Science.gov

Sample records for damage formation due

  1. Radiation damage due to electromagnetic showers

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; Mokhov, Nikolai; Striganov, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    Radiation-induced damage due to atomic displacements is essential to correctly predict the behavior of materials in nuclear reactors and at charged-particle accelerators. Traditionally the damage due to hadrons was of major interest. The recent increased interest in high-energy lepton colliders gave rise to the problem of prediction of radiation damage due to electromagnetic showers in a wide energy range--from a few hundred keV and up to a few hundred GeV. The report describes results of an electron- and positron-induced displacement cross section evaluation. It is based on detailed lepton-nucleus cross sections, realistic nuclear form-factors and a modified Kinchin-Pease damage model. Numerical data on displacement cross sections for various target nuclei is presented.

  2. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  3. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  4. Modelling direct tangible damages due to natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreibich, H.; Bubeck, P.

    2012-04-01

    Europe has witnessed a significant increase in direct damages from natural hazards. A further damage increase is expected due to the on-going accumulation of people and economic assets in risk-prone areas and the effects of climate change, for instance, on the severity and frequency of drought events in the Mediterranean basin. In order to mitigate the impact of natural hazards an improved risk management based on reliable risk analysis is needed. Particularly, there is still much research effort needed to improve the modelling of damage due to natural hazards. In comparison with hazard modelling, simple approaches still dominate damage assessments, mainly due to limitations in available data and knowledge on damaging processes and influencing factors. Within the EU-project ConHaz, methods as well as data sources and terminology for damage assessments were compiled, systemized and analysed. Similarities and differences between the approaches concerning floods, alpine hazards, coastal hazards and droughts were identified. Approaches for significant improvements of direct tangible damage modelling with a particular focus on cross-hazard-learning will be presented. Examples from different hazards and countries will be given how to improve damage data bases, the understanding of damaging processes, damage models and how to conduct improvements via validations and uncertainty analyses.

  5. Modelling of elastoplastic damage in concrete due to desiccation shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, F.; Burlion, N.; Shao, J. F.

    2002-07-01

    We present a numerical modelling of elastoplastic damage due to drying shrinkage of concrete in the framework of mechanics of partially saturated porous media. An elastoplastic model coupled with isotropic damage is first formulated. Two plastic flow mechanisms are involved, controlled by applied stress and suction, respectively. A general concept of net effective stress is used in take into account effects of capillary pressure and material damage on stress-controlled plastic deformation. Damage evolution depends both on elastic and plastic strains. The model's parameters are determined or chosen from relevant experimental data. Comparisons between numerical simulations and experimental data are presented to show the capacity of model to reproduce mains features of concrete behaviour under mechanical loading and during drying shrinkage of concrete. An example of application concerning drying of a concrete wall is finally presented. The results obtained allow to show potential capacity of proposed model for numerical modelling of complex coupling processes in concrete structures.

  6. Exploring aggregate economic damage functions due to climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Dowlatabadi, H.; Kandlikar, M.; Patwardhan, A.

    1994-12-31

    A number of issues need to be considered when developing aggregated economic damage functions due to climate change. These include: (i) identification of production processes vulnerable to climate change, (ii) an understanding of the mechanism of vulnerability, (iii) the rate of technological advance and diffusion (iv) the issue of detection of damages and availability of response options. In this paper we will explore the implications of these considerations with the aid of an illustrative model. The findings suggest that there is a significant upward bias in damage functions calculated without consideration of these issues. Furthermore, this systematic bias is larger as climate change increases. We believe the approach explored here is a more suitable model for adoption in future integrated assessments of climate change.

  7. CO/sub 2/ formation damage study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, J.T.

    1983-07-01

    The literature did provide insight into four possible damage mechanisms, namely: (1) precipitation of reservoir mineral in the vicinity around the producing well as carbon dioxide escapes from the water phase due to pressure draw down; (2) plugging of reservoir interstices by insoluble organic solids precipitated as the carbon dioxide dissolves in crude oil; (3) formation of an immobile gas phase, predominately CO/sub 2/, which would drastically lower the effective permeability to oil and, especially water; and (4) dissolution of cementation, especially carbonates or feldspars, that could allow fines to migrate in the reservoir and plug tiny flow passages. Each of these mechanisms was investigated in depth during the laboratory experiments. Occasional reports from industry suggested that the use of carbon dioxide to enhance the recovery of tertiary oil might be causing formation damage. This project was undertaken to define the mechanisms responsible for such occurrences. The objectives were threefold: (1) provide a comprehensive literature survey to elicit all that is currently known or suspected, relative to formation damage that might occur during the injection of carbon dioxide into an oil reservoir; (2) under simulated reservoir conditions, demonstrate in the laboratory each of the damage mechanisms and quantify the degree to which each mechanism could cause damage; and (3) for those damage mechanisms identified to be significant, develop a feasible remedy, easily applied in actual field operations. The third mechanism, related to the presence of an immobile gas phase, is a real problem but not unique to the injection of carbon dioxide. In the case of carbon dioxide, the damage should be self-correcting, as the solubility of carbon dioxide in water will eventually allow the water to dissolve away the gas and, hence, the blocking effect.

  8. Shear degradation in fiber reinforced laminates due to matrix damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavatian, Mohammedmahdi

    The objective of this study was to develop and implement a shear modulus degradation model to improve the failure analysis of the fiber reinforced composite structures. Matrix damage, involving transverse and shear cracks, is a common failure mode for composite structures, yet little is known concerning their interaction. To understand the material behavior after matrix failure, the nonlinear response of the composite laminate was studied using pressure vessels made from a [+/-o] bias orientation, which tend to exhibit a matrix dominated failure. The result of this work showed laminate matrix hardening in shear and softening in the transverse direction. A modified Iosipescu coupon was proposed to study the evolution of shear and transverse damage and their mutual effects. The proposed method showed good agreement with tubular results and has advantages of simplified specimen fabrication using standard test fixtures. The proposed method was extended by introducing a novel experimental technique to study the shear degradation model under biaxial loading. Experimental results of the transverse modulus reduction were in good agreement with material degradation models, while the predicted shear modulus reduction was higher than experiment. The discrepancy between available models and observations was due to the presence of a traction between the crack surfaces. Accordingly, a closed form solution was proposed for the shear stress-strain field of a cracked laminate by replacing the cracks with cohesive zones. The constitutive equations of the crack laminate were derived including the effects of internal tractions and transverse stress on the shear modulus. The proposed analytical model was shown to be the most comprehensive model for shear modulus degradation reduction of the fiber reinforced laminates. A numerical implementation of the shear degradation model was done using continuum damage mechanics. Through this work it was shown the common assumption of a linear

  9. Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K.

    2008-07-01

    Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

  10. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    SciTech Connect

    El-Baz, F. . Center for Remote Sensing); Al-Ajmi, D. . Environmental and Earth Sciences Div.)

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait.

  11. Study of Damages on Home Electric Appliances due to Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Sigeru; Yokota, Tsutomu

    Lightning damages of home electric appliances occurred in 154houses of 6,024monitors, were gathered in summer and winter seasons of 1987-1991 and 1996-1997. Types of damaged home appliances are summarized and extent of the damages are investigated. Furthermore the magnitude of invading lightning currents and the path of the invasion were estimated by means of inspections of the inner circuits of damaged home appliances and the experimental verifications. These investigations can lead to the development of lightning protection methods for home electric appliances of this highly computerized society.

  12. A Kinetic Model for Cell Damage Caused by Oligomer Formation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liu; Huang, Ya-Jing; Yong, Wen-An

    2015-10-06

    It is well known that the formation of amyloid fiber may cause invertible damage to cells, although the underlying mechanism has not been fully understood. In this article, a microscopic model considering the detailed processes of amyloid formation and cell damage is constructed based on four simple assumptions, one of which is that cell damage is raised by oligomers rather than mature fibrils. By taking the maximum entropy principle, this microscopic model in the form of infinite mass-action equations together with two reaction-convection partial differential equations (PDEs) has been greatly coarse-grained into a macroscopic system consisting of only five ordinary differential equations (ODEs). With this simple model, the effects of primary nucleation, elongation, fragmentation, and protein and seeds concentration on amyloid formation and cell damage have been extensively explored and compared with experiments. We hope that our results will provide new insights into the quantitative linkage between amyloid formation and cell damage.

  13. Secondary factors influencing cascade damage formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoller, Roger E.; Guiriec, Sylvain G.

    2004-08-01

    Primary cascade damage production in iron has been extensively investigated by molecular dynamics, and the average defect production as a function of cascade energy and temperature is well characterized. However, preliminary results indicate several factors alter `normal' cascade evolution, leading to quite different defect production behavior. Further investigation of three such factors has been carried out: (1) primary knock-on atom (PKA) direction, (2) nearby free surfaces, and (3) pre-existing effects. Results of the investigation confirm these factors significantly impact damage production. Effects include: enhanced defect survival for PKA directions lying in close-packed {1 1 0} planes, increased point defect clustering and larger defect clusters in cascades initiated near a surface, and reduced defect survival in material containing defects. The origin and implications of these effects are discussed relative to the interpretation of certain experimental observations and parameters used in other modeling studies.

  14. Chemically Induced Damage to the Hippocampal Formation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    31-42. Siesj0, B K (1981): Cell damage in the brain: A speculative synthe i, J Cereb Blood Flow Metabol 1, 155-85. Stefanis, C (1964): Hippocampal... serotonin effects on central neurons, Advanc Pharmacol 6A, 414-18. Storm-Mathisen, J (1972): Glutamate decarboxylase in the rat hippo- campal region...and chro- nic toluene inhalation on behavior and [ H]- serotonin binding in rat, Life Sciences 30, 1997-2002. Zimmer, L, Woolley, D and Chang, L (1985

  15. Vibrometric Detection of Beam Damage Due to Inclusions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    fatigue cracks, thermal exposure, overstressing, etc. The central focus of SHM is to identify the presence of a change in structural integrity as...vibration monitoring for damage presence began with rotor cracking in machinery and railroad equipment, as presented by Dimaroganas (1970) and Nagy...Dousis, and Finch (1978). The latter work has been noted to explain that “the presence of cracks [in railroad wheels] causes some resonance

  16. [Preventive measures against health damage due to chemicals in household products].

    PubMed

    Kaniwa, Masa-aki

    2006-01-01

    Chemicals in household products have been paid much attention as main cause of health damage on consumers, such as allergic contact dermatitis. Preventive measures against health damage due to chemicals in fabric, plastic and rubber products for household uses, are reviewed, focusing on (1) regulation and voluntary control by manufacturers, (2) incidence of health damage from household products, (3) causative product-chemical investigation, (4) case studies on skin damage and respiratory tract damage.

  17. [Preventive measures against health damage due to chemicals in household products].

    PubMed

    Kaniwa, Masa-aki

    2010-01-01

    Chemicals in household products have been paid much attention as the main cause of health damage in consumers, such as allergic contact dermatitis. Preventive measures against health damage due to chemicals in fabrics, plastics and rubber products for household use, are reviewed, focusing on 1) the incidence of health damage due to household products, 2) causative product-chemical investigation, and 3) case studies on skin damage.

  18. The Damage To The Armour Layer Due To Extreme Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztunali Ozbahceci, Berguzar; Ergin, Aysen; Takayama, Tomotsuka

    2010-05-01

    The sea waves are not regular but random and chaotic. In order to understand this randomness, it is common to make individual wave analysis in time domain or spectral analysis in frequency domain. Characteristic wave heights like Hmax, H%2,H1-10, H1-3, Hmean are obtained through individual wave analysis in time domain. These characteristic wave heights are important because they are used in the design of different type of coastal structures. It is common to use significant wave height, H1-3,for the design of rubble mound structures. Therefore, only spectrally derived or zero-crossing significant wave height is usually reported for the rubble mound breakwaters without any information on larger waves. However, even the values of H1-3are similar; some train of irregular waves may exhibit a large fluctuation of instantaneous wave energy, while another train may not show such a fluctuation (Goda, 1998). Moreover, freak or rogue wave, simply defined as the wave exceeding at least twice the significant wave height may also occur. Those larger waves were called as extreme waves in this study and the effect of extreme waves on the damage to the armour layer of rubble mound breakwaters was investigated by means of hydraulic model experiment. Rock armored rubble mound breakwater model with 1:1.5 slope was constructed in the wave channel of Hydraulics Laboratory of the Disaster Prevention Research Institute of Kyoto University, Japan. The model was consisted of a permeable core layer, a filter and armour layer with two stones thicknesses. Size of stones were same for both of the slopes as Dn50(armour)=0.034m, Dn50(filter)=0.021m and Dn50(core)=0.0148m for armour, filter and core layers, respectively. Time series which are approximately equal to 1000 waves, with similar significant wave height but different extreme wave height cases were generated. In order to generate necessary time series in the wave channel, they were firstly computed by numerically. For the numerical

  19. Drill-in fluid reduces formation damage, increases production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Hands, N.; Kowbel, K.; Nouris, R.

    1998-07-13

    A sodium formate drill-in fluid system reduced formation damage, resulting in better-than-expected production rates for an off-shore Dutch development well. Programmed to optimize production capacity and reservoir drainage from a Rotliegend sandstone gas discovery, the 5-7/8-in. subhorizontal production interval was drilled and completed barefoot with a unique, rheologically engineered sodium formate drill-in fluid system. The new system, consisting of a sodium formate (NaCOOH) brine as the base fluid and properly sized calcium carbonate as the formation-bridging agent, was selected on the basis of its well-documented record in reducing solids impairment and formation damage in similar sandstone structures in Germany. The system was engineered around the low-shear-rate viscosity (LSRV) concept, designed to provide exceptional rheological properties. After describing the drilling program, the paper gives results on the drilling and completion.

  20. Damage areas due to impact craters on LDEF aluminum panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Atkinson, Dale R.; Allbrooks, Martha; Wagner, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    spallation zone on the backside, approximately equal in size to that on the front side. Results from this study demonstrate that the impact damaged areas extend far beyond the actual craters in coated or painted surfaces. While the cratering damaged much greater than 1 percent of the total surface area, the total impact damage area exceeded 3 percent.

  1. 78 FR 66852 - Housing Assistance Due to Structural Damage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 206 RIN 1660-AA68 Housing Assistance Due to... rule finalizes revisions to FEMA's repair, replacement, and housing construction assistance regulations... may be in the form of housing assistance as well as assistance to meet ``other needs'' such as...

  2. 77 FR 44562 - Housing Assistance Due to Structural Damage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 206 RIN 1660-AA68 Housing Assistance Due to... emergency. FEMA proposes to revise its repair, replacement, and housing construction assistance regulations... disasters. This help may be in the form of housing assistance as well as assistance to meet ``other...

  3. Intracavity Optical Damage Due To Electrons, Ions And Ultraviolet Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard F.

    1988-06-01

    Many of the damage problems experienced by intracavity laser optics, particularly for discharge-pumped and electron-beam-pumped laser systems, arise from the electronic interactions of low-energy electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons with the surface and near-surface regions of the optical material. We shall describe results of recent experiments which display some of the electronic mechanisms involved in these processes, through which incident electronic energy is absorbed, localized, transformed and ultimately dissipated in ways which change the surface composition and electronic structure of model wide bandgap optical materials. We consider discuss recent experimental results on the metallization of dielectric surfaces, the effects of adsorbed overlayers in inhibiting desorption of excited neutral atoms, and the effects of glass processing on response to electron and ion irradiation. We also point out some of the ways in which the changes in the optical surfaces wrought by the low-energy and low-intensity irradiation arising from the laser pumping mechanism can influence thermal, chemical and plasma properties of the surface in ways which alter the surface response to intense laser radiation.

  4. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. )

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  5. Effects of restraint on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzabata, Hassina; Multon, Stephane; Sellier, Alain; Houari, Hacene

    2012-07-15

    Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) is a chemical reaction that causes expansion in civil engineering structures. The safety level of such damaged structures has to be reassessed. To do this, the mechanical conditions acting on DEF expansions have to be analysed and, in particular, the variation of strength with expansion and the effect of restraint on the DEF expansion. This paper highlights several points: DEF expansion is isotropic in stress-free conditions, compressive stresses decrease DEF expansion in the direction subjected to restraint and lead to cracks parallel to the restraint, and expansion measured in the stress-free direction of restrained specimens is not modified. Thus restraint causes a decrease of the volumetric expansion and DEF expansion under restraint is anisotropic. Moreover, the paper examines the correlation between DEF expansion and concrete damage, providing data that can be used for the quantification of the effect of stresses on DEF induced expansion.

  6. Energy Change due to Off-Fault Damage Evolution associated with Dynamic Fault Tip Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.

    2010-12-01

    We theoretically study off-fault damage evolution effects on dynamic earthquake rupture, especially from a standpoint of energy change in a whole system. The importance of off-fault inelastic energy loss due to damage on dynamic earthquake rupture has attracted interests of many researchers in terms of, for example, rupture velocity reduction and crack tip growth cessation. The damage effect is found to be important on dynamic earthquake slip behavior in terms of porosity increase also in a series of our previous studies, Suzuki and Yamashita (2007; 2008; 2009; 2010). The mathematical formulation of Murakami and Kamiya (1997) is assumed in the present study; the damage tensor D is used to describe damage state in a medium. Damage, which consists of microcracks in a medium, has direction (defined as normal to the crack surface) and the magnitude (crack size), so that a scalar damage variable is insufficient to describe the damage state. We first analytically derive the equation system including the damage tensor and describing energy change in a whole system due to any dynamic elastic and inelastic deformation processes such as macroscopic crack extension and damage evolution. The change in the summation of strain and kinetic energies and damage energy is found to be equal to the summation of energy flowing out of the medium through the boundary and energy turning to heat and irreversibly lost based on the analytical expression; the damage energy is associated with surface energy released by damage evolution. The damage energy is confirmed to be equal to the summation of the loss in strain energy due to change in the elastic moduli and irreversibly lost energy. A mode III crack embedded in a medium causing damage is then assumed to study the off-fault damage effects on dynamic earthquake rupture. Spontaneous crack tip growth with the Coulomb fracture criterion is assumed and in such a case the rupture velocity can be sufficiently smaller than the terminal velocity

  7. CFD Assessment of Aerodynamic Degradation of a Subsonic Transport Due to Airframe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    A computational study is presented to assess the utility of two NASA unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solvers for capturing the degradation in static stability and aerodynamic performance of a NASA General Transport Model (GTM) due to airframe damage. The approach is to correlate computational results with a substantial subset of experimental data for the GTM undergoing progressive losses to the wing, vertical tail, and horizontal tail components. The ultimate goal is to advance the probability of inserting computational data into the creation of advanced flight simulation models of damaged subsonic aircraft in order to improve pilot training. Results presented in this paper demonstrate good correlations with slope-derived quantities, such as pitch static margin and static directional stability, and incremental rolling moment due to wing damage. This study further demonstrates that high fidelity Navier-Stokes flow solvers could augment flight simulation models with additional aerodynamic data for various airframe damage scenarios.

  8. Reducing Mechanical Formation Damage by Minimizing Interfacial Tension and Capillary Pressure in Tight Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Arshad; Talib Shuker, Muhannad; Rehman, Khalil; Bahrami, Hassan; Memon, Muhammad Khan

    2013-12-01

    Tight gas reservoirs incur problems and significant damage caused by low permeability during drilling, completion, stimulation and production. They require advanced improvement techniques to achieve flow gas at optimum rates. Water blocking damage (phase Trapping/retention of fluids) is a form of mechanical formation damage mechanism, which is caused by filtrate invasion in drilling operations mostly in fracturing. Water blocking has a noticeable impact on formation damage in gas reservoirs which tends to decrease relative permeability near the wellbore. Proper evaluation of damage and the factors which influence its severity is essential to optimize well productivity. Reliable data regarding interfacial tension between gas and water is required in order to minimize mechanical formation damage potential and to optimize gas production. This study was based on the laboratory experiments of interfacial tension by rising drop method between gas-brine, gas-condensate and gas-brine. The results showed gas condensate has low interfacial tension value 6 - 11 dynes/cm when compared to gas-brine and gas- diesel which were 44 - 58 dynes/cm and 14 - 19 dynes/cm respectively. In this way, the capillary pressure of brine-gas system was estimated as 0.488 psi, therefore diesel-gas system was noticed about 0.164 psi and 0.098 psi for condensate-gas system. A forecast model was used by using IFT values to predict the phase trapping which shows less severe phase trapping damage in case of condensate than diesel and brine. A reservoir simulation study was also carried out in order to better understand the effect of hysteresis on well productivity and flow efficiency affected due to water blocking damage in tight gas reservoirs.

  9. A Study of the Crack Damage in Fuel-Filled Tank Walls Due to Ballistic Penetrators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    b----e~ REPORT , DOCUMENTATIONPAGE ____________________ I. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ lp _MOR aUUE ACESO O3 I TATALOG ŘU01 R A Study of the Crack Damage in Fuel...ates es5 r ~~~Filled Tank’Wa~lls Due to Ballistic ____________ a. PaRPORMIMS 0960. REPORT NUMBS" Steven Lock/Fahrenkrog Naval Postgraduiate School...the accurate prediction of damage to the tank. due to a ball.istic projectile. This report presents a method for predicting the amount of cracking of a

  10. Shunt insufficiency due to knot formation in the peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Nagy, Andrea; Pataki, István; Bognar, László; Novák, László

    2013-07-30

    The authors report a rare case of the peripheral obstruction of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Premature baby was operated on hydrocephalus due to germinal matrix bleeding. After two months of implantation of venticuloperitoneal shunt peripheral insufficiency of the system was emerged. During the shunt revision extensive knot formation became visible. We simply cut the catheter above the knot and the working shunt was replaced into the abdominal cavity. The postoperative course was uneventful and the baby was free of complaints for more than one year. The pathomechanism of knot formation is not clear thus the discovery of the problem during the operation is an unexpected event. In our opinion tight knot cannot be spontaneously formed intraabdominally. Loose knots can be developed and can reduce the capacity of liquor flow. We think that the knot tightens during pulling out. Longer peritoneal catheters can precipitate multiple looping and/or axial torquations and increase the peripheral resistance of the shunt. In such cases when the pulling out is challenged conversion to laparotomy is suggested.

  11. Changes of color coordinates of biological tissue with superficial skin damage due to mechanical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteruk, Vail; Mokanyuk, Olexander; Kvaternuk, Olena; Yakenina, Lesya; Kotyra, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dussembayeva, Shynar

    2015-12-01

    Change of color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues is based on calculated spectral diffuse reflection. The proposed color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues of skin provided using standard light sources, allowing accurately diagnose skin damage due to mechanical trauma with a blunt object for forensic problems.

  12. APPLICABILITY OF A ACCUMULATED DAMAGE PARAMETER METHOD ON SOIL LIQUEFACTION DUE TOSEVERAL EARTHQUAKES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, Jun; Tanoue, Kazuya; Murono, Yoshitaka

    Severe soil liquefaction due to long duration earthquake with low acceleration occurred at Tokyo Bay area in the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. This phenomenon clearly shows that soil liquefaction is affected by properties of input waves. This paper describes effect of wave properties of earthquake on liquefaction using Effective Stress analysis with some earthquakes. Analytical result showedthat almost the same pore water pressure was observed due to both long durationearthquake with max acceleration of 150Gal and typical inland active fault earthquake with 891Gal. Additionally, lique-faction potentials for each earthquake were evaluated by simple judgment with accumulated damage parameter, which is used for design of railway structuresin Japan. As a result, it was found that accurate liquefaction resistance on large cyclic area is necessaryto evaluate liquefaction potential due to long duration earthquake with low acceleration with simple judgment with accumulated damage parameter.

  13. New perspectives on the damage estimation for buried pipeline systems due to seismic wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda Porras, Omar Andrey

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three decades, seismic fragility fonnulations for buried pipeline systems have been developed following two tendencies: the use of earthquake damage scenarios from several pipeline systems to create general pipeline fragility functions; and, the use of damage scenarios from one pipeline system to create specific-system fragility functions. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of both tendencies are analyzed and discussed; in addition, a summary of what can be considered the new challenges for developing better pipeline seismic fragility formulations is discussed. The most important conclusion of this paper states that more efforts are needed to improve the estimation of transient ground strain -the main cause of pipeline damage due to seismic wave propagation; with relevant advances in that research field, new and better fragility formulations could be developed.

  14. Observation of earthquake ground motion due to aftershocks of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake in damaged areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Chimoto, Kosuke; Miyake, Hiroe; Tsuno, Seiji; Yamada, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    We have conducted observation of earthquake ground motion due to aftershocks of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake at 26 temporary stations in damaged areas of Kumamoto city, Mashiki town, Nishihara village and Minami-Aso village (partly in Aso city) in Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. Continuous recordings of ground acceleration were acquired in a period of about 1 month after the occurrence of the main shock on April 16, 2016. This preliminary analysis of the observed records clearly indicates strong effects of local geological condition in the heavily damaged districts in Mashiki town and Nishihara village. Spectral ratios of the ground motions at the stations in the severely damaged districts to those at the reference sites are characterized by large amplitudes at periods of 0.5-1 s. Peak ground velocities and seismic intensities are also large at the sites. Seismic intensities at the stations in the damaged districts are larger by an intensity of one at the maximum than those at the stations with the minor damage. The ground motions at the stations in Kumamoto city are rich in later phases with long duration suggesting basin effects. However, site amplification effects could not clearly be identified at the stations in the Minami-Aso area from the results in the conventional spectral ratio approach.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Attenuation due to hysteretic damage in the free vibration of a beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, Daniel A.; Pecorari, Claudio

    2014-02-18

    We present an asymptotic analysis of nonlinear free vibration of a beam with a damage plane represented by nonlinear hysteretic bending and shear springs. The perturbation parameter is the product of the ratio of the nonlinear to linear parts of the stiffness times the amplitude of the free vibration. The loss of energy and ensuing attenuation due to hysteresis is accounted for by reducing the amplitude of vibration after each cycle by an amount such that the loss in total system energy equals the work done to traverse the hysteresis loop. A new Fourier representation for each cycle of the hysteresis and the deflection solution is used for this purpose and leads to higher harmonics, an evolving complex stiffness and corrected natural frequency that are linked to the attenuation. The frequency increases to its linear value from an initially reduced value. The damage parameter, frequency shift and fundamental amplitudes are presented as functions of the initial damage parameter and time (cycles of vibration). The amplitudes of several of the higher harmonics are also presented as functions of time. Many of the results exhibit sufficient sensitivity with respect to the damage parameter that they should be able to be used to characterize the damage.

  16. Time evolution of damage due to environmentally assisted aging in a fiber bundle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz-Sassinek, S.; Main, I. G.; Danku, Z.; Kun, F.

    2013-09-01

    Damage growth in composite materials is a complex process which is of interest in many fields of science and engineering. We consider this problem in a fiber bundle model where fibers undergo an aging process due to the accumulation of damage driven by the locally acting stress in a chemically active environment. By subjecting the bundle to a constant external load, fibers fail either when the load on them exceeds their individual intrinsic strength or when the accumulated internal damage exceeds a random threshold. We analyze the time evolution of the breaking process under low external loads where aging of fibers dominates. In the mean field limit, we show analytically that the aging system continuously accelerates in a way which can be characterized by an inverse power law of the event rate with a singularity that defines a failure time. The exponent is not universal; it depends on the details of the aging process. For localized load sharing, a more complex damage process emerges which is dominated by distinct spatial regions of the system with different degrees of stress concentration. Analytical calculations revealed that the final acceleration to global failure is preceded by a stationary accumulation of damage. When the disorder is strong, the accelerating phase has the same functional behavior as in the mean field limit. The analytical results are verified by computer simulations.

  17. Formation of amorphous silicon by light ion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.C.

    1985-12-01

    Amorphization by implantation of boron ions (which is the lightest element generally used in I.C. fabrication processes) has been systematically studied for various temperatures, various voltages and various dose rates. Based on theoretical considerations and experimental results, a new amorphization model for light and intermediate mass ion damage is proposed consisting of two stages. The role of interstitial type point defects or clusters in amorphization is emphasized. Due to the higher mobility of interstitials out-diffusion to the surface particularly during amorphization with low energy can be significant. From a review of the idealized amorphous structure, diinterstitial-divacancy pairs are suggested to be the embryos of amorphous zones formed during room temperature implantation. The stacking fault loops found in specimens implanted with boron at room temperature are considered to be the origin of secondary defects formed during annealing.

  18. Damage Characteristics of the Logical Chip Module Due to Plasma Created by Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Enling; Wu, Jin; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Lijiao; Xiang, Shenghai; Xia, Jin; Liu, Shuhua; He, Liping; Han, Yafei; Xu, Mingyang; Zhang, Shuang; Yuan, Jianfei

    2016-04-01

    To researching the damage characteristics of typical logical chip modules in spacecraft due to plasma generated by hypervelocity impacts, we have established a triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system and a logical chips measurement system, which were used to diagnose plasma characteristic parameters and the logical chip module's logical state changes due to the plasma created by a 7075 aluminum projectile hypervelocity impact on the 2A12 aluminum target. Three sets of experiments were performed with the collision speeds of 2.85 km/s, 3.1 km/s and 2.20 km/s, at the same incident angles of 30 degrees and logical chip module's positions by using a two-stage light gas gun loading system, a plasma characteristic parameters diagnostic system and a logical chip module's logical state measurement system, respectively. Electron temperature and density were measured at given position and azimuth, and damage estimation was performed for the logical chip module by using the data acquisition system. Experimental results showed that temporary damage could be induced on logical chip modules in spacecraft by plasma generated by hypervelocity impacts under the given experimental conditions and the sensors' position and azimuth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10972145, 11272218, 11472178), Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University of China (No. LR2013008), Open Foundation of Key Laboratory of Liaoning Weapon Science and Technology, Liaoning Province Talents Engineering Projects of China (No. 2012921044)

  19. Experimental study on asphaltene adsorption onto formation rock: An approach to asphaltene formation damage prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, G.; Barberis Canonica, L.; Galbariggi, G.; Bertero, L.; Carniani, C.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, through a comparative study on Static vs Dynamic adsorption of asphaltene onto formation rock, it is reported how, for the particular asphaltene/formation rock system here considered, the Dynamic asphaltene adsorption onto formation rock is a continuous phenomenon by which the quantity of adsorbed asphaltene increases continuously. In the authors` opinion this rather remarkable adsorption behavior may contribute to asphaltene formation damage. In the hypothesis that prevention may represent a more economical approach than removal, in this work is also reported a possible prevention approach based on formation rock treatment by means of specific chemicals more apt than asphaltenes to be adsorbed onto rock. As preliminary demonstration, with the aim at assessing qualitatively the potential of their approach, the authors have pre-treated the rock by means of commercially available asphaltene dispersant and flocculation inhibitors. Albeit the chosen additives are not commercialized on the base of their specific adsorption feature, a prevention effect has been effectively found. Experimental set ups and procedures used as a base for a test able to rank chemicals with respect to their asphaltene adsorption inhibitive effects are also reported.

  20. Asphaltene adsorption onto formation rock: An approach to asphaltene formation damage prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, G.; Canonico, L.B.; Galbariggi, G.; Bertero, L.; Carniani, C.

    1996-08-01

    In this paper, through a comparative study on static vs. dynamic adsorption of asphaltene onto formation rock, the authors report how, for the particular asphaltene/formation rock system considered, the dynamic asphaltene adsorption onto formation rock is a continuous phenomenon by which the quantity of adsorbed asphaltene increases continuously. In their opinion, this rather remarkable adsorption behavior may contribute to asphaltene formation damage. In the hypothesis that prevention may represent a more economical approach than removal, they also report a possible prevention approach based on formation rock treatment by means of specific chemicals more apt than asphaltenes to be adsorbed onto rock. As a preliminary demonstration, with the aim of assessing qualitatively the potential of their approach, they have pretreated the rock with commercially available asphaltene dispersant and flocculation inhibitors. Although the chosen additives are not commercialized on the basis of their specific adsorption feature, a modest prevention effect has been found. Experimental set-ups and procedures used as a base for a test to rank chemicals with respect to their asphaltene adsorption inhibitive effects are also reported.

  1. Direct participation of DNA in the formation of singlet oxygen and base damage under UVA irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yagura, Teiti; Schuch, André Passaglia; Garcia, Camila Carrião Machado; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro Reily; Moreno, Natália Cestari; Angeli, José Pedro Friedmann; Mendes, Davi; Severino, Divinomar; Bianchini Sanchez, Angelica; Di Mascio, Paolo; de Medeiros, Marisa Helena Gennari; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2017-03-18

    UVA light is hardly absorbed by the DNA molecule, but recent works point to a direct mechanism of DNA lesion by these wavelengths. UVA light also excite endogenous chromophores, which causes DNA damage through ROS. In this study, DNA samples were irradiated with UVA light in different conditions to investigate possible mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage. The different types of DNA lesions formed after irradiation were determined through the use of endonucleases, which recognize and cleave sites containing oxidized bases and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), as well as through antibody recognition. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanine (8-oxodG) was also studied in more detail using electrochemical detection. The results show that high NaCl concentration and concentrated DNA are capable of reducing the induction of CPDs. Moreover, concerning damage caused by oxidative stress, the presence of sodium azide and metal chelators reduce their induction, while deuterated water increases the amounts of oxidized bases, confirming the involvement of singlet oxygen in the generation of these lesions. Curiously, however, high concentrations of DNA also enhanced the formation of oxidized bases, in a reaction that paralleled the increase in the formation of singlet oxygen in the solution. This was interpreted as being due to an intrinsic photosensitization mechanism, depending directly on the DNA molecule to absorb UVA and generate singlet oxygen. Therefore, the DNA molecule itself may act as a chromophore for UVA light, locally producing a damaging agent, which may lead to even greater concerns about the deleterious impact of sunlight.

  2. Damage evaluation in metal structures subjected to high energy deposition due to particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapin, Martina; Peroni, Lorenzo; Dallocchio, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    The unprecedented energy intensities of modern hadron accelerators yield special problems with the materials that are placed close to or into the high intensity beams. The energy stored in a single beam of LHC particle accelerator is equivalent to about 80 kg of TNT explosive, stored in a transverse beam area with a typical value of 0.2 mm×0.2 mm. The materials placed close to the beam are used at, or even beyond, their damage limits. However, it is very difficult to predict structural efficiency and robustness accurately: beam-induced damage for high energy and high intensity occurs in a regime where practical experience does not exist. The interaction between high energy particle beams and metals induces a sudden non uniform temperature increase. This provokes a dynamic response of the structure entailing thermal stress waves and thermally induced vibrations or even the failure of the component. This study is performed in order to estimate the damage on a copper component due to the impact with a 7 TeV proton beam generated by LHC. The case study represents an accidental case consequent to an abnormal release of the beam: the energy delivered on the component is calculated using the FLUKA code and then used as input in the numerical simulations, that are carried out via the FEM code LS-DYNA.

  3. Ion transport through macrocapillaries - Oscillations due to charge patch formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, D. D.; Lyle, L. A. M.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present results on ion transport through large bore capillaries (macrocapillaries) that probe both the geometric and ion-guided aspects of this ion delivery mechanism. We have demonstrated that guiding in macrocapillaries exhibits position- and angle-dependent transmission properties which are directly related to the capillary material (either metal or insulator) and geometry. Specifically, we have passed 1 keV Rb+ ions through glass and metal macrocapillaries, and have observed oscillations for the transmitted ion current passing through the insulating capillaries. Straightforward calculations show that these oscillations can be attributed to beam deflections from charge patches that form on the interior walls of the capillary. The absence of these oscillations in the metal capillary data serve as further confirmation of the role of charge patch formation.

  4. Vulnerability Assessment of Housing Damage in the Philippines Due to an Increase Increase in Typhoon Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Miguel; Stromberg, Per; Gasparatos, Alexandros

    2010-05-01

    south is almost unaffected due to its proximity to the equator. The estimation of the damage shows that the number of houses partially or totally destroyed could increase by up to 58% in certain regions by 2085. The historical damage data shows how the adaptive capacity values of each region given by Yusuf and Herminia (2009) are crucial to the amount of damage recorded. These authors defined this parameter as the degree to which adjustments in practices, processes or structures can moderate or offset potential damage or take advantage of opportunities from climate change. This clearly highlights the importance of mitigation measures to increase the resilience of communities in the future. This is a significant conclusion of the present paper, independent of whether tropical cyclones increase in intensity or not.

  5. Damage to apparel layers and underlying tissue due to hand-gun bullets.

    PubMed

    Carr, Debra; Kieser, Jules; Mabbott, Alexander; Mott, Charlotte; Champion, Stephen; Girvan, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Ballistic damage to the clothing of victims of gunshot wounds to the chest can provide useful forensic evidence. Anyone shot in the torso will usually be wearing clothing which will be damaged by the penetrating impact event and can reportedly be the source of some of the debris in the wound. Minimal research has previously been reported regarding the effect of bullets on apparel fabrics and underlying tissue. This paper examines the effect of ammunition (9 mm full metal jacket [FMJ] DM11 A1B2, 8.0 g; and soft point flat nose Remington R357M3, 10.2 g) on clothing layers that cover the torso (T-shirt, T-shirt plus hoodie, T-shirt plus denim jacket) and underlying structures represented by porcine thoracic wall (skin, underlying tissue, ribs). Impacts were recorded using a Phantom V12 high speed camera. Ejected bone debris was collected before wound tracts were dissected and measured; any debris found was recovered for further analysis. Size and mass of bony debris was recorded; fibre debris recovered from the wound and impact damage to fabrics were imaged using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Remington R357M3 ammunition was characteristically associated with stellate fabric damage; individual fibres were less likely to show mushrooming. In contrast, 9 mm FMJ ammunition resulted in punch-out damage to fabric layers, with mushrooming of individual fibres being more common. Entry wound sizes were similar for both types of ammunition and smaller than the diameter of the bullet that caused them. In this work, the Remington R357M3 ammunition resulted in larger exit wounds due to the bullet construction which mushroomed. That fabric coverings did not affect the amount of bony debris produced is interesting, particularly given there was some evidence that apparel layers affected the size of the wound. Recent work has suggested that denim (representative of jeans) can exacerbate wounding caused by high-velocity bullet impacts to the thigh when the bullet does not

  6. Jet Formation in Solar Atmosphere due to Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Avilés, J. J.; Guzmán, F. S.; Fedun, V.

    2017-02-01

    Using numerical simulations, we show that jets with features of type II spicules and cool coronal jets corresponding to temperatures of 104 K can be formed as a result of magnetic reconnection in a scenario with magnetic resistivity. For this, we model the low chromosphere–corona region using the C7 equilibrium solar atmosphere model, assuming that resistive MHD rules the dynamics of the plasma. The magnetic field configurations we analyze correspond to two neighboring loops with opposite polarity. The formation of a high-speed and sharp structure depends on the separation of the loops’ feet. We analyze the cases where the magnetic field strength of the two loops is equal and different. In the first case, with a symmetric configuration the jets rise vertically, whereas in an asymmetric configuration the structure shows an inclination. With a number of simulations carried out under a 2.5D approach, we explore various properties of the excited jets, namely, inclination, lifetime, and velocity. The parameter space involves a magnetic field strength between 20 and 40 G, and the resistivity is assumed to be uniform with a constant value of the order {10}-2{{Ω }}\\cdot m.

  7. Pattern formation due to non-linear vortex diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.; Surdeanu, R.; Huijbregtse, J. M.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Einfeld, J.; Wördenweber, R.; Griessen, R.

    Penetration of magnetic flux in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 superconducting thin films in an external magnetic field is visualized using a magneto-optic technique. A variety of flux patterns due to non-linear vortex diffusion is observed: (1) Roughening of the flux front with scaling exponents identical to those observed in burning paper including two distinct regimes where respectively spatial disorder and temporal disorder dominate. In the latter regime Kardar-Parisi-Zhang behavior is found. (2) Fractal penetration of flux with Hausdorff dimension depending on the critical current anisotropy. (3) Penetration as ‘flux-rivers’. (4) The occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate channels in films with anti-dots as predicted in numerical simulations by Reichhardt, Olson and Nori. It is shown that most of the observed behavior is related to the non-linear diffusion of vortices by comparison with simulations of the non-linear diffusion equation appropriate for vortices.

  8. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    The present study investigates interfacial damage mechanism of modular implants due to synergetic action of mechanical contact loading and corrosion. Modular implants are manufactured such that surfaces have a characteristic degree of roughness determined by tool tip size and motion of tool path or feeding speed. The central hypothesis for this work is that during contact loading of metallic implants, mechanisms of damage and dissolution are determined by contact loads, plastic deformation, residual stresses and environmental conditions at the nanoscale surface asperities; while during subsequent rest periods, mechanism of metallic dissolution is determined by the environmental conditions and residual stress field induced due to long range elastic interactions of the plastically deformed asperities. First part of the thesis is focused on investigating the mechanisms underlying surface roughness evolution due to stress-assisted dissolution during the rest period. The latter part is focused on investigating material removal mechanisms during single asperity contact of implant surfaces. Experimental study was performed to elucidate the roughness evolution mechanism by combined effect of multi-asperity contact and environmental corrosion. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum specimen was subjected to either contact loading alone or alternating contact loading and exposure to reactive environment. Roughness of the specimen surface was monitored by optical profilometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation was used to characterize the evolving behavior of roughness modes. Finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to identify influences of surface morphological configurations and contact pressures on the residual stress development. Analytical model of multi-asperity contact has been developed for prediction of residual stress field for different roughness configurations during varying magnitude of contact loads based on elastic inclusion theory. Experimental results

  9. Mesoscopic structure formation in condensed matter due to vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Siddhartha; Gupta, Kumar S.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    An observable influence of zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum electromagnetic field on bound electrons is well known in the hydrogen atom, where it produces the Lamb shift. Here, we adapt an approach used to explain the Lamb shift in terms of a slight expansion of the orbits due to interaction with the zero-point field and apply it to assemblies of N electrons that are modeled as independent atomically bound two-level systems. The effect is to stabilize a collective ground-state energy, which leads to a prediction of novel effects at room temperature for quasi-two-dimensional systems over a range of parameters in the model, namely, N , the two-level excitation energy ℏ ω and the ionization energy ℏ ω +ɛ . Some mesoscopic systems where these effects may be observable include water sheaths on protein or DNA, surfaces of gaseous nanobubbles, and the magnetic response of inhomogeneous, electronically dilute oxides. No such effects are envisaged for uniform three-dimensional systems.

  10. Evolution of damage fraction due to dense ionizing irradiation on TiO2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avesh; Kanjilal, D.; Mohanty, T.

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of damage fraction during dense ionizing irradiation at various fluences using 100 MeV Ag ion is studied. Irradiation induced modification of surface roughness and surface potential of titanium dioxide nanocrystalline thin films are estimated. TiO2 thin films deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrate were irradiated by 100 MeV Ag ion beam with varying fluences. Ion bombardment generates point and extended defects in TiO2 thin films due to dense electronic excitation. The surface morphology and surface roughness of irradiated and pristine thin films were measured using atomic force microscopy. The changes in surface potential of pristine as well as Ag ion beam irradiated thin films were measured from contact potential difference between TiO2 thin film (one electrode) of unknown work function and Au (reference electrode) of known work function using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The defect size and damage fraction are calculated from exponential fitting of variation of both contact surface potential difference and roughness exponent with fluence.

  11. Mechanical Properties and Elastic Constants Due to Damage Accumulation and Amorphization in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-06-28

    Damage accumulation due to cascade overlap, which was simulated previously, has been used to study the changes of elastic constants, bulk and elastic moduli as a function of dose. These mechanical properties generally decrease with increasing dose, and the rapid decrease at low-dose level indicates that point defects and small clusters play an important role in the changes of elastic constants rather than topological disorder. The internal strain relaxation has no effect on the elastic constants, C11 and C12, in perfect SiC, but it has a significant influence on all elastic constants calculated in damaged SiC. The elastic constants in the cascade-amorphized (CA) SiC decrease about 19%, 29% and 46% for C11, C12 and C44, respectively. The bulk modulus decrease 23% and the elastic modulus decreases 29%, which is consistent with experimental measurements. The stability of both the perfect SiC and CA-SiC under hydrostatic tension has been also investigated. All mechanical properties in the CA-SiC exhibit behavior similar to that in perfect SiC, but the critical stress at which the CA-SiC becomes structurally unstable is one order of magnitude smaller than that for perfect SiC.

  12. Damage in Monolithic Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules Due to Partial Shade

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, Timothy J.; Mansfield, Lorelle; Repins, Ingrid; Kurtz, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    The typical configuration of monolithic thin-film photovoltaic modules makes it possible for partial shade to place one or more cells in such a module in reverse bias. Reverse bias operation leads to high voltage, current density, and power density conditions, which can act as driving forces for failure. We showed that a brief outdoor shadow event can cause a 7% permanent loss in power. We applied an indoor partial shade durability test that moves beyond the standard hot spot endurance test by using more realistic mask and bias conditions and by carefully quantifying the permanent change in performance due to the stress. With the addition of a pass criterion based on change in maximum power, this procedure will soon be proposed as a part of the module-type qualification test. All six commercial copper indium gallium diselenide and cadmium telluride modules we tested experienced permanent damage due to the indoor partial shade test, ranging from 4% to 14% loss in maximum power. We conclude by summarizing ways to mitigate partial shade stress at the cell, module, and system levels.

  13. Myelinosome formation represents an early stage of oligodendrocyte damage in multiple sclerosis and its animal model

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Elisa; Merkler, Doron; Mezydlo, Aleksandra; Weil, Marie-Theres; Weber, Martin S.; Nikić, Ivana; Potz, Stephanie; Meinl, Edgar; Matznick, Florian E. H.; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Ghanem, Alexander; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Metz, Imke; Brück, Wolfgang; Routh, Matthew; Simons, Mikael; Bishop, Derron; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte damage is a central event in the pathogenesis of the common neuroinflammatory condition, multiple sclerosis (MS). Where and how oligodendrocyte damage is initiated in MS is not completely understood. Here, we use a combination of light and electron microscopy techniques to provide a dynamic and highly resolved view of oligodendrocyte damage in neuroinflammatory lesions. We show that both in MS and in its animal model structural damage is initiated at the myelin sheaths and only later spreads to the oligodendrocyte cell body. Early myelin damage itself is characterized by the formation of local myelin out-foldings—‘myelinosomes'—, which are surrounded by phagocyte processes and promoted in their formation by anti-myelin antibodies and complement. The presence of myelinosomes in actively demyelinating MS lesions suggests that oligodendrocyte damage follows a similar pattern in the human disease, where targeting demyelination by therapeutic interventions remains a major open challenge. PMID:27848954

  14. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Holley, W.R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-02-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber composed of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and {delta} rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers > 100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of {circ}OH, {circ}H, e{sub aq}, etc.; {circ}OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; {circ}OH attack on bases; direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 hp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the chromatin fibers in mammalian DNA. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Damage assessment through changes in mode shapes due to non-proportional damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iezzi, F.; Spina, D.; Valente, C.

    2015-07-01

    Modal parameters are often used for the structural damage assessment in the dynamic field. Usually, the changes in the modal parameters between different states are assumed as measures of damage. The frequencies are easy to identify, but in some circumstances they are not sensitive to damage and moreover they are mainly a global measure. On the contrary, the mode shapes are more suited for damage localization, but they are generally hard to identify accurately. The energy dissipation, and hence the damping, increases with damage. This feature is stable and has a monotonic behaviour, therefore, damping can be confidently used as an alternative or complementary measure for damage assessment in spite of the accuracy of its identification. However, the damping by itself suffers of the same drawbacks as the frequencies. The joint use of damping and mode shapes is an effective procedure for the damage identification. In the real world the damping is of nonproportional type and the measured mode shapes are complex. It is assumed that an increase of damage causes a modification of non-proportional damping and a variation of the modal complexity. The extent of modal complexity between two different structural states can be used to identify the damage through appropriate indicators. A number of such indicators is introduced and discussed. The effectiveness and sensitivity of the damage indicators are tested on theoretical and pseudo-experimental data.

  16. Partial interruption of axonal transport due to microtubule breakage accounts for the formation of periodic varicosities after traumatic axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Tang-Schomer, Min D; Johnson, Victoria E; Baas, Peter W; Stewart, William; Smith, Douglas H

    2012-01-01

    Due to their viscoelastic nature, white matter axons are susceptible to damage by high strain rates produced during traumatic brain injury (TBI). Indeed, diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is one of the most common features of TBI, characterized by the hallmark pathological profiles of axonal bulbs at disconnected terminal ends of axons and periodic swellings along axons, known as "varicosities." Although transport interruption underlies axonal bulb formation, it is unclear how varicosities arise, with multiple sites accumulating transported materials along one axon. Recently, axonal microtubules have been found to physically break during dynamic stretch injury of cortical axons in vitro. Here, the same in vitro model was used in parallel with histopathological analyses of human brains acquired acutely following TBI to examine the potential role of mechanical microtubule damage in varicosity formation post-trauma. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following in vitro stretch injury revealed periodic breaks of individual microtubules along axons that regionally corresponded with undulations in axon morphology. However, typically less than a third of microtubules were broken in any region of an axon. Within hours, these sites of microtubule breaks evolved into periodic swellings. This suggests axonal transport may be halted along one broken microtubule, yet can proceed through the same region via other intact microtubules. Similar axonal undulations and varicosities were observed following TBI in humans, suggesting primary microtubule failure may also be a feature of DAI. These data indicate a novel mechanism of mechanical microtubule damage leading to partial transport interruption and varicosity formation in traumatic axonal injury.

  17. Estimated crop yield losses due to surface ozone exposure and economic damage in India.

    PubMed

    Debaje, S B

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we estimate yield losses and economic damage of two major crops (winter wheat and rabi rice) due to surface ozone (O3) exposure using hourly O3 concentrations for the period 2002-2007 in India. This study estimates crop yield losses according to two indices of O3 exposure: 7-h seasonal daytime (0900-1600 hours) mean measured O3 concentration (M7) and AOT40 (accumulation exposure of O3 concentration over a threshold of 40 parts per billion by volume during daylight hours (0700-1800 hours), established by field studies. Our results indicate that relative yield loss from 5 to 11% (6-30%) for winter wheat and 3-6% (9-16%) for rabi rice using M7 (AOT40) index of the mean total winter wheat 81 million metric tons (Mt) and rabi rice 12 Mt production per year for the period 2002-2007. The estimated mean crop production loss (CPL) for winter wheat are from 9 to 29 Mt, account for economic cost loss was from 1,222 to 4,091 million US$ annually. Similarly, the mean CPL for rabi rice are from 0.64 to 2.1 Mt, worth 86-276 million US$. Our calculated winter wheat and rabi rice losses agree well with previous results, providing the further evidence that large crop yield losses occurring in India due to current O3 concentration and further elevated O3 concentration in future may pose threat to food security.

  18. Finite element analysis of cornea thermal damage due to pulse incidental far IR laser.

    PubMed

    Shibib, Khalid Salem

    2013-05-01

    Due to the wide use of laser systems in human activities, an accidental event of laser exposure may occur where the most susceptible part to injury is the eye. A typical invisible pulsed, far IR, CO2 laser beam was used as an intrabeam accidentally struck an eye leading to raise its temperature to a limit where a pain sensation was started followed by aversion response with a delay of 0.25 s. At this time, the laser beam was assumed to terminate with respect to the cornea. The finite element method (FEM) was used successfully to predict, numerically, the temperature distribution through the anterior part of the eye when subjected to the laser beam. The FEM program was written using Visual Basic 6 coding. The effects of laser parameters such as laser beam profile, pulse width, and repetition rate on the temperature distribution and the consequential thermal damage were studied. The efficiency of the constructed computer program of the present work was examined by the comparison of the predicted results with those obtained from previously published experimental and theoretical works. The comparison shows good agreements.

  19. The effect of solids concentration and formation characteristics on formation damage and permeability recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, A.R.; Arshad, A.M.; Peden, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    An experimental study has been made to investigate the effect of solids concentration and filter media on fluid loss and permeability recovery of cores. KCl-polymer muds of different barite concentrations and different types of core were used to perform the tests. Filtration tests showed that fluid loss increased as solids concentration in the mud increased. Increasing the solids concentration in the mud appears to improve permeability recovery when the cores were backflushed. However, high spurt loss and poor permeability recovery were observed if muds containing polymer materials were used without the addition of solid particles. Filtration and permeability restoration are not only affected by the size, shape and solids concentration in the mud but also to the pore size distribution and core characteristics. Detailed observation using scanning electron microscope was used to identify the solids impairment at the core face. Therefore, to reduce formation damage and improve recovery, suitable size, shape and concentration of solids in the mud must be properly selected.

  20. Experimental and theoretical modeling of shrinkage damage formation in fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, V. N.; Rozenberg, B. A.

    1998-03-01

    The cure of a thermoset matrix in the formation of composites is always accompanied by chemical shrinkage that generates internal stresses. In composites with high fiber content, the matrix is cured under three-dimensionally constrained conditions. The results of the previous experimental and theoretical modeling of formation of shrinkage damage under these conditions in epoxy-amine systems are briefly discussed. The effect of the model geometry (tube and plate models), scale factor, cure schedule, and chemical structure of composites is analyzed. A theoretical model for predicting the possibility of formation of shrinkage damage in fiber composites is proposed. A regular square structure was considered. Analysis showed that the maximum level of shrinkage stress in the matrix at the ultimate fiber fraction ϕ+ was close to the stress level σ+ in an experimental long tube model, where the formation of shrinkage damage took place. The experimental results for the short tube model showed that the shrinkage damage in epoxy-amine systems occurred up to approximately σ+/3. The damage development took place within the whole range of fiber content from ϕ+ to ϕ* (where the shrinkage stress level was about σ+/3). In the long tube model, cohesive defects always nucleated inside the matrix. The damage grew, reached the inner surface of the tube, and then extended as adhesive debondings. A similar situation is expected in composites with a high fiber content. The damage considered is local, and the total monolithic character of a composite product is conserved.

  1. Damage formation and annealing at low temperatures in ion implanted ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Wendler, E.; Bilani, O.; Wesch, W.; Hayes, M.

    2005-11-07

    N, Ar, and Er ions were implanted into ZnO at 15 K within a large fluence range. The Rutherford backscattering technique in the channeling mode was used to study in situ the damage built-up in the Zn sublattice at 15 K. Several stages in the damage formation were observed. From the linear increase of the damage for low implantation fluences, an upper limit of the Zn displacement energy of 65 eV could be estimated for [0001] oriented ZnO. Annealing measurements below room temperature show a significant recovery of the lattice starting at temperatures between 80 and 130 K for a sample implanted with low Er fluence. Samples with higher damage levels do not reveal any damage recovery up to room temperature, pointing to the formation of stable defect complexes.

  2. Death, Disease, and Dirty Power. Mortality and health damage due to air pollution from power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Conrad G.

    2000-10-01

    The Clean Air Task Force, on behalf of the Clear the Air campaign, commissioned Abt Associates to quantify the health impacts of fine particle air pollution, commonly known as soot, from power plants, as well as the expected benefits (avoidable deaths, hospitalizations, etc.) of policies that would reduce fine particle pollution from power plants. The health effects analyzed include death, hospitalizations, emergency room visits, asthma attacks, and a variety of lesser respiratory symptoms. This report summarizes the findings of the Abt Associates study, reviews the contribution of power plants to fine particle pollution, and discusses policies that will reduce power plant fine particle pollution and thus save thousands of lives. Key findings include: Fine particle pollution from US power plants cuts short the lives of over 30,000 people each year. In more polluted areas, fine particle pollution can shave several years off its victims' lives. Hundreds of thousands of Americans suffer from asthma attacks, cardiac problems and upper and lower respiratory problems associated with fine particles from power plants. The elderly, children, and those with respiratory disease are most severely impacted by fine particle pollution from power plants. Metropolitan areas with large populations near coal-fired power plants feel their impacts most acutely - their attributable death rates are much higher than in areas with few or no coal-fired power plants. Power plants outstrip all other polluters as the largest source of sulfates - the major component of fine particle pollution - in the US Approximately two-thirds (over 18,000) of the deaths due to fine particle pollution from power plants could be avoided by implementing policies that cut power plant sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide pollution 75 percent below 1997 emission levels. Fine particle pollution is responsible for increased risk of death and shortened life spans. Abt Associates' findings are based on a body of well

  3. Geochemical modeling of scale formation, and formation damage during production from sulfate and carbonate mineral-bearing reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Macgowan, D.B.; Dunn, T.L.; Surdam, R.C. )

    1991-03-01

    The physical and chemical processes that affect reservoir fluids during production can be modeled by methodologies similar to those used for modeling clastic diagenesis. That these processes may result in formation damage and scale formation make them of interest to production geologists and engineers. Pathway modeling, based upon a series of critical divides, predicts which reactions are likely to occur between formation, production tubing, and reservoir fluids. Thermodynamic equilibria modeling calculates direction and magnitude of possible reactions. Integration of these approaches with observations of patterns of scale formation, production line, and formation damage yield a model capable of predicting the magnitude and direction of reactions that may produce negative impacts on reservoir production. Critical divides characterizing these processes in carbonate and sulfate mineral-bearing reservoirs include: (1) presence or absence of sulfate-bearing minerals within the production volume; (2) presence of iron within production line or formation; (3) ratio of concentration of bicarbonate to hydrogen sulfide; (4) capacity of aqueous and solid phases to buffer formation fluid pH; and (5) magnitude of pressure and temperature drops during production. The model qualitatively predicts: (1) likelihood of sulfide, sulfate, or carbonate mineral precipitation during production; (2) souring of the reservoir; and (3) corrosion of production tubing. The model has been developed from production histories for Weber Sandstone reservoirs, Colorado and Wyoming, and has been applied to examples of reservoir production from Tensleep and Minnelusa reservoirs in Wyoming.

  4. DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification occurs via excessive formation of centriolar satellites.

    PubMed

    Löffler, H; Fechter, A; Liu, F Y; Poppelreuther, S; Krämer, A

    2013-06-13

    Centrosome amplification is a frequent phenomenon in malignancies and may facilitate tumorigenesis by promoting chromosomal instability. On the other hand, a centrosome inactivation checkpoint comprising centrosome amplification leading to elimination of cells by mitotic catastrophe has been described in response to DNA damage by ionizing radiation or cytostatic drugs. So far, the exact nature of DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification, which might be overduplication or fragmentation of existing centrosomes, has been controversial. To solve this controversy, we have established a method to distinguish between these two possibilities using A549 cells expressing photoconvertible CETN2-Dendra2. In response to various DNA-damaging treatments, centrosome amplification but not fragmentation was observed. Moreover, centrosome amplification was preceded by excessive formation of centrin-containing centriolar satellites, which were identified as de novo-generated atypical centrin dots staining positive for centriolar satellite markers but negative or only weakly positive for other established centrosomal markers, and which could be verified as centriolar satellites using immunogold electron microscopy. In line with this notion, disruption of dynein-mediated recruitment of centrosomal proteins via centriolar satellites suppressed centrosome amplification after DNA damage, and excessive formation of centriolar satellites could be inhibited by interference with Chk1, a known mediator of centrosome amplification in response to DNA damage. In conclusion, we provide a model in which a Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint induces excessive formation of centriolar satellites constituting assembly platforms for centrosomal proteins, which subsequently leads to centrosome amplification.

