemosiderin (H), osteophytes (O), haemarthrosis (Hae), erosion (Er) and fibrotic septa (FS) with US. X-rays [Pettersson Score (PXS)] were performed in 61 patients and clinical evaluation [World Federation Haemophiliac orthopaedic score (WFHO)] was performed in all patients. A total of 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients affected by Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) were used as controls. Power Doppler US (PDUS) was performed in all patients on the knee, ankle and elbow joints. A total of 83 joints were studied (50 knees; 12 elbows and 21 ankles). US showed effusion in 57 joint, bone remodelling in 62, cartilage damage in 64, synovial hypertrophy in 45, haemosiderin in 39, osteophytes in 30, haemarthrosis in 24, erosion in 5 and fibrotic septa in 3. The X-rays score showed remodelling in 47 joints, narrowing joint space in 44, displacement/angulation in 39, osteoporosis in 42, subchondral irregularity in 44, subchondral cyst formation in 37, osteophytes in 36 and erosions in 25. The US score in healthy subjects was always ≤ 5 (range 0 to 4). In haemophiliacs, 34 of 83 joints showed US score ≤ 5, and 49 US score > 5. Joints with US score ≤ 5 had a low PXS (SRCC = 0.375, P < 0.01) and joints with US score > 5 showed a high PXS (SRCC = 0.440, P < 0.01). A significant correlation between US score and PXS for bone remodelling [Spearman's rho Correlation Coefficient (SRCC) = 0.429, P < 0.01] and for osteophytes (SRCC = 0.308, P < 0.05) was found. The correlation

  3. Semi-auto assessment system on building damage caused by landslide disaster with high-resolution satellite and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Xu, Qihua; He, Jun; Ge, Fengxiang; Wang, Ying

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, earthquake and heavy rain have triggered more and more landslides, which have caused serious economic losses. The timely detection of the disaster area and the assessment of the hazard are necessary and primary for disaster mitigation and relief. As high-resolution satellite and aerial images have been widely used in the field of environmental monitoring and disaster management, the damage assessment by processing satellite and aerial images has become a hot spot of research work. The rapid assessment of building damage caused by landslides with high-resolution satellite or aerial images is the focus of this article. In this paper, after analyzing the morphological characteristics of the landslide disaster, we proposed a set of criteria for rating building damage, and designed a semi-automatic evaluation system. The system is applied to the satellite and aerial images processing. The performance of the experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of our system.

  4. Damage detection method for wind turbine blades based on dynamics analysis and mode shape difference curvature information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanfeng; Liang, Ming; Xiang, Jiawei

    2014-10-01

    Blades are among the key components of wind turbines. Blade damage is one of the most common types of structural defects and can cause catastrophic structural failure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to detect and diagnose blade damage as early as possible. In this paper, we propose a method for blade damage detection and diagnosis. This method incorporates finite element method (FEM) for dynamics analysis (modal analysis and response analysis) and the mode shape difference curvature (MSDC) information for damage detection/diagnosis. Finite element models of wind turbine blades have been built and modified via frequency comparison with experimental data and the formula for the model updating technique. Our numerical simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed technique can detect the spatial locations of damages for wind turbine blades. Changes in natural frequencies and modes for smaller size blades with damage are found to occur at lower frequencies and lower modes than in the larger sized blade case. The relationship between modal parameters and damage information (location, size) is very complicated especially for larger size blades. Moreover, structure and dynamic characters for larger size blades are different from those for smaller sized blades. Therefore, dynamic response analysis for a larger sized wind turbine blade with a multi-layer composite material based on aerodynamic loads’ (including lift forces and drag forces) calculation has been carried out and improved the efficiency and precision to damage detection by combining (MSDC) information. This method provides a low cost and efficient non-destructive tool for wind turbine blade condition monitoring.

  5. Reconstructing the critically damaged health service system of the country.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Debabar

    2012-01-01

    India's ruling class, in association with international agencies, bureaucrats, and business interests, has formed a powerful syndicate that has been imposing its will on the country to the detriment of public health. After gaining independence, India developed a body of knowledge suited to its social, cultural, economic, and epidemiological conditions. This led to an alternative approach to public health education, practice, and research that foreshadowed the Alma Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care of 1978. In the early 1980s, global power shifts undermined national and international commitment to the Declaration. Wealthy countries' response to the declaration of self-reliance by economically disadvantaged countries was swift: an effort to suppress the Declaration's ideals in favor of an unscientific, market-driven agenda. As a result, public health practice in India virtually disappeared. Responding to growing restiveness among a population in need, political leaders have launched the foredoomed National Rural Health Mission and pursued an American brand of public health through the Public Health Foundation of India. Reconstructing the damaged public health system will require pressure on the syndicate to ensure India's public health heritage will be used to effectively transfer "People's health in people's hands" according to the guidelines set down at Alma Ata.

