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Sample records for damage mechanics formulation

  1. Differential genotoxicity of Roundup(®) formulation and its constituents in blood cells of fish (Anguilla anguilla): considerations on chemical interactions and DNA damaging mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Santos, M A; Barroso, C; Gaivão, I; Pacheco, M

    2012-07-01

    It has been widely recognized that pesticides represent a potential threat in aquatic ecosystems. However, the knowledge on the genotoxicity of pesticides to fish is still limited. Moreover, genotoxic studies have been almost exclusively focused on the active ingredients, whereas the effect of adjuvants is frequently ignored. Hence, the present study addressed the herbicide Roundup®, evaluating the relative contribution of the active ingredient (glyphosate) and the surfactant (polyethoxylated amine; POEA) to the genotoxicity of the commercial formulation on Anguilla anguilla. Fish were exposed to equivalent concentrations of Roundup® (58, 116 μg L⁻¹), glyphosate (17.9, 35.7 μg L⁻¹) and POEA (9.3, 18.6 μg L⁻¹), during 1 and 3 days. The comet assay was applied to blood cells, either as the standard procedure, or with an extra step involving DNA lesion-specific repair enzymes in an attempt to clarify DNA damaging mechanisms. The results confirmed the genotoxicity of Roundup®, also demonstrating the genotoxic potential of glyphosate and POEA individually. Though both components contributed to the overall genotoxicity of the pesticide formulation, the sum of their individual effects was never observed, pointing out an antagonistic interaction. Although POEA is far from being considered biologically inert, it did not increase the risk associated to glyphosate when the two were combined. The analysis of oxidatively induced breaks suggested that oxidation of DNA bases was not a dominant mechanism of damage. The present findings highlighted the risk posed to fish populations by the assessed chemicals, jointly or individually, emphasizing the need to define regulatory thresholds for all the formulation components and recommending, in particular, the revision of the hazard classification of POEA.

  2. Operator Formulation of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jack

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the construction of an operator formulation of classical mechanics which is directly concerned with wave packets in configuration space and is more similar to that of convential quantum theory than other extant operator formulations of classical mechanics. (Author/HM)

  3. Operator Formulation of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jack

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the construction of an operator formulation of classical mechanics which is directly concerned with wave packets in configuration space and is more similar to that of convential quantum theory than other extant operator formulations of classical mechanics. (Author/HM)

  4. Mechanisms of freezing damage.

    PubMed

    Pegg, D E

    1987-01-01

    Freezing of aqueous systems involves numerous simultaneous changes but this review concentrates on direct effects of the formation of ice and the consequent concentration of solutes in the remaining liquid phase. It is generally believed that cell injury at low cooling rates is principally due to the concentration of both intracellular and extracellular electrolytes and that cryoprotectants act by reducing this build-up. New experimental data are presented to support this explanation; we find that the extent of damage to human red blood cells during freezing in solutions of sodium chloride/glycerol/water can be quantitatively accounted for by the increase in solute concentration. However, we also show that a given degree of damage occurs at lower concentrations of solute in the presence of higher concentrations of glycerol; it appears that glycerol contributes an element of damage itself. Recently published studies from Mazur's laboratory have suggested that the dominant damaging factor at low cooling rates is actually the reduction of the quantity of unfrozen water rather than the corresponding increase in salt concentration that accompanies freezing. These data are re-evaluated, and it is argued that the experimental results could equally well be explained by a susceptibility of cells to shrinkage and re-expansion as the concentration of external impermeant solutes first increases during freezing and then decreases during thawing. It is concluded that external ice probably has no directly damaging effect upon dilute suspensions of cells. However, it is also argued that ice is directly damaging whenever it forms intracellularly, and also when it forms extracellularly in densely packed cell suspensions. In the latter case the damage is probably due to recrystallization of the ice masses during thawing. Extracellular ice also has a directly damaging effect when tissues and organs are frozen. The difficulties of designing experimental methods that will yield

  5. Finite strain formulation of viscoelastic damage model for simulation of fabric reinforced polymers under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treutenaere, S.; Lauro, F.; Bennani, B.; Matsumoto, T.; Mottola, E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of fabric reinforced polymers in the automotive industry is growing significantly. The high specific stiffness and strength, the ease of shaping as well as the great impact performance of these materials widely encourage their diffusion. The present model increases the predictability of explicit finite element analysis and push the boundaries of the ongoing phenomenological model. Carbon fibre composites made up various preforms were tested by applying different mechanical load up to dynamic loading. This experimental campaign highlighted the physical mechanisms affecting the initial mechanical properties, namely intra- and interlaminar matrix damage, viscoelasticty and fibre failure. The intralaminar behaviour model is based on the explicit formulation of the matrix damage model developed by the ONERA as the given damage formulation correlates with the experimental observation. Coupling with a Maxwell-Wiechert model, the viscoelasticity is included without losing the direct explicit formulation. Additionally, the model is formulated under a total Lagrangian scheme in order to maintain consistency for finite strain. Thus, the material frame-indifference as well as anisotropy are ensured. This allows reorientation of fibres to be taken into account particularly for in-plane shear loading. Moreover, fall within the framework of the total Lagrangian scheme greatly makes the parameter identification easier, as based on the initial configuration. This intralaminar model thus relies upon a physical description of the behaviour of fabric composites and the numerical simulations show a good correlation with the experimental results.

  6. Hamiltonian formulations and symmetries in rod mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dichmann, D.J.; Li, Yiwei; Maddocks, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    This article provides a survey of contemporary rod mechanics, including both dynamic and static theories. Much of what we discuss is regarded as classic material within the mechanics community, but the objective here is to provide a self-contained account accessible to workers interested in modelling DNA. We also describe a number of recent results and computations involving rod mechanics that have been obtained by our group at the University of Maryland. This work was largely motivated by applications to modelling DNA, but our approach reflects a background of research in continuum mechanics. In particular, we emphasize the role that Hamiltonian formulations and symmetries play in the effective computation of special solutions, conservation laws of dynamics and integrals of statics. 41 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Entropic formulation of relativistic continuum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    An entropic formulation of relativistic continuum mechanics is developed in the Landau-Lifshitz frame. We introduce two spatial scales, one being the small scale representing the linear size of each material particle and the other the large scale representing the linear size of a large system which consists of material particles and is to linearly regress to the equilibrium. We propose a local functional which is expected to represent the total entropy of the larger system and require the entropy functional to be maximized in the process of linear regression. We show that Onsager's original idea on linear regression can then be realized explicitly as current conservations with dissipative currents in the desired form. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this formulation by showing that one can treat a wide class of relativistic continuum materials, including standard relativistic viscous fluids and relativistic viscoelastic materials.

  8. Immunoglobulin: production, mechanisms of action and formulations

    PubMed Central

    Novaretti, Marcia Cristina Zago; Dinardo, Carla Luana

    2011-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin (Ig) began to be applied in the clinical practice with the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies. Quickly, applications of Ig increased, as its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions were elucidated. Currently, Ig is the most commonly used blood product. Ig is obtained by processing plasma; methods, in particular, techniques to reduce plasma viral loads have been evolving over the years and include: pasteurization, solvent/ detergent treatment, caprylic acid treatment and nanofiltration. These methods contribute to increased safety and quality of blood products. The mechanisms of action of Ig not only involve the blockade of Fc receptors of phagocytes, but also control complement pathways, idiotype-anti-idiotype dimer formation, blockage of superantigen binding to T cells, inhibition of dendritic cells and stimulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). There are several formulations of Ig available, each one with its own peculiar characteristics. In Brazil, there is stringent legislation regulating the quality of Ig. Only Ig products that completely fulfill the quality control criteria are released for use. These standards involve different tests from visual inspection to determination of anti-complementary activity. This paper will further review the history and current status of Ig, including its production and mechanisms of action. The formulations available in Brazil and also the criteria of quality control currently applied will be presented. PMID:23049343

  9. On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

  10. A comparative review of four formulations of noncommutative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouba, Laure

    2016-07-01

    Four formulations of quantum mechanics on noncommutative Moyal phase spaces are reviewed. These are the canonical, path-integral, Weyl-Wigner and systematic formulations. Although all these formulations represent quantum mechanics on a phase space with the same deformed Heisenberg algebra, there are mathematical and conceptual differences which we discuss.

  11. An explicit finite element formulation for dynamic strain localization and damage evolution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Hashem M; Bronkhorst, Curt A; Addessio, Francis L

    2010-12-16

    An explicit finite element formulation, used to study the behavior and failure mechanisms of metallic materials under high strain rate loading, is presented. The formulation is based on the assumed-strain approach of Fish and Belytschko [1988], which allows localization bands to be embedded within an element, thereby alleviating mesh sensitivity and reducing the required computational effort. The behavior of the material outside localization bands (and of the virgin material prior to the onset of strain localization) is represented using a Gurson-type coupled plasticity-damage model based on the work of Johnson and Addessio [1988]. Assuming adiabatic conditions, the response of the localization band material is represented by a set of constitutive equations for large elasticviscoplastic deformations in metals at high strain rates and high homologous temperatures (see Brown et al. [1989]). Computational results are compared to experimental data for different metallic alloys to illustrate the advantages of the proposed modeling strategy.

  12. Damaging HMX/HTPB formulations: In-situ compression imaging using X-ray micro computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Brian M.; Cordes, Nikolaus Lynn; Tappan, Bryce C.; Thompson, Darla Graff; Manner, Virginia Warren

    2015-04-17

    HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is a powerful high explosive that is routinely used in formulations such as PBX 9501. Much remains to be learned about the performance and mechanical properties of HMX formulations such as these, particularly after dynamic damage has occurred. We have prepared formulations with HMX using hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) binder in order to form an explosive that is relatively insensitive to mild stimuli, analogous to PBXB-110 (different only is substitution of dioctyladipate (DO) for isodecyl pelargonate).

  13. A method of damage mechanics analysis for solder material

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Chow, C.L.; Yang, Fan

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents as a method of damage mechanics analysis for solder joint material stressed to extensive plastic deformation. The material chosen for the current work is the 60Sn-40Pb eutectic alloy due to its wide use. The analysis is based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes. With the introduction of a set of internal state variables, known as damage variables, and a damage effect tensor, a damage dissipative potential function is proposed to enable the formulation of the constitutive equations of elasticity and plasticity coupled with damage. The equations of damage evolution are also derived to monitor damage initiation and growth. Before a damage analysis can be performed with a finite element analysis, the mechanical properties of the chosen solder joint material and its damage variables must first be determined. A method of experimental analysis was developed and used to successfully measure the highly strain sensitive 60Sn-40Pb solder material. The measured properties are presented and various characteristics of the solder material are examined and discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Majorization formulation of uncertainty in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Partovi, M. Hossein

    2011-11-15

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is formulated for a set of generalized measurements within the framework of majorization theory, resulting in a partial uncertainty order on probability vectors that is stronger than those based on quasientropic measures. The theorem that emerges from this formulation guarantees that the uncertainty of the results of a set of generalized measurements without a common eigenstate has an inviolable lower bound which depends on the measurement set but not the state. A corollary to this theorem yields a parallel formulation of the uncertainty principle for generalized measurements corresponding to the entire class of quasientropic measures. Optimal majorization bounds for two and three mutually unbiased bases in two dimensions are calculated. Similarly, the leading term of the majorization bound for position and momentum measurements is calculated which provides a strong statement of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in direct operational terms. Another theorem provides a majorization condition for the least-uncertain generalized measurement of a given state with interesting physical implications.

  15. Non local damage model based on micromorphic formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelia, Diamantopoulou; Carl, Labergere; Khemais, Saanouni

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an experimental-numerical study based on simple tensile test of a high strength metallic sheet, including the diffuse necking stage, up to the large plastic strain and damage localization. A micromorphic approach including nonlocal damage can overcome the mesh dependency problem. The numerical implementation into ABAQUS/Explicit is made for 2D quadrangular elements thanks to the VUEL user's subroutine. Promising results are obtained which qualitatively are compatible with the experiments.

  16. [Mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation damaging male reproduction].

    PubMed

    Xue, Lei; Chen, Hao-Yu; Wang, Shui-Ming

    2012-08-01

    More and more evidence from over 50 years of researches on the effects of electromagnetic radiation on male reproduction show that a certain dose of electromagnetic radiation obviously damages male reproduction, particularly the structure and function of spermatogenic cells. The mechanisms of the injury may be associated with energy dysmetabolism, lipid peroxidation, abnormal expressions of apoptosis-related genes and proteins, and DNA damage.

  17. Subsurface damage detection and damage mechanism analysis of chemical-mechanical polished optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Yang, Wei; Bi, Guo; Yang, Ping; Guo, Yinbiao

    2014-09-01

    Detection of the subsurface damage depth in optical elements has significance on the subsequent material removal amount and improving element surface quality. The paper focuses on the subsurface damage of chemical-mechanical polished K9 specimen, and analyses the chemical-mechanical polishing mechanism and the cause of subsurface damage. A most suitable etchant is chosen and the step-by-step etching method is applied to measure the subsurface damage depth. A microscope is used to detect the damage morphology and the variation trend at different depth. Research shows that the subsurface damage caused by chemical-mechanical polishing is Hertz scratch, and the scratch quantity below surface presents a variation of zero-more-less-disappeared. The K9 specimen is polished for 3 min under the pressure of 2.5 Kgf and the spindle speed of 43139 r/min, thus resulting in a subsurface damage depth 15.3μm.

  18. Mechanisms of DNA damage, repair, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Walker, Graham C

    2017-06-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of DNA damaging agents that can impact health and modulate disease-states. However, robust DNA repair and damage-bypass mechanisms faithfully protect the DNA by either removing or tolerating the damage to ensure an overall survival. Deviations in this fine-tuning are known to destabilize cellular metabolic homeostasis, as exemplified in diverse cancers where disruption or deregulation of DNA repair pathways results in genome instability. Because routinely used biological, physical and chemical agents impact human health, testing their genotoxicity and regulating their use have become important. In this introductory review, we will delineate mechanisms of DNA damage and the counteracting repair/tolerance pathways to provide insights into the molecular basis of genotoxicity in cells that lays the foundation for subsequent articles in this issue. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:235-263, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Modeling elastic tensile fractures in snow using nonlocal damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstad, C. P.; McClung, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The initiation and propagation of tensile fractures in snow and ice are fundamental to numerous important physical processes in the cryosphere, from iceberg calving to ice shelf rift propagation to slab avalanche release. The heterogeneous nature of snow and ice, their proximity to the melting temperature, and the varied governing timescales typically lead to nonlinear fracture behavior which does not follow the predictions of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Furthermore, traditional fracture mechanics is formally inapplicable for predicting crack initiation in the absence of a pre-existing flaw or stress concentration. An alternative to fracture mechanics is continuum damage mechanics, which accounts for the material degradation associated with cracking in a numerically efficient framework. However, damage models which are formulated locally (e.g. stress and strain are defined as point properties) suffer from mesh-sensitive crack trajectories, spurious localization of damage and improper fracture energy dissipation with mesh refinement. Nonlocal formulations of damage, which smear the effects of the material heterogeneity over an intrinsic length scale related to the material microstructure, overcome these difficulties and lead to numerically efficient and mesh-objective simulations of the tensile failure of heterogeneous materials. We present the results of numerical simulations of tensile fracture initiation and propagation in cohesive snow using a nonlocal damage model. Seventeen beam bending experiments, both notched and unnotched, were conducted using blocks of cohesive dry snow extracted from an alpine snowpack. Material properties and fracture parameters were calculated from the experimental data using beam theory and quasi-brittle fracture mechanics. Using these parameters, a nonlocal isotropic damage model was applied to two-dimensional finite element meshes of the same scale as the experiments. The model was capable of simulating the propagation

  20. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A. H.; Zariyantey, A. H.; Budin, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α—exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  1. Functional integral approach: a third formulation of quantum statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xian Xi; Evenson, William E

    2002-02-01

    Quantum statistical mechanics has developed primarily through two approaches, pioneered by Gibbs and Feynman, respectively. In Gibbs' method one calculates partition functions from phase-space integrations or sums over stationary states. Alternatively, in Feynman's approach, the focus is on the path-integral formulation. The Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation leads to a functional-integral formulation for calculating partition functions. We outline here the functional integral approach to quantum statistical mechanics, including generalizations and improvements to Hubbard's formulation. We show how the dimensionality of the integrals is reduced exactly, how the problem of assuming an unknown canonical transformation is avoided, how the reality of the partition function in the complex representation is guaranteed, and how the extremum conditions are simplified. This formulation can be applied to general systems, including superconductors.