  5. Evaluation of Surface Damage of Organic Films due to Irradiation with Energetic Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Masaki; Hontani, Yusaku; Ichiki, Kazuya; Seki, Toshio; Ibuki, Sachi; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Matsuo, Jiro; Aoki, Takaaki

    2011-01-07

    The surface of L-leucine films irradiated with an Ar{sub 5000} cluster ion beam (5 keV) was characterized by using the X-ray reflective (XRR) measurement method, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry. No significant damage was detected on the surface of the L-leucine films irradiated with the Ar cluster ion beam. Therefore, the large cluster-low-energy (about 1 eV/atom) beam would be suitable for low-damage etching of organic materials.

  6. Formation of plasma induced surface damage in silica glass etching for optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, D. S.; Jung, S. T.

    2004-06-01

    Ge, B, P-doped silica glass films are widely used as optical waveguides because of their low losses and inherent compatibility with silica optical fibers. These films were etched by ICP (inductively coupled plasma) with chrome etch masks, which were patterned by reactive ion etching (RIE) using chlorine-based gases. In some cases, the etched surfaces of silica glass were very rough (root-mean square roughness greater than 100 nm) and we call this phenomenon plasma induced surface damage (PISD). Rough surface cannot be used as a platform for hybrid integration because of difficulty in alignment and bonding of active devices. PISD reduces the etch rate of glass and it is very difficult to remove residues on a rough surface. The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of PISD formation. To achieve this goal, PISD formation during different etching conditions of chrome etch mask and silica glass was investigated. In most cases, PISD sources are formed on a glass surface after chrome etching, and metal compounds are identified in theses sources. Water rinse after chrome etching reduces the PISD, due to the water solubility of metal chlorides. PISD is decreased or even disappeared at high power and/or low pressure in glass etching, even if PISD sources were present on the glass surface before etching. In conclusion, PISD sources come from the chrome etching process, and polymer deposition on these sources during the silica etching cause the PISD sources to grow. In the area close to the PISD source there is a higher ion flux, which causes an increase in the etch rate, and results in the formation of a pit.

  7. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Ashley M; Herxheimer, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs) may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis. PMID:11914150

  8. Characterization of damage due to stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel using nonlinear surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitvogel, D. T.; Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Jacobs, L. J.; Singh, P. M.; Qu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Cold rolled carbon steel 1018C is widely used in pressurized fuel pipelines. In these structures, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can pose a significant problem because cracks initiate late in the lifetime and often unexpectedly, but grow fast once they get started. To ensure a safe operation it is crucial that any damage can be detected before the structural stability is reduced by large cracks. In the early stages of SCC, microstructural changes occur which in many cases increase the acoustic nonlinearity of the material. Therefore, an initially monochromatic Rayleigh wave is distorted and measurable higher harmonics are generated. Different levels of stress corrosion cracking is induced in five specimens. For each specimen, nonlinear ultrasonic measurements are performed before and after inducing the damage. For the measurements, oil coupled wedge transducers are used to generate and detect tone burst Rayleigh wave signals. The amplitudes of the received fundamental and second harmonic waves are measured at varying propagation distances to obtain a measure for the acoustic nonlinearity of the specimens. The results show a damage-dependent increase in nonlinearity for early stages of damage, indicating the feasibility of this nonlinear ultrasonic method to detect the initiation of stress corrosion cracking.

  9. Partial Interruption of Axonal Transport Due to Microtubule Breakage Accounts for the Formation of Periodic Varicosities after Traumatic Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Schomer, Min D.; Johnson, Victoria E.; Baas, Peter W.; Stewart, William; Smith, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    Due to their viscoelastic nature, white matter axons are susceptible to damage by high strain rates produced during traumatic brain injury (TBI). Indeed, diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is one of the most common features of TBI, characterized by the hallmark pathological profiles of axonal bulbs at disconnected terminal ends of axons and periodic swellings along axons, known as “varicosities.” Although transport interruption underlies axonal bulb formation, it is unclear how varicosities arise, with multiple sites accumulating transported materials along one axon. Recently, axonal microtubules have been found to physically break during dynamic stretch-injury of cortical axons in vitro. Here, the same in vitro model was used in parallel with histopathological analyses of human brains acquired acutely following TBI to examine the potential role of mechanical microtubule damage in varicosity formation post-trauma. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following in vitro stretch-injury revealed periodic breaks of individual microtubules along axons that regionally corresponded with undulations in axon morphology. However, typically less than a third of microtubules were broken in any region of an axon. Within hours, these sites of microtubule breaks evolved into periodic swellings. This suggests axonal transport may be halted along one broken microtubule, yet can proceed through the same region via other intact microtubules. Similar axonal undulations and varicosities were observed following TBI in humans, suggesting primary microtubule failure may also be a feature of DAI. These data indicate a novel mechanism of mechanical microtubule damage leading to partial transport interruption and varicosity formation in traumatic axonal injury. PMID:22079153

  10. Damages in American Samoa due to the 29 September 2009 Samoa Islands Region Earthquake Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Suzuki, S.

    2009-12-01

    A large earthquake of Mw 8.0 occurred in Samoa Islands Region in the early morning on 29 September 2009 (local time). A Large Tsunami generated by the earthquake hit Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga. Total 192 people were died or missing in these three countries (22 October 2009). The authors surveyed in Tutuila Island, American Samoa from 6 to 8 in October 2009 with the aim to find out damages in the disaster. In American Samoa, death and missing toll was 35. The main findings are as follows; first, human damages were little for tsunami run-up height of about 4 to 6 meters and tsunami arrival time of about 20 minutes. We can suppose that residents evacuated quickly after feeling shaking or something. Secondly, houses were severely damaged in some low elevation coastal villages such as Amanave, Leone, Pago Pago, Tula and so on. Third, a power plant and an airport, which are important infrastructures in relief and recovery phase, were also severely damaged. Inundation depth at the power plant was 2.31 meters. A blackout in the daytime lasted when we surveyed. On the other hand, the airport could use already at that time. But it was closed on the first day in the disaster because of a lot of disaster debris on the runway carried by tsunami. Inundation depth at the airport fence was measured in 0.7 to 0.8 meters. Other countries in the south-western Pacific region may have power plants or airports with similar risk, so it should be assessed against future tsunami disasters. Inundated thermal power plant in Pago Pago Debris on runway in Tafuna Airport (Provided by Mr. Chris Soti, DPA)

  11. Constitutive Modeling for Particle-Dispersed Composites with Degradation Due to Interfacial Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Huajian

    2002-07-01

    The composite materials are susceptible to interfacial delamination. The overall properties of composites will degrade dramatically if the interface between the particles and the matrix material undertakes interfacial damage. In present paper, the effects of interfacial delamination on the macro properties of composites are evaluated by the Equivalent Inclusion Method (EIM) with some modifications and supplementation on the conventional one, which was originally proposed by Eshelby. The meso-local behaviors of particle, matrix, as well as their interface are theoretically modeled, and the relationships between these behaviors and the macro stress/stress field are established. Upon modeling the damaged interface with spring layers and making equivalent of stress and strain inside a real particle to those inside the corresponding virtual inclusion, a modified Eshelby tensor and the damage-relevant tensor of the inclusions are derived explicitly. These tensors can be conveniently incorporated into the constitutive model, and make it available to assess the effects of delamination. Some numerical calculations are carried out to verify the performance of the present model. (author)

  12. Analysis of progressive damage in thin circular laminates due to static-equivalent impact loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Elber, W.; Illg, W.

    1983-01-01

    Clamped circular graphite/epoxy plates (25.4, 38.1, and 50.8 mm radii) with an 8-ply quasi-isotropic layup were analyzed for static-equivalent impact loads using the minimum-total-potential-energy method and the von Karman strain-displacement equations. A step-by-step incremental transverse displacement procedure was used to calculate plate load and ply stresses. The ply failure region was calculated using the Tsai-Wu criterion. The corresponding failure modes (splitting and fiber failure) were determined using the maximum stress criteria. The first-failure mode was splitting and initiated first in the bottom ply. The splitting-failure thresholds were relatively low and tended to be lower for larger plates than for small plates. The splitting-damage region in each ply was elongated in its fiber direction; the bottom ply had the largest damage region. The calculated damage region for the 25.4-mm-radius plate agreed with limited static test results from the literature.

  13. Computational Hydrocode Study of Target Damage due to Fragment-Blast Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch-Aguilar, T; Najjar, F; Szymanski, E

    2011-03-24

    A target's terminal ballistic effects involving explosively generated fragments, along with the original blast, are of critical importance for many different security and safety related applications. Personnel safety and protective building design are but a few of the practical disciplines that can gain from improved understanding combined loading effects. Traditionally, any engineering level analysis or design effort involving explosions would divide the target damage analysis into two correspondingly critical areas: blast wave and fragment related impact effects. The hypothesis of this paper lies in the supposition that a linear combination of a blast-fragment loading, coupled with an accurate target response description, can lead to a non-linear target damage effect. This non-linear target response could then stand as the basis of defining what a synergistic or combined frag-blast loading might actually look like. The table below, taken from Walters, et. al. categorizes some of the critical parameters driving any combined target damage effect and drives the evaluation of results. Based on table 1 it becomes clear that any combined frag-blast analysis would need to account for the target response matching similar ranges for the mechanics described above. Of interest are the critical times upon which a blast event or fragment impact loading occurs relative to the target's modal response. A blast, for the purposes of this paper is defined as the sudden release of chemical energy from a given material (henceforth referred to as an energetic material) onto its surrounding medium. During the coupling mechanism a discrete or discontinuous shockwave is generated. This shockwave travels outward from the source transferring energy and momentum to any surrounding objects including personnel and engineering structures. From an engineering perspective blast effects are typically characterized by way of physical characteristics such as Peak Pressure (PP), Time of Arrival (TOA

  14. A damage mechanics approach for quantifying stress changes due to brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Natural fault zones or man-made injection or production of fluid impact the regional stress distribution in Earth's crust and can be responsible for localized stress discontinuities. Understanding the processes controlling fracturing of the porous rocks and mechanical behaviour of fault zones is therefore of interest for several applications including geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes controlling the deformation of porous rocks during and after brittle failure. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To illustrate the model, simulation of a compaction experiment of a sandstone leading to shear failure will be presented which allows to quantify the stress drop accompanying the failure. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field scale to simulate hydraulic fracturing and assess the resulting changes in the stress field.

  15. Damage initiation, progression and failure of polymer matrix composites due to manufacturing induced defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Khairul Alam

    In polymer matrix composites (PMCs) manufacturing processes can induce defects, e.g., voids, fiber misalignment, irregular fiber distribution in the cross-section and broken fibers. The effects of such defects can be beneficial or deleterious depending on whether they cause failure suppression or enhancement by localized deformation processes e.g., crazing, shear yielding and fiber-matrix debonding. In this study, a computational approach is formulated and implemented to develop solutions for general boundary-value problems for PMC microstructures that accounts for micromechanics-based constitutive relations including fine scale mechanisms of material failure. The defects considered are voids, and the microstructure is explicitly represented by a distribution of fibers and voids embedded in a polymer matrix. Fiber is modeled as a linearly elastic material while the polymer matrix is modeled as an elastic-viscoplastic material. Two distinct models for the matrix behavior are implemented: (i) Drucker-Prager type Bodner model that accounts for rate and pressure-sensitivity, and (ii) improved macromolecular constitutive model that also accounts for temperature dependence, small-strain softening and large-strain hardening. Damage is simulated by the Gearing-Anand craze model as a reference model and by a new micromechanical craze model, developed to account for craze initiation, growth and breakdown. Critical dilatational energy density criterion is utilized to predict fiber-matrix debonding through cavitation induced matrix cracking. An extensive parametric study is conducted in which the roles of void shape, size and distribution relative to fiber in determining damage initiation and evolution are investigated under imposed temperature and strain rate conditions. Results show there are significant effects of voids on microstructural damage as well as on the overall deformational and failure response of composites.

  16. Gonadal damage due to radioactive iodine (I131) treatment for thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S. R.; Shalet, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid is the most common type of thyroid cancer and is associated with a good prognosis. Complications of treatment with surgery and radioiodine are uncommon. We report the case of a 13 year old boy who developed testicular damage following treatment with radioactive iodine 350 mCi for a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. Four years after radioiodine treatment there has been no suggestion of recovery of spermatogenesis. Detailed follow-up studies of similarly treated young patients are required to define the incidence of this complication and to determine its reversibility. PMID:4022871

  17. Skeletal muscle damage and impaired regeneration due to LPL-mediated lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tamilarasan, K P; Temmel, H; Das, S K; Al Zoughbi, W; Schauer, S; Vesely, P W; Hoefler, G

    2012-01-01

    According to the concept of lipotoxicity, ectopic accumulation of lipids in non-adipose tissue induces pathological changes. The most prominent effects are seen in fatty liver disease, lipid cardiomyopathy, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and skeletal muscle myopathy. We used the MCK(m)-hLPL mouse distinguished by skeletal and cardiac muscle-specific human lipoprotein lipase (hLPL) overexpression to investigate effects of lipid overload in skeletal muscle. We were intrigued to find that ectopic lipid accumulation induced proteasomal activity, apoptosis and skeletal muscle damage. In line with these findings we observed reduced Musculus gastrocnemius and Musculus quadriceps mass in transgenic animals, accompanied by severely impaired physical endurance. We suggest that muscle loss was aggravated by impaired muscle regeneration as evidenced by reduced cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers after cardiotoxin-induced injury in MCK(m)-hLPL mice. Similarly, an almost complete loss of myogenic potential was observed in C2C12 murine myoblasts upon overexpression of LPL. Our findings directly link lipid overload to muscle damage, impaired regeneration and loss of performance. These findings support the concept of lipotoxicity and are a further step to explain pathological effects seen in muscle of obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and patients with cancer-associated cachexia. PMID:22825472

  18. Variation of the enhanced biologically damaging solar UV due to clouds.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Alfio V; Downs, Nathan

    2004-07-01

    The variation of the biologically damaging solar UV (UVBE) enhanced by clouds above that of clear sky UVBE has been investigated. This was undertaken for summer through to winter for SZA of 5 to 60 degrees employing an integrated automatic cloud and spectral UV measurement system that recorded the solar UV spectra and the sky images at five minute intervals. The UVBE calculated with action spectra with higher relative effectiveness in the UVA produced the lower percentage of cloud enhanced cases. The DNA UVBE provided the highest percentage of cloud enhanced cases compared to the total number of UV scans with 2.2% cloud enhanced cases. As a comparison, the plant and fish melanoma UVBE provided the lowest percentage of cloud enhanced cases with 0.6 to 0.8% cloud enhanced cases. For the cases of cloud enhanced UVBE, the average ratio of the measured UVBE to calculated cloud free UVBE for the photokeratitis, cataracts, plant, generalized plant damage and fish melanoma action spectra was 1.21 to 1.25. In comparison, the highest value of 1.4 was for the DNA action spectrum.

  19. Patterns of venous reflux and obstruction in patients with skin damage due to chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Patel, Parag J; Tiongson, Jay E; Pryor, Landon; Leon, Luis R; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos K

    2007-01-01

    Identified were characteristics of individuals with skin damage related to chronic venous disease. Patients with chronic venous disease (n = 164) were evaluated with duplex ultrasound imaging and were placed in classes 4, 5, and 6 according to the CEAP classification. Their findings were compared with 100 class 2 controls. The prevalence of deep venous thrombosis was higher in the study group (23.7%) versus controls (5.1%; P < .0001), as was the prevalence of deep, perforator, and combined patterns of disease (P < .0001, P < .0007, and P < .0001). The mean duration of disease in controls 2 was shorter compared with the study group (P = .0019). The prevalence of reflux and obstruction within the study group was higher than in controls (P = .0021). Skin changes accurately reflect severity of chronic venous disease. Superficial and perforator vein reflux is the major cause of disease.

  20. Stress and Damage in Polymer Matrix Composite Materials Due to Material Degradation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, Hugh L.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods for calculating stresses and damage caused by degradation of the matrix constituent in polymer matrix composite materials. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. The model is incorporated into an existing composite mechanics computer code. Stresses, strains, and deformations at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are calculated, and from these calculations it is determined if there is failure of any kind. The rationale for the model (based on published experimental work) is presented, its integration into the laminate analysis code is outlined, and example results are given, with comparisons to existing material and structural data. The mechanisms behind the changes in properties and in surface cracking during long-term aging of polyimide matrix composites are clarified. High-temperature-material test methods are also evaluated.

  1. Inflammatory damage on respiratory and nervous systems due to hRSV infection.

    PubMed

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; Becerra, Daniela; Rivera, Katherine; Lay, Margarita K; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-10-01

    The exacerbated inflammatory response elicited by human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV) in the lungs of infected patients causes a major health burden in the pediatric and elderly population. Since the discovery of hRSV, the exacerbated host immune-inflammatory response triggered by this virus has been extensively studied. In this article, we review the effects on the airways caused by immune cells and cytokines/chemokines secreted during hRSV infection. While molecules such as interferons contribute at controlling viral infection, IL-17 and others produce damage to the hRSV-infected lung. In addition to affecting the airways, hRSV infection can cause significant neurologic abnormalities in the host, such as seizures and encephalopathy. Although the origin of these symptoms remains unclear, studies from patients suffering neurological alteration suggest an involvement of the inflammatory response against hRSV.

  2. A systematic approach for the prevention and treatment of formation damage caused by asphaltene deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Leontaritis, K.J.; Amaefule, J.O.; Charles, R.E. )

    1994-08-01

    Asphaltene plugging is a known cause of near-wellbore formation damage. Deposited asphaltenes can reduce effective hydrocarbon mobility by (1) blocking the pore throats; (2) adsorbing onto the rock, thereby altering the formation wettability from water-wet to oil-wet; and (3) increasing hydrocarbon viscosity by nucleating water-in-oil emulsions. Asphaltene flocculation and deposition can be avoided in some, but not all, cases. Some formation damage resulting from asphaltene plugging is permanent and hence must be prevented rather than treated. Prevention of asphaltene-induced formation damage should be started in the early stages of drilling and well completion, once the oil is known to be asphaltenic. This paper presents a systematic approach to successful diagnosis, prevention, and mitigation of asphaltene problems during recovery of asphaltenic oils. A mechanism of asphaltene flocculation and deposition is proposed and analyzed, and the previously defined concept of asphaltene deposition envelope is further refined. Diagnostic technology is presented that can test the compatibility of drilling and completion fluids with any asphaltenic oil. Important issues that need to be considered in the design of treatments for asphaltene removal are discussed. Finally, the paper presents a methodology for restoring unfavorable wettability changes caused by asphaltene deposition.

  3. Signaling molecules regulating phenotypic conversions of astrocytes and glial scar formation in damaged nerve tissues.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    Phenotypic conversion of astrocytes from resting to reactive (i.e., astrocytic activation) occurs in numerous brain disorders. Astrocytic activation in severely damaged brain regions often leads to glial scar formation. Because astrocytic activation and glial scar largely affect the vulnerability and tissue repair of damaged brain, numerous studies have been made to clarify mechanisms regulating the astrocytic phenotype. The phenotypic conversion is accompanied by the increased expression of intermediate filament proteins and the induction of hypertrophy in reactive astrocytes. Severe brain damage results in proliferation and migration of reactive astrocytes, which lead to glial scar formations at the injured areas. Gliogenesis from neural progenitors in the adult brain is also involved in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. Recent studies have shown that increased expression of connexin 43, aquaporin 4, matrix metalloproteinase 9, and integrins alter the function of astrocytes. The transcription factors: STAT3, OLIG2, SMAD, NF-κB, and Sp1 have been suggested to play regulatory roles in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. In this review, I discuss the roles of these key molecules regulating the pathophysiological functions of reactive astrocytes.

  4. Modeling dose deposition and DNA damage due to low-energy β(-) emitters.

    PubMed

    Alloni, D; Cutaia, C; Mariotti, L; Friedland, W; Ottolenghi, A

    2014-09-01

    One of the main issues of low-energy internal emitters concerns the very short ranges of the beta particles, versus the dimensions of the biological targets. Depending on the chemical form, the radionuclide may be more concentrated either in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus of the target cell. Consequently, since in most cases conventional dosimetry neglects this issue it may overestimate or underestimate the dose to the nucleus and hence the biological effects. To assess the magnitude of these deviations and to provide a realistic evaluation of the localized energy deposition by low-energy internal emitters, the biophysical track-structure code PARTRAC was used to calculate nuclear doses, DNA damage yields and fragmentation patterns for different localizations of radionuclides in human interphase fibroblasts. The nuclides considered in the simulations were tritium and nickel-63, which emit electrons with average energies of 5.7 (range in water of 0.42 μm) and 17 keV (range of 5 μm), respectively, covering both very short and medium ranges of beta-decay products. The simulation results showed that the largest deviations from the conventional dosimetry occur for inhomogeneously distributed short-range emitters. For uniformly distributed radionuclides selectively in the cytoplasm but excluded from the cell nucleus, the dose in the nucleus is 15% of the average dose in the cell in the case of tritium but 64% for nickel-63. Also, the numbers of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and the distributions of DNA fragments depend on subcellular localization of the radionuclides. In the low- and medium-dose regions investigated here, DSB numbers are proportional to the nuclear dose, with about 50 DSB/Gy for both studied nuclides. In addition, DSB numbers on specific chromosomes depend on the radionuclide localization in the cell as well, with chromosomes located more peripherally in the cell nucleus being more damaged by short-ranged emitters in cytoplasm compared with chromosomes

  5. Electrothermic damage to the nail due to arcing in high-voltage discharge.

    PubMed

    Bielefeld, Lena; Mierdel, Katrin; Pollak, Stefan; Perdekamp, Markus Große

    2013-12-10

    The burn effects in high-voltage electrocutions are manifold ranging from inconspicuous marks to deep charring. Apart from lesions caused by direct contact with a live conductor, the victim's body may suffer flash burns from arcing resulting in extensive scattered or confluent heat damage of the skin. In such cases, the nail plates of fingers and toes may undergo thermal changes which up to now have not been mentioned in the pertinent literature. Macroscopically, the nail shows a yellowish discoloration with tiny and closely arranged verruciform elevations. Histologically, the uppermost layer of the nail plate is interspersed with small vacuoles resembling micro-blisters as seen in the corneal layer of common electric marks. The surface of the nail is coated with a thin film of carbonaceous material. Based on an accidental high-voltage electrocution recently observed by the authors, attention is also drawn to the possible occurrence of contact burns from metal objects heated by the current as this finding is usually described only in victims of lightning strikes and not in the context of high-voltage discharges of technical electricity.

  6. Recent Advances in Targeted, Self-Assembling Nanoparticles to Address Vascular Damage Due to Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Ji; Tirrell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling nanoparticles functionalized with targeting moieties have significant potential for atherosclerosis nanomedicine. While self-assembly allows for easy construction (and degradation) of nanoparticles with therapeutic or diagnostic functionality, or both, the targeting agent can direct them to a specific molecular marker within a given stage of the disease. Therefore, supramolecular nanoparticles have been investigated in the last decade as molecular imaging agents or explored as nanocarriers that can decrease the systemic toxicity of drugs by producing accumulation predominantly in specific tissues of interest. In this review, we first describe the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and the damage caused to vascular tissue, as well as the current diagnostic and treatment options. Then we provide an overview of targeted strategies using self-assembling nanoparticles and include liposomes, high density lipoproteins, protein cages, micelles, proticles, and perfluorocarbon nanoparticles. Finally, we elaborate on and provide an overview of current challenges, limitations, and future applications for personalized medicine in the context of atherosclerosis of self-assembling nanoparticles. PMID:26085109

  7. [Interferon-alpha and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic damage due to hepatitis C virus].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Huezo, María Sarai; Gallegos-Orozco, Juan Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the published information published regarding the effects of interferon alpha therapy on liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver damage secondary to hepatitis C infection. Data reviewed included results of the in vitro effects of interferon on hepatic cell line cultures with regards to indirect markers of fibrosis, activation of hepatic stellate cells and oxidative stress response. In the clinical arena, there is current clear evidence of a favorable histological outcome in patients with sustained viral response to interferon therapy. For this reason, the current review focuses more on the histological outcomes regarding liver fibrosis in patients who have not attained viral response to therapy (non-responders) or who already have biopsy defined cirrhosis. Data in these patients were analyzed according to the results of objective testing of fibrosis through the assessment of liver biopsy and its change during time, specially because the morbidity and mortality of this disease is directly related to the complications of liver cirrhosis and not necessarily to the persistence of the hepatitis C virus. Lastly, it is concluded that the process of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis is a dynamic one and that there is some evidence to support the usefulness of interferon alpha therapy as a means to halt or retard the progression of hepatic fibrosis. The result of current clinical trials in which interferon therapy is being used to modify the progression of fibrosis in non-responders or cirrhotic patients is eagerly awaited.

  8. Damage in graphene due to electronic excitation induced by highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopster, J.; Kozubek, R.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Guillous, S.; Lebius, H.; Schleberger, M.

    2014-06-01

    Graphene is expected to be rather insensitive to ion irradiation. We demonstrate that single layers of exfoliated graphene sustain significant damage from irradiation with slow highly charged ions. We have investigated the ion induced changes of graphene after irradiation with highly charged ions of different charge states (q = 28-42) and kinetic energies ({{E}_{\\text{kin}}} = 150-450 keV). Atomic force microscopy images reveal that the ion induced defects are not topographic in nature but are related to a significant change in friction. To create these defects, a minimum charge state is needed. In addition to this threshold behaviour, the required minimum charge state as well as the defect diameter show a strong dependency on the kinetic energy of the projectiles. From the linear dependency of the defect diameter on the projectile velocity we infer that electronic excitations triggered by the incoming ion in the above-surface phase play a dominant role for this unexpected defect creation in graphene.

  9. Cardiotoxic (Arrhythmogenic) Effects of 1,1-Difluoroethane Due to Electrolyte Imbalance and Cardiomyocyte Damage.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kaushal; Barletta, Michael; Wurpel, John

    2017-03-03

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of chemical vapors to attain euphoric effects. Many common household products are abused by inhalation and one is 1,1-difluoroethane (DFE), which is a halogenated hydrocarbon used in refrigeration, dust-off spray, and airbrush painting. Although many human DFE abuse cases have been studied, the etiology and mechanism of sudden death is still unknown. In this study, an animal model was used to simulate the human conditions of DFE inhalation abuse that results in sudden death.Current research targets mechanistic studies involving electrolyte changes and cardiomyocyte damage after DFE administration in vivo. To investigate these changes, Sprague Dawley rats (N = 6) were exposed to 30 seconds of 20 L/min of DFE in multiple doses. Isoflurane acted as a control. Two additional groups, epinephrine and epinephrine + DFE, were included to simulate the clinical condition of DFE abuse. Plasma sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium levels were measured, followed by lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and cardiac troponin I levels. In addition, oxidative stress markers were also evaluated in all animal groups. Electrolyte levels showed a significant rise in plasma potassium and magnesium levels for the treated groups. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and cardiac troponin I levels in DFE and epinephrine + DFE administered rats were significantly elevated as compared with control. Some oxidative stress makers were also elevated significantly in treatment groups. Furthermore, histopathological analysis showed hyperemia/congestion in treated rats.These results support cardiotoxic effects indicating that DFE results in fatal arrhythmias, and the study can be important during clinical cases involving inhalant abuse.

  10. Estimation of the Past and Future Infrastructure Damage Due the Permafrost Evolution Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, D. O.; Chesnokova, I. V.; Morozova, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The geocryological processes such as thermokarst, frost heaving and fracturing, icing, thermal erosion are the source of immediate danger for the structures. The economic losses during the construction procedures in the permafrost area are linked also with the other geological processes that have the specific character in cold regions. These processes are swamping, desertification, deflation, flooding, mudflows and landslides. Linear transport structures are most vulnerable component of regional and national economy. Because the high length the transport structures have to cross the landscapes with different permafrost conditions that have the different reaction to climate change. The climate warming is favorable for thermokarst and the frost heaving is linked with climate cooling. In result the structure falls in the circumstances that are not predicted in the construction project. Local engineering problems of structure exploitation lead to global risks of sustainable development of regions. Authors developed the database of geocryological damage cases for the last twelve years at the Russian territory. Spatial data have the attributive table that was filled by the published information from various permafrost conference proceedings. The preliminary GIS-analysis of gathered data showed the widespread territorial distribution of the cases of negative consequences of geocryological processes activity. The information about maximum effect from geocryological processes was validated by detailed field investigation along the railways in Yamal and Transbaicalia Regions. Authors expect the expanding of database by similar data from other sectors of Arctic. It is important for analyzing the regional, time and industrial tendencies of geocryological risk evolution. Obtained information could be used in insurance procedures and in information systems of decisions support in different management levels. The investigation was completed with financial support by Russian

  11. Valuation of damages to recreational trout fishing in the Upper Northeast due to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; Cameron, T.A.; Mendelsohn, R.E.; Parsons, G.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1991-04-01

    This report documents methods used to estimate economic models of changes in recreational fishing due to the acidic deposition. The analysis was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and its subcontractors for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) in support of the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The primary data needed to estimate these models were collected in the 1989 Aquatic Based Recreation Survey (ABRS), which was jointly funded by the DOE and the EPA's Office of Policy Planning and Evaluation. 11 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. NEK8 regulates DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation and replication fork protection

    PubMed Central

    Abeyta, Antonio; Castella, Maria; Jacquemont, Celine; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteins essential for homologous recombination play a pivotal role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks, DNA inter-strand crosslinks and replication fork stability. Defects in homologous recombination also play a critical role in the development of cancer and the sensitivity of these cancers to chemotherapy. RAD51, an essential factor for homologous recombination and replication fork protection, accumulates and forms immunocytochemically detectable nuclear foci at sites of DNA damage. To identify kinases that may regulate RAD51 localization to sites of DNA damage, we performed a human kinome siRNA library screen, using DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation as readout. We found that NEK8, a NIMA family kinase member, is required for efficient DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation. Interestingly, knockout of Nek8 in murine embryonic fibroblasts led to cellular sensitivity to the replication inhibitor, hydroxyurea, and inhibition of the ATR kinase. Furthermore, NEK8 was required for proper replication fork protection following replication stall with hydroxyurea. Loading of RAD51 to chromatin was decreased in NEK8-depleted cells and Nek8-knockout cells. Single-molecule DNA fiber analyses revealed that nascent DNA tracts were degraded in the absence of NEK8 following treatment with hydroxyurea. Consistent with this, Nek8-knockout cells showed increased chromosome breaks following treatment with hydroxyurea. Thus, NEK8 plays a critical role in replication fork stability through its regulation of the DNA repair and replication fork protection protein RAD51. PMID:27892797

  13. Bulk damage and absorption in fused silica due to high-power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberg, F.; Kühn, B.; Langner, A.; Altwein, M.; Schötz, G.; Takke, R.; Thomas, S.; Vydra, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion projects are heading for IR optics with high broadband transmission, high shock and temperature resistance, long laser durability, and best purity. For this application, fused silica is an excellent choice. The energy density threshold on IR laser optics is mainly influenced by the purity and homogeneity of the fused silica. The absorption behavior regarding the hydroxyl content was studied for various synthetic fused silica grades. The main absorption influenced by OH vibrational excitation leads to different IR attenuations for OH-rich and low-OH fused silica. Industrial laser systems aim for the maximum energy extraction possible. Heraeus Quarzglas developed an Yb-doped fused silica fiber to support this growing market. But the performance of laser welding and cutting systems is fundamentally limited by beam quality and stability of focus. Since absorption in the optical components of optical systems has a detrimental effect on the laser focus shift, the beam energy loss and the resulting heating has to be minimized both in the bulk materials and at the coated surfaces. In collaboration with a laser research institute, an optical finisher and end users, photo thermal absorption measurements on coated samples of different fused silica grades were performed to investigate the influence of basic material properties on the absorption level. High purity, synthetic fused silica is as well the material of choice for optical components designed for DUV applications (wavelength range 160 nm - 260 nm). For higher light intensities, e.g. provided by Excimer lasers, UV photons may generate defect centers that effect the optical properties during usage, resulting in an aging of the optical components (UV radiation damage). Powerful Excimer lasers require optical materials that can withstand photon energy close to the band gap and the high intensity of the short pulse length. The UV transmission loss is restricted to the DUV wavelength range below 300 nm and

  14. Formation of clustered DNA damage after high-LET irradiation: a review.

    PubMed

    Hada, Megumi; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2008-05-01

    Radiation can cause as well as cure cancer. The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.(1)) These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose range for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as X- or gamma-rays. The situation of estimating the real biological effects becomes even more difficult in the case of high LET particles encountered in space or as the result of domestic exposure to alpha-particles from radon gas emitters or other radioactive emitters like uranium-238. Complex DNA damage, i.e., the signature of high-LET radiations comprises of closely spaced DNA lesions forming a cluster of DNA damage. The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDL). Theoretical analysis and experimental evidence suggest an increased complexity and severity of complex DNA damage with increasing LET (linear energy transfer) and a high mutagenic or carcinogenic potential. Data available on the formation of clustered DNA damage (DSBs and OCDL) by high-LET radiations are often controversial suggesting a variable response to dose and type of radiation. The chemical nature and cellular repair mechanisms of complex DNA damage have been much less characterized than those of isolated DNA lesions like an oxidized base or a single strand break especially in the case of high-LET radiation. This review will focus on the induction of clustered DNA damage by high-LET radiations presenting the earlier and recent relative data.

  15. Formation of Clustered DNA Damage after High-LET Irradiation: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation can cause as well as cure cancer. The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose range for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as X- or gamma-rays. The situation of estimating the real biological effects becomes even more difficult in the case of high LET particles encountered in space or as the result of domestic exposure to particles from radon gas emitters or other radioactive emitters like uranium-238. Complex DNA damage, i.e., the signature of high-LET radiations comprises by closely spaced DNA lesions forming a cluster of DNA damage. The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDL). Theoretical analysis and experimental evidence suggest there is increased complexity and severity of complex DNA damage with increasing LET (linear energy transfer) and a high mutagenic or carcinogenic potential. Data available on the formation of clustered DNA damage (DSBs and OCDL) by high-LET radiations are often controversial suggesting a variable response to dose and type of radiation. The chemical nature and cellular repair mechanisms of complex DNA damage have been much less characterized than those of isolated DNA lesions like an oxidized base or a single strand break especially in the case of high-LET radiation. This review will focus on the induction of clustered DNA damage by high-LET radiations presenting the earlier and recent relative data.

  16. Geodynamically unusual settings of sedimentary rock and ore formation due to tectonic-decompression effects

    SciTech Connect

    Goryainov, P.M.

    1984-05-01

    The traditional views of terrigenous rocks as products of classical sedimentary cycle, ''mobilization-transport-deposition,'' are not universal. Detrital rocks are sometimes formed due to flaking and fracturation of rocks of rising blocks. The process is produced by tectonic-decompression mechanisms - the origination of a gradient of excessive stress and its discharge. It is incorrect to classify rocks created by this phenomenon with weathering crusts. The origins of certain terrigenous rocks, as well as products of low-temperature chemical processing, are connected with deep-volume decompression (brecciation, stockwork formation, formation of pipes and columns of igneous rocks, and chamber pegmatite and karst formation). The ore concentrations associated with such entities and appearing as stratiform deposits are most likely not exogenous, but they complete the endogenous history of the block concerned. The means and methods tested on typical endogenous deposits may therefore prove valuable in predicting certain varieties of stratiform deposits.

  17. Cellular responses and gene expression profile changes due to bleomycin-induced DNA damage in human fibroblasts in space

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Living organisms in space are constantly exposed to radiation, toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage is essential for assessing the radiation risk for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. In a study conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblasts in culture were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment. The degree of DNA damage was quantified by immunofluorescence staining for γ-H2AX, which is manifested in three types of staining patterns. Although similar percentages of these types of patterns were found between flight and ground cells, there was a slight shift in the distribution of foci counts in the flown cells with countable numbers of γ-H2AX foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. We also performed a microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment. A qualitative comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. The microarray data was confirmed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly upregulated in both flight and ground cells after bleomycin treatment. Our results suggest that whether microgravity affects DNA damage response in space can be dependent on the cell type and cell growth condition. PMID:28248986

  18. Hypochlorite-induced damage to nucleosides: formation of chloramines and nitrogen-centered radicals.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, M J

    2001-08-01

    Stimulated monocytes and neutrophils generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is a key bactericidal agent, but can also damage host tissue. As there is a strong link between chronic inflammation and some cancers, we have investigated HOCl damage to DNA bases. We show that reaction of HOCl with the exocyclic -NH(2) groups of cytidine, adenosine, and guanosine, and the ring NH groups of all bases, yields chloramines (RNHCl/RR'NCl). These are the major initial products. Chloramine decay can be accelerated by UV light and metal ions, and these reactions, together with thermal decomposition, give rise to nucleoside-derived nitrogen-centered radicals. Evidence is presented for the rapid addition of pyrimidine-derived nitrogen-centered radicals to another parent molecule to give dimers. Experiments with nucleoside mixtures show that the propensity for radical formation is cytidine > adenosine = guanosine > uridine = thymidine. These data are inconsistent with the selectivity of HOCl attack and the stability of the resulting chloramines, but can be rationalized if chlorine transfer between bases is rapid and yields the most stable chloramine, with such transfer preceding radical formation. Thus, though thymidine is the major initial site of chloramine formation, rapid chlorine atom transfer generates cytidine and adenosine chloramines. These reactions rationalize the preferential formation of chlorinated cytidine and adenosine in DNA.

  19. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-03

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly with eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.

  20. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-03

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly withmore » eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.« less

  1. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly with eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state. PMID:26529259

  2. Telomeres in ICF syndrome cells are vulnerable to DNA damage due to elevated DNA:RNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Sagie, Shira; Toubiana, Shir; Hartono, Stella R.; Katzir, Hagar; Tzur-Gilat, Aya; Havazelet, Shany; Francastel, Claire; Velasco, Guillaume; Chédin, Frédéric; Selig, Sara

    2017-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrids, nucleic acid structures with diverse physiological functions, can disrupt genome integrity when dysregulated. Human telomeres were shown to form hybrids with the lncRNA TERRA, yet the formation and distribution of these hybrids among telomeres, their regulation and their cellular effects remain elusive. Here we predict and confirm in several human cell types that DNA:RNA hybrids form at many subtelomeric and telomeric regions. We demonstrate that ICF syndrome cells, which exhibit short telomeres and elevated TERRA levels, are enriched for hybrids at telomeric regions throughout the cell cycle. Telomeric hybrids are associated with high levels of DNA damage at chromosome ends in ICF cells, which are significantly reduced with overexpression of RNase H1. Our findings suggest that abnormally high TERRA levels in ICF syndrome lead to accumulation of telomeric hybrids that, in turn, can result in telomeric dysfunction. PMID:28117327

  3. Analysis of linear elasticity and non-linearity due to plasticity and material damage in woven and biaxial braided composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Deepak

    Textile composites have a wide variety of applications in the aerospace, sports, automobile, marine and medical industries. Due to the availability of a variety of textile architectures and numerous parameters associated with each, optimal design through extensive experimental testing is not practical. Predictive tools are needed to perform virtual experiments of various options. The focus of this research is to develop a better understanding of linear elastic response, plasticity and material damage induced nonlinear behavior and mechanics of load flow in textile composites. Textile composites exhibit multiple scales of complexity. The various textile behaviors are analyzed using a two-scale finite element modeling. A framework to allow use of a wide variety of damage initiation and growth models is proposed. Plasticity induced non-linear behavior of 2x2 braided composites is investigated using a modeling approach based on Hill's yield function for orthotropic materials. The mechanics of load flow in textile composites is demonstrated using special non-standard postprocessing techniques that not only highlight the important details, but also transform the extensive amount of output data into comprehensible modes of behavior. The investigations show that the damage models differ from each other in terms of amount of degradation as well as the properties to be degraded under a particular failure mode. When compared with experimental data, predictions of some models match well for glass/epoxy composite whereas other's match well for carbon/epoxy composites. However, all the models predicted very similar response when damage factors were made similar, which shows that the magnitude of damage factors are very important. Full 3D as well as equivalent tape laminate predictions lie within the range of the experimental data for a wide variety of braided composites with different material systems, which validated the plasticity analysis. Conclusions about the effect of

  4. Semiconductor structural damage attendant to contact formation in III-V solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1991-01-01

    In order to keep the resistive losses in solar cells to a minimum, it is often necessary for the ohmic contacts to be heat treated to lower the metal-semiconductor contact resistivity to acceptable values. Sintering of the contacts, however can result in extensive mechanical damage of the semiconductor surface under the metallization. An investigation of the detailed mechanisms involved in the process of contact formation during heat treatment may control the structural damage incurred by the semiconductor surface to acceptable levels, while achieving the desired values of contact resistivity for the ohmic contacts. The reaction kinetics of sintered gold contacts to InP were determined. It was found that the Au-InP interaction involves three consecutive stages marked by distinct color changes observed on the surface of the Au, and that each stage is governed by a different mechanism. A detailed description of these mechanisms and options to control them are presented.

  5. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt blockage due to spontaneous knot formation in the peritoneal catheter. Case report.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Hunn, Andrew

    2008-02-01

    The authors report the third case of ventriculoperitoneal shunt blockage due to spontaneous knot formation in the peritoneal catheter that had been placed in a 3.5-year-old boy 8 months earlier. On surgical exploration a double knot was found 10 cm from the distal end of the peritoneal catheter. Although the underlying mechanism remains unknown, the authors used the analogy of related physical studies and true knot formation in the umbilical cord and determined the possible causes as related to the catheter, volume and configuration of the abdomen, and kinetics of the catheter movements. If further study should reveal a significantly higher incidence of this complication, the authors suggest further in vitro studies, designed to investigate the optimal characteristics and safe range of length of peritoneal catheters in different situations.

  6. Prediction of subsidence: Relationship between lowering of formation pressure and subsidence due to fluid withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Serebryakov, V.A.; Chilingar, G.V.

    2000-06-01

    Abnormally low formation pressures develop in petroleum reservoirs during intensive oil and gas production or in aquifers as a result of water extraction. A simple method is presented for calculating (predicting) the amount of compaction (and resulting subsidence) from the pressure drop in formation due to production, i.e., the increase in the effective pressure p{sub e} (p{sub e} = p{sub t} {minus} p{sub p}, where p{sub t} is the total overburden pressure and p{sub p} is the fluid or pore pressure). This work is based on extensive data collected in Russia. For example, large petroliferous areas in Western Siberia became marshlands as a result of fluid withdrawal. One should remember that sophisticated methods, such as FSMT (direct measurement of rock compaction by wireline tools in situ) and GPS (measurement of surface subsidence by satellite microwave Doppler techniques), are not yet available in many areas of the world.

  7. ASCIZ regulates lesion-specific Rad51 focus formation and apoptosis after methylating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Rad51 focus formation is required for homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but its regulation in response to non-DSB lesions is poorly understood. Here we report a novel human SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein termed ASCIZ that forms Rad51-containing foci in response to base-modifying DNA methylating agents but not in response to DSB-inducing agents. ASCIZ foci seem to form prior to Rad51 recruitment, and an ASCIZ core domain can concentrate Rad51 in focus-like structures independently of DNA damage. ASCIZ depletion dramatically increases apoptosis after methylating DNA damage and impairs Rad51 focus formation in response to methylating agents but not after ionizing radiation. ASCIZ focus formation and increased apoptosis in ASCIZ-depleted cells depend on the mismatch repair protein MLH1. Interestingly, ASCIZ foci form efficiently during G1 phase, when sister chromatids are unavailable as recombination templates. We propose that ASCIZ acts as a lesion-specific focus scaffold in a Rad51-dependent pathway that resolves cytotoxic repair intermediates, most likely single-stranded DNA gaps, resulting from MLH1-dependent processing of base lesions. PMID:15933716

  8. The effect of green tea on oxidative damage and tumour formation in Lobund-Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Sheridan, Juliette; Mulcahy, Hugh; Tenniswood, Martin; Morrissey, Colm

    2008-11-01

    A number of epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of green tea reduces the incidence of prostate cancer. As the major catechins present in green tea are potent antioxidants, we hypothesized that genetic and cellular damage induced by oxygen free radicals could be significantly reduced by potent antioxidants in green tea, thus reducing the cumulative genetic and cellular damage with age, and slowing or preventing tumour formation. Long-term administration of a decaffeinated green tea extract to Lobund-Wistar rats for periods up to 26 months almost halved the incidence of primary tumours in the genitourinary tract when compared with an age-matched cohort receiving just water. We observed no inhibition of DNA adduct formation or lipid peroxidation in animals consuming green tea compared with animals consuming deionized water. The decrease in tumour formation was associated with an increase in 8-hydroxy-2'deoxyguanosine and 4-hydroxynonenal content (markers of DNA adduct formation and lipid peroxidation, respectively) in the epithelium of the ventral prostate in aging animals. In addition, there was an increase in 8-hydroxy-2'deoxyguanosine expression, but no change in 4-hydroxynonenal expression in the seminal vesicles of older animals. An age-associated increase in expression of the antioxidant enzymes manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase in the epithelium of the ventral prostate of aging animals was observed. Furthermore, there was also an increase in manganese superoxide dismutase expression, but no change in catalase expression in the seminal vesicles of older animals. These data demonstrate that consumption of green tea decreases the incidence of genitourinary tract tumours in the Lobund-Wistar rat, but has no effect on age-associated DNA adduct formation and lipid peroxidation in the ventral prostate and seminal vesicles of the aging rat.

  9. The protective effect of L-carnitine against hippocampal damage due to experimental formaldehyde intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, E; Ozsoy, S Y; Donmez, N; Ozsoy, B; Yumuşak, N

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the protective effects of L-carnitine on hippocampus tissue damage in rats during experimental formaldehyde (FA) intoxication. Male Wistar albino rats were assigned into four groups: (1) control (C), (2) formaldehyde (FA), (3) formaldehyde + 0.5 g/kg of L-carnitine (FA + 0.5 LC) (4) formaldehyde + 1 g/kg L-carnitine (FA + 1 LC). At the end of the 14 day trial period, animals were sacrificed by decapitation under anesthesia. The hippocampus tissue samples were extracted to measure MDA, GSH and SOD activity. Neuronal degeneration was assessed based on histopathological (hematoxylin and eosin) and immunohistochemical (anti-ubiquitin) examination. To detect oxidative stress, specimens were reacted with anti-Cu/Zn-SOD antibody. After administering L-carnitine with FA to the animals, the activities of SOD and GSH increased, but the levels of MDA decreased in hippocampus tissue. Neuronal degeneration was observed in the FA group. L-carnitine administration reduced neuronal degeneration and histological structure was similar to controls. After FA application, degenerated hippocampus neurons were stained with anti-ubiquitin and Cu/Zn-SOD antibodies; weakly positive staining was observed in L- carnitine-treated groups. L-carnitine may be useful for preventing oxidative damage in the hippocampus tissue due to formaldehyde intoxication.

  10. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees.

  11. Mutism and auditory agnosia due to bilateral insular damage--role of the insula in human communication.

    PubMed

    Habib, M; Daquin, G; Milandre, L; Royere, M L; Rey, M; Lanteri, A; Salamon, G; Khalil, R

    1995-03-01

    We report a case of transient mutism and persistent auditory agnosia due to two successive ischemic infarcts mainly involving the insular cortex on both hemispheres. During the 'mutic' period, which lasted about 1 month, the patient did not respond to any auditory stimuli and made no effort to communicate. On follow-up examinations, language competences had re-appeared almost intact, but a massive auditory agnosia for non-verbal sounds was observed. From close inspection of lesion site, as determined with brain resonance imaging, and from a study of auditory evoked potentials, it is concluded that bilateral insular damage was crucial to both expressive and receptive components of the syndrome. The role of the insula in verbal and non-verbal communication is discussed in the light of anatomical descriptions of the pattern of connectivity of the insular cortex.

  12. Endogenous alpha-oxoaldehydes and formation of protein and nucleotide advanced glycation endproducts in tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Thornalley, Paul J

    2007-01-01

    Human and other biological tissues face a continual threat of damage by alpha-oxoaldehydes formed endogenously. Glyoxal, methylglyoxal and 3-deoxyglucosone are formed by the degradation of glycolytic intermediates, glycated proteins and lipid peroxidation. They are potent glycating agents of protein and nucleotides leading to the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). With proteins, they are arginine residue-directed glycating agents forming mainly hydroimidazolones, found at 0.1-1% of total arginine residues in tissues (2-20% of proteins modified). With nucleotides, imidazopurinone- and N2-carboxyalkyl- derivatives of deoxyguanosine are formed, found at 0.1-0.8 per 10(6) nucleotides in DNA. Glycation occurs in all tissues and body fluids. Cellular proteolysis of AGE-modified proteins and DNA releases glycated amino acids and nucleosides. Glycated amino acids and nucleosides are released into plasma, undergo glomerular filtration and are excreted in urine. The damage to tissue protein and nucleotides by alpha-oxoaldehydes is suppressed by the metabolism of alpha-oxoaldehyde glycating agents by the glutathione-dependent enzyme, glyoxalase I, and aldo-keto reductases. These enzymatic activities are part of the enzymatic defence against glycation. Tissue damage by alpha-oxoaldehyde glycation is implicated in diabetic and non-diabetic vascular disease, renal failure, cirrhosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis and ageing.

  13. Peroxynitrite formation in nitric oxide-exposed submitochondrial particles: Detection, oxidative damage and catalytic removal by Mn-porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Valez, Valeria; Cassina, Adriana; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Radi, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO−) formation in mitochondria may be favored due to the constant supply of superoxide radical (O2•−) by the electron transport chain plus the facile diffusion of nitric oxide (•NO) to this organelle. Herein, a model system of submitochondrial particles (SMP) in the presence of succinate plus the respiratory inhibitor antimycin A (to increase O2•− rates) and the •NO-donor NOC-7 was studied to directly establish and quantitate peroxynitrite by a multiplicity of methods including chemiluminescence, fluorescence and immunochemical analysis. While all the tested probes revealed peroxynitrite at near stoichiometric levels with respect to its precursor radicals, coumarin boronic acid (a probe that directly reacts with peroxynitrite) had the more straightforward oxidation profile from O2•−-forming SMP as a function of the •NO flux. Interestingly, immunospintrapping studies verified protein radical generation in SMP by peroxynitrite. Substrate-supplemented SMP also reduced Mn(III)porphyrins (MnP) to Mn(II)P under physiologically-relevant oxygen levels (3–30 μM); then, Mn(II)P were capable to reduce peroxynitrite and protect SMP from the inhibition of complex I-dependent oxygen consumption and protein radical formation and nitration of membranes. The data directly support the formation of peroxynitrite in mitochondria and demonstrate that MnP can undergo a catalytic redox cycle to neutralize peroxynitrite-dependent mitochondrial oxidative damage. PMID:23142682

  14. Modification of the Kozeny-Carman equation to quantify formation damage by fines in clean unconsolidated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Eva D.

    Accurately estimating formation permeability as a function of porosity, grain size, and the quantity and structure of fines is important for increasing hydrocarbon extraction from rock formations. Accurate formation permeability estimation can provide insight into the factors that lead to formation damage due to fines deposition. The Kozeny-Carman equation can be used to estimate the permeability of unconsolidated media as a function of porosity and grain size, but does not account for the structure of fines. In this study, I show how incorporating a dimensionless bulk factor into the Kozeny-Carman equation can be used to quantify the permeability reduction resulting from deposition of fines in the pore space. I consider several experimental studies from the literature that use a variety of porosities, fluids, fines (differentiated by diameter and type), porous media, and flow velocities. Results indicate that for all of the experiments analyzed, when other variables are held constant, experiments conducted at higher flow velocity result in less plugging. The bulk value was adjusted in the Kozeny-Carman equation to obtain a line of best fit. The root mean square method was used to obtain the best bulk factor value that calculated a curve which had the best match for the experimental data. Fitted values of the bulk factor were then correlated with the Peclet number to investigate how the structure of fines in the pore space, quantified by the bulk factor, depends on the characteristics of the porous media, the depositing colloids, and the flow velocity. For a particular experimental set, at a lower Peclet Number, higher bulk factors are observed, when diffusive transport dominates, which I speculate results from the presence of more dendritic deposits. At higher Peclet Numbers, lower bulk factors are observed, when advective transport dominates, which I speculate results from deposits that are more compact. By understanding the flow velocity dependence of

  15. Modelling biofilm-induced formation damage and biocide treatment in subsurface geosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ezeuko, C C; Sen, A; Gates, I D

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm growth in subsurface porous media, and its treatment with biocides (antimicrobial agents), involves a complex interaction of biogeochemical processes which provide non-trivial mathematical modelling challenges. Although there are literature reports of mathematical models to evaluate biofilm tolerance to biocides, none of these models have investigated biocide treatment of biofilms growing in interconnected porous media with flow. In this paper, we present a numerical investigation using a pore network model of biofilm growth, formation damage and biocide treatment. The model includes three phases (aqueous, adsorbed biofilm, and solid matrix), a single growth-limiting nutrient and a single biocide dissolved in the water. Biofilm is assumed to contain a single species of microbe, in which each cell can be a viable persister, a viable non-persister, or non-viable (dead). Persisters describe small subpopulation of cells which are tolerant to biocide treatment. Biofilm tolerance to biocide treatment is regulated by persister cells and includes ‘innate’ and ‘biocide-induced’ factors. Simulations demonstrate that biofilm tolerance to biocides can increase with biofilm maturity, and that biocide treatment alone does not reverse biofilm-induced formation damage. Also, a successful application of biological permeability conformance treatment involving geologic layers with flow communication is more complicated than simply engineering the attachment of biofilm-forming cells at desired sites. PMID:23164434

  16. Thermo-elasto-visco-plastic constitutive equations fully coupled with ductile damage. Application to metal cutting by chip formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestriez, P.; Cherouat, A.; Saanouni, K.; Mariage, J. F.

    2004-06-01

    A fully coupled (strong coupling) thermo-elasto-visco-plastic-damage constitutive equations based on the state variables under large plastic deformation developed for metal forming simulation are presented. The relevant numerical aspects concerning either the local integration scheme as well as the global resolution strategy are discussed. This model is implemented into ABAQUS/EXPLICIT using the Vumat user subroutine. Applications are made to the orthogonal metal cutting by chip formation and segmentation. The interaction between hardening plasticity, ductile damage and thermal effects are carefully analyzed. The numerical results obtained with this procedure based on the damage coupling are compared with those obtained with the classical procedure neglecting the damage effect.

  17. The formation of bronchocutaneous fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Patris, Vasileios; Argiriou, Michalis; Salem, Agni-Leila; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Charitos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Temporary epicardial pacing wires during open-heart surgery are routinely used both for diagnostic and treatment purposes. In complicated cases where patients are unstable or the wires are difficult to remove, the pacing wires are cut at the skin level and allowed to retract by themselves. This procedure rarely causes complications. However, there have been cases reporting that retained pacing wires are linked to the formation of sterno-bronchial fistulae, which may present a while after the date of operation and are usually infected. This review aims to study the cases presenting sterno-bronchial fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires and to highlight the important factors associated with these. It is important to note these complications, as fistulae may cause a variety of problems to the patient if undiagnosed and left untreated. With the aid of scans such as fistulography, fistulae can be identified and treated and will improve the patients’ health dramatically. PMID:27716700

  18. Stratospheric denitrification due to polar aerosol formation: Implications for a future atmosphere with increased CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitari, Giovanni; Ricciardulli, Lucrezia

    The amount of stratospheric denitrification produced by NAT aerosol formation is studied with a photochemical two-dimensional model which includes the effects of zonal asymmetries of the temperature field. The model photochemistry is coupled with a microphysical code for aerosol formation and growth, so that the permanent loss of stratospheric nitric acid and water vapor may be taken into account. The model results for nitric acid relative to the atmospheric chemical composition of 1980 are compared with LIMS data. We show that the level of denitrification may rise substantially if the polar vortex cools down, as it could be the case in a future atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide. A three-dimensional model is used to calculate the temperature perturbation due to an increase of CO2 from 335 ppmv of 1980 (baseline) up to 500 ppmv (predicted for 2050). The photochemical model adopting these new temperatures predicts an average 20% HNO3 column decrease poleward of 45N with respect to baseline. One consequence is that the relative weight of the NOx catalytic cycle for O3 destruction decreases with respect to the present atmosphere.

  19. The hot-spot p53R172H mutant promotes formation of giant spermatogonia triggered by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y; Raharja, A; Sim, W; Wong, E S M; Rahmat, S A B; Lane, D P

    2017-04-06

    Overexpression of mutant p53 is a common finding in most cancers but testicular tumours accumulate wild-type p53 (wtp53). In contrast to the accepted concept that p53 homozygous mutant mice do not accumulate mutant p53 in normal cells, our study on a mutant p53 mouse model of Li-Fraumeni syndrome harbouring the hot-spot p53R172H mutation described an elevated level of mutant p53 in non-cancerous mouse tissues. Here we use detailed immunohistochemical analysis to document the expression of p53R172H in mouse testis. In developing and adult testes, p53R172H was expressed in gonocytes, type A, Int, B spermatogonia as well as in pre-Sertoli cells and Leydig cells but was undetectable in spermatocytes and spermatids. A similar staining pattern was demonstrated for wtp53. However, the intensity of wtp53 staining was generally weaker than that of p53R172H, which indicates that the expression of p53R172H can be a surrogate marker of p53 gene transcription. Comparing the responses of wtp53 and p53R172H to irradiation, we found persistent DNA double-strand breaks in p53R172H testes and the formation of giant spermatogonia (GSG) following persistent DNA damage in p53R172H and p53-null mice. Strikingly, we found that p53R172H promotes spontaneous formation of GSG in non-stressed p53R172H ageing mice. Two types of GSG: Viable and Degenerative GSG were defined. We elucidate the factors involved in the formation of GSG: the loss of p53 function is a requirement for the formation of GSG whereas DNA damage acts as a promoting trigger. The formation of GSG does not translate to higher efficacy of testicular tumorigenesis arising from mutant p53 cells, which might be due to the presence of delayed-onset of p53-independent apoptosis.