  6. Investigation of Tapered Roller Bearing Damage Detection Using Oil Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Krieder, Gary; Fichter, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage to tapered roller bearings. Tapered roller bearings are used in helicopter transmissions and have potential for use in high bypass advanced gas turbine aircraft engines. This diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting oil debris data from failure progression tests performed by The Timken Company in their Tapered Roller Bearing Health Monitoring Test Rig. Failure progression tests were performed under simulated engine load conditions. Tests were performed on one healthy bearing and three predamaged bearings. During each test, data from an on-line, in-line, inductance type oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of debris generated during failure of the bearing. The bearing was removed periodically for inspection throughout the failure progression tests. Results indicate the accumulated oil debris mass is a good predictor of damage on tapered roller bearings. The use of a fuzzy logic model to enable an easily interpreted diagnostic metric was proposed and demonstrated.

  7. An imaging algorithm for damage detection with dispersion compensation using piezoceramic induced lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangmin; Gao, Weihang; Song, Gangbing; Song, Yue

    2017-02-01

    Piezoceramic induced Lamb waves are often used for imaging based damage detection, especially for plate like structures. The dispersion effect of the Lamb waves deteriorates the performance of most of imaging methods, since the waveform of the dispersion signals will spread out. In this paper, an imaging method which can compensate the dispersion is developed. In the proposed method, the phase induced by the propagation distance is compensated firstly. After that, the phase deviation generated by the dispersion effect is compensated. Via the two compensations, the proposed method can derive an accurate location of the target with a clean imaging map. An experiment using a plate like structure with four piezoceramic transducer was conducted. In the experiment, the four piezoceramic sensors were used to obtain the signals of the scatterer that simulated the damage on an aluminum plate. The experimental results show that since the dispersion effect is compensated, the target’s image based on the proposed method is about 10 cm × 14 cm, which is about a quarter of that of using the back-projection imaging method.

  8. Automated image classification applied to reconstituted human corneal epithelium for the early detection of toxic damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Urani, Chiara; De Servi, Barbara; Meloni, Marisa

    2010-02-01

    For a long time acute eye irritation has been assessed by means of the DRAIZE rabbit test, the limitations of which are known. Alternative tests based on in vitro models have been proposed. This work focuses on the "reconstituted human corneal epithelium" (R-HCE), which resembles the corneal epithelium of the human eye by thickness, morphology and marker expression. Testing a substance on R-HCE involves a variety of methods. Herewith quantitative morphological analysis is applied to optical microscope images of R-HCE cross sections resulting from exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BAK). The short term objectives and the first results are the analysis and classification of said images. Automated analysis relies on feature extraction by the spectrum-enhancement algorithm, which is made sensitive to anisotropic morphology, and classification based on principal components analysis. The winning strategy has been the separate analysis of the apical and basal layers, which carry morphological information of different types. R-HCE specimens have been ranked by gross damage. The onset of early damage has been detected and an R-HCE specimen exposed to a low BAK dose has been singled out from the negative and positive control. These results provide a proof of principle for the automated classification of the specimens of interest on a purely morphological basis by means of the spectrum enhancement algorithm.