  2. Internal clock formulation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małkiewicz, Przemysław; Miroszewski, Artur

    2017-08-01

    The basic tenet of the present work is the assumption of the lack of external and fixed time in the Universe. This assumption is best embodied by general relativity, which replaces the fixed space-time structure with the gravitational field, which is subject to dynamics. The lack of time does not imply the lack of evolution but rather brings to the forefront the role of internal clocks which are some largely arbitrary internal degrees of freedom with respect to which the evolution of timeless systems can be described. We take this idea seriously and try to understand what it implies for quantum mechanics when the fixed external time is replaced by an arbitrary internal clock. We put the issue in a solid, mathematically rigorous framework. We find that the dynamical interpretation of a quantum state of a timeless system depends on the employed internal clock. In particular, we find that the continuous spectra of well-known dynamical observables like the position of a free particle on the real line may turn discrete if measured in unusual clocks. We discuss the meaning of our result for attempts at quantization of global gravitational degrees of freedom.

  3. Volatile Emission of Mechanically Damaged Almonds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mature almonds from the Monterey variety were evaluated for their volatile composition after mechanical damage and compared to the volatile composition of the corresponding undamaged almonds. Volatiles were collected on Tenax, desorbed with diethyl ether, and identified via GC-MS analyses. Volatile ...

  4. Damage Mechanics in the Community Ice Sheet Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, R.; Cathles, L. M. M., IV; Bassis, J. N.; Lipscomb, W. H.; Price, S. F.

    2016-12-01

    Half of the mass that floating ice shelves lose to the ocean comes from iceberg calving, which is a difficult process to simulate accurately. This is especially true in the large-scale ice dynamics models that couple changes in the cryosphere to climate projections. Damage mechanics provide a powerful technique with the potential to overcome this obstacle by describing how fractures in ice evolve over time. Here, we demonstrate the application of a damage model to ice shelves that predicts realistic geometries. We incorporated this solver into the Community Ice Sheet Model, a three dimensional ice sheet model developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The damage mechanics formulation that we use comes from a first principles-based evolution law for the depth of basal and surface crevasses and depends on the large scale strain rate, stress state, and basal melt. We show that under idealized conditions it produces ice tongue lengths that match well with observations for a selection of natural ice tongues, including Erebus, Drygalski, and Pine Island in Antarctica, as well as Petermann in Greenland. We also apply the model to more generalized ideal ice shelf geometries and show that it produces realistic calving front positions. Although our results are preliminary, the damage mechanics model that we developed provides a promising first principles method for predicting ice shelf extent and how the calving margins of ice shelves respond to climate change.

  5. Significance of Strain in Formulation in Theory of Solid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    The basic theory of solid mechanics was deemed complete circa 1860 when St. Venant provided the strain formulation or the field compatibility condition. The strain formulation was incomplete. The missing portion has been formulated and identified as the boundary compatibility condition (BCC). The BCC, derived through a variational formulation, has been verified through integral theorem and solution of problems. The BCC, unlike the field counterpart, do not trivialize when expressed in displacements. Navier s method and the stiffness formulation have to account for the extra conditions especially at the inter-element boundaries in a finite element model. Completion of the strain formulation has led to the revival of the direct force calculation methods: the Integrated Force Method (IFM) and its dual (IFMD) for finite element analysis, and the completed Beltrami-Michell formulation (CBMF) in elasticity. The benefits from the new methods in elasticity, in finite element analysis, and in design optimization are discussed. Existing solutions and computer codes may have to be adjusted for the compliance of the new conditions. Complacency because the discipline is over a century old and computer codes have been developed for half a century can lead to stagnation of the discipline.

  6. A damage mechanics based general purpose interface/contact element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengyong

    Most of the microelectronics packaging structures consist of layered substrates connected with bonding materials, such as solder or epoxy. Predicting the thermomechanical behavior of these multilayered structures is a challenging task in electronic packaging engineering. In a layered structure the most complex part is always the interfaces between the strates. Simulating the thermo-mechanical behavior of such interfaces, is the main theme of this dissertation. The most commonly used solder material, Pb-Sn alloy, has a very low melting temperature 180sp°C, so that the material demonstrates a highly viscous behavior. And, creep usually dominates the failure mechanism. Hence, the theory of viscoplasticity is adapted to describe the constitutive behavior. In a multilayered assembly each layer has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. Under thermal cycling, due to heat dissipated from circuits, interfaces and interconnects experience low cycle fatigue. Presently, the state-of-the art damage mechanics model used for fatigue life predictions is based on Kachanov (1986) continuum damage model. This model uses plastic strain as a damage criterion. Since plastic strain is a stress path dependent value, the criterion does not yield unique damage values for the same state of stress. In this dissertation a new damage evolution equation based on the second law of thermodynamic is proposed. The new criterion is based on the entropy of the system and it yields unique damage values for all stress paths to the final state of stress. In the electronics industry, there is a strong desire to develop fatigue free interconnections. The proposed interface/contact element can also simulate the behavior of the fatigue free Z-direction thin film interconnections as well as traditional layered interconnects. The proposed interface element can simulate behavior of a bonded interface or unbonded sliding interface, also called contact element. The proposed element was verified against

  7. A combined analytical formulation and genetic algorithm to analyze the nonlinear damage responses of continuous fiber toughened composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Haemin; Yu, Jaesang; Lee, Hunsu; Kim, G. M.; Kim, Jae Woo; Jung, Yong Chae; Yang, Cheol-Min; Yang, B. J.

    2017-04-01

    Continuous fiber-reinforced composites are important materials that have the highest commercialized potential in the upcoming future among existing advanced materials. Despite their wide use and value, their theoretical mechanisms have not been fully established due to the complexity of the compositions and their unrevealed failure mechanisms. This study proposes an effective three-dimensional damage modeling of a fibrous composite by combining analytical micromechanics and evolutionary computation. The interface characteristics, debonding damage, and micro-cracks are considered to be the most influential factors on the toughness and failure behaviors of composites, and a constitutive equation considering these factors was explicitly derived in accordance with the micromechanics-based ensemble volume averaged method. The optimal set of various model parameters in the analytical model were found using modified evolutionary computation that considers human-induced error. The effectiveness of the proposed formulation was validated by comparing a series of numerical simulations with experimental data from available studies.

  8. Mechanisms of bleomycin-induced lung damage.

    PubMed

    Hay, J; Shahzeidi, S; Laurent, G

    1991-01-01

    Bleomycins are a family of compounds produced by Streptomyces verticillis. They have potent tumour killing properties which have given them an important place in cancer chemotherapy. They cause little marrow suppression, but pulmonary toxicity is a major adverse effect. The mechanisms of cell toxicity are well described based on in vitro experiments on DNA. The bleomycin molecule has two main structural components: a bithiazole component which partially intercalates into the DNA helix, parting the strands, as well as pyrimidine and imidazole structures, which bind iron and oxygen forming an activated complex capable of releasing damaging oxidants in close proximity to the polynucleotide chains of DNA. This may lead to chain scission or structural modifications leading to release of free bases or their propenal derivatives. The mechanisms are well described based on in vitro experiments on DNA, but how they relate to intact cells in whole animals is more tenuous. Bleomycin is able to cause cell damage independent from its effect on DNA by induction lipid peroxidation. This may be particularly important in the lung and in part account for its ability to cause alveolar cell damage and subsequent pulmonary inflammation. The lung injury seen following bleomycin comprises an interstitial oedema with an influx of inflammatory and immune cells. This may lead to the development of pulmonary fibrosis, characterized by enhanced production and deposition of collagen and other matrix components. Several polypeptide mediators capable of stimulating fibroblasts replication or excessive collagen deposition have been implicated in this, but the precise role of these in bleomycin-induced fibrosis is yet to be demonstrated. Current therapy for bleomycin-induced lung damage is inadequate, with corticosteroids most often used. Given the mechanism of action described above, antioxidants and iron chelators might be beneficial. Although, studies to date are equivocal and there is

  9. Thermomechanical formulation of ductile damage coupled to nonlinear isotropic hardening and multiplicative viscoplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyarslan, C.; Bargmann, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a thermomechanical framework which makes use of the internal variable theory of thermodynamics for damage-coupled finite viscoplasticity with nonlinear isotropic hardening. Damage evolution, being an irreversible process, generates heat. In addition to its direct effect on material's strength and stiffness, it causes deterioration of the heat conduction. The formulation, following the footsteps of Simó and Miehe (1992), introduces inelastic entropy as an additional state variable. Given a temperature dependent damage dissipation potential, we show that the evolution of inelastic entropy assumes a split form relating to plastic and damage parts, respectively. The solution of the thermomechanical problem is based on the so-called isothermal split. This allows the use of the model in 2D and 3D example problems involving geometrical imperfection triggered necking in an axisymmetric bar and thermally triggered necking of a 3D rectangular bar.

  10. Damage mechanics characterization on fatigue behavior of a solder joint material

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, C.L.; Yang, F.; Fang, H.E.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents the first part of a comprehensive mechanics approach capable of predicting the integrity and reliability of solder joint material under fatigue loading without viscoplastic damage considerations. A separate report will be made to present a comprehensive damage model describing life prediction of the solder material under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The method is based on a theory of damage mechanics which makes possible a macroscopic description of the successive material deterioration caused by the presence of microcracks/voids in engineering materials. A damage mechanics model based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes with internal state variables is proposed and used to provide a unified approach in characterizing the cyclic behavior of a typical solder material. With the introduction of a damage effect tensor, the constitutive equations are derived to enable the formulation of a fatigue damage dissipative potential function and a fatigue damage criterion. The fatigue evolution is subsequently developed based on the hypothesis that the overall damage is induced by the accumulation of fatigue and plastic damage. This damage mechanics approach offers a systematic and versatile means that is effective in modeling the entire process of material failure ranging from damage initiation and propagation leading eventually to macro-crack initiation and growth. As the model takes into account the load history effect and the interaction between plasticity damage and fatigue damage, with the aid of a modified general purpose finite element program, the method can readily be applied to estimate the fatigue life of solder joints under different loading conditions.

  11. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-06

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process.

  12. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nims, Robert J.; Durney, Krista M.; Cigan, Alexander D.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process. PMID:26855751

  13. Continuum damage mechanics (CDM) modelling demonstrates that ligament fatigue damage accumulates by different mechanisms than creep damage.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Timothy D; Johnston, Clifton R; Oxland, Thomas R; Thornton, Gail M

    2007-01-01

    Ligaments can be subjected to creep and fatigue damage when loaded to higher than normal stresses due to injury of a complementary joint restraint. Continuum damage mechanics (CDM) assumes that diffuse damage accumulates in a material, thereby reducing the effective cross-sectional area and leading to eventual rupture. The objective of this study was to apply CDM modelling to ligament creep and fatigue to reveal mechanisms of damage. Fatigue was modelled by cyclically varying the stress in the creep model. A few novel approaches were used. First, area reduction was not assumed equal to modulus reduction; thus, allowing damaged fibres to potentially contribute to load-bearing through the extracellular matrix. Modulus ratio was related to area reduction using residual strength. Second, damage rate was not assumed constant but rather was determined directly from the modulus ratio change with respect to time. Third, modulus ratio was normalized to maximum modulus to avoid artificial calculation of negative damage. With this approach, the creep time-to-rupture was predicted with -4% error at 60% UTS and -13% error at 30% UTS. At 15% UTS, no test was undertaken experimentally for a duration as long as the 24 days predicted theoretically. Oscillating the time-dependent damage in the creep model could not completely explain the fatigue behaviour because the fatigue time-to-rupture was predicted with over 1300% error at all stresses. These results suggest that a cycle-dependent damage mechanism, in addition to a time-dependent one, was responsible for fatigue rupture. Cycle-dependent damage may be an important consideration for rehabilitation activities following injury of a complementary ligament restraint.

  14. Dynamic Rate Dependent Elastoplastic Damage Modeling of Concrete Subject to Blast Loading: Formulation and Computational Aspects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-31

    continuum theory may be considered for damage mechanics; see, e.g., Bazant , Lin and Pijaudier-Cabot [1987], Eringen [1983], Eringen [1987], Eringen and...Edelen [1972], Pijaudier-Cabot and Bazant [19871, Xia et al. [1987]. The essence of nonlocal theory includes the characteristic length (1) and the...Eringen and Edelen [1972], Bazant et al. [1987], Xia et al. [1987]), or the viscous damage model presented in Section 3.4. The nonlocal damage

  15. Constitutive formulations for the mechanical investigation of colonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Carniel, Emanuele Luigi; Gramigna, Vera; Fontanella, Chiara Giulia; Stefanini, Cesare; Natali, Arturo N

    2014-05-01

    A constitutive framework is provided for the characterization of the mechanical behavior of colonic tissues, as a fundamental tool for the development of numerical models of the colonic structures. The constitutive analysis is performed by a multidisciplinary approach that requires the cooperation between experimental and computational competences. The preliminary investigation pertains to the review of the tissues histology. The complex structural configuration of the tissues and the specific distributions of fibrous elements entail the nonlinear mechanical behavior and the anisotropic response. The identification of the mechanical properties requires to perform mechanical tests according to different loading situations, as different loading directions. Because of the typical functionality of colon structures, the tissues mechanics is investigated by tensile tests, which are performed on taenia coli and haustra specimens from fresh pig colons. Accounting for the histological investigation and the results from the mechanical tests, a specific hyperelastic framework is provided within the theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials. Preliminary analytical formulations are defined to identify the constitutive parameters by the inverse analysis of the experimental tests. Finite element models of the specimens are developed accounting for the actual configuration of the colon structures to verify the quality of the results. The good agreement between experimental and numerical model results suggests the reliability of the constitutive formulations and parameters. Finally, the developed constitutive analysis makes it possible to identify the mechanical behavior and properties of the different colonic tissues.

  16. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic injuries and gradual wear-and-tear of articular cartilage (AC) that can lead to osteoarthritis (OA) have been hypothesized to result from tissue damage to AC. In this study, a previous equilibrium constitutive model of AC was extended to a constitutive damage articular cartilage (CDAC) model. In particular, anisotropic collagen (COL) fibril damage and isotropic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) damage were considered in a 3D formulation. In the CDAC model, time-dependent effects, such as viscoelasticity and poroelasticity, were neglected, and thus all results represent the equilibrium response after all time-dependent effects have dissipated. The resulting CDAC model was implemented in two different finite-element models. The first simulated uniaxial tensile loading to failure, while the second simulated spherical indentation with a rigid indenter displaced into a bilayer AC sample. Uniaxial tension to failure simulations were performed for three COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain (i.e., the maximum elastic COL fibril strain) values of 15%, 30%, and 45%, while spherical indentation simulations were performed with a COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain of 15%. GAG damage parameters were held constant for all simulations. Our results indicated that the equilibrium postyield tensile response of AC and the macroscopic tissue failure strain are highly dependent on COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain. The uniaxial tensile response consisted of an initial nonlinear ramp region due to the recruitment of intact fibrils followed by a rapid decrease in tissue stress at initial COL fibril failure, as a result of COL fibril damage which continued until ultimate tissue failure. In the spherical indentation simulation, damage to both the COL fibril and GAG constituents was located only in the superficial zone (SZ) and near the articular surface with tissue thickening following unloading. Spherical indentation simulation results are in agreement with published experimental

  17. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  18. Damage Mechanics Approach for Bearing Lifetime Prognostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jing; Seth, Brij B.; Liang, Steven Y.; Zhang, Cheng

    2002-09-01

    The ability to achieve accurate bearing prognostics is critical to the optimal maintenance of rotating machinery in the interest of cost and productivity. However, techniques to real time predict the lifetime of a bearing under practical operating conditions have not been well developed. In this paper, a stiffness-based prognostic model for bearing systems based on vibration response analysis and damage mechanics is discussed. As the bearing system is considered as a single-degree-of-freedom vibratory system, its natural frequency and its acceleration amplitude at the natural frequency can be related to the system stiffness. On the other hand, the relationship between failure lifetime, running time and stiffness variation can be established from the damage mechanics. Combining the above two, the natural frequency and the acceleration amplitude of a bearing system can be related to its running time and failure lifetime. Thus, the failure lifetime of a bearing system can be predicted on-line based on vibration measurement. Experiments have been performed on a tapered roller bearing life testing stand under various operation conditions to calibrate and to validate the proposed model. The comparison between model-calculated data and experimental results indicates that this model can be used to effectively predict the failure lifetime and the remaining life of a bearing system.