  20. Decrease in corneal damage due to benzalkonium chloride by the addition of sericin into timolol maleate eye drops.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Norio; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of sericin on corneal damage due to benzalkonium chloride (BAC) used as a preservative in commercially available timolol maleate eye drops using rat debrided corneal epithelium and a human cornea epithelial cell line (HCE-T). Corneal wounds were monitored using a fundus camera TRC-50X equipped with a digital camera; eye drops were instilled into the rat eyes five times a day after corneal epithelial abrasion. The viability of HCE-T cells was calculated by TetraColor One; and Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) were used to measure antimicrobial activity. The reducing effects on transcorneal penetration and intraocular pressure (IOP) of the eye drops were determined using rabbits. The corneal wound healing rate and rate constants (kH) as well as cell viability were higher following treatment with 0.005% BAC solution containing 0.1% sericin than in the case of treatment with BAC solution alone; the antimicrobial activity was approximately the same for BAC solutions with and without sericin. In addition, the kH for rat eyes instilled with commercially available timolol maleate eye drops containing 0.1% sericin was significantly higher than that of eyes instilled with timolol maleate eye drops without sericin, and the addition of sericin did not affect the corneal penetration or IOP reducing effect of commercially available timolol maleate eye drops. A preservative system comprising BAC and sericin may provide effective therapy for glaucoma patients requiring long-term anti-glaucoma agents.

  1. Siderophile Element Depletion in the Angrite Parent Body (APB) Mantle: Due to Core Formation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2008-01-01

    The origin of angrites has evaded scientists due in part to unusual mineralogy, oxidized character, and small numbers of samples. Increased interest in the origin of angrites has stemmed from the recovery of approximately 10 new angrites in the past decade. These new samples have allowed meteoriticists to recognize that angrites are compositionally diverse, old, and record very early differentiation. Also, a magma ocean has been proposed to have been involved in APB early differentiation, but this remains untested for siderophile elements which are commonly cited as one of the main lines of evidence for magma oceans on the early Earth, Moon, Mars and eucrite parent body (e.g., [6]). And recent suggestions that angrites may or may not be from Mercury have also peaked interest in these achondrites. Given all of this background, a detailed understanding of the early differentiation process is desired. Previous efforts at examining siderophile element (SE) concentrations with respect to core formation processes in the APB have not resulted in any definite conclusions regarding segregation of a metallic core. The goal of this study is to summarize what is known about SE concentrations in the suite, estimate depletions of SE compared to chondrites, and apply metal/silicate experimental partition coefficients to assess whether the APB had a core.

  2. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  3. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals.

  4. In field damage of high and low cyanogenic cassava due to a generalist insect herbivore Cyrtomenus bergi (Hemiptera: Cydnidae).

    PubMed

    Riis, Lisbeth; Bellotti, Anthony Charles; Castaño, Oscar

    2003-12-01

    The hypothesis that cyanogenic potential in cassava roots deters polyphagous insects in the field is relevant to current efforts to reduce or eliminate the cyanogenic potential in cassava. To test this hypothesis, experiments were conducted in the field under natural selection pressure of the polyphagous root feeder Cyrtomenus bergi Froeschner (Hemiptera: Cydnidae). A number of cassava varieties (33) as well as 13 cassava siblings and their parental clone, each representing a determined level of cyanogenic potential (CNP), were scored for damage caused by C. bergi and related to CNP and nonglycosidic cyanogens, measured as hydrogen cyanide. Additionally, 161 low-CNP varieties (< 50 ppm hydrogen cyanide, fresh weight) from the cassava germplasm core collection at Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) were screened for resistance/tolerance to C. bergi. Low root damage scores were registered at all levels of CNP. Nevertheless, CNP and yield (or root size) partly explained the damage in cassava siblings (r2 = 0.82) and different cassava varieties (r2 = 0.42), but only when mean values of damage scores were used. This relation was only significant in one of two crop cycles. A logistic model describes the underlying negative relation between CNP and damage. An exponential model describes the underlying negative relation between root size and damage. Damage, caused by C. bergi feeding, released nonglycosidic cyanogens, and an exponential model fits the underlying positive relation. Fifteen low-CNP clones were selected for potential resistance/tolerance against C. bergi.

  5. A method for computing the damage level due to the exposure to an airborne chemical with a time-varying concentration.

    PubMed

    Acquesta, Alejandro D; Sánchez, Erica Yanina; Porta, Andres; Jacovkis, Pablo M

    2011-09-01

    The calculation of damage level due to the exposure to a toxic cloud is usually not included in most popular software, or it is included using techniques that do not take into account the variation in concentration over a period of time. In this work, a method is introduced for calculating the temporal evolution of the potential damage level and to obtain a more precise and descriptive estimation of this level. The proposed goal is: to estimate the maximum and minimum damage level experienced by a population due to the exposure to an airborne chemical with a time-varying concentration; to be able to assess the damage level experienced in a progressive way, as the exposure to the airborne chemical occurs. The method relies on transformations of time-concentration pairs on a continuum of damage level curves based on the available guideline levels, obtaining maximum and minimum approximations of the expected damage level for any exposure duration. Consequently, applying this method to transport model output data and demographic information, damage evolution in relation to time and space can be predicted, as well as its effect on the local population, which enables the determination of threat zones. The comparison between the proposed method and the current (Spanish and ALOHA) ones showed that the former can offer a more precise estimation and a more descriptive approach of the potential damage level. This method can be used by atmospheric dispersion models to compute damage level and graphically display the regions exposed to each guideline level on area maps.

  6. Electron Microscopy Study of Stainless Steel Radiation Damage Due to Long-Term Irradation by Alpha Particles Emitted From Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Unlu, Kenan; Rios-Martinez, Carlos; Saglam, Mehmet; Hart, Ron R.; Shipp, John D.; Rennie, John

    1998-04-16

    Radiation damage and associated surface and microstructural changes produced in stainless steel encapsulation by high-fluence alpha particle irradiations from weapons-grade plutonium of 316-stainless steel are being investigated.

  7. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single delta rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA (see the accompanying paper: W.R. Holley and A. Chatterjee, Radiat. Res. 145, 188-199, 1996). In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [3H]thymidine and exposed at 0 degrees C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/microns. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated "regionally multiply damaged sites." Postirradiation incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown.

  8. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, B.

    1996-02-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single {delta} rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA. In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [{sup 3}H]thymidine and exposed at 0{degrees}C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/pm. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated {open_quotes}regionally multiply damaged sites.{close_quotes} Postirradiation incubation at 37{degrees}C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

    1994-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

  10. Damage formation, fatigue behavior and strength properties of ZrO2-based ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozulin, A. A.; Narikovich, A. S.; Kulkov, S. N.; Leitsin, V. N.; Kulkov, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    It is suggested that a non-destructive testing technique using a three-dimensional X-ray tomography be applied to detecting internal structural defects and monitoring damage formation in a ceramic composite structure subjected to a bending load. Three-point bending tests are used to investigate the fatigue behavior and mechanical and physical properties of medical-grade ZrO2-based ceramics. The bending strength and flexural modulus are derived under static conditions at a loading rate of 2 mm/min. The fatigue strength and fatigue limit under dynamic loading are investigated at a frequency of 10 Hz in three stress ranges: 0.91-0.98, 0.8-0.83, and 0.73-0.77 MPa of the static bending strength. The average values of the bending strength and flexural modulus of sintered specimens are 43 MPa and 22 GPa, respectively. The mechanical properties of the ceramics are found to be similar to those of bone tissues. The testing results lead us to conclude that the fatigue limit obtained from 105 stress cycles is in the range 33-34 MPa, i.e. it accounts for about 75% of the static bending strength for the test material.

  11. Analysis of core damage frequency due to external events at the DOE (Department of Energy) N-Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, J.A.; Bohn, M.P.; Daniel, S.L. ); Baxter, J.T. ); Johnson, J.J.; Ravindra, M.K.; Hashimoto, P.O.; Mraz, M.J.; Tong, W.H.; Conoscente, J.P. ); Brosseau, D.A. )

    1990-11-01

    A complete external events probabilistic risk assessment has been performed for the N-Reactor power plant, making full use of all insights gained during the past ten years' developments in risk assessment methodologies. A detailed screening analysis was performed which showed that all external events had negligible contribution to core damage frequency except fires, seismic events, and external flooding. A limited scope analysis of the external flooding risk indicated that it is not a major risk contributor. Detailed analyses of the fire and seismic risks resulted in total (mean) core damage frequencies of 1.96E-5 and 4.60E-05 per reactor year, respectively. Detailed uncertainty analyses were performed for both fire and seismic risks. These results show that the core damage frequency profile for these events is comparable to that found for existing commercial power plants if proposed fixes are completed as part of the restart program. 108 refs., 85 figs., 80 tabs.

  12. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  13. Identification of the formation phases of filamentary damage induced by nanosecond laser pulses in bulk fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Zhongjie; Chambonneau, Maxime E-mail: jiangtian198611@163.com; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian E-mail: jiangtian198611@163.com

    2015-09-14

    Employing a pump-probe polarization-based two-frame shadowgraphy setup, the formation of filamentary damage induced in bulk fused silica by a nanosecond pulse at 1064 nm is investigated with a picosecond probe. Three different phases are exhibited in the damage experiments. The first phase is the formation of a micrometric plasma channel along the laser direction during the beginning of the pulse likely caused by multi-photon ionization. This channel exhibits growth during ∼400 ps, and the newly grown plasma is discrete. Then, during the end of the pulse, this channel evolves into a tadpole-like morphology showing an elliptical head upstream the laser flux followed by a thin tail. This observed asymmetry is attributed to shielding effects caused by both the plasma and hot modified silica. Once the damage shows its almost final morphology, a last phase consists in the launch of a pressure wave enlarging it after the laser pulse. The physical mechanisms that might be involved in the formation of plasma channels are discussed. The experimental data are first confronted to the moving breakdown model which overestimates the filamentary damage length. Finally, taking into account the temporal shape of the laser pulses, the coupling between Kerr-induced self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin scattering is discussed to interpret the observations.

  14. Dose rate effects on damage formation in ion-implanted gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, T.E.; Holland, O.W.

    1990-09-01

    The residual damage in GaAs was measured by ion channeling following implantation of either 100 keV {sup 30}Si{sup +} at temperatures of 300K or 77K, or 360 keV {sup 120}Sn{sup +} at 300K. For room-temperature Si implants and fluences between 1 and 10 {times} 10{sup 14} Si/cm{sup 2}, the amount of damage created was strongly dependent upon the ion current density, which was varied between 0.05 and 12 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. Two different stages of damage growth were identified by an abrupt increase in the damage growth rate as a function of fluence, and the threshold fluence for the onset of the second stage was found to be dependent on the dose rate. The dose rate effect on damage was substantially weaker for {sup 120}Sn{sup +} implants and was negligible for Si implants at 77K. The damage was found to be most sensitive to the average current density, demonstrating that the defects which are the precursors to the residual dose-rate dependent damage have active lifetimes of at least 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s. The dose rate effect and its variation with ion mass and temperature are discussed in the context of homogeneous nucleation and growth of damage during ion irradiation.

  15. Star Formation In The Centers Of Galaxies Due To Secular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David; Drory, Niv; Kormendy, John

    2006-05-01

    The two fundamental channels for disk galaxy evolution are environmentally driven hierarchical clustering (galaxy mergers) and internally driven secular evolution. Ellipticals and "classical bulges" are believed to form by mergers. "Pseudobulges" are observed to be more disk-like than classical bulges: they are flatter, they rotate very rapidly, and they have embedded bars, spiral structure, and ongoing star formation. They are the likely products of slow ("secular") rearrangement of disks by bars and oval distortions. Note that pseudobulges can form only if it has been a long time since the last major merger. This qualitative picture is well supported by observations. But, what is the relative importance of mergers and secular evolution in building bulges -- quantitatively? We propose to measure star formation rates in classical bulges and pseudobulges using the far-infrared fluxes observed with MIPS. Additionally, we use mid-infared IRAC imaging to resolve star-forming substructure within these bulges. To measure star formation rates we use published warm dust SED calibrations (Dale and Helou 2002; Wu et al 2005) as well as any that are still under development. Our purpose is to measure pseudobulge growth rates in Sa, Sb, and Sbc galaxies, and to tie together star formation rates with other indicators of secular evolution. Estimating pseudobulge growth time is the necessary next step in determing the relative importance of major mergers and secular evolution in bulge formation. A key to our strategy is the choice of galaxy sample. We propose to observe matched triples of the nearest giant galaxies that have strong, weak, and no obvious driving agents for internal evolution; i.e. galaxies that are barred, globally oval, and unbarred, respectively. Our sample will provide a valuable augmentation of archive data, completing observations of triples where necessary. The result is to increase the return of previous investments for a wider variety of science

  16. Small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoar formation within meckel diverticulum: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Frazzini, V.I. Jr.; English, W.J.; Bashist, B.; Moore, E.

    1996-05-01

    Intestinal obstruction due to a phytobezoar within a Meckel diverticulum is exceedingly rare, with only seven reported cases in the surgical literature. The most important precipitating factor is the ingestion of agents high in fiber and cellulose. Small bowel obstruction in all but one case was due to retrograde propagation of the bezoar into the small bowel lumen. We report the clinical and CT findings in such a patient following a vegetarian diet. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  17. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis.

  18. Final Report - Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment

    SciTech Connect

    L.H. Toburen, Principal Investigator; J.L. Shinpaugh; M. Dingfelder; and G. Lapicki; Co-Investigators

    2007-01-07

    Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. Our primary objective has been to understand the underling physics associated with these new biological responses. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many Monte Carlo codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction physics is still based on gas phase measurements and/or untested theoretical calculations that focus on water as the transport medium. Our objectives were threefold, (1) to expand the applicability of Monte Carlo track structure simulation to tissue-like material beyond the current focus on water, (2) to incorporate the most recent experimental information on electron interactions in biologically relevant material, and (3) to compare recent measurements of electron emissions induced by charged particles in thin foils with Monte Carlo predictions. We addressed these research objectives in three ways. First we applied theoretical techniques, similar to those used to derive data for water, to obtain cross sections for other condensed phase materials. This served two purposes. One was to provide testability of the theoretical technique by comparison to existing experimental data for electron transport (similar data does not exist for water), and the other was to expand the target database for use in modeling tissue. Second, we carefully reviewed published data, and ongoing experiments, for electron interaction cross-sections in biologically relevant condensed phase material. Results for low-energy electron

  19. Characteristics of magnetic island formation due to resistive interchange instability in helical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, R.; Matsumoto, Y.; Itagaki, M.; Oikawa, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Sato, M.

    2014-05-15

    Focusing attention on the magnetic island formation, we investigate the characteristics of the resistive interchange magnetohydrodynamics instabilities, which would limit a high beta operational regime in helical type fusion reactors. An introduction of a new index, i.e., the ratio of the magnetic fluctuation level to the radial displacement, enables us to make a systematic analysis on the magnetic island formation in the large helical device-like plasmas during the linear growth phase; (i) the interchange instability with the second largest growth rate makes the magnetic island larger than that with the largest growth rate when the amplitude of the radial displacement in both cases is almost the same as each other; (ii) applied to a typical tearing instability, the index is smaller than that for the interchange instability with the second largest growth rate.

  20. Formation of laves phase in a refractory austenitic steel due to long-term heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, L. V.; Shal'kevich, A. B.

    2011-07-01

    Steels of the Fe - Cr - Ni -Mo - Nb - Al - C system are studied by methods of phase physicochemical analysis and electron microscopy with the aim to determine the causes of changes in mechanical properties after long-term heating at a temperature of 600 - 700°C. Grain-boundary formation of particles of a Laves phase is shown to cause decrease in the impact toughness and transformation of particles of γ'-phase under conditions of creep. The effect of alloying elements on the chemical composition of the multicomponent Laves phase is studied depending on the temperatures of hardening, aging, and subsequent heating. Concentration correspondence between the chemical composition of the austenite and the intermetallic tcp phase formed in aging is discovered. A computational scheme for predicting the possibility of formation of Laves phases in multicomponent alloys is suggested.

  1. Electromagnetic radiation due to naked singularity formation in self-similar gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuda, Eiji; Yoshino, Hirotaka; Tomimatsu, Akira

    2005-04-15

    Dynamical evolution of test fields in background geometry with a naked singularity is an important problem relevant to the Cauchy horizon instability and the observational signatures different from black hole formation. In this paper we study electromagnetic perturbations generated by a given current distribution in collapsing matter under a spherically symmetric self-similar background. Using the Green's function method, we construct the formula to evaluate the outgoing energy flux observed at the future null infinity. The contributions from 'quasinormal' modes of the self-similar system as well as 'high-frequency' waves are clarified. We find a characteristic power-law time evolution of the outgoing energy flux which appears just before naked singularity formation and give the criteria as to whether or not the outgoing energy flux diverges at the future Cauchy horizon.

  2. Radiation damage of the Kokchetav diamonds due to α-particles from zircon - for proper understanding of spectroscopic variations of metamorphic diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, R.; Ogasawara, Y.

    2013-12-01

    .g., Orwa et al., 2000). Therefore our results strongly suggest that radiation damage predominantly due to α-particle emission from radioactive decay of actinides (mainly U) in zircon is a principal factor that is responsible for the spectral variations. Radiation damage (metamictization) is probably a common phenomenon among microdiamonds in zircon in diamond-bearing rocks from the Kokchetav Massif (c.f., Shimizu & Ogasawara, 2011; Smith et al., 2011). To discuss the genesis of diamond from its Raman, PL or CL spectra, microdiamonds contained in actinides-bearing minerals (e.g., zircon) should be treated with the most careful attention because radiation damage after the formation does influence the spectra significantly.

  3. Self-consistent orogenic wedge formation and shear zone propagation due to thermal softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Duretz, Thibault; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2016-04-01

    We present two dimensional numerical simulations of orogenic wedge formation for a viscoelastoplastic lithosphere under compression. The thermo-mechanical model is based on the principle of energy conservation and includes temperature-dependent rheologies. With this approach, shear zones caused by thermal softening develop spontaneously in the absence of strain softening. The initial locus of shear localization is controlled by either lateral temperature variations (100°C) at the model base or by lateral variations in crustal thickness. The first episode of strain localization occurs after 15% bulk shortening. With ongoing strain, a series of shear zones arise and propagate towards the foreland leading to the self-consistent formation of an orogenic wedge. We investigate the impact of bulk shortening rates, erosion and rheology on the dynamics of wedge formation, the associated topography and uplift rates. The maximum topography reaches up to 10 km and the surface morphology evolves according to shear zone activation and deactivation. Uplift rates are transient and peak values are maintained only on very short time scales. A running average of the uplift rate versus time curves with a time-window of 4 My provides average uplift rates in the order of a few millimeters per year. Erosion is an important parameter for the formation and the evolution of the wedge (e.g. can control the spacing of shear zones by modifying crustal thickness). Rheological parameters, such as the friction angle or the upper crustal viscosity, control the occurrence of strain localization. Bulk shortening rates between 10-15 and 10-16 s-1 do not have a major impact on the resulting wedge structure.

  4. Void formation in amorphous germanium due to high electronic energy deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertner, K.; Joehrens, J.; Steinbach, T.; Schnohr, C. S.; Wesch, W.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of high electronic energy deposition in amorphous germanium has been studied experimentally by Au irradiation with ion energies of up to 185 MeV and different angles of incidence and by molecular dynamics computer simulations. In both cases, the energy deposition leads to void formation accompanied by strong swelling of the amorphous germanium. The simulation results prove that the formation of the voids is mainly based on a shock wave mechanism and the swelling is determined by the competing processes of the formation and growth of voids on the one hand and the shrinking and annihilation of voids on the other hand. In full agreement between experiment and simulation, the amount of the swelling is a linear function of the total energy deposited into electronic processes and there exists a threshold value of the electronic energy loss per ion and depth for swelling. A comparison of the threshold values obtained by the experiment and the simulation suggests that approximately 20% of the energy deposited into electronic processes is converted into atomic motion.

  5. Alterations of domains in the plasmatic membrane due to damages of the perinuclear theca of pig preserved spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Orozco Benítez, María Guadalupe; Lemus Flores, Clemente; Hernández Ballesteros, Juan Antonio; Navarrete Méndez, Raúl; Juárez-Mosqueda, María de Lourdes

    2008-05-15

    Samples of semen from 12 pigs, three from Yorkshire, Landrace, Duroc and Mexican Hairless each where obtained to study cryopreservation methods. Three stages of boar semen cryopreservation were evaluated: none (fresh stage), cooling at 5 degrees C and freezing at -196 degrees C then thawing to 56 degrees C for 12 sec. Perinuclear theca damage and domain alterations were selected as indices of seminal quality, as measured by electronic and fluorescence microcopy, respectively according to two lineal models considering by separately the effect of semen preservation and breed. Integrity and absence of perinuclear theca significantly (p < 0.001) decreased and increased, respectively according to a decrease in temperature of cryopreservation, from 87.4 to 58.8% and from 0.8 to 26.2%, respectively. This same significant (p < 0.001) effect was found for acrosomal and post-acrosomal membrane distribution of domains, from 92.1 to 76.8% and from 3.1 to 13.1% in this same order. Slight but highly significant (p < 0.001) differences were observed when theca integrity was evaluated as affected by breed, with highest and lowest values for Yorkshire and Pel6n Mexicano pigs, respectively. No breed effect was encountered for presence of acrosomal domains. A strong interdependence was found between perinuclear theca damage and domain distribution. In this connection, a highly significant (p < 0.001) positive, interdependence was observed between the theca damage and acrosomal domain (r = 0.87), while this same relationship was although highly significant (p < 0.001), negative in nature for equatorial and post-acrosonal domains (r = -0.77 and -0.85, respectively). This experiment confirmed that cryopreservation methods may severely affect semen quality of pigs and that genotype may further influence these same indices. More research is needed for improving methods of preservation of pig semen quality, from the point of view of perinuclear theca and domain characteristics of

  6. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  7. Investigations of Pulmonary Epithelial Cell Damage due to Air-Liquid Interfacial Stresses in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaver, Donald P., III; Bilek, A. M.; Kay, S.; Dee, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary airway closure is a potentially dangerous event that can occur in microgravity environments and may result in limited gas exchange for flight crew during long-term space flight. Repetitive airway collapse and reopening subjects the pulmonary epithelium to large, dynamic, and potentially injurious mechanical stresses. During ventilation at low lung volumes and pressures, airway instability leads to repetitive collapse and reopening. During reopening, air must progress through a collapsed airway, generating stresses on the airway walls, potentially damaging airway tissues. The normal lung can tolerate repetitive collapse and reopening. However, combined with insufficient or dysfunctional pulmonary surfactant, repetitive airway collapse and reopening produces severe lung injury. Particularly at risk is the pulmonary epithelium. As an important regulator of lung function and physiology, the degree of pulmonary epithelial damage influences the course and outcome of lung injury. In this paper we present experimental and computational studies to explore the hypothesis that the mechanical stresses associated with airway reopening inflict injury to the pulmonary epithelium.

  8. Extent, perception and mitigation of damage due to high groundwater levels in the city of Dresden, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreibich, H.; Thieken, A. H.; Grunenberg, H.; Ullrich, K.; Sommer, T.

    2009-07-01

    Flood risk analysis and management plans mostly neglect groundwater flooding, i.e. high groundwater levels. However, rising groundwater may cause considerable damage to buildings and infrastructure. To improve the knowledge about groundwater flooding and support risk management, a survey was undertaken in the city of Dresden (Saxony, Germany), resulting in 605 completed interviews with private households endangered by high groundwater levels. The reported relatively low flood impact and damage of groundwater floods in comparison with mixed floods was reflected by its scarce perception: Hardly anybody thinks about the risk of groundwater flooding. The interviewees thought that public authorities and not themselves, should be mainly responsible for preparedness and emergency response. Up to now, people do not include groundwater risk in their decision processes on self protection. The implementation of precautionary measures does not differ between households with groundwater or with mixed flood experience. However, less households undertake emergency measures when expecting a groundwater flood only. The state of preparedness should be further improved via an intensified risk communication about groundwater flooding by the authorities. Conditions to reach the endangered population are good, since 70% of the interviewed people are willing to inform themselves about groundwater floods. Recommendations for an improved risk communication are given.

  9. Protective effects of melatonin and vitamin E in brain damage due to gamma radiation: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Erol, Fatih S; Topsakal, Cahide; Ozveren, M Faik; Kaplan, Metin; Ilhan, Nevin; Ozercan, I Hanifi; Yildiz, Oguz G

    2004-01-01

    Gamma radiation is known to cause serious damage in the brain, and many agents have been used for neuroprotection. In this study, lipid peroxidation levels and histopathological changes in brain tissues of whole-body irradiated rats with likely radiation injury were compared to those with melatonin and vitamin E protection. Forty rats in four equal groups were used. The control group received neither radiation nor medication. The remaining groups received doses of 720 cGy in two equal fractions 12 h apart. The second group received radiation but no medication, the third received radiation plus 100 mg/kg per day of vitamin E i.p., and the fourth received radiation plus 100 mg/kg per day of melatonin i.p. over 5 days. On the 10th postoperative day, all the rats were decapitated and specimens from parietal cortices were analyzed for tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and histopathological changes. Increases in MDA were relatively well prevented by melatonin treatment but less so with vitamin E therapy. On histopathological examination, melatonin significantly reduced the rates of edema, necrosis, and neuronal degeneration, whereas vitamin E reduced only necrosis. Neither substance was capable of preventing vasodilatation. In conclusion, melatonin may be useful in preventing the pathological changes of secondary brain damage as a result of free oxygen radicals generated by irradiation.

  10. Retinal Afferent Ingrowth to Neocortical Transplants in the Adult Rat Superior Colliculus is due to the Regeneration of Damaged Axons

    PubMed Central

    Ross, D. T.; Das, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    Retinal afferent ingrowth to embryonic neural transplants in the adult rat superior colliculus may represent either sprouting of intact axons or the regeneration of transected axons. If ingrowth represents regeneration of damaged retinofugai axons, then lesions that axotomize more retinofugal axons at the transplantation site should induce greater retinal afferent ingrowth. Alternately, if ingrowth represents terminal or collateral sprouting of intact retinofugal axons at or near the transplant/host optic layer interface, then the magnitude of retinal afferent ingrowth should be directly related to the total area of this interface. To test between these two hypotheses surgical knife wounds were made either parallel (in the sagittal plane) or perpendicular (in the transverse plane) to the course of axons in the stratum opticum, embryonic neocortical tissue was transplanted at the coordinates of these tectal slits, and retinal afferent ingrowth visualized 1-90 days after surgery using anterogradely transported HRP. A zone of traumatic reaction (ztr) in the optic layers was seen in every case, characterized by hypertrophied axons and swollen terminal clubs at 1 day. Between 30 and 90 days the damaged retinofugal axons in the zone formed dense fascicles and neuroma-like tangles. Retinal afferent ingrowth occurred only across transplant interface regions with the ztr. The magnitude of ingrowth was directly related to the area of the ztr interface and not the total optic layer interface area. Retinal afferent ingrowth appears to reflect the intrinsic regenerative capacity of adult mammalian retinal ganglion cells and not sprouting of undamaged axons. PMID:7703292

  11. Aldh2 knockout mice were more sensitive to DNA damage in leukocytes due to ethyl tertiary butyl ether exposure.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zuquan; Suda, Megumi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Mei, Nan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the genotoxicity of ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE), a gasoline additive, male and female C57BL/6 mice of Aldh2+/+ and Aldh2-/- genotypes, aged 8 wk, were exposed to 0, 500, 1,750, or 5,000 ppm ETBE for 6 h/day, 5 d per week for 13 wk. DNA damage in leukocytes was measured by the alkaline comet assay and expressed quantitatively as Tail Intensity (TI). For male mice, TI was significantly higher in all three groups exposed to ETBE than in those without exposure within Aldh2-/- mice, whereas within Aldh2+/+ mice, TI increased only in those exposed to 5,000 ppm of ETBE as compared with mice without exposure. For female mice, a significant increase in TI values was observed in the group exposed to 5,000 ppm of ETBE as compared with those without exposure within Aldh2-/- mice; TI in Aldh2-/- mice exposed to 1,750 and 5,000 ppm was significantly higher than in Aldh2+/+ mice without exposure. TI did not significantly increase in any of the groups exposed to ETBE within female Aldh2+/+ mice. Based on the results we suggest that Aldh2-/- mice are more sensitive to DNA damage caused by ETBE than Aldh2+/+ mice and that males seem more susceptible to this effect than females.

  12. Repair of UVB-induced DNA damage is reduced in melanoma due to low XPC and global genome repair

    PubMed Central

    Budden, Timothy; Davey, Ryan J.; Vilain, Ricardo E.; Ashton, Katie A.; Braye, Stephen G.; Beveridge, Natalie J.; Bowden, Nikola A.

    2016-01-01

    UVB exposure leads to DNA damage, which when unrepaired induces C>T transitions. These mutations are found throughout the melanoma genome, particularly in non-transcribed regions. The global genome repair (GGR) branch of nucleotide excision repair (NER) is responsible for repairing UV-induced DNA damage across non-transcribed and silent regions of the genome. This study aimed to examine the relationship between UVB and GGR in melanoma. DNA repair capacity and relative expression of NER in melanocytes and melanoma cell lines before and after treatment with UVB was quantified. Transcript expression from 196 melanomas was compared to clinical parameters including solar elastosis and whole transcriptome data collected. Melanoma cell lines showed significantly reduced DNA repair when compared to melanocytes, most significantly in the S phase of the cell cycle. Expression of GGR components XPC, DDB1 and DDB2 was significantly lower in melanoma after UVB. In the melanoma tumours, XPC expression correlated with age of diagnosis and low XPC conferred significantly poorer survival. The same trend was seen in the TCGA melanoma dataset. Reduced GGR in melanoma may contribute to the UV mutation spectrum of the melanoma genome and adds further to the growing evidence of the link between UV, NER and melanoma. PMID:27487145

  13. Loss of transmittance in fluoropolymer films due to laser-induced damage at 1053 and 351-nm

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, P.; Milam, D.; Norton, M.; Sell, W.

    1997-12-01

    Thick fluoropolymer films are being evaluated as a potential `disposable` debris shield to protect high-peak-power laser optics from x-ray and target debris generated in inertial-confinement fusion-ignition experiments, Two obstacles to implementation are optical uniformity and damage threshold. To understand the damage characteristics, transmittance of single 1053- or 351-nm laser pulses has been measured for commercial fluoropolymer films in vacuum. Samples were tested at fluences up to 105 J/cm2 at 1053-nm and 13 J/cm2 at 351-nm. Both the total transmitted energy for a single shot and the temporal energy transmittance profile during the shot were measured as a function of fluence. In addition, the total focusable transmitted energy was recorded for 351 -nm pulses. Results show that transmittance decreases slowly during a single-pulse irradiation, allowing much of the energy to be transmitted at fluences which cause noticeable degradation to the film. The film transmits greater than 90% of the 351-nm energy delivered in a beam with spatial average fluence of 8 J/cm2 with modulation up to 15 J/cm2. For 1053-nm laser light, the films do not begin to exhibit noticeable transmittance loss until average fluences exceed 40 J/cm2.

  14. Equatorial disk formation around rotating stars due to ram pressure confinement by the stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, J. E.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The axisymmetric 2D supersonic solution of a rotating, radiation-driven stellar wind presently obtained by a simple approximation predicts the formation of a dense equatorial disk, when the star's rotation rate lies above a threshold value that depends on the ratio of the wind's terminal speed to the escape speed of the star. The disk is formed because the trajectories of the wind leaving the stellar surface at high latitudes carry it down to the equatorial plane; there, the material passes through a standing oblique shock atop the disk; it is therefore the ram pressure of the polar wind that compresses and confines the disk.

  15. Anhelation due to formation of tuberculomas at the medulla oblongata during chemotherapy of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiaojie; Zhong, Yangping; Bian, Xinchao; Fu, Shuanglin; Luo, Yinan

    2012-01-01

    Formation of tuberculoma is a rare response of neurotuberculosis in patients regularly and adequately treated with anti-tuberculous drugs. We report a 13-year-old girl with two tuberculomas which formed in the dorsal part of the medulla oblongata during chemotherapy for tuberculous meningitis. The tuberculomas were both removed via a suboccipital midline approach and were demonstrated by pathological findings but the girl died of cardiac arrest that was thought to be caused by postoperative medulla oblongata oedema. In combination with a literature review, we discuss the clinical features and treatment options of brainstem tuberculomas.

  16. Underground Excavation Behaviour of the Queenston Formation: Tunnel Back Analysis for Application to Shaft Damage Dimension Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perras, Matthew A.; Wannenmacher, Helmut; Diederichs, Mark S.

    2015-07-01

    The Niagara Tunnel Project (NTP) is a 10.1 km long water-diversion tunnel in Niagara Falls, Ontario, which was excavated by a 7.2 m radius tunnel boring machine. Approximately half the tunnel length was excavated through the Queenston Formation, which locally is a shale to mudstone. Typical overbreak depths ranged between 2 and 4 m with a maximum of 6 m observed. Three modelling approaches were used to back analyse the brittle failure process at the NTP: damage initiation and spalling limit, laminated anisotropy modelling, and ubiquitous joint approaches. Analyses were conducted for three tunnel chainages: 3 + 000, 3 + 250, and 3 + 500 m because the overbreak depth increased from 2 to 4 m. All approaches produced similar geometries to those measured. The laminated anisotropy modelling approach was able to produced chord closures closest to those measured, using a joint normal to shear stiffness ratio between 1 and 2. This understanding was applied to a shaft excavation model in the Queenston Formation at the proposed Deep Geological Repository (DGR) site for low and intermediate level nuclear waste storage in Canada. The maximum damage depth was 1.9 m; with an average of 1.0 m. Important differences are discussed between the tunnel and shaft orientation with respect to bedding. The models show that the observed normalized depth of failure at the NTP would over-predict the depth of damage expected in the Queenston Formation at the DGR.

  17. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    DOE PAGES

    Shan, Tzu -Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-01

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed bymore » coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. Furthermore, the formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.« less

  18. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-01

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed by coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. The formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.

  19. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Tzu -Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-01

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed by coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. Furthermore, the formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.

  20. Methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin formation due to benzocaine and lidocaine in macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Woodard, C.L.; Gold, M.B.; Watson, C.E.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine (BNZ) and lidocaine (LC) are commonly used topical (spray) anesthetics approved for use in humans. BNZ has structural similarities to methemoglobin (MHb) forming drugs that are current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis, while LC has been reported to increase MHb in man. We therefore, compared MHb and sulfhemoglobin (SHb) production in three groups of Macaques (Macaca mulata, Chinese rhesus and Indian rhesus, and Macaca nemistrina, Pig-tailed Macaques) after exposure to BNZ and LC. Formation of SHb, unlike MHb, is not thought to be reversible and is considered to be toxic. MHb and SHb levels were measured periodically on a CO-Oximeter. All rhesus (n=8) were dosed intratrachealy/intranasaly with 56 mg and 280 mg BNZ and with 40 mg of LC in a randomized cross-over design. Pig-tailed macaques (n=6) were dosed with BNZ intranasaly 56 mg and with 40 mg of LC. Since no differences in the peak MHb or time to peak (mean +/- SD) were observed among the three macaque subspecies, the data were pooled. LC did not cause MHb or SHb formation above baseline in any monkey.

  1. Ionic liquid effects on a multistep process. Increased product formation due to enhancement of all steps.

    PubMed

    Keaveney, Sinead T; Haines, Ronald S; Harper, Jason B

    2015-09-07

    The reaction of a series of substituted benzaldehydes with hexylamine was examined in acetonitrile and an ionic liquid. In acetonitrile, as the electron withdrawing nature of the substituent increases, the overall addition-elimination process becomes faster as does the build-up of the aminol intermediate. Under equivalent conditions in an ionic liquid, less intermediate build up is observed, and the effect on the rate on varying the substituent is different to that in acetonitrile. Extensive kinetic analysis shows that the ionic liquid solvent increases the rate constant of all steps of the reaction, resulting in faster product formation relative to acetonitrile; these effects increase with the proportion of ionic liquid in the reaction mixture. Differences in the equilibrium position of the addition step in the ionic liquid were found to account for both the decrease in intermediate build up relative to acetonitrile, as well as the differing trend in the overall rate of product formation as the substituent was changed. The microscopic origins of these ionic liquid effects were probed through temperature dependent analyses, highlighting the subtle balance of interactions between the ionic liquid and species along the reaction coordinate, particularly the importance of charge development in the transition state.

  2. Acceleration of raindrop formation due to the tangling-clustering instability in a turbulent stratified atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Krasovitov, B.; Kulmala, M.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2015-07-01

    Condensation of water vapor on active cloud condensation nuclei produces micron-size water droplets. To form rain, they must grow rapidly into at least 50- to 100 -μ m droplets. Observations show that this process takes only 15-20 min. The unexplained physical mechanism of such fast growth is crucial for understanding and modeling of rain and known as "condensation-coalescence bottleneck in rain formation." We show that the recently discovered phenomenon of the tangling clustering instability of small droplets in temperature-stratified turbulence [Phys. Fluids 25, 085104 (2013), 10.1063/1.4816643] results in the formation of droplet clusters with drastically increased droplet number densities. The mechanism of the tangling clustering instability is much more effective than the previously considered by us the inertial clustering instability caused by the centrifugal effect of turbulent vortices. This is the reason of strong enhancement of the collision-coalescence rate inside the clusters. The mean-field theory of the droplet growth developed in this study can be useful for explanation of the observed fast growth of cloud droplets in warm clouds from the initial 1 -μ m -size droplets to 40- to 50 -μ m -size droplets within 15-20 min.

  3. Conduction Channel Formation and Dissolution Due to Oxygen Thermophoresis/Diffusion in Hafnium Oxide Memristors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Wang, Ziwen; Huang, Xiaopeng; Kumari, Niru; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Vine, David; Kilcoyne, A L David; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2016-12-27

    Transition-metal-oxide memristors, or resistive random-access memory (RRAM) switches, are under intense development for storage-class memory because of their favorable operating power, endurance, speed, and density. Their commercial deployment critically depends on predictive compact models based on understanding nanoscale physicochemical forces, which remains elusive and controversial owing to the difficulties in directly observing atomic motions during resistive switching, Here, using scanning transmission synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy to study in situ switching of hafnium oxide memristors, we directly observed the formation of a localized oxygen-deficiency-derived conductive channel surrounded by a low-conductivity ring of excess oxygen. Subsequent thermal annealing homogenized the segregated oxygen, resetting the cells toward their as-grown resistance state. We show that the formation and dissolution of the conduction channel are successfully modeled by radial thermophoresis and Fick diffusion of oxygen atoms driven by Joule heating. This confirmation and quantification of two opposing nanoscale radial forces that affect bipolar memristor switching are important components for any future physics-based compact model for the electronic switching of these devices.

  4. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D. A.; Spence, J. C.H.; Starodub, D.

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.

  5. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; ...

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper wemore » address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.« less

  6. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D. A.; Spence, J. C. H.; Starodub, D.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called “dose fractionation theorem” of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and “Rose-criterion” image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm. PMID:20463854

  7. Scenario-based assessment of buildings damage and population exposure due to tsunamis for the town of Alexandria, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnoni, G.; Armigliato, A.; Tinti, S.

    2015-08-01

    Alexandria is the second biggest city in Egypt as regards population, is a key economic area in northern Africa and has a very important tourist activity. Historical catalogues indicate that it was severely affected by a number of tsunami events. In this work we assess the tsunami hazard by running numerical simulations of tsunami impact in Alexandria through the Worst-case Credible Tsunami Scenario Analysis (WCTSA). We identify three main seismic sources: the Western Hellenic Arc (WHA - reference event AD 365, Mw = 8.5), the Eastern Hellenic Arc (EHA - reference event 1303, Mw = 8.0) and the Cyprus Arc (CA - hypothetical scenario earthquake with Mw = 8.0), inferred from the tectonic setting and from historical tsunami catalogues. All numerical simulations are carried out by means of the code UBO-TSUFD, developed and maintained by the Tsunami Research Team of the University of Bologna. Relevant tsunami metrics are computed for each scenario and then used to build aggregated fields such as the maximum flood depth and the maximum inundation area. We find that the case that produces the most relevant flooding in Alexandria is the EHA scenario, with wave heights up to 4 m. The aggregate fields are used for a building vulnerability assessment according to a methodology developed in the frame of the EU-FP6 project SCHEMA and further refined in this study, based on the adoption of a suitable building damage matrix and on water inundation depth. It is found that in the districts of El Dekhila and Al Amriyah, to the south-west of the port of Dekhila over 12 000 buildings could be affected and hundreds of them could incur in consequences ranging from important damage to total collapse. It is also found that in the same districts tsunami inundation covers an area of about 15 km2 resulting in more than 150 000 residents being exposed.

  8. Histopathology of Incontinence-Associated Skin Lesions: Inner Tissue Damage Due to Invasion of Proteolytic Enzymes and Bacteria in Macerated Rat Skin

    PubMed Central

    Mugita, Yuko; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Nakagami, Gojiro; Kishi, Chihiro; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Nagase, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Mori, Taketoshi; Abe, Masatoshi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A common complication in patients with incontinence is perineal skin lesions, which are recognized as a form of dermatitis. In these patients, perineal skin is exposed to digestive enzymes and intestinal bacterial flora, as well as excessive water. The relative contributions of digestive enzymes and intestinal bacterial flora to skin lesion formation have not been fully shown. This study was conducted to reveal the process of histopathological changes caused by proteases and bacterial inoculation in skin maceration. For skin maceration, agarose gel containing proteases was applied to the dorsal skin of male Sprague-Dawley rats for 4 h, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculation for 30 min. Macroscopic changes, histological changes, bacterial distribution, inflammatory response, and keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation were examined. Proteases induced digestion in the prickle cell layer of the epidermis, and slight bleeding in the papillary dermis and around hair follicles in the macerated skin without macroscopic evidence of erosion. Bacterial inoculation of the skin macerated by proteolytic solution resulted in the formation of bacteria-rich clusters comprising numerous microorganisms and inflammatory cells within the papillary dermis, with remarkable tissue damage around the clusters. Tissue damage expanded by day 2. On day 3, the proliferative keratinocyte layer was elongated from the bulge region of the hair follicles. Application of proteases and P. aeruginosa induced skin lesion formation internally without macroscopic erosion of the overhydrated area, suggesting that the histopathology might be different from regular dermatitis. The healing process of this lesion is similar to transepidermal elimination. PMID:26407180

  9. Formation of electron kappa distributions due to interactions with parallel propagating whistler waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, X. Lu, Q.

    2014-02-15

    In space plasmas, charged particles are frequently observed to possess a high-energy tail, which is often modeled by a kappa-type distribution function. In this work, the formation of the electron kappa distribution in generation of parallel propagating whistler waves is investigated using fully nonlinear particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A previous research concluded that the bi-Maxwellian character of electron distributions is preserved in PIC simulations. We now demonstrate that for interactions between electrons and parallel propagating whistler waves, a non-Maxwellian high-energy tail can be formed, and a kappa distribution can be used to fit the electron distribution in time-asymptotic limit. The κ-parameter is found to decrease with increasing initial temperature anisotropy or decreasing ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency. The results might be helpful to understanding the origin of electron kappa distributions observed in space plasmas.

  10. Formation of electric dipoles in pea stem tissue due to an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Farahani, Elham

    2016-07-01

    For examining the effect of an electrical field (DC) on pea seed, we exposed the pea seeds to electric fields with intensities 1, 4 and 7 kV/cm for 30, 230, 430 and 630 seconds. The tests were repeated three times, and each iteration had 5 seeds. Then, the seeds were moved to packaged plates. Finally, microscopic observation of the pea stem tissue showed that the application of a DC electrical field caused a deformation in the pea stem tissue. The results led us to examine the deformation of the tissue theoretically and to address that deformation as an electrostatic problem. In this regard, we modeled the pea stem based on the formation of electric dipoles. Then, theoretically, we calculated the force acting on each xylem section by coding, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  11. Organogel Formation Due to the Self-Assembly of Dibenzylidene Sorbitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, Elizabeth; Hall, Carol; Khan, Saad; Spontak, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS) is a small organic molecule that is capable of inducing gelation in a variety of organic solvents and polymers at low concentrations. In this study, a combination of rheological studies, electron microscopy, and computational methods were employed to probe the mechanisms involved in DBS-induced gelation. Rheological tests on DBS/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) gels reveal that as DBS concentration is increased, the gels exhibit greater elastic moduli, shorter gelation times, and maintain their connectivity at higher temperatures. Comparison of methoxy-capped PEG gels with hydroxy-capped PEG gels reveals that polar end groups interfere with network formation resulting in slower gelation times. Electron microscopy and tomography on DBS networks in poly(ethyl methacrylate) show that at low concentrations, DBS associates into small aggregates, while at higher concentrations fibrillar growth is evident. Molecular mechanical energy calculations suggest that DBS networks may form through a combination of intermolecular hydrogen bonding and pi-interactions.

  12. Centerline Bed Elevation Profile of Sand Bed Channel due to Bar Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholibon, D. A.; Ariffin, J.; Abdullah, J.; Muhamad, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    Numerous data on bar formation have been accumulated yet the methods to predict bar geometry especially bar height are still insufficient. Objectives of this study to determine the trend in term of a significant difference of centreline bed elevation profile along the longitudinal distance. This can be investigate by carried out an experimental work in an erodible sand bed channel using a large-scale physical river model. The study included the various hydraulic characteristics with steady flow rates and sediment supply. An experimental work consists of four matrices of flow rate and channel width with other variables namely grains size and bed slope were kept constant. Analysis have included the discussion on a significant difference of centreline bed elevation profile along the longitudinal distance. As a conclusion the higher velocity in the smaller channel width have induced erosion of the banks that resulted in elevation increase while the larger flow rates have contributed to higher elevation.

  13. Simulation of surface profile formation in oxygen laser cutting of mild steel due to combustion cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaev, G. V.; Kovalev, O. B.

    2009-09-01

    A physicomathematical model of cyclic iron combustion in an oxygen flow during oxygen laser cutting of metal sheets is developed. The combustion front is set into motion by focused laser radiation and a heterogeneous oxidation reaction in oxygen. The burning rate is limited by oxygen supply from the gas phase towards the metal surface, and the interface motion depends on the local temperature. A 3D numerical simulation predicts wavy structures on the metal surface; their linear sizes depend on the scanning speed of the laser beam, the thickness of the produced liquid oxide film and the parameters of the oxygen jet flow. Simulation results help in understanding the mechanism of striation formation during oxygen gas-laser cutting of mild steel and are in qualitative agreement with experimental findings.

  14. Free radical formation in vivo and hepatotoxicity due to anesthesia with halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, J.L.; Beckwith, A.L.; Bastin, F.N.; Adams, J.F.; Cousins, M.J.; Hall, P.

    1982-09-01

    In vivo studies were undertaken to determine whether free radical formation in the liver during administration of various halogenated anesthetics is associated with hepatotoxicity of these agents in an animal model. In addition to the anesthetics halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane, carbon tetrachloride was studied as an example of a hepatotoxic halogenated compound acting by a free radical mechanism. Free radicals were trapped in vivo during anesthesia as stable adducts using the spin trap, alpha-phenyl-t-butyl nitrone. These adducts were extracted from the liver and studied by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Free radicals were detected after administration of halothane or carbon tetrachloride, compounds which were hepatotoxic under the conditions of the experiment, but were not found after anesthesia induced with enflurane or isoflurane, anesthetics which were not hepatotoxic under identical conditions. The free radical trapped after alpha-phenyl-t-butyl nitrone treatment of halothane-anesthetized rats appeared to be a metabolic intermediate of halothane.

  15. Arteriovenous fistula failure due to two straight shunts formation at draining vein.

    PubMed

    Tong, YanQing; Qi, WanLi; Sun, Min

    2013-01-01

    A 48-year-old asian man was admitted to hospital for the consideration of hemodialysis (HD). An adequate site was decided on for the AVF after Doppler ultrasonography examination of radial artery and cephalic vein. The AVF was formed under local anaesthetic at his right wrist. When seen at the clinic appointment one month later, the AVF was not working. The subsequent Doppler ultrasonography examination revealed two straight shunts at draining vein. The failure of AVF is due to impaired outflow following reduction of the resistance between draining vein and peripheral venous system.

  16. Early amygdala or hippocampus damage influences adolescent female social behavior during group formation.

    PubMed

    Moadab, Gilda; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Bauman, Melissa D; Amaral, David G

    2017-02-01

    This study continues a longitudinal analysis of rhesus macaque social behavior following bilateral neonatal ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala or hippocampus, or sham operations. The social behavior of female subjects was evaluated at a critical developmental time point-the transition to adulthood. At approximately 4 years of age, female subjects were housed in small groups with other female subjects and reproductively viable adult males. As compared with neurologically intact control animals and animals with early amygdala damage, animals with early hippocampal damage were more social with their female peers. In contrast, as compared with control animals, animals with early amygdala damage spent less time with the males, engaged less frequently in behaviors typical of reproductive consortships, had higher frequencies of self-directed stereotypies, and became pregnant later. Males also generated fewer communicative signals toward animals with early amygdala damage than to control animals and animals with early hippocampus damage. Rates of sexual behavior were generally low for all animals, and there were no lesion-based differences in their frequencies. Discriminant function analyses demonstrated that patterns of affiliative social behaviors differed across the 3 experimental groups, both in terms of the social behaviors directed to the males, and the social behaviors generated by the males toward the females. In 4 of the 5 social groups, amygdala-lesioned animals were lowest ranked, potentially contributing to reduced sociability interactions with males. Other potential mechanisms and the experiments needed to elucidate them are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Reduction of Liquid Clad Formation Due to Solid State Diffusion in Clad Brazing Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-12-01

    Warm forming operations have shown promise in expanding automotive heat exchanger designs by increasing forming limits of clad brazing sheet. The impact of isothermal holds below the clad melting temperature on subsequent brazeability has not previously been studied in detail. The effect of these holds on brazeability, as measured by the clad thickness loss due to solid state diffusion of Si out of the clad layer prior to clad melting, was assessed through parallel DSC and optical microscopy measurements, as well as through the use of a previously developed model. EPMA measurements were also performed to support the other measures. Overall, the same trends were predicted by DSC, microscopy, and the theoretical model; however, the DSC predictions were unable to accurately predict remaining clad thickness prior to melting, even after correcting the data for clad-core interactions. Microscopy measurements showed very good agreement with the model predictions, although there were slight discrepancies at short hold times due to the inability of the model to account for clad loss during heating to the brazing temperature. Further microscopy measurements showed that when the heating rate is set below a critical value, there is a reduction in the clad thickness from the as-received condition.

  18. Amelioration of oxidative DNA damage in mouse peritoneal macrophages by Hippophae salicifolia due to its proton (H+) donation capability: Ex vivo and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mainak; Karmakar, Indrajit; Haldar, Sagnik; Das, Avratanu; Bala, Asis; Haldar, Pallab Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The present study evaluates the antioxidant effect of methanol extract of Hippophae salicifolia (MEHS) bark with special emphasis on its role on oxidative DNA damage in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Material and Methods: In vitro antioxidant activity was estimated by standard antioxidant assays whereas the antioxidant activity concluded the H+ donating capacity. Mouse erythrocytes’ hemolysis and peritoneal macrophages’ DNA damage were determined spectrophotometrically. In vivo antioxidant activity of MEHS was determined in carbon tetrachloride-induced mice by studying its effect on superoxide anion production in macrophages cells, superoxide dismutase in the cell lysate, DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and reduces glutathione. Results: The extract showed good in vitro antioxidant activities whereas the inhibitory concentrations values ranged from 5.80 to 106.5 μg/ml. MEHS significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the oxidative DNA damage. It also attenuated the oxidative conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin and elevation of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant in cells. Conclusion: The result indicates MEHS has good in vitro-in vivo antioxidant property as well as the protective effect on DNA and red blood cell may be due to its H+ donating property. PMID:27413349

  19. Modelling of cloud formation due to air-sea interactions in an energy-active zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, K. Ya.; Khvorostyanov, V. I.

    1989-02-01

    A mesoscale 3D numerical model is described, with which detailed calculations have been made of turbulence and wind characteristics in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), as well as cloud particle size distribution, longwave and solar radiation fluxes and flux divergences, and atmosphere-ocean heat exchange. Based on numerical experiments simulating winter conditions of the Newfoundland energy-active zone of the ocean (EAZO), atmosphere-ocean energy exchange is investigated. It is shown that the basic mechanisms for the EAZO formation involve the following processes: (i) at the hydrological front between cold and warm ocean currents, the fluxes of sensible and latent heat grow significantly; (ii) at this front, in a particular synoptic situation, overcast low-level cloudiness forms, screening solar radiation so that in winter, the radiation budget at the front is reduced, and the radiative flux into the ocean is less than the energy release to the atmosphere; (iii) frequent occurrence of such synoptic situations with cloudiness decreases the oceanic enthalpy and creates negative SST anomalies. The transport of these anomalies by currents to the western coasts of the continents causes anomalies of weather and climate.

  20. Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Due to Defective Glial Wedge Formation in Lhx2 Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Gregory A; Hirokawa, Karla E; Chuang, Tony M; Urbina, Cecilia; Patel, Fenil; Fong, Jeanette; Funatsu, Nobuo; Monuki, Edwin S

    2015-09-01

    Establishment of the corpus callosum involves coordination between callosal projection neurons and multiple midline structures, including the glial wedge (GW) rostrally and hippocampal commissure caudally. GW defects have been associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Here we show that conditional Lhx2 inactivation in cortical radial glia using Emx1-Cre or Nestin-Cre drivers results in ACC. The ACC phenotype was characterized by aberrant ventrally projecting callosal axons rather than Probst bundles, and was 100% penetrant on 2 different mouse strain backgrounds. Lhx2 inactivation in postmitotic cortical neurons using Nex-Cre mice did not result in ACC, suggesting that the mutant phenotype was not autonomous to the callosal projection neurons. Instead, ACC was associated with an absent hippocampal commissure and a markedly reduced to absent GW. Expression studies demonstrated strong Lhx2 expression in the normal GW and in its radial glial progenitors, with absence of Lhx2 resulting in normal Emx1 and Sox2 expression, but premature exit from the cell cycle based on EdU-Ki67 double labeling. These studies define essential roles for Lhx2 in GW, hippocampal commissure, and corpus callosum formation, and suggest that defects in radial GW progenitors can give rise to ACC.

  1. Formation of a chronic pain syndrome due to mesh shrinkage after laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM).

    PubMed

    Klein, Fritz; Ospina, Carlos; Rudolph, Birgit; Wüstefeld, Joost; Denecke, Timm; Neuhaus, Peter; Schmidt, Sven-Christian

    2012-10-01

    The case of a 58-year-old male patient who developed a chronic pain syndrome after laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh for treatment of a large symptomatic umbilical hernia combined with rectus diastasis is reported. Twelve months after an uncomplicated initial surgery, the patient presented with progressive signs of a foreign body sensation and pain in the anterior abdominal wall. Computed tomography examination revealed no pathologic findings but a marked shrinkage of the mesh implant. Because of further progressive symptoms, explorative laparotomy was performed. Mesh shrinkage and adhesions with a surrounding chronic tissue reaction were found as the cause of the pain syndrome. This case demonstrates a case of a chronic pain syndrome due to mesh shrinkage 12 months after initial ventral hernia repair. Mesh shrinkage should therefore be taken into consideration in patients with progressive pain chronic syndromes after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

  2. Subsurface deuterium bubble formation in W due to low-energy high flux deuterium plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Qu, S. L.; Shi, L. Q.; Morgan, T. W.

    2017-03-01

    The deuterium (D) bubbles formed in W exposed to high flux D plasma were researched by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. After D plasma exposure at 500 K and 1000 K, a layer of nano-sized bubbles were homogenously distributed in W subsurface region. The D bubbles were homogenously nucleated due to the high D concentration, and the nucleation process is not related to the vacancy defects. At low temperature (500 K), D bubbles can grow by surface blistering, which caused different nano scale morphologies on different surfaces. At high temperature (1000 K), D bubbles mainly grow by vacancy clustering, which caused pinholes on the surface.

  3. Decrease in Corneal Damage due to Benzalkonium Chloride by the Addition of Mannitol into Timolol Maleate Eye Drops.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Tanino, Tadatoshi; Ito, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Norio; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of mannitol on corneal damage caused by benzalkonium chloride (BAC), which is used as a preservative in commercially available timolol maleate eye drops, using rat debrided corneal epithelium and a human cornea epithelial cell line (HCE-T). Corneal wounds were monitored using a fundus camera TRC-50X equipped with a digital camera; eye drops were instilled into rat eyes five times a day after corneal epithelial abrasion. The viability of HCE-T cells was calculated by TetraColor One; and Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) were used to measure antimicrobial activity. The reducing effects on transcorneal penetration and intraocular pressure (IOP) of the eye drops were determined using rabbits. The corneal wound healing rate and rate constant (kH), as well as cell viability, were higher following treatment with 0.005% BAC solution containing 0.5% mannitol than in the case BAC solution alone; the antimicrobial activity was approximately the same for BAC solutions with and without mannitol. In addition, the kH for rat eyes instilled with commercially available timolol maleate eye drops containing 0.5% mannitol was significantly higher than that for eyes instilled with timolol maleate eye drops without mannitol, and the addition of mannitol did not affect the corneal penetration or IOP reducing effect of the timolol maleate eye drops. A preservative system comprising BAC and mannitol may provide effective therapy for glaucoma patients requiring long-term treatment with anti-glaucoma agents.

  4. Parametric studies on confinement of radionuclides in the excavated damaged zone due to bentonite type and temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, R. A.; Thivent, Olivier; Ahn, Joonhong

    A parametric study is presented in this paper in order to examine the potential of the extruding bentonite into a fracture in the EDZ to confine radionuclides. Radionuclide migration of cesium and neptunium were studied at elevated temperatures and for a sodium- and calcium-type bentonite. Parameter values were obtained based on empirical studies for hydraulic conductivity, molecular diffusion, and sorption. Results indicate extrusion speed is affected by temperature changes. Elevated temperatures also affect radionuclide migration. For Cs, migration is enhanced due to decreasing sorption, while Np migration is inhibited due to increasing sorption. The potential to confine radionuclides is favorable, and the choice of bentonite does not seem to affect radionuclide confinement in the extruding region.

  5. Permeability evolution of fractured limestone due to reactive flow: Observation and prediction of wormhole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H.; Fitts, J. P.; Crandall, D.; McIntyre, D.; Peters, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fractures in porous media provide preferential pathways for flow and solute transport. Their hydraulic properties are critical parameters for determining fluid migration and leakage, and are subject to alterations when exposed to reactive flow, e.g. CO2-acidfied brine in the case of carbon storage. Our previous studies have shown how mineral heterogeneity could lead to increased roughness that mitigates the increase in fracture permeability. This study shows that, even in rocks with mineral homogeneity, fracture geometry is subject to complex alterations. In this presentation, we report an experimental study of CO2-acidified brine in fractured Indiana Limestone, with comprehensive characterization of effluent chemistry analyzed by ICP-OES, and 3D geometry evolution using micro-computed topography (xCT). Significant carbonate dissolution was observed but the reaction extent revealed by the effluent chemistry was less than what was predicted by simple reaction transport models. xCT imaging revealed the formation of wormhole channels in the fracture, and the channels grew larger downstream and more prominent over time. Using the fracture geometries derived from the xCT images, we simulated the flow field and inferred the evolution of fracture hydraulic properties. To interpret the process of wormholing and its impacts on fracture hydraulic properties, we used reactive transport modeling to simulate the interplay between fracture geometry, fluid flow and geochemical reactions. Our simulations predicted that wormholes were formed in fractures with initial roughness representative of natural subsurface systems. The presence of wormholes caused a disproportionately larger permeability increase than would be expected given the extent of volume change.