  9. Fourier spectral-based modal curvature analysis and its application to damage detection in beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi-Bo; Radzienski, Maciej; Kudela, Pawel; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a simple Fourier spectral-based method is proposed to calculate the modal curvature (MC) of beams instead of the traditional central difference method. Based on the present method, damages in beam-like structures are localized. The present method provides an alternative selection to estimate MC in damage detection. There are two advantages of the present method. Firstly, the spectral calculation of spatial derivatives is conducted globally, which provides the suppression for noise. In addition, signal processing in the wavenumber domain provides an alternative choice for spatial filtering for mode shapes. Secondly, the proposed method provides a precise estimation of the MC which is related to original definition. With the absence of numerical derivative, the estimated results can be more stable and robust. Statistical analysis is conducted to show the effectiveness and noise immunity of the proposed method. In order to obtain the better identification, the MC calculated by the proposed method is employed as the input of continuous wavelet transform, and then the hybrid method is generated. The validations of the present method and comparison with the traditional central difference method are numerically and experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Development of nondestructive non-contact acousto-thermal evaluation technique for damage detection in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathish, Shamachary; Welter, John T.; Jata, Kumar V.; Schehl, Norman; Boehnlein, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a new non-contact acousto-thermal signature (NCATS) nondestructive evaluation technique. The physical basis of the method is the measurement of the efficiency of the material to convert acoustic energy into heat, and a theoretical model has been used to evaluate this. The increase in temperature due to conversion of acoustic energy injected into the material without direct contact was found to depend on the thermal and elastic properties of the material. In addition, it depends on the experimental parameters of the acoustic source power, the distance between sample and acoustic source, and the period of acoustic excitation. Systematic experimental approaches to optimize each of the experimental variables to maximize the observed temperature changes are described. The potential of the NCATS technique to detect microstructural-level changes in materials is demonstrated by evaluating accumulated damage due to plasticity in Ti-6Al-4V and low level thermal damage in polymer matrix composites. The ability of the technique for macroscopic applications in nondestructive evaluation is demonstrated by imaging a crack in an aluminum test sample.

  11. Damage detection and locating using tone burst and continuous excitation modulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Zhi; Xiao, Li; Qu, Wenzhong

    2014-03-01

    Among structural health monitoring techniques, nonlinear ultrasonic spectroscopy methods are found to be effective diagnostic approach to detecting nonlinear damage such as fatigue crack, due to their sensitivity to incipient structural changes. In this paper, a nonlinear ultrasonic modulation method was developed to detect and locate a fatigue crack on an aluminum plate. The method is different with nonlinear wave modulation method which recognizes the modulation of low-frequency vibration and high-frequency ultrasonic wave; it recognizes the modulation of tone burst and high-frequency ultrasonic wave. In the experiment, a Hanning window modulated sinusoidal tone burst and a continuous sinusoidal excitation were simultaneously imposed on the PZT array which was bonded on the surface of an aluminum plate. The modulations of tone burst and continuous sinusoidal excitation was observed in different actuator-sensor paths, indicating the presence and location of fatigue crack. The results of experiments show that the proposed method is capable of detecting and locating the fatigue crack successfully.

  12. Acoustics and temperature based NDT for damage assessment of concrete masonry system subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Fuad; Bartoli, Ivan; Rajaram, Satish; Vanniamparambil, Prashanth A.; Kontsos, Antonios; Bolhassani, Mohammad; Hamid, Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    This paper represents a hybrid non-destructive testing (HNDT) approach based on infrared thermography (IRT), acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic (UT) techniques for effective damage quantification of partially grouted concrete masonry walls (CMW). This integrated approach has the potential to be implemented for the health monitoring of concrete masonry systems. The implementation of this hybrid approach assists the cross validation of in situ recorded information for structural damage assessment. In this context, NDT was performed on a set of partially grouted CMW subjected to cyclic loading. Acoustic emission (AE) signals and Infrared thermography (IRT) images were recorded during each cycle of loading while the ultrasonic (UT) tests were performed in between each loading cycle. Four accelerometers, bonded at the toe of the wall, were used for recording waveforms for both passive (AE) and active (UT) acoustics. For the active approach, high frequency stress waves were generated by an instrumented hammer and the corresponding waveforms were recorded by the accelerometers. The obtained AE, IRT, and UT results were correlated to visually confirm accumulated progressive damage throughout the loading history. Detailed post-processing of these results was performed to characterize the defects at the region of interest. The obtained experimental results demonstrated the potential of the methods to detect flaws on monitored specimens; further experimental investigations are planned towards the quantitative use of these NDT methods.

  13. Waveform design for high-resolution damage detection using lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Xie, Hang

    2013-05-01

    Dispersion is encountered very often in ultrasonic guided waves, and may decrease the performance for damage detection significantly. For this reason, many signal processing methods have been proposed to obtain each mode under serious dispersion. In this paper, a new scheme is established for waveform design to suppress the dispersion such that each wave packet can be separated clearly. In this method, the dispersion effect of the guided wave is pre-compensated for a particular distance as it propagates through the structure. The relationship between the resolvable resolution and the waveform parameters is discussed; this relationship is employed as a guide to separately identify the wave packets caused by different structural features. Subsequently, an experiment is carried out to compare the performance of the proposed method with the time-reversal method. By using the proposed method, closely distributed structural features can be recognized with ease in the time domain.