  19. Protective effect of Xingnaojia formulation on rats with brain and liver damage caused by chronic alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHUANG; WANG, SU; GUO, ZHI-GANG; HUANG, NING; ZHAO, FAN-RONG; ZHU, MO-LI; MA, LI-JUAN; LIANG, JIN-YING; ZHANG, YU-LIN; HUANG, ZHONG-LIN; WAN, GUANG-RUI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a formulation of traditional Chinese medicine extracts known as Xingnaojia (XNJ) on the liver function, learning ability and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism and to verify the mechanism by which it protects the brain and liver. A rat model of chronic alcoholism was used in the study. The spatial learning ability and memory of the rats were tested. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains and hepatic tissues were isolated. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and levels of glutamate (Glu), N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the hippocampus were analyzed. The ultrastructure of the hepatic tissue was observed by electron microscopy. In addition, the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in serum were tested and the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TCHOL) were analyzed. XNJ enhanced the learning and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism. Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and decreased the expression levels of NR2B mRNA and NR2B, CB1 and CDK5 proteins in the brain tissues compared with those in the model rats. It also increased the activity of ALDH in the serum and liver, decreased the serum levels of LDL, TG and TCHOL and increased the serum level of HDL. These results indicate that XNJ exhibited a protective effect against brain and liver damage in rats with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26640531

  20. Bridging meso- and microscopic anisotropic unilateral damage formulations for microcracked solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qi-Zhi; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Shao, Jian-fu

    2017-04-01

    A mathematically consistent and unified description of induced anisotropy and unilateral effects constitutes one of the central tasks in the continuum damage theories developed so far. This paper aims at bridging constitutive damage formulations on meso- and micro-scales with an emphasis on a complete mesoscopic determination of material effective properties for microcracked solids. The key is to introduce a new set of invariants in terms of strain tensor and fabric tensor by making use of the Walpole's tensorial base. This invariant set proves to be equivalent to the classical one, while the new one provides great conveniences to high-order orientation-dependent tensor manipulations. When limited to the case of parallel microcracks, potential relations between ten combination coefficients are established by applying continuity conditions. It is found that the dilute approximation with penny-shaped microcracks is a particular case of the present one. By originally introducing effective strain effect, interactions between microcracks are taken into account with comparison to the Mori-Tanaka method as well as the Ponte-Castaneda and Willis scheme. For completeness, discussions are also addressed on macroscopic formulations with high-order damage variables.

  1. Formulation and Mechanical Properties of LLM-105 PBXs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M; Lorenz, K T; Cunningham, B; Gagliardi, F

    2008-04-03

    Eight different polymer binders were formulated with bimodal distributions of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) in 5/95 weight ratio of polymer to explosive at the 25 gram level. The polymers evaluated included: Kel-F 800, Viton A, Oxy 461, Cytop A, Hyflon AD 60, Hytemp 5545, Technoflon PFR 91 and Technoflon P 459. LLM-105 had an average particle size of 35.6 {+-} 0.6 {micro}m. This material was ground in a ball mill for 24 h to achieve a particle size of 0.72 {+-} 0.02 {micro}m. Small angle light scattering measurements were used to obtain particle size distributions on both ground and unground LLM-105. Optical microscopy was used to characterize the morphology of the crystals. Bimodal mixes of approximately 75/25% coarse to fine LLM-105 were used in all formulations. Cylinders 1.27 cm diameter by 2.54 cm long were compression molded using 3 three-minute cycles at 105 C, except in the case of Cytop and Hyflon formulations which were molded at {approx}130 C. Densities varied between 94-98% of theoretical maximum. Stress strain measurements were made in compression at -30, ambient and 74 C at a strain rate of 0.0001 sec{sup -1}. As expected, the mechanical strength scaled with temperature depending on the glass transition temperature of the polymer.

  2. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-30

    to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014- l6- l -2 173 Sc. PROGRAM... Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics A ward Number 1\\00014-1 6-1-2173 DOD - NAVY -Office of...of interface bonds between different phases in a composite . Task 1.2 Ply level constrained cracking Task 1.1 dealt with initiation of micro-level

  3. Constitutive formulation and analysis of heel pad tissues mechanics.

    PubMed

    Natali, A N; Fontanella, C G; Carniel, E L

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a visco-hyperelastic constitutive model developed to describe the biomechanical response of heel pad tissues. The model takes into account the typical features of the mechanical response such as large displacement, strain phenomena, and non-linear elasticity together with time-dependent effects. The constitutive model was formulated, starting from the analysis of the complex structural and micro-structural configuration of the tissues, to evaluate the relationship between tissue histology and mechanical properties. To define the constitutive model, experimental data from mechanical tests were analyzed. To obtain information about the mechanical response of the tissue so that the constitutive parameters could be established, data from both in vitro and in vivo tests were investigated. Specifically, the first evaluation of the constitutive parameters was performed by a coupled deterministic and stochastic optimization method, accounting for data from in vitro tests. The comparison of constitutive model results and experimental data confirmed the model's capability to describe the compression behaviour of the heel pad tissues, regarding both constant strain rate and stress relaxation tests. Based on the data from additional experimental tests, some of the constitutive parameters were modified in order to interpret the in vivo mechanical response of the heel pad tissues. This approach made it possible to interpret the actual mechanical function of the tissues.

  4. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-1 6-1-2173 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics Award Number N00014-16-1-2173 DOD - NAVY- Office of Naval Research PI: Ramesh Talreja Co-PI: Florin Bobaru Executive...local stress states are responsible for the precursor mechanisms that initiate cracks. This task studies the point-failure processes that become critical

  5. Formulation and process strategies to minimize coat damage for compaction of coated pellets in a rotary tablet press: A mechanistic view.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2016-02-29

    Compaction of multiple-unit pellet system (MUPS) tablets has been extensively studied in the past few decades but with marginal success. This study aims to investigate the formulation and process strategies for minimizing pellet coat damage caused by compaction and elucidate the mechanism of damage sustained during the preparation of MUPS tablets in a rotary tablet press. Blends containing ethylcellulose-coated pellets and cushioning agent (spray dried aggregates of micronized lactose and mannitol), were compacted into MUPS tablets in a rotary tablet press. The effects of compaction pressure and dwell time on the physicomechanical properties of resultant MUPS tablets and extent of pellet coat damage were systematically examined. The coated pellets from various locations at the axial and radial peripheral surfaces and core of the MUPS tablets were excavated and assessed for their coat damage individually. Interestingly, for a MUPS tablet formulation which consolidates by plastic deformation, the tablet mechanical strength could be enhanced without exacerbating pellet coat damage by extending the dwell time in the compaction cycle during rotary tableting. However, the increase in compaction pressure led to faster drug release rate. The location of the coated pellets in the MUPS tablet also contributed to the extent of their coat damage, possibly due to uneven force distribution within the compact. To ensure viability of pellet coat integrity, the formation of a continuous percolating network of cushioning agent is critical and the applied compaction pressure should be less than the pellet crushing strength.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  7. A signed particle formulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, Jean Michel

    2015-09-15

    A formulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics in terms of Newtonian particles is presented in the shape of a set of three postulates. In this new theory, quantum systems are described by ensembles of signed particles which behave as field-less classical objects which carry a negative or positive sign and interact with an external potential by means of creation and annihilation events only. This approach is shown to be a generalization of the signed particle Wigner Monte Carlo method which reconstructs the time-dependent Wigner quasi-distribution function of a system and, therefore, the corresponding Schrödinger time-dependent wave-function. Its classical limit is discussed and a physical interpretation, based on experimental evidences coming from quantum tomography, is suggested. Moreover, in order to show the advantages brought by this novel formulation, a straightforward extension to relativistic effects is discussed. To conclude, quantum tunnelling numerical experiments are performed to show the validity of the suggested approach.

  8. Noncommutative spaces and covariant formulation of statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, V.; Gorji, M. A.; Nozari, K.; Vakili, B.

    2015-07-01

    We study the statistical mechanics of a general Hamiltonian system in the context of symplectic structure of the corresponding phase space. This covariant formalism reveals some interesting correspondences between properties of the phase space and the associated statistical physics. While topology, as a global property, turns out to be related to the total number of microstates, the invariant measure which assigns a priori probability distribution over the microstates is determined by the local form of the symplectic structure. As an example of a model for which the phase space has a nontrivial topology, we apply our formulation on the Snyder noncommutative space-time with de Sitter four-momentum space and analyze the results. Finally, in the framework of such a setup, we examine our formalism by studying the thermodynamical properties of a harmonic oscillator system.

  9. Induction of microtubule damage in Allium cepa meristematic cells by pharmaceutical formulations of thiabendazole and griseofulvin.

    PubMed

    Andrioli, Nancy B; Soloneski, Sonia; Larramendy, Marcelo L; Mudry, Marta D

    2014-09-15

    Microtubules (MT) are formed by the assembly of α- and β-tubulins and MT-associated proteins. We characterized the effects of pharmaceutical formulations containing the microtubule disruptors thiabendazole (TBZ) and griseofulvin (GF) on the mitotic machinery of plant (A. cepa) meristematic cells. GF concentrations between 10 and 250 μg/ml were tested. GF induced mitotic index inhibition and genotoxic effects, including chromosome fragments, bridges, lagged chromosomes, C-metaphases, tripolar cell division, disorganized anaphases and nuclear abnormalities in interphase cells. Efects on the mitotic machinery were studied by direct immunofluorescence with β-tubulin labeling and by DNA counterstaining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Exposure of meristematic root cells to TBZ or GF, 100 μg/ml, caused microtubular damage which led to abnormal MT arrays. Our results suggest that GF induces abnormalities in spindle symmetry/polarity, while TBZ causes chromosome missegregation, polyploidy, and lack of cytokinesis.

  10. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  11. Strawberry-Based Cosmetic Formulations Protect Human Dermal Fibroblasts against UVA-Induced Damage.

    PubMed

    Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Y; Afrin, Sadia; Reboredo-Rodriguez, Patricia; Cianciosi, Danila; Mezzetti, Bruno; Quiles, Josè L; Bompadre, Stefano; Battino, Maurizio; Giampieri, Francesca

    2017-06-14

    Extreme exposure of skin to Ultraviolet A (UVA)-radiation may induce a dysregulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can interact with cellular biomolecules leading to oxidative stress, inflammation, DNA damage, and alteration of cellular molecular pathways, responsible for skin photoaging, hyperplasia, erythema, and cancer. For these reasons, the use of dietary natural bioactive compounds with remarkable antioxidant activity could be a strategic tool to counteract these UVA-radiation-caused deleterious effects. Thus, the purpose of the present work was to test the efficacy of strawberry (50 μg/mL)-based formulations supplemented with Coenzyme Q10 (100 μg/mL) and sun protection factor 10 in human dermal fibroblasts irradiated with UVA-radiation. The apoptosis rate, the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, the expression of proteins involved in antioxidant and inflammatory response, and mitochondrial functionality were evaluated. The results showed that the synergic topical use of strawberry and Coenzyme Q10 provided a significant (p < 0.05) photoprotective effect, reducing cell death and ROS, increasing antioxidant defense, lowering inflammatory markers, and improving mitochondrial functionality. The obtained results suggest the use of strawberry-based formulations as an innovative, natural, and useful tool for the prevention of UVA exposure-induced skin diseases in order to decrease or substitute the amount of synthetic sunscreen agents.

  12. Strawberry-Based Cosmetic Formulations Protect Human Dermal Fibroblasts against UVA-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Y.; Afrin, Sadia; Reboredo-Rodriguez, Patricia; Cianciosi, Danila; Mezzetti, Bruno; Quiles, Josè L.; Bompadre, Stefano; Battino, Maurizio; Giampieri, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Extreme exposure of skin to Ultraviolet A (UVA)-radiation may induce a dysregulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can interact with cellular biomolecules leading to oxidative stress, inflammation, DNA damage, and alteration of cellular molecular pathways, responsible for skin photoaging, hyperplasia, erythema, and cancer. For these reasons, the use of dietary natural bioactive compounds with remarkable antioxidant activity could be a strategic tool to counteract these UVA-radiation-caused deleterious effects. Thus, the purpose of the present work was to test the efficacy of strawberry (50 μg/mL)-based formulations supplemented with Coenzyme Q10 (100 μg/mL) and sun protection factor 10 in human dermal fibroblasts irradiated with UVA-radiation. The apoptosis rate, the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, the expression of proteins involved in antioxidant and inflammatory response, and mitochondrial functionality were evaluated. The results showed that the synergic topical use of strawberry and Coenzyme Q10 provided a significant (p < 0.05) photoprotective effect, reducing cell death and ROS, increasing antioxidant defense, lowering inflammatory markers, and improving mitochondrial functionality. The obtained results suggest the use of strawberry-based formulations as an innovative, natural, and useful tool for the prevention of UVA exposure-induced skin diseases in order to decrease or substitute the amount of synthetic sunscreen agents. PMID:28613256

  13. Damage Mechanics Model Development for Monocrystalline Superalloys (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4148 DAMAGE MECHANICS MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR MONOCRYSTALLINE SUPERALLOYS (PREPRINT) Mark A. Tschopp Mississippi State...October 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DAMAGE MECHANICS MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR MONOCRYSTALLINE SUPERALLOYS (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-07-D-5800...better predict damage initiation, such as cracking, in superalloys under engine representative conditions. This report details work that focuses on

  14. Mechanisms for mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Iatridis, J C James C; ap Gwynn, Iolo

    2004-08-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration results in disorganization of the laminate structure of the annulus that may arise from mechanical microfailure. Failure mechanisms in the annulus were investigated using composite lamination theory and other analyses to calculate stresses in annulus layers, interlaminar shear stress, and the region of stress concentration around a fiber break. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate failure patterns in the annulus and evaluate novel structural features of the disc tissue. Stress concentrations in the annulus due to an isolated fiber break were localized to approximately 5 microm away from the break, and only considered a likely cause of annulus fibrosus failure (i.e., radial tears in the annulus) under extreme loading conditions or when collagen damage occurs over a relatively large region. Interlaminar shear stresses were calculated to be relatively large, to increase with layer thickness (as reported with degeneration), and were considered to be associated with propagation of circumferential tears in the annulus. SEM analysis of intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus tissue demonstrated a clear laminate structure, delamination, matrix cracking, and fiber failure. Novel structural features noted with SEM also included the presence of small tubules that appear to run along the length of collagen fibers in the annulus and a distinct collagenous structure representative of a pericellular matrix in the nucleus region.

  15. Surface Damage Mechanism of Monocrystalline Si Under Mechanical Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Quanli; To, Suet; Guo, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Single-point diamond scratching and nanoindentation on monocrystalline silicon wafer were performed to investigate the surface damage mechanism of Si under the contact loading. The results showed that three typical stages of material removal appeared during dynamic scratching, and a chemical reaction of Si with the diamond indenter and oxygen occurred under the high temperature. In addition, the Raman spectra of the various points in the scratching groove indicated that the Si-I to β-Sn structure (Si-II) and the following β-Sn structure (Si-II) to amorphous Si transformation appeared under the rapid loading/unloading condition of the diamond grit, and the volume change induced by the phase transformation resulted in a critical depth (ductile-brittle transition) of cut (˜60 nm ± 15 nm) much lower than the theoretical calculated results (˜387 nm). Moreover, it also led to abnormal load-displacement curves in the nanoindentation tests, resulting in the appearance of elbow and pop-out effects (˜270 nm at 20 s, 50 mN), which were highly dependent on the loading/unloading conditions. In summary, phase transformation of Si promoted surface deformation and fracture under both static and dynamic mechanical loading.