  6. Solar Wind Strahl Observations and Their Implication to the Core-Halo Formation due to Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the kinetic properties of the strahl electron velocity distribution functions (VDF?s) in the solar wind is presented. This study focuses on the mechanisms that control and regulate the electron VDF?s and the stability of the strahl electrons in the solar wind; mechanisms that are not yet well understood. Various parameters are investigated such as the strahl-electron density, temperature anisotropy, and electron heat-flux. These parameters are used to investigate the stability of the strahl population. The analysis check for whether the strahl electrons are constrained by some instability (e.g., the whistler or KAW instabilities), or are maintained by other types of processes. The electron heat-flux and temperature anisotropy are determined by modeling of the 3D-VDF?s from which the moments properties of the various populations are obtained. The results of this study have profound implication on the current hypothesis about the probable formation of the solar wind halo electrons produced from the scattering of the strahl population. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the core-halo in an isolated event. The observation implies that the scattering of the strahl is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicate that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx. 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The study is based on high time resolution data from the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer.

  7. Effects on detection of radical formation in skin due to solar irradiation measured by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Stephanie; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Beckers, Ingeborg; Kockott, Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Paul, Victoria; Zastrow, Leonhard; Meinke, Martina C

    2016-10-15

    In various research projects, oxidative stress in irradiated skin was investigated by measuring the production of free radical using EPR spectroscopy. However, comparison of the obtained measuring results proved to be difficult as different preparation parameters were used for those measurements. In the present study the influence of the preparation parameters on the detected radical production was methodically investigated. For this purpose, porcine skin was exposed in situ to UV and VIS-NIR radiation, respectively, while being measured in an X band EPR spectrometer. Prior to the measurements, the skin had been treated with the spin trap N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) and the spin marker 3-(Carboxyl)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (PCA). The two methods were investigated for quantitative comparability, for advantages and disadvantages and for errors potentially affecting the evaluation of the results. A significant influence of the preparation parameters (concentration and amount of substance) on the detected radical formations could be found. This influence had a nonlinear effect on the detected radical production. 120μl of incubated amount for 1M PBN and for PCA at a concentration of 0.6 and 1.5mM were determined to be the optimum parameters. The incubated skin samples were 1cm in diameter and 300μm thick. Between 22 and 37°C the incubation temperature showed no significant influence on the detected radical production. For the first time it could be demonstrated for PCA-incubated skin that the radiation-induced radical production depends exclusively on the irradiation dose, provided the preparation parameters and the spectral region are kept constant. In addition, the radical production in the UVB-UVA and VIS-NIR spectral regions was measured in PCA- and PBN-treated excised porcine skin. It was found that PBN and PCA provide comparable results for the relative quantity and kinetics of radical production.

  8. Spatial Distribution of Adult Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Damage to Cotton Flower Buds Due to Feeding and Oviposition.

    PubMed

    Grigolli, J F J; Souza, L A; Fernandes, M G; Busoli, A C

    2016-12-12

    The cotton boll weevil Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is the main pest in cotton crop around the world, directly affecting cotton production. In order to establish a sequential sampling plan, it is crucial to understand the spatial distribution of the pest population and the damage it causes to the crop through the different developmental stages of cotton plants. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the spatial distribution of adults in the cultivation area and their oviposition and feeding behavior throughout the development of the cotton plants. The experiment was conducted in Maracaju, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, in the 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 growing seasons, in an area of 10,000 m(2), planted with the cotton cultivar FM 993. The experimental area was divided into 100 plots of 100 m(2) (10 × 10 m) each, and five plants per plot were sampled weekly throughout the crop cycle. The number of flower buds with feeding and oviposition punctures and of adult A. grandis was recorded throughout the crop cycle in five plants per plot. After determining the aggregation indices (variance/mean ratio, Morisita's index, exponent k of the negative binomial distribution, and Green's coefficient) and adjusting the frequencies observed in the field to the distribution of frequencies (Poisson, negative binomial, and positive binomial) using the chi-squared test, it was observed that flower buds with punctures derived from feeding, oviposition, and feeding + oviposition showed an aggregated distribution in the cultivation area until 85 days after emergence and a random distribution after this stage. The adults of A. grandis presented a random distribution in the cultivation area.

  9. White Layer Formation Due to Phase Transformation to Orthogonal machine of AISI 1045 Annealed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sangil; Melkote, Shreyes N; Haluska, Dr. Michael S; Watkins, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the white layer formed during machining of steels is caused primarily by a thermally induced phase transformation resulting from rapid heating and quenching. As a result, it is often assumed that if the temperature at the tool flank-workpiece interface exceeds the nominal phase transformation temperature for the steel, a white layer forms. However, no attempt has been made to actually measure the temperatures produced at the tool flank-workpiece interface and correlate it with microstructural evidence of phase transformation. This paper aims to address these limitations through suitably designed experiments and analysis. Orthogonal machining tests were performed on AISI 1045 annealed steel at different cutting speeds and tool flank wear. During machining, temperature measurements at the tool flank-workpiece interface were made using an exposed thermocouple technique. Metallographic studies of the machined sub-surface and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were performed to determine the presence and depth of white layer, and the presence of the retained austenite phase in the machined surface layer, respectively. Analysis of the data shows that the white layer can form due to phase transformation at temperatures below the nominal austenitization temperature of the steel. Possible causes of this result are presented.

  10. Output switching in a semiconductor circular ring resonator due to solitons wave formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Ming Chang; Yen, Chun Liang

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrated the phenomena of switching of the coupling in an InGaAlP multiple-quantum-well semiconductor circular ring resonator due to the generation of solitons wave guiding. The fabricated device is consisted of a circular ridge waveguide ring resonator with diameter range from 150 to 250 µm with two Y-junction directional couplers for output coupling of clockwise/counter clockwise (CW/CCW) modes. Ridge waveguide of 1.1 and 0.8 µm depth were fabricated to study the effect in solitons generation. It showed that for the 1.1 µm etched depth waveguide, CW and CCW modes in the ring resonator were coupled out through each Y-junction couplers respectively. However, for the 0.8 µm depth waveguide when spatial solitons was formed, coupling of the CCW modes in the circular ring resonator was switched from Y-junction coupler to the spatial solitons guiding terminal. Measurements of light-current (L-I) and spectral characteristics were studied to enunciate the mechanism of output modes switching in circular ring resonator.

  11. Influence of age on brain edema formation, secondary brain damage and inflammatory response after brain trauma in mice.

    PubMed

    Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Luh, Clara; Gotthardt, Philipp; Huang, Changsheng; Schäfer, Michael K; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C

    2012-01-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI) elderly patients suffer from higher mortality rate and worse functional outcome compared to young patients. However, experimental TBI research is primarily performed in young animals. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether age affects functional outcome, neuroinflammation and secondary brain damage after brain trauma in mice. Young (2 months) and old (21 months) male C57Bl6N mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) on the right parietal cortex. Animals of both ages were randomly assigned to 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h survival. At the end of the observation periods, contusion volume, brain water content, neurologic function, cerebral and systemic inflammation (CD3+ T cell migration, inflammatory cytokine expression in brain and lung, blood differential cell count) were determined. Old animals showed worse neurological function 72 h after CCI and a high mortality rate (19.2%) compared to young (0%). This did not correlate with histopathological damage, as contusion volumes were equal in both age groups. Although a more pronounced brain edema formation was detected in old mice 24 hours after TBI, lack of correlation between brain water content and neurological deficit indicated that brain edema formation is not solely responsible for age-dependent differences in neurological outcome. Brains of old naïve mice were about 8% smaller compared to young naïve brains, suggesting age-related brain atrophy with possible decline in plasticity. Onset of cerebral inflammation started earlier and primarily ipsilateral to damage in old mice, whereas in young mice inflammation was delayed and present in both hemispheres with a characteristic T cell migration pattern. Pulmonary interleukin 1β expression was up-regulated after cerebral injury only in young, not aged mice. The results therefore indicate that old animals are prone to functional deficits and strong ipsilateral cerebral inflammation

  12. Hypochlorite-induced damage to DNA, RNA, and polynucleotides: formation of chloramines and nitrogen-centered radicals.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Stimulated monocytes and neutrophils generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is a key bactericidal agent, but can also damage host tissue. As there is a strong link between chronic inflammation and some cancers, we have investigated HOCl damage to DNA, RNA, and polynucleotides. Reaction of HOCl with these materials is shown to yield multiple semistable chloramines (RNHCl/RR'NCl), which are the major initial products, and account for 50-95% of the added HOCl. These chloramines decay by thermal and metal-ion catalyzed processes, to give nucleoside-derived, nitrogen-centered, radicals. The latter have been characterized by EPR spin trapping. The propensity for radical formation with polynucleotides is cytidine > adenosine = guanosine > uridine = thymidine. The rates of decay, and yield of radicals formed, are dependent on the nature of the nucleobase on which they are formed, with chloramines formed from ring heterocyclic amine groups being less stable than those formed on exocyclic amines (RNH2 groups). Evidence is presented for chlorine transfer from the former, kinetically favored, sites to the more thermodynamically favored exocyclic amines. EPR experiments have also provided evidence for the rapid addition of pyrimidine-derived nitrogen-centered radicals to other nucleobases to give dimers and the oxidation of DNA by radicals derived from preformed nucleoside chloramines. Direct reaction of HOCl with plasmid DNA gives rise to single- and double-strand breaks via chloramine-mediated reactions. Preformed nucleoside chloramines also induce plasmid cleavage, though this only occurs to a significant extent with unstable thymidine- and uridine-derived chloramines, where radical formation is rapid. Overall the data rationalize the preferential formation of chlorinated 2'-deoxycytidine and 2'-deoxyadenosine in DNA and suggest that DNA damage induced by HOCl, and preformed chloramines, occurs at sequence

  13. Impacts of plasma-induced damage due to UV light irradiation during etching on Ge fin fabrication and device performance of Ge fin field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizubayashi, Wataru; Noda, Shuichi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Nishi, Takashi; Kikuchi, Akio; Ota, Hiroyuki; Su, Ping-Hsun; Li, Yiming; Samukawa, Seiji; Endo, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the impacts of plasma-induced damage due to UV light irradiation during etching on Ge fin fabrication and the device performance of Ge fin field-effect transistors (Ge FinFETs). UV light irradiation during etching affected the shape of the Ge fin and the surface roughness of the Ge fin sidewall. A vertical and smooth Ge fin could be fabricated by neutral beam etching without UV light irradiation. The performances of Ge FinFETs fabricated by neutral beam etching were markedly improved as compared to those of Ge FinFETs fabricated by inductively coupled plasma etching, in which the UV light has an impact.

  14. Fibrinogen triggers astrocyte scar formation by promoting the availability of active TGF-β after vascular damage

    PubMed Central

    Schachtrup, Christian; Ryu, Jae K.; Helmrick, Matthew; Vagena, Eirini; Galanakis, Dennis K.; Degen, Jay L.; Margolis, Richard U.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Scar formation in the nervous system begins within hours after traumatic injury and is characterized primarily by reactive astrocytes depositing proteoglycans that inhibit regeneration. A fundamental question in CNS repair has been the identity of the initial molecular mediator that triggers glial scar formation. Here we show that the blood protein fibrinogen, which leaks into the CNS immediately after blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption or vascular damage, serves as an early signal for the induction of glial scar formation via the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Our studies revealed that fibrinogen is a carrier of latent TGF-β and induces phosphorylation of Smad2 in astrocytes that leads to inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Consistent with these findings, genetic or pharmacologic depletion of fibrinogen in mice reduces active TGF-β, Smad2 phosphorylation, glial cell activation and neurocan deposition following cortical injury. Furthermore, stereotactic injection of fibrinogen into the mouse cortex is sufficient to induce astrogliosis. Inhibition of the TGF-β receptor pathway abolishes the fibrinogen-induced effects on glial scar formation in vivo and in vitro. These results identify fibrinogen as a primary astrocyte activation signal, provide evidence that deposition of inhibitory proteoglycans is induced by a blood protein that leaks in the CNS after vasculature rupture, and point to TGF-β as a molecular link between vascular permeability and scar formation. PMID:20427645

  15. HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate sensitizes E1A+Ras-transformed cells to DNA damaging agents by facilitating formation and persistence of γH2AX foci.

    PubMed

    Abramova, Maria V; Svetlikova, Svetlana B; Kukushkin, Alexander N; Aksenov, Nikolai D; Pospelova, Tatiana V; Pospelov, Valery A

    2011-12-15

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) suppress the growth of tumor cells due to induction of cell cycle arrest, senescence or apoptosis. Recent data demonstrate that HDACi can interfere with DNA Damage Response (DDR) thereby sensitizing the cells to DNA damaging agents. Here, we show that HDACi sodium butyrate (NaBut) potentiates the formation of γH2AX foci predominantly in S-phase E1A+Ras cells. Accumulation of γH2AX foci sensitizes the cells toward such DNA damaging agents as irradiation (IR) and adriamycin. In fact, NaBut potentiates the persistence of γH2AX foci induced by genotoxic agents. The synergizing effects depend on DNA damaging factors and on the order of NaBut treatment. Indeed, NaBut treatment for 24 h leads to an accumulation of G 1-phase cells and a lack of S-phase cells, therefore, adriamycin, a powerful S-phase-specific inhibitor, when added to NaBut-treated cells, is unable to substantially add γH2AX foci. In contrast, IR produces both single- and double-strand DNA breaks at any stage of the cell cycle and was shown to increase γH2AX foci in NaBut-treated cells. Further, a lifetime of IR-induced γH2AX foci depends on the subsequent presence of HDACi. Correspondingly, NaBut withdrawal leads to the extinction of IR-induced γH2AX foci. This necessitates HDACi to hold the IR-induced γH2AX foci unrepaired. However, the IR-induced γH2AX foci persist after long-term NaBut treatment (72 h) even after washing the drug. Thus, although signaling pathways regulating H2AX phosphorylation in NaBut-treated cells remain to be investigated, the obtained results show that NaBut potentiates effects of DNA damaging agents by facilitating formation and persistence of γH2AX foci.

  16. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage "FOD" Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/ health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite-element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  17. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage (FOD) Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  18. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  19. Impairment of vitamin D metabolism due to environmental cadmium exposure, and possible relevance to sex-related differences in vulnerability to the bone damage

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuritani, Ikiko; Honda, Ryumon; Ishizaki, Masao; Yamada, Yuichi ); Kido, Teruhiko; Nogawa, Koji )

    1992-12-01

    To determine whether depleted serum 1[alpha],25-dihydroxyvitamin D (VD) concentrations are associated with cadmium (Cd)-induced renal damage, the relationships between four indices of renal function and two indicators of bone metabolism, that is, serum VD and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations, were analyzed in 30 male and 44 female subjects exposed to environmental Cd. Also, these associations were compared in male and female subjects to evaluate sex-related differences in vulnerability to the bone damage observed in Cd-exposed persons. Serum VD decreased significantly with declines in creatinine clearance and percentage tubular reabsorption of phosphate, and with increases in serum creatinine and serum [beta][sub 2]-microglobulin ([beta][sub 2]m) concentrations in the female subjects exposed to Cd, but not in the male subjects. The correlation between serum VD and PTH levels was also significant only in the females. Correlation coefficients between serum [beta][sub 2]m and VD and those between serum PTH and VD in both sexes were significantly different. These results suggest that renal damage due to Cd exposure leads to the decreases in the serum VD level and increases in serum PTH level, and that the more marked changes in serum VD and PTH in the women may play a role in the development of sex-related differences in Cd-induced bone injury.

  20. Field observations of seismic velocity changes caused by shaking-induced damage and healing due to mesoscopic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassenmeier, M.; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Eulenfeld, T.; Bartsch, M.; Victor, P.; Tilmann, F.; Korn, M.

    2016-03-01

    To investigate temporal seismic velocity changes due to earthquake related processes and environmental forcing in Northern Chile, we analyse 8 yr of ambient seismic noise recorded by the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC). By autocorrelating the ambient seismic noise field measured on the vertical components, approximations of the Green's functions are retrieved and velocity changes are measured with Coda Wave Interferometry. At station PATCX, we observe seasonal changes in seismic velocity caused by thermal stress as well as transient velocity reductions in the frequency range of 4-6 Hz. Sudden velocity drops occur at the time of mostly earthquake-induced ground shaking and recover over a variable period of time. We present an empirical model that describes the seismic velocity variations based on continuous observations of the local ground acceleration. The model assumes that not only the shaking of large earthquakes causes velocity drops, but any small vibrations continuously induce minor velocity variations that are immediately compensated by healing in the steady state. We show that the shaking effect is accumulated over time and best described by the integrated envelope of the ground acceleration over the discretization interval of the velocity measurements, which is one day. In our model, the amplitude of the velocity reduction as well as the recovery time are proportional to the size of the excitation. This model with two free scaling parameters fits the data of the shaking induced velocity variation in remarkable detail. Additionally, a linear trend is observed that might be related to a recovery process from one or more earthquakes before our measurement period. A clear relationship between ground shaking and induced velocity reductions is not visible at other stations. We attribute the outstanding sensitivity of PATCX to ground shaking and thermal stress to the special geological setting of the station, where the subsurface material

  1. Global crop yield reductions due to surface ozone exposure: 1. Year 2000 crop production losses and economic damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avnery, Shiri; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Liu, Junfeng; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to elevated concentrations of surface ozone (O 3) causes substantial reductions in the agricultural yields of many crops. As emissions of O 3 precursors rise in many parts of the world over the next few decades, yield reductions from O 3 exposure appear likely to increase the challenges of feeding a global population projected to grow from 6 to 9 billion between 2000 and 2050. This study estimates year 2000 global yield reductions of three key staple crops (soybean, maize, and wheat) due to surface ozone exposure using hourly O 3 concentrations simulated by the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers version 2.4 (MOZART-2). We calculate crop losses according to two metrics of ozone exposure - seasonal daytime (08:00-19:59) mean O 3 (M12) and accumulated O 3 above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40) - and predict crop yield losses using crop-specific O 3 concentration:response functions established by field studies. Our results indicate that year 2000 O 3-induced global yield reductions ranged, depending on the metric used, from 8.5-14% for soybean, 3.9-15% for wheat, and 2.2-5.5% for maize. Global crop production losses totaled 79-121 million metric tons, worth $11-18 billion annually (USD 2000). Our calculated yield reductions agree well with previous estimates, providing further evidence that yields of major crops across the globe are already being substantially reduced by exposure to surface ozone - a risk that will grow unless O 3-precursor emissions are curbed in the future or crop cultivars are developed and utilized that are resistant to O 3.

  2. Formation of singlet oxygen and protection against its oxidative damage in Photosystem II under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Pospíšil, Pavel; Prasad, Ankush

    2014-08-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is exposed to various abiotic stresses associated with adverse environmental conditions such as high light, heat, heavy metals or mechanical injury. Distinctive functional response to adverse environmental conditions is formation of singlet oxygen ((1)O2). In this review, recent progress on mechanistic principles on (1)O2 formation under abiotic stresses is summarized. Under high light, (1)O2 is formed by excitation energy transfer from triplet chlorophylls to molecular oxygen formed by the spin conversion via photosensitization Type II reaction in the PSII antenna complex or by the recombination of (1)[P680(+)Pheo(-)] radical pair in the PSII reaction center. Apart from well-described (1)O2 formation by excitation energy transfer, (1)O2 formation by decomposition of dioxetane and tetroxide is summarized as a potential source of (1)O2 in PSII under heat, heavy metals and mechanical stress. The description of mechanistic principles on (1)O2 formation under abiotic stress allows us to understand how plants respond to adverse environmental conditions in vivo.

  3. A case of tricuspid valve endocarditis due to Cardiobacterium hominis which emphasizes the shift between the poverty of clinical symptoms and the severity of cardiac damages.

    PubMed

    Molet, Lucie; Revest, Matthieu; Fournet, Maxime; Donal, Erwan; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Minet, Jacques; Le Bars, Hervé

    2016-12-01

    Infectious endocarditis due to Cardiobacterium hominis is an uncommon event, accounting for less than 2% of all cases of infectious endocarditis. The infection of the tricuspid valve as it is reported here is extremely rare. We report the case of a tricuspid endocarditis due to Cardiobacterium hominis in a 56 year-old man who was admitted to hospital with pelvic and scapular pain. The diagnosis was established through positive blood cultures and echographic detection of a large tricuspid vegetation. Despite efficient antibiotic therapy, valve replacement was required. The clinical course of Cardiobacterium endocarditis is usually subacute, and the diagnosis may therefore be delayed. This case emphasizes the shift between the poverty of clinical symptoms and severity of cardiac damages, what we could call the Cardiobacterium paradox.

  4. Oxidative damage of U937 human leukemic cells caused by hydroxyl radical results in singlet oxygen formation.

    PubMed

    Rác, Marek; Křupka, Michal; Binder, Svatopluk; Sedlářová, Michaela; Matušková, Zuzana; Raška, Milan; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The exposure of human cells to oxidative stress leads to the oxidation of biomolecules such as lipids, proteins and nuclei acids. In this study, the oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA was studied after the addition of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent to cell suspension containing human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line U937. EPR spin-trapping data showed that the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cell suspension formed hydroxyl radical via Fenton reaction mediated by endogenous metals. The malondialdehyde HPLC analysis showed no lipid peroxidation after the addition of hydrogen peroxide, whereas the Fenton reagent caused significant lipid peroxidation. The formation of protein carbonyls monitored by dot blot immunoassay and the DNA fragmentation measured by comet assay occurred after the addition of both hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent. Oxidative damage of biomolecules leads to the formation of singlet oxygen as conformed by EPR spin-trapping spectroscopy and the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It is proposed here that singlet oxygen is formed by the decomposition of high-energy intermediates such as dioxetane or tetroxide formed by oxidative damage of biomolecules.

  5. Oxidative Damage of U937 Human Leukemic Cells Caused by Hydroxyl Radical Results in Singlet Oxygen Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rác, Marek; Křupka, Michal; Binder, Svatopluk; Sedlářová, Michaela; Matušková, Zuzana; Raška, Milan; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The exposure of human cells to oxidative stress leads to the oxidation of biomolecules such as lipids, proteins and nuclei acids. In this study, the oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA was studied after the addition of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent to cell suspension containing human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line U937. EPR spin-trapping data showed that the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cell suspension formed hydroxyl radical via Fenton reaction mediated by endogenous metals. The malondialdehyde HPLC analysis showed no lipid peroxidation after the addition of hydrogen peroxide, whereas the Fenton reagent caused significant lipid peroxidation. The formation of protein carbonyls monitored by dot blot immunoassay and the DNA fragmentation measured by comet assay occurred after the addition of both hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent. Oxidative damage of biomolecules leads to the formation of singlet oxygen as conformed by EPR spin-trapping spectroscopy and the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It is proposed here that singlet oxygen is formed by the decomposition of high-energy intermediates such as dioxetane or tetroxide formed by oxidative damage of biomolecules. PMID:25730422

  6. Enhanced Light Emission due to Formation of Semi-polar InGaN/GaN Multi-quantum Wells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wan-Ru; Weng, Guo-En; Wang, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Jiang-Yong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Zhang, Bao-Ping

    2015-12-01

    InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) are grown on (0001) sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with special growth parameters to form V-shaped pits simultaneously. Measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrate the formation of MQWs on both (0001) and ([Formula: see text]) side surface of the V-shaped pits. The latter is known to be a semi-polar surface. Optical characterizations together with theoretical calculation enable us to identify the optical transitions from these MQWs. The layer thickness on ([Formula: see text]) surface is smaller than that on (0001) surface, and the energy level in the ([Formula: see text]) semi-polar quantum well (QW) is higher than in the (0001) QW. As the sample temperature is increased from 15 K, the integrated cathodoluminescence (CL) intensity of (0001) MQWs increases first and then decreases while that of the ([Formula: see text]) MQWs decreases monotonically. The integrated photoluminescence (PL) intensity of (0001) MQWs increases significantly from 15 to 70 K. These results are explained by carrier injection from ([Formula: see text]) to (0001) MQWs due to thermal excitation. It is therefore concluded that the emission efficiency of (0001) MQWs at high temperatures can be greatly improved due to the formation of semi-polar MQWs.

  7. Nucleosomes Suppress the Formation of Double-strand DNA Breaks during Attempted Base Excision Repair of Clustered Oxidative Damages*

    PubMed Central

    Cannan, Wendy J.; Tsang, Betty P.; Wallace, Susan S.; Pederson, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can produce multiple, clustered oxidative lesions in DNA. The near simultaneous excision of nearby lesions in opposing DNA strands by the base excision repair (BER) enzymes can produce double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This attempted BER accounts for many of the potentially lethal or mutagenic DSBs that occur in vivo. To assess the impact of nucleosomes on the frequency and pattern of BER-dependent DSB formation, we incubated nucleosomes containing oxidative damages in opposing DNA strands with selected DNA glycosylases and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1. Overall, nucleosomes substantially suppressed DSB formation. However, the degree of suppression varied as a function of (i) the lesion type and DNA glycosylase tested, (ii) local sequence context and the stagger between opposing strand lesions, (iii) the helical orientation of oxidative lesions relative to the underlying histone octamer, and (iv) the distance between the lesion cluster and the nucleosome edge. In some instances the binding of a BER factor to one nucleosomal lesion appeared to facilitate binding to the opposing strand lesion. DSB formation did not invariably lead to nucleosome dissolution, and in some cases, free DNA ends resulting from DSB formation remained associated with the histone octamer. These observations explain how specific structural and dynamic properties of nucleosomes contribute to the suppression of BER-generated DSBs. These studies also suggest that most BER-generated DSBs will occur in linker DNA and in genomic regions associated with elevated rates of nucleosome turnover or remodeling. PMID:24891506

  8. Thiourea protects against copper-induced oxidative damage by formation of a redox-inactive thiourea-copper complex.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Antholine, William E; Frei, Balz

    2002-06-15

    Although thiourea has been used widely to study the role of hydroxyl radicals in metal-mediated biological damage, it is not a specific hydroxyl radical scavenger and may also exert antioxidant effects unrelated to hydroxyl radical scavenging. Thus, we investigated the effects of thiourea on copper-induced oxidative damage to bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml) in three different copper-containing systems: Cu(II)/ascorbate, Cu(II)/H(2)O(2), and Cu(II)/H(2)O(2)/ascorbate [Cu(II), 0.1 mM; ascorbate, 1 mM; H(2)O(2), 1 mM]. Oxidative damage to albumin was measured as protein carbonyl formation. Thiourea (0.1-10 mM) provided marked and dose-dependent protection against protein oxidation in all three copper-containing systems. In contrast, only minor protection was observed with dimethyl sulfoxide and mannitol, even at concentrations as high as 100 mM. Strong protection was also observed with dimethylthiourea, but not with urea or dimethylurea. Thiourea also significantly inhibited copper-catalyzed oxidation of ascorbate, and competed effectively with histidine and 1,10-phenanthroline for binding of cuprous, but not cupric, copper, as demonstrated by both UV-visible and low temperature electron spin resonance measurements. We conclude that the protection by thiourea against copper-mediated protein oxidation is not through scavenging of hydroxyl radicals, but rather through the chelation of cuprous copper and the formation of a redox-inactive thiourea-copper complex.

  9. Authigenic albite formation due to water-rock interactions - Case study: Magnus oilfield (UK, Northern North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nana; Fu, Yunjiao; Schulz, Hans-Martin; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this contribution to test whether organic-inorganic interactions could induce the formation of authigenic albite. This concept and related results are being compared with modelling scenarios which are purely based on inorganic geochemical reactions. In order to unravel the pathway of authigenic albite formation, this paper presents results of a multidisciplinary study from imaging, geochemistry, mineralogy, and hydrogeochemical modelling. The Jurassic reservoir sandstones of the Magnus oilfield (UK, North Sea) were chosen as a test site. Albite occurs with 4-18 wt.% in the Magnus sandstones and its contents vary with depth. However, albite contents increase with increasing K-feldspar contents and decreasing grain size. It occurs in three forms: (1) as lamellae in perthite, (2) as overgrowth on/in corroded feldspar, and, (3) as cloudy replacing albite patches in K-feldspar. The albite overgrowth has the highest chemical purity (100% albite) whilst albite lamellae and replacing albite patches are slightly less pure (containing 1-4% anorthite). Albite appears non-altered, and has a euhedral morphology and dull cathodoluminescence. It commonly co-occurs with corroded K-feldspar grains. The precipitation of diagenetic albite in the Magnus sandstones is attributed to deep burial 80 Ma ago and may have continued until today at temperatures between 90-120 °C. The results of hydrogeochemical modelling offer two possible pathways for the authigenic albite formation: (1) Dissolution of unstable minerals (such as kaolinite and chalcedony) coupled to reduction of ferric iron minerals by products generated during oil generation, migration and degradation; (2) Dissolution of non-end member feldspar, such as K-feldspar with 10% albite, coupled to illite formation can account for trace amounts of albite due to an elevated Na+/K+ activity ratio in the pore water.

  10. Radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA: Chemical nature and mechanisms of lesion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J. Richard

    2016-11-01

    This mini-review focuses on the recent identification of several novel radiation-induced single and tandem modifications in cellular DNA. For this purpose accurate high-performance electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was applied allowing their quantitative measurement and unambiguous characterization. Exposure of human cells to gamma rays led to the formation of several modified bases arising from the rearrangement of the pyrimidine ring of thymine, cytosine and 5-methylcytosine subsequent to initial addition of an hydroxyl radical (•OH) to the 5,6-ethylenic bond. In addition, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an novel epigenetic mark, and 5-formylcytosine, were found to be generated consecutively to •OH-mediated hydrogen abstraction from the methyl group of 5-methylcytosine. Relevant mechanistic information on one-oxidation reactions of cellular DNA was also gained from the detection of 5-hydroxycytosine and guanine-thymine intra-strand adducts whose formation is rationalized by the generation of related base radical cation. Attempts to search for the radiation-induced formation of purine 5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyribonucleosides were unsuccessful with the exception of trace amounts of (5‧S)-5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyadenosine.

  11. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation. I. Initial characterization of DNA damage, micronucleus formation, apoptosis, cell survival, and cell cycle phase redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Bant, A. M.; Kazarians, G.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Tran, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    The RBE of protons has been assumed to be equivalent to that of photons. The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced DNA and chromosome damage, apoptosis, cell killing and cell cycling in organized epithelial cells was influenced by radiation quality. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-dependent Fischer rat thyroid cells, established as follicles, were exposed to gamma rays or proton beams delivered acutely over a range of physical doses. Gamma-irradiated cells were able to repair DNA damage relatively rapidly so that by 1 h postirradiation they had approximately 20% fewer exposed 3' ends than their counterparts that had been irradiated with proton beams. The persistence of free ends of DNA in the samples irradiated with the proton beam implies that either more initial breaks or a quantitatively different type of damage had occurred. These results were further supported by an increased frequency of chromosomal damage as measured by the presence of micronuclei. Proton-beam irradiation induced micronuclei at a rate of 2.4% per gray, which at 12 Gy translated to 40% more micronuclei than in comparable gamma-irradiated cultures. The higher rate of micronucleus formation and the presence of larger micronuclei in proton-irradiated cells was further evidence that a qualitatively more severe class of damage had been induced than was induced by gamma rays. Differences in the type of damage produced were detected in the apoptosis assay, wherein a significant lag in the induction of apoptosis occurred after gamma irradiation that did not occur with protons. The more immediate expression of apoptotic cells in the cultures irradiated with the proton beam suggests that the damage inflicted was more severe. Alternatively, the cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms required for recovery from such damage might not have been invoked. Differences based on radiation quality were also evident in the alpha components of cell survival curves (0.05 Gy(-1) for gamma rays, 0

  12. Indoor damage of aged porous natural stone due to thermohygric stress: a case study of opuka stone altar from the St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, Richard; Prikrylova, Jirina; Racek, Martin; Kreislova, Kateřina; Weishauptova, Zuzana

    2016-04-01

    Opuka stone (extremely fine-grained clayey-calcareous silicite) used for a carved stone altar located in the interior of the St. Vitus Cathedral (Prague, Czech Republic) was affected by decay phenomena (formation of the case-hardened surface, its later blistering, flaking and/or powdering of stone substrate) which are similar to those observed in outdoor environments. Through the detailed analytical study (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry and x-ray elemental mapping of cross-sections of surface layers, x-ray diffraction of surface layers, ion-exchange chromatography for water-soluble salts, mercury porosimetry) and analysis of long-term indoor environmental monitoring (temperature, relative humidity, sulphur and nitrogen oxides deposition), it has been found that observed decay phenomena, which are manifested on microscale by brittle damage and formation of mode I (tensile) cracks along the exposed surface of the stone, can be interpreted as a result from thermohygric stress occurring on the interface between case hardened surface layer and stone substrate.

  13. Heat-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and 8-oxoguanine, a biomarker of damage to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bruskov, Vadim I.; Malakhova, Lyudmila V.; Masalimov, Zhaksylyk K.; Chernikov, Anatoly V.

    2002-01-01

    Heat-induced formation of 8-oxoguanine was demonstrated in DNA solutions in 10–3 M phosphate buffer, pH 6.8, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using monoclonal antibodies against 8-oxoguanine. A radiation-chemical yield of 3.7 × 10–2 µmol J–1 for 8-oxoguanine production in DNA upon γ-irradiation was used as an adequate standard for quantitation of 8-oxoguanine in whole DNA. The initial yield of heat-induced 8-oxoguanine exhibits first order kinetics. The rate constants for 8-oxoguanine formation were determined at elevated temperatures; the activation energy was found to be 27 ± 2 kcal/mol. Extrapolation to 37°C gave a value of k37 = 4.7 × 10–10 s–1. Heat-induced 8-oxoguanine formation and depurination of guanine and adenine show similarities of the processes, which implies that heat-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) should occur. Heat-induced production of H2O2 in phosphate buffer was shown. The sequence of reactions of thermally mediated ROS formation have been established: activation of dissolved oxygen to the singlet state, generation of superoxide radicals and their dismutation to H2O2. Gas saturation (O2, N2 and Ar), D2O, scavengers of 1O2, O2–• and OH• radicals and metal chelators influenced heat-induced 8-oxoguanine formation as they affected thermal ROS generation. These findings imply that heat acts via ROS attack leading to oxidative damage to DNA. PMID:11884633

  14. Large-diameter coiled tubing completions decrease risk of formation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, V. ); Edens, F. ); Coker, G. ); King, G. )

    1992-07-20

    Amoco Production Co. has used large-diameter coiled tubing strings to avoid damaging gas wells with kill fluids. The coiled tubing is stripped in the gas well under pressure. In Amoco's case, the gas flows up the tubing/casing annulus. The coiled tubing string provides a way to blow down the well whenever the well loads up with liquids from completion, workover, or naturally produced fluids. This paper reports that to date, Amoco has installed coiled tubing in four wells. The oldest has 18 months of service. Although some turbine longevity questions must be answered, the first four completions have proven fast and trouble free. The basic equipment for handling coil tubing is shown. The transport trailer and tubing injector head are similar to standard servicing equipment and not considered experimental. The production tubing reel is capable of carrying 14,000 ft of 2-in tubing or 18,000 ft of 1 3/4-in. tubing. For shallower wells, multiple tubing strings can be would on the same spool. Because of handling difficulties of large tubing, spools must be wound at the factory. Most of the largest sizes are made to order, making lead time a necessary consideration.

  15. Pseudotumour formation due to tribocorrosion at the taper interface of large diameter metal on polymer modular total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Cook, Richard B; Bolland, Benjamin J R F; Wharton, Julian A; Tilley, Simon; Latham, Jeremy M; Wood, Robert J K

    2013-09-01

    We present an in-depth failure analysis of two large diameter bearing metal-on-polymer (MoP) modular total hip replacements, which have required revision surgery due to pseudotumour formation. The failure analysis showed a discrete pattern of material loss from the distal end of the head taper/stem trunnion interface. We postulate that the use of a proximal contacting taper design had provided insufficient mechanical locking between the head and the stem, enabling the head to toggle on the trunnion. In addition, the difference in angle between the taper and the trunnion formed a crevice between the two components. Through a combination of crevice environment, mechanically assisted corrosion, mechanical wear and erosion; debris and metal-ions have been released resulting in the adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR).

  16. A giant and insidious subphrenic biloma formation due to gallbladder perforation mimicking biliary cystic tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guwei; Zhu, Feipeng; Wang, Ke; Jiao, Chenyu; Shao, Zicheng; Li, Xiangcheng

    2017-01-01

    Gallbladder perforation (GBP) represents a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication of acute cholecystitis. GBP is subdivided into three categories whereas the development of biloma is extremely rare. The present case study reports on a 40-year-old man with a 10-year history of calculus cholecystitis, who was referred to The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (Nanjing, China) for the surgical treatment of an emerging massive hepatic entity with insidious symptoms and normal laboratory tests. A preoperative imaging study demonstrated the collection with internal septations and mural nodules, but no visible communication with the biliary system. Given the suspected biliary cystic tumor, a laparotomy was performed and the lumen was scattered with papillae. An intraoperative frozen section examination illustrated a simple hepatic cyst. Biochemical analysis of the collection and histopathology of the gallbladder and capsule substantiated the diagnosis of biloma formation due to GBP. The purpose of the present case report was to demonstrate how a pinhole-sized perforation with extravasation of unconcentrated bile from the gallbladder may result in insidious clinical presentation and an undetected leak site. According to the clinicopathological characteristics and composition, formation of biloma should be classified as type IV GBP. To differentiate bilomas with intracystic septations and mural nodules from BCTs is difficult via a preoperative examination, and the definitive diagnosis should be based on a histological examination. Laparotomy with frozen section examination may be the optimal approach in such a case. PMID:28123732

  17. THEOS-2 Orbit Design: Formation Flying in Equatorial Orbit and Damage Prevention Technique for the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimnoo, Ammarin

    2016-07-01

    Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency (GISTDA) has initiative THEOS-2 project after the THEOS-1 has been operated for more than 7 years which is over the lifetime already. THEOS-2 project requires not only the development of earth observation satellite(s), but also the development of the area-based decision making solution platform comprising of data, application systems, data processing and production system, IT infrastructure improvement and capacity building through development of satellites, engineering model, and infrastructures capable of supporting research in related fields. The developing satellites in THEOS-2 project are THAICHOTE-2 and THAICHOTE-3. This paper focuses the orbit design of THAICHOTE-2 & 3. It discusses the satellite orbit design for the second and third EOS of Thailand. In this paper, both THAICHOTE will be simulated in an equatorial orbit as a formation flying which will be compared the productive to THAICHOTE-1 (THEOS-1). We also consider a serious issue in equatorial orbit design, namely the issue of the geomagnetic field in the area of the eastern coast of South America, called the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA). The high-energy particles of SAMA comprise a radiation environment which can travel through THAICHOTE-2 & 3 material and deposit kinetic energy. This process causes atomic displacement or leaves a stream of charged atoms in the incident particles' wake. It can cause damage to the satellite including reduction of power generated by solar arrays, failure of sensitive electronics, increased background noise in sensors, and exposure of the satellite devices to radiation. This paper demonstrates the loss of ionizing radiation damage and presents a technique to prevent damage from high-energy particles in the SAMA.

  18. Analysis of the internal structure of a carbonate damage zone: Implications for the mechanisms of fault breccia formation and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausegger, Stefan; Kurz, Walter; Rabitsch, Robert; Kiechl, Eva; Brosch, Franz-Josef

    2010-09-01

    A segment of the Salzach-Ennstal fault zone (Talhof fault, Eastern Alps) shows evidence for joint nucleation by layer-parallel shear, causing the formation of joint-bounded slices oriented at high angles (65-85°) with respect to the shear zone boundary (SZB). Subsequent slice rotation resulted in joint reactivation as antithetic shears, slice kinking, and breaking-up of the individual slices into smaller fragments. The latter process, due to the longitudinal constraint of slices with impeded shear zone widening, marked the transition to cataclasite formation and fault core evolution during shear localization. Cataclasites were subsequently cemented and underwent continuous shear deformation by re-fracturing. Cement precipitation from fluids therefore played a fundamental role in the evolution of the fault zone, with a cyclic change between an open and a closed permeability system during fault evolution. Stable isotope compositions (δ 13C, δ 18O) of fault rock cements indicate a continuous equilibration between protolith-derived fragments and cements precipitated from those fluids. This points to limited fluid amounts, only temporally replenished by meteoric water, and a hydraulic gradient that directed fluid flow from the damage zone towards the fault core.

  19. Investigation of mud density and weighting materials effect on drilling fluid filter cake properties and formation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah, K. A.; Lashin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Drilling fluid density/type is an important factor in drilling and production operations. Most of encountered problems during rotary drilling are related to drilling mud types and weights. This paper aims to investigate the effect of mud weight on filter cake properties and formation damage through two experimental approaches. In the first approach, seven water-based drilling fluid samples with same composition are prepared with different densities (9.0-12.0 lb/gal) and examined to select the optimum mud weight that has less damage. The second approach deals with investigating the possible effect of the different weighting materials (BaSO4 and CaCO3) on filter cake properties. High pressure/high temperature loss tests and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analyses were carried out on the filter cake (two selected samples). Data analysis has revealed that mud weigh of 9.5 lb/gal has the less reduction in permeability of ceramic disk, among the seven used mud densities. Above 10.5 ppg the effect of the mud weight density on formation damage is stabilized at constant value. Fluids of CaCO3-based weighting material, has less reduction in the porosity (9.14%) and permeability (25%) of the filter disk properties than the BaSO4-based fluid. The produced filter cake porosity increases (from 0.735 to 0.859) with decreasing of fluid density in case of drilling samples of different densities. The filtration loss tests indicated that CaCO3 filter cake porosity (0.52) is less than that of the BaSO4 weighted material (0.814). The thickness of the filter cake of the BaSO4-based fluid is large and can cause some problems. The SEM analysis shows that some major elements do occur on the tested samples (Ca, Al, Si, and Ba), with dominance of Ca on the expense of Ba for the CaCO3 fluid sample and vice versa. The less effect of 9.5 lb/gal mud sample is reflected in the well-produced inter-particle pore structure and relatively crystal size. A general recommendation is given to

  20. Influence of subcascade formation on displacement damage at high PKA energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1997-08-01

    The design of first generation fusion reactors will have to be rely on radiation effects data obtained from experiments conducted in fission reactors. Two issues must be addressed to use this data with confidence. The first is differences in the neutron energy spectrum, and the second is differences in nuclear transmutation rates. Differences in the neutron energy spectra are reflected in the energy spectra of the primary knockon atoms (PKA). The issue of PKA energy effects has been addressed through the use of displacement cascade simulations using the method of molecular dynamics (MD). Although MD simulations can provide a detailed picture of the formation and evolution of displacement cascades, they impose a substantial computational burden. However, recent advances in computing equipment permit the simulation of high energy displacement events involving more than one-million atoms; the results presented here encompass MD cascade simulation energies from near the displacement threshold to as high as 40 keV. Two parameters have been extracted from the MD simulations: the number of point defects that remain after the displacement event is completed and the fraction of the surviving interstitials that are contained in clusters. The MD values have been normalized to the number of atomic displacements calculated with the secondary displacement model by Norgett, Robinson, and Torrens (NRT).

  1. Cloning, localization and focus formation at DNA damage sites of canine Ku70

    PubMed Central

    KOIKE, Manabu; YUTOKU, Yasutomo; KOIKE, Aki

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair machinery, specifically non-homologous DNA-end joining (NHEJ), is crucial for developing next-generation radiotherapies and common chemotherapeutics for human and animal cancers. The localization, protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications of core NHEJ factors, might play vital roles for regulation of NHEJ activity. The human Ku heterodimer (Ku70/Ku80) is a core NHEJ factor in the NHEJ pathway and is involved in sensing of DSBs. Companion animals, such as canines, have been proposed to be an excellent model for cancer research, including development of chemotherapeutics. However, the post-translational modifications, localization and complex formation of canine Ku70 have not been clarified. Here, we show that canine Ku70 localizes in the nuclei of interphase cells and that it is recruited quickly at laser-microirradiated DSB sites. Structurally, two DNA-PK phosphorylation sites (S6 and S51), an ubiquitination site (K114), two canonical sumoylation consensus motifs, a CDK phosphorylation motif, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the human Ku70 are evolutionarily conserved in canine and mouse species, while the acetylation sites in human Ku70 are partially conserved. Intriguingly, the primary candidate nucleophile (K31) required for 5’dRP/AP lyase activity of human and mouse Ku70 is not conserved in canines, suggesting that canine Ku does not possess this activity. Our findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of Ku-dependent NHEJ in a canine model and form a platform for the development of next-generation common chemotherapeutics for human and animal cancers. PMID:28163277

  2. Cloning, localization and focus formation at DNA damage sites of canine Ku70.

    PubMed

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2017-03-23

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair machinery, specifically non-homologous DNA-end joining (NHEJ), is crucial for developing next-generation radiotherapies and common chemotherapeutics for human and animal cancers. The localization, protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications of core NHEJ factors, might play vital roles for regulation of NHEJ activity. The human Ku heterodimer (Ku70/Ku80) is a core NHEJ factor in the NHEJ pathway and is involved in sensing of DSBs. Companion animals, such as canines, have been proposed to be an excellent model for cancer research, including development of chemotherapeutics. However, the post-translational modifications, localization and complex formation of canine Ku70 have not been clarified. Here, we show that canine Ku70 localizes in the nuclei of interphase cells and that it is recruited quickly at laser-microirradiated DSB sites. Structurally, two DNA-PK phosphorylation sites (S6 and S51), an ubiquitination site (K114), two canonical sumoylation consensus motifs, a CDK phosphorylation motif, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the human Ku70 are evolutionarily conserved in canine and mouse species, while the acetylation sites in human Ku70 are partially conserved. Intriguingly, the primary candidate nucleophile (K31) required for 5'dRP/AP lyase activity of human and mouse Ku70 is not conserved in canines, suggesting that canine Ku does not possess this activity. Our findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of Ku-dependent NHEJ in a canine model and form a platform for the development of next-generation common chemotherapeutics for human and animal cancers.

  3. Formation of Island Arc-Trench System due to Plate Subduction on the Basis of Elastic Dislocation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahata, Y.; Matsu'ura, M.

    2015-12-01

    The most conspicuous cumulative deformation in subduction zones is the formation of island arc-trench system. A pair of anomalies in topography and free-air gravity, high in the arc and low around the trench, is observed without exceptions all over the world. Since the 1960s, elastic dislocation theory has been widely used to interpret coseismic crustal deformation. For the modeling of longer-term crustal deformation, it is necessary to consider viscoelastic properties of the asthenosphere. By simply applying elastic-viscoelastic dislocation theory to plate subduction, Matsu'ura and Sato (1989, GJI) have shown that some crustal deformation remains after the completion of one earthquake cycle, which means that crustal deformation accumulates with time in a long term due to plate subduction. In fact, by constructing a plate interface model in and around Japan, Hashimoto, Fukui and Matsu'ura (2004, PAGEOPH) have demonstrated that the computed vertical displacements due to steady plate subduction well explain the observed free-air gravity anomaly pattern. Recently, we got a lucid explanation of crustal deformation due to plate subduction. In subduction zones, oceanic plates bend and descend into the mantle. Because the bending of oceanic plates is usually not spontaneous, there exists kinematic interaction between the oceanic and overriding plates, which causes cumulative deformation of the overriding plate. This may be understood based on the law of action and reaction: one is bending of an oceanic plate and the other is deformation of the overriding plate. As a special case, it is useful to consider plate subduction along a part of true circle. In this case, crustal deformation due to steady subduction is solely caused by the effect of gravity, because dislocation along a circle does not cause any intrinsic internal deformation. When an oceanic plate is descending along an arcuate plate interface from the right-hand side, according to dislocation theory, the oceanic

  4. Decreased Xylitol Formation during Xylose Fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Due to Overexpression of Water-Forming NADH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Chang; Ding, Wen-Tao

    2012-01-01

    The recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain harboring xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) from Scheffersomyces stipitis requires NADPH and NAD+, creates cofactor imbalance, and causes xylitol accumulation during growth on d-xylose. To solve this problem, noxE, encoding a water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactococcus lactis driven by the PGK1 promoter, was introduced into the xylose-utilizing yeast strain KAM-3X. A cofactor microcycle was set up between the utilization of NAD+ by XDH and the formation of NAD+ by water-forming NADH oxidase. Overexpression of noxE significantly decreased xylitol formation and increased final ethanol production during xylose fermentation. Under xylose fermentation conditions with an initial d-xylose concentration of 50 g/liter, the xylitol yields for of KAM-3X(pPGK1-noxE) and control strain KAM-3X were 0.058 g/g xylose and 0.191 g/g, respectively, which showed a 69.63% decrease owing to noxE overexpression; the ethanol yields were 0.294 g/g for KAM-3X(pPGK1-noxE) and 0.211 g/g for the control strain KAM-3X, which indicated a 39.33% increase due to noxE overexpression. At the same time, the glycerol yield also was reduced by 53.85% on account of the decrease in the NADH pool caused by overexpression of noxE. PMID:22156411

  5. Formation of fold and thrust belts on Venus due to horizontal shortening of a laterally heterogeneous lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Parmentier, E. M.; Neumann, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    An outstanding question relevant to understanding the tectonics of Venus is the mechanism of formation of fold and thrust belts, such as the mountain belts that surround Lakshmi Planum in western Ishtar Terra. These structures are typically long (hundreds of km) and narrow (many tens of km), and are often located at the margins of relatively high (km-scale) topographic rises. Previous studies have attempted to explain fold and thrust belts in various areas of Venus in the context of viscous and brittle wedge theory. However, while wedge theory can explain the change in elevation from the rise to the adjacent lowland, it fails to account for a fundamental aspect of the deformation, i.e., the topographic high at the edge of the rise. In this study we quantitatively explore the hypothesis that fold and thrust belt morphology on Venus can alternatively be explained by horizontal shortening of a lithosphere that is laterally heterogeneous, due either to a change in thickness of the lithosphere or the crust. Lateral heterogeneities in lithosphere structure may arise in response to thermal thinning or extensive faulting, while variations in crustal thickness may arise due to either spatially variable melting of mantle material or by horizontal shortening of the crust. In a variable thickness lithosphere or crust that is horizontally shortened, deformation will tend to localize in the vicinity of thickness heterogeneity, resulting in a higher component of dynamic topography there as compared to elsewhere in the shortening lithosphere. This mechanism may thus provide a simple explanation for the topographic high at the edge of the rise.

  6. Potential formation of bromophenols in Barcelona's tap water due to daily salt mine discharges and occasional phenol spills

    SciTech Connect

    Ventura, F.; Rivera, J.

    1986-02-01

    The presence of phenol and chlorinated phenols in drinking water has been shown to affect both taste and odor and to cause negative effects on health. The priority pollutants list issued by E.P.A. includes eleven of these compounds as suspected carcinogens. Little attention has been focussed on the presence of bromophenols. The presence of volatile brominated organic compounds has been demonstrated when bromide is present, due to chlorination. Similarly, brominated phenols might be formed during chlorination in the water works. More than 3 million inhabitants in the area of Barcelona drink water taken from Llobregat river. Quality of this raw water is strongly influenced by high contents of bromide coming from salt mines located in the upper course of the river. Phenol and phenolic compounds are usually found in raw water in the ppb range but occasional spills may increase the phenol content up to parts per million. This study shows the possibility of formation of bromophenols during normal chlorination conditions at Barcelona's water works plant.

  7. Predicting Formation Damage in Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems Utilizing a Coupled Hydraulic-Thermal-Chemical Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Daniel; Regenspurg, Simona; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido; Kranz, Stefan; Saadat, Ali

    2014-05-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, large amounts of energy can be stored by injecting hot water into deep or intermediate aquifers. In a seasonal production-injection cycle, water is circulated through a system comprising the porous aquifer, a production well, a heat exchanger and an injection well. This process involves large temperature and pressure differences, which shift chemical equilibria and introduce or amplify mechanical processes. Rock-fluid interaction such as dissolution and precipitation or migration and deposition of fine particles will affect the hydraulic properties of the porous medium and may lead to irreversible formation damage. In consequence, these processes determine the long-term performance of the ATES system and need to be predicted to ensure the reliability of the system. However, high temperature and pressure gradients and dynamic feedback cycles pose challenges on predicting the influence of the relevant processes. Within this study, a reservoir model comprising a coupled hydraulic-thermal-chemical simulation was developed based on an ATES demonstration project located in the city of Berlin, Germany. The structural model was created with Petrel, based on data available from seismic cross-sections and wellbores. The reservoir simulation was realized by combining the capabilities of multiple simulation tools. For the reactive transport model, COMSOL Multiphysics (hydraulic-thermal) and PHREEQC (chemical) were combined using the novel interface COMSOL_PHREEQC, developed by Wissmeier & Barry (2011). It provides a MATLAB-based coupling interface between both programs. Compared to using COMSOL's built-in reactive transport simulator, PHREEQC additionally calculates adsorption and reaction kinetics and allows the selection of different activity coefficient models in the database. The presented simulation tool will be able to predict the most important aspects of hydraulic, thermal and chemical transport processes relevant to

  8. Oxidative damage-related genes AKR1C3 and OGG1 modulate risks for lung cancer due to exposure to PAH-rich coal combustion emissions.

    PubMed

    Lan, Qing; Mumford, Judy L; Shen, Min; Demarini, David M; Bonner, Matthew R; He, Xingzhou; Yeager, Meredith; Welch, Robert; Chanock, Stephen; Tian, Linwei; Chapman, Robert S; Zheng, Tongzhang; Keohavong, Phouthone; Caporaso, Neil; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2004-11-01

    Lung cancer rates among men and particularly among women, almost all of whom are non-smokers, in Xuan Wei County, China are among the highest in China and have been causally associated with exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). As such, this population provides a unique opportunity to study the pathogenesis of PAH-induced lung cancer that is not substantially influenced by the large number of other carcinogenic constituents of tobacco smoke. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) activate PAH dihydrodiols to yield their corresponding reactive and redox-active o-quinones, which can then generate reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative DNA damage. We therefore examined the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genes (AKR1C3-Gln5His, NQO1-Pro187Ser, MnSOD-Val16Ala and OGG1-Ser326Cys) that play a role in the generation, prevention or repair of oxidative damage and lung cancer risk in a population-based, case-control study of 119 cases and 113 controls in Xuan Wei, China. The AKR1C3-Gln/Gln genotype was associated with a 1.84-fold [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.98-3.45] increased risk and the combined OGG1-Cys/Cys and Ser/Cys genotypes were associated with a 1.93-fold (95% CI = 1.12-3.34) increased risk of lung cancer. Subgroup analysis revealed that the effects were particularly elevated among women who had relatively high cumulative exposure to smoky coal. SNPs in MnSOD and NQO1 were not associated with lung cancer risk. These results suggest that SNPs in the oxidative stress related-genes AKR1C3 and OGG1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in this population, particularly among heavily exposed women. However, due to the small sample size, additional studies are needed to evaluate these associations within Xuan Wei and other populations with substantial exposure to PAHs.

  9. Insight to UV-induced formation of laser damage on LiB(3)O(5) optical surfaces during long-term sum-frequency generation.

    PubMed

    Möller, S; Andresen, A; Merschjann, C; Zimmermann, B; Prinz, M; Imlau, M

    2007-06-11

    Microscopic investigations of UV-induced formation of laser damage on LiB(3)O(5) optical surfaces during long-term sum-frequency generation (SFG) uncovers a significant growth of a SiO(2)-amorphous layer spatially limited to the illuminated area. The layer gives rise to a catastrophic break-down of the LiB(3)O(5)-output surface upon long-term laser operation even at intensities far below the laser-induced damage threshold. The interaction of UV laser light, LiB(3)O(5) surface and foreign atoms in the ambient atmosphere is discussed in the frame of a two-step process for surface-damage formation.

  10. Enhanced formation of secondary air pollutants and aggravation of urban smog due to crop residue burning emissions in North India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Chinmoy; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Vinayak

    2013-04-01

    implications for the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere increased from an average value of 14 /s (N.F.E.) to 40 /s (F.E.) just due to CO, NOx and the measured aromatics. The observed increase in ozone was 10ppbV higher after sunrise on the day after the fire plume was sampled and driven by the sudden NOx availability at a site that normally falls in a NOx limited ozone production regime. The strong pollutant enhancements in carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons that are also highly reactive and fuel ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation when accompanied by the high NOx and CO levels resulting from crop residue burning in N. India, clearly highlight the need to address the practice of crop residue burning which strongly alters the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere with adverse effects on both air quality and health. This study is the first from within India to combine fast in-situ PTR-MS VOC emission tracer measurements with online measurements of primary pollutants and MODIS satellite data. Further targeted studies employing a comprehensive measurement suite of both aerosol and gas species are needed to assess the full impact of crop residue burning on atmospheric chemistry and regional air quality. Acknowledgement: We thank the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry Facility for data and the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD),India and IISER Mohali for funding the facility. Vinod Kumar acknowledges the DST INSPIRE Fellowship programme. Chinmoy Sarkar thanks the Max Planck-DST India Partner Group on Tropospheric OH reactivity and VOCs for funding support.

  11. The DNA unwinding element binding protein DUE-B interacts with Cdc45 in preinitiation complex formation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A; Liu, G; Kemp, M; Chen, X; Katrangi, N; Myers, S; Ghosh, M; Yao, J; Gao, Y; Bubulya, P; Leffak, M

    2010-03-01

    Template unwinding during DNA replication initiation requires the loading of the MCM helicase activator Cdc45 at replication origins. We show that Cdc45 interacts with the DNA unwinding element (DUE) binding protein DUE-B and that these proteins localize to the DUEs of active replication origins. DUE-B and Cdc45 are not bound at the inactive c-myc replicator in the absence of a functional DUE or at the recently identified ataxin 10 (ATX10) origin, which is silent before disease-related (ATTCT)(n) repeat length expansion of its DUE sequence, despite the presence of the origin recognition complex (ORC) and MCM proteins at these origins. Addition of a heterologous DUE to the ectopic c-myc origin, or expansion of the ATX10 DUE, leads to origin activation, DUE-B binding, and Cdc45 binding. DUE-B, Cdc45, and topoisomerase IIbeta binding protein 1 (TopBP1) form complexes in cell extracts and when expressed from baculovirus vectors. During replication in Xenopus egg extracts, DUE-B and Cdc45 bind to chromatin with similar kinetics, and DUE-B immunodepletion blocks replication and the loading of Cdc45 and a fraction of TopBP1. The coordinated binding of DUE-B and Cdc45 to origins and the physical interactions of DUE-B, Cdc45, and TopBP1 suggest that complexes of these proteins are necessary for replication initiation.