  14. Application of order cyclostationary demodulation to damage detection in a direct-driven wind turbine bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Bo, Lin; Peng, Chang

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a method of fault detection and isolation for a direct-driven wind turbine (DWT) bearing. Computed order tracking is employed to convert the non-stationary envelope signal in the time domain into a quasi-stationary signal in the angular domain by even-angle resampling. Cyclostationary demodulation is then utilized to expose the orders related to fault characteristics in the demodulation spectrum. In order to realize the automatic fault diagnosis and emit a stable alarm about bearing damage, the peak value of the demodulation spectrum is scaled and compared to a defined threshold. The significant advantage of the proposed method is the implementation of an automatic algorithm for DWT bearing diagnostics under randomly varying speed and highly alternating load. Practical applications are provided to show that the proposed approach is able to achieve reliable failure warning in the bearing condition monitoring of a DWT.

  15. Measurement point selection in damage detection using the mutual information concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, I.; Heylen, W.; Van Brussel, H.

    2001-06-01

    The problem for measurement point selection in damage detection procedures is addressed. The concept of average mutual information is applied in order to find the optimal distance between measurement points. The idea is to select the measurement points in such a way that the taken measurements are independent, i.e. the measurements do not `learn' from each other. The average mutual information can be utilized as a kind of an autocorrelation function for the purpose. It gives the average amount of information that two points `learn' from each other. Thus the minimum of the average mutual information will provide the distance between measurement points with independent measurements. The idea to use the first minimum of the average mutual information is taken from nonlinear dynamics. The proposed approach is demonstrated on a test case. The results show that it is possible to decrease significantly the number of measurement points, without decreasing the precision of the solution.

  16. On-Line Database of Vibration-Based Damage Detection Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Doebling, Scott W.; Kholwad, Tina D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new, on-line bibliographic database of vibration-based damage detection experiments. Publications in the database discuss experiments conducted on actual structures as well as those conducted with simulated data. The database can be searched and sorted in many ways, and it provides photographs of test structures when available. It currently contains 100 publications, which is estimated to be about 5-10% of the number of papers written to date on this subject. Additional entries are forthcoming. This database is available for public use on the Internet at the following address: http://sdbpappa-mac.larc.nasa.gov. Click on the link named "dd_experiments.fp3" and then type "guest" as the password. No user name is required.

  17. Damage detection in bridge structures under moving loads with phase trajectory change of multi-type vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Jun; Hao, Hong; Ma, Hongwei

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a non-model based damage detection approach for bridge structures under moving loads based on the phase trajectory change of multi-type vibration measurements. A brief theoretical background on the vibration of a simply-supported bridge with a crack under moving load is described. The phase trajectories of multi-type dynamic responses are obtained and a damage index is defined as the separated distance between the trajectories of undamaged and damaged structures to indicate the damage location. Numerical studies on a simply-supported beam structure are conducted to investigate the sensitivity and robustness of the proposed approach to accurately identify the damage location. Experimental studies demonstrate that the proposed approach can be used to successfully identify the shear connection failure in a composite bridge model subjected to moving loads.

  18. Gastric mucosal damage induced by nonsalicylate nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in rats is mediated systemically.

    PubMed

    Skeljo, M V; Giraud, A S; Yeomans, N D

    1993-11-01

    The gastric toxicities of an enteric-coated formulation and conventional indomethacin were compared in rats. Both formulations were equally damaging to the mucosa, suggesting that topical damage was not the major route of injury. The importance of systemically mediated damage was further determined by gastrotoxicity dose-response curves and pyloric ligation experiments in which indomethacin was administered either orally or parenterally, or into stomach or duodenum with the pylorus occluded. Gastric damage was significantly higher in those groups that had received the drug parenterally or intraduodenally. The extent of deeper mucosal damage, assessed histologically, was greater in parenterally dosed rats. In further experiments, oral and parenteral routes of administration of two other nonsalicylate NSAIDs, naproxen and sodium diclofenac, were found to be equally damaging to the mucosa. Our results show that indomethacin-induced gastric damage, unlike aspirin injury, is mediated mainly systemically. Enteric-coating may not be a useful strategy in reducing gastric injury by nonsalicylate, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