  16. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  17. Bohmian mechanics with complex action: a new trajectory-based formulation of quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Yair; Degani, Ilan; Tannor, David J

    2006-12-21

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Bohmian mechanics as a numerical tool because of its local dynamics, which suggest the possibility of significant computational advantages for the simulation of large quantum systems. However, closer inspection of the Bohmian formulation reveals that the nonlocality of quantum mechanics has not disappeared-it has simply been swept under the rug into the quantum force. In this paper we present a new formulation of Bohmian mechanics in which the quantum action, S, is taken to be complex. This leads to a single equation for complex S, and ultimately complex x and p but there is a reward for this complexification-a significantly higher degree of localization. The quantum force in the new approach vanishes for Gaussian wave packet dynamics, and its effect on barrier tunneling processes is orders of magnitude lower than that of the classical force. In fact, the current method is shown to be a rigorous extension of generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics to give exact quantum mechanics. We demonstrate tunneling probabilities that are in virtually perfect agreement with the exact quantum mechanics down to 10(-7) calculated from strictly localized quantum trajectories that do not communicate with their neighbors. The new formulation may have significant implications for fundamental quantum mechanics, ranging from the interpretation of non-locality to measures of quantum complexity.

  18. Bohmian mechanics with complex action: A new trajectory-based formulation of quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, Yair; Degani, Ilan; Tannor, David J.

    2006-12-21

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Bohmian mechanics as a numerical tool because of its local dynamics, which suggest the possibility of significant computational advantages for the simulation of large quantum systems. However, closer inspection of the Bohmian formulation reveals that the nonlocality of quantum mechanics has not disappeared--it has simply been swept under the rug into the quantum force. In this paper we present a new formulation of Bohmian mechanics in which the quantum action, S, is taken to be complex. This leads to a single equation for complex S, and ultimately complex x and p but there is a reward for this complexification - a significantly higher degree of localization. The quantum force in the new approach vanishes for Gaussian wave packet dynamics, and its effect on barrier tunneling processes is orders of magnitude lower than that of the classical force. In fact, the current method is shown to be a rigorous extension of generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics to give exact quantum mechanics. We demonstrate tunneling probabilities that are in virtually perfect agreement with the exact quantum mechanics down to 10{sup -7} calculated from strictly localized quantum trajectories that do not communicate with their neighbors. The new formulation may have significant implications for fundamental quantum mechanics, ranging from the interpretation of non-locality to measures of quantum complexity.

  19. Three-Hilbert-Space Formulation of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znojil, Miloslav

    2009-01-01

    In paper [Znojil M., Phys. Rev. D 78 (2008), 085003, 5 pages, arXiv:0809.2874] the two-Hilbert-space (2HS, a.k.a. cryptohermitian) formulation of Quantum Mechanics has been revisited. In the present continuation of this study (with the spaces in question denoted as H(auxiliary) and H(standard)) we spot a weak point of the 2HS formalism which lies in the double role played by H(auxiliary). As long as this confluence of roles may (and did!) lead to confusion in the literature, we propose an amended, three-Hilbert-space (3HS) reformulation of the same theory. As a byproduct of our analysis of the formalism we offer an amendment of the Dirac's bra-ket notation and we also show how its use clarifies the concept of covariance in time-dependent cases. Via an elementary example we finally explain why in certain quantum systems the generator H(gen) of the time-evolution of the wave functions may differ from their Hamiltonian H.

  20. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    composites . However, this temperature can be varied. Today, resins are avai lable to do room temperature curing of thermosetting resins . Therefore, the... Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synerg istic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014-16-1 -2 173 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Quarterly Progress Report, Aprill -June 30, 2016 A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining

  1. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-30

    during resin infusion in polymer matrix composites . Task 2.1 is concerned with damage evolution in a peridynamic model of poroelastic materials. Effects... Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics 5b. GRANT NUMBER NOOO 14-16-1-2173 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...element containing disordered fiber distributions. Procedures have been developed to simulate formation of fiber clusters during resin infusion in

  2. Damage Evolution On Mechanical Parts Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestriez, P.; Bogard, F.; Shan, J. L.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a fatigue damage model, based on the continuum damage mechanics and general thermodynamic theory, proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche, for rolling bearings under very numerous loading cycles. A flow surface of fatigue using the Sines criterion is adopted. The coupling between the hardening plasticity and damage effects is considered in the constitutive equations. An explicit algorithm of weak coupling leads to a calculation very fast. This fatigue damage model is implemented into Abaqus/Explicit using a Vumat user's subroutine. Moreover, the damage variable in function of time is transformed into a function of number of cycles. An algorithm of cycle jump, with a criterion for choosing the number increment of cycles, is proposed, which allows to largely reduce the CPU time. The present damage simulation allows to determine the lifetime of mechanical parts under cyclic loading.

  3. Damage mechanisms and life assessment of high-temperature components

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, R.

    1989-01-01

    This book provides coverage of the mechanisms and assessment procedures for high temperature induced damage. The text operates within an engineering framework, and emphasis is placed on both theoretical and practical concerns (i.e., estimating unobservable damage from observable damage). Low-alloy steels represent the focus of the test since they comprise the bulk of plant materials. Topics covered include: Life assessment of steam turbine components, and Petroleum reactor pressure-vessel materials for hydrogen service.

  4. Formulations and computational methods for contact problems in solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirar, Anand Ramchandra

    2000-11-01

    A study of existing formulations and computational methods for contact problems is conducted. The purpose is to gain insights into the solution procedures and pinpoint their limitations so that alternate procedures can be developed. Three such procedures based on the augmented Lagrangian method (ALM) are proposed. Small-scale benchmark problems are solved analytically as well as numerically to study the existing and proposed methods. The variational inequality formulation for frictionless contact is studied using the two bar truss-wall problem in a closed form. Sub-differential formulation is investigated using the spring-wall contact and the truss-wall friction problems. A two-phase analytical procedure is developed for solving the truss-wall frictional contact benchmark problem. The variational equality formulation for contact problems is studied using the penalty method along with the Newton-Raphson procedure. Limitations of such procedures, mainly due to their dependence on the user defined parameters (i.e., the penalty values and the number of time steps), are identified. Based on the study it is concluded that alternate formulations need to be developed. Frictionless contact formulation is developed using the basic concepts of ALM from optimization theory. A new frictional contact formulation (ALM1) is then developed employing ALM. Automatic penalty update procedure is used to eliminate dependence of the solution on the penalty values. Dependence of the solution on the number of time steps in the existing as well as ALM1 formulations is attributed to a flaw in the return mapping procedure for friction. Another new frictional contact formulation (ALM2) is developed to eliminate the dependence of solution on the number of time steps along with the penalty values. Effectiveness of ALM2 is demonstrated by solving the two bar and five bar truss-wall problems. The solutions are compared with the analytical and existing formulations. Design sensitivity analysis of

  5. Formulation of engineered particulate systems for chemical mechanical polishing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basim, Gul Bahar

    slurry formulations are developed by studying the frictional forces, which are representative of the particle-substrate interactions, while achieving stability by introducing adequate interparticle repulsion. Finally, optimal slurry particulate properties are examined by analyzing the material removal mechanisms for silica-silica polishing. Based on the reported findings, a slurry design criterion is developed to achieve optimal polishing performance.

  6. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, Rossella; Comi, Claudia; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  7. Analyses of the cell mechanical damage during microinjection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Wu, Dan; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Ken

    2015-02-04

    The microinjection is an essential technique to introduce foreign materials into biological cells. The soft cell is inevitably ruptured by the microinjector during microinjection. We discuss the way to reduce the mechanical damage by analyzing the control parameters during microinjection. The computational model is developed with the dissipative particle dynamics to simulate the soft mechanical properties of biological cells. The cell model contains the membrane networks, the internal cytoskeleton, crosslink proteins, motors and their functions. The weak power law rheology verifies our computational model. The number of ruptured bonds is used to describe the extent of the mechanical damage that the cell experiences during microinjection. Some experiments are conducted on the Zebrafish embryos. Both the simulation works and experimental results show that the size, shape of the microinjector tip, and the injection velocity have a significant influence on the cell damage. A small, sharp microinjector with a high velocity can reduce the mechanical damage.

  8. Damage progression in mechanically fastened composite structural joints

    SciTech Connect

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C.C.; Murthy, P.L.N.

    1994-12-31

    Progressive damage and fracture of a bolted graphite/epoxy composite laminate is evaluated via computational simulation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a new methodology that scales up constituent material properties, stress and strain limits to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for mechanically fastened composite structures. An integrated computer code is used for the simulation of structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the damage progression sequence and structural fracture resistance during different degradation stages. The effect of fastener spacing is investigated with regard to the structural durability of a bolted joint.

  9. Anisotropic Damage Mechanics Modeling in Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-15

    conducted on a titanium aluminide SiC-reinforced metal matrix composite. Center-cracked plates with laminate layups of (0/90) and (±45). were tested...Kattan, P. I., "Finite Strain Plasticity and Damage in Constitutive Modeling of Metals with Spin Tensors," Applied Mechanics Reviews, Vol. 45, No. 3...34Contractors Meeting on Mechanics of Materials," Dayton, Ohio, October 1991. Voyiadjis, G. Z., and Kattan, P. I., "Finite Strain Plasticity and Damage in

  10. Damage Mechanics of Composite Materials: Constitutive Modeling and Computational Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-21

    Damage Mechanics", Appl. Mech. Rev., Vol. 37, Jan ., pp. 1-6. 15. KRAJCINOVIC, D., (1985), "Constitutive Theories for Solids with Defective Microstruc...damage models; see, e.g., Krajcinovic (1984,1986,1989) and Bazant (1986) for a comprehensive literature review. There are, however, some micromechanical...Solids, Vol. 37, No. 4, pp. 435-453. 5. BAZANT , Z., (1986), "Mechanics of Distributed Cracking",Appl. Mech. Rev., Vol. 39, No. 5 pp. 675-705. 6. BUDIANSKY

  11. Laser damage mechanisms in conductive widegap semiconductor films

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Menor, Marlon G.; Adams, John J.; ...

    2016-07-25

    Here, laser damage mechanisms of two conductive wide-bandgap semiconductor films - indium tin oxide (ITO) and silicon doped GaN (Si:GaN) were studied via microscopy, spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and elemental analysis. Nanosecond laser pulse exposures with a laser photon energy (1.03 eV, 1064 nm) smaller than the conductive films bandgaps were applied and radically different film damage morphologies were produced. The laser damaged ITO film exhibited deterministic features of thermal degradation. In contrast, laser damage in the Si:GaN film resulted in highly localized eruptions originating at interfaces. For ITO, thermally driven damage was related to free carrier absorption and, for GaN,more » carbon complexes were proposed as potential damage precursors or markers.« less

  12. Laser damage mechanisms in conductive widegap semiconductor films

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Menor, Marlon G.; Adams, John J.; ...

    2016-07-25

    Here, laser damage mechanisms of two conductive wide-bandgap semiconductor films - indium tin oxide (ITO) and silicon doped GaN (Si:GaN) were studied via microscopy, spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and elemental analysis. Nanosecond laser pulse exposures with a laser photon energy (1.03 eV, 1064 nm) smaller than the conductive films bandgaps were applied and radically different film damage morphologies were produced. The laser damaged ITO film exhibited deterministic features of thermal degradation. In contrast, laser damage in the Si:GaN film resulted in highly localized eruptions originating at interfaces. For ITO, thermally driven damage was related to free carrier absorption and, for GaN,more » carbon complexes were proposed as potential damage precursors or markers.« less

  13. Laser damage mechanisms in conductive widegap semiconductor films

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Menor, Marlon G.; Adams, John J.; Raman, Rajesh N.; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Olson, Tammy Y.; Shen, Nan; Suh, Joonki; Demos, Stavros G.; Bude, Jeff; Elhadj, Selim

    2016-07-25

    Here, laser damage mechanisms of two conductive wide-bandgap semiconductor films - indium tin oxide (ITO) and silicon doped GaN (Si:GaN) were studied via microscopy, spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and elemental analysis. Nanosecond laser pulse exposures with a laser photon energy (1.03 eV, 1064 nm) smaller than the conductive films bandgaps were applied and radically different film damage morphologies were produced. The laser damaged ITO film exhibited deterministic features of thermal degradation. In contrast, laser damage in the Si:GaN film resulted in highly localized eruptions originating at interfaces. For ITO, thermally driven damage was related to free carrier absorption and, for GaN, carbon complexes were proposed as potential damage precursors or markers.

  14. Ontogenetic contingency of tolerance mechanisms in response to apical damage

    PubMed Central

    Gruntman, Michal; Novoplansky, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants are able to tolerate tissue loss through vigorous branching which is often triggered by release from apical dominance and activation of lateral meristems. However, damage-induced branching might not be a mere physiological outcome of released apical dominance, but an adaptive response to environmental signals, such as damage timing and intensity. Here, branching responses to both factors were examined in the annual plant Medicago truncatula. Methods Branching patterns and allocation to reproductive traits were examined in response to variable clipping intensities and timings in M. truncatula plants from two populations that vary in the onset of reproduction. Phenotypic selection analysis was used to evaluate the strength and direction of selection on branching under the damage treatments. Key Results Plants of both populations exhibited an ontogenetic shift in tolerance mechanisms: while early damage induced greater meristem activation, late damage elicited investment in late-determined traits, including mean pod and seed biomass, and supported greater germination rates. Severe damage mostly elicited simultaneous development of multiple-order lateral branches, but this response was limited to early damage. Selection analyses revealed positive directional selection on branching in plants under early- compared with late- or no-damage treatments. Conclusions The results demonstrate that damage-induced meristem activation is an adaptive response that could be modified according to the plant's developmental stage, severity of tissue loss and their interaction, stressing the importance of considering these effects when studying plastic responses to apical damage. PMID:21873259

  15. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

  16. Viscoelastic-damage interface model formulation with friction to simulate the delamination growth in mode II shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Mohammad Saeed; Hosseini-Toudeshky, Hossein

    2017-02-01

    In this paper a formulation of a viscoelastic-damage interface model with friction in mode-II is presented. The cohesive constitutive law contains elastic and damage regimes. It has been assumed that the shear stress in the elastic regime follows the viscoelastic properties of the matrix material. The three element Voigt model has been used for the formulation of relaxation modulus of the material. Damage evolution proceeds according to the bilinear cohesive constitutive law combined with friction stress consideration. Combination of damage and friction is based on the presumption that the damaged area, related to an integration point, can be dismembered into the un-cracked area with the cohesive damage and cracked area with friction. Samples of a one element model have been presented to see the effect of parameters on the cohesive constitutive law. A comparison between the predicted results with available results of end-notched flexure specimens in the literature is also presented to verify the model. Transverse crack tension specimens are also simulated for different applied displacement velocities.

  17. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading.

    PubMed

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress-strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history.

  18. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    PubMed Central

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress–strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history. PMID:26150939

  19. Micromechanical Modeling of Impact Damage Mechanisms in Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Zhenqing

    2016-12-01

    Composite laminates are susceptible to the transverse impact loads resulting in significant damage such as matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delamination. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to predict the impact damage of composite laminates based on microstructure and various failure models of laminates. The fiber and matrix are represented by the isotropic and elastic-plastic solid, and their impact failure behaviors are modeled based on shear damage model. The delaminaton failure is modeling by the interface element controlled by cohesive damage model. Impact damage mechanisms of laminate are analyzed by using the micromechanical model proposed. In addition, the effects of impact energy and laminated type on impact damage behavior of laminates are investigated. Due to the damage of the surrounding matrix near the impact point caused by the fiber deformation, the surface damage area of laminate is larger than the area of ​​impact projectile. The shape of the damage area is roughly rectangle or elliptical with the major axis extending parallel to the fiber direction in the surface layer of laminate. The alternating laminated type with two fiber directions is more propitious to improve the impact resistance of laminates.

  20. Numerical Modelling and Damage Assessment of Rotary Wing Aircraft Cabin Door Using Continuum Damage Mechanics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyina, Gangadhara Rao T.; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; V. V., Subba Rao

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of ultimate strength remains the main challenge in the simulation of the mechanical response of composite structures. This paper examines continuum damage model to predict the strength and size effects for deformation and failure response of polymer composite laminates when subjected to complex state of stress. The paper also considers how the overall results of the exercise can be applied in design applications. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting prediction of size effects are compared against the standard benchmark solutions. The stress analysis for strength prediction of rotary wing aircraft cabin door is carried out. The goal of this study is to extend the proposed continuum damage model such that it can be accurately predict the failure around stress concentration regions. The finite element-based continuum damage mechanics model can be applied to the structures and components of arbitrary configurations where analytical solutions could not be developed.