  12. Listeriolysin O Membrane Damaging Activity Involves Arc Formation and Lineaction -- Implication for Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Phagocytic Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Yi; Rezelj, Saša; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Anderluh, Gregor; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Listeriolysin-O (LLO) plays a crucial role during infection by Listeria monocytogenes. It enables escape of bacteria from phagocytic vacuole, which is the basis for its spread to other cells and tissues. It is not clear how LLO acts at phagosomal membranes to allow bacterial escape. The mechanism of action of LLO remains poorly understood, probably due to unavailability of suitable experimental tools that could monitor LLO membrane disruptive activity in real time. Here, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) featuring high spatio-temporal resolution on model membranes and optical microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to investigate LLO activity. We analyze the assembly kinetics of toxin oligomers, the prepore-to-pore transition dynamics and the membrane disruption in real time. We reveal that LLO toxin efficiency and mode of action as a membrane-disrupting agent varies strongly depending on the membrane cholesterol concentration and the environmental pH. We discovered that LLO is able to form arc pores as well as damage lipid membranes as a lineactant, and this leads to large-scale membrane defects. These results altogether provide a mechanistic basis of how large-scale membrane disruption leads to release of Listeria from the phagocytic vacuole in the cellular context. PMID:27104344

  13. Formation of ghost images due to metal objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Bárbara Couto; da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jéssica Lourdes Costa; Souza, Priscilla Sena; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita

    2016-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses. PMID:27051642

  14. Formation of ghost images due to metal objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Bárbara Couto; da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jéssica Lourdes Costa; Souza, Priscilla Sena; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita; Manzi, Flávio Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses.

  15. The effects of environmental enrichment and beak-trimming during the rearing period on subsequent feather damage due to feather-pecking in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hartcher, K M; Tran, K T N; Wilkinson, S J; Hemsworth, P H; Thomson, P C; Cronin, G M

    2015-05-01

    This experiment investigated effects of environmental enrichment and beak-trimming during the rearing period on behavior in rearing and plumage damage later in life. Treatments were applied in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Half of the birds were beak-trimmed at 1 d of age using an infra-red laser. A follow-up light-trim was performed at 11 wk of age with a hot blade. Environmental enrichment consisted of pecking strings, whole oats in the litter, and greater litter depth. Sixteen pens of 50 ISA Brown laying hens were used. Four pullets were selected from each pen as focal birds and observed in their home pens between 3 and 14 wk of age. Plumage damage was scored at the end of the experiment in wk 43. Beak-trimmed birds performed less ground-pecking (P = 0.003), less severe feather-pecking (P = 0.021) and more gentle feather-pecking (P = 0.018) than their non-trimmed counterparts during the rearing period. These birds also exhibited less feather damage in wk 43 (P < 0.001). The results indicate that gentle feather-pecking during rearing is not related to plumage damage when older. Additionally, higher rates of ground-pecking and severe feather-pecking during rearing may be predictive of plumage damage later in life. There was no effect of enrichment on plumage damage. It was concluded that while there was no effect on enrichment, beak-trimming appeared to be effective in reducing plumage damage in wk 43.

  16. Numerical simulation of advection fog formation on multi-disperse aerosols due to combustion-related pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of multi-disperse distribution of the aerosol population are presented. Single component and multi-component aerosol species on the condensation/nucleation processes which affect the reduction in visibility are described. The aerosol population with a high particle concentration provided more favorable conditions for the formation of a denser fog than the aerosol population with a greater particle size distribution when the value of the mass concentration of the aerosols was kept constant. The results were used as numerical predictions of fog formation. Two dimensional observations in horizontal and vertical coordinates, together with time-dependent measurements were needed as initial values for the following physical parameters: (1)wind profiles; (2) temperature profiles; (3) humidity profiles; (4) mass concentration of aerosol particles; (5) particle size distribution of aerosols; and (6) chemical composition of aerosols. Formation and dissipation of advection fog, thus, can be forecasted numerically by introducing initial values obtained from the observations.

  17. Flexure with damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaker, David M.; Turcotte, Donald L.; Kellogg, Louise H.

    2006-09-01

    Ductile behaviour in rocks is often associated with plasticity due to dislocation motion or diffusion under high pressures and temperatures. However, ductile behaviour can also occur in brittle materials. An example would be cataclastic flow associated with folding at shallow crustal levels. Engineers utilize damage mechanics to model the continuum deformation of brittle materials. In this paper we utilize a modified form of damage mechanics that includes a yield stress. Here, damage represents a reduction in frictional strength. We use this empirical approach to simulate bending of the lithosphere through the problem of plate flexure. We use numerical simulations to obtain quasi-static solutions to the Navier equations of elasticity. We use the program GeoFEST v. 4.5 (Geophysical Finite Element Simulation Tool), developed by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to generate solutions for each time step. When the von Mises stress exceeds the critical stress on an element we apply damage to reduce the shear modulus of the element. Damage is calculated at each time step by a power-law relationship of the ratio of the critical stress to the von Mises stress and the critical strain to the von Mises strain. This results in the relaxation of the material due to increasing damage. To test our method, we apply our damage rheology to a semi-infinite plate deforming under its own weight. Where the von Mises stress exceeds the critical stress, we simulate the formation of damage and observe the time-dependent relaxation of the stress and strain to near the yield strength. We simulate a wide range of behaviours from slow relaxation to instantaneous failure, over timescales that span six orders of magnitude. Using this method, stress relaxation produces perfectly plastic behaviour in cases where failure does not occur. For cases of failure, we observe a rapid increase in damage, analogous to the acceleration of microcrack formation and acoustic emissions prior to failure. Thus

  18. Effect of 800 keV argon ions pre-damage on the helium blister formation of tungsten exposed to 60 keV helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Ar8+ ions pre-damage on the following He2+ irradiation behavior of polycrystalline tungsten. We compared the irradiation resistance performance against 60 keV He2+ ions of undamaged tungsten samples with that of pre-damaged samples which were preliminarily exposed to 800 keV Ar8+ ions at a fluence of 4 × 1019 ions m-2. The experimental results indicate that the helium blistering of tungsten could be effectively relieved by the Ar8+ ions pre-damage, while the retention of helium around low energy desorption sites in the pre-damaged tungsten was larger than that of the undamaged samples. A strong orientation dependence of blistering had been observed, with the blister occurred preferentially on the surface of grains with normal direction close to <111>. The Ar8+ ions irradiation-induced damage altered the morphology of helium bubbles in tungsten exposed to the following He2+ irradiation significantly. The intensity of helium release peaks at relatively low temperatures (<600 K) was enhanced due to Ar8+ ions pre-damage.

  19. Formation of higher-order nuclear Rad51 structures is functionally linked to p21 expression and protection from DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Raderschall, Elke; Bazarov, Alex; Cao, Jiangping; Lurz, Rudi; Smith, Avril; Mann, Wolfgang; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Sedivy, John M; Golub, Efim I; Fritz, Eberhard; Haaf, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    After exposure of mammalian cells to DNA damage, the endogenous Rad51 recombination protein is concentrated in multiple discrete foci, which are thought to represent nuclear domains for recombinational DNA repair. Overexpressed Rad51 protein forms foci and higher-order nuclear structures, even in the absence of DNA damage, in cells that do not undergo DNA replication synthesis. This correlates with increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21. Following DNA damage, constitutively Rad51-overexpressing cells show reduced numbers of DNA breaks and chromatid-type chromosome aberrations and a greater resistance to apoptosis. In contrast, Rad51 antisense inhibition reduces p21 protein levels and sensitizes cells to etoposide treatment. Downregulation of p21 inhibits Rad51 foci formation in both normal and Rad51-overexpressing cells. Collectively, our results show that Rad51 expression, Rad51 foci formation and p21 expression are interrelated, suggesting a functional link between mammalian Rad51 protein and p21-mediated cell cycle regulation. This mechanism may contribute to a highly effective recombinational DNA repair in cell cycle-arrested cells and protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

  20. Formation of high-stress phase and extrusion of polyethylene due to nanoconfinements during Ziegler-Natta polymerization inside nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sujith; Naredi, Prabhat; Kim, Seong H

    2005-06-30

    Polyethylene nanofibers were synthesized by heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta polymerization inside nanochannels of robust anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. The polymerization catalysts were chemisorbed at the inner wall of the nanochannels and monomers were provided through diffusion from the outside. Polyethylene is produced inside the nanochannels in the 10-20 mum region from the channel entrance. Polyethylene fibers were extruded from the nanochannels up to 3-5 mum during the polymerization. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared analyses indicated formation of a highly stressed crystalline structure although the polymerization was carried out without any external pressure or mechanical work. The highly stressed phase formation inside nanochannels and some degree of polyethylene nanofiber extrusion from nanochannels were attributed to catalytic production of excess amounts of polyethylene inside nanoconfined templates.

  1. Spatial Dependence of DNA Damage in Bacteria due to Low-Temperature Plasma Application as Assessed at the Single Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Privat-Maldonado, Angela; O’Connell, Deborah; Welch, Emma; Vann, Roddy; van der Woude, Marjan W.

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature plasmas (LTPs) generate a cocktail of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) with bactericidal activity. The RNOS however are spatially unevenly distributed in the plasma. Here we test the hypothesis that this distribution will affect the mechanisms underpinning plasma bactericidal activity focussing on the level of DNA damage in situ. For the first time, a quantitative, single cell approach was applied to assess the level of DNA damage in bacteria as a function of the radial distance from the centre of the plasma jet. Salmonella enterica on a solid, dry surface was treated with two types of LTP: an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet (charged and neutral species) and a radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (neutral species). In both cases, there was an inverse correlation between the degree of DNA damage and the radial distance from the centre of the plasma, with the highest DNA damage occurring directly under the plasma. This trend was also observed with Staphylococcus aureus. LTP-generated UV radiation was eliminated as a contributing factor. Thus valuable mechanistic information can be obtained from assays on biological material, which can inform the development of LTP as a complementary or alternative therapy for (topical) bacterial infections. PMID:27759098

  2. OXIDATIVE DAMAGE-RELATED GENES AKR1C3 AND OGG1 MODULATE RISKS FOR LUNG CANCER DUE TO EXPOSURE TO PAH-RICH COAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied polymorphisms in genes that generate, prevent, or repair oxidative damage and lung cancer risk among 118 cases and 113 controls in Xuan Wei China, where extremely high lung cancer rates are caused by indoor exposure to smoky coal. SOD2-Vak16Ala and NQO1-Pro 187Ser were...

  3. Spatial Dependence of DNA Damage in Bacteria due to Low-Temperature Plasma Application as Assessed at the Single Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privat-Maldonado, Angela; O’Connell, Deborah; Welch, Emma; Vann, Roddy; van der Woude, Marjan W.

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature plasmas (LTPs) generate a cocktail of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) with bactericidal activity. The RNOS however are spatially unevenly distributed in the plasma. Here we test the hypothesis that this distribution will affect the mechanisms underpinning plasma bactericidal activity focussing on the level of DNA damage in situ. For the first time, a quantitative, single cell approach was applied to assess the level of DNA damage in bacteria as a function of the radial distance from the centre of the plasma jet. Salmonella enterica on a solid, dry surface was treated with two types of LTP: an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet (charged and neutral species) and a radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (neutral species). In both cases, there was an inverse correlation between the degree of DNA damage and the radial distance from the centre of the plasma, with the highest DNA damage occurring directly under the plasma. This trend was also observed with Staphylococcus aureus. LTP-generated UV radiation was eliminated as a contributing factor. Thus valuable mechanistic information can be obtained from assays on biological material, which can inform the development of LTP as a complementary or alternative therapy for (topical) bacterial infections.

  4. Kinetics of the formation of ozone and nitrogen oxides due to a pulsed microwave discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, V. F.; Rumiantsev, S. A.

    1989-03-01

    The paper presents results of a numerical simulation of the kinetics of plasma-chemical processes induced by a single microwave pulse in the stratosphere. It is shown that the gas temperature is one of the main factors influencing the concentration ratio of ozone and nitrogen oxides formed under the effect of a microwave pulse. Long pulses, producing considerable gas heating, favor the formation of nitrogen oxides.

  5. Rupture of pluronic micelles by di-methylated β-cyclodextrin is not due to polypseudorotaxane formation.

    PubMed

    Valero, Margarita; Grillo, Isabelle; Dreiss, Cécile A

    2012-02-02

    Spectroscopic measurements (uv/vis absorbance and fluorescence) and time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering experiments (TR-SANS) were used to follow the breakdown of Pluronic micelles by heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin (DIMEB) over time in order to elucidate the mechanism of micellar rupture, generally attributed to polypseudotorotaxane (PR) formation between the cyclodextrin and the central hydrophobic PPO block. The spectroscopic measurements with two different probes (methyl orange and nile red) suggest that very rapid changes (on the order of seconds) take place when mixing DIMEB with F127 Pluronic and that no displacement of the probe from the cyclodextrin cavity occurs, which is in disagreement with PR formation. TR-SANS measurements demonstrate for the first time that the micelles are broken down in less than 100 ms, which categorically rules out PR formation as the mechanism of rupture. In addition, the same mechanism is demonstrated with other Pluronics, P85 and P123. In the latter case, after micellar rupture, lamellar structures are seen to form over a longer period of time, thus suggesting that after the instantaneous micellar disruption, further, longer-scale rearrangements are not excluded.

  6. Positive regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation by activation of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Mec1(ATR).

    PubMed

    Gray, Stephen; Allison, Rachal M; Garcia, Valerie; Goldman, Alastair S H; Neale, Matthew J

    2013-07-31

    During meiosis, formation and repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) create genetic exchange between homologous chromosomes-a process that is critical for reductional meiotic chromosome segregation and the production of genetically diverse sexually reproducing populations. Meiotic DSB formation is a complex process, requiring numerous proteins, of which Spo11 is the evolutionarily conserved catalytic subunit. Precisely how Spo11 and its accessory proteins function or are regulated is unclear. Here, we use Saccharomyces cerevisiae to reveal that meiotic DSB formation is modulated by the Mec1(ATR) branch of the DNA damage signalling cascade, promoting DSB formation when Spo11-mediated catalysis is compromised. Activation of the positive feedback pathway correlates with the formation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombination intermediates and activation of the downstream kinase, Mek1. We show that the requirement for checkpoint activation can be rescued by prolonging meiotic prophase by deleting the NDT80 transcription factor, and that even transient prophase arrest caused by Ndt80 depletion is sufficient to restore meiotic spore viability in checkpoint mutants. Our observations are unexpected given recent reports that the complementary kinase pathway Tel1(ATM) acts to inhibit DSB formation. We propose that such antagonistic regulation of DSB formation by Mec1 and Tel1 creates a regulatory mechanism, where the absolute frequency of DSBs is maintained at a level optimal for genetic exchange and efficient chromosome segregation.

  7. Vitamin U has a protective effect on valproic acid-induced renal damage due to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrotic properties.

    PubMed

    Gezginci-Oktayoglu, Selda; Turkyilmaz, Ismet Burcu; Ercin, Merve; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of vitamin U (vit U, S-methylmethionine) on oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis within the context of valproic acid (VPA)-induced renal damage. In this study, female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: Group I consisted of intact animals, group II was given vit U (50 mg/kg/day, by gavage), group III was given VPA (500 mg/kg/day, intraperitonally), and group IV was given VPA + vit U. The animals were treated by vit U 1 h prior to treatment with VPA every day for 15 days. The following results were obtained in vit U + VPA-treated rats: (i) the protective effect of vit U on renal damage was shown by a significant decrease in histopathological changes and an increase in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity; (ii) anti-oxidant property of vit U was demonstrated by a decrease in malondialdehyde levels and xanthine oxidase activity and an increase in glutathione levels, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities; (iii) anti-inflammatory property of vit U was demonstrated by a decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels, and adenosine deaminase activity; (iv) anti-fibrotic effect of vit U was shown by a decrease in transforming growth factor-β, collagen-1 levels, and arginase activity. Collectively, these data show that VPA is a promoter of inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis which resulted in renal damage. Vit U can be proposed as a potential candidate for preventing renal damage which arose during the therapeutic usage of VPA.

  8. Choice of Cell Source in Cell-Based Therapies for Retinal Damage due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review.

    PubMed

    John, Sudhakar; Natarajan, Sundaram; Parikumar, Periyasamy; Shanmugam P, Mahesh; Senthilkumar, Rajappa; Green, David William; Abraham, Samuel J K

    2013-01-01

    Background. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disorder that affects primarily the macula involving the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) but also to a certain extent the photoreceptor layer and the retinal neurons. Cell transplantation is a promising option for AMD and clinical trials are underway using different cell types. Methods. We hypothesize that instead of focusing on a particular cell source for concurrent regeneration of all the retinal layers and also to prevent exhaustive research on an array of cell sources for regeneration of each layer, the choice should depend on, precisely, which layer is damaged. Results. Thus, for a damage limited to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layer, the choice we suggest would be RPE cells. When the damage extends to rods and cones, the choice would be bone marrow stem cells and when retinal neurons are involved, relatively immature stem cell populations with an inherent capacity to yield neuronal lineage such as hematopoietic stem cells, embryonic stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells can be tried. Conclusion. This short review will prove to be a valuable guideline for those working on cell therapy for AMD to plan their future directions of research and therapy for this condition.

  9. Measurements of thermal electron heating and the formation of a non-Maxwellian energy distribution due to ion acoustic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of intense microwaves with an inhomogeneous plasma is studied in the U.C. Davis Prometheus III Device. P-polarized microwaves (f = 1.2 GHz, P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 5 KW) are incident on an essentially collisionless plasma with a long scale length in an oversized waveguide. For modest powers, large amplitude ion acoustic turbulence is observed on the underdense plasma shelf due to a combination of the parametric decay and the electron drift instabilities. Suprathermal and thermal electrons are strongly heated in this region with the thermal heating due to scattering with the ion turbulence. Since the cross section for interaction decreases rapidly as the electron energy increases, the low energy electrons are preferentially heated. The electron distribution function is measured and agrees with theory; the power absorption is reduced by up to a factor of two compared to a Maxwellian distribution. After the microwaves have been measured to decay, the electron distribution function is seen to relax back to its initial Maxwellian form. This occurs, as theory predicts, roughly on the electron-electron collision time scale.

  10. On the possibility of solar dust ring formation due to increased dust-ion drag from coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misconi, N. Y.; Pettera, L. E.

    1995-07-01

    Model calculations of circumsolar dust are conducted taking into account the increased ion drag due to the interaction of F-coronal dust with CMEs inside 8 Rs. The choice of 8 Rs is not arbitrary, after considering the severe plasma environment inside this region. Dust particles are allowed to spiral inward towards the Sun via the Poynting-Robertson drag, and the characteristics of the CMEs are applied in order to numerically compute the increased ion drag on F-coronal dust. The results show that the spiraling time would roughly be cut in half for dust particles inside 8 Rs. Differences in the spiraling time due to the dependence of the magnitude of increased ion drag on dust particle size, creates separation in the heliocentric distance of the orbits of small (> 10 μm) vs. larger particles. This result could create conditions where a dust ring or rings may appear as a transient feature, which would explain former citing of such dust rings by observers and their absence by others.

  11. Large Crystal Toxin Formation in Chromosomally Engineered Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai Due to σE Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Buasri, Wasin

    2012-01-01

    Seven distinct Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai integrants were constructed that carried the chitinase (chiBlA) gene from B. licheniformis under the control of the cry11Aa promoter and terminator with and without p19 and p20 genes. The toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai integrants against second-instar Spodoptera litura larvae was increased 1.8- to 4.6-fold compared to that of the wild-type strain (BTA1). Surprisingly, the enhanced toxicity in some strains of B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai integrants (BtaP19CS, BtaP19CSter, and BtaCAT) correlated with an increase in toxin formation. To investigate the role of these genes in toxin production, the expression profiles of the toxin genes, cry1Aa and chiBlA, as well as their transcriptional regulators (sigK and sigE), were analyzed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) from BTA1, BtaP19CS, and BtaCAT. Expression levels of cry1Aa in these two integrants increased about 2- to 3-fold compared to those of BTA1. The expression of the transcription factor sigK also was prolonged in the integrants compared to that of the wild type; however, sigE expression was unchanged. Western blot analysis of σE and σK showed the prolonged accumulation of σE in the integrants compared to that of BTA1, resulting in the increased synthesis of pro-σK up to T17 after the onset of sporulation in both BtaP19CS and BtaCAT compared to that of T13 in BTA1. The results from qPCR indicate clearly that the cry1Aa promoter activity was influenced most strongly by σE, whereas cry11Aa depended mostly on σK. These results on large-crystal toxin formation with enhanced toxicity should provide useful information for the generation of strains with improved insecticidal activity. PMID:22267677

  12. Air exposure behavior of the semiterrestrial crab Neohelice granulata allows tolerance to severe hypoxia but not prevent oxidative damage due to hypoxia-reoxygenation cycle.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Tábata Martins; Geihs, Márcio Alberto; Nery, Luiz Eduardo Maia; Maciel, Fábio Everton

    2015-11-01

    The air exposure behavior of the semi-terrestrial crab Neohelice granulata during severe hypoxia was studied. This study also verified whether this behavior mitigates possible oxidative damage, namely lipoperoxidation, caused by hypoxia and reoxygenation cycles. The lethal time for 50% of the crabs subjected to severe hypoxia (0.5 mgO2 · L(-1)) with free access to air was compared to that of crabs subjected to severe hypoxia without access to air. Crabs were placed in aquaria divided into three zones: water (when the animal was fully submersed), land (when the animal was completely emerged) and intermediate (when the animal was in contact with both environments) zones. Then the crabs were held in this condition for 270 min, and the time spent in each zone was recorded. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) damage to the walking leg muscles was determined for the following four experimental conditions: a--normoxic water with free access to air; b--hypoxic water without access to air; c--hypoxic water followed by normoxic water without air access; and d--hypoxic water with free access to air. When exposed to hypoxic water, N. granulata spent significantly more time on land, 135.3 ± 17.7 min, whereas control animals (exposed to normoxic water) spent more time submerged, 187.4 ± 20.2 min. By this behavior, N. granulata was able to maintain a 100% survival rate when exposed to severe hypoxia. However, N. granulata must still return to water after periods of air exposure (~ 14 min), causing a sequence of hypoxia/reoxygenation events. Despite increasing the survival rate, hypoxia with air access does not decrease the lipid peroxidation damage caused by the hypoxia and reoxygenation cycle experienced by these crabs.

  13. Intrusion of Fukushima-derived radiocaesium into subsurface water due to formation of mode waters in the North Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Kaeriyama, Hideki; Shimizu, Yugo; Setou, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Okazaki, Makoto; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 released radiocaesium (137Cs and 134Cs) into the North Pacific Ocean. Meridional transects of the vertical distribution of radiocaesium in seawater were measured along 147 °E and 155 °E in October–November 2012, 19 months after the accident. These measurements revealed subsurface peaks in radiocaesium concentrations at locations corresponding to two mode waters, Subtropical Mode Water and Central Mode Water. Mode water is a layer of almost vertically homogeneous water found over a large geographical area. Here we show that repeated formation of mode water during the two winter seasons after the Fukushima accident and subsequent outcropping into surface water transported radiocaesium downward and southward to subtropical regions of the North Pacific. The total amount of Fukushima-derived 134Cs within Subtropical Mode Water, decay-corrected to April 2011, was estimated to be 4.2 ± 1.1 PBq in October–November 2012. This amount of 134Cs corresponds to 22–28% of the total amount of 134Cs released to the Pacific Ocean. PMID:26915424

  14. Intrusion of Fukushima-derived radiocaesium into subsurface water due to formation of mode waters in the North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Kaeriyama, Hideki; Shimizu, Yugo; Setou, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Okazaki, Makoto; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo

    2016-02-26

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 released radiocaesium ((137)Cs and (134)Cs) into the North Pacific Ocean. Meridional transects of the vertical distribution of radiocaesium in seawater were measured along 147 °E and 155 °E in October-November 2012, 19 months after the accident. These measurements revealed subsurface peaks in radiocaesium concentrations at locations corresponding to two mode waters, Subtropical Mode Water and Central Mode Water. Mode water is a layer of almost vertically homogeneous water found over a large geographical area. Here we show that repeated formation of mode water during the two winter seasons after the Fukushima accident and subsequent outcropping into surface water transported radiocaesium downward and southward to subtropical regions of the North Pacific. The total amount of Fukushima-derived (134)Cs within Subtropical Mode Water, decay-corrected to April 2011, was estimated to be 4.2 ± 1.1 PBq in October-November 2012. This amount of (134)Cs corresponds to 22-28% of the total amount of (134)Cs released to the Pacific Ocean.

  15. Intrusion of Fukushima-derived radiocaesium into subsurface water due to formation of mode waters in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeriyama, Hideki; Shimizu, Yugo; Setou, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Okazaki, Makoto; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo

    2016-02-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 released radiocaesium (137Cs and 134Cs) into the North Pacific Ocean. Meridional transects of the vertical distribution of radiocaesium in seawater were measured along 147 °E and 155 °E in October-November 2012, 19 months after the accident. These measurements revealed subsurface peaks in radiocaesium concentrations at locations corresponding to two mode waters, Subtropical Mode Water and Central Mode Water. Mode water is a layer of almost vertically homogeneous water found over a large geographical area. Here we show that repeated formation of mode water during the two winter seasons after the Fukushima accident and subsequent outcropping into surface water transported radiocaesium downward and southward to subtropical regions of the North Pacific. The total amount of Fukushima-derived 134Cs within Subtropical Mode Water, decay-corrected to April 2011, was estimated to be 4.2 ± 1.1 PBq in October-November 2012. This amount of 134Cs corresponds to 22-28% of the total amount of 134Cs released to the Pacific Ocean.

  16. Oxide formation on NbAl{sub 3} and TiAl due to ion implantation of {sup 18}O

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Verink, E.D. Jr.; Withrow, S.P.; Ristolainen, E.O.

    1993-12-31

    Surface modification by ion implantation of {sup 18}O ions was investigated as a technique for altering the high-temperature oxidation of aluminide intermetallic compounds and related alloys. Specimens of NbAl{sub 3} and TiAl were implanted to a dose of 1 {times} 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} at 168 keV. Doses and accelerating energies were calculated to obtain near-stoichiometric concentrations of oxygen. Use of {sup 18}O allowed the implanted oxygen profiles to be measured using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The near surface oxides formed were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy. Specimens were also examined using x-ray diffraction and SEM. This paper presents results for specimens examined in the as-implanted state. The oxide formed due to implantation is a layer containing a mixture of Nb or Ti and amorphous Al oxides.

  17. [Cytogenetic damage to the corneal epithelium of mice due to the in vivo exposure to ionizing radiation with different levels of linear energy transfer].

    PubMed

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Bulynina, T M; Molokanov, A G; Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Damages to corneal epithelium cells were studied in mice irradiated by protons with the energies of 10, 25, 50 and 645 MeV, 60Co γ-quanta and accelerated ions of boron, carbon and neon with the energies of 7.5; 2.5 and 6.0 MeV/nucleon, respectively. X-rays (180 keV) were used as a standard radiation. Animals were exposed to a single dose in the range from 25 to 760 cGy. The mitotic index and aberrant mitoses were counted in corneal preparations in 24 hrs after irradiation. No matter the type of radiation, the mitotic index had an inverse dose dependence, i.e. the higher the dose, the lower the mitotic index. Exposure to all types of radiation resulted in a sharp increase in the number of chromosomal aberrations in the corneal epithelium; frequency of aberrations was a function of dose and type of radiation. The number of chromosomal aberrations displayed a peculiar direct dose dependence irrespective of type of radiation; however, heavy ions of carbon and boron are the most damaging to the cytogenetic apparatus of epithelial cells. Protons at the Bragg peak and ensuing fall, and of 50 MeV also contribute to the production of chromosomal aberrations as compared with sparsely ionizing gamma- and X-rays and high-energy protons with low linear energy transfer. Coefficients of relative biological effectiveness were calculated based on the mitotic index and evidence of aberrant mitosis.

  18. Changes in the Physicochemical Properties of Piperine/β-Cyclodextrin due to the Formation of Inclusion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ezawa, Toshinari; Inoue, Yutaka; Tunvichien, Sujimon; Suzuki, Rina; Kanamoto, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Piperine (PP) is a pungent component in black pepper that possesses useful biological activities; however it is practically insoluble in water. The aim of the current study was to prepare a coground mixture (GM) of PP and β-cyclodextrin (βCD) (molar ratio of PP/βCD = 1/1) and subsequently evaluate the solubility of PP and physicochemical properties of the GM. DSC thermal behavior of the GM showed the absence of melting peak of piperine. PXRD profile of the GM exhibited halo pattern and no characteristic peaks due to PP and βCD were observed. Based on Job's plot, the PP/βCD complex in solution had a stoichiometric ratio of 1/1. Raman spectrum of the GM revealed scattering peaks assigned for the benzene ring (C=C), the methylene groups (CH2), and ether groups (C-O-C) of PP that were broaden and shifted to lower frequencies. SEM micrographs showed that particles in the GM were agglomerated and had rough surface, unlike pure PP and pure βCD particles. At 15 min of dissolution testing, the amount dissolved of PP in the GM was dramatically increased (about 16 times) compared to that of pure PP. Moreover the interaction between PP and βCD cavity was detected by 1H-1H NMR nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26998357

  19. Functional MRI for characterization of renal perfusion impairment and edema formation due to acute kidney injury in different mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongjun; Gutberlet, Marcel; Jang, Mi-Sun; Meier, Martin; Mengel, Michael; Hartung, Dagmar; Wacker, Frank; Rong, Song; Hueper, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to characterize acute kidney injury (AKI) in C57BL/6 (B6)- and 129/Sv (Sv)-mice by noninvasive measurement of renal perfusion and tissue edema using functional MRI. Methods Different severities of AKI were induced in B6- and Sv-mice by renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Unilateral clamping of the renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI) or 45 min (severe AKI) was done. MRI (7-Tesla) was performed 1, 7 and 28 days after surgery using a flow alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence. Maps of perfusion and T1-relaxation time were calculated. Relative MRI-parameters of the IRI kidney compared to the contralateral not-clipped kidney were compared between AKI severities and between mouse strains using unpaired t-tests. In addition, fibrosis was assessed by Masson Trichrome and collagen IV staining. Results After moderate AKI relative perfusion impairment was significantly higher in B6- than in Sv-mice at d7 (55±7% vs. 82±8%, p<0.05) and d28 (76±7% vs. 102±3%, p<0.01). T1-values increased in the early phase after AKI in both mouse strains. T1-increase was more severe after prolonged ischemia times of 45 min compared to 35 min in both mouse strains, measured in the renal cortex and outer stripe of outer medulla. Kidney volume loss (compared to the contralateral kidney) occurred already after 7 days but proceeded markedly towards 4 weeks in severe AKI. Early renal perfusion impairment was predictive for later kidney volume loss. The progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the severe AKI model was similar in both mouse strains as revealed by histology. Conclusion Quantification of renal perfusion and tissue edema by functional MRI allows characterization of strain differences upon AKI. Renal perfusion impairment was stronger in B6- compared to Sv-animals following moderate AKI. Prolonged ischemia times were associated with more severe perfusion impairment and edema formation in the early phase and

  20. Scenario-based assessment of buildings' damage and population exposure due to earthquake-induced tsunamis for the town of Alexandria, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnoni, G.; Armigliato, A.; Tinti, S.

    2015-12-01

    Alexandria is the second biggest city in Egypt with regards to population, is a key economic area in northern Africa and has very important tourist activity. Historical records indicate that it was severely affected by a number of tsunami events. In this work we assess the tsunami hazard by running numerical simulations of tsunami impact in Alexandria through the worst-case credible tsunami scenario analysis (WCTSA). We identify three main seismic sources: the western Hellenic Arc (WHA - reference event AD 365, Mw = 8.5), the eastern Hellenic Arc (EHA - reference event 1303, Mw = 8.0) and the Cyprus Arc (CA - hypothetical scenario earthquake with Mw = 8.0), inferred from the tectonic setting and from historical tsunami catalogues. All numerical simulations are carried out in two sea level conditions (mean sea level and maximum high-tide sea level) by means of the code UBO-TSUFD, developed and maintained by the Tsunami Research Team of the University of Bologna. Relevant tsunami metrics are computed for each scenario and then used to build aggregated fields such as the maximum flood depth and the maximum inundation area. We find that the case that produces the most relevant flooding in Alexandria is the EHA scenario, with wave heights up to 4 m. The aggregate fields are used for a building vulnerability assessment according to a methodology developed in the framework of the EU-FP6 project SCHEMA and further refined in this study, based on the adoption of a suitable building damage matrix and on water inundation depth. It is found that in the districts of El Dekhila and Al Amriyah, to the south-west of the port of Dekhila, over 12 000 (13 400 in the case of maximum high tide) buildings could be affected and hundreds of them could sustain damaging consequences, ranging from critical damage to total collapse. It is also found that in the same districts tsunami inundation covers an area of about 15 km2, resulting in more than 150 000 (165 000 in the case of maximum high

  1. Gain of cellular adaptation due to prolonged p53 impairment leads to functional switchover from p53 to p73 during DNA damage in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Juni; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Ray, Pallab; Hossain, Dewan Md Sakib; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Adhikary, Arghya; Chattopadhyay, Sreya; Das, Tanya; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2010-10-22

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays the central role in regulating apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. From an evolutionary perspective, the activity of p53 has to be backed up by other protein(s) in case of any functional impairment of this protein, to trigger DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. We adopted multiple experimental approaches to demonstrate that in p53-impaired cancer cells, DNA damage caused accumulation of p53 paralogue p73 via Chk-1 that strongly impacted Bax expression and p53-independent apoptosis. On the contrary, when p53 function was restored by ectopic expression, Chk-2 induced p53 accumulation that in turn overshadowed p73 activity, suggesting an antagonistic interaction between p53 family members. To understand such interaction better, p53-expressing cells were impaired differentially for p53 activity. In wild-type p53-expressing cancer cells that were silenced for p53 for several generations, p73 was activated, whereas no such trend was observed when p53 was transiently silenced. Prolonged p53 interference, even in functional p53 settings, therefore, leads to the "gain of cellular adaptation" in a way that alters the cellular microenvironment in favor of p73 activation by altering p73-regulatory proteins, e.g. Chk1 activation and dominant negative p73 down-regulation. These findings not only unveil a hitherto unexplained mechanism underlying the functional switchover from p53 to p73, but also validate p73 as a promising and potential target for cancer therapy in the absence of functional p53.

  2. Formation of a fibrin based gelatinous coat over repairing rat gastric epithelium after acute ethanol damage: interaction with adherent mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, L A; Allen, A; Bennett, M K

    1987-01-01

    A gelatinous coat, heterogeneous in appearance, was formed over damaged rat gastric mucosa recovering from acute ethanol injury. This coat, in places 1.6 mm thick (median thickness 680 microns), was 10 times thicker than the translucent layer of adherent mucus (median thickness 70 microns) covering the undamaged mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and periodic acid Schiff staining showed this gelatinous coat to be predominantly a fibrin gel with an exterior layer rich in mucus and necrotic cells. The plasma clotting time was significantly decreased in vitro by pig gastric mucus gel and soluble mucus glycoprotein (90% and 13% respectively) suggesting that in vivo the mucus layer remaining after epithelial damage could act as a template for fibrinogen-fibrin conversion. These results show that a fibrin based gelatinous coat, quite distinct from the adherent mucus layer and with considerable protective potential could be formed over the repairing rat gastric mucosa after acute ethanol damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3653751

  3. Disruption of the ECM33 gene in Candida albicans prevents biofilm formation, engineered human oral mucosa tissue damage and gingival cell necrosis/apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Chmielewski, Witold; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen). We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida.

  4. Disruption of the ECM33 Gene in Candida albicans Prevents Biofilm Formation, Engineered Human Oral Mucosa Tissue Damage and Gingival Cell Necrosis/Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Chmielewski, Witold; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen). We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida. PMID:22665950

  5. Motor and sensory neuropathy due to myelin infolding and paranodal damage in a transgenic mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1C

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Samuel M.; Sha, Di; Mohammed, Anum A.; Asress, Seneshaw; Glass, Jonathan D.; Chin, Lih-Shen; Li, Lian

    2013-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1C (CMT1C) is a dominantly inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Despite human genetic evidence linking missense mutations in SIMPLE to CMT1C, the in vivo role of CMT1C-linked SIMPLE mutations remains undetermined. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying CMT1C pathogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing either wild-type or CMT1C-linked W116G human SIMPLE. Mice expressing mutant, but not wild type, SIMPLE develop a late-onset motor and sensory neuropathy that recapitulates key clinical features of CMT1C disease. SIMPLE mutant mice exhibit motor and sensory behavioral impairments accompanied by decreased motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and reduced compound muscle action potential amplitude. This neuropathy phenotype is associated with focally infolded myelin loops that protrude into the axons at paranodal regions and near Schmidt–Lanterman incisures of peripheral nerves. We find that myelin infolding is often linked to constricted axons with signs of impaired axonal transport and to paranodal defects and abnormal organization of the node of Ranvier. Our findings support that SIMPLE mutation disrupts myelin homeostasis and causes peripheral neuropathy via a combination of toxic gain-of-function and dominant-negative mechanisms. The results from this study suggest that myelin infolding and paranodal damage may represent pathogenic precursors preceding demyelination and axonal degeneration in CMT1C patients. PMID:23359569

  6. Mineralogical and chemical assessment of concrete damaged by the oxidation of sulfide-bearing aggregates: Importance of thaumasite formation on reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A.; Duchesne, J.; Fournier, B.; Durand, B.; Rivard, P.; Shehata, M.

    2012-10-15

    Damages in concrete containing sulfide-bearing aggregates were recently observed in the Trois-Rivieres area (Quebec, Canada), characterized by rapid deterioration within 3 to 5 years after construction. A petrographic examination of concrete core samples was carried out using a combination of tools including: stereomicroscopic evaluation, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. The aggregate used to produce concrete was an intrusive igneous rock with different metamorphism degrees and various proportions of sulfide minerals. In the rock, sulfide minerals were often surrounded by a thin layer of carbonate minerals (siderite). Secondary reaction products observed in the damaged concrete include 'rust' mineral forms (e.g. ferric oxyhydroxides such as goethite, limonite (FeO (OH) nH{sub 2}O) and ferrihydrite), gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite. In the presence of water and oxygen, pyrrhotite oxidizes to form iron oxyhydroxides and sulphuric acid. The acid then reacts with the phases of the cement paste/aggregate and provokes the formation of sulfate minerals. Understanding both mechanisms, oxidation and internal sulfate attack, is important to be able to duplicate the damaging reaction in laboratory conditions, thus allowing the development of a performance test for evaluating the potential for deleterious expansion in concrete associated with sulfide-bearing aggregates.

  7. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase is Involved in the Repair of DNA Damage Due to Sulfur Mustard by a Mechanism Other Than DNA Ligase I Activation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-16

    agents including sulfur mustard (SM). We observed concurrent activation of PARP and DNA ligase in SM-exposed human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK...Previous reports from other laboratories suggested that DNA ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. In humans, there are three distinct...DNA ligases, I, II and IV of which DNA ligase I participates in DNA replication and repair. By metabolically labeling HEK using 3H-adenosine

  8. Ion beam damage assessment and waveguide formation induced by energetic Si-ion irradiation in lanthanum aluminate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Huang, Q.; Crespillo, M. L.; Qiao, M.; Liu, P.; Wang, X. L.

    2017-02-01

    Lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) crystal has emerged as one of the most valuable functional-materials, and its physical, electronic and optical properties strongly depend on the crystal structure, which can be easily altered in an irradiation environment and therefore affect the performance of LaAlO3-based devices. On the other hand, the preparation of LaAlO3 waveguide is also a scientific challenge for its potential application prospects in optoelectronics field. In this work, the damage evolution behavior of LaAlO3 crystal under Si-ion irradiation has been discussed in detail utilizing complementary characterization techniques, and then, single-mode waveguide of LaAlO3 crystal in the visible band can be obtained based on ion-irradiation-induced lattice damage behavior. Waveguide optical-coupling techniques are used to show its competitive features. Thus, novel optical waveguides with optimized features in LaAlO3 crystals can be tailored by a proper selection of ion mass, energy and fluence using the modification of the target material during ion irradiation process.

  9. The selection and application of loss control materials to minimize formation damage in gravel packed completions for a North Sea field

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, R.M.; MacKinlay, W.M.; Landrum, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a laboratory evaluation of Loss Control Materials (LCM) commonly used to control fluid-loss during completions and workovers and the development of on-site Quality Control procedures for monitoring the performance of the LCM at the well site. In addition to the laboratory results, case histories are provided detailing application of the findings in gravel-packed completions. Conoco has recently completed five gravel-packed wells in the North Sea. The gravel packs were conducted in two stages: a perforation pre-pack and an annular gravel pack. During this completion procedure, LCM was used to wash excess gravel out of the casing following the pre-pack and to control fluid-loss. Analysis of the first completion indicated production was restricted through the completion. Subsequent evaluation of the completion procedure and LCM products indicated the most likely source of formation damage was residual LCM filter-cake. Laboratory tests monitoring fluid-loss control, rheology, and formation damage were performed on commonly-used LCM candidates. These candidates included sized-salt formulations, sized-calcium carbonate systems, and polymers from a variety of commercial suppliers. In addition to the evaluation of LCM products, remedial treatment options and a new delayed-release breaker were tested.

  10. Acidification due to microbial dechlorination near a trichloroethene DNAPL is overcome with pH buffer or formate as electron donor: experimental demonstration in diffusion-cells.

    PubMed

    Philips, Jo; Maes, Nele; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Acidification due to microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) can limit the bio-enhanced dissolution of TCE dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). This study related the dissolution enhancement of a TCE DNAPL to the pH buffer capacity of the medium and the type of electron donor used. In batch systems, dechlorination was optimal at pH7.1-7.5, but was completely inhibited below pH6.2. In addition, dechlorination in batch systems led to a smaller pH decrease at an increasing pH buffer capacity or with the use of formate instead of lactate as electron donor. Subsequently, bio-enhanced TCE DNAPL dissolution was quantified in diffusion-cells with a 5.5 cm central sand layer, separating a TCE DNAPL layer from an aqueous top layer. Three different pH buffer capacities (2.9 mM-17.9 mM MOPS) and lactate or formate as electron donor were applied. In the lactate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor increased from 1.5 to 2.2 with an increase of the pH buffer capacity. In contrast, in the formate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor (2.4±0.3) was unaffected by the pH buffer capacity. Measurement of the pore water pH confirmed that the pH decreased less with an increased pH buffer capacity or with formate instead of lactate as electron donor. These results suggest that the significant impact of acidification on bio-enhanced DNAPL dissolution can be overcome by the amendment of a pH buffer or by applying a non acidifying electron donor like formate.

  11. Examining food additives and spices for their anti-oxidant ability to counteract oxidative damage due to chronic exposure to free radicals from environmental pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Raul A., III

    The main objective of this work was to examine food additives and spices (from the Apiaceae family) to determine their antioxidant properties to counteract oxidative stress (damage) caused by Environmental pollutants. Environmental pollutants generate Reactive Oxygen species and Reactive Nitrogen species. Star anise essential oil showed lower antioxidant activity than extracts using DPPH scavenging. Dill Seed -- Anethum Graveolens -the monoterpene components of dill showed to activate the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase , which helped attach the antioxidant molecule glutathione to oxidized molecules that would otherwise do damage in the body. The antioxidant activity of extracts of dill was comparable with ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and quercetin in in-vitro systems. Black Cumin -- Nigella Sativa: was evaluated the method 1,1-diphenyl2-picrylhhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. Positive correlations were found between the total phenolic content in the black cumin extracts and their antioxidant activities. Caraway -- Carum Carvi: The antioxidant activity was evaluated by the scavenging effects of 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Caraway showed strong antioxidant activity. Cumin -- Cuminum Cyminum - the major polyphenolic were extracted and separated by HPTLC. The antioxidant activity of the cumin extract was tested on 1,1'-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging. Coriander -- Coriandrum Sativum - the antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging property of the seeds was studied and also investigated whether the administration of seeds curtails oxidative stress. Coriander seed powder not only inhibited the process of Peroxidative damage, but also significantly reactivated the antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant levels. The seeds also showed scavenging activity against superoxides and hydroxyl radicals. The total polyphenolic content of the seeds was found to be 12.2 galic acid equivalents (GAE)/g while the total flavonoid content

  12. Reactivity of damaged pyrimidines: formation of a Schiff base intermediate at the glycosidic bond of saturated dihydrouridine.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yajun; Lin, Gengjie; Chomicz, Lidia; Li, Lei

    2015-03-11

    DNA glycosylases catalyze the first step of the base excision repair (BER) pathway. The chemistry used by these enzymes for deglycosylation has been largely considered as the chemistry of the oxocarbenium ion, e.g., direct rupture of the C1'-N1 bond resulting in an oxocarbenium ion intermediate. Here we present mechanistic studies revealing the 2'-deoxyribose isomerization and subsequent deglycosylation processes in two pyrimidine lesions: 5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine (dHdU) and 5,6-dihydrothymidine (dHT), formed via ionizing radiation damage to 2'-deoxycytidine and thymidine, respectively, under anoxic conditions. Acid or heat treatment of these two lesions leads to the production of two pairs of C1' epimers containing a pyranose and a furanose, respectively, indicating that both lesions favor the rupture of the C1'-O4' bond, resulting in a Schiff base intermediate at the N-glycosidic bond. Such a Schiff base intermediate was trapped and characterized by either Pd-catalyzed hydrogenation or thiol-mediated addition reaction. In contrast, in undamaged 2'-deoxyuridine and thymidine, reactions at elevated temperatures lead to the release of nucleobases most likely via the traditional oxocarbenium ion pathway. DFT calculations further support the experimental findings, suggesting that the oxocarbenium ion intermediate is responsible for the deglycosylation process if the integrity of the pyrimidine ring is maintained, while the Schiff base intermediate is preferred if the C5═C6 bond is saturated. Currently, the oxocarbenium ion pathway is indicated to be solely responsible for the deglycosylation in BER enzymes, however our results suggest an alternative Schiff base mechanism which may be responsible for the repair of saturated pyrimidine damages.

  13. New petrophysical magnetic methods MACC and MAFM in permeability characterisation of petroleum reservoir rock cleaning, flooding modelling and determination of fines migration in formation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, O. P.

    2012-04-01

    Potential applications of magnetic techniques and methods in petroleum engineering and petrophysics (Ivakhnenko, 1999, 2006; Ivakhnenko & Potter, 2004) reveal their vast advantages for the petroleum reservoir characterisation and formation evaluation. In this work author proposes for the first time developed systematic methods of the Magnetic Analysis of Core Cleaning (MACC) and Magnetic Analysis of Fines Migration (MAFM) for characterisation of reservoir core cleaning and modelling estimations of fines migration for the petroleum reservoir formations. Using example of the one oil field we demonstrate results in application of these methods on the reservoir samples. Petroleum reservoir cores samples have been collected within reservoir using routine technique of reservoir sampling and preservation for PVT analysis. Immediately before the MACC and MAFM studies samples have been exposed to atmospheric air for a few days. The selected samples have been in detailed way characterised after fluid cleaning and core flooding by their mineralogical compositions and petrophysical parameters. Mineralogical composition has been estimated utilizing XRD techniques. The petrophysical parameters, such as permeability and porosity have been measured on the basis of total core analysis. The results demonstrate effectiveness and importance of the MACC and MAFM methods for the routine core analysis (RCAL) and the special core analysis (SCAL) in the reservoir characterisation, core flooding and formation damage analysis.

  14. A geminivirus betasatellite damages the structural and functional integrity of chloroplasts leading to symptom formation and inhibition of photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Gnanasekaran, Prabu; Kumar, Reddy Kishore; Kushwaha, Nirbhay Kumar; Sharma, Veerendra Kumar; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Chakraborty, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    Geminivirus infection often causes severe vein clearing symptoms in hosts. Recently a betasatellite has emerged as a key regulator of symptom induction. To understand the host–betasatellite interactions in the process of symptom development, a systematic study was carried out involving symptoms induced by a betasatellite associated with radish leaf curl disease (RaLCB) in Nicotiana benthamiana. It has been found that βC1 protein localized to chloroplasts of host cells, and RaLCB lacking βC1, which failed to produce symptoms, had no effect on chloroplast ultrastructure. Vein flecking induced by transiently expressed βC1 was associated with chloroplast ultrastructure. In addition, the betasatellite down-regulates expression of genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis as well as genes involved in chloroplast development and plastid translocation. Interestingly, the expression of key host genes involved in chlorophyll degradation remains unaffected. Betasatellite infection drastically reduced the numbers of active reaction centres and the plastoquinol pool size in leaves exhibiting vein clearing symptoms. Betasatellite-mediated impediments at different stages of chloroplast functionality affect the photosynthetic efficiency of N. benthamiana. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first evidence of a chloroplast-targeting protein encoded by a DNA virus which induces vein clearing and structurally and functionally damages chloroplasts in plants. PMID:26113193

  15. Global Crop Yield Reductions due to Surface Ozone Exposure: Crop Production Losses and Economic Damage in 2000 and 2030 under Two Future Scenarios of O3 Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avnery, S.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Liu, J.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Field studies demonstrate that exposure to elevated concentrations of surface ozone (O3) may cause substantial reductions in the agricultural yields of many crops. As emissions of O3 precursors rise in many parts of the world over the next few decades, yield reductions from O3 exposure may increase the challenges of feeding a global population projected to grow from approximately 6 to 8 billion people between 2000 and 2030. This study estimates global yield reductions of three key staple crops (soybean, maize, and wheat) due to surface ozone exposure in 2000 and 2030 according to two trajectories of O3 pollution: the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (IPCC SRES) A2 and B1 storylines, which represent upper- and lower-boundary projections, respectively, of most O3 precursor emissions in 2030. Our results indicate that year 2000 O3-induced global yield reductions ranged, depending on the O3 exposure metric used, from 3.9-15% for wheat, 8.5-14% for soybean, and 2.2-5.5% for maize. Global crop production losses totaled 79-121 million metric tons, worth 11-18 billion annually (USD2000). In the 2030-A2 scenario we find global O3-induced yield loss of wheat to be 5.4-26% (a further reduction in yield of +1.5-10% from year 2000 values), 15-19% for soybean (reduction of +0.9-11%), and 4.4-8.7% for maize (reduction of +2.1-3.2%) depending on the metric used, with total global agricultural losses worth 17-35 billion USD2000 annually (an increase of +6-17 billion in losses from 2000). Under the 2030-B1 scenario, we project less severe but still substantial reductions in yields: 4.0-17% for wheat (a further decrease in yield of +0.1-1.8% from 2000), 9.5-15% for soybean (decrease of +0.7-1.0%), and 2.5-6.0% for maize (decrease of+ 0.3-0.5%), with total losses worth 12-21 billion annually (an increase of +$1-3 billion in losses from 2000). Because our analysis uses crop data from the year 2000, which likely underestimates agricultural

  16. The Effects of Topically Applied Glycolic Acid and Salicylic Acid on Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Erythema, DNA Damage and Sunburn Cell Formation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Wei, Rong-Rong; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Coelho, Sergio G.; Kaidbey, Kays; Barton, Curtis; Takahashi, Kaoruko; Beer, Janusz Z.; Miller, Sharon A.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Background α-Hydroxy acids (αHA) are reported to reduce signs of aging in the skin and are widely used cosmetic ingredients. Several studies suggest that αHA can increase the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet radiation. More recently, β-hydroxy acids (βHA), or combinations of αHA and βHA have also been incorporated into antiaging skin care products. Concerns have also arisen about increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation following use of skin care products containing β-HA. Objective To determine whether topical treatment with glycolic acid, a representative αHA, or with salicylic acid, a βHA, modifies the short-term effects of solar simulated radiation (SSR) in human skin. Methods Fourteen subjects participated in this study. Three of the four test sites on the mid-back of each subject were treated daily Monday - Friday, for a total of 3.5 weeks, with glycolic acid (10%), salicylic acid (2%), or vehicle (control). The fourth site received no treatment. After the last treatment, each site was exposed to SSR, and shave biopsies from all 4 sites were obtained. The endpoints evaluated in this study were erythema (assessed visually and instrumentally), DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Results Treatment with glycolic acid resulted in increased sensitivity of human skin to SSR, measured as an increase in erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Salicylic acid did not produce significant changes in any of these biomarkers. Conclusions Short-term topical application of glycolic acid in a cosmetic formulation increased the sensitivity of human skin to SSR, while a comparable treatment with salicylic acid did not. PMID:19411163

  17. The laser driven short-term heating balloon catheter: Relation between the chronic neointimal hyperplasia formation and thermal damage to arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Natsumi; Hayashi, Tomoaki; Kunio, Mie; Igami, Yuka; Arai, Tsunenori; Sakurada, Masami

    2010-01-01

    We proposed a novel laser-driven short-term heating angioplasty to realize restenosis-suppressive angioplasty for peripheral artery disease. In this study, we investigated the chronic intimal hyperplasia formation after the short-term heating dilatation in vivo, as well as the thermal damage calculation on arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The prototype short-term heating balloon catheter with 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 mm φ in balloon diameter and 25 mm in balloon length were employed. The short-term heating dilatation was performed in porcine iliac arteries with dilatation conditions of 75°C (N=4) and 65°C (N=5) as peak balloon temperature, 18 ± 4s as heating duration, 3.5 atm as balloon dilatation pressure. Four weeks after the balloon dilatation, the balloon-dilated artery segments were extracted and were stained with HE and picrosirius red for histological observation. In the case of 75°C as the peak balloon temperature, neointimal hyperplasia formation was significantly reduced. In this case, the SMCs density in the artery media measured from the HE-stained specimen was 20% lower than that in the reference artery. According to the thermal damage calculation, it was estimated that the SMCs lethality in artery media after the short-term heating angioplasty was 20% in the case of 75°C as the peak balloon temperature. We demonstrated that the short-term heating dilatation reduced the number of SMCs in artery media. We think this SMCs reduction might contribute to the suppression of chronic neointimal hyperplasia.

  18. Mechanistic investigation of the formation damaging characteristics of mixed metal hydroxide drill-in fluids and comparison with polymer-base fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, L.J.; Reid, D.P.; Williamson, D.

    1995-12-31

    Mixed metal hydroxide (MMH) fluids are highly thixotropic and have shown exceptional abilities in the areas of hole cleaning, suspension, and maintenance of good hole gauge even through very poorly consolidated sandstones. When a drill-in fluid based on an MMH has been used in reservoir sections, the ease of cleanup and the production rates have both exceeded expectations. Results have been better than those achieved on offsets where more conventional fluids have been used. Laboratory results have also shown properly formulated MMH fluids to have a low potential for formation damage. The primary objectives of the laboratory project presented in this paper were to (1) investigate the mechanisms by which filter cakes develop against sandstone faces, (2) study the natures of the cakes produced with different types of drill-in fluids, and (3) investigate the implications for cake cleanup. In a group of unweighted fluids an MMH fluid was found to be unique in its ability to form a predominantly external cake. It was further shown that the strong interactions between the MMH crystals and the bentonite platelets, which interactions provide the characteristic high shear thinning and almost instantaneous gelling behavior of such fluids, also contribute to the avoidance of damaging internal cake formation. This study demonstrates by dynamic fluid-loss measurements, imaging of dried filter cakes using an SEM, and direct imaging of wet filter cakes using an environmental SEM that the fluid is able to form mineral bridges over pore throats in a wide range of reservoir rocks. The external cake formed by the MMH fluid is easily removed by wash fluids or simply by application of backpressure as occurs when a well is brought on to production.

  19. [Chronic Heart Failure Due to Formation of Giant Left Ventricular Pseudoaneurysm After Painless Myocardial Infarction in a Female Patient With Diabetes].

    PubMed

    Katkova, L A; Furman, N V; Dolotovskaya, P V; Dovgalevsky, Ya P; Sakharova, N K; Panteleeva, E A; Parshina, E A

    2016-09-01

    Rupture of the free wall of the left ventricle with the formation of a false aneurysm (pseudoaneurysm, PA) - is a rare complication of acute myocardial infarction. Given the high risk of rupture of the PA and other life-threatening consequences (progressive heart failure, thromboembolic events), as well as the absence of pathognomonic signs and the difficulty in determining treatment strategy (feasibility and timing of surgery), early diagnosis of this complication appears to be especially important. We present here an overview of literature data on prevalence, specific features of diagnostics, and problems related to selection of method of treatment of PA. A case f congestive heart failure due to PA of the left ventricle as a result of painless myocardial infarction in 65-year-old patient with diabetes is also presented.

  20. Thermal properties of Central Aare granite for temperatures up to 500°C: Irreversible changes due to thermal crack formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Michael A.; Ammann, Jens; Rossi, Edoardo; Madonna, Claudio; Höser, Dragana; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity of Central Aare granite are reported in the temperature range from 25°C to 500°C. Each rock sample underwent three consecutive heating and cooling cycles. Significant irreversible changes in the properties due to thermal crack formation could be observed. After the first thermal cycle, both thermal diffusivity and conductivity dropped to about 75% of the initial value at room temperature, whereas the heat capacity did not show an irreversible decay. For subsequent thermal cycles, no further permanent changes of the investigated properties could be observed. From the conducted measurements, accurate correlations are derived, offering a platform for precise high-temperature experiments and other research on Central Aare granite and similar granitic rocks. The report shows that the assumption of constant thermal properties leads to significant inaccuracies at elevated temperatures, especially if thermal cycles are present.

  1. Mitigation of environmental impacts due to ghat road formation in Palamalai Hills, South India, by optimizing cut and fill volumes using GPS and GIS techniques.

    PubMed

    Arulmozhi, R; Subramani, T; Sukumar, S

    2015-01-01

    Formation of new roads generally brings about adverse impact on the environment, and in the case of hill roads, the impact is diverse and effective measures are required to mitigate it. The common problems in hill road formation are tree cutting, destruction of canopies, change in land use pattern, soil erosion, slope instability, induced landslides, invasion of foreign species, and so on. Removal of trees and vegetations causes rapid soil erosion, landslides, and invasion of foreign species posing danger to the survival of weak native species. Dumping of surplus earth materials on the valley side poses a significant threat to the environment as it would cause induced landslides. Using the cut earth for filling in road formation and dumping, the surplus cut earth in safe locations will reduce environmental degradation considerably. Conventionally, hill road alignments are finalized using traditional survey methods using ghat tracer, compass, and leveling surveys which require enormous complicated field and office works. Any revision to reduce the quantum of earthwork is difficult in this method due to its complex nature. In the present study at Palamalai Hills, South India, an alignment for a length of 7.95 km was prepared by traditional methods using ghat tracer and total station instruments for survey works. The earthwork quantities were ascertained from the longitudinal profile of the alignment. A GPS survey was also conducted along the alignment to examine its utility in alignment modification. To modify the stretches, where the earthwork cutting and filling are above normal and unbalanced and result in surplus earth, repeated GPS surveys were conducted along different paths to optimize the earthwork. The earthwork quantities of the original alignment were analyzed, and its correlation with environmental effect and the usefulness of the GPS survey in this task are presented in this paper.