  19. Development of Nondestructive Non-Contact Acousto-Thermal Evaluation Technique for Damage Detection in Materials (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    ex- periments are generally similar to that of flash thermography and IR thermography there is a difference between them in terms of the sources of...heat generation and propagation. In flash thermography , and pulse laser methods the source is a direct heat pulse. Thermal diffusivity in the material...extensive damage that can be detected visually without much difficulty. When the damage is not visible, ultrasonic and thermography NDE techniques have

  20. Fusion of Heterogeneous Intrusion Detection Systems for Network Attack Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kaliappan, Jayakumar; Thiagarajan, Revathi; Sundararajan, Karpagam

    2015-01-01

    An intrusion detection system (IDS) helps to identify different types of attacks in general, and the detection rate will be higher for some specific category of attacks. This paper is designed on the idea that each IDS is efficient in detecting a specific type of attack. In proposed Multiple IDS Unit (MIU), there are five IDS units, and each IDS follows a unique algorithm to detect attacks. The feature selection is done with the help of genetic algorithm. The selected features of the input traffic are passed on to the MIU for processing. The decision from each IDS is termed as local decision. The fusion unit inside the MIU processes all the local decisions with the help of majority voting rule and makes the final decision. The proposed system shows a very good improvement in detection rate and reduces the false alarm rate. PMID:26295058

  1. Flat nose low velocity drop-weight impact response of carbon fibre composites using non-destructive damage detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umar; Myler, Peter

    2015-03-01

    This work is mainly concerned with the nondestructive post-impact damage evaluation of carbon fibre reinforced laminated composite panels subject to low velocity drop-weight impact by flat and round nose impactors. Quasi-isotropic laminates consisting of eight-, sixteen-, and twenty-four plies were impacted by flat and round nose impactors at different velocity levels. Load-time history data were recorded and plotted to correlate loaddrop as damage level to the impactor nose profiles. Test produced data, non-destructive damage detection techniques: visual, ultrasonic, and eddy- current, and computer simulations were utilised to identify and quantify status of the impact induced damage. To evaluate damage in relatively thick laminates (consisting of 24-Ply), the damage ratios and deflection quantities were correlated to the corresponding impactor nose profiles. Damage induced by the flat nose impactor to thick laminates was compared against the data produced by the round nose impactor. Results show that relatively thin laminates were largely affected by the impactor nose. Reasonable difference was observed in damage caused by flat and round impactor nose profiles to thick laminates impacted at relatively higher velocity impacts. Resultswere compared and validated against simulation produced data.

  2. DNA damage detected by the comet assay in the white blood cells of workers in a wooden furniture plant.

    PubMed

    Palus, J; Dziubałtowska, E; Rydzyński, K

    1999-07-21

    The study was aimed at the assessment of genotoxic effects in workers of a wooden furniture manufacture, based on the level of DNA damage in white blood cells (WBC). The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay (known as the comet assay) in individual cells was adapted for detecting damaged DNA in WBC. The level of DNA damage was determined as the percentage of cells with comets. It was assessed in cells before and after incubation in RPMI 1640 medium and CO(2) at 37 degrees C for 1 h to repair DNA breaks. Thirty-five woodworkers and 41 control subjects were studied. In the woodworkers, significantly more cells with DNA damage (21.5%) were observed than in the control persons (9.7%). A slight but significant decrease in the level of DNA damage was found in the WBC of woodworkers after incubation (17.2%). Significantly higher levels of damaged DNA was observed in woodworkers who either smoked (22.1%) or did not smoke cigarettes (20.8%) than in smokers (13.2%) and non-smokers (7.0%) from the control group. After incubation, a slight decrease in the level of DNA damage was found in both smoking and non-smoking woodworkers compared to the respective subjects in the control group. The increased levels of DNA damage observed in the woodworkers could be associated with the occupational exposure to wood dust in the furniture manufacture.

  3. Fiber-Optic Defect and Damage Locator System for Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Vahid Sotoudeh; Dr. Richard J. Black; Dr. Behzad Moslehi; Mr. Aleks Plavsic

    2010-10-30

    IFOS in collaboration with Auburn University demonstrated the feasibility of a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) integrated sensor system capable of providing real time in-situ defect detection, localization and quantification of damage. In addition, the system is capable of validating wind turbine blade structural models, using recent advances in non-contact, non-destructive dynamic testing of composite structures. This new generation method makes it possible to analyze wind turbine blades not only non-destructively, but also without physically contacting or implanting intrusive electrical elements and transducers into the structure. Phase I successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technology with the construction of a 1.5 kHz sensor interrogator and preliminary instrumentation and testing of both composite material coupons and a wind turbine blade.