  1. Biconvex intraocular lenses and Nd:YAG capsulotomy: Experimental comparison of surface damage with different poly(methyl methacrylate) formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.E.; Alberhasky, M.T. )

    1990-11-01

    Biconvex posterior chamber lenses have optical advantages and decrease the risk of capsular opacification, but they are more likely to be pitted during ND:YAG capsulotomy because of apposition of the lens to the capsule. This study reports the likelihood of surface damage to different formulations of poly(methyl methacrylate) at the energy levels required to open posterior capsules. Molded lenses are more easily damaged than higher molecular weight lathe-cut materials (P less than .01), as expected. However, by keeping energy output low, even injection-molded lenses showed minimal damage, with mean pit size 39 +/- 39 microns at 1 mJ. By using a converging contact lens, low power, and keeping the focus behind the capsule, damage to all materials tested should be clinically insignificant.

  2. Biconvex intraocular lenses and Nd:YAG capsulotomy: experimental comparison of surface damage with different poly(methyl methacrylate) formulations.

    PubMed

    Downing, J E; Alberhasky, M T

    1990-11-01

    Biconvex posterior chamber lenses have optical advantages and decrease the risk of capsular opacification, but they are more likely to be pitted during ND:YAG capsulotomy because of apposition of the lens to the capsule. This study reports the likelihood of surface damage to different formulations of poly(methyl methacrylate) at the energy levels required to open posterior capsules. Molded lenses are more easily damaged than higher molecular weight lathe-cut materials (P less than .01), as expected. However, by keeping energy output low, even injection-molded lenses showed minimal damage, with mean pit size 39 +/- 39 microns at 1 mJ. By using a converging contact lens, low power, and keeping the focus behind the capsule, damage to all materials tested should be clinically insignificant.

  3. Research on Creep Damage and Life Forecast of Rod Fastening Rotor Based on Damage Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Liu; Ai-lun, Wang

    2017-03-01

    Rod fastening rotor (RFR) is the core part of gas turbine, the degradation of RFR has great effect on gas turbine’s performance. One of the main reasons which cause the RFR performance degradation is creep damage, while few studies have been carried out in terms of it so far. In order to analyze the influence of preload on virtual material parameters, a dynamic model of RFR considering interface contact effect was built. Then equivalent stiffness of RFR and elements was analyzed as well. Furthermore, creep damage of elements under higher stress were analyzed with damage mechanics to get their influence on the total damage. Likewise, RFR were analyzed with damage mechanics to get the connection between the total damage and rupture life. The results showed that connection between the total damage and rupture life was a complicated, non-linear process. Moreover, the rods of turbine and combustion chamber were the biggest influencing factors. The results of this dissertation can be a support for structural design and life prediction of RFR.

  4. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-30

    most manufacturing processes for polymer matrix composites (PMCs) one starts with dry bundles of fibers. On resin infusion, the initially closed-pack... Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics 5b. GRANT NUMBER NOOO 14-16-1-21 73 5c. PROGRAM...distributions. The activities related to Task 2 cover the new peridynamic model for multi-phase composites which can introduce the presence of pores and

  5. Cavitation damage of pyrolytic carbon in mechanical heart valves.

    PubMed

    Kafesjian, R; Howanec, M; Ward, G D; Diep, L; Wagstaff, L S; Rhee, R

    1994-04-01

    A summary of the observations of cavitation-related damage is presented for over a hundred mechanical heart valves (MHV) containing pyrolytic carbon components. Valves were obtained from several types of simulators, animal studies and clinical explantations, and were primarily of the bileaflet type. Damage on these valves was documented as to location, type, and severity. This report focuses on the damage location where cavitation bubbles have been observed in vitro. Pitting and microcracking are the forms of damage observed that can be associated with cavitation. The pitting is primarily of a focal nature and is thought to be due to cavitation bubble collapse or, possibly, initiation. Certain features of the deposited material appear to be important relative to cavitation damage resistance and the so-called cavitation threshold of a MHV. A highly polished surface with few micropores provides few nucleation sites for cavitation bubbles and will better withstand cavitation forces. Attributing certain observations of in vivo damage to cavitation is done by inference from; 1. the similarity of the damage features observed on explants to those produced by cavitation in vitro, and 2. the identity of the location of this damage with the location of cavitation as observed by high speed video (HSV). In addition, confirmation was obtained in a number of instances by in vitro observation of cavitation coinciding with a specific damage location on the same explanted MHV. In most of the fractures, a focal pit was usually present on the fracture line at or near the fracture origin, indicating pitting as a primary damage mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Characterizing mechanical effects of aging damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, T.D.; Chen, S.P.; Schoonover, J.R.; Trent, B.C.; Howe, P.M.; Hjelm, R.P.; Browning, R.V.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal was to develop and apply several different experimental and theoretical/computational tools to better understand physical and chemical aging phenomena in plastic-bonded high explosives, and to develop a methodology for predicting the likely effects of aging on the mechanical properties of the composite based on input from these fundamental studies. Initial comparisons were done for spectra of fresh and aged Esane, as well as PBX-9501, and the authors found differences in the carbonyl region of the spectrum, which possibly reflect differences in hydrogen bonding due to aging phenomena. The micromechanical model of composites was extended to study various volume fractions of HMX with binders. The results showed that, as the binder fraction increases, there is a decrease in the maximum stress that can be supported but an increase in the percent strain at final fracture. A more realistic microstructural model was obtained through the use of a phase field model. Using this model, the authors have studied the microstructural evolution as a function of the grain boundary energy vs. misorientation relationship. The initial results indicate that there are some changes in the grain growth rate when the grain-boundary energy dependence on the angle is not constant. They also find that solute tends to segregate at the grain boundary and slows the grain growth kinetics.

  7. Mechanisms to explain damage growth in optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Kozlowski, M R; Staggs, M; Chase, L L; Burnham, A; Radousky, H B

    2001-01-10

    Damage growth in optical materials used in large aperture laser systems is an issue of great importance when determining component lifetime and therefore cost of operation. Understanding the mechanisms and photophysical processes associated with damage growth are important in order to devise mitigation techniques. In this work we examined plasma-modified material and cracks for their correlation to damage growth on fused silica and DKDP samples. We employ an in-situ damage testing optical microscope that allows the acquisition of light scattering and fluorescence images of the area of interest prior to, and following exposure to a high fluence, 355-nm, 3-ns laser pulse. In addition, high-resolution images of the damage event are recorded using the associated plasma emission. Experimental results indicate that both aforementioned features can initiate plasma formation at fluences as low as 2 J/cm{sup 2}. The intensity of the recorded plasma emission remains low for fluences up to approximately 5 J/cm{sup 2} but rapidly increases thereafter. Based on the experimental results, we propose as possible mechanisms leading to damage growth the initiation of avalanche ionization by defects at the damage modified material and presence of field intensification due to cracks.

  8. Mechanisms to Explain Damage Growth in Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Kozlowski, M R; Staggs, M; Chase, L L; Burnham, A; Radousky, H B

    2000-12-18

    Damage growth in optical materials used in large aperture laser systems is an issue of great importance when determining component lifetime and therefore cost of operation. Understanding the mechanisms and photophysical processes associated with damage growth are important in order to devise mitigation techniques. In this work we examined plasma-modified material and cracks for their correlation to damage growth on fused silica and DKDP samples. We employ an in-situ damage testing optical microscope that allows the acquisition of light scattering and fluorescence images of the area of interest prior to, and following exposure to a high fluence, 355-nm, 3-ns laser pulse. In addition, high-resolution images of the damage event are recorded using the associated plasma emission. Experimental results indicate that both aforementioned features can initiate plasma formation at fluences as low as 2 J/cm{sup 2}. The intensity of the recorded plasma emission remains low for fluences up to approximately 5 J/cm{sup 2} but rapidly increases thereafter. Based on the experimental results, we propose as possible mechanisms leading to damage growth the initiation of avalanche ionization by defects at the damage modified material and presence of field intensification due to cracks.

  9. Are DNA-damaging effects induced by herbicide formulations (Roundup® and Garlon®) in fish transient and reversible upon cessation of exposure?

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Santos, M A; Gaivão, I; Pacheco, M

    2014-10-01

    Owing to the seasonality of crop cultivation and subsequent periodic/seasonal application of herbicides, their input to the aquatic systems is typically intermittent. Consequently, exposure of fish to this type of contaminants can be short and followed by a period of permanence in non-contaminated areas. Thus, the assessment of genotoxic endpoints in fish after removal of the contamination source appears as a crucial step to improve the knowledge on the dynamics of herbicide genotoxicity, as well as to determine the actual magnitude of risk posed by these agrochemicals. Therefore, the present study intended to shed light on the ability of fish to recover from the DNA damage induced by short-term exposures to the herbicide formulations Roundup(®) (glyphosate-based) and Garlon(®) (triclopyr-based) upon the exposure cessation. European eel (Anguilla anguilla) was exposed to the above commercial formulations for 3 days, and allowed to recover for 1, 7 and 14 days (post-exposure period). The comet assay was used to identify the DNA damage in blood cells during both exposure and post-exposure periods. As an attempt to clarify the DNA damaging mechanisms involved, an extra-step including the incubation of the nucleotides with DNA lesion-specific repair enzyme was added to the standard comet. The genotoxic potential of both herbicides was confirmed, concerning the exposure period. In addition, the involvement of oxidative DNA damage on the action of Roundup(®) (pointed out as pyrimidine bases oxidation) was demonstrated, while for Garlon(®) this damaging mechanism was less evident. Fish exposed to Garlon(®), though presenting some evidence towards a tendency of recovery, did not achieve a complete restoration of DNA integrity. In what concerns to Roundup(®), a recovery was evident when considering non-specific DNA damage on day 14 post-exposure. In addition, this herbicide was able to induce a late oxidative DNA damage (day 14). Blood cells of A. anguilla exposed to

  10. Evolution of the passive film on mechanically damaged nitinol.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Valeska

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of Nitinol-based medical implants is critical to their success in vivo. Contemporary Nitinol-based medical implants are typically chemically passivated or electrochemically polished to form a protective passive film. However, mechanically formed surfaces caused by handling damage, fretting, or fatigue fracture may also be present on a device in vivo. In this study, mechanically polished surfaces are used to simulate mechanically damaged surfaces such that analytical techniques, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, open circuit potential monitoring, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mott-Schottky analysis may be used to monitor the evolution of the passive film on mechanically damaged Nitinol. These mechanically polished Nitinol surfaces are compared with chemically passivated and electrochemically polished Nitinol surfaces and mechanically polished titanium surfaces in phosphate buffered saline solution. The mechanically polished Nitinol exhibits lower impedance at low frequencies, empirically modeled to a thinner film with lower film resistance than chemically passivated and electrochemically polished Nitinol and mechanically polished titanium. Moreover, the passive film on mechanically polished Nitinol continues to develop over time, increasing in its thickness and film resistance. This characterization demonstrates that mechanically formed surfaces may be initially less protective than chemically passivated and electrochemically polished Nitinol surfaces, but continue to become thicker and more resistant to electrochemical reactions with exposure to saline solution.

  11. Phototoxicity mechanisms: chlorpromazine photosensitized damage to DNA and cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, K.E.

    1981-07-01

    Photosensitized damage to biological molecules is the initial process in phototoxic responses. It is now recognized that many phototoxic compounds can photosensitize damage to more than one type of biological substrate. The in vitro light-initiated reactions of phototoxic compounds with DNA, soluble proteins and membrane components can be classified by their molecular mechanisms: (1) those in which an excited state of the phototoxic compound (or an unstable species derived from it) reacts directly with the biological substrate and (2) those in which a molecule derived from the phototoxic compound (a photoproduct or an activated oxygen species) reacts with the biological substrate. This paper describes the mechanisms by which chlorpromazine photosensitizes damage to membranes, protein and DNA and compares them to the mechanisms of photosensitization by psoralens, porphyrins, dyes, and other molecules.

  12. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Final report, June 1, 1986--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last 10 years significant advances have been made impacting the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The principal objective of this work was the elucidation of the fundamental mechanisms of radiation damage to DNA through the direct and indirect effects. Recently the work concentrated on the direct effect of radiation damage on DNA. The objective was to elucidate the ultimate radiation chemical damage to DNA arising from the direct effect. In this effort the focus was on the application of three techniques. ESR spectroscopic measurement of initial radicals formed in DNA and its hydration layer at low temperatures. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations were employed to give highly accurate theoretical predictions of early events such as electron and hole localization sites which serve to test and to clarify the experimental observations. HPLC and GC-mass spectroscopic assays of DNA base products formation provide the ultimate chemical outcome of the initial radiation events. The bridge between the early ion radical species and the non-radical products is made in ESR studies which follow the chemistry of the early species as they react with water and or other DNA bases. The use of these techniques has resulted in a new and fundamental understanding of the radiation damage to DNA on a molecular scale. From this work, a working model for DNA damage from the initial ionization event to the eventual formation of molecular base damage products and strand breaks has been formulated. Results over the past several years which have led to the formulation of this model are described.

  13. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Lowe, Tracie M

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  14. Mechanical Data for Use in Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Newman, John A.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of a research program to determine the damage tolerance properties of metallic propeller materials. Three alloys were selected for investigation: 2025-T6 Aluminum, D6AC Steel and 4340 Steel. Mechanical response, fatigue (S-N) and fatigue crack growth rate data are presented for all of the alloys. The main conclusions that can be drawn from this study are as follows. The damage tolerant design of a propeller system will require a complete understanding of the fatigue crack growth threshold. There exists no experimental procedure to reliably develop the fatigue crack growth threshold data that is needed for damage tolerant design methods. Significant research will be required to fully understand the fatigue crack growth threshold. The development of alternative precracking methods, evaluating the effect of specimen configuration and attempting to identify micromechanical issues are simply the first steps to understanding the mechanics of the threshold.

  15. An anisotropic damage mechanics model for concrete with applications for fatigue loading and freeze-thaw effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reberg, Andrew Steven

    It is well known that the formation and propagation of microcracks within concrete is anisotropic in nature, and has a degrading effect on its mechanical performance. In this thesis an anisotropic damage mechanics model is formulated for concrete which can predict the behavior of the material subjected to monotonic loading, fatigue loading, and freeze-thaw cycles. The constitutive model is formulated using the general framework of the internal variable theory of thermodynamics. Kinetic relations are used to describe the directionality of damage accumulation and the associated softening of mechanical properties. The rate independent model is then extended to cover fatigue loading cycles and freeze-thaw cycles. Two simple softening functions are used to predict the mechanical properties of concrete as the number of cyclic loads as well as freeze-thaw cycles increases. The model is compared with experimental data for fatigue and freeze-thaw performance of plain concrete.