  2. Study of crater formation and its characteristics due to impact of a cluster projectile on a metal surface by molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naspoori, Srujan Kumar; Kammara, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-04-01

    Impingement of energetic particles/ions on material surfaces is of great interest as these impacts give rise to various interesting phenomena, such as sputtering, back-scattering, crater formation, emission of electrons and photons from material surfaces etc. Surface erosion occurring in the plasma-facing material of nuclear fusion reactors reduce their performance and this motivated the course of the current work in understanding the underlying physics of solid-particle interactions. In the present work, we have studied sputtering, crater formation and its characteristics on the surface of a plasma-facing material due to the impact of a low to high energy dust particle (a conglomerate of a few to a thousand atoms) using the molecular dynamics method. Sputtering yield, excavated atoms from the crater, crater depth, height of crater rim, radius and aspect ratio of the crater are calculated for a range of incident energies (10 eV to 10 keV), and the variation of these parameters with varying size (formed of 14, 32, 64 atoms) of dust particle at different temperatures of the target material are computed.

  3. 3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) induced micronucleus formation and DNA damage in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Evelyn; Kassie, Fekadu; Gminski, Richard; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2004-01-15

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), identified in diesel exhaust and in airborne particulate matter, is a potent mutagen in Salmonella, induces micronuclei formation in mice and in human cells and DNA adducts in rats. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic potency of 3-NBA in human HepG2 cells using the micronucleus (MN) assay and the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). 3-NBA caused a genotoxic effect at concentrations > or =12 nM in both assays. In the micronucleus assay, we found 98.7+/-10.3 MN/1000 BNC at a concentration of 100 nM 3-NBA in comparison to 27.3+/-0.6 MN/1000 BNC with the negative control. At the same concentration, the DNA-migration (SCGE) showed an Olive tail moment (OTM) of 2.7+/-0.45 and %DNA in the tail of 8.28+/-0.76; OTM and %DNA in the tail of cells treated with the negative control were 0.73+/-0.08 and 2.81+/-0.30, respectively. The results are discussed under consideration of former studies.

  4. In vitro effects of fluor-hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite on colony formation, DNA damage and mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Jantová, S; Theiszová, M; Letasiová, S; Birosová, L; Palou, T M

    2008-04-30

    The number of biomaterials used in biomedical applications has rapidly increased in the past two decades. Fluorapatite (FA) is one of the inorganic constituents of bone or teeth used for hard-tissue repairs and replacements. Fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) is a new synthetically prepared composite that in its structure contains the same molecular concentration of OH(-) groups and F(-) ions. The aim of this experimental investigation was to evaluate cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of FHA and FA eluates on Chinese hamster V79 cells and to compare them with the effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) eluate. Cytotoxicity of the biomaterials tested was evaluated by use of the cell colony-formation assay and by direct counting of the cells in each colony. Genotoxicity was assessed by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) and mutagenicity was evaluated by the Hprt gene-mutation assay and in bacterial mutagenicity tests using Salmonella typhimurium TA100. The results show that the highest test concentrations of the biomaterials (100% and 75% eluates) induced very weak inhibition of colony growth (about 10%). On the other hand, the reduction of cell number per colony induced by these concentrations was in the range from 43% to 31%. The comet assay showed that biomaterials induced DNA breaks, which increased with increasing test concentrations in the order HA

  5. Formation of DNA-damaging N-nitroso compounds from the interaction of calcium-channel blockers with nitrite.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Antonietta; Robbiano, Luigi; Grossi, Sarah; Mattioli, Francesca; Brambilla, Giovanni

    2007-09-05

    A large number of drugs have been shown to react with nitrite to give genotoxic-carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds (NOC). However, the majority of drugs remain to be examined in this respect, among which calcium-channel blockers, all theoretically nitrosatable and widely used in the therapy of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. In this preliminary investigation, seven calcium-channel blockers have been examined either for their in vitro nitrosation according to the procedure recommended by the WHO, or for occurrence of liver DNA fragmentation, as detected by the Comet assay, in rats given by gavage 1/2 LD50 of the drug and 80 mg/kg of sodium nitrite. After 6h incubation the yields of NOC formed in vitro from nicardipine, nifedipine, nimodipine and nitrendipine ranged from 37 to 45% of the theoretical one, whereas the yields of NOC formed from diltiazem, gallopamil and verapamil ranged from 2 to 5%. In vivo, as compared with the effect of the same dose of the drug alone, a significant increase of both tail length and tail moment, indicative of an increased frequency of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, was produced in rat liver DNA by the administration with nitrite of gallopamil, nifedipine, nimodipine and nitrendipine, the ratio [tail length of drug+NaNO(2)/tail length of drug alone] being 3.2 for nimodipine, 3.1 for gallopamil 2.2 for nifedipine, and 2.1 for nitrendipine. Even if present, the increase in the degree of DNA fragmentation did not reach the statistical significance in rats given with nitrite nicardipine, diltiazem and verapamil. Further studies should be performed to investigate the formation of NOC in conditions simulating those occurring in the stomach of humans treated with a therapeutic dose, and to quantitate their genotoxic potency.

  6. Determination of oxidative DNA base damage by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Effect of derivatization conditions on artifactual formation of certain base oxidation products.

    PubMed

    England, T G; Jenner, A; Aruoma, O I; Halliwell, B

    1998-10-01

    GC-MS is a widely used tool to measure oxidative DNA damage because of its ability to identify a wide range of base modification products. However, it has been suggested that the derivatization procedures required to form volatile products prior to GC-MS analysis can sometimes produce artifactual formation of certain base oxidation products, although these studies did not replicate previously-used reaction conditions, e.g. they failed to remove air from the derivatization vials. A systematic examination of this problem revealed that levels of 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, 5-hydroxycytosine and 5-(hydroxymethyluracil) in commercial calf thymus DNA determined by GC-MS are elevated by increasing the temperature at which derivatization is performed in our laboratory. In particular, 8-hydroxyguanine levels after silylation at 140 degrees C were raised 8-fold compared to derivatization at 23 degrees C. Experiments on the derivatization of each undamaged base revealed that the artifactual oxidation of guanine, adenine, cytosine and thymine respectively was responsible. Formation of the above products was potentiated by not purging with nitrogen prior to derivatization. Increasing the temperature to 140 degrees C or allowing air to be present during derivatization did not significantly increase levels of the other oxidized bases measured. This work suggests that artifactual oxidation during derivatization is restricted to certain products (8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, 5-hydroxycytosine and 5-[hydroxymethyluracil]) and can be decreased by reducing the temperature of the derivatization reaction to 23 degrees C and excluding as much air possible. Despite some recent reports, we were easily able to detect formamidopyrimidines in acid-hydrolyzed DNA. Artifacts of derivatization are less marked than has been claimed in some papers and may vary between laboratories, depending on the experimental procedures used, in particular the efficiency of exclusion of O2 during

  7. Assessment of selective homing and contribution to vessel formation of cryopreserved peripherally injected bone marrow mononuclear cells following experimental myocardial damage.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, M M; Ferrero, S; Montelatici, E; Gianelli, U; Braidotti, P; Calderoni, S; Paliotti, R; Annoni, G; De Camilli, E; Busca, G; Magrini, F; Bosari, S; Lazzari, L; Rebulla, P

    2006-09-01

    In view of a potential clinical use we aimed this study to assess the selective homing to the injured myocardium and the definitive fate of peripherally injected labeled and previously cryopreserved Bone Marrow Mononuclear cells (BMMNCs). The myocardial damage (cryoinjury) was produced in 59 rats (45 treated, 14 controls). From 51 donor rats 4.4 x 10(9) BMMNCs were isolated and cryopreserved (slow-cooling protocols); the number of CD34+ and the viability of pooled cells was assessed by flow-cytometry analysis before and after cryopreservation and simulated delivery through a 23G needle. Seven days after injury, BMMNCs were thawed, labeled with PKH26 dye and peripherally injected (20 x 10(6) cells in 500 microl) in recipient rats. Two weeks after experimental injury, the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen and thymus were harvested to track transplanted cells. Except a small amount in the spleen, PKH26+ cells were found only in the infarcted myocardium of the treated animals. Typical vascular structures CD34+ were found in the infarcted areas of all animals; treated rats showed a significantly higher number of these structures if compared with untreated. Morphological ultra-structural examination of infarcted areas confirmed in treated rats the presence of early-stage PKH26+ vascular structures derived from injected BMMNCs. The estimated mean CD34+ cells loss due to the cryopreservation procedure and to the system of delivery was 0.24% and 0.1%, respectively, confirming the feasibility of the procedure. This study supports the possible therapeutic use of cryopreserved peripherally injecetd BMMNCs as a source of CD34+ independent vascular structures following myocardial damage.

  8. THE K-REGION DIHYDRODIOL OF BENZO[A]PYRENE INDUCES DNA DAMAGE AND MORPHOLOGICAL CELL TRANSFORMATION IN C3H10T1/2CL8 MOUSE EMBRYO CELLS WITHOUT THE FORMATION OF DETECTABLE STABLE COVALENT DNA ADDUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The K -region dihydrodiol ofbenzo[ a ]pyrene induces DNA damage and morphological cell transformation in C3HlOTY2CL8 mouse embryo cells without the formation of detectable stable covalent DNA adducts

    Benzo[ a ]pyrene (B[ a ]P) is the most thoroughly studied polycyclic aro...

  9. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. I. Evidence of suppressed planet formation due to stellar companions within 20 au and validation of four planets from the Kepler multiple planet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Barclay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The planet occurrence rate for multiple stars is important in two aspects. First, almost half of stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are multiple systems. Second, the comparison of the planet occurrence rate for multiple stars to that for single stars sheds light on the influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation and evolution. We developed a method of distinguishing planet occurrence rates for single and multiple stars. From a sample of 138 bright (K{sub P} < 13.5) Kepler multi-planet candidate systems, we compared the stellar multiplicity rate of these planet host stars to that of field stars. Using dynamical stability analyses and archival Doppler measurements, we find that the stellar multiplicity rate of planet host stars is significantly lower than field stars for semimajor axes less than 20 AU, suggesting that planet formation and evolution are suppressed by the presence of a close-in companion star at these separations. The influence of stellar multiplicity at larger separations is uncertain because of search incompleteness due to a limited Doppler observation time baseline and a lack of high-resolution imaging observation. We calculated the planet confidence for the sample of multi-planet candidates and find that the planet confidences for KOI 82.01, KOI 115.01, KOI 282.01, and KOI 1781.02 are higher than 99.7% and thus validate the planetary nature of these four planet candidates. This sample of bright Kepler multi-planet candidates with refined stellar and orbital parameters, planet confidence estimation, and nearby stellar companion identification offers a well-characterized sample for future theoretical and observational study.

  10. Alterations in platelet Ca2+ signalling in diabetic patients is due to increased formation of superoxide anions and reduced nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, G; Wascher, T C; Kostner, G M; Graier, W F

    1999-02-01

    Increased aggregation of platelets might contribute to the development of vascular complication in diabetes mellitus. In this study release of superoxide anions, intracellular Ca2+ signalling and nitric oxide formation stimulated by the receptor-dependent agonist adenosine 5 '-diphosphate (ADP) and the receptor-independent stimulus thapsigargin, were compared in platelets isolated from patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and healthy control subjects. Diabetes augmented intracellular Ca2+ release and Ca2+ entry to ADP by 40 and 44% (control subjects: n = 11; diabetic: n = 6), while the median effective concentration (EC50) of ADP to initiate Ca2+ signalling was similar in both groups. The effect of thapsigargin on Ca2+ concentration was increased by 69% in diabetic patients (control subjects: n = 22; diabetic patients: n = 9). In addition, release of superoxide anions was 70% greater in diabetic patients (control subjects: n = 9; diabetic patients: n = 6). Treatment of platelets from control subjects with the superoxide anion-generating mixture xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine or buthioninesulphoximine (BSO) mimicked the effect of diabetes on platelet Ca2+ signalling. The antioxidant glutathione normalized enhanced Ca2+ response in the diabetic group (control subjects: n = 5: diabetic patients: n = 6). Basal and thapsigargin-evoked nitric oxide synthase activity was reduced in the diabetic group by 85 and 64%, respectively (control subjects: n = 13; diabetic subjects: n = 13). The nitric oxide-donor 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide sodium (DEA/NO) normalized enhanced Ca2+ signalling in platelets preincubated with xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine (n = 12) and in those from diabetics (control subjects: n = 6; diabetic patients: n = 6). Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) augmented thapsigargin-induced Ca2+ signalling by 51% (n = 8). These data indicate that in diabetes platelet Ca2+ signalling might be

  11. In Situ TEM Observations of Sn-Containing Silicon Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Pore Formation Due to Fast Lithiation/Delithiation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaotang; Bogart, Timothy D.; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian

    2015-09-03

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were carried out to observe directly in real time the lithiation and delithiation of silicon (Si) nanowires with significant amounts of tin (Sn). The incorporation of Sn significantly enhances the lithiation rate compared to typical Si nanowires. For instance, surface diffusion is enhanced by two orders of magnitude and the bulk lithiation rate by one order of magnitude, resulting in a sequential surface-then-core lithiation mechanism. Pore formation was observed in the nanowires during delithiation, most likely as a result of the fast delithiation kinetics of the nanowires. Pore formation was reversible and the pores disappeared during subsequent lithiation. When an amorphous Si shell was applied to the nanowires, pore formation was not observed during the in situ TEM experimences. Ex situ TEM analysis of Sn-containing Si nanowires cycled in coin cell batteries also showed that the application of an a-Si shell significantly retards pore formation in these nanowires.

  12. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spatial self-organisation of a defect generation wave and laser-induced formation of ordered and crystallographic-oriented regions of optical damage in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, Vladimir I.; Rogacheva, Aleksandra V.

    2004-06-01

    The spatial self-organisation of a defect generation wave (DGW) in laser-excited crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics is considered. It is shown that due to the elastic crystal anisotropy, for a Gaussian intensity distribution of exciting laser radiation, the DGW is focused along the crystallographic axes, resulting in the production of optical damage 'stars'.

  13. Effect of reaction pH and CuSO4 addition on the formation of catechinone due to oxidation of (+)-catechin.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, T; Wataoka, I; Urakawa, H; Yasunaga, H

    2013-08-01

    A novel hair dyeing technique being milder and safer for a human body is desired. The oxidation product of (+)-catechin, catechinone, was invented as a safer dyestuff for hair colouring under such the situation. The preparation of catechinone by a chemical oxidation is a practical way and the objective of the study is clarify the effect of the solution pH and in the presence or absence of Cu(2+) on the formation rate and yield of catechinone in order to improve the efficiency of the dye formation. The catechinone formation was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Catechinone was prepared chemically from (+)-catechin in aqueous solution with O2 gas introduced over a pH range of 7.1-11.7. The rate and amount of the dye formation increase with increasing pH. Dissociation of the hydroxyl group of the catechol part of (+)-catechin is significant for the oxidation of (+)-catechin and promotes the dye production. This is because the deprotonated (+)-catechin has a higher reactivity with O2 . The production of catechinone is accelerated by the addition of CuSO4 and the production rate reaches the maximum at pH = 8.8. (+)-Catechin - Cu(2+) complexes are formed and the formation promotes the oxidation of the catechol part of (+)-catechin at pH ≤ 8.8. On the other hand, the complex becomes too stable to proceed for the oxidation reaction at pH > 8.8.

  14. War Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During and after the Persian Gulf war, hundreds of "oil lakes" were created in Kuwait by oil released from damaged wells. The lakes are a hazard to the Kuwait atmosphere, soil and ground water and must be carefully monitored. Boston University Center for Remote Sensing, assisted by other organizations, has accurately mapped the lakes using Landsat and Spot imagery. The war damage included the formation of over 300 oil lakes, oil pollution and sand dune movement. Total damage area is over 5,400 square kilometers - 30 percent of Kuwait's total surface area.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibits Deficient Biofilm Formation in the Absence of Class II and III Ribonucleotide Reductases Due to Hindered Anaerobic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Astola, Josep; Torrents, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II, and III). Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development. In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this

  16. The Role of Carbides in Formation of Surface Layer on Steel X153CrMoV12 Due to Low-Pressure Nitriding (Vacuum Nitriding)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewicz, B.; Wołowiec, E.; Kula, P.

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of formation of surface layer on steel X153CrMoV12 in the process of vacuum nitriding (low-pressure nitriding) in a universal vacuum furnace in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia at a pressure of 30 × 102 Pa (30 mbar) is studied by the methods of light microscopy and measurement of microhardness. The chemical composition of the nitrided layers is determined.

  17. Batch tests on mineral deposit formation due to co-mingling of leachates derived from municipal solid wastes and waste-to-energy combustion residues.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Antonio J; Levine, Audrey D

    2009-02-01

    Deposit formation in leachate collection systems can be problematic for landfill operations. Deposits from municipal solid waste (MSW) derived leachates are impacted by microbial activity and biofilm development, whereas leachates generated from co-disposal of MSW with combustion residues (CR) from waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities and other mineral-rich waste materials are more prone to forming dense mineral deposits dominated by calcium carbonate. In this study, leachates from laboratory lysimeters containing either WTE-CR or shredded MSW were mixed at different volumetric ratios. The mixed leachates were incubated for 5 weeks in batch tests to evaluate the potential for formation of precipitates. Although mineral precipitates have been reported to form in landfills with no co-disposal practices, in this study mineral precipitates did not form in either the WTE-CR derived leachate or the MSW derived leachate, but formed in all leachate mixtures. Mineral precipitates consisted of calcium carbonate particles, with the highest yield from a 1:1 combination of the WTE-CR derived leachate mixed with the MSW derived leachate. The introduction of gaseous carbon dioxide or air into WTE-CR derived leachate resulted in the production of particles of similar chemical composition but different morphology. Operation of landfills to prevent co-mingling of mineral-rich leachates with microbially active leachates and/or to control leachate exposure to sources of carbon dioxide may help to prevent this type of precipitate formation in leachate collection systems.

  18. Formation of unexpected ions from a first-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer by use of methanol: an artefact due to electrospray emitter corrosion?

    PubMed

    Maire, Florian; Lange, Catherine M

    2010-04-15

    We report the formation of unexpected ions during the analyses of a first-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer in negative ion mode using an ion trap equipped with an electrospray ionisation source. These surprising ions corresponded to an increase of 12 m/z units over those expected. The formation of the unexpected ions was dependent on the tuning of the solution flow rate and the capillary high voltage. In addition, measurements of unusual value of the current suggested that a reaction was occurring in the corona plasma. The influence of methanol in this phenomenon was demonstrated by using CD(3)OH in the sample preparation. We propose two structures to explain the observed adduct based on the results of MS(2) experiments and by referring to previous work dealing with 12 m/z units addition. We showed that a corona discharge caused by alterations taking place to the electrospray capillary emitter was the origin of these unexpected ions. Finally, we discuss the mechanism involved in the formation of the ions and we propose means to control such artefacts.

  19. A Satellite Formation Due to A Giant Impact: The Effect of the Protoplanet Mass and Its Composition on the Disk Gas Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Genda, H.; Asphaug, E. I.; Ida, S.

    2010-12-01

    It has been thought that the Moon is formed by a giant impact in the late stage of the Earth formation. The impact generates a debris disk around the earth, from which the Moon is accreted. This type of satellite formation is believed to be common in the solar and extra solar systems, such as Pluto and its moon, Charon. Recent study has revealed that the initial gas mass fraction in an impact-generated disk can highly affect the satellite formation process. It also means that a satellite mass depends on the initial disk gas ratio. Machida and Abe (2004) have shown that the higher disk gas ratio creates smaller satellite mass. They have also found out that if evaporation rate exceeds 70%, no satellite can be formed from the disk since solid/liquid materials in the disk fall into the Earth or escape before the disk cooling. Wada et al. (2006) have suggested that strong shocks occur in a gas rich disk, which causes most of the disk material falls into the earth within a few days. Thus, initial disk gas ratio must be taken into account in order to understand the satellite formation process, however, its effect has not been considered carefully yet. In our work, we have investigated the disk gas ratio as a function of protoplanet mass and its material, based on the idea that impact energy and the latent heat of disk material basically define the disk gas ratio. We have performed giant impact simulations of water-icy and rocky protoplanets using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. ANEOS and SESAME equation of states are used. As a result, the disk evaporation is negligible in a Pluto-Chaon mass-size impact, but for an Earth-Moon size, the disk evaporation rate of the water-icy protoplanet can exceed 70%, whereas that of rocky one is about 10-30%. For a 5 Earth mass size system, most of the disk material evaporates in both icy and rocky protoplanet impacts. The result suggests that protoplanet mass and its material also affect the satellite mass. In our

  20. Probing the sources of the apparent irreproducibility of amyloid formation: drastic changes in kinetics and a switch in mechanism due to micellelike oligomer formation at critical concentrations of IAPP.

    PubMed

    Brender, Jeffrey R; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Sciacca, Michele F M; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; D'Urso, Luisa; Chen, Jennifer; La Rosa, Carmelo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-02-19

    The aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is infamous for being highly chaotic, with small variations in conditions sometimes leading to large changes in aggregation rates. Using the amyloidogenic protein IAPP (islet amyloid polypeptide protein, also known as amylin) as an example, we show that a part of this phenomenon may be related to the formation of micellelike oligomers at specific critical concentrations and temperatures. We show that pyrene fluorescence can sensitively detect micellelike oligomer formation by IAPP and discriminate between micellelike oligomers from fibers and monomers, making pyrene one of the few chemical probes specific to a prefibrillar oligomer. We further show that oligomers of this type reversibly form at critical concentrations in the low micromolar range and at specific critical temperatures. Micellelike oligomer formation has several consequences for amyloid formation by IAPP. First, the kinetics of fiber formation increase substantially as the critical concentration is approached but are nearly independent of concentration below it, suggesting a direct role for the oligomers in fiber formation. Second, the critical concentration is strongly correlated with the propensity to form amyloid: higher critical concentrations are observed for both IAPP variants with lower amyloidogenicity and for native IAPP at acidic pH in which aggregation is greatly slowed. Furthermore, using the DEST NMR technique, we show that the pathway of amyloid formation switches as the critical point is approached, with self-interactions primarily near the N-terminus below the critical temperature and near the central region above the critical temperature, reconciling two apparently conflicting views of the initiation of IAPP aggregation.

  1. The inhibition of PB125I formation in calf thyroid caused by 14-iodo-15-hydroxy-eicosatrienoic acid is due to decreased H2O2 availability.

    PubMed

    Krawiec, L; Chazenbalk, G D; Puntarulo, S A; Burton, G; Boveris, A; Valsecchi, R M; Pisarev, M A

    1988-02-01

    Previous work from our laboratory has shown that 14-iodo-15-hydroxy-5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (I-HO-A) is a potent inhibitor of iodine organification in calf thyroid slices. The present studies were performed in order to clarify the mechanism of this action. Incubation of thyroid slices with 10(-4)M I-HO-A caused a 47 and 53% decrease in PB125I formation after 30 and 60 min incubation, respectively. In a series of experiments an inverse relationship between the degree of inhibition caused by I-HO-A and total iodine content and basal iodoprotein formation was observed. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled compounds showed a significant decrease in 125I incorporation into MIT, DIT, T3 and total iodolipid. The site of the inhibitory effect of I-HO-A was then sought. TPO was measured by three different methods. When TPO was solubilized from I-HO-A treated slices, no change in enzymatic activity was observed. Moreover, the same lack of action was found when solubilized TPO was incubated with I-HO-A. The production and release of H2O2 into the incubation medium was measured by chemiluminiscence technique. In control slices the values increased during the first 10 min and reached a plateau. Pretreatment of the slices with 10(-4)M KI caused a 51% inhibition, while the same concentration of I-HO-A produced a 59% inhibition. The possibility that I-HO-A might exert its action through a putative protein inhibitor was also explored. Incubation of slices with 10(-5)M I-HO-A caused a 46% decrease in PB125I formation and addition of actinomycin D or puromycin failed to alter this effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Catheter colonization and abscess formation due to Staphylococcus epidermidis with normal and small-colony-variant phenotype is mouse strain dependent.

    PubMed

    Sander, Gunnar; Börner, Tina; Kriegeskorte, André; von Eiff, Christof; Becker, Karsten; Mahabir, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) form a thick, multilayered biofilm on foreign bodies and are a major cause of nosocomial implant-associated infections. Although foreign body infection models are well-established, limited in vivo data are available for CoNS with small-colony-variant (SCV) phenotype described as causative agents in implant-associated infections. Therefore, we investigated the impact of the Staphylococcus epidermidis phenotype on colonization of implanted PVC catheters and abscess formation in three different mouse strains. Following introduction of a catheter subcutaneously in each flank of 8- to 12-week-old inbred C57BL/6JCrl (B6J), outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) (CD-1), and inbred BALB/cAnNCrl (BALB/c) male mice, doses of S. epidermidis O-47 wild type, its hemB mutant with stable SCV phenotype, or its complemented mutant at concentrations of 10(6) to 10(9) colony forming units (CFUs) were gently spread onto each catheter. On day 7, mice were sacrificed and the size of the abscesses as well as bacterial colonization was determined. A total of 11,500 CFUs of the complemented mutant adhered to the catheter in BALB/c followed by 9,960 CFUs and 9,900 CFUs from S. epidermidis wild type in BALB/c and CD-1, respectively. SCV colonization was highest in CD-1 with 9,500 CFUs, whereas SCVs were not detected in B6J. The minimum dose that led to colonization or abscess formation in all mouse strains was 10(7) or 10(8) CFUs of the normal phenotype, respectively. A minimum dose of 10(8) or 10(9) CFU of the hemB mutant with stable SCV phenotype led to colonization only or abscess formation, respectively. The largest abscesses were detected in BALB/c inoculated with wild type bacteria or SCV (64 mm(2) vs. 28 mm(2)). Our results indicate that colonization and abscess formation by different phenotypes of S. epidermidis in a foreign body infection model is most effective in inbred BALB/c followed by outbred CD-1 and inbred B6J mice.

  3. GRB 980425 host: [C II], [O I], and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Wardlow, J. L.; Karska, A.; Messias, H.; van der Werf, P.; Hunt, L. K.; Baes, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pérez-Martínez, R.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Rizzo, J. R.; Rossi, A.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Schady, P.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, D.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium is required to fuel star formation in galaxies. We have recently suggested that this process can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Aims: Our aim is to test this possibility by studying in detail the properties of gas in the closest galaxy hosting a GRB (980425). Methods: We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [O i] 63 μm spectroscopy, and an APEX/SHeFI CO(2-1) line detection and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. Results: The GRB 980425 host has elevated [C ii]/FIR and [O i]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rates (SFR) derived from line ([C ii], [O i], Hα) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [C ii] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy centre, whereas [O i] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [O i] flux indicates that there is high radiation field and high gas density at these positions, as derived from modelling of photo-dissociation regions. The [C ii]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Indeed, its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [C ii]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. Conclusions: The [O i] and H i concentrations and the high radiation field and density close to the GRB position are consistent with the hypothesis of a very recent (at most a few tens of Myr ago) inflow of atomic gas triggering star formation. In this scenario dust has not had time to build up (explaining high line-to-continuum ratios). Such a recent enhancement of star formation activity would indeed manifest itself in high SFRline/SFRcontinuum ratios because the line indicators are sensitive only to recent (≲10 Myr) activity, whereas the continuum indicators measure

  4. Kinematics of the Alpenrhein-Bodensee graben system in the Central Alps: Oligocene/Miocene transtension due to formation of the Western Alps arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Uwe; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-06-01

    We report fault slip data from exhumed fault surfaces along the NNE trending Alpenrhein valley and its intersection with the WNW striking Bodensee Graben near the Alpine thrust front of the Central Alps in the Swiss-Austrian-German border region. This conjugated graben system straddles the boundary between the Alps and its foreland and allows comparing the kinematics of graben formation between the two different tectonic domains. Our data show sinistral transtension along the Alpenrhein Graben and dextral transtension along the Bodensee Graben. Both transtensional graben systems resulted from the same kinematic regime of NW directed shortening and NE oriented extension. The graben faults are not older than NW striking tear faults associated with NW directed Oligocene nappe emplacement in the Helvetics starting at 35-30 Ma and ending by 25-20 Ma. Compatible with this are six U-Pb ages of calcite fibers from four samples yielding consistent ages ranging from 25.3 ± 5.6 Ma to 21.8 ± 3.4 Ma (2σ errors). Earthquake data since 1996 show that kinematic directions persisted until the Recent. Our data broadly fit with the kinematic evolution of the Oberrhein Graben, which shows significant E-W extension in the Oligocene. We suggest that Oligocene extension in the Alps and its foreland resulted from the increased curvature of the Western Alps arc and associated moderate tangential stretching in the internal parts of the Central Alps. We discuss a tectonic model of eastward rollback of the west Mediterranean subduction zone associated with counterclockwise rotation of Adria, the latter of which aided the formation of the Western Alps arc.

  5. Ferrite Formation Dynamics and Microstructure Due to Inclusion Engineering in Low-Alloy Steels by Ti2O3 and TiN Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Hedström, Peter; Jönsson, Pär Göran; Nakajima, Keiji

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of intragranular ferrite (IGF) formation in inclusion engineered steels with either Ti2O3 or TiN addition were investigated using in situ high temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the inclusions and the final microstructure after continuous cooling transformation was investigated using electron probe microanalysis and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. It was found that there is a significant effect of the chemical composition of the inclusions, the cooling rate, and the prior austenite grain size on the phase fractions and the starting temperatures of IGF and grain boundary ferrite (GBF). The fraction of IGF is larger in the steel with Ti2O3 addition compared to the steel with TiN addition after the same thermal cycle has been imposed. The reason for this difference is the higher potency of the TiO x phase as nucleation sites for IGF formation compared to the TiN phase, which was supported by calculations using classical nucleation theory. The IGF fraction increases with increasing prior austenite grain size, while the fraction of IGF in both steels was the highest for the intermediate cooling rate of 70 °C/min, since competing phase transformations were avoided, the structure of the IGF was though refined with increasing cooling rate. Finally, regarding the starting temperatures of IGF and GBF, they decrease with increasing cooling rate and the starting temperature of GBF decreases with increasing grain size, while the starting temperature of IGF remains constant irrespective of grain size.

  6. Assessing the osteoblast transcriptome in a model of enhanced bone formation due to constitutive G{sub s}–G protein signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wattanachanya, Lalita; Wang, Liping; Millard, Susan M.; Lu, Wei-Dar; O’Carroll, Dylan; Hsiao, Edward C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Nissenson, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in osteoblasts (OBs) is an important regulator of bone formation. We previously described a mouse model expressing Rs1, an engineered constitutively active G{sub s}-coupled GPCR, under the control of the 2.3 kb Col I promoter. These mice showed a dramatic age-dependent increase in trabecular bone of femurs. Here, we further evaluated the effects of enhanced G{sub s} signaling in OBs on intramembranous bone formation by examining calvariae of 1- and 9-week-old Col1(2.3)/Rs1 mice and characterized the in vivo gene expression specifically occurring in osteoblasts with activated G{sub s} G protein-coupled receptor signaling, at the cellular level rather than in a whole bone. Rs1 calvariae displayed a dramatic increase in bone volume with partial loss of cortical structure. By immunohistochemistry, Osterix was detected in cells throughout the inter-trabecular space while Osteocalcin was expressed predominantly in cells along bone surfaces, suggesting the role of paracrine mediators secreted from OBs driven by 2.3 kb Col I promoter could influence early OB commitment, differentiation, and/or proliferation. Gene expression analysis of calvarial OBs revealed that genes affected by Rs1 signaling include those encoding proteins important for cell differentiation, cytokines and growth factors, angiogenesis, coagulation, and energy metabolism. The set of G{sub s}-GPCRs and other GPCRs that may contribute to the observed skeletal phenotype and candidate paracrine mediators of the effect of G{sub s} signaling in OBs were also determined. Our results identify novel detailed in vivo cellular changes of the anabolic response of the skeleton to G{sub s} signaling in mature OBs. - Highlights: • OB expression of an engineered G{sub s}-coupled receptor dramatically increases bone mass. • We investigated the changes in gene expression in vivo in enhanced OB G{sub s} signaling. • Genes in cell cycle and transcription were increased in

  7. Exploring large O 1s and N 1s core level shifts due to intermolecular hydrogen bond formation in organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gil, S.; Arnau, A.; Garcia-Lekue, A.

    2013-07-01

    Core level shifts (CLSs) induced by intermolecular hydrogen bond (H-bond) formation are studied with a recent implementation based on density functional theory using pseudopotentials and localized atomic orbitals, as applied to the SIESTA code. By calculating different CLSs for a set of representative simple systems containing O and/or N atoms as proton donors and/or acceptors, we are able to determine the role of the core hole screening, from the difference of CLS values calculated in the final and initial state approximations. Our calculations show that CLSs are dominated by electrostatic effects, and that the final magnitude of the CLSs, which are positive (higher binding energy) for the proton acceptor and negative for the proton donor, can be larger than 1 eV for strong H-bonds. We also find that core hole screening contribution to final CLS absolute values is always negative, thus being responsible for the difference in the magnitude of the CLS of the proton donor and proton acceptor.

  8. Spontaneously Occurring Formation of Intranuclear and Cytoplasmic Inclusions in Renal Proximal Epithelium Due to Accumulation of D-Amino Acid Oxidase in Wistar Hannover Rats.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Natsumi; Nakatsuji, Shunji; Andoh, Rie; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Tamura, Kazutoshi; Hoshiya, Toru

    2015-07-01

    Intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions in the renal proximal tubular epithelium were observed in nontreated male and female Wistar Hannover rats in a 26-week study (32 weeks of age) and a 104-week study (110 weeks of age). The incidence rates were less than 5% in these two studies. In affected animals, the inclusions were observed in more than 60% of proximal tubular epithelium as various sized (approximately 1-8 μm in diameter) round and eosinophilic materials, but not in distal tubules, Henle's loop, or collecting ducts. Ultrastructurally, inclusions appeared finely granular, homogenous with middle-electron density, and without a limiting membrane. These inclusions were determined to be protein histochemically stained by Azan-Mallory and immunoreactive with an antibody against D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). There was no abnormality in in-life observations or in clinical test values suggestive of renal dysfunction. There were no associated degenerative or inflammatory changes in the kidneys, and no similar inclusions were observed in the other organs. These inclusions are very similar to propiverine hydrochloride (propiverine) and norepinephreine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor-induced inclusions. This is the first report of accumulation of DAO and formation of inclusions occurring spontaneously in rat kidneys. The data are important for toxicological studies using Wistar Hannover rats.

  9. Domain formation due to surface steps in topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films grown on Si (111) by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, S.; Kampmeier, J.; Mussler, G.; Grützmacher, D.; Luysberg, M.

    2013-08-19

    The atomic structure of topological insulators Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films on Si (111) substrates grown in van der Waals mode by molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Besides single and multiple quintuple layer (QL) steps, which are typical for the step-flow mode of growth, a number of 0.4 QL steps is observed. We determine that these steps originate from single steps at the substrate surface causing domain boundaries in the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film. Due to the peculiar structure of these domain boundaries the domains are stable and penetrate throughout the entire film.

  10. Esophageal bezoar formation due to solidification of enteral feed administered through a malpositioned nasogastric tube: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tawfic, Qutaiba Amir; Bhakta, Pradipta; Date, Rohit Raman; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Enteral feeding is now standard and routine practice in intensive care. The use of a nasogastric tube for enteral feeding is generally considered to be safe, but tubes with small bores can sometimes lead to aspiration or passage clogging when malpositioned in sedated patients who are on long-term mechanical ventilation. Thus, accurate confirmation of correct placement is mandatory in such patients. This is not always the case, but this faulty practice can lead to serious complications in the absence of potential bezoar-forming medicines or gastrointestinal pathology. We present here one such interesting case of a patient who developed esophageal bezoar due to a malpositioned nasogastric tube for administering a casein-containing feed. In addition, we present a review of the literature.

  11. Effect of flow rate and rheology on shear strength of migrating formation fines due to flow of pseudoplastic fluids. [Oil wells

    SciTech Connect

    SenGupta, S.K.; Hayatdavoudi, A.; Tiab, J.O.; Kalra, S.K.; LeBlanc, J.L.; Schluntz, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    Recent investigations have established the fact that authigenic clays may be dislodged during enhanced oil recovery operations. However, no mechanical stabilization of these clays along with chemical treatments has been fully used or investigated. The mechanical unstability of the clays is due to stress variation at the pore surfaces of the reservoir rock during the flow of pseudoplastic fluid such as polymer, etc. An equation has been derived which shows the relationship between the stress developed and the radial distance from the well bore at constant injection pressure. The analysis of this equation shows that the stress is maximum near the well bore and decreases rapidly with distance. Graphs have been plotted to show further the effect of flow rate and power law coefficient on the stress. 12 refs.

  12. Evidence of the formation of noctilucent clouds due to propagation of an isolated gravity wave caused by a tropospheric occluded front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalin, P.; Pogoreltsev, A.; Pertsev, N.; Perminov, V.; Shevchuk, N.; Dubietis, A.; Zalcik, M.; Kulikov, S.; Zadorozhny, A.; Kudabayeva, D.; Solodovnik, A.; Salakhutdinov, G.; Grigoryeva, I.

    2015-03-01

    We consider a unique case of a propagating internal gravity wave that has generated in situ a compact and thin layer of noctilucent clouds (NLC) at 82.7-85.2 km with a characteristic horizontal scale of 65-70 km, as observed in the Moscow region on the night of 18-19 July 2013. This particular transient isolated gravity wave together with the whole NLC layer suddenly appeared in the clear twilight sky and lasted about 1 h traveling eastward, which differs significantly from previously observed cases of gravity waves propagating through preexisting NLC layers. Our model studies demonstrate that the wave had a tropospheric source connected to the passage of an occluded front. The wave was likely generated due to strong horizontal wind shears at about 5 km altitude.

  13. Defect formation in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films due to the presence of potassium during growth by low temperature co-evaporation process

    SciTech Connect

    Pianezzi, F. Reinhard, P.; Chirilă, A.; Nishiwaki, S.; Bissig, B.; Buecheler, S.; Tiwari, A. N.

    2013-11-21

    Doping the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) absorber layer with alkaline metals is necessary to process high efficiency solar cells. When growth of CIGS solar cells is performed on soda-lime glass (SLG), the alkaline elements naturally diffuse from the substrate into the absorber layer. On the other hand, when CIGS is grown on alkaline free substrates, the alkaline metals have to be added from another source. In the past, Na was believed to be the most important dopant of the alkaline elements, even though K was also observed to diffuse into CIGS from the SLG. Recently, the beneficial effect of a post deposition treatment with KF was pointed out and enabled the production of a 20.4% CIGS solar cell grown at low substrate temperature (<500 °C). However, possible negative effects of the presence or addition of the alkaline impurities during the low temperature growth process were observed for Na, but were not investigated for K so far. In this study, we investigate in detail the role of K on the defect formation in CIGS layers deposited at low temperature on alkaline free polyimide with intentional addition of K during selected time intervals of the CIGS layer growth. By means of admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy, we identify a deep minority carrier trap at around 280 meV below the conduction band E{sub C} in CIGS layers grown with K. Its influence on recombination and minority carrier lifetime in the absorber layer is investigated with external quantum efficiency measurements and time-resolved photoluminescence. Furthermore, to support the experimental findings device simulations were performed using the software SCAPS.

  14. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Schmidt, John W; Harhay, Dayna M

    2013-09-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their planktonic counterparts, so these foodborne pathogens in biofilms pose a serious food safety concern. We investigated how the coexistence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium strains would affect bacterial planktonic growth competition and mixed biofilm composition. Furthermore, we also investigated how mixed biofilm formation would affect bacterial resistance to common sanitizers. Salmonella Typhimurium strains were able to outcompete E. coli strains in the planktonic growth phase; however, mixed biofilm development was highly dependent upon companion strain properties in terms of the expression of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), including curli fimbriae and exopolysaccharide cellulose. The EPS-producing strains with higher biofilm-forming abilities were able to establish themselves in mixed biofilms more efficiently. In comparison to single-strain biofilms, Salmonella or E. coli strains with negative EPS expression obtained significantly enhanced resistance to sanitization by forming mixed biofilms with an EPS-producing companion strain of the other species. These observations indicate that the bacterial EPS components not only enhance the sanitizer resistance of the EPS-producing strains but also render protections to their companion strains, regardless of species, in mixed biofilms. Our study highlights the potential risk of cross-contamination by multispecies biofilms in food safety and the need for increased attention to proper sanitization practices in food processing facilities.

  15. [Effect of incubation in sodium chloride hypertonic solutions on human blood lymphocyte DNA damage formation by long-wave UV-radiation].

    PubMed

    Smetanina, N M; Pustovalova, M V; Osipov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Effect of incubation in NaCl hypertonic solutions (0.2, 0.35 and 0.5 mol/L for 1 h at 4 degrees C) on the DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) and alkaline-labile site (ALS) yields induced by long-wave UV-radiation (365 +/- 10 nm) in human blood peripheral lymphocytes in vitro was investigated. It was shown that compared to the cells incubated in NaCl isotonic solution (0.14 mol/L) statistically significant increases in the yields of both spontaneous (-1.5-1.9 times) and UV-A radiation induced (-1.6-1.7 times) DNA damage was observed only at the NaCl concentration of 0.5 mol/L. It is assumed that at this concentration of NaCl, dissociation of the linker histone H1 occurs, the structure of chromatin is disrupted and the free radical-induced DNA damage output dramatically increases.

  16. Quantification of damage due to low-dose radiation exposure in mice: construction and application of a biodosimetric model using mRNA indicators in circulating white blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Tanaka, Mika; Yokochi, Kazuko; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Tajima, Katsushi; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Biodosimetry, the measurement of radiation damage in a biologic sample, is a reliable tool for increasing the accuracy of dose estimation. Although established chromosome analyses are suitable for estimating the absorbed dose after high-dose irradiation, biodosimetric methodology to measure damage following low-dose exposure is underdeveloped. RNA analysis of circulating blood containing radiation-sensitive cells is a candidate biodosimetry method. Here we quantified RNA from a small amount of blood isolated from mice following low-dose body irradiation (<0.5 Gy) aimed at developing biodosimetric tools for situations that are difficult to study in humans. By focusing on radiation-sensitive undifferentiated cells in the blood based on Myc RNA expression, we quantified the relative levels of RNA for DNA damage-induced (DDI) genes, such as Bax, Bbc3 and Cdkn1a. The RNA ratios of DDI genes/Myc in the blood increased in a dose-dependent manner 4 h after whole-body irradiation at doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy (air-kerma) of X-rays, regardless of whether the mice were in an active or resting state. The RNA ratios were significantly increased after 0.014 Gy (air-kerma) of single X-ray irradiation. The RNA ratios were directly proportional to the absorbed doses in water ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy, based on gamma-irradiation from 137Cs. Four hours after continuous irradiation with gamma-rays or by internal contamination with a beta-emitter, the increased RNA ratios resembled those following single irradiation. These findings indicate that the RNA status can be utilized as a biodosimetric tool to estimate low-dose radiation when focusing on undifferentiated cells in blood. PMID:26589759

  17. Quantification of damage due to low-dose radiation exposure in mice: construction and application of a biodosimetric model using mRNA indicators in circulating white blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Tanaka, Mika; Yokochi, Kazuko; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Tajima, Katsushi; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Biodosimetry, the measurement of radiation damage in a biologic sample, is a reliable tool for increasing the accuracy of dose estimation. Although established chromosome analyses are suitable for estimating the absorbed dose after high-dose irradiation, biodosimetric methodology to measure damage following low-dose exposure is underdeveloped. RNA analysis of circulating blood containing radiation-sensitive cells is a candidate biodosimetry method. Here we quantified RNA from a small amount of blood isolated from mice following low-dose body irradiation (<0.5 Gy) aimed at developing biodosimetric tools for situations that are difficult to study in humans. By focusing on radiation-sensitive undifferentiated cells in the blood based on Myc RNA expression, we quantified the relative levels of RNA for DNA damage-induced (DDI) genes, such as Bax, Bbc3 and Cdkn1a. The RNA ratios of DDI genes/Myc in the blood increased in a dose-dependent manner 4 h after whole-body irradiation at doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy (air-kerma) of X-rays, regardless of whether the mice were in an active or resting state. The RNA ratios were significantly increased after 0.014 Gy (air-kerma) of single X-ray irradiation. The RNA ratios were directly proportional to the absorbed doses in water ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy, based on gamma-irradiation from (137)Cs. Four hours after continuous irradiation with gamma-rays or by internal contamination with a beta-emitter, the increased RNA ratios resembled those following single irradiation. These findings indicate that the RNA status can be utilized as a biodosimetric tool to estimate low-dose radiation when focusing on undifferentiated cells in blood.

  18. Nano-cathodoluminescence reveals the effect of electron damage on the optical properties of nitride optoelectronics and the damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James T.; Zhang, Siyuan; Lhuillier, Jeremy; Zhu, Dandan; Fu, Wai Yuen; Howkins, Ashley; Boyd, Ian; Stowe, David; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2016-10-01

    Nano-cathodoluminescence (Nano-CL) reveals optical emission from individual InGaN quantum wells for applications in optoelectronic devices. We show the luminescent intensity decays over time with exposure to the electron beam for energies between 80 and 200 keV. Measurements of the CL intensity over time show an exponential decline in intensity, which we propose is due to the formation of nitrogen Frenkel defects. The measured CL damage decreases with reductions in the electron accelerating voltage and we suggest that the electron induced structural damage may be suppressed below the proposed damage threshold. The electron beam induced damage leads to a non-radiative region that extends over the measured minority carrier diffusion length. Nano-CL may thus serve as a powerful technique to study III-nitride optoelectronics.

  19. Knockout of crtB or crtI gene blocks the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and influences its resistance to oxidative DNA-damaging agents due to change of free radicals scavenging ability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Qiao; Luo, Xuesong; Fang, Chengxiang; Zhang, Qiuju; Tang, Yali

    2007-10-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1, a red-pigmented strain of the extremely radioresistant genus Deinococcus, contains a major carotenoid namely deinoxanthin. The high resistance of this organism against the lethal actions of DNA-damaging agents including ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light (UV) has been widely reported. However, the possible antioxidant role of carotenoids in this strain has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we constructed two colorless mutants by knockout of crtB and crtI genes, respectively. Comparative analysis of the two colorless mutants and the wild type showed that the two colorless mutants were more sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV, and hydrogen peroxide, but not to mitomycin-C (MMC). With electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping techniques, we observed that hydroxyl radical signals occurred in the suspensions of UV irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans cells and the intensity of signals was influenced by carotenoids levels. We further showed that the carotenoid extract from the wild type could obviously scavenge superoxide anions generated by the irradiated riboflavin/EDTA system. These results suggest that carotenoids in D. radiodurans R1 function as free radical scavengers to protect this organism against the deleterious effects of oxidative DNA-damaging agents.

  20. A2E-epoxides damage DNA in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Vitamin E and other antioxidants inhibit A2E-epoxide formation.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Janet R; Vollmer-Snarr, Heidi R; Zhou, Jilin; Jang, Young P; Jockusch, Steffen; Itagaki, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Koji

    2003-05-16

    The autofluorescent pigments that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial cells with aging and in some retinal disorders have been implicated in the etiology of macular degeneration. The major constituent is the fluorophore A2E, a pyridinium bisretinoid. Light-exposed A2E-laden retinal pigment epithelium exhibits a propensity for apoptosis with light in the blue region of the spectrum being most damaging. Efforts to understand the events precipitating the death of the cells have revealed that during irradiation (430 nm), A2E self-generates singlet oxygen with the singlet oxygen in turn reacting with A2E to generate epoxides at carbon-carbon double bonds. Here we demonstrate that A2E-epoxides, independent of singlet oxygen, exhibit reactivity toward DNA with oxidative base changes being at least one of these lesions. Mass spectrometry revealed that the antioxidants vitamins E and C, butylated hydroxytoluene, resveratrol, a trolox analogue (PNU-83836-E), and bilberry extract reduce A2E-epoxidation, whereas single cell gel electrophoresis and cell viability studies revealed a corresponding reduction in the incidence of DNA damage and cell death. Vitamin E, a lipophilic antioxidant, produced a more pronounced decrease in A2E-epoxidation than vitamin C, and treatment with both vitamins simultaneously did not confer additional benefit. Studies in which singlet oxygen was generated by endoperoxide in the presence of A2E revealed that vitamin E, butylated hydroxytoluene, resveratrol, the trolox analogue, and bilberry reduced A2E-epoxidation by quenching singlet oxygen. Conversely, vitamin C and ginkgolide B were not efficient quenchers of singlet oxygen under these conditions.

  1. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  2. Micronucleus formation, DNA damage and repair in premenopausal women chronically exposed to high level of indoor air pollution from biomass fuel use in rural India.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nandan Kumar; Mukherjee, Bidisha; Das, Debangshu; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2010-03-29

    Genotoxicity of indoor air pollution from biomass fuel use has been examined in 132 biomass users (median age 34 years) and 85 age-matched control women from eastern India who used the cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) to cook. Micronucleus (MN) frequency was evaluated in buccal (BEC) and airway epithelial cells (AEC); DNA damage was examined by comet assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL); and expressions of gamma-H2AX, Mre11 and Ku70 proteins were localized in AEC and PBL by immunocytochemistry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in leukocytes was measured by flow cytometry, and the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total antioxidant status (TAS) in blood were measured by spectrophotometry. Real-time aerosol monitor was used to measure particulate pollutants in indoor air. Compared with controls, biomass users had increased frequencies of micronucleated cells in BEC (3.5 vs. 1.7, p<0.001) and AEC (4.54 vs. 1.86, p<0.001), and greater comet tail % DNA (18.6 vs. 11.7%, p<0.01), tail length (45.5 vs. 31.4mum, p<0.01) and olive tail moment (4.0 vs. 1.4, p<0.01) in PBL. Moreover, biomass users had more gamma-H2AX-positive nuclei in PBL (49.5 vs. 8.5%, p<0.01) and AEC (11.3 vs. 2.9%, p<0.01) along with higher expression of DNA repair proteins Mre11 and Ku70 in these cells, suggesting stimulation of DNA repair mechanism. Biomass users showed rise in ROS generation and depletion of SOD and TAS. Biomass-using households had 2-4 times more particulate matter with diameter less than 10 and 2.5mum in indoor air, and MN frequency and comet tail % DNA were positively associated with these pollutants after controlling potential confounders. Thus, chronic exposure to biomass smoke causes chromosomal and DNA damage and upregulation of DNA repair mechanism.

  3. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  4. A study of the alumina-silica gel adsorbent for the removal of silicic acid from geothermal water: increase in adsorption capacity of the adsorbent due to formation of amorphous aluminosilicate by adsorption of silicic acid.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takushi; Ueda, Akira; Kato, Koichi; Mogi, Katsumi; Matsuo, Shorin

    2002-08-01

    Two kinds of adsorbents (Si adsorbent and Al adsorbent) for the removal of silicic acid from geothermal water to retard the formation of silica scales were prepared using silicic acid contained in geothermal water. The Si adsorbent was prepared by evaporating geothermal water, and the Al adsorbent was prepared by evaporating geothermal water after the addition of aluminum chloride. The specific surface area of the Si adsorbent was small and it's adsorption capacity of silicic acid was low. Although the specific surface area of the Al adsorbent was also small, it was significantly increased by the adsorption of silicic acid and it's adsorption capacity was high. Based on the change in the local structure of aluminum ion by the adsorption of silicic acid, the Al adsorbent was considered to be silica particles covered with crystalline aluminum hydroxide. Moreover, it was concluded that the increase in the specific surface area of the Al adsorbent and the decrease in the zeta potential were due to the formation of an amorphous aluminosilicate with a large surface area and a negative charge (one 4-coordinated Al) by the reaction between aluminum ions and silicic acids.

  5. Strength and failure of a damaged material

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K.; Gray III, George T.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Potocki, Mark L.; Vachhani, Shraddha; Martinez, Daniel T.; Lovato, Manual L.

    2015-09-07

    Under complex, dynamic loading conditions, damage can occur within a material. Should this damage not lead to catastrophic failure, the material can continue to sustain further loading. But, little is understood about how to represent the mechanical response of a material that has experienced dynamic loading leading to incipient damage. We examine this effect in copper. Copper is shock loaded to impart an incipient state of damage to the material. Thereafter compression and tensile specimens were sectioned from the dynamically damaged specimen to quantify the subsequent properties of the material in the region of intense incipient damage and in regions far from the damage. Finally, we observed that enhanced yield stresses result from the damaged material even over material, which has simply been shock loaded and not damaged. These results are rationalized in terms of stored plastic work due to the damage process.

  6. Strength and failure of a damaged material

    DOE PAGES

    Cerreta, Ellen K.; Gray III, George T.; Trujillo, Carl P.; ...

    2015-09-07

    Under complex, dynamic loading conditions, damage can occur within a material. Should this damage not lead to catastrophic failure, the material can continue to sustain further loading. But, little is understood about how to represent the mechanical response of a material that has experienced dynamic loading leading to incipient damage. We examine this effect in copper. Copper is shock loaded to impart an incipient state of damage to the material. Thereafter compression and tensile specimens were sectioned from the dynamically damaged specimen to quantify the subsequent properties of the material in the region of intense incipient damage and in regionsmore » far from the damage. Finally, we observed that enhanced yield stresses result from the damaged material even over material, which has simply been shock loaded and not damaged. These results are rationalized in terms of stored plastic work due to the damage process.« less

  7. A Web-GIS Procedure Based on Satellite Multi-Spectral and Airborne LIDAR Data to Map the Road blockage Due to seismic Damages of Built-Up Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, Antonio; Montuori, Antonio; Silva, Juan Pablo; Silvestri, Malvina; Musacchio, Massimo; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a web-GIS procedure to map the risk of road blockage in urban environments through the combined use of space-borne and airborne remote sensing sensors is presented. The methodology concerns (1) the provision of a geo-database through the integration of space-borne multispectral images and airborne LiDAR data products; (2) the modeling of building vulnerability, based on the corresponding 3D geometry and construction time information; (3) the GIS-based mapping of road closure due to seismic- related building collapses based on the building characteristic height and the width of the road. Experimental results, gathered for the Cosenza urban area, allow demonstrating the benefits of both the proposed approach and the GIS-based integration of multi-platforms remote sensing sensors and techniques for seismic road assessment purposes.

  8. Battle Damage Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    The compressive matrix damage zone was found along the whole central thickness for CFRP models only in the case of 875 g blast load, while is...high specific properties, also fiber- reinforced polymers are being considered for energy absorption applications in military armors. A deep insight...equilibrium. Due to their high specific properties, also fiber-reinforced polymers are being considered for energy absorption applications in

  9. Chicken fetal liver DNA damage and adduct formation by activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and related compounds of several structural classes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gary M; Duan, Jian-Dong; Brunnemann, Klaus D; Iatropoulos, Michael J; Vock, Esther; Deschl, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    The chicken egg genotoxicity assay (CEGA), which utilizes the liver of an intact and aseptic embryo-fetal test organism, was evaluated using four activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and four structurally related less potent carcinogens or non-carcinogens. In the assay, three daily doses of test substances were administered to eggs containing 9-11-day-old fetuses and the fetal livers were assessed for two endpoints, DNA breaks using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay and DNA adducts using the (32)P-nucleotide postlabeling (NPL) assay. The effects of four carcinogens of different structures requiring distinct pathways of bioactivation, i.e., 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), were compared with structurally related non-carcinogens fluorene (FLU) and benzo[e]pyrene (B[e]P) or weak carcinogens, aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) and N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA). The four carcinogens all produced DNA breaks at microgram or low milligram total doses, whereas less potent carcinogens and non-carcinogens yielded borderline or negative results, respectively, at higher doses. AAF and B[a]P produced DNA adducts, whereas none was found with the related comparators FLU or B[e]P, consistent with comet results. DEN and NDELA were also negative for adducts, as expected in the case of DEN for an alkylating agent in the standard NPL assay. Also, AFB1 and AFB2 were negative in NPL, as expected, due to the nature of ring opened aflatoxin adducts, which are resistant to enzymatic digestion. Thus, the CEGA, using comet and NPL, is capable of detection of the genotoxicity of diverse DNA-reactive carcinogens, while not yielding false positives for non-carcinogens.

  10. A constitutive model with damage for high temperature superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, J. A.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    A unified constitutive model is searched for that is applicable for high temperature superalloys used in modern gas turbines. Two unified inelastic state variable constitutive models were evaluated for use with the damage parameter proposed by Kachanov. The first is a model (Bodner, Partom) in which hardening is modeled through the use of a single state variable that is similar to drag stress. The other (Ramaswamy) employs both a drag stress and back stress. The extension was successful for predicting the tensile, creep, fatigue, torsional and nonproportional response of Rene' 80 at several temperatures. In both formulations, a cumulative damage parameter is introduced to model the changes in material properties due to the formation of microcracks and microvoids that ultimately produce a macroscopic crack. A back stress/drag stress/damage model was evaluated for Rene' 95 at 1200 F and is shown to predict the tensile, creep, and cyclic loading responses reasonably well.

  11. Excitotoxic brain damage involves early peroxynitrite formation in a model of Huntington's disease in rats: protective role of iron porphyrinate 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III).

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, V; González-Cortés, C; Galván-Arzate, S; Medina-Campos, O N; Pérez-Severiano, F; Ali, S F; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative/nitrosative stress is involved in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxic brain damage produced by the glutamate analog quinolinic acid. The purpose of this work was to study a possible role of peroxynitrite, a reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, in the course of excitotoxic events evoked by quinolinic acid in the brain. The effects of Fe(TPPS) (5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III)), an iron porphyrinate and putative peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, were tested on lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial function in brain synaptic vesicles exposed to quinolinic acid, as well as on peroxynitrite formation, nitric oxide synthase and superoxide dismutase activities, lipid peroxidation, caspase-3-like activation, DNA fragmentation, and GABA levels in striatal tissue from rats lesioned by quinolinic acid. Circling behavior was also evaluated. Increasing concentrations of Fe(TPPS) reduced lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by quinolinic acid (100 microM) in synaptic vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner (10-800 microM). In addition, Fe(TPPS) (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 2 h before the striatal lesions, prevented the formation of peroxynitrite, the increased nitric oxide synthase activity, the decreased superoxide dismutase activity and the increased lipid peroxidation induced by quinolinic acid (240 nmol/microl) 120 min after the toxin infusion. Enhanced caspase-3-like activity and DNA fragmentation were also reduced by the porphyrinate 24 h after the injection of the excitotoxin. Circling behavior from quinolinic acid-treated rats was abolished by Fe(TPPS) six days after quinolinic acid injection, while the striatal levels of GABA, measured one day later, were partially recovered. The protective effects that Fe(TPPS) exerted on quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction in synaptic vesicles suggest a primary action of the porphyrinate as an antioxidant molecule. In vivo findings

  12. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at ...