  4. An integrated active sensing system for damage identifcation and prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wait, J. R.; Park, G. H.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates an integrated approach for identifying structural damage. Two damage identification techniques, Lamb wave propagation and impedance-based methods, are investigated utilizing piezoelectric (PZT) actuators/sensors. The Lamb wave propagation and the impedance methods operate in high frequency ranges (typically > 30 kHz) at which there are measurable changes in structural responses even for incipient damage such as small cracks, debonding, delamination, and loose connections. In Lamb wave propagation, one PZT is used to launch an elastic wave through the structure, and responses are measured by an array of sensors. The technique used for the Lamb wave propagation method looks for the possibility of damage by tracking changes in transmission velocity and wave attenuation/reflections. Experimental results show that this method works well for surface anomalies. The impedance method monitors the variations in structural mechanical impedance, which is coupled with the electrical impedance of the PZT. Through monitoring the measured electrical impedance and comparing it to a baseline measurement, a decision can be made about whether or not structural damage has occurred or is imminent. In addition, significant advances have been made recently by incorporating advanced statistic-based signal processing techniques into the impedance methods. To date, several sets of experiments have been conducted on a cantilevered aluminum plate and composite plate to demonstrate the feasibility of this combined active sensing technology.

  5. Detecting divertor damage during steady state operation of Wendelstein 7-X from thermographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Rodatos, A; Greuner, H; Jakubowski, M W; Boscary, J; Wurden, G A; Pedersen, T S; König, R

    2016-02-01

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) aims to demonstrate the reactor capability of the stellarator concept, by creating plasmas with pulse lengths of up to 30 min at a heating power of up to 10 MW. The divertor plasma facing components will see convective steady state heat flux densities of up to 10 MW/m(2). These high heat flux target elements are actively cooled and are covered with carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) as plasma facing material. The CFC is bonded to the CuCrZr cooling structure. Over the life time of the experiment this interface may weaken and cracks can occur, greatly reducing the heat conduction between the CFC tile and the cooling structure. Therefore, there is not only the need to monitor the divertor to prevent damage by overheating but also the need to detect these fatigue failures of the interface. A method is presented for an early detection of fatigue failures of the interface layer, solely by using the information delivered by the IR-cameras monitoring the divertor. This was developed and validated through experiments made with high heat flux target elements prior to installation in W7-X.

  6. Detecting divertor damage during steady state operation of Wendelstein 7-X from thermographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodatos, A.; Greuner, H.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Boscary, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.; König, R.

    2016-02-01

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) aims to demonstrate the reactor capability of the stellarator concept, by creating plasmas with pulse lengths of up to 30 min at a heating power of up to 10 MW. The divertor plasma facing components will see convective steady state heat flux densities of up to 10 MW/m2. These high heat flux target elements are actively cooled and are covered with carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) as plasma facing material. The CFC is bonded to the CuCrZr cooling structure. Over the life time of the experiment this interface may weaken and cracks can occur, greatly reducing the heat conduction between the CFC tile and the cooling structure. Therefore, there is not only the need to monitor the divertor to prevent damage by overheating but also the need to detect these fatigue failures of the interface. A method is presented for an early detection of fatigue failures of the interface layer, solely by using the information delivered by the IR-cameras monitoring the divertor. This was developed and validated through experiments made with high heat flux target elements prior to installation in W7-X.

  7. Frost Damage Detection in Sugarcane Crop Using Modis Images and Srtm Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudorff, B.; Alves de Aguiar, D.; Adami, M.

    2011-12-01

    potential to detect the impact of climatic effects, such as frost, on crop growth, which is relevant information to evaluate the negative impact on sugarcane production. Thus, the objective of the present study is to detect the impact of the frost occurred on 28 June 2011 in the sugarcane production region of São Paulo state, using MODIS images acquired on board of Terra and Aqua satellites before and after the frost event. Also, Landsat type images were used to map the harvested sugarcane fields up to the frost event based on a sugarcane crop map for year 2011. The remaining sugarcane fields available for harvest in 2011 were monitored with the MODIS images acquired on 17, 19, 27, 28 June and 8 and 9 July, to detect frost damage. Field work was conducted shortly after frost occurrence to identify sugarcane fields with frost damage for training and validation purposes. MODIS images transformed to vegetation indices and morphometric variables extracted from SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) data are being analyzed to detect and quantify the damage of the frost from 28 July 2011 on sugarcane crop.