  16. Early mechanisms in radiation-induced biological damage

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    An introduction to the mechanisms of radiation action in biological systems is presented. Several questions about the nature of the radiation damage process are discussed, including recognition of the oxygen effects, dose-response relationships, and the importance of the hydroxyl radical. (ACR)

  17. Herbal Formulation C168 Attenuates Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells: Role of Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Lek Mun; Chan, Kok Meng; Hamid, Asmah; Latip, Jalifah; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal formulations has gained scientific interest, particularly in cancer treatment. In this study, the herbal formulation of interest, denoted as C168, is a mixture of eight genera of plants. This study aims to investigate the antiproliferative effect of C168 methanol extract (CME) on various cancer cells and its underlying mechanism of action on the most responsive cell line, namely, HCT 116 cells. CME exerted antiproliferative activities on HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells and HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells but not on CCD-841-CoN normal colon epithelial cells, Jurkat E6.1 lymphoblastic leukemic cells, and V79-4 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. Further investigation on HCT 116 cells showed that CME induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Treatment of CME induced oxidative stress in HCT 116 cells by increasing the superoxide anion level and decreasing the intracellular glutathione. CME also increased tail moment value and H2AX phosphorylation in HCT 116 cells, suggesting DNA damage as an early signal of CME induced apoptosis. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in CME-treated cells also indicated the involvement of mitochondria in CME induced apoptosis. This study indicated the selectivity of CME toward colon cancer cells with the involvement of oxidative damage as its possible mechanism of action. PMID:26884792

  18. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of Karisalai Karpam, a polyherbal Siddha formulation against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Saikat; Chakraborty, Raja; Thangavel, Ganesh; Logaiyan, Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The usage of Siddha medicine in Tamil Nadu and several parts of Southern India has considerably increased over the past two decades and it is steadily crossing the various geographies owing to its inexpensiveness compared to conventional medicines and has fairly high acceptance rates because of its herbal origin and therefore its nontoxic nature. Aim: This study aims to investigate the anti-hepatotoxic and antioxidant potential of the Karisalai Karpam formulation. Materials and Methods: Karisalai Karpam tablet at 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day, p.o. doses were administered orally to rats for three consecutive days. Single dose of acetaminophen (3 g/kg, p.o.) was administered on the 3rd day. Animals were sacrificed 48 h after the administration of acetaminophen, and their serum bilirubin, different hepatic enzymes and in vivo antioxidant activity were estimated. Statistical Analysis: Data were evaluated using analysis of variance, followed by Tukey tests. A level of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Pretreatment with Karisalai Karpam tablet showed dose-dependent hepatoprotective activity. Karisalai Karpam tablet (200 mg/kg) reduces serum glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin, direct bilirubin by 67.8%, 72.3%, 47.6%, 61.3% and 62.9% respectively compared to disease control group. A significant increase (P < 0.001) in antioxidant enzyme level was observed in Karisalai Karpam treated animals. At higher doses, Karisalai Karpam prevented the depletion of glutathione in liver tissue. Conclusion: Results confirmed that Karisalai Karpam tablet could protect the liver against acetaminophen-induced oxidative damage possibly by increasing the antioxidant defence mechanism in rats. PMID:26283804

  19. Alcohol teratogenesis: mechanisms of damage and strategies for intervention.

    PubMed

    Goodlett, Charles R; Horn, Kristin H; Zhou, Feng C

    2005-06-01

    There are multiple mechanisms by which alcohol can damage the developing brain, but the type of damage induced will depend on the amount and developmental timing of exposure, along with other maternal and genetic factors. This article reviews current perspectives on how ethanol can produce neuroteratogenic effects by its interactions with molecular regulators of brain development. The current evidence suggests that alcohol produces many of its damaging effects by exerting specific actions on molecules that regulate key developmental processes (e.g., L1 cell adhesion molecule, alcohol dehydrogenase, catalase), interfering with the early development of midline serotonergic neurons and disrupting their regulatory-signaling function for other target brain structures, interfering with trophic factors that regulate neurogenesis and cell survival, or inducing excessive cell death via oxidative stress or activation of caspase-3 proteases. The current understanding of pathogenesis mechanisms suggests several strategic approaches to develop rational molecular prevention. However, the development of behavioral and biologic treatments for alcohol-affected children is crucial because it is unlikely that effective delivery of preventative interventions can realistically be achieved in ways to prevent prenatal damage in at-risk pregnancies. Toward that end, behavioral training that promotes experience-dependent neuroplasticity has been effective in a rat model of cerebellar damage induced by alcohol exposure during the period of brain development that is comparable to that of the human third trimester.

  20. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-03

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  1. Lightning Strike Induced Damage Mechanisms of Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hirohide

    Composite materials have a wide application in aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries, because of the superior structural and weight performances. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites possess a much lower electrical conductivity as compared to traditional metallic materials utilized for aircraft structures, serious concern about damage resistance/tolerance against lightning has been rising. Main task of this study is to clarify the lightning damage mechanism of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy polymer composites to help further development of lightning strike protection. The research on lightning damage to carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites is quite challenging, and there has been little study available until now. In order to tackle this issue, building block approach was employed. The research was started with the development of supporting technologies such as a current impulse generator to simulate a lightning strike in a laboratory. Then, fundamental electrical properties and fracture behavior of CFRPs exposed to high and low level current impulse were investigated using simple coupon specimens, followed by extensive parametric investigations in terms of different prepreg materials frequently used in aerospace industry, various stacking sequences, different lightning intensity, and lightning current waveforms. It revealed that the thermal resistance capability of polymer matrix was one of the most influential parameters on lightning damage resistance of CFRPs. Based on the experimental findings, the semi-empirical analysis model for predicting the extent of lightning damage was established. The model was fitted through experimental data to determine empirical parameters and, then, showed a good capability to provide reliable predictions for other test conditions and materials. Finally, structural element level lightning tests were performed to explore more practical situations. Specifically, filled-hole CFRP plates and patch

  2. Damage mechanisms for ultrasound-induced cavitation in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M.; Vlaisavljevich, E.; Xu, Z.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-03-01

    In a variety of biomedical applications, cavitation occurs in soft tissue. Although significant amounts of research have been performed on cavitation in water, bubble dynamics, and related bioeffects remain poorly understood. We use numerical simulations of spherical bubble dynamics in soft tissue to assess the extent to which viscoelasticity affects "known" and introduces "new" damage mechanisms. We find that deviatoric stresses - although not an important damage mechanism in water - are significantly enhanced and could be an important bioeffect mechanism in tissue. Both the viscoelastic properties and the nonlinear, large-collapse radius contribute to stress amplification in the surroundings. In addition, temperatures in the surrounding medium increase more in the Zener tissue than in water, due to viscous heating.

  3. Differential continuum damage mechanics models for creep and fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three multiaxial isothermal continuum damage mechanics models for creep, fatigue, and creep/fatigue interaction of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element are presented, only one of which will be discussed in depth. Each model is phenomenological and stress based, with varying degrees of complexity to accurately predict the initiation and propagation of intergranular and transgranular defects over a wide range of loading conditions. The development of these models is founded on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, static fracture surface, normalized stress amplitude function and isochronous creep damage failure surface, from which both fatigue and creep damage evolutionary laws can be obtained. The anisotropy of each model is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. All three transversely isotropic models have been shown, when taken to their isotropic limit, to directly simplify to previously developed and validated creep and fatigue continuum damage theories. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation when attempting to characterize a large class of composite materials, and (2) its ability to predict anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Additionally, the potential for the inclusion of various micromechanical effects (e.g., fiber/matrix bond strength, fiber volume fraction, etc.), into the phenomenological anisotropic parameters is noted, as well as a detailed discussion regarding the necessary exploratory and characterization experiments needed to utilize the featured damage theories.

  4. Fatigue and Mechanical Damage Propagation in Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banan, Roshanak

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are generally exposed to high magnitude road-induced vibrations and impact loads, frequent humidity-temperature loading cycles, and freeze/thaw stresses when employed in automotive applications. The resultant mechanical stresses can play a significant role in the evolution of mechanical defects in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The focus of this research is to investigate fatigue challenges due to humidity-temperature (hygrothermal) cycles and vibrations and their effects on damage evolution in PEM fuel cells. To achieve this goal, this thesis is divided into three parts that provide insight into damage propagation in the MEA under i) hygrothermal cycles, ii) external applied vibrations, and iii) a combination of both to simulate realistic automotive conditions. A finite element damage model based on cohesive zone theory was developed to simulate the propagation of micro-scale defects (cracks and delaminations) in the MEA under fuel cell operating conditions. It was found that the micro-defects can propagate to critical states under start-up and shut-down cycles, prior to reaching the desired lifespan of the fuel cell. The simultaneous presence of hygrothermal cycles and vibrations severely intensified damage propagation and resulted in considerably large defects within 75% of the fuel cell life expectancy. However, the order of generated damage was found to be larger under hygrothermal cycles than vibrations. Under hygrothermal cycles, membrane crack propagation was more severe compared to delamination propagation. Conversely, the degrading influence of vibrations was more significant on delaminations. The presence of an anode/cathode channel offset under the combined loadings lead to a 2.5-fold increase in the delamination length compared to the aligned-channel case. The developed model can be used to investigate the damage behaviour of current materials employed in fuel cells as well as to evaluate the

  5. Investigation of mechanisms leading to laser damage morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamaignère, L.; Chambonneau, M.; Diaz, R.; Grua, P.; Courchinoux, R.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Rullier, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The original damage ring pattern at the exit surface of fused silica induced by highly modulated nanosecond infrared laser pulses demonstrates the time dependence of damage morphology. Such a damage structure is used to study the dynamics of the plasma issued from open cracks. This pattern originates from electron avalanche in this plasma, which simultaneously leads to an ionization front displacement in air and a silica ablation process. Experiments have shown that the propagation speed of the detonation wave reaches about 20 km/s and scales as the cube root of the laser intensity, in good agreement with theoretical hydrodynamics modeling. During this presentation, we present the different phases and the associated mechanisms leading to this peculiar morphology: • During an incubation phase, a precursor defect provides energy deposit that drives the near surface material into a plasma state. • Next the silica plasma provides free electrons in the surrounding air, under laser irradiation an electron avalanche is initiated and generates a breakdown wave. • Then this breakdown wave leads to an expansion of the air plasma. This latter is able to heat strongly the silica surface as well as generate free electrons in its conduction band. Hence, the silica becomes activated along the breakdown wave. • When the silica has become absorbent, an ablation mechanism of silica occurs, simultaneously with the air plasma expansion, resulting in the formation of the ring patterns in the case of these modulated laser pulses. These mechanisms are supported by experiments realized in vacuum environment. A model describing the expansion of the heated area by thermal conduction due to plasma free electrons is then presented. Next, the paper deals with the two damage formation phases that are distinguished. The first phase corresponds to the incubation of the laser flux by a subsurface defect until the damage occurrence: an incubation fluence corresponds to this phase. The

  6. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Zane L.; Benton, Samuel T.

    1988-01-01

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  7. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Z.L.; Benton, S.T.

    1988-11-22

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  8. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Z.L.; Benton, S.T.

    1987-07-08

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  9. Mechanisms of fatigue damage and crack growth in advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-03-01

    In terms of in-service failures, cyclic fatigue is the most prevalent form of fracture. Despite the wealth of information on fatigue failures in traditional structural materials such as (ductile) metals and alloys, far less is understood about the susceptibility of the newer advanced materials, such as (brittle) intermetallics, ceramics and their composites. In this presentation, the mechanics and mechanisms of fatigue damage and crack propagation are examined with particular emphasis on the similarities and differences between cyclic crack growth in ductile metallic materials, and corresponding behavior in the more brittle advanced materials. This is achieved by considering the process of subcritical crack growth as a mutual competition between intrinsic mechanisms of microstructural damage ahead of the crack tip, which promote crack growth, and extrinsic mechanisms of crack-tip shielding behind the tip, which impede it. This approach is shown to be important for the understanding of the structural fatigue properties of advanced materials, such as monolithic and composite ceramics, and a range of intermetallics (e.g., TiAl, MoSi2, Nb3Al), as the mechanisms of fatigue in these brittle materials are conceptually distinct from that associated with the well known metal fatigue. Examples of the application and life-prediction methodologies for such materials in fatigue-critical situations will be given from the aerospace and bioengineering industries.

  10. Origin and magma pathways for intraplate volcanism: a new damage mechanics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Rosenbaum, G.; Weinberg, R. F.; Lyakhovsky, V.; Segev, A.; Weinstein, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We address the question of melting at the base of the lithosphere and the opening of pathways capable of transferring melt to the surface in an intraplate setting of an extending continental lithosphere. We study the initial stage of melting and the onset of the melting instability. The aim of this study thus is to understand: (i) the ubiquitous appearance of alkali-basaltic volcanic provinces that appear without identifiable heat source in intraplate settings; (ii) the apparent relation between melting and localization of deformation under such extremely low intraplate strain rates; (iii) the challenge of generating efficient pathways for the propagation of melt to the surface; (iv) the generation of melt at the base of a lithosphere with low regional heat flow in a thermodynamically consistent model; (iv) as a minor aspect, we also investigate the effect of a pre-existing structure at the surface of the lithosphere. We use a novel method for calculating the effect of melt on lithosphere deformation, which includes damage mechanics and feedback effects between melt generation and rock deformation. We show that it is possible to nucleate melt damage shear bands at the bottom of initially cold lithosphere in slow extensional setting. We conducted numerical models for common continental lithosphere with 50mW/m2 heat flow and a slow asymmetric extension velocity of 1 mm/y, and allowed three different damage mechanisms: (1) classical brittle damage with a Drucker-Prager type rheology; (2) creep damage with a crustal fluid assisted diffusional/dislocation mechanism; and (3) melt damage with a melt-supported diffusional/ dislocation mechanism. The melt conditions were calculated with a Gibbs energy minimization method (Melts; http://melts.ofm-research.org/), and the energy equation solved self-consistently for latent heat and shear heating effects. Our results show that within a short timeframe (~2 Ma), melt damage can propagate from the bottom of the lithosphere upwards

  11. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage after Ocular Alkali Burns.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, Eleftherios I; Zhou, Chengxin; Lei, Fengyang; Scott, Nathan; Kapoulea, Vassiliki; Robert, Marie-Claude; Vavvas, Demetrios; Dana, Reza; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H

    2017-06-01

    Alkali burns to the eye constitute a leading cause of worldwide blindness. In recent case series, corneal transplantation revealed unexpected damage to the retina and optic nerve in chemically burned eyes. We investigated the physical, biochemical, and immunological components of retinal injury after alkali burn and explored a novel neuroprotective regimen suitable for prompt administration in emergency departments. Thus, in vivo pH, oxygen, and oxidation reduction measurements were performed in the anterior and posterior segment of mouse and rabbit eyes using implantable microsensors. Tissue inflammation was assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. The experiments confirmed that the retinal damage is not mediated by direct effect of the alkali, which is effectively buffered by the anterior segment. Rather, pH, oxygen, and oxidation reduction changes were restricted to the cornea and the anterior chamber, where they caused profound uveal inflammation and release of proinflammatory cytokines. The latter rapidly diffuse to the posterior segment, triggering retinal damage. Tumor necrosis factor-α was identified as a key proinflammatory mediator of retinal ganglion cell death. Blockade, by either monoclonal antibody or tumor necrosis factor receptor gene knockout, reduced inflammation and retinal ganglion cell loss. Intraocular pressure elevation was not observed in experimental alkali burns. These findings illuminate the mechanism by which alkali burns cause retinal damage and may have importance in designing therapies for retinal protection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An Extended Damage Plasticity Model for Shotcrete: Formulation and Comparison with Other Shotcrete Models

    PubMed Central

    Neuner, Matthias; Gamnitzer, Peter; Hofstetter, Günter

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present paper are (i) to briefly review single-field and multi-field shotcrete models proposed in the literature; (ii) to propose the extension of a damage-plasticity model for concrete to shotcrete; and (iii) to evaluate the capabilities of the proposed extended damage-plasticity model for shotcrete by comparing the predicted response with experimental data for shotcrete and with the response predicted by shotcrete models, available in the literature. The results of the evaluation will be used for recommendations concerning the application and further improvements of the investigated shotcrete models and they will serve as a basis for the design of a new lab test program, complementing the existing ones. PMID:28772445

  13. Mechanisms Used by Plants to Cope with DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhubing; Cools, Toon; De Veylder, Lieven

    2016-04-29

    Because the genome stores all genetic information required for growth and development, it is of pivotal importance to maintain DNA integrity, especially during cell division, when the genome is prone to replication errors and damage. Although over the last two decades it has become evident that the basic cell cycle toolbox of plants shares several similarities with those of fungi and mammals, plants appear to have evolved a set of distinct checkpoint regulators in response to different types of DNA stress. This might be a consequence of plants' sessile lifestyle, which exposes them to a set of unique DNA damage-inducing conditions. In this review, we highlight the types of DNA stress that plants typically experience and describe the plant-specific molecular mechanisms that control cell division in response to these stresses.

  14. Mechanisms of vessel damage in photodynamic therapy (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingar, Victor H.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1992-06-01

    Vessel constriction and platelet aggregation are observed within the first minutes of light exposure to photosensitized tissues and lead to blood flow stasis, tissue hypoxia, and nutrient depravation. The mechanism for these vessel changes remains unknown, although the release of eicosanoids is implicated. We propose the following hypothesis: Photodynamic therapy results in specific perturbations of endothelial cells which results in a combination of membrane damage, mitochondrial damage, and rearrangement of cytoskeletal proteins. This results in cellular stress which leads to interruption of tight junctions along the endothelium and cell rounding. Cell rounding exposes the basement membrane proteins causing activation of platelets and leukocytes. Activated platelets and leukocytes release thromboxane and other eicosanoids. These eicosanoids induce vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, increases in vessel permeability, and blood flow stasis.