  13. Damaged Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  14. Modelling blast induced damage from a fully coupled explosive charge

    PubMed Central

    Onederra, Italo A.; Furtney, Jason K.; Sellers, Ewan; Iverson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents one of the latest developments in the blasting engineering modelling field—the Hybrid Stress Blasting Model (HSBM). HSBM includes a rock breakage engine to model detonation, wave propagation, rock fragmentation, and muck pile formation. Results from two controlled blasting experiments were used to evaluate the code’s ability to predict the extent of damage. Results indicate that the code is capable of adequately predicting both the extent and shape of the damage zone associated with the influence of point-of-initiation and free-face boundary conditions. Radial fractures extending towards a free face are apparent in the modelling output and matched those mapped after the experiment. In the stage 2 validation experiment, the maximum extent of visible damage was of the order of 1.45 m for the fully coupled 38-mm emulsion charge. Peak radial velocities were predicted within a relative difference of only 1.59% at the nearest history point at 0.3 m from the explosive charge. Discrepancies were larger further away from the charge, with relative differences of −22.4% and −42.9% at distances of 0.46 m and 0.61 m, respectively, meaning that the model overestimated particle velocities at these distances. This attenuation deficiency in the modelling produced an overestimation of the damage zone at the corner of the block due to excessive stress reflections. The extent of visible damage in the immediate vicinity of the blasthole adequately matched the measurements. PMID:26412978

  15. Damage assessment in roadways with ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Dryver R.; Pelczarski, Noel V.; Esser, Brian; Maser, Kenneth R.; Weedon, William H.

    2000-06-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can be an effective technique for assessing internal damage levels in concrete roadways. Damage to concrete roadways, particularly those on bridges, can have large economic consequences. Damage often takes the form of corrosion of reinforcing bars, the promotion of internal cracking, eventually large-scale spalling, and the formation of deep potholes. This damage usually initiates internally and does not appear on the surface until it is at an advanced state. The use of asphalt overlays further exacerbates this problem. One of the most important, yet difficult to identify, defects is a delamination, which can be due to expansion associated with reinforcing bar corrosion. The GPR reflections from a delamination can be relatively weak, whereas the reflection from a reinforcing bar can be fairly strong. Identifying the damage levels at an early stage can be used as a guide for efficiently planning maintenance activities. This paper presents the results of a laboratory and field study that focused on GPR methods of detecting delaminations in concrete roadways. The measurement technique used 0.5 to 6.0 GHz air-coupled waves to probe the roadways. Delaminations as small as 0.5 mm were simulated and detected in the laboratory. Field measurements are suggestive that this technique can be effective for field use.

  16. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  17. Structural Damage Assessment under Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Martinez, Israel

    Structural damage assessment has applications in the majority of engineering structures and mechanical systems ranging from aerospace vehicles to manufacturing equipment. The primary goals of any structural damage assessment and health monitoring systems are to ascertain the condition of a structure and to provide an evaluation of changes as a function of time as well as providing an early-warning of an unsafe condition. There are many structural heath monitoring and assessment techniques developed for research using numerical simulations and scaled structural experiments. However, the transition from research to real-world structures has been rather slow. One major reason for this slow-progress is the existence of uncertainty in every step of the damage assessment process. This dissertation research involved the experimental and numerical investigation of uncertainty in vibration-based structural health monitoring and development of robust detection and localization methods. The basic premise of vibration-based structural health monitoring is that changes in structural characteristics, such as stiffness, mass and damping, will affect the global vibration response of the structure. The diagnostic performance of vibration-based monitoring system is affected by uncertainty sources such as measurement errors, environmental disturbances and parametric modeling uncertainties. To address diagnostic errors due to irreducible uncertainty, a pattern recognition framework for damage detection has been developed to be used for continuous monitoring of structures. The robust damage detection approach developed is based on the ensemble of dimensional reduction algorithms for improved damage-sensitive feature extraction. For damage localization, the determination of an experimental structural model was performed based on output-only modal analysis. An experimental model correlation technique is developed in which the discrepancies between the undamaged and damaged modal data are

  18. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  19. Renal tissue damage induced by focused shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioritani, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Kambe, K.; Taguchi, K.; Saitoh, T.; Shirai, S.; Orikasa, S.; Takayama, K.; Lush, P. A.

    1990-07-01

    Biological evidence of renal arterial wall damage induced by the microjet due to shock wave-cavitation bubble interaction was demonstrated in living dog kidneys. We also intended to clarify the mechanism of renal tissue damage and the effects of different conditions of shock wave exposure (peak pressure of focused area, number of shots, exposure rate) on the renal tissue damage in comparison to stone disintegration. Disruption of arterial wall was the most remarkable histological change in the focused area of the kidneys. This lesion appeared as if the wall had been punctured by a needle. Large hematoma formation in the renal parenchym, and interstitial hemorrhage seemed to be the results of the arterial lesion. This arterial disorder also led to ischemic necrosis of the tubules surrounding the hematoma. Micro-angiographic examination of extracted kidneys also proved such arterial puncture lesions and ischemic lesions. The number of shots required for model stone disintegration was not inversely proportional to peak pressure. It decreased markedly when peak pressure was above 700 bar. Similarly thenumber of shots for hematoma formation was not inversely proportional to peak pressure, however, this decreased markedly above 500 bar. These results suggested that a hematoma could be formed under a lower peak pressure than that required for stone disintegration.

  20. Cavitation damage prediction for spallation target vessels by assessment of acoustic vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Ikeda, Dr. Yujiro; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Haines, John R; Bauer, Guenter; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Okita, Dr. Kohei; Fujiwara, Dr. Akiko; Matsumoto, Dr. Yoichiro; Tanaka, Dr. Nobuatsu

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed around the world. Proton beams are used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion, i.e. the pitting damage formed by the collapse of cavitation bubbles, off-beam tests were performed by using an electric magnetic impact testing machine (MIMTM), which can impose equivalent pressure pulses in mercury. The damage potential was defined based on the relationship between the pitting damage and the time-integrated acoustic vibration induced by impact due to the bubble collapses. Additionally, the damage potential was measured in on-beam tests carried out by using the proton beam at WNR (Weapons Neutron Research) facility in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In this paper, the concept of the damage potential, the relationship between the pitting damage formation and the damage potential both in off-beam and on-beam tests is shown.

  1. Involvement of DNA Damage Response Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wei, Ren-Jie; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Wang, Shen-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been known as one of the most lethal human malignancies, due to the difficulty of early detection, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, and is characterized by active angiogenesis and metastasis, which account for rapid recurrence and poor survival. Its development has been closely associated with multiple risk factors, including hepatitis B and C virus infection, alcohol consumption, obesity, and diet contamination. Genetic alterations and genomic instability, probably resulted from unrepaired DNA lesions, are increasingly recognized as a common feature of human HCC. Dysregulation of DNA damage repair and signaling to cell cycle checkpoints, known as the DNA damage response (DDR), is associated with a predisposition to cancer and affects responses to DNA-damaging anticancer therapy. It has been demonstrated that various HCC-associated risk factors are able to promote DNA damages, formation of DNA adducts, and chromosomal aberrations. Hence, alterations in the DDR pathways may accumulate these lesions to trigger hepatocarcinogenesis and also to facilitate advanced HCC progression. This review collects some of the most known information about the link between HCC-associated risk factors and DDR pathways in HCC. Hopefully, the review will remind the researchers and clinicians of further characterizing and validating the roles of these DDR pathways in HCC. PMID:24877058

  2. Simulating Damage Due to a Lightning Strike Event: Effects of Temperature Dependent Properties on Interlaminar Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghezeljeh, Paria Naghipour; Pineda, Evan Jorge

    2014-01-01

    A multidirectional, carbon fiber-epoxy, composite panel is subjected to a simulated lightning strike, within a finite element method framework, and the effect of material properties on the failure (delamination) response is investigated through a detailed numerical study. The numerical model of the composite panel consists of individual homogenized plies with user-defined, cohesive interface elements between them. Lightning strikes are simulated as an assumed combination of excessive heat and high pressure loadings. It is observed that the initiation and propagation of lightning-induced delamination is a significant function of the temperature dependency of interfacial fracture toughness. This dependency must be defined properly in order to achieve reliable predictions of the present lightning-induced delamination in the composite panel.

  3. Boulder Damage Symposium annual thin-film laser damage competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-12-01

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed between different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. This series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). For each of the competitions, a double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. In summary, laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.

  4. Boulder damage symposium annual thin film laser damage competition

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-11-28

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed between different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. The resulting series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity were used in each of the competitions so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. Laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.

  5. Boulder damage symposium annual thin film laser damage competition

    DOE PAGES

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-11-28

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed betweenmore » different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. The resulting series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity were used in each of the competitions so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. Laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.« less

  6. On the cooperativeness of nanosecond-laser induced damage during frequency doubling of 1064 nm light in KTiOPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Frank; Duchateau, Guillaume; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2011-12-01

    Due to its high nonlinear coefficients, KTP (KTiOPO4) is one of the most important nonlinear optical materials for frequency doubling of Nd:YAG lasers. Former studies suggest a certain cooperativeness of the laser induced damage mechanism between the 1064 nm and the 532 nm wavelengths present during second harmonic generation. We report on experiments that allow confirming and quantifying the cooperativeness of the laser damage mechanism in this material and compare it to known data from KDP. A damage scenario based on the formation of color centers, which are also responsible for the gray tracking effect, will be presented.

  7. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  8. Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions in microdiamond from the gneisses of Kokchetav and Erzgebirge massifs: Diversified characteristics of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamond in UHP rocks due to host-rock buffering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shyh-Lung; Chu, Hao-Tsu; Yui, Tzen-Fu; Shen, Pouyan; Schertl, Hans-Peter; Liou, Juhn G.; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2006-03-01

    Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions were identified within metamorphic microdiamonds from garnets of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) gneisses of the Kokchetav and the Erzgebirge massifs by analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The chemical characteristics of these inclusions within microdiamonds are surprisingly similar among various gneissic rocks from both Kokchetav and Erzgebirge, but are significantly different from the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid inclusions within microdiamonds from garnets of the Kokchetav UHP marble. These contrasting findings not only provide constraints on the characteristics/compositions of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamonds, but also imply that the formation media must have been buffered by the hosting rocks, resulting in the observed diversities as reported here. In addition, depending on the rock types and thus on the nature of the formation media from which metamorphic microdiamonds were formed, the respective characteristic morphologies of the microdiamonds differ. The P/K-rich silica melt tends to form octahedral or cubo-octahedral microdiamonds within garnet in gneissic rocks, whereas the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid tends to form spheroids/cuboid microdiamonds with rugged surfaces within garnet in marble. Consequently, the buffered media in hosting rocks played a decisive role in determining the different morphologies and growth rates/mechanisms of metamorphic microdiamonds in general.

  9. Investigation of mechanisms leading to laser damage morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamaignère, L.; Chambonneau, M.; Diaz, R.; Grua, P.; Courchinoux, R.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Rullier, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The original damage ring pattern at the exit surface of fused silica induced by highly modulated nanosecond infrared laser pulses demonstrates the time dependence of damage morphology. Such a damage structure is used to study the dynamics of the plasma issued from open cracks. This pattern originates from electron avalanche in this plasma, which simultaneously leads to an ionization front displacement in air and a silica ablation process. Experiments have shown that the propagation speed of the detonation wave reaches about 20 km/s and scales as the cube root of the laser intensity, in good agreement with theoretical hydrodynamics modeling. During this presentation, we present the different phases and the associated mechanisms leading to this peculiar morphology: • During an incubation phase, a precursor defect provides energy deposit that drives the near surface material into a plasma state. • Next the silica plasma provides free electrons in the surrounding air, under laser irradiation an electron avalanche is initiated and generates a breakdown wave. • Then this breakdown wave leads to an expansion of the air plasma. This latter is able to heat strongly the silica surface as well as generate free electrons in its conduction band. Hence, the silica becomes activated along the breakdown wave. • When the silica has become absorbent, an ablation mechanism of silica occurs, simultaneously with the air plasma expansion, resulting in the formation of the ring patterns in the case of these modulated laser pulses. These mechanisms are supported by experiments realized in vacuum environment. A model describing the expansion of the heated area by thermal conduction due to plasma free electrons is then presented. Next, the paper deals with the two damage formation phases that are distinguished. The first phase corresponds to the incubation of the laser flux by a subsurface defect until the damage occurrence: an incubation fluence corresponds to this phase. The

  10. Flood damage curves for consistent global risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moel, Hans; Huizinga, Jan; Szewczyk, Wojtek

    2016-04-01

    Assessing potential damage of flood events is an important component in flood risk management. Determining direct flood damage is commonly done using depth-damage curves, which denote the flood damage that would occur at specific water depths per asset or land-use class. Many countries around the world have developed flood damage models using such curves which are based on analysis of past flood events and/or on expert judgement. However, such damage curves are not available for all regions, which hampers damage assessments in those regions. Moreover, due to different methodologies employed for various damage models in different countries, damage assessments cannot be directly compared with each other, obstructing also supra-national flood damage assessments. To address these problems, a globally consistent dataset of depth-damage curves has been developed. This dataset contains damage curves depicting percent of damage as a function of water depth as well as maximum damage values for a variety of assets and land use classes (i.e. residential, commercial, agriculture). Based on an extensive literature survey concave damage curves have been developed for each continent, while differentiation in flood damage between countries is established by determining maximum damage values at the country scale. These maximum damage values are based on construction cost surveys from multinational construction companies, which provide a coherent set of detailed building cost data across dozens of countries. A consistent set of maximum flood damage values for all countries was computed using statistical regressions with socio-economic World Development Indicators from the World Bank. Further, based on insights from the literature survey, guidance is also given on how the damage curves and maximum damage values can be adjusted for specific local circumstances, such as urban vs. rural locations, use of specific building material, etc. This dataset can be used for consistent supra

  11. Auto Body and Collision Damage Repairer (Branch 1). Apprenticeship Training Standards = Reparateur de carrossiers et de dommages resultant d'une collision (categorie 1). Normes de formation en apprentissage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Skills Development, Toronto.

    This manual presents training standards for auto body and collision damage repairers (branch 1) and is intended to be used by apprentice/trainees, instructors, and companies in Ontario, Canada as a blueprint for training or as a prerequisite for accreditation/certification. The training standards identify skills required for this occupation and…

  12. Gallium arsenide solar cell radiation damage study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Herbert, G. A.; Kinnison, J. D.; Meulenberg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A thorough analysis has been made of electron- and proton- damaged GaAs solar cells suitable for use in space. It is found that, although some electrical parametric data and spectral response data are quite similar, the type of damage due to the two types of radiation is different. An I-V analysis model shows that electrons damage the bulk of the cell and its currents relatively more, while protons damage the junction of the cell and its voltages more. It is suggested that multiple defects due to protons in a strong field region such as a p/n junction cause the greater degradation in cell voltage, whereas the individual point defects in the quasi-neutral minority-carrier-diffusion regions due to electrons cause the greater degradation in cell current and spectral response.

  13. Use of the metallothionein promoter-human growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) mouse to identify regulatory pathways that suppress pituitary somatotrope hyperplasia and adenoma formation due to GHRH-receptor hyperactivation.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Soares, Beatriz S; Peng, Xiao-ding; Krishnan, Sonia; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Frohman, Lawrence A; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2009-07-01

    Hyperactivation of the GHRH receptor or downstream signaling components is associated with hyperplasia of the pituitary somatotrope population, in which adenomas form relatively late in life, with less than 100% penetrance. Hyperplastic and adenomatous pituitaries of metallothionein promoter-human GHRH transgenic (Tg) mice (4 and > 10 months, respectively) were used to identify mechanisms that may prevent or delay adenoma formation in the presence of excess GHRH. In hyperplastic pituitaries, expression of the late G(1)/G(2) marker Ki67 increased, whereas the proportion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled cells (S phase marker) did not differ from age-matched controls. These results indicate cell cycle progression is blocked, with further evidence suggesting that enhanced p27 activity may contribute to this process. For adenomas, formation was associated with loss of p27 activity (nuclear localization and mRNA). Increased endogenous somatostatin (SST) tone may also slow the conversion from hyperplastic to adenomatous state because mRNA levels for SST receptors, sst2 and sst5, were elevated in hyperplastic pituitaries, whereas adenomas were associated with a decline in sst1 and sst5 mRNA. Also, SST-knockout Tg pituitaries were larger and adenomas formed earlier compared with those of SST-intact Tg mice. Unexpectedly, these changes were independent of changes in proliferation rate within the hyperplastic tissue, suggesting that endogenous SST controls GHRH-induced adenoma formation primarily via modulation of apoptotic and/or cellular senescence pathways, consistent with the predicted function of some of the most differentially expressed genes (Casp1, MAP2K1, TNFR2) identified by membrane arrays and confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR.

  14. Tricuspid valve chordal rupture due to airbag injury and review of pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Thekkudan, Joyce; Luckraz, Heyman; Ng, Alex; Norell, Mike

    2012-09-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The latter is usually due to an aortic transection, whereas the former is related to myocardial contusion, cardiac valve injury, coronary artery disruption and intracardiac shunts due to the formation of septal defects. The main mechanisms causing these injuries are due to the sudden deceleration force and compression within the chest cavity. Moreover, there is also the sudden increase in intravascular pressure due to a mechanical compression effect and a hormonal adrenergic surge during the event. We report a case of a tricuspid valve injury caused by the deployment of the airbag during a high-speed impact car accident and the subsequent damage to the tricuspid valve chordal mechanism. The patient's management and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the injury are reviewed.

  15. Nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of stress corrosion cracking damage in sensitized 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morlock, Florian Jacobs, Laurence J. Kim, Jin-Yeon; Singh, Preet; Wall, James J.

    2015-03-31

    This research uses nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to characterize stress corrosion cracking (SCC) damage in welded 304 Stainless Steel (304 SS). 304 SS is widely used in reactor pressure vessels, where a corrosive environment in combination with applied stress due to high internal pressures can cause SCC. Welds and the nearby heat affected zones (HAZ) in the vessel material are especially sensitive to SCC damage. SCC damage results in microstructural changes such as dislocation formation and microcrack initiation that in the long term lead to reduced structural integrity and material failure. Therefore, the early detection of SCC is crucial to ensure safe operation. It has been shown that the microstructural changes caused by SCC can generate higher harmonic waves when excited harmonically. This research considers different levels of SCC damage induced in samples of welded 304 SS by applying stress to a specimen held in a corrosive medium (Sodium Thiosulfate). A nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave is introduced in the material and the fundamental and the second harmonic waves are measured using wedge detection. The nonlinearity parameter that relates the fundamental and the second harmonic amplitudes, is computed to quantify the SCC damage in each sample. These results are used to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonlinear Rayleigh waves to characterize SCC damage.

  16. Plasmid DNA damage by heavy ions at spread-out Bragg peak energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2010-10-01

    Interaction of ionizing radiation with plasmid DNA can lead to formation of single strand breaks, double strand breaks and clustered lesions. We have investigated the response of the synthetic plasmid pBR322 in aqueous solution upon irradiation with 12C ions under spread-out Bragg peak conditions (densely ionizing) and with 137Cs γ-photons (sparsely ionizing) as a function of dose. To evaluate the relevance of indirect effects, i.e. influences of diffusion limited radical induced DNA damage triggered by water radiolysis, the experiments were performed at various concentrations of the radical scavenger mannitol. Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to quantify the DNA damage. At low scavenger concentration for a given dose DNA damage is higher for γ-photons than for 12C. For the latter, the microscopic dose distribution is inhomogeneous, with very high dose deposited along the few tracks through the solution. This is in agreement with the concept that scavengers efficiently reduce damage for γ-photons, implying that the underlying damage mechanism is single strand break induction by OH radicals. For 12C induced damage, the fraction of SSB and DSB that is unaffected by radical scavengers and thus due to direct effect is quantified.

  17. The CATDAT damaging earthquakes database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.; Vervaeck, A.

    2011-08-01

    The global CATDAT damaging earthquakes and secondary effects (tsunami, fire, landslides, liquefaction and fault rupture) database was developed to validate, remove discrepancies, and expand greatly upon existing global databases; and to better understand the trends in vulnerability, exposure, and possible future impacts of such historic earthquakes. Lack of consistency and errors in other earthquake loss databases frequently cited and used in analyses was a major shortcoming in the view of the authors which needed to be improved upon. Over 17 000 sources of information have been utilised, primarily in the last few years, to present data from over 12 200 damaging earthquakes historically, with over 7000 earthquakes since 1900 examined and validated before insertion into the database. Each validated earthquake includes seismological information, building damage, ranges of social losses to account for varying sources (deaths, injuries, homeless, and affected), and economic losses (direct, indirect, aid, and insured). Globally, a slightly increasing trend in economic damage due to earthquakes is not consistent with the greatly increasing exposure. The 1923 Great Kanto (214 billion USD damage; 2011 HNDECI-adjusted dollars) compared to the 2011 Tohoku (>300 billion USD at time of writing), 2008 Sichuan and 1995 Kobe earthquakes show the increasing concern for economic loss in urban areas as the trend should be expected to increase. Many economic and social loss values not reported in existing databases have been collected. Historical GDP (Gross Domestic Product), exchange rate, wage information, population, HDI (Human Development Index), and insurance information have been collected globally to form comparisons. This catalogue is the largest known cross-checked global historic damaging earthquake database and should have far-reaching consequences for earthquake loss estimation, socio-economic analysis, and the global reinsurance field.

  18. Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

  19. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Fatigue Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, P.; Singher, L.; Notea, A.

    2004-02-01

    Despite the fact that most engineers and designers are aware of fatigue, many severe breakdowns of industrial plant and machinery still occur due to fatigue. In effect, it's been estimated that fatigue causes at least 80% of the failures in modern engineering components. From an operational point of view, the detection of fatigue damage, preferably at a very early stage, is a critically important consideration in order to prevent possible catastrophic equipment failure and associated losses. This paper describes the investigation involving the use of ultrasonic waves as a potential tool for early detection of fatigue damage. The parameters investigated were the ultrasonic wave velocities (longitudinal and transverse waves) and attenuation coefficient before fatigue damage and after progressive stages of fatigue. Although comparatively small uncertainties were observed, the feasibility of utilizing the velocity of ultrasonic waves as a fatigue monitor was barely substantiated within actual research conditions. However, careful measurements of the ultrasonic attenuation parameter had demonstrated its potential to provide an early assessment of damage during fatigue.

  20. Collisional Aggregation Due to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars and to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favored by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modeling such processes. These advances lead to a semiquantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  1. Process Recovery after CaO Addition Due to Granule Formation in a CSTR Co-Digester-A Tool to Influence the Composition of the Microbial Community and Stabilize the Process?

    PubMed

    Liebrich, Marietta; Kleyböcker, Anne; Kasina, Monika; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Kassahun, Andrea; Würdemann, Hilke

    2016-03-17

    The composition, structure and function of granules formed during process recovery with calcium oxide in a laboratory-scale fermenter fed with sewage sludge and rapeseed oil were studied. In the course of over-acidification and successful process recovery, only minor changes were observed in the bacterial community of the digestate, while granules appeared during recovery. Fluorescence microscopic analysis of the granules showed a close spatial relationship between calcium and oil and/or long chain fatty acids. This finding further substantiated the hypothesis that calcium precipitated with carbon of organic origin and reduced the negative effects of overloading with oil. Furthermore, the enrichment of phosphate minerals in the granules was shown, and molecular biological analyses detected polyphosphate-accumulating organisms as well as methanogenic archaea in the core. Organisms related to Methanoculleus receptaculi were detected in the inner zones of a granule, whereas they were present in the digestate only after process recovery. This finding indicated more favorable microhabitats inside the granules that supported process recovery. Thus, the granule formation triggered by calcium oxide addition served as a tool to influence the composition of the microbial community and to stabilize the process after overloading with oil.

  2. Process Recovery after CaO Addition Due to Granule Formation in a CSTR Co-Digester—A Tool to Influence the Composition of the Microbial Community and Stabilize the Process?

    PubMed Central

    Liebrich, Marietta; Kleyböcker, Anne; Kasina, Monika; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Kassahun, Andrea; Würdemann, Hilke

    2016-01-01

    The composition, structure and function of granules formed during process recovery with calcium oxide in a laboratory-scale fermenter fed with sewage sludge and rapeseed oil were studied. In the course of over-acidification and successful process recovery, only minor changes were observed in the bacterial community of the digestate, while granules appeared during recovery. Fluorescence microscopic analysis of the granules showed a close spatial relationship between calcium and oil and/or long chain fatty acids. This finding further substantiated the hypothesis that calcium precipitated with carbon of organic origin and reduced the negative effects of overloading with oil. Furthermore, the enrichment of phosphate minerals in the granules was shown, and molecular biological analyses detected polyphosphate-accumulating organisms as well as methanogenic archaea in the core. Organisms related to Methanoculleus receptaculi were detected in the inner zones of a granule, whereas they were present in the digestate only after process recovery. This finding indicated more favorable microhabitats inside the granules that supported process recovery. Thus, the granule formation triggered by calcium oxide addition served as a tool to influence the composition of the microbial community and to stabilize the process after overloading with oil. PMID:27681911

  3. Current pulse effects on cylindrical damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    A series of joint experiments between LANL and VNIIEF use a VNIIEF-designed helical generator to provide currents for driving a LANL-designed cylindrical spallation experimental load. Under proper driving conditions, a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material. In addition, the damaged material is able to come to a complete stop due to its strength, avoiding application of further forces. Thus far, experiments have provided data about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and behavior of material recollected after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will focus on the effects of tailoring the driving current pulse to obtain the desired data.

  4. Investigation of the Precipitates on the Concrete Surface due to Sulphate Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalčíková, Martina; Eštoková, Adriana; Oravec, Jozef; Luptáková, Alena

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the durability of cement-based materials subjected to the effects of sulphuric acid in terms of surface deterioration. Damaged concrete surfaces and the samples' mass changes were studied during 270-day simulation of both chemical and biological attacks. Chemical corrosion was simulated by sulphuric acid with pH of 3.0 and 4.0, respectively, while biological corrosion was simulated by activity of bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. XRD and SEM analyses confirmed a massive sulphate precipitate formation on the concrete surface due to chemical and biological sulphate corrosion.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

    2004-12-01

    The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can

  6. Corrosion Damage Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell H.

    2002-11-30

    Corrosion damage can lead to reduced operational lifetimes. Often this damage is not as obvious as general corrosion but takes the form of pits, intergranular corrosion, crevice corrosion and hydrogen absorption. These types of corrosion damage lead to stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking and corrosion fatigue. A critical step in defining a corrosion damage function is determining the relationship between the corrosion damage, the resulting crack propagation mechanism and component lifetimes. The sequence of events is often some localized corrosion event such as pitting, transition of the pit to a planar crack, propagation of this short crack, transition of the short crack to long crack conditions and continued propagation through Stage I, II, and III of the long crack SCC regimes. A description of critical corrosion damage processes and examples of the transition to long crack SCC conditions will be discussed.

  7. Intervention of glutathione in pre-mutagenic catechol-mediated DNA damage in the presence of copper(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Hepel, Maria; Stobiecka, Magdalena; Peachey, Janet; Miller, Jeremiah

    2012-07-01

    The catechol-mediated DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) ions involves oxidation of guanine to 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and DNA strand scission. It proceeds through the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The mutagenicity of 8-oxoG lesions is due to its miscoding propensity reflected in GC→TA transversion taking place during the DNA repair process. To gain new insights into the nature of catechol-mediated DNA damage and its prevention, we have investigated the changes in DNA melting characteristics and 8-oxoG formation as the indicators of DNA damage in a model calf-thymus DNA system. A novel fluorescence method for DNA melting temperature determination, based on DAPI fluorescent-probe staining, has been proposed. The DNA melting-onset temperature has been found to be more sensitive to DNA damage than the standard melting temperature due to the increased width of the melting transition observed in oxidatively damaged DNA. We have found that the efficiency of Fenton cascade in generating DNA-damaging ROS is higher for catechol than for GSH, two strong antioxidants, mainly due to the much longer distance between ROS-generating radical group in GS to nucleobases than that of semiquinone radical group to nucleobases (2.1nm vs. 0.27nm), making the ROS transport from GSH an order of magnitude less likely to damage DNA because of short lifetime of HO radicals. The antioxidant and DNA-protecting behaviors of GSH have been elucidated. We have found that the redox potential of GSH/GSSG couple is lower than that of catechol/semiquinone couple. Hence, GSH keeps catechol in the reduced state, thereby shutting down the initial step of the catechol-mediated Fenton cascade. The catechol-induced DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) ions has also been confirmed in studies of ON-OFF hairpin-oligonucleotide beacons.

  8. Influence of Subsurface Cracks on Laser Induced Surface Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-11-07

    Cracks can affect laser damage susceptibility in three ways. These are field intensification due to interference, enhanced absorption due to trapped material in the cracks, and increased mechanical weakness. Enhanced absorption is the most important effect.

  9. Impact damage of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Hsi-Young T.; Springer, George S.

    1986-01-01

    A model is described for estimating the impact damage of fiber reinforced composite plates. The displacements and stresses are calculated by a three dimensional transient, finite element method of solution of the governing equations applicable to a linearly elastic body. The region in which damage occurs is estimated using the Tsai-Wu failure criterion. A computer code was developed which can be used to calculate the impact force, displacements and velocities of the plate and the impact body, stresses and strains in the plate, and the damage area. Sample numerical results are presented illustrating the type of information provided by the code. Comparisons between measured and calculated damage areas are also given.

  10. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  11. Damage Tolerant Microstructures for Shock Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerreta, Ellen; Dennis-Koller, Darcie; Escobedo, Juan Pablo; Fensin, Saryu; Valone, Steve; Trujillo, Carl; Bronkhorst, Curt; Lebensohn, Ricardo

    While dynamic failure, due to shock loading, has been studied for many years, our current ability to predict and simulate evolving damage during dynamic loading remains limited. One reason for this is due to the lack of understanding for the linkages between process-induced as well as evolved microstructure and damage. To this end, the role of microstructure on the early stages of dynamic damage has been studied in high purity Ta and Cu. This work, which utilizes plate-impact experiments to interrogate these effects, has recently been extended to a subset to Cu-alloys (Cu-Pb, Cu-Nb, and Cu-Ag). These multi-length scale studies, have identified a number of linkages between damage nucleation and growth and microstructural features such as: grain boundary types, grain boundary orientation with respect to loading direction, grain orientation, and bi-metal interfaces. A combination of modeling and simulation techniques along with experimental observation has been utilized to examine the mechanisms for the ductile damage processes such as nucleation, growth and coalescence. This work has identified differing features of importance for damage nucleation in high purity and alloyed materials, lending insight into features of concern for mitigating shock induced damage in more complicated alloy systems.

  12. [Liability in Anaesthesiology: theory of disproportionate damage].

    PubMed

    Galán Gutiérrez, J C; Galán Cortés, J C

    2013-10-01

    An analysis is made of the controversial application of the theory of disproportionate damage in the anaesthetic act, due to the high inherent risk, and regardless of the seriousness and importance of the surgery being performed. The existence of a disproportionate damage, that is, damage not foreseen nor accountable within the framework of the professional performance of the anaesthetist, does not by itself determine the existence of liability on the part of the anaesthetist, but the demand from the professionals themselves for a coherent explanation of the serious disagreement between the initial risk implied by their actions and the final consequence produced.

  13. Detection of insect damage in almonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soowon; Schatzki, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Pinhole insect damage in natural almonds is very difficult to detect on-line. Further, evidence exists relating insect damage to aflatoxin contamination. Hence, for quality and health reasons, methods to detect and remove such damaged nuts are of great importance in this study, we explored the possibility of using x-ray imaging to detect pinhole damage in almonds by insects. X-ray film images of about 2000 almonds and x-ray linescan images of only 522 pinhole damaged almonds were obtained. The pinhole damaged region appeared slightly darker than non-damaged region in x-ray negative images. A machine recognition algorithm was developed to detect these darker regions. The algorithm used the first order and the second order information to identify the damaged region. To reduce the possibility of false positive results due to germ region in high resolution images, germ detection and removal routines were also included. With film images, the algorithm showed approximately an 81 percent correct recognition ratio with only 1 percent false positives whereas line scan images correctly recognized 65 percent of pinholes with about 9 percent false positives. The algorithms was very fast and efficient requiring only minimal computation time. If implemented on line, theoretical throughput of this recognition system would be 66 nuts/second.

  14. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  15. Laser Damage Precursors in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P; Suratwala, T; Bude, J; Laurence, T A; Shen, N; Steele, W A; Feit, M; Menapace, J; Wong, L

    2009-11-11

    There is a longstanding, and largely unexplained, correlation between the laser damage susceptibility of optical components and both the surface quality of the optics, and the presence of near surface fractures in an optic. In the present work, a combination of acid leaching, acid etching, and confocal time resolved photoluminescence (CTP) microscopy has been used to study laser damage initiation at indentation sites. The combination of localized polishing and variations in indentation loads allows one to isolate and characterize the laser damage susceptibility of densified, plastically flowed and fractured fused silica. The present results suggest that: (1) laser damage initiation and growth are strongly correlated with fracture surfaces, while densified and plastically flowed material is relatively benign, and (2) fracture events result in the formation of an electronically defective rich surface layer which promotes energy transfer from the optical beam to the glass matrix.

  16. Targeting the DNA Damage Response in Cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mark J

    2015-11-19

    An underlying hallmark of cancers is their genomic instability, which is associated with a greater propensity to accumulate DNA damage. Historical treatment of cancer by radiotherapy and DNA-damaging chemotherapy is based on this principle, yet it is accompanied by significant collateral damage to normal tissue and unwanted side effects. Targeted therapy based on inhibiting the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancers offers the potential for a greater therapeutic window by tailoring treatment to patients with tumors lacking specific DDR functions. The recent approval of olaparib (Lynparza), the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor for treating tumors harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, represents the first medicine based on this principle, exploiting an underlying cause of tumor formation that also represents an Achilles' heel. This review highlights the different concepts behind targeting DDR in cancer and how this can provide significant opportunities for DDR-based therapies in the future.

  17. Biofilm Formation As a Response to Ecological Competition

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Nuno M.; Martinez-Garcia, Esteban; Xavier, Joao; Durham, William M.; Kolter, Roberto; Kim, Wook; Foster, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria form dense surface-associated communities known as biofilms that are central to their persistence and how they affect us. Biofilm formation is commonly viewed as a cooperative enterprise, where strains and species work together for a common goal. Here we explore an alternative model: biofilm formation is a response to ecological competition. We co-cultured a diverse collection of natural isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and studied the effect on biofilm formation. We show that strain mixing reliably increases biofilm formation compared to unmixed conditions. Importantly, strain mixing leads to strong competition: one strain dominates and largely excludes the other from the biofilm. Furthermore, we show that pyocins, narrow-spectrum antibiotics made by other P. aeruginosa strains, can stimulate biofilm formation by increasing the attachment of cells. Side-by-side comparisons using microfluidic assays suggest that the increase in biofilm occurs due to a general response to cellular damage: a comparable biofilm response occurs for pyocins that disrupt membranes as for commercial antibiotics that damage DNA, inhibit protein synthesis or transcription. Our data show that bacteria increase biofilm formation in response to ecological competition that is detected by antibiotic stress. This is inconsistent with the idea that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics are cooperative signals that coordinate microbial communities, as is often concluded. Instead, our work is consistent with competition sensing where low-levels of antibiotics are used to detect and respond to the competing genotypes that produce them. PMID:26158271

  18. Radiation damage in barium fluoride detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Woody, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To develop radiation hard detectors, particularly for high energy physics studies, radiation damage is being studied in BaF/sub 2/, both undoped and doped with La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd and Tm. Some dopants reduce radiation damage. In La doped BaF/sub 2/ they reduce the unwanted long lifetime luminescence which interferes with the short-lived fluorescence used to detect particles. Radiation induced coloring is being studied with facilities for making optical measurements before, during and after irradiation with /sup 60/C0 gamma rays. Doses of 10/sup 6/ rad, or less, create only ionization induced charge transfer effects since lattice atom displacement damage is negligible at these doses. All crystals studied exhibit color center formation, between approximately 200 and 800 nm, during irradiation and color center decay after irradiation. Thus only measurements made during irradiation show the total absorption present in a radiation field. Both undoped and La doped BaF/sub 2/ develop damage at minimum detectable levels in the UV---which is important for particle detectors. For particle detector applications these studies must be extended to high dose irradiations with particles energetic enough to cause lattice atom displacement damage. In principle, the reduction in damage provided by dopants could apply to other applications requiring radiation damage resistant materials.

  19. Damage and intensity survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reagor, G.; Brewer, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    A field team (the tuhors) from the National Earthquake Information Center (USGS) conducted a damage survey of the epicentral area in the week following the earthquakes. Detailed information about damage and where and how strongly the earthquakes were felt was obtained through interviews with local residents and personal observations. 

  20. Detection of transport and age induced damages on artwork: an advanced concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawitz, M.; Hein, N.; Alexeenko, I.; Wilke, M.; Pedrini, G.; Krekel, C.; Osten, W.

    2013-05-01

    For the society it is of great interest to make cultural heritage accessible to the general public. The subsequent increase of museum loan services increases the risk of accelerated degeneration. Hence, in addition to the age related deterioration, transportation can be another source of damage. Despite modern packaging technologies, vibrations and environmental climate change can add up and damage the transported object. Besides obvious mechanical influencing quantities, a main concern is the detection of climate induced damages. Changes in the relative humidity cause inner strain, which may lead to defect formations and damages. White light fringe projection was applied to detect object changes due to variations of the relative humidity. First measurements indicated a sensitivity down to a relative humidity change of 6 %. Recently, the Stuppach Madonna, a painting by Matthias Grunewald (painted 1514 - 1516), was investigated with shearography after the return from an exhibition. The obtained shearograms revealed a variety of defects like bubbles, delaminations and tunnels caused by wood worms. Even the planking of the wooden panel and existing putty could be detected. This paper describes the first steps of a project with the aim of investigating and implementing a method to detect and classify transport related damages on works of art.

  1. Microstructures and Type-IV Creep Damage of High Cr Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Takahashi, Yukio

    Creep strength of welded joints in high Cr steels decreases due to the formation of Type-IV creep damage in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) during long-term use at high temperatures. This paper aims to elucidate the processes and mechanisms of Type-IV failure. Creep tests for the welded joints with different groove configurations of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted. Distributions of Type-IV creep damages in HAZ of these welds were measured quantitatively, and were compared with FEM computations using damage mechanics analysis. For the welded joints with double U groove, creep voids were observed mostly at 20% below the surface of the plate, and scarcely near surfaces and center of thickness. For the welded joints with single U groove, creep voids were observed inside the plate thickness more than 3mm below the surfaces. From the comparison of experimental damage distributions with FEM analysis, it is considered to be important to take the stress triaxiality into account for the prediction of damage location and fracture life of high Cr ferritic steel welds.

  2. Few-cycle pulse laser induced damage threshold determination of ultra-broadband optics.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Kyle R P; Talisa, Noah; Tempea, Gabriel; Austin, Drake R; Neacsu, Catalin; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2016-12-12

    A systematic study of few-cycle pulse laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) determination was performed for commercially-available ultra-broadband optics, (i.e. chirped mirrors, silver mirrors, beamsplitters, etc.) in vacuum and in air, for single and multi-pulse regime (S-on-1). Multi-pulse damage morphology at fluences below the single-pulse LIDT was studied in order to investigate the mechanisms leading to the onset of damage. Stark morphological contrast was observed between multi-pulse damage sites formed in air versus those in vacuum. One effect of vacuum testing compared to air included suppression of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formation, possibly influenced by a reduced presence of damage debris. Another effect of vacuum was occasional lowering of LIDT, which appears to be due to the stress-strain performance of the coating design during laser irradiation and under the external stress of vacuum ambience. A fused silica substrate is also examined, and a non-LIPSS nanostructuring is observed on the surface. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Flood damage claims reveal insights about surface runoff in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, D. B.; Prasuhn, V.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    A few case studies in Switzerland exemplify that not only overtopping water bodies frequently cause damages to buildings. Reportedly, a large share of the total loss due to flooding in Switzerland goes back to surface runoff that is formed and is propagating outside of regular watercourses. Nevertheless, little is known about when, where and why such surface runoff occurs. The described process encompasses surface runoff formation, followed by unchannelised overland flow until a water body is reached. It is understood as a type of flash flood, has short response times and occurs diffusely in the landscape. Thus, the process is difficult to observe and study directly. A promising source indicating surface runoff indirectly are houseowners' damage claims recorded by Swiss Public Insurance Companies for Buildings (PICB). In most of Switzerland, PICB hold a monopoly position and insure (almost) every building. Consequently, PICB generally register all damages to buildings caused by an insured natural hazard (including surface runoff) within the respective zones. We have gathered gapless flood related claim records of most of all Swiss PICB covering more than the last two decades on average. Based on a subset, we have developed a methodology to differentiate claims related to surface runoff from other causes. This allows us to assess the number of claims as well as total loss related to surface runoff and compare these to the numbers of overtopping watercourses. Furthermore, with the good data coverage, we are able to analyze surface runoff related claims in space and time, from which we can infer spatial and temporal characteristics of surface runoff. Although the delivered data of PICB are heterogeneous and, consequently, time-consuming to harmonize, our first results show that exploiting these damage claim records is feasible and worthwhile to learn more about surface runoff in Switzerland.

  4. Nonlinear flutter of composite plates with damage evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young I.; Stragnac, Thomas W.; Kurdila, Andrew J.

    1993-04-01

    The investigators present a study of dynamic and aeroelastic response of structures which evolve due to damage. Aeroelastic response is shown to be dependent upon the distribution and accumulation of damage. In turn, the damage is dependent upon the presence of the aerodynamic loads. Dynamic characteristics are unique to the coupled damage/aeroelastic system and are developed as part of the solution methodology. In this study, the damage is due to the natural progression of microcracking of the composite structure; yet, the control model presented is appropriate for distributed actuation systems. The stability boundary for aeroelastic flutter and divergence evolves due to damage. Control design based upon the min-max control theory is presented which addresses model uncertainties.

  5. Radiation damage in cubic ZrO2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia from molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2014-11-20

    Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulation on cubic ZrO2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to elucidate defect cluster formation resulting from radiation damage, and evaluate the impact of Y-dopants. Interstitial clusters composed of split-interstitial building blocks, i.e., Zr-Zr or Y-Zr are formed. Moreover, oxygen vacancies control cation defect migration; in their presence, Zr interstitials aggregate to form split-interstitials whereas in their absence Zr interstitials remain immobile, as isolated single-interstitials. Y-doping prevents interstitial cluster formation due to sequestration of oxygen vacancies.

  6. Radiation damage in cubic ZrO2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2014-11-20

    Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulation on cubic ZrO2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to elucidate defect cluster formation resulting from radiation damage, and evaluate the impact of Y-dopants. Interstitial clusters composed of split-interstitial building blocks, i.e., Zr-Zr or Y-Zr are formed. Moreover, oxygen vacancies control cation defect migration; in their presence, Zr interstitials aggregate to form split-interstitials whereas in their absence Zr interstitials remain immobile, as isolated single-interstitials. Y-doping prevents interstitial cluster formation due to sequestration of oxygen vacancies.

  7. Due process traditionalism.

    PubMed

    Sunstein, Cass R

    2008-06-01

    In important cases, the Supreme Court has limited the scope of "substantive due process" by reference to tradition, but it has yet to explain why it has done so. Due process traditionalism might be defended in several distinctive ways. The most ambitious defense draws on a set of ideas associated with Edmund Burke and Friedrich Hayek, who suggested that traditions have special credentials by virtue of their acceptance by many minds. But this defense runs into three problems. Those who have participated in a tradition may not have accepted any relevant proposition; they might suffer from a systematic bias; and they might have joined a cascade. An alternative defense sees due process traditionalism as a second-best substitute for two preferable alternatives: a purely procedural approach to the Due Process Clause, and an approach that gives legislatures the benefit of every reasonable doubt. But it is not clear that in these domains, the first-best approaches are especially attractive; and even if they are, the second-best may be an unacceptably crude substitute. The most plausible defense of due process traditionalism operates on rule-consequentialist grounds, with the suggestion that even if traditions are not great, they are often good, and judges do best if they defer to traditions rather than attempting to specify the content of "liberty" on their own. But the rule-consequentialist defense depends on controversial and probably false assumptions about the likely goodness of traditions and the institutional incapacities of judges.

  8. Reversal of Mitochondrial Damage Caused by Environmental Neurotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    on electron transport and respiration of mitochondria. In turn, damage to mitochondria can contribute to the progression of Parkinson’s disease and...leads concerning thiol redox status (viz., oxidation of GSH, formation of PrSSG) can lead to improved methods to protect DA neurons from damage by environmental neurotoxins or from the ravages of Parkinson’s disease .

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Energetic Uranium Recoil Damage in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2006-10-11

    Defect production and amorphization due to energetic uranium recoils in zircon (ZrSiO4), which is a promising ceramic nuclear waste form, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a partial charge model. An algorithm that distinguishes between undamaged crystal, crystalline defects and amorphous regions is used to develop a fundamental understanding of the primary damage state. The amorphous cascade core is separated from the surrounding crystal by a defect-rich region. Small, chemically inhomogeneous amorphous clusters are also produced around the core. The amorphous regions consist of under-coordinated Zr and polymerized Si leading to amorphization and phase separation on a nanometer scale into Zr- and Si-rich regions. This separation could play an important role in the experimentally observed formation of nanoscale ZrO2 in ZrSiO4 irradiated at elevated temperatures.

  10. DNA damage, oxidative mutagen sensitivity, and repair of oxidative DNA damage in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bendesky, Andrés; Michel, Alejandra; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Salazar, Ana M; Podoswa, Nancy; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most frequent type of cancer in humans. Exposure to UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and oxidative DNA damage, caused either by UV radiation itself or by other agents, may be involved in its induction. Increased sensitivity to oxidative damage and an altered DNA repair capacity (DRC) increase the risk of many types of cancer; however, sensitivity to oxidizing agents has not been evaluated for NMSC, and results regarding DRC in NMSC are inconclusive. In the present study, we evaluated DNA damage and repair in leukocytes from 41 NMSC patients and 45 controls. The Comet assay was used to measure basal and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage, as well as the DRC, while the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to measure the basal level of chromosome damage. Although basal DNA damage was higher for the controls than for the patients, this finding was mainly due to sampling more controls in the summer, which was associated with longer comet tails. In contrast, H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage was significantly higher in cases than in controls, and this parameter was not influenced by the season of the year. The DRC for the H(2)O(2)-induced damage was similar for cases and controls and unrelated to seasonality. Finally, the frequency of binucleated lymphocytes with micronuclei was similar for cases and controls. The results of this study indicate that NMSC patients are distinguished from controls by an increased sensitivity to oxidative DNA damage.

  11. Damage detection tests of five-story steel frame with simulated damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Koichi; Teshigawara, Masaomi; Isoda, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Takuji; Mita, Akira

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents damage detection tests of five-story steel frame with simulated damages. We discuss pre-analytical study and results of experiments. Fiber brag grating (FBG) sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges and laser displacement meters are installed in this test frame. We assume damages by removing studs from only one story, loosening bolts of beams, cutting part of beams and extracting braces from only one story. From the results of pre-analytical study, we can estimate which story is damaged from the change of natural period and mode shape to some extent. We applied flexibility method which is one of a damage identification methods using modal properties. We also apply flexibility method to results of experiments. In some cases we can estimate which story is damaged, and in other cases we cannot. We also applied a method using multiple natural frequency shifts. Making use of the change in five natural frequencies due to damage, the location of damaged stories can be pinpointed. In both methods, we cannot identify damaged story in some cases. Some methods other than methods using modal properties have to be tried to apply in such cases.

  12. Damages from the 20 September earthquakes near Klamath Falls, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Most of the damage resulting from the earthquakes was reported from Klamath Falls, approximately 20 km from the source region of earthquakes. As has commonly been the case with earthquakes in other parts of the United States, the degree of damage was highly uneven in Klamath Falls. Most of the town escaped with little damage to buildings or building contents. Losses were concentrated in the downtown area, but even there most of the buildings were not damaged. The unevenness of damage in earthquakes results primarily from large differences in the seismic resistance of individual buildings and differences in the seismic response due to different soil conditions and geology beneath buildings. 

  13. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy study of focused ion beam damage in small intrinsic Josephson junctions of single crystalline Bi2Sr2CaCu2O y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizaki, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Junpei; Yamaguchi, Ayami; Umegai, Shunpei; Ayukawa, Shin-ya; Kitano, Haruhisa

    2017-04-01

    We report a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study on the damage produced by the focused ion beam (FIB) etching for small Bi2Sr2CaCu2O y (Bi2212) intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). The selected area diffraction patterns of TEM images demonstrate that the FIB damage causes the formation of an amorphous layer. The thickness of FIB damage is at least 30 nm for the Ga+ ion beam emitted at 50 pA and 30 kV, independent of the incident direction of the Ga+ ion beam. We also confirmed that the damage or the redeposition due to the FIB etching was effectively removed by the additional irradiation of Ar ions after the FIB etching. This suggests the advantage of the combinatorial method of the FIB and Ar-ion etchings in the successful fabrication of small and high-quality IJJs.

  15. Ballistic damage in hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Pandya, Kedar S.; Naik, Niranjan K.; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-07-01

    Ballistic damage of hybrid woven-fabric composites made of plain-weave E-glass- fabric/epoxy and 8H satin-weave T300 carbon-fabric/epoxy is studied using a combination of experimental tests, microstructural studies and finite-element (FE) analysis. Ballistic tests were conducted with a single-stage gas gun. Fibre damage and delamination were observed to be dominating failure modes. A ply-level FE model was developed, with a fabric-reinforced ply modelled as a homogeneous orthotropic material with capacity to sustain progressive stiffness degradation due to fibre/matrix cracking, fibre breaking and plastic deformation under shear loading. Simulated damage patterns on the front and back faces of fabric-reinforced composite plates provided an insight into their damage mechanisms under ballistic loading.

  16. Court Disallows Damage Claims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomson, Bernard; Coplan, Norman

    1976-01-01

    In rejecting claims for damages, the Court finds that contract's "increase or decrease of cost" language is not applicable to added overhead costs and loss of labor efficiency resulting from delays over which the contractor has no control. (Author)

  17. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  18. LSD and Genetic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  19. Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may include numbness or insensitivity to pain or temperature a tingling, burning, or prickling sensation sharp pains ... from working properly, the body cannot regulate its temperature as it should. Nerve damage can also cause ...

  20. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  1. Ultrasonic Techniques for Baseline-Free Damage Detection in Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debaditya

    damage threshold and prevents the occurrences of false alarms resulting from imperfections and noise in the measurement system. The threshold computation from only the measured signals is they key behind baseline-free damage detection in plates. Chapters 3 and 4 are concerned with nonlinear ultrasonic techniques for crack detection in metallic structures. Chapter 3 describes a nonlinear guided wave technique based on the principle of super-harmonic production due to crack induced nonlinearity. A semi-analytical method is formulated to investigate the behavior of a bilinear crack model. Upon comparing the behavior with experimental observations, it is inferred that a bilinear model can only partially capture the signal characteristics arising from a fatigue crack. A correlation between the extents of nonlinear behavior of a breathing crack with the different stages of the fatigue crack growth is also made in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, a nonlinear system identification method through coherence measurement is proposed. A popular electro-magnetic impedance circuit was used to detect acoustic nonlinearity produced by a crack. Chapters 5 and 6 comprise the final part of this thesis where wavefield images from a scanning laser vibrometer are digitally processed to detect defects in composite structures. Once processed, the defect in the scanned surface stands out as an outlier in the background of the undamaged area. An outlier analysis algorithm is then implemented to detect and localize the damage automatically. In Chapter 5, exploratory groundwork on wavefield imaging is done by obtaining wave propagation images from specimens made of different materials and with different geometries. In Chapter 6, a hitherto unnoted phenomenon of standing wave formation in delaminated composite plates is observed and explained. Novel signal and image processing techniques are also proposed in this chapter, of which the isolation of standing waves using wavenumber-frequency domain manipulation

  2. Effect of Vacuum on the Occurrence of UV-Induced Surface Photoluminescence, Transmission Loss, and Catastrophic Surface Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Runkel, M; Demos, S G; Kozlowski, M R; Wegner, P J

    2000-07-20

    Vacuum degrades the transmittance and catastrophic damage performance of fused-silica surfaces, both bare and silica-sol anti-reflective coated. These effects may be important in certain space application of photonics devices. When exposed to hundreds of 355-rim, 10-ns laser pulses with fluences in the 2-15 J/cm{sup 2} range, transmittance loss is due to both increased reflectance and absorption at the surface. Spectroscopic measurements show that the absorbed light induces broadband fluorescence from the visible to infrared and that the peak photoluminescence wavelength depends cumulative fluence. The effect appears to be consistent with the formation of surface SiO{sub x} (x<2) with progressively lower x as cumulative fluence increases. Conversely, low fluence CW UV irradiation of fluorescent sites in air reduces the fluorescence signal, which suggests a photochemical oxidation reaction back to Si0{sub 2}. The occurrence of catastrophic damage (craters that grow on each subsequent pulse) also increases in a vacuum relative to air for both coated and uncoated samples. In both cases, the 50% damage probability for 100 one-mm sites decreases from about 45 to 35 J/cm{sup 2} for superpolished fused silica at pressures in the 10{sup -6} Torr range. The damage probability distribution in 10 Torr of air is close to that at one atmosphere of air. The damage morphology of the crater formed in vacuum differs substantially from that in air and has a more melted appearance and does not show cracking and flaking. These differences are possibly due to more coupling of the plasma shock wave into the surface with air present but slower heat dissipation in a vacuum. While it is attractive to propose that formation of sub-stoichiometric silica on the surface in a vacuum environment enhances the probability of catastrophic damage, initial experiments have not yet been able to establish a mechanistic link between the two phenomena.

  3. Analysis of Radiation Damage in Light Water Reactors: Comparison of Cluster Analysis Methods for the Analysis of Atom Probe Data.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jonathan M; DaCosta, Gérald; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Weekes, Hannah; Radiguet, Bertrand; Styman, Paul D; Vurpillot, Francois; Pareige, Cristelle; Etienne, Auriane; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas; Malerba, Lorenzo; Pareige, Philippe

    2017-01-30

    Irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes the formation of nanoscale microstructural features (termed radiation damage), which affect the mechanical properties of the vessel. A key tool for characterizing these nanoscale features is atom probe tomography (APT), due to its high spatial resolution and the ability to identify different chemical species in three dimensions. Microstructural observations using APT can underpin development of a mechanistic understanding of defect formation. However, with atom probe analyses there are currently multiple methods for analyzing the data. This can result in inconsistencies between results obtained from different researchers and unnecessary scatter when combining data from multiple sources. This makes interpretation of results more complex and calibration of radiation damage models challenging. In this work simulations of a range of different microstructures are used to directly compare different cluster analysis algorithms and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

  4. Preventing Arc Welding From Damaging Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Noel; Mareen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Shielding technique developed to protect sensitive electronic equipment from damage due to electromagnetic disturbances produced by arc welding. Established acceptable alternative in instances in which electronic equipment cannot be removed prior to arc welding. Guidelines established for open, unshielded welds. Procedure applicable to robotics or computer-aided manufacturing.

  5. 7 CFR 1488.11 - Liquidated damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... determines that the delay was due to such causes as acts of God or government or public enemy, fires, floods..., damage, destruction or deterioration of the commodity or act of God or government or public enemy; and... deterioration of the commodity or act of God or government or public enemy. Bank Obligations and Repayment...

  6. 7 CFR 1488.11 - Liquidated damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... determines that the delay was due to such causes as acts of God or government or public enemy, fires, floods..., damage, destruction or deterioration of the commodity or act of God or government or public enemy; and... deterioration of the commodity or act of God or government or public enemy. Bank Obligations and Repayment...

  7. [Onychomycoses due to molds].

    PubMed

    Chabasse, D; Pihet, M

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycoses represent about 30% of superficial mycosis that are encountered in Dermatology consults. Fungi such as dermatophytes, which are mainly found on the feet nails, cause nearly 50% of these onychopathies. Yeasts are predominantly present on hands, whereas non-dermatophytic moulds are very seldom involved in both foot and hand nails infections. According to literature, these moulds are responsible for 2 to 17% of onychomycoses. Nevertheless, we have to differentiate between onychomycoses due to pseudodermatophytes such as Neoscytalidium (ex-Scytalidium) and Onychocola canadensis, which present a high affinity for keratin, and onychomycoses due to filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus, Fusarium, Scopulariopsis, Acremonium... These saprophytic moulds are indeed most of the time considered as colonizers rather than real pathogens agents. Mycology and histopathology laboratories play an important role. They allow to identify the species that is involved in nail infection, but also to confirm parasitism by the fungus in the infected nails. Indeed, before attributing any pathogenic role to non-dermatophytic moulds, it is essential to precisely evaluate their pathogenicity through samples and accurate mycological and/or histological analysis. The treatment of onychomycoses due to non-dermatophytic moulds is difficult, as there is today no consensus. The choice of an antifungal agent will first depend on the species that is involved in the infection, but also on the severity of nail lesions and on the patient himself. In most cases, the onychomycosis will be cured with chemical or mechanical removing of the infected tissues, followed by a local antifungal treatment. In some cases, a systemic therapy will be discussed.

  8. Credit where due.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Steven G

    2016-08-01

    The history of medicine is filled with stories of tireless researchers who failed to get credit for their hard work. Examples of this include Rosalind Franklin, who helped to elucidate the structure of DNA; Frederick Banting, who helped to discover insulin; and Jay McLean, who discovered heparin. The founding of the field of vascular surgery provides one of the most vivid examples of uncredited work. Even though Alexis Carrel was an unpaid, untitled assistant in Charles Guthrie's laboratory, it was Carrel alone who received a Nobel Prize for their work. In an attempt to give credit where due, the reasons for this injustice are described.