  8. Discriminating ultrasonic proximity detection system

    DOEpatents

    Annala, Wayne C.

    1989-01-01

    This invention uses an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver and a microprocessor to detect the presence of an object. In the reset mode the invention uses a plurality of echoes from each ultrasonic burst to create a reference table of the echo-burst-signature of the empty monitored environment. The invention then processes the reference table so that it only uses the most reliable data. In the detection mode the invention compares the echo-burst-signature of the present environment with the reference table, detecting an object if there is a consistent difference between the echo-burst-signature of the empty monitored environment recorded in the reference table and the echo-burst-signature of the present environment.

  9. Evaluation of a One-Page Report to Aid in Detecting Glaucomatous Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Donald C.; Raza, Ali S.; De Moraes, Carlos G.; Alhadeff, Paula A.; Idiga, Juliet; Blumberg, Dana M.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the use of a customized, one-page structure + function report for aiding in detection of glaucomatous damage. Methods Two individuals (report specialists), experienced in analyzing optical coherent tomography (OCT) and visual field (VF) results, examined a customized one-page report for 50 eyes from 50 patients who either had glaucoma or were glaucoma suspects. The report contained key features of OCT scans with VF information. All patients had 24-2 VFs with a mean deviation (MD) better than −6 dB. The report specialists classified each hemifield and eye as either glaucomatous or nonglaucomatous based upon only the customized report, either without (phase 1) or with (phase 2) 24-2 VF information included on the report. Their results were compared to the classifications made by 3 ophthalmologists (glaucoma specialists) based upon traditional measures, namely stereo photographs, 24-2 VFs, and a commercially available, OCT disc scan report. Results The two report specialists agreed on all but one eye and four hemifields in phase 1, and on all eyes and all but one hemifield in phase 2. In phase 2, they judged 31 eyes abnormal. Of these 31 eyes, 30 were judged abnormal by all three glaucoma specialists and the 31st by two of the three. Without the VF information (phase 1), one report specialist classified 1, and the other 2, of these 31 “abnormal” eyes as normal. Conclusions When using the one-page report, the experienced readers showed excellent inter-rater repeatability and diagnostic ability relative to glaucoma specialists. Translational Relevance This condensed report may help the clinician assess glaucomatous damage. PMID:25674357

  10. Validating finite element models of composite aerospace structures for damage detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.; Hemez, François M.; Farrar, Charles R.

    2006-03-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP) composites represent the future for advanced lightweight aerospace structures. However, reliable and cost-effective techniques for structural health monitoring (SHM) are needed. Modal and vibration-based analysis, when combined with validated finite element (FE) models, can provide a key tool for SHM. Finite element models, however, can easily give spurious and misleading results if not finely tuned and validated. These problems are amplified in complex structures with numerous joints and interfaces. A small series of all-composite test pieces emulating wings from a lightweight all-composite Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) have been developed to support damage detection and SHM research. Each wing comprises two CFRP prepreg and Nomex honeycomb co-cured skins and two CFRP prepreg spars bonded together in a secondary process using a structural adhesive to form the complete wings. The first of the set is fully healthy while the rest have damage in the form of disbonds built into the main spar-skin bondline. Detailed FE models were created of the four structural components and the assembled structure. Each wing component piece was subjected to modal characterization via vibration testing using a shaker and scanning laser Doppler vibrometer before assembly. These results were then used to correlate the FE model on a component-basis, through fitting and optimization of polynomial meta-models. Assembling and testing the full wing provided subsequent data that was used to validate the numerical model of the entire structure, assembled from the correlated component models. The correlation process led to the following average percent improvement between experimental and FE frequencies of the first 20 modes for each piece: top skin 10.98%, bottom skin 45.62%, main spar 25.56%, aft spar 10.79%. The assembled wing model with no further correlation showed an improvement of 32.60%.

  11. Expandable coating cocoon leak detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, R. L.; Kochansky, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    Development of system and materials for detecting leaks in cocoon protective coatings are discussed. Method of applying materials for leak determination is presented. Pressurization of system following application of materials will cause formation of bubble if leak exists.