  15. Damages to optical silica glass: processes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian; Zheng, Lianqing; An, Qi; Wu, Heng-An; Xia, Kaiwen; Ni, Sidao

    2007-01-01

    We present recent results of molecular dynamics simulations to illustrate the processes and mechanisms in damages to silica glass, including densification, cavitation, fragmentation and agglomeration via photon, electron, ion and neutron radiations and stresses. Radiation of glass creates point defects (vacancies and interstitials), and subsequent structure relaxation induces densification. Nanovoid below a certain size and rapid-quenching of silica liquid can also densify a glass. Hot spots due to photon-absorbing impurities in glass may cause local densification and cavitation as well. Densification can also be induced by compressional stress, and spall, by tensile stress. The densified glasses, regardless of the exact processes, share similar structural and vibrational properties, for example, the five-fold coordinated Si atoms. Densification is essentially a kinetic frustration during structure relaxation driven by excessive free energy, e.g., due to defects or stresses. The point-defect mechanism is dominant for densification without compression and complemented by thermal spike mechanism in thermal processes. Defects, thermal effects and stresses may interplay in a general damage process in silica glass.

  16. [Pathogenic mechanisms of neuronal damage in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Gabriel-Ortiz, Genaro; Pacheco-Mois, Fermín P; Bitzer-Quintero, K

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common cause of progressive neurological disability in young adults. This disease involves damage to the myelin sheath that normally insulates the electrical activity of nerve fibers. This leads to a wide range of symptoms as specific nerves become injured and lose their function. Epidemiological and experimental studies show that genetic alterations, antioxidant enzyme abnormalities and autoimmunity are risk factors for developing the disease. Recent evidence suggests that inflammation and oxidative stress within the central nervous system are major causes of ongoing tissue damage. Resident central nervous system cells and invading inflammatory cells release several reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which cause the histopathological features of multiple sclerosis: demyelization and axonal damage. The interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes results in an intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress status are important therapeutic strategies to slow or halt the disease processes. Therefore, several drugs are currently in trial in clinical practice to target this mechanism; particularly the use of supplements such as antioxidants and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in order to improve the survival and quality of patients' lives.

  17. Outrunning damage: Electrons vs X-rays—timescales and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Spence, John C. H.

    2017-01-01

    Toward the end of his career, Zewail developed strong interest in fast electron spectroscopy and imaging, a field to which he made important contributions toward his aim of making molecular movies free of radiation damage. We therefore compare here the atomistic mechanisms leading to destruction of protein samples in diffract-and-destroy experiments for the cases of high-energy electron beam irradiation and X-ray laser pulses. The damage processes and their time-scales are compared and relevant elastic, inelastic, and photoelectron cross sections are given. Inelastic mean-free paths for ejected electrons at very low energies in insulators are compared with the bioparticle size. The dose rate and structural damage rate for electrons are found to be much lower, allowing longer pulses, reduced beam current, and Coulomb interactions for the formation of smaller probes. High-angle electron scattering from the nucleus, which has no parallel in the X-ray case, tracks the slowly moving nuclei during the explosion, just as the gain of the XFEL (X-ray free-electron laser) has no parallel in the electron case. Despite reduced damage and much larger elastic scattering cross sections in the electron case, leading to not dissimilar elastic scattering rates (when account is taken of the greatly increased incident XFEL fluence), progress for single-particle electron diffraction is seen to depend on the effort to reduce emittance growth due to Coulomb interactions, and so allow formation of intense sub-micron beams no larger than a virus. PMID:28653018

  18. A displacement-based finite element formulation for incompressible and nearly-incompressible cardiac mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hadjicharalambous, Myrianthi; Lee, Jack; Smith, Nicolas P.; Nordsletten, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lagrange Multiplier (LM) and penalty methods are commonly used to enforce incompressibility and compressibility in models of cardiac mechanics. In this paper we show how both formulations may be equivalently thought of as a weakly penalized system derived from the statically condensed Perturbed Lagrangian formulation, which may be directly discretized maintaining the simplicity of penalty formulations with the convergence characteristics of LM techniques. A modified Shamanskii–Newton–Raphson scheme is introduced to enhance the nonlinear convergence of the weakly penalized system and, exploiting its equivalence, modifications are developed for the penalty form. Focusing on accuracy, we proceed to study the convergence behavior of these approaches using different interpolation schemes for both a simple test problem and more complex models of cardiac mechanics. Our results illustrate the well-known influence of locking phenomena on the penalty approach (particularly for lower order schemes) and its effect on accuracy for whole-cycle mechanics. Additionally, we verify that direct discretization of the weakly penalized form produces similar convergence behavior to mixed formulations while avoiding the use of an additional variable. Combining a simple structure which allows the solution of computationally challenging problems with good convergence characteristics, the weakly penalized form provides an accurate and efficient alternative to incompressibility and compressibility in cardiac mechanics. PMID:25187672

  19. A displacement-based finite element formulation for incompressible and nearly-incompressible cardiac mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hadjicharalambous, Myrianthi; Lee, Jack; Smith, Nicolas P; Nordsletten, David A

    2014-06-01

    The Lagrange Multiplier (LM) and penalty methods are commonly used to enforce incompressibility and compressibility in models of cardiac mechanics. In this paper we show how both formulations may be equivalently thought of as a weakly penalized system derived from the statically condensed Perturbed Lagrangian formulation, which may be directly discretized maintaining the simplicity of penalty formulations with the convergence characteristics of LM techniques. A modified Shamanskii-Newton-Raphson scheme is introduced to enhance the nonlinear convergence of the weakly penalized system and, exploiting its equivalence, modifications are developed for the penalty form. Focusing on accuracy, we proceed to study the convergence behavior of these approaches using different interpolation schemes for both a simple test problem and more complex models of cardiac mechanics. Our results illustrate the well-known influence of locking phenomena on the penalty approach (particularly for lower order schemes) and its effect on accuracy for whole-cycle mechanics. Additionally, we verify that direct discretization of the weakly penalized form produces similar convergence behavior to mixed formulations while avoiding the use of an additional variable. Combining a simple structure which allows the solution of computationally challenging problems with good convergence characteristics, the weakly penalized form provides an accurate and efficient alternative to incompressibility and compressibility in cardiac mechanics.

  20. Hygrothermal damage mechanisms in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman, F. W.; Mauri, R. E.; Warren, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    T300/5209 and T300/5208 graphite epoxy laminates were studied experimentally and analytically in order to: (1) determine the coupling between applied stress, internal residual stress, and moisture sorption kinetics; (2) examine the microscopic damage mechanisms due to hygrothermal cycling; (3) evaluate the effect of absorbed moisture and hygrothermal cycling on inplane shear response; (4) determine the permanent loss of interfacial bond strength after moisture absorption and drying; and (5) evaluate the three dimensional stress state in laminates under a combination of hygroscopic, thermal, and mechanical loads. Specimens were conditioned to equilibrium moisture content under steady exposure to 55% or 95% RH at 70 C or 93 C. Some specimens were tested subsequent to moisture conditioning and 100 cycles between -54 C and either 70 C or 93 C.

  1. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  2. Application and mechanism of inhalation profile improvement of DPI formulations by mechanofusion with magnesium stearate.

    PubMed

    Kumon, Michiko; Machida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kusai, Akira; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2008-05-01

    In our previous paper, we reported the inhalation properties of dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations containing Compound A and mechanofusion-processed lactose carriers. The mechanofusion process with magnesium stearate (Mg-St) on the lactose carrier enhanced the fine particle fraction (FPF) value of the Andersen cascade impactor (ACI) study. The increase of FPF seemed to be associated with the increase of the dispersibility of drug particles. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the applicability of lactose carrier mechanofusion-processed with Mg-St and (2) to examine the mechanism of FPF alteration by the mechanofusion process applied on the lactose carrier with or without additive. The inhalation profiles of DPI formulations containing four different pharmaceutical compounds were evaluated with an ACI. The dispersibility of the formulations was observed by particle size distribution measurement in the air stream and the adhesive force was measured bydirect separation method. It was found that higher FPF was obtained with lactose mechanofusion-processed with Mg-St as compared to control lactose carriers for all four compounds. This suggested that mechanofusion process with Mg-St is widely applicable in DPI formulations. The homogenization of surface adhesiveness was attributed to the increased FPF of the DPI including lactose mechanofusion-processed with Mg-St, as suggested by the combination of several physicochemical characteristics. Combination of different characterization methods would be of help to clarify the whole mechanism which defines the inhalation properties of DPI formulations.

  3. Characteristics and mechanisms of acrylate polymer damage to maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Mao, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qin; Liao, Zongwen; He, Zhenli

    2016-07-01

    Superabsorbent acrylate polymers (SAPs) have been widely used to maintain soil moisture in agricultural management, but they may cause damage to plants, and the mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, seed germination, soil pot culture, hydroponic experiments, and SAPs degradation were conducted to investigate damage characteristics and mechanisms associated with SAPs application. The Results showed that SAPs inhibited maize growth and altered root morphology (irregular and loose arrangement of cells and breakage of cortex parenchyma), and the inhibitory effects were enhanced at higher SAPs rates. After 1h SAP hydrogels treatment, root malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly increased, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) content were significantly decreased. Hydroponics experiment indicated that root and shoot growth was inhibited at 2.5mgL(-1) acrylic acid (AA), and the inhibition was enhanced with increasing AA rates. This effect was exacerbated by the presence of Na(+) at a high concentration in the hydrogels. Release and degradation of AA were enhanced at higher soil moisture levels. A complete degradation of AA occurred between 15 and 20 days after incubation (DAI), but it took longer for Na(+) concentration to decrease to a safe level. These results indicate that high concentration of both AA and Na(+) present in the SAPs inhibits plant growth. The finding of this study may provide a guideline for appropriate application of SAPs in agriculture.

  4. A mechanism for impaired fear recognition after amygdala damage.

    PubMed

    Adolphs, Ralph; Gosselin, Frederic; Buchanan, Tony W; Tranel, Daniel; Schyns, Philippe; Damasio, Antonio R

    2005-01-06

    Ten years ago, we reported that SM, a patient with rare bilateral amygdala damage, showed an intriguing impairment in her ability to recognize fear from facial expressions. Since then, the importance of the amygdala in processing information about facial emotions has been borne out by a number of lesion and functional imaging studies. Yet the mechanism by which amygdala damage compromises fear recognition has not been identified. Returning to patient SM, we now show that her impairment stems from an inability to make normal use of information from the eye region of faces when judging emotions, a defect we trace to a lack of spontaneous fixations on the eyes during free viewing of faces. Although SM fails to look normally at the eye region in all facial expressions, her selective impairment in recognizing fear is explained by the fact that the eyes are the most important feature for identifying this emotion. Notably, SM's recognition of fearful faces became entirely normal when she was instructed explicitly to look at the eyes. This finding provides a mechanism to explain the amygdala's role in fear recognition, and points to new approaches for the possible rehabilitation of patients with defective emotion perception.

  5. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  6. OXIDANT CONDITIONING PROTECTS CARTILAGE FROM MECHANICALLY-INDUCED DAMAGE

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin; Pedersen, Doug; Lavery, Matthew; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph; Martin, James

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the anti-oxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that anti-oxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant pre-conditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 hours with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at non-lethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, 500 µM) for a varying number of times (1, 2 or 4) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 µM tBHP applied 4 times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 µM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated 4 times with 100 µM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sub-lethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  7. The effects of starches on mechanical properties of paracetamol tablet formulations. I. Pregelatinization of starch binders.

    PubMed

    Alebiowu, Gbenga; Itiola, Oludele Adelanwa

    2003-09-01

    A study has been made of the effects of pregelatinization of native sorghum and plantain starches on the mechanical properties of a paracetamol tablet formulation in comparison with corn starch BP. The mechanical properties tested, viz. tensile strength (T) and brittle fracture index (BFI) of the paracetamol tablets were affected by pregelatinization of the starch. The results suggest that pregelatinized starches may be useful as binders when a particular degree of bond strength and brittleness is desired.

  8. Protective effects of topical application of a poorly soluble antioxidant astaxanthin liposomal formulation on ultraviolet-induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Hama, Susumu; Takahashi, Kanako; Inai, Yuko; Shiota, Kanako; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamada, Asako; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Eiji; Kogure, Kentaro

    2012-08-01

    Astaxanthin (Asx) would be expected to prevent ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin damage, as it is regarded as a potent antioxidative carotenoid in biological membranes. However, it is difficult to administer Asx topically to skin because of its poor water solubility. In this study, we attempted to solve this problem by preparing liposomes containing Asx (Asx-lipo), which were dispersible in the water phase, and therefore, suitable for topical application to the skin. Asx-lipo was shown to have potent scavenging ability against chemiluminescence-dependent singlet oxygen production in the water phase. When Asx-lipo was applied to skin before UV exposure, UV-induced skin thickening was prevented. Interestingly, collagen reduction induced by UV exposure was also prevented by preadministration of Asx-lipo. In addition, topical administration of Asx-lipo containing cationic lipid inhibited melanin production in skin exposed to UV. Consequently, we succeeded in preventing UV-induced skin damage using a topical application of a liposomal formulation containing Asx.

  9. An oral formulation of angiotensin-(1-7) reverses corpus cavernosum damages induced by hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Costa-Fraga, Fabiana P; Savergnini, Silvia Q; De Sousa, Frederico B; Montecucco, Fabrizio; da Silva, Daniele; Sinisterra, Ruben D; Mach, François; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; da Silva, Rafaela F; Santos, Robson A S

    2013-10-01

    The renin angiotensin system plays a crucial role in erectile function. It has been shown that elevated angiotensin-II levels contribute to the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). Oppositely, angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-[1-7]) mediates penile erection by activation of receptor Mas. Recently, we have developed a formulation based on Ang-(1-7) inclusion in cyclodextrin (CyD) [Ang-(1-7)-CyD], which allows for the oral administration of Ang-(1-7). In the present study, we evaluated the effects of chronic treatment with Ang-(1-7)-CyD on penile fibrosis, oxidative stress, and endothelial function in hypercholesterolemic mice. Apolipoprotein(Apo)E-/- mice fed a Western-type diet for 11 weeks received Ang-(1-7)-CyD or vehicle during the final 3 weeks. Collagen content and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production within the corpus cavernosum were evaluated by Sirius red and dihydroethidium staining, respectively. Protein expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) subunits (p67-phox and p22-phox), and AT1 and Mas receptors in the penis was assessed by Western blotting. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured by Griess assay in the mice serum. Cavernosal strips were mounted in an isometric organ bath to evaluate the endothelial function. The effect of Ang-(1-7)-CyD treatment on penile fibrosis, oxidative stress, and endothelial function in hypercholesterolemia-induced ED. Ang-(1-7)-CyD treatment reduced collagen content in the corpus cavernosum of ApoE-/- mice. This effect was associated with an attenuation of ROS production and a diminished expression of NADPH. Furthermore, Ang-(1-7)-CyD treatment augmented the expression of nNOS and eNOS in the penis and elevated vascular NO production. Importantly, these effects were accompanied by an improvement in cavernosal endothelial function. Long-term treatment with Ang-(1-7)-CyD reduces penile fibrosis associated with

  10. Damage mechanisms in PBT-GF30 under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, A. De Monte, M. Hoffmann, C.; Vormwald, M.; Quaresimin, M.

    2014-05-15

    The scope of this paper is the investigation of damage mechanisms at microscopic scale on a short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT-GF30) under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. In addition the principal mechanisms are verified through micro mechanical FE models. In order to investigate the fatigue behavior of the material both isothermal strain controlled fatigue (ISCF) tests at three different temperatures and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on plain and notched specimens, manufactured by injection molding. The goal of the work is to determine the damage mechanisms occurring under TMF conditions and to compare them with the mechanisms occurring under ISCF. For this reason fracture surfaces of TMF and ISCF samples loaded at different temperature levels were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, specimens that failed under TMF were examined on microsections revealing insight into both crack initiation and crack propagation. The findings of this investigation give valuable information about the main damage mechanisms of PBT-GF30 under TMF loading and serve as basis for the development of a TMF life estimation methodology.