  9. Helium vs. Proton Induced Displacement Damage in Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringo, Sawnese; Barghouty, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the specific effects of displacement damage due to the passage of protons and helium nuclei on some typical electronic materials will be evaluated and contrasted. As the electronic material absorbs the energetic proton and helium momentum, degradation of performance occurs, eventually leading to overall failure. Helium nuclei traveling at the same speed as protons are expected to impart more to the material displacement damage; due to the larger mass, and thus momentum, of helium nuclei compared to protons. Damage due to displacement of atoms in their crystalline structure can change the physical properties and hence performance of the electronic materials.

  10. Reducing Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2006-06-05

    This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

  11. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  12. Storm-Related Postmortem Damage to Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Maijanen, Heli; Wilson-Taylor, Rebecca J; Jantz, Lee Meadows

    2016-05-01

    In April 2011, human skeletons were exposed to heavy storms at the outdoor Anthropology Research Facility (ARF) in Knoxville, Tennessee. Of the approximate 125 skeletons at the ARF in April 2011, 30 donations exhibited postmortem damage that could be attributed to the storms. At least 20 of the affected donations exhibit postmortem damage clearly associated with hailstones due to the oval shape and similar small size of the defects observed. The irregular shape and larger size of other defects may be a product of other falling objects (e.g., tree branches) associated with the storms. Storm-related damage was observed throughout the skeleton, with the most commonly damaged skeletal elements being the scapula and ilium, but more robust elements (i.e., femora and tibiae) also displayed characteristic features of hailstone damage. Thus, hailstone damage should be considered when forensic practitioners observe unusual postmortem damage in skeletal remains recovered from the outdoor context.

  13. Anisotropic damage effects in masonry walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massart, T.; Bouillard, P.; Geers, M. G. D.; Peerlings, R. H. J.

    2003-03-01

    This paper refers to the characterization of plane masonry behaviour under the assumption of plane stress. Masonry may be seen as a two-phase (bricks and mortar) periodic anisotropic material with complex macroscopic behaviour due to the possible occurrence of cracking in each of the phases. Non-linear constitutive equations have thus to be used in order to realistically represent masonry structures. Most existing macroscopic models defined for such materials are by essence phenomenological. This leads to weakly motivated frameworks and rather complex models, especially if one wants to account for material symmetry evolution due to cracking. The aim of this paper is to identify a simple set of damage mechanics variables for the constituents that could be used in homogenization procedures to infer the overall behaviour of the material from its mesostructural features (geometrical arrangement and mechanical properties of the constituents). Based on unit cell computations, it is shown that scalar damage mesomodels allow to obtain realistic damage patterns encountered in experiments. Results suggest that at the meso-scale, it is possible to use a scalar damage model for the individual phases which naturally leads to the desired anisotropy evolution into the macroscopic descriptions. This macroscopic anisotropy evolution is illustrated using a numerical homogenization procedure to identify the degraded stiffness associated to damage patterns. The influence of variations in the constituent characteristics is also correctly captured as illustrated for some of the loading schemes.

  14. Crumpling Damaged Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Giordanelli, I.; Mendoza, M.; Andrade Jr., J. S.; Gomes, M. A. F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties. PMID:27173442

  15. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  16. Surface damage of W exposed to combined stationary D plasma and ELMs-like pulsed plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.

    2017-04-01

    The surface damage of W under D plasma and ELMs-like transient heat loads was studied by combined stationary and pulsed D plasma. Low-flux transient heat loads will promote blister formation due to the gas expansion inside the blisters. On the contrary, high-flux transient heat loads will mitigate blistering due to the high surface temperature. Therefore, blistering on W surface first increased and then decreased with the increasing transient heat loads. The promotion effect of pulsed plasma on blistering is more obvious on [001] and [110] surfaces than on [111] surface, and the orientation dependence of blisters was mitigated by the transient heat loads. Surface modification induced by transient heat loads only formed on [001] and [110] surfaces, but did not form on [111] surface. The orientation dependence of surface modification was mainly due to the slipping system of dislocations.

  17. Displacement Cascade Damage Production in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Malerba, Lorenzo; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in microstructure and mechanical properties in structural materials are the result of a complex set of physical processes initiated by the collision between an energetic particle (neutron or ion) and an atom in the lattice. This primary damage event is called an atomic displacement cascade. The simplest description of a displacement cascade is to view it as a series of many billiard-ball-like elastic collisions among the atoms in the material. This chapter describes the formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the relevant variables such as cascade energy and irradiation temperature is discussed, and defect formation in different materials is compared.

  18. Role of tool marks inside spherical mitigation pit fabricated by micro-milling on repairing quality of damaged KH2PO4 crystal

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Jun; Cheng, Jian; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Liao, Wei; Wang, Hai-Jun; Wang, Jing-He; Xiao, Yong; Li, Ming-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Repairing initial slight damage site into stable structures by engineering techniques is the leading strategy to mitigate the damage growth on large-size components used in laser-driven fusion facilities. For KH2PO4 crystals, serving as frequency converter and optoelectronic switch-Pockels cell, micro-milling has been proven the most promising method to fabricate these stable structures. However, tool marks inside repairing pit would be unavoidably introduced due to the wearing of milling cutter in actual repairing process. Here we quantitatively investigate the effect of tool marks on repairing quality of damaged crystal components by simulating its induced light intensification and testing the laser-induced damage threshold. We found that due to the formation of focusing hot spots and interference ripples, the light intensity is strongly enhanced with the presence of tool marks, especially for those on rear surfaces. Besides, the negative effect of tool marks is mark density dependent and multiple tool marks would aggravate the light intensification. Laser damage tests verified the role of tool marks as weak points, reducing the repairing quality. This work offers new criterion to comprehensively evaluate the quality of repaired optical surfaces to alleviate the bottleneck issue of low laser damage threshold for optical components in laser-driven fusion facilities. PMID:26399624

  19. Role of tool marks inside spherical mitigation pit fabricated by micro-milling on repairing quality of damaged KH2PO4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Jun; Cheng, Jian; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Liao, Wei; Wang, Hai-Jun; Wang, Jing-He; Xiao, Yong; Li, Ming-Quan

    2015-09-01

    Repairing initial slight damage site into stable structures by engineering techniques is the leading strategy to mitigate the damage growth on large-size components used in laser-driven fusion facilities. For KH2PO4 crystals, serving as frequency converter and optoelectronic switch-Pockels cell, micro-milling has been proven the most promising method to fabricate these stable structures. However, tool marks inside repairing pit would be unavoidably introduced due to the wearing of milling cutter in actual repairing process. Here we quantitatively investigate the effect of tool marks on repairing quality of damaged crystal components by simulating its induced light intensification and testing the laser-induced damage threshold. We found that due to the formation of focusing hot spots and interference ripples, the light intensity is strongly enhanced with the presence of tool marks, especially for those on rear surfaces. Besides, the negative effect of tool marks is mark density dependent and multiple tool marks would aggravate the light intensification. Laser damage tests verified the role of tool marks as weak points, reducing the repairing quality. This work offers new criterion to comprehensively evaluate the quality of repaired optical surfaces to alleviate the bottleneck issue of low laser damage threshold for optical components in laser-driven fusion facilities.

  20. Role of tool marks inside spherical mitigation pit fabricated by micro-milling on repairing quality of damaged KH2PO4 crystal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Jun; Cheng, Jian; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Liao, Wei; Wang, Hai-Jun; Wang, Jing-He; Xiao, Yong; Li, Ming-Quan

    2015-09-24

    Repairing initial slight damage site into stable structures by engineering techniques is the leading strategy to mitigate the damage growth on large-size components used in laser-driven fusion facilities. For KH2PO4 crystals, serving as frequency converter and optoelectronic switch-Pockels cell, micro-milling has been proven the most promising method to fabricate these stable structures. However, tool marks inside repairing pit would be unavoidably introduced due to the wearing of milling cutter in actual repairing process. Here we quantitatively investigate the effect of tool marks on repairing quality of damaged crystal components by simulating its induced light intensification and testing the laser-induced damage threshold. We found that due to the formation of focusing hot spots and interference ripples, the light intensity is strongly enhanced with the presence of tool marks, especially for those on rear surfaces. Besides, the negative effect of tool marks is mark density dependent and multiple tool marks would aggravate the light intensification. Laser damage tests verified the role of tool marks as weak points, reducing the repairing quality. This work offers new criterion to comprehensively evaluate the quality of repaired optical surfaces to alleviate the bottleneck issue of low laser damage threshold for optical components in laser-driven fusion facilities.

  1. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Selles, Jose L. Martin-Bragado, Ignacio; Claverie, Alain; Benistant, Francis

    2015-02-07

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3} which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions.

  2. Drivers of flood damage on event level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreibich, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk is dynamic and influenced by many processes related to hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Flood damage increased significantly over the past decades, however, resulting overall economic loss per event is an aggregated indicator and it is difficult to attribute causes to this increasing trend. Much has been learned about damaging processes during floods at the micro-scale, e.g. building level. However, little is known about the main factors determining the amount of flood damage on event level. Thus, we analyse and compare paired flood events, i.e. consecutive, similar damaging floods that occurred in the same area. In analogy to 'Paired catchment studies' - a well-established method in hydrology to understand how changes in land use affect streamflow - we will investigate how and why resulting flood damage in a region differed between the first and second consecutive flood events. One example are the 2002 and 2013 floods in the Elbe and Danube catchments in Germany. The 2002 flood caused the highest economic damage (EUR 11600 million) due to a natural hazard event in Germany. Damage was so high due to extreme flood hazard triggered by extreme precipitation and a high number of resulting dyke breaches. Additionally, exposure hotspots like the city of Dresden at the Elbe river as well as some smaller municipalities at the river Mulde (e.g. Grimma, Eilenburg, Bitterfeld, Dessau) were severely impacted. However, affected parties and authorities learned from the extreme flood in 2002, and many governmental flood risk programs and initiatives were launched. Considerable improvements since 2002 occurred on many levels that deal with flood risk reduction and disaster response, in particular in 1) increased flood prevention by improved spatial planning, 2) an increased number of property-level mitigation measures, 3) more effective early warning and improved coordination of disaster response and 4) a more targeted maintenance of flood defence systems and their

  3. 49 CFR 178.345-8 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident damage protection. 178.345-8 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-8 Accident damage protection. (a... of lading due to an accident. (1) Any dome, sump, or washout cover plate projecting from the...

  4. 49 CFR 178.345-8 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident damage protection. 178.345-8 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-8 Accident damage protection. (a... of lading due to an accident. (1) Any dome, sump, or washout cover plate projecting from the...

  5. Modeling laser damage to the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Clifton D.

    significantly for wavelengths in the near infrared due to an increase in the absorption coefficient for these long wavelengths. This means that less energy actually reaches the retina, but it also means that more energy is absorbed by the vitreous which can lead to significant temperature rises. The refractive index of water is known to depend on temperature, and the vitreous has very similar optical properties to water, so temperature gradients in the vitreous lead to refractive index gradients that act as a lens. Since the refractive index of water decreases with an increase in temperature, the overall effect is to establish a negative lens that defocuses a beam inside the eye during a laser exposure. This effect is a potential protection mechanism for the retina, as it would limit the time for which a laser can be sharply focused on the retina. Our model agrees well with thermal lensing measurements that have been conducted in water and we have used it to predict the retinal damage threshold as a function of exposure duration for 1318 nm exposures at various beam diameters. The model predicts that the damage threshold remains constant after some exposure time, which depends on the beam diameter. This is due mainly to the fact the retinal temperature rise is limited by the thermal lens and reaches a peak value in a relatively short time (on the order of 10 ms), which limits the amount of time that a laser exposure can cause damage. Finally, in Chapter 6 we describe the first steps we have taken in building a comprehensive short pulse retina damage model. Currently, no model capable of predicting retinal damage outcome based on the exposure parameters at the cornea exists. Models of possible damage mechanisms do exist (the damage mechanism for pulses less than about 1 mus are non-thermal), but these models assume that the exposure parameters are known at the absorption site (the retina). We have constructed a configurable, linear short pulse propagation model, that is capable

  6. Infrared scanning of damage in leather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Minh Phong; Parganin, Dominique

    1997-04-01

    The paper aims to illustrate the relevant use of infrared thermography as a nondestructive, noncontact and real time technique (a) to observe the progressive damage processes and mechanisms of leather failure, and (b) to detect the occurrence of intrinsic dissipation localization. The parameter, investigated in this paper, is the heat generation due to intrinsic dissipation caused by anelasticity and/or inelasticity of leather. Thanks to the thermomechanical coupling, this useful technique offers the possibility of scanning processes of leather mechanical degradation before reaching the ultimate strength. It allows a measure of the limit of a progressive damaging process under load beyond which leather is destroyed.

  7. Anti- and pro-oxidant effects of (+)-catechin on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Puqing; Yang, Qin; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme proteins as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Flavonoids have been widely used to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo and in vitro, where the mechanism of this therapeutic action was usually dependent on their anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the influence of (+)-catechin, a polyphenol identified in tea, cocoa, and red wine, on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage. It was found that (+)-catechin had the capacities to act as a free radical scavenger and reducing agent to remove cytotoxic ferryl hemoglobin, demonstrating apparent anti-oxidant activities. However, the presence of (+)-catechin surprisingly promoted hemoglobin-induced protein oxidation, which was probably due to the ability of this anti-oxidant to rapidly trigger the oxidative degradation of normal hemoglobin. In addition, hemoglobin-H2O2-induced protein carbonyl formation was significantly enhanced by (+)-catechin at lower concentrations, while it was efficiently inhibited when higher concentrations were used. These novel results showed that the dietary intake and therapeutic use of catechins might possess pro-oxidant activity through aggravating hemoglobin-related oxidative damage. The dual effects on hemoglobin redox reactions may provide new insights into the physiological implications of tea extract and wine (catechins) with cellular heme proteins.

  8. Protective capacities of certain spices against peroxynitrite-mediated biomolecular damage.

    PubMed

    Ho, Su-Chen; Tsai, Tzung-Hsun; Tsai, Po-Jung; Lin, Chih-Cheng

    2008-03-01

    Peroxynitrite, a potent cytotoxic agent, can damage a variety of biomolecules such as proteins, lipids, and DNA, and is considered as one of the major pathological causes of several diseases. Therefore, it would appear likely that interception of peroxynitrite by certain dietary compounds may represent one mechanism by which such foods may exert their beneficial action in vivo. A number of researchers have speculated that certain spices, rich in phenolics, may, conceivably, act as potential protectors against the actions of peroxynitrite. Eight culinary spices including cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, nutmeg, paprika, rosemary and turmeric were selected for study purposes. Further, the protective effects of methanol extracts of such spices against peroxynitrite-mediated damage to proteins, lipids and DNA were evaluated as determined by these extracts' ability to attenuate the formation of, respectively, nitrotyrosine in albumin, thiobarbiturate acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in liposome and strand breakages for plasmid DNA. All of the tested spices exerted some level of protective ability against peroxynitrite-mediated biomolecular damage. Amongst them, cloves deserve special attention due to their outstanding protective abilities against two of three forms of peroxynitrite-mediated biomolecular damage. Additionally, the phenolic content of certain spices appears to correlate well with such spices' protective effect against peroxynitrite-mediated tyrosine nitration and lipid peroxidation. Such an observation indicates that phenolics present in the spices contributed to such spice-elicited protection against peroxynitrite toxicity.

  9. Understanding and preventing mitochondrial oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative damage has long been known to contribute to damage in conditions such as ischaemia–reperfusion (IR) injury in heart attack. Over the past years, we have developed a series of mitochondria-targeted compounds designed to ameliorate or determine how this damage occurs. I will outline some of this work, from MitoQ to the mitochondria-targeted S-nitrosating agent, called MitoSNO, that we showed was effective in preventing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in IR injury with therapeutic implications. In addition, the protection by this compound suggested that ROS production in IR injury was mainly coming from complex I. This led us to investigate the mechanism of the ROS production and using a metabolomic approach, we found that the ROS production in IR injury came from the accumulation of succinate during ischaemia that then drove mitochondrial ROS production by reverse electron transport at complex I during reperfusion. This surprising mechanism led us to develop further new therapeutic approaches to have an impact on the damage that mitochondrial ROS do in pathology and also to explore how mitochondrial ROS can act as redox signals. I will discuss how these approaches have led to a better understanding of mitochondrial oxidative damage in pathology and also to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27911703

  10. Courtside: A Damaging Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2004-01-01

    This case presents a costly lesson for teachers and for districts that include a liquidated, or stipulated, damages clause in their teacher employment contracts. Although the court enforced the clause in this case, in this well-reasoned recent decision and in most of the much older, canvassed case law from other jurisdictions, the answer to the…

  11. Loss and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Saleemul; Roberts, Erin; Fenton, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    Loss and damage is a relative newcomer to the climate change agenda. It has the potential to reinvigorate existing mitigation and adaptation efforts, but this will ultimately require leadership from developed countries and enhanced understanding of several key issues, such as limits to adaptation.

  12. Coping with brain damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, W.

    1974-01-01

    Two neurological disorders, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain damage as from an accident, are considered. The discussion covers the incidence of disabilities, their characteristics, and what is now being done to deal with them, particularly in reference to areas in which the capabilities of the engineer can be effectively applied.

  13. Modifying Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanghee; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation leaves a fairly characteristic footprint in biological materials, but this is rapidly all but obliterated by the canonical biological responses to the radiation damage. The innate immune recognition systems that sense “danger” through direct radiation damage and through associated collateral damage set in motion a chain of events that, in a tissue compromised by radiation, often unwittingly result in oscillating waves of molecular and cellular responses as tissues attempt to heal. Understanding “nature’s whispers” that inform on these processes will lead to novel forms of intervention targeted more precisely towards modifying them in an appropriate and timely fashion so as to improve the healing process and prevent or mitigate the development of acute and late effects of normal tissue radiation damage, whether it be accidental, as a result of a terrorist incident, or of therapeutic treatment of cancer. Here we attempt to discuss some of the non-free radical scavenging mechanisms that modify radiation responses and comment on where we see them within a conceptual framework of an evolving radiation-induced lesion. PMID:20583981

  14. Modulatory effects of Moringa oleifera extracts against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, S; Padma, P R

    2011-09-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the induction of oxidative stress may be involved in oxidative DNA damage. The present study examined and assessed the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-mediated DNA damage in human tumor KB cells and also assessed the ability of Moringa oleifera leaf extracts to inhibit the oxidative damage. H(2)O(2) imposed a stress on the membrane lipids which was quantified by the extent of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formed. The leaf extracts caused a very significant inhibition of the extent of LPO formation and enhanced the activity of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in KB cells. The comet assay was employed to study the DNA damage and its inhibition by the leaf extracts. H(2)O(2) caused a significant increase in the number of cells bearing comets, resulting in significant DNA damage. The leaf extracts significantly reduced the incidence of comets in the oxidant stressed cells. The extent of cytotoxicity of H(2)O(2) in the presence and the absence of leaf extracts studied in KB tumor cells by the MTT assay showed that H(2)O(2) caused a marked decrease in the viability of KB cells where as the leaf extracts effectively increased the viability of assaulted KB cells. The observed cytoprotective activity is probably due to the antioxidant properties of its constituents, mainly phenolics. Total phenolics showed higher correlation with antioxidant activity. The leaf extracts showed higher antioxidant activity than the reference compound. These results suggest that the inhibition by the leaf extracts on oxidative DNA damage could be attributed to their free radical scavenging activities and the effect evidenced in KB cells can be in part correlated to a modulation of redox-sensitive mechanisms.

  15. A coupled effect of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion irradiation damage in lithium niobate

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Xue, Haizhou; ...

    2016-01-09

    Understanding irradiation effects induced by elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei and inelastic energy loss to electrons in a crystal, as well as the coupled effect between them, is a scientific challenge. Damage evolution in LiNbO3 irradiated by 0.9 and 21 MeV Si ions at 300 K has been studied utilizing Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling mode. During the low-energy ion irradiation process, damage accumulation produced due to elastic collisions is described utilizing a disorder accumulation model. Moreover, low electronic energy loss is shown to induce observable damage that increases with ion fluence. For the same electronic energy loss, themore » velocity of the incident ion could affect the energy and spatial distribution of excited electrons, and therefore effectively modify the diameter of the ion track. Furthermore, nonlinear additive phenomenon of irradiation damage induced by high electronic energy loss in pre-damaged LiNbO3 has been observed. The result indicates that pre-existing damage induced from nuclear energy loss interacts synergistically with inelastic electronic energy loss to promote the formation of amorphous tracks and lead to rapid phase transformation, much more efficient than what is observed in pristine crystal solely induced by electronic energy loss. As a result, this synergistic effect is attributed to the fundamental mechanism that the defects produced by the elastic collisions result in a decrease in thermal conductivity, increase in the electron-phonon coupling, and further lead to higher intensity in thermal spike from intense electronic energy deposition along high-energy ion trajectory.« less

  16. A coupled effect of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion irradiation damage in lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Crespillo, Miguel L.; Wang, Xuelin; Weber, William J.

    2016-01-09

    Understanding irradiation effects induced by elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei and inelastic energy loss to electrons in a crystal, as well as the coupled effect between them, is a scientific challenge. Damage evolution in LiNbO3 irradiated by 0.9 and 21 MeV Si ions at 300 K has been studied utilizing Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling mode. During the low-energy ion irradiation process, damage accumulation produced due to elastic collisions is described utilizing a disorder accumulation model. Moreover, low electronic energy loss is shown to induce observable damage that increases with ion fluence. For the same electronic energy loss, the velocity of the incident ion could affect the energy and spatial distribution of excited electrons, and therefore effectively modify the diameter of the ion track. Furthermore, nonlinear additive phenomenon of irradiation damage induced by high electronic energy loss in pre-damaged LiNbO3 has been observed. The result indicates that pre-existing damage induced from nuclear energy loss interacts synergistically with inelastic electronic energy loss to promote the formation of amorphous tracks and lead to rapid phase transformation, much more efficient than what is observed in pristine crystal solely induced by electronic energy loss. As a result, this synergistic effect is attributed to the fundamental mechanism that the defects produced by the elastic collisions result in a decrease in thermal conductivity, increase in the electron-phonon coupling, and further lead to higher intensity in thermal spike from intense electronic energy deposition along high-energy ion trajectory.

  17. 48 CFR 422.302 - Liquidated damages and overtime pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Contract Work Hours and Safety... authorized to review determinations of liquidated damages due under section 104(c) of the Contract Work...

  18. Adaptive lesion formation using dual mode ultrasound array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Casper, Andrew; Haritonova, Alyona; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results from an ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound platform designed to perform real-time monitoring and control of lesion formation. Real-time signal processing of echogenicity changes during lesion formation allows for identification of signature events indicative of tissue damage. The detection of these events triggers the cessation or the reduction of the exposure (intensity and/or time) to prevent overexposure. A dual mode ultrasound array (DMUA) is used for forming single- and multiple-focus patterns in a variety of tissues. The DMUA approach allows for inherent registration between the therapeutic and imaging coordinate systems providing instantaneous, spatially-accurate feedback on lesion formation dynamics. The beamformed RF data has been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity to tissue changes during lesion formation, including in vivo. In particular, the beamformed echo data from the DMUA is very sensitive to cavitation activity in response to HIFU in a variety of modes, e.g. boiling cavitation. This form of feedback is characterized by sudden increase in echogenicity that could occur within milliseconds of the application of HIFU (see http://youtu.be/No2wh-ceTLs for an example). The real-time beamforming and signal processing allowing the adaptive control of lesion formation is enabled by a high performance GPU platform (response time within 10 msec). We present results from a series of experiments in bovine cardiac tissue demonstrating the robustness and increased speed of volumetric lesion formation for a range of clinically-relevant exposures. Gross histology demonstrate clearly that adaptive lesion formation results in tissue damage consistent with the size of the focal spot and the raster scan in 3 dimensions. In contrast, uncontrolled volumetric lesions exhibit significant pre-focal buildup due to excessive exposure from multiple full-exposure HIFU shots. Stopping or reducing the HIFU exposure upon the detection of such an

  19. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by

  20. Microcavitation as a Neuronal Damage Mechanism in Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Christian; Estrada, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a leading cause of injury in the armed forces. Diffuse axonal injury, the hallmark feature of blunt TBI, has been investigated in direct mechanical loading conditions. However, recent evidence suggests inertial cavitation as a possible bTBI mechanism, particularly in the case of exposure to blasts. Cavitation damage to free surfaces has been well-studied, but bubble interactions within confined 3D environments, in particular their stress and strain signatures are not well understood. The structural damage due to cavitation in living tissues - particularly at the cellular level - are incompletely understood, in part due to the rapid bubble formation and deformation strain rates of up to ~ 105-106 s-1. This project aims to characterize material damage in 2D and 3D cell culture environments by utilizing a novel high-speed red-blue diffraction assisted image correlation method at speeds of up to 106 frames per second. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Office of Naval Research (POC: Dr. Tim Bentley).

  1. PWR fuel features to preclude externally induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shallenberger, J.M.; Wilson, J.F.; Knott, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past several years there have been instances of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel damage attributed to factors external to the fuel. These externally induced causes include debris in the reactor coolant and baffle jetting. These causes of PWR fuel damage account for --50% of the total number of damaged rods. This paper discusses two features that significantly reduce the potential for fuel damage due to debris and baffle jetting. These two features are the debris filter bottom nozzle (DFBN) and the antivibration clip.

  2. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  3. Micro-mechanical modeling of perforating shock damage

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, R.P.; Krogh, K.E.; Behrmann, L.A.; Halleck, P.M.

    1997-11-17

    Shaped charge jet induced formation damage from perforation treatments hinders productivity. Manifestation of this damage is in the form of grain fragmentation resulting in fines that plug up pore throats along with the breakdown of inter-grain cementation. The authors use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method as a way to explicitly model, on a grain pore scale, the dynamic interactions of grains and grain/pores to calculate the damage resulting from perforation type stress wave loading. The SPH method is a continuum Lagrangian, meshless approach that features particles. Clusters of particles are used for each grain to provide representation of a grain pore structure that is similar to x-ray synchrotron microtomography images. Numerous damage models are available to portray fracture and fragmentation. In this paper the authors present the results of well defined impact loading on a grain pore structure that illustrate how the heterogeneity affects stress wave behavior and damage evolution. The SPH approach easily accommodates the coupling of multi-materials. Calculations for multi-material conditions with the pore space treated as a void, fluid filled, and/or clay filled show diverse effects on the stress wave propagation behavior and damage. SPH comparisons made with observed damage from recovered impacted sandstone samples in gas gun experiments show qualitatively the influence of stress intensity. The modeling approach presented here offers a unique way in concert with experiments to define a better understanding of formation damage resulting from perforation completion treatments.

  4. A study of pump cavitation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-11-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  5. The expected radiation damage of CSNS target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Yu, Q. Z.; Lu, Y. L.; Wang, S. L.; Tong, J. F.; Liang, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The radiation damage to the tungsten target and its SS316 vessel for Chinese Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) has been estimated with a Monte-Carlo simulation code MCNPX2.5.0. We compare the effects on the radiation damage due to two different proton beam profiles: a uniform distribution and a Gaussian distribution. We also discuss the dependence of the radiation damage estimation on different physics models. The results show the peak displacement productions in vessel and the fourth target plate are 2.5 and 5.5 dpa/y, respectively, under a Gaussian proton beam. The peak helium productions in the vessel and the fourth target are 305 and 353 appm/y, respectively, under the same proton beam. Based on these results and the allowable dpa values we have estimated the lifetime of the tungsten target and its vessel.

  6. Damage detection using scanning laser vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shen-En; Venkatappa, Suhas; Petro, Samer H.; Gangarao, Hota V.

    1998-06-01

    A damage detection algorithm based on the principle of curvature changes has been developed at CFC-WVU. However, the algorithm requires accurate mode shapes with adequate spatial density. Existing contact sensors can not provide adequate spatial density without adding excessive mass. Hence, non-contact scanning techniques, such as scanning laser vibrometer (SLV) has adequate sensitivity and accuracy is yet to be proven. The applicability of SLV on large structures is also questionable. To assess the suitability of using SLV for damage detection, a beam specimen has been tested using an existing system. The results confirm that damage detection using vibration measurements from SLV is successful. Due to more spatial density, the SLV data is shown to be more sensitive than the contact sensor test.

  7. Quantitative study of fretting fatigue damage in shot peened titanium-aluminum-vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Sonia A.

    understanding of the mechanisms leading to the residual stress relaxation samples with varying number of fretting fatigue cycles were prepared and the microstructure of the damaged region was examined using SEM and White Light Intereference Microscopy (WLIM). The SEM images show formation of platelet like structures due to delamination at early stages. On further continuation of fretting the delaminated regions act as stress concentrators and generate micro-cracks. As the fretting fatigue damage is increased the micro-cracks appear to coalesce together to create a large crack to drive the sample to failure.

  8. A Joint Numerical-Experimental Study on Impact Induced Intra-laminar and Inter-laminar Damage in Laminated Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, A.; Caputo, F.; Di Felice, G.; Saputo, S.; Toscano, C.; Lopresto, V.

    2016-06-01

    The investigation of the mechanical response of fibre-reinforced composite laminates under impact loads can be very difficult due to the occurrence of simultaneous failure phenomena. Indeed, as a consequence of low velocity impacts, intra-laminar damages, like fibre and matrix cracking, and inter-laminar damages, such as delaminations, can take place simultaneously. These damage mechanisms can lead to significant reductions in strength and stability of the composite structure. In this paper a joint numerical-experimental study is proposed which, by means of non-destructive testing techniques (Ultra-sound and thermography) and non-linear explicit FEM analyses, aims to completely characterise the impact induced damage in composite laminates under low velocity impacts. Indeed the proposed numerical tool has been used to improve the understanding of the experimental data obtained by Non-Destructive Techniques. Applications on samples tested according to the AECMA (European Association of Aerospace Manufacturers) prEn6038 standard at three different impact energies are presented. The interaction between numerical and experimental investigation allowed to obtain an exhaustive insight on the different phases of the impact event considering the inter-laminar damage formation and evolution.

  9. An investigation of rolling-sliding contact fatigue damage of carburized gear steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Patrick C.

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the differences in RSCF performance between vacuum and gas carburized steels as well as to investigate the evolution of damage (wear and microstructure changes) leading to pitting. Vacuum and gas carburizing was performed on two gear steels (4120 and 4320) at 1010°C. The carburized specimens were tested in the as-carburized condition using a RSCF machine designed and built at the Colorado School of Mines. The tests were conducted at 3.2 GPa nominal Hertzian contact stress, based on pure rolling, 100°C, and using a negative twenty percent slide ratio. Tests were conducted to pitting failure for each condition for a comparison of the average fatigue lives. Pure rolling tests were also conducted, and were suspended at the same number of cycles as the average RSCF life for a comparison of fatigue damage developed by RCF and RSCF. Incremental tests were suspended at 1,000, 10,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles for the vacuum carburized steels to evaluate the wear and damage developed during the initial cycles of RSCF testing and to relate the wear and damage to pitting resistance. Incremental damage was not investigated for gas carburizing due to the limited number of available specimens. The vacuum carburized samples showed a decreased pitting fatigue resistance over the gas carburized samples, possibly due to the presence of bainite in the vacuum carburized cases. Pitting was observed to initiate from surface micropitting and microcracking. A microstructural change induced by contact fatigue, butterflies, was shown to contribute to micropitting and microcracking. Incremental testing revealed that the formation of a microcrack preceded and was necessary for the formation of the butterfly features, and that the butterfly features developed between 10,000 and 100,000 cycles. The orientation and depth of butterfly formation was shown to be dependent upon the application of traction stresses from sliding. RSCF butterflies formed

  10. Image correlation nondestructive evaluation of impact damage in a glass fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.

    1990-01-01

    Presented in viewgraph format, digital image correlation, damage in fibrous composites, and damaged coupons (cross-ply scotchply GI-Ep laminate) are outlined. It was concluded that the image correlation accuracy was 0.03 percent; strains can be processed through Tsai-Hill failure criteria to qualify the damage; the statistical data base must be generated to evaluate certainty of the damage estimate; size effects need consideration; and better numerical techniques are needed.

  11. Tornado damage risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, T.A.; Ellingwood, B.

    1982-09-01

    Several proposed models were evaluated for predicting tornado wind speed probabilities at nuclear plant sites as part of a program to develop statistical data on tornadoes needed for probability-based load combination analysis. A unified model was developed which synthesized the desired aspects of tornado occurrence and damage potential. The sensitivity of wind speed probability estimates to various tornado modeling assumptions are examined, and the probability distributions of tornado wind speed that are needed for load combination studies are presented.

  12. Earthquake damage to schools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    These unusual slides show earthquake damage to school and university buildings around the world. They graphically illustrate the potential danger to our schools, and to the welfare of our children, that results from major earthquakes. The slides range from Algeria, where a collapsed school roof is held up only by students' desks; to Anchorage, Alaska, where an elementary school structure has split in half; to California and other areas, where school buildings have sustained damage to walls, roofs, and chimneys. Interestingly, all the United States earthquakes depicted in this set of slides occurred either on a holiday or before or after school hours, except the 1935 tremor in Helena, Montana, which occurred at 11:35 am. It undoubtedly would have caused casualties had the schools not been closed days earlier by Helena city officials because of a damaging foreshock. Students in Algeria, the People's Republic of China, Armenia, and other stricken countries were not so fortunate. This set of slides represents 17 destructive earthquakes that occurred in 9 countries, and covers more than a century--from 1886 to 1988. Two of the tremors, both of which occurred in the United States, were magnitude 8+ on the Richter Scale, and four were magnitude 7-7.9. The events represented by the slides (see table below) claimed more than a quarter of a million lives.

  13. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F.

    1993-06-01

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

  14. Some Examples of the Relations Between Processing and Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2012-01-01

    Most structures made of laminated polymer matrix composites (PMCs) must be designed to some damage tolerance requirement that includes foreign object impact damage. Thus from the beginning of a part s life, impact damage is assumed to exist in the material and the part is designed to carry the required load with the prescribed impact damage present. By doing this, some processing defects may automatically be accounted for in the reduced design allowable due to these impacts. This paper will present examples of how a given level of impact damage and certain processing defects affect the compression strength of a laminate that contains both. Knowledge of the impact damage tolerance requirements, before processing begins, can broaden material options and processing techniques since the structure is not being designed to pristine properties.

  15. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts: Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    This handbook reviews the analysis of structural damage on spacecraft due to hypervelocity impacts by meteoroid and space debris. These impacts can potentially cause structural damage to a Space Station module wall. This damage ranges from craters, bulges, minor penetrations, and spall to critical damage associated with a large hole, or even rupture. The analysis of damage depends on a variety of assumptions and the area of most concern is at a velocity beyond well controlled laboratory capability. In the analysis of critical damage, one of the key questions is how much momentum can actually be transfered to the pressure vessel wall. When penetration occurs without maximum bulging at high velocity and obliquities (if less momentum is deposited in the rear wall), then large tears and rupture may be avoided. In analysis of rupture effects of cylindrical geometry, biaxial loading, bending of the crack, a central hole strain rate and R-curve effects are discussed.

  16. DAMCAL; Damage Reach Stage-Damage Calculation: Users Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    M AD-A273 611 US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center GENERALIZED COMPUTER PROGRAM DTIC "k ELECTE DEC 13 1993 DAMCAL A Damage Reach...Stage- Damage Calculation User’s Manual February 1979 93-30134 ApprOved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. CPD-35 93 12 100 3 8 DAMCAL Damage ...Reach Stage- Damage Calculation Accesion For User’s Manual TIS ’C&I DTIC TA.3 Juhfificatoc.n By ............. .......................... February 1979

  17. Nonlinear damage analysis: Postulate and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is to assess the viability of a damage postulate which asserts that the fatigue resistance curve of a metal is history dependent due to inelastic action. The study focusses on OFE copper because this simple model material accentuates the inelastic action central to the damage postulate. Data relevant to damage evolution and crack initiation are developed via a study of surface topography. The effects of surface layer residual stresses are explored via comparative testing as were the effects in initial prestraining. The results of the study very clearly show the deformation history dependence of the fatigue resistance of OFE copper. Furthermore the concept of deformation history dependence is shown to qualitatively explain the fatigue resistance of all histories considered. Likewise quantitative predictions for block cycle histories are found to accurately track the observed results. In this respect the assertion that damage per cycle for a given level of the damage parameter is deformation history dependent appears to be physically justified.

  18. Cavitation damage prediction for the JSNS mercury target vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Wakui, Takashi; Haga, Katsuhiro; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Takada, Hiroshi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    The liquid mercury target system for the Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS) at the Materials and Life science experimental Facility (MLF) in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is designed to produce pulsed neutrons. The mercury target vessel in this system, which is made of type 316L stainless steel, is damaged by pressure wave-induced cavitation due to proton beam bombardment. Currently, cavitation damage is considered to be the dominant factor influencing the service life of the target vessel rather than radiation damage. In this study, cavitation damage to the interior surface of the target vessel was predicted on the basis of accumulated damage data from off-beam and on-beam experiments. The predicted damage was compared with the damage observed in a used target vessel. Furthermore, the effect of injecting gas microbubbles on cavitation damage was predicted through the measurement of the acoustic vibration of the target vessel. It was shown that the predicted depth of cavitation damage is reasonably coincident with the observed results. Moreover, it was confirmed that the injection of gas microbubbles had an effect on cavitation damage.

  19. Ductile damage parameters identification for cold metal forming applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Pierre-Olivier; Gachet, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emile

    2011-05-01

    Ductile damage mechanics is essential to predict failure during cold metal forming applications. Several damage models can be found in the literature. These damage models are coupled with the mechanical behavior so as to model the progressive softening of the material due to damage growth. However, the identification of damage parameters remains an issue. In this paper, an inverse analysis approach is set-up to identify ductile damage parameters, based on different kind of mechanical tests and observables. The Lemaitre damage model is used and damage is coupled with the material behavior. The Efficient Global Optimization (EGO) method is used in a parallel environment. This global algorithm based on kriging meta-model enables the identification of a set of damage parameters based on experimental observables. Global and local observables are used to identify these parameters and a special attention is paid to the computation of the cost function. Finally, an identification procedure based on displacement field measurements is presented and applied for damage parameters identification.

  20. [Dendrolimus spp. damage monitoring by using NOAA/AVHRR data].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yushu; Ban, Xianxiu; Chen, Pengshi; Feng, Rui; Ji, Ruipeng; Xiao, Yan

    2005-05-01

    This paper approached the feasibility of quantitatively monitoring Dendrolimus spp. damage by using NOAA/ AVHRR data. The damaged rate of needle leaf was used to represent Dendrolimus spp. harming degree, and < 30%, 30%-60% and > 60% of damaged rate was defined as low, medium and severe harming degree, respectively. The correlation equation of damaged rate and normalized vegetation index (NDVI) was established, based on the ground spectrum observation. The NDVI was 0.8823 when no damage occurred. A relative NDVI value of damaged to undamaged area was used to express the remote sensing index of low, medium and severe harming degree. The index was 1 for undamaged forest, and 0.78-1, 0.57-0.78 and < 0.57 for low, medium and severe harming degrees, respectively. The mixed pixels were separated by linear addable vertical vegetation index in the monitoring, and the quantitative monitoring and analysis was accomplished for years when the three damage degrees happened. It was shown that AVHRR data could be more available in quantitatively monitoring and analyzing serious damage, while low degree damage was difficult to distinguish by AVHRR data, due to the differences of surface properties and atmospheric influences, as well as the lower space resolution of NOAA/AVHRR. The damaged area estimated by AVHRR was 12.1%-14.3% lower than that by TM.

  1. Replication fork dynamics and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Petermann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Prevention and repair of DNA damage is essential for maintenance of genomic stability and cell survival. DNA replication during S-phase can be a source of DNA damage if endogenous or exogenous stresses impair the progression of replication forks. It has become increasingly clear that DNA-damage-response pathways do not only respond to the presence of damaged DNA, but also modulate DNA replication dynamics to prevent DNA damage formation during S-phase. Such observations may help explain the developmental defects or cancer predisposition caused by mutations in DNA-damage-response genes. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which DNA-damage-response pathways control and promote replication dynamics in vertebrate cells. In particular, DNA damage pathways contribute to proper replication by regulating replication initiation, stabilizing transiently stalled forks, promoting replication restart and facilitating fork movement on difficult-to-replicate templates. If replication fork progression fails to be rescued, this may lead to DNA damage and genomic instability via nuclease processing of aberrant fork structures or incomplete sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

  2. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, H.R.; Stephenson, D.E.; Zandt, G.; Bouchon, M.; Hustrulid, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    In order to assess the seismic risk for an underground facility, a data base was established and analyzed to evaluate the potential for seismic disturbance. Substantial damage to underground facilities is usually the result of displacements primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures, or at the surface entrance to these facilities. Evidence of this comes from both earthquakes and large explosions. Therefore, the displacement due to earthquakes as a function of depth is important in the evaluation of the hazard to underground facilities. To evaluate potential displacements due to seismic effects of block motions along pre-existing or induced fractures, the displacement fields surrounding two types of faults were investigated. Analytical models were used to determine relative displacements of shafts and near-surface displacement of large rock masses. Numerical methods were used to determine the displacement fields associated with pure strike-slip and vertical normal faults. Results are presented as displacements for various fault lengths as a function of depth and distance. This provides input to determine potential displacements in terms of depth and distance for underground facilities, important for assessing potential sites and design parameters.

  3. Formation of Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Under the support of NASA Origins grant, we studied the formation of gaps in protoplanetary disks due the tidal interaction between a fully grown protoplanet and protostellar disk. The result of this study is published in the Astrophysical Journal, (vol 514, 344-367, 1999) and in several conference proceedings. The main focus of this work is to analyze planet-disk interaction during the final stages of protoplanetary formation.

  4. Low Level Laser Retinal Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    18 Related Projects ........................ . . ....... 20 References . . . . .......................... 22 2 INTRODUCTION The objectives of...fluorescein is a potent phototoxic agent in the retina.26 The damage threshold for blue light retinal damage is lowered by a factor of ten after an... Related to the Probiem of Retinal Light Damage 1. Corneal Holography 2. Hematoporphyrin Studies 3. Fluorescein Fluorescence Measurements 7 EQUIPMENT

  5. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    DOE PAGES

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films withmore » (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.« less

  6. Analysis of Boling's laser-damage morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, M.S.

    1980-08-15

    Boling observed that his total-internal-reflection laser-damage sites in glass closely resembled the scattering cross section for small (ka << 1), perfectly conducting sphere and suggested that a very small plasma formed and grew to a larger size, still with ka << 1 satisfied. Even with ka = 1, for which the cross section is different from that observed, the scattered field still is too small to explain the damage in terms of constructive interference between the incident- and scattered fields. Furthermore, the characteristic shape of the scattering cross section that matches the damage patterns is for circular polarization or unpolarized light, in contrast to the experimental plane polarizations. Extending the ideas to include effects of the scattered field outside the glass, such as plasma formation, and to include the correct field (with interesting polarization, including longitudinal circuler polarization at certain distances from the surface) incident on the sphere may explain the experiments. Additional experiments and analysis would be useful to determine if the extended model is valid and to investigate related materials improvement, nondestructive testing, and the relation between laser damage, plasma initiation, and failure under stress, all initiated at small isolated spots.

  7. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films with (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.

  8. The Course of Due Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getty, Laura A.; Summy, Sarah E.

    2004-01-01

    Discussion of due process rights for children with disabilities considers common issues leading to due process requests, due process procedures, hearing officers, procedural violations, effects of due process meetings, and areas for improvement (i.e., accountability, paperwork). Tables list categories of procedural violations with examples and…

  9. Radiation Damage and Fission Product Release in Zirconium Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, Gerald W.

    2005-08-29

    Zirconium nitride is a material of interest to the AFCI program due to some of its particular properties, such as its high melting point, strength and thermal conductivity. It is to be used as an inert matrix or diluent with a nuclear fuel based on transuranics. As such, it must sustain not only high temperatures, but also continuous irradiation from fission and decay products. This study addresses the issues of irradiation damage and fission product retention in zirconium nitride through an assessment of defects that are produced, how they react, and how predictions can be made as to the overall lifespan of the complete nuclear fuel package. Ion irradiation experiments are a standard method for producing radiation damage to a surface for observation. Cryogenic irradiations are performed to produce the maximum accumulation of defects, while elevated temperature irradiations may be used to allow defects to migrate and react to form clusters and loops. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and grazing-incidence x-ray diffractometry were used in evaluating the effects that irradiation has on the crystal structure and microstructure of the material. Other techniques were employed to evaluate physical effects, such as nanoindentation and helium release measurements. Results of the irradiations showed that, at cryogenic temperatures, ZrN withstood over 200 displacements per atom without amorphization. No significant change to the lattice or microstructure was observed. At elevated temperatures, the large amount of damage showed mobility, but did not anneal significantly. Defect clustering was possibly observed, yet the size was too small to evaluate, and bubble formation was not observed. Defects, specifically nitrogen vacancies, affect the mechanical behavior of ZrN dramatically. Current and previous work on dislocations shows a distinct change in slip plane, which is evidence of the bonding characteristics. The stacking-fault energy changes dramatically with

  10. Tokamak ARC damage

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  11. Does orthodontics damage faces?

    PubMed

    DiBiase, A T; Sandler, P J

    2001-03-01

    With the increasing provision of orthodontic care in this country, certain practitioners have raised concerns regarding the use of elective extractions and retraction mechanics, especially the effects on the facial profile and the TMJ. The non-extraction versus extraction debate spans the history of orthodontics, and the concepts of facial attractiveness are subject to change as fashions change. Within the realms of evidence-based practice, there is little or no evidence to suggest that the philosophies and mechanics of contemporary orthodontics, in the vast majority of cases, cause damage to the profile or are directly linked to the development of TMJ dysfunction.

  12. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  13. Formulation and process strategies to minimize coat damage for compaction of coated pellets in a rotary tablet press: A mechanistic view.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2016-02-29

    Compaction of multiple-unit pellet system (MUPS) tablets has been extensively studied in the past few decades but with marginal success. This study aims to investigate the formulation and process strategies for minimizing pellet coat damage caused by compaction and elucidate the mechanism of damage sustained during the preparation of MUPS tablets in a rotary tablet press. Blends containing ethylcellulose-coated pellets and cushioning agent (spray dried aggregates of micronized lactose and mannitol), were compacted into MUPS tablets in a rotary tablet press. The effects of compaction pressure and dwell time on the physicomechanical properties of resultant MUPS tablets and extent of pellet coat damage were systematically examined. The coated pellets from various locations at the axial and radial peripheral surfaces and core of the MUPS tablets were excavated and assessed for their coat damage individually. Interestingly, for a MUPS tablet formulation which consolidates by plastic deformation, the tablet mechanical strength could be enhanced without exacerbating pellet coat damage by extending the dwell time in the compaction cycle during rotary tableting. However, the increase in compaction pressure led to faster drug release rate. The location of the coated pellets in the MUPS tablet also contributed to the extent of their coat damage, possibly due to uneven force distribution within the compact. To ensure viability of pellet coat integrity, the formation of a continuous percolating network of cushioning agent is critical and the applied compaction pressure should be less than the pellet crushing strength.

  14. An Approach for Nonlinear Fatigue Damage Evaluation in Asphalt Pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajbongshi, Pabitra; Thongram, Sonika

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue due to vehicular loads is one of the primary distress mechanisms in asphalt pavements. It happens primarily due to deterioration in asphalt material with load repetitions. Degradation of asphalt material may be evaluated using different parameters. In view of degradation, the incremental damage in a given pavement section would be different for different repetitions, even with same loadings. Therefore, the damage progression becomes nonlinear with repetitions. Accounting such nonlinearity in damage accumulation, and based on different damage evaluation parameters, this paper presents an equivalent approach for fatigue damage evaluation in asphalt pavements. Traditional fatigue equation adopted in mechanistic-empirical pavement design has been used in the present work. Four different criteria, namely number of load repetitions, asphalt stiffness reduction, strain enhancement and fatigue life reduction with repetitions are considered for damage estimation. The proposed approach could estimate same value of nonlinear damage, irrespective of the criteria used. The simplest form of criterion i.e. the number of load repetitions can be used for fatigue performance evaluation. Probabilistically, the damage propagation is also correlated and assessed with the failure probability.

  15. Optimization of control laws for damage detection in smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Laura R.; Marini, Solomon

    2000-06-01

    A prevalent method of damage detection is based on identifying changes in modal characteristics due to damage induced variations in stiffness or mass along a structure. It is known that modal frequencies can be insensitive to damage, and the open-loop sensitivity itself depends on modal properties and damage location. Here, we develop methods of designing control laws that enhance the sensitivity of modal characteristics to damage. Sensitivity enhancing control exploits the relationship between control gains and closed-loop dynamics in order to increase the observability of damage. The design methods are based on optimization of cost functions that involve the dependence of classic measures of sensitivity on design variables, which include placement of sensors and actuators and state feedback control gains. Due to the size of the design space and the unknown nature of the cost surface, genetic algorithms are used to find control laws that maximize sensitivity to specific damage types subject to control effort and stability constraints. Optimized control laws designed for sensitivity enhancement of stiffness damage in a cantilevered beam are demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  16. Fatigue damage evolution study with non-destructive magnetic properties measurement method using scanning SQUID microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu

    The fatigue process can be precisely defined in the crack propagation stage, where the fatigue damage can be evaluated by observed cracks and where an increase of the dislocation density occurs at the first 10% of the fatigue life. But for the stages between dislocation saturation and prior to nucleation, no definition can be given due to the relative difficulty in quantifying the damage. Especially, detecting a high-cycle fatigue damage is a particularly important yet an unsolved problem in non-destructive testing. There are no reliable techniques to measure the progress of fatigue in the intermediate fatigue regime, the second stage of fatigue, where the overall dislocation density is approximately constant and the microstructural changes are subtle include about 80% of the fatigue life in high-cycle fatigue. In this study, a non-destructive evaluation method is established by continuously measuring the magnetic properties, which interact with the developing fatigue damage during cyclic loading. Dislocations and microcracks which are initiated during the fatigue act as pinning sites which impede the motion of magnetic domain walls under the applied magnetic field, thereby influencing the bulk magnetic properties. The remanence field of various fatigued steel specimens are detected using a scanning microscope based on a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The results show the development of localized peaks in remanent magnetization prior to the formation of visible fatigue cracks. Even in the second stage of fatigue, where the macroscopic state of the sample is relatively constant, the results show that a scanning SQUID microscope is capable of detecting regions of fatigue damage both on surface and in sub-surface regions.

  17. Modelling the wind damage probability in forests in Southwestern Germany for the 1999 winter storm 'Lothar'.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Dirk; Grebhan, Karin; Albrecht, Axel; Schönborn, Jochen

    2009-11-01

    The wind damage probability (P (DAM)) in the forests in the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg (Southwestern Germany) was calculated using weights of evidence (WofE) methodology and a logistic regression model (LRM) after the winter storm 'Lothar' in December 1999. A geographic information system (GIS) was used for the area-wide spatial prediction and mapping of P (DAM). The combination of the six evidential themes forest type, soil type, geology, soil moisture, soil acidification, and the 'Lothar' maximum gust field predicted wind damage best and was used to map P (DAM) in a 50 x 50 m resolution grid. GIS software was utilised to produce probability maps, which allowed the identification of areas of low, moderate, and high P (DAM) across the study area. The highest P (DAM) values were calculated for coniferous forest growing on acidic, fresh to moist soils on bunter sandstone formations-provided that 'Lothar' maximum gust speed exceeded 35 m s(-1) in the areas in question. One of the most significant benefits associated with the results of this study is that, for the first time, there is a GIS-based area-wide quantification of P (DAM) in the forests in Southwestern Germany. In combination with the experience and expert knowledge of local foresters, the probability maps produced can be used as an important tool for decision support with respect to future silvicultural activities aimed at reducing wind damage. One limitation of the P (DAM)-predictions is that they are based on only one major storm event. At the moment it is not possible to relate storm event intensity to the amount of wind damage in forests due to the lack of comprehensive long-term tree and stand damage data across the study area.

  18. Evaluation of radiation damage using nonlinear ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, K. H.; Wall, J. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.; Viehrig, H.-W.

    2012-03-01

    Nonlinear ultrasound was used to monitor radiation damage in two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The microstructural changes associated with radiation damage include changes in dislocation density and the formation of precipitates, and nonlinear ultrasonic waves are known to be sensitive to such changes. Six samples each of two different RPV steels were previously irradiated in the Rheinsberg power reactor to two fluence levels, up to 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV). Longitudinal waves were used to measure the acoustic nonlinearity in these samples, and the results show a clear increase in the measured acoustic nonlinearity from the unirradiated state to the medium dose, and then a decrease from medium dose to high dose.

  19. Isoflavonoid Formation as an Indicator of UV Stress in Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Christopher J.; Stolzer-Jehle, Andrea; Wellmann, Eckard

    1985-01-01

    Induction of the isoflavonoid pigment, coumestrol (3,9-dihydroxy-6H-benzofuro-[3,2-c][1] benzopyran-6-one), in primary leaves of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Saxa) by ultraviolet (UV) radiation was used as a quantifiable marker for UV damage to a plant system. Coumestrol was induced only by wavelengths below 300 nanometers and its formation could be reversed by treatment with white, but not red light after the UV irradiation period. Formation of coumestrol by UV could also be prevented over a period of 14 hours by simultaneous irradiation with blue light provided that the blue fluence rate was high enough. The results suggest that coumestrol formation is mediated via UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plant DNA and the photorepair properties of blue light are discussed with respect to possible increases in solar UV due to stratospheric ozone depletion. PMID:16664463

  20. Isoflavonoid formation as an indicator of UV stress in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. ) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, C.J.; Stolzer-Jehle, A.; Wellmann, E.

    1985-11-01

    Induction of the isoflavonoid pigment, coumestrol (3,9-dihydroxy-6H-benzofuro-(3,2-c)(1) benzopyran-6-one), in primary leaves of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Saxa) by ultraviolet (UV) radiation was used as a quantifiable marker for UV damage to a plant system. Coumestrol was induced only by wavelengths below 300 nanometers and its formation could be reversed by treatment with white, but not red light after the UV irradiation period. Formation of coumestrol by UV could also be prevented over a period of 14 hours by simultaneous irradiation with blue light provided that the blue fluence rate was high enough. The results suggest that coumestrol formation is mediated via UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plant DNA and the photorepair properties of blue light are discussed with respect to possible increases in solar UV due to stratospheric ozone depletion.

  1. Damage Pre-Cursors Based Assessment of Accrued Thermo-Mechanical Damage and Remaining Useful Life in Field Deployed Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Pradeep; Harsha, Mahendra; Goebel, Kai; Jones, Jim

    Field deployed electronics may accrue damage due to environmental exposure and usage after finite period of service but may not often have any o-indicators of failure such as cracks or delamination. A method to interrogate the damage state of field deployed electronics in the pre-failure space may allow insight into the damage initiation, progression, and remaining useful life of the deployed system. Aging has been previously shown to effect the reliability and constitutive behavior of second-level leadfree interconnects. Prognostication of accrued damage and assessment of residual life can provide valuable insight into impending failure. In this paper, field deployed parts have been extracted and prognosticated for accrued damage and remaining useful life in an anticipated future deployment environment. A subset of the field deployed parts have been tested to failure in the anticipated field deployed environment to validate the assessment of remaining useful life. In addition, some parts have been subjected to additional known thermo-mechanical stresses and the incremental damage accrued validated with respect to the amount of additional damage imposed on the assemblies. The presented methodology uses leading indicators of failure based on micro-structural evolution of damage to identify accrued damage in electronic systems subjected to sequential stresses of thermal aging and thermal cycling. Damage equivalency methodologies have been developed to map damage accrued in thermal aging to the reduction in thermo-mechanical cyclic life based on damage proxies. The expected error with interrogation of system state and assessment of residual life has been quantified. Prognostic metrics including α-λmetric, sample standard deviation, mean square error, mean absolute percentage error, average bias, relative accuracy, and cumulative relative accuracy have been used to compare the performance of the damage proxies.

  2. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  3. Self inflicted corneal abrasions due to delusional parasitosis

    PubMed Central

    Meraj, Adeel; Din, Amad U; Larsen, Lynn; Liskow, Barry I

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of self inflicted bilateral corneal abrasions and skin damage due to ophthalmic and cutaneous delusional parasitosis. A male in his 50s presented with a 10 year history of believing that parasites were colonizing his skin and biting into his skin and eyes. The patient had received extensive medical evaluations that found no evidence that symptoms were due to a medical cause. He was persistent in his belief and had induced bilateral corneal abrasions and skin damage by using heat lamps and hair dryers in an attempt to disinfect his body. The patient was treated with olanzapine along with treatment for his skin and eyes. His delusional belief system persisted but no further damage to his eyes and skin was noted on initial follow-up. PMID:22689836

  4. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  5. Observed damage during Argon gas cluster depth profiles of compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Anders J. Portoles, Jose F.; Cumpson, Peter J.

    2014-08-07

    Argon Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) sources have become very popular in XPS and SIMS in recent years, due to the minimal chemical damage they introduce in the depth-profiling of polymer and other organic materials. These GCIB sources are therefore particularly useful for depth-profiling polymer and organic materials, but also (though more slowly) the surfaces of inorganic materials such as semiconductors, due to the lower roughness expected in cluster ion sputtering compared to that introduced by monatomic ions. We have examined experimentally a set of five compound semiconductors, cadmium telluride (CdTe), gallium arsenide (GaAs), gallium phosphide (GaP), indium arsenide (InAs), and zinc selenide (ZnSe) and a high-κ dielectric material, hafnium oxide (HfO), in their response to argon cluster profiling. An experimentally determined HfO etch rate of 0.025 nm/min (3.95 × 10{sup −2} amu/atom in ion) for 6 keV Ar gas clusters is used in the depth scale conversion for the profiles of the semiconductor materials. The assumption has been that, since the damage introduced into polymer materials is low, even though sputter yields are high, then there is little likelihood of damaging inorganic materials at all with cluster ions. This seems true in most cases; however, in this work, we report for the first time that this damage can in fact be very significant in the case of InAs, causing the formation of metallic indium that is readily visible even to the naked eye.

  6. Due Process Hearing Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, David F.

    2009-01-01

    Marnie is a resident of an unnamed School District ("the District"). In January 2000 at the age of 13, Marnie was involved in a bicycle accident that severely damaged her central nervous system, leaving her without use of her legs or left hand and cognitively impaired. She had not received special education previously. By September 2001,…

  7. A method of damage mechanics analysis for solder material

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Chow, C.L.; Yang, Fan

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents as a method of damage mechanics analysis for solder joint material stressed to extensive plastic deformation. The material chosen for the current work is the 60Sn-40Pb eutectic alloy due to its wide use. The analysis is based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes. With the introduction of a set of internal state variables, known as damage variables, and a damage effect tensor, a damage dissipative potential function is proposed to enable the formulation of the constitutive equations of elasticity and plasticity coupled wi