  12. An automatically tuning intrusion detection system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenwei; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Weigert, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    An intrusion detection system (IDS) is a security layer used to detect ongoing intrusive activities in information systems. Traditionally, intrusion detection relies on extensive knowledge of security experts, in particular, on their familiarity with the computer system to be protected. To reduce this dependence, various data-mining and machine learning techniques have been deployed for intrusion detection. An IDS is usually working in a dynamically changing environment, which forces continuous tuning of the intrusion detection model, in order to maintain sufficient performance. The manual tuning process required by current systems depends on the system operators in working out the tuning solution and in integrating it into the detection model. In this paper, an automatically tuning IDS (ATIDS) is presented. The proposed system will automatically tune the detection model on-the-fly according to the feedback provided by the system operator when false predictions are encountered. The system is evaluated using the KDDCup'99 intrusion detection dataset. Experimental results show that the system achieves up to 35% improvement in terms of misclassification cost when compared with a system lacking the tuning feature. If only 10% false predictions are used to tune the model, the system still achieves about 30% improvement. Moreover, when tuning is not delayed too long, the system can achieve about 20% improvement, with only 1.3% of the false predictions used to tune the model. The results of the experiments show that a practical system can be built based on ATIDS: system operators can focus on verification of predictions with low confidence, as only those predictions determined to be false will be used to tune the detection model.

  13. Forward Obstacle Detection System by Stereo Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Hiroaki; Saneyoshi, Keiji

    Forward obstacle detection is needed to prevent car accidents. We have developed forward obstacle detection system which has good detectability and the accuracy of distance only by using stereo vision. The system runs in real time by using a stereo processing system based on a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Road surfaces are detected and the space to drive can be limited. A smoothing filter is also used. Owing to these, the accuracy of distance is improved. In the experiments, this system could detect forward obstacles 100 m away. Its error of distance up to 80 m was less than 1.5 m. It could immediately detect cutting-in objects.

  14. Toward detecting deception in intelligent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Eugene, Jr.; Johnson, Gregory, Jr.

    2004-08-01

    Contemporary decision makers often must choose a course of action using knowledge from several sources. Knowledge may be provided from many diverse sources including electronic sources such as knowledge-based diagnostic or decision support systems or through data mining techniques. As the decision maker becomes more dependent on these electronic information sources, detecting deceptive information from these sources becomes vital to making a correct, or at least more informed, decision. This applies to unintentional disinformation as well as intentional misinformation. Our ongoing research focuses on employing models of deception and deception detection from the fields of psychology and cognitive science to these systems as well as implementing deception detection algorithms for probabilistic intelligent systems. The deception detection algorithms are used to detect, classify and correct attempts at deception. Algorithms for detecting unexpected information rely upon a prediction algorithm from the collaborative filtering domain to predict agent responses in a multi-agent system.

  15. The effects of frequency-dependent amplitude on the time-reversed Lamb wave based baseline-free damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Luo, Zhi; Gao, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Time reversal is the process that a response signal recorded at a receiver location is reversed in time and emitted back to the original source transducer. In the absence of any damage, theoretically the main wave packet of the reconstructed signal could exactly resemble the original input wave form. However, since the amplitude response of Lamb wave mode is generally frequency dependent, the reconstruction is not perfect. In this study, the influences of the frequency-dependent amplitude to the spectrum of the reconstructed signal is investigated. The results show that the peak frequency shifts and the bandwidth varies due to the frequency dependency of amplitude. This spectrum distortion affects the wave form of the main wave packet of the reconstructed signal significantly. Since the baseline-free damage detection is accomplished by comparing the wave form of the TR reconstructed signal with that of the original input signal, these effects would be captured by the damage index and be attributed to the presence of damage. Thus a false alarm may arise. To mitigate these effects, an amplitude modification strategy is established. With the application of this strategy, the modified baseline-free damage detection method is then employed for monitoring the growth of damage.

  16. Hydrogen Fire Detection System Features Sharp Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, C. S.

    1966-01-01

    Hydrogen fire detection system discovers fires by detecting the flickering ultraviolet radiation emitted by the OH molecule, a short-lived intermediate combustion product found in hydrogen-air flames. In a space application, the system discriminates against false signals from sunlight and rocket engine exhaust plume radiation.

  17. Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawan, M. E.; Ghoniem, N. M.; Snead, L.; Katoh, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation damage parameters in SiC/SiC composite structures are determined in both magnetic (MFE) and inertial (IFE) confinement fusion systems. Variations in the geometry, neutron energy spectrum, and pulsed nature of neutron production result in significant differences in damage parameters between the two systems. With the same neutron wall loading, the displaceme