  11. Enhanced protective activity of nano formulated andrographolide against arsenic induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujata; Pradhan, Goutam Kumar; Das, Subhadip; Nath, Debjani; Das Saha, Krishna

    2015-12-05

    Chronic exposure to arsenic over a period of time induces toxicity, primarily in liver but gradually in all systems of the body. Andrographolide (AG), a major diterpene lactone of Andrographis paniculata, shows a wide array of physiological functions including hepatoprotection. Therapeutic applications of AG are however seriously constrained because of its insolubility, poor bioavailability, and short plasma half-life. Nanoparticulation of AG is a possible solution to these problems. In the present study we investigated the effectiveness of polylactide co-glycolide (PLGA) nanocapsulated andrographolide (NA) against arsenic induced liver damage in mice. NA of average diameter 65.8 nm and encapsulation efficiency of 64% were prepared. Sodium arsenite at a dose of 40 mg/L supplied via drinking water in mice significantly raised the serum level of liver function markers such as AST, ALT, and ALP, and caused arsenic deposition in liver and ROS generation, though it did not show any lethality up to 30 days of exposure. However, even liver toxicity was not observed when mice were given AG and NA orally at doses up to 100 mg/kg bwt and 20 mg/kg bwt respectively on alternate days for one month. Treatment of non-toxic doses of AG or NA on alternate days along with arsenic significantly decreased the arsenic induced elevation of the serum level of ALT, AST and ALP, and arsenic deposition in liver. AG and NA increased the level of hepatic antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH). Also, the ROS level was lowered in mice exposed to arsenic but treated with AG or NA. Protective efficiency of NA is about five times more than that of AG. Administration of NA to arsenic-treated mice caused signs of improvement in liver tissue architecture. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that NA could be beneficial against arsenic-induced liver toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  12. Predicting weld solidification cracking using damage mechanics -- LDRD summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.; Krafcik, J.S.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the efforts to develop and validate a finite element based model to predict weld solidification cracking behavior. Such a model must capture the solidification behavior, the thermal behavior in the weld pool region, the material mechanical response, and some failure criteria to determine when solidification cracking will occur. For such a program to be successful, each aspect of the model had to be accurately modeled and verified since the output of one portion of the model served as the input to other portions of the model. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was developed and used in both the thermal and mechanical finite element analysis. High magnification video techniques were developed to measure strains for validation of the mechanical predictions using a strain rate and temperature dependent constitutive model. This model was coupled with a ductile void growth damage model and correlated with experimental observations to determine capabilities of predicting cracking response. A two phase (solid + liquid) material model was also developed that can be used to more accurately capture the mechanics of weld solidification cracking. In general, reasonable agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment for location of crack initiation and extent of cracking for 6061-T6 aluminum. 35 refs.

  13. A Micromechanical Damage Mechanics Model for the Seismic Coupling of Underground Nuclear Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers-Martinez, M. A.; Sammis, C. G.; Mihaly, J. M.; Bhat, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Seismological discrimination between underground explosions and earthquakes is complicated by the observation that explosions generate significant S wave radiation. Whether these S waves are generated mainly in the non-linear source region, or by slip on nearby faults, or by mode conversion at boundaries along the propagation path remains controversial. In this study we explore the hypothesis that S wave radiation is generated during the ubiquitous generation of fractures observed in the non-linear source region. We model the nucleation, growth, and interaction of these fractures using a fully dynamic micromechanical damage mechanics recently formulated by Bhat et al. (J. Appl. Mech., 2012). Parameters in the model include the size, density, and orientation of initial fractures in the source rock, the coefficient of friction on their faces, and the dynamic critical stress intensity factor for nucleation and propagation. The damage mechanics is built into the ABAQUS dynamic finite element code as a user-defined rheology and is used to calculate the spatial extent and geometry of the fracture damage as well as resultant seismic radiation generated by an explosion with a specified pressure time-function. A fundamental result of these calculations is that any process that breaks the spherical symmetry of the explosion produces S waves. Sources of asymmetry include an anisotropic distribution of initial fracture (e.g. a rift in the granitic texture), an anisotropic regional pre-stress, or even heterogeneity that breaks the symmetry of the radial fractures. We compare our calculations with field experiments (by Weston Geophysical and New England Research) in a granite quarry and with laboratory experiments that use high-speed photography and laser velocimeters to record the evolution of the damage pattern and resultant seismic radiation.

  14. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  15. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Kevin J; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways.

  16. Review: Wind impacts on plant growth, mechanics and damage.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Barry; Berry, Peter; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land plants have adapted to survive under a range of wind climates and this involve changes in chemical composition, physical structure and morphology at all scales from the cell to the whole plant. Under strong winds plants can re-orientate themselves, reconfigure their canopies, or shed needles, leaves and branches in order to reduce the drag. If the wind is too strong the plants oscillate until the roots or stem fail. The mechanisms of root and stem failure are very similar in different plants although the exact details of the failure may be different. Cereals and other herbaceous crops can often recover after wind damage and even woody plants can partially recovery if there is sufficient access to water and nutrients. Wind damage can have major economic impacts on crops, forests and urban trees. This can be reduced by management that is sensitive to the local site and climatic conditions and accounts for the ability of plants to acclimate to their local wind climate. Wind is also a major disturbance in many plant ecosystems and can play a crucial role in plant regeneration and the change of successional stage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Early Damage Detection in Composites during Fabrication and Mechanical Testing

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Neha; Sanchez, Daniel Martinez; Soutis, Constantinos; Gresil, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    Fully integrated monitoring systems have shown promise in improving confidence in composite materials while reducing lifecycle costs. A distributed optical fibre sensor is embedded in a fibre reinforced composite laminate, to give three sensing regions at different levels through-the-thickness of the plate. This study follows the resin infusion process during fabrication of the composite, monitoring the development of strain in-situ and in real time, and to gain better understanding of the resin rheology during curing. Piezoelectric wafer active sensors and electrical strain gauges are bonded to the plate after fabrication. This is followed by progressive loading/unloading cycles of mechanical four point bending. The strain values obtained from the optical fibre are in good agreement with strain data collected by surface mounted strain gauges, while the sensing regions clearly indicate the development of compressive, neutral, and tensile strain. Acoustic emission event detection suggests the formation of matrix (resin) cracks, with measured damage event amplitudes in agreement with values reported in published literature on the subject. The Felicity ratio for each subsequent loading cycle is calculated to track the progression of damage in the material. The methodology developed here can be used to follow the full life cycle of a composite structure, from manufacture to end-of-life. PMID:28773048

  18. A Coupled Thermal–Hydrological–Mechanical Damage Model and Its Numerical Simulations of Damage Evolution in APSE

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chenhui; Zhu, Wancheng; Chen, Shikuo; Ranjith, Pathegama Gamage

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a coupled thermal–hydrological–mechanical damage (THMD) model for the failure process of rock, in which coupling effects such as thermally induced rock deformation, water flow-induced thermal convection, and rock deformation-induced water flow are considered. The damage is considered to be the key factor that controls the THM coupling process and the heterogeneity of rock is characterized by the Weibull distribution. Next, numerical simulations on excavation-induced damage zones in Äspö pillar stability experiments (APSE) are carried out and the impact of in situ stress conditions on damage zone distribution is analysed. Then, further numerical simulations of damage evolution at the heating stage in APSE are carried out. The impacts of in situ stress state, swelling pressure and water pressure on damage evolution at the heating stage are simulated and analysed, respectively. The simulation results indicate that (1) the v-shaped notch at the sidewall of the pillar is predominantly controlled by the in situ stress trends and magnitude; (2) at the heating stage, the existence of confining pressure can suppress the occurrence of damage, including shear damage and tensile damage; and (3) the presence of water flow and water pressure can promote the occurrence of damage, especially shear damage. PMID:28774001

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR HARMONIC SENSORS FOR DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred E. Crouch; Alan Dean; Carl Torres; Jeff Aron

    2004-03-01

    In a joint effort with Tuboscope Pipeline Services of Houston, Texas, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) adapted its nonlinear harmonic (NLH) sensing technology for use on a new in-line inspection system (smart pig). Nonlinear harmonics, an AC magnetic method for detecting local anomalies of stress and plastic deformation, shows promise of improved characterization of mechanical damage defects such as gouged dents, even though the dents may have re-rounded. The SwRI-Tuboscope project produced a sensor design, electronic design, and sensor suspension design that are directly adaptable to a multitechnology ILI system. This report describes the NLH method, the sensor, circuit, and suspension designs, and shows results from the supporting laboratory work.

  20. Damage Pre-Cursors Based Assessment of Accrued Thermo-Mechanical Damage and Remaining Useful Life in Field Deployed Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Pradeep; Harsha, Mahendra; Goebel, Kai; Jones, Jim

    Field deployed electronics may accrue damage due to environmental exposure and usage after finite period of service but may not often have any o-indicators of failure such as cracks or delamination. A method to interrogate the damage state of field deployed electronics in the pre-failure space may allow insight into the damage initiation, progression, and remaining useful life of the deployed system. Aging has been previously shown to effect the reliability and constitutive behavior of second-level leadfree interconnects. Prognostication of accrued damage and assessment of residual life can provide valuable insight into impending failure. In this paper, field deployed parts have been extracted and prognosticated for accrued damage and remaining useful life in an anticipated future deployment environment. A subset of the field deployed parts have been tested to failure in the anticipated field deployed environment to validate the assessment of remaining useful life. In addition, some parts have been subjected to additional known thermo-mechanical stresses and the incremental damage accrued validated with respect to the amount of additional damage imposed on the assemblies. The presented methodology uses leading indicators of failure based on micro-structural evolution of damage to identify accrued damage in electronic systems subjected to sequential stresses of thermal aging and thermal cycling. Damage equivalency methodologies have been developed to map damage accrued in thermal aging to the reduction in thermo-mechanical cyclic life based on damage proxies. The expected error with interrogation of system state and assessment of residual life has been quantified. Prognostic metrics including α-λmetric, sample standard deviation, mean square error, mean absolute percentage error, average bias, relative accuracy, and cumulative relative accuracy have been used to compare the performance of the damage proxies.

  1. A Symbolic Formulation for Analytical Compliance Analysis and Synthesis of Flexure Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Su, Hai-Jun; Shi, Hongliang; Yu, Jingjun

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a symbolic formulation for analytical compliance analysis and synthesis of flexure mechanisms with serial, parallel, or hybrid topologies. Our approach is based on the screw theory that characterizes flexure deformations with motion twists and loadings with force wrenches. In this work, we first derive a symbolic formulation of the compliance and stiffness matrices for commonly used flexure elements, flexure joints, and simple chains. Elements of these matrices are all explicit functions of flexure parameters. To analyze a general flexure mechanism, we subdivide it into multiple structural modules, which we identify as serial, parallel, or hybrid chains. We then analyze each module with the known flexure structures in the library. At last, we use a bottom-up approach to obtain the compliance/stiffness matrix for the overall mechanism. This is done by taking appropriate coordinate transformation of twists and wrenches in space. Four practical examples are provided to demonstrate the approach. A numerical example is employed to compare analytical compliance models against a finite element model. The results show that the errors are sufficiently small (2%, compared with finite element (FE) model), if the range of motion is limited to linear deformations. This work provides a systematical approach for compliance analysis and synthesis of general flexure mechanisms. The symbolic formulation enables subsequent design tasks, such as compliance synthesis or sensitivity analysis.

  2. Symbiotic formulation in experimentally induced liver fibrosis in rats: intestinal microbiota as a key point to treat liver damage?

    PubMed

    D'Argenio, Giuseppe; Cariello, Rita; Tuccillo, Concetta; Mazzone, Giovanna; Federico, Alessandro; Funaro, Annalisa; De Magistris, Laura; Grossi, Enzo; Callegari, Maria L; Chirico, Marilena; Caporaso, Nicola; Romano, Marco; Morelli, Lorenzo; Loguercio, Carmela

    2013-05-01

    Evidence indicates that intestinal microbiota may participate in both the induction and the progression of liver damage. The aim of our research was the detection and evaluation of the effects of chronic treatment with a symbiotic formulation on CCl4 -induced rat liver fibrosis. CCl4 significantly increased gastric permeability in respect to basal values, and the treatment with symbiotic significantly decreased it. CCl4 per se induced a decrease in intestinal permeability. This effect was also seen in fibrotic rats treated with symbiotic and was still evident when normal rats were treated with symbiotic alone (P < 0.001 in all cases). Circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α were significantly increased in rats with liver fibrosis as compared with normal rats, while symbiotic treatment normalized the plasma levels of TNF-α and significantly enhanced anti-inflammatory cytokine IL 10. TNF-α, TGF-β, TLR4, TLR2, iNOS and α-SMA mRNA expression in the liver were up-regulated in rats with CCl4 -induced liver fibrosis and down-regulated by symbiotic treatment. Moreover, IL-10 and eNOS mRNA levels were increased in the CCL4 (+) symbiotic group. Symbiotic treatment of fibrotic rats normalized serum ALT, AST and improved histology and liver collagen deposition. DGGE analysis of faecal samples revealed that CCl4 administration and symbiotic treatment either alone or in combination produced modifications in faecal profiles vs controls. Our results provide evidence that in CCl4 -induced liver fibrosis, significant changes in gastro-intestinal permeability and in faecal flora occur. Treatment with a specific symbiotic formulation significantly affects these changes, leading to improvement in both liver inflammation and fibrosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. A Look Behind the Salt Curve: An Examination of Thickening Mechanisms in Shampoo Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penfield, Kevin

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic oscillatory rheological measurements are used to examine two mechanisms for thickening simple shampoo formulations. The salt curve, in which viscosity of a surfactant solution is maximized at intermediate levels of salt, is shown to be due to the variation in relaxation time; this is found to correlate with variation in the degree of entanglement per micelle. This is contrasted with the effect of PEG-150 distearate, which alters viscosity through a change in modulus.

  4. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    PubMed

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection.

  5. Skin Damage Mechanisms Related to Airborne Particulate Matter Exposure.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Natalia D; Muresan, Ximena M; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Cervellati, Franco; Sticozzi, Claudia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Miracco, Clelia; Marchini, Timoteo; Evelson, Pablo; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between increased airborne particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects. The mechanisms of PM-health effects are believed to involve oxidative stress and inflammation. To evaluate the ability of PM promoting skin tissue damage, one of the main organs exposed to outdoor pollutants, we analyzed the effect of concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in a reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model. RHE tissues were exposed to 25 or 100 µg/ml CAPs for 24 or 48 h. Data showed that RHE seems to be more susceptible to CAPs-induced toxicity after 48 h exposure than after 24 h. We found a local reactive O(2) species (ROS) production increase generated from metals present on the particle, which contributes to lipids oxidation. Furthermore, as a consequence of altered redox status, NFkB nucleus translocation was increase upon CAPs exposure, as well as cyclooxygenase 2 and cytochrome P450 levels, which may be involved in the inflammatory response initiated by PM. CAPs also triggered an apoptotic process in skin. Surprisingly, by transition electron microscopy analysis we showed that CAPs were able to penetrate skin tissues. These findings contribute to the understanding of the cutaneous pathophysiological mechanisms initiated by CAPs exposure, where oxidative stress and inflammation may play predominant roles.

  6. An alternate formulation of blood vessel mechanics and the meaning of the in vivo property.

    PubMed

    Brossollet, L J; Vito, R P

    1995-06-01

    In an effort to bridge the gap between theoretically based vascular mechanics and simpler, clinically relevant compliance models, an alternative complementary energy formulation as well as an improved experimental method are proposed. This formulation generalizes the uniaxial compliance models to multiaxial stretch and twist and clarifies the role of the total in vivo force (measured in biaxial vascular testing) in vessel stability. The measurement of wall thickness when incompressibility is assumed, and the assumption of the existence of an unloaded state are unnecessary. Scattered results from both clinical and mechanical literature are reinterpreted in view of this new understanding of vascular mechanics. Canine saphenous veins (4-5 mm in diameter) conform to the behavior expected from the analysis. Their in vivo property is shown to be a passive property, independent of smooth muscle tone. Redundant particle tracking, control of force and pressure values and the use of papaverine, result, respectively, in strain measurements accurate to within 0.002, experimental control accurate to 0.5% of full range, and repeatable experiments over a few days. The validated system and the new formulation show great potential for exploiting the benefits of innovative experimental design and statistically reliable data analysis.

  7. Understanding the Effects of Electrode Formulation on the Mechanical Strength of Composite Electrodes for Flexible Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Abhinav M; Arias, Ana Claudia

    2017-02-22

    Flexible lithium-ion batteries are necessary for powering the next generation of wearable electronic devices. In most designs, the mechanical flexibility of the battery is improved by reducing the thickness of the active layers, which in turn reduces the areal capacity and energy density of the battery. The performance of a battery depends on the electrode composition, and in most flexible batteries, standard electrode formulation is used, which is not suitable for flexing. Even with considerable efforts made toward the development of flexible lithium-ion batteries, the formulation of the electrodes has received very little attention. In this study, we investigate the relation between the electrode formulation and the mechanical strength of the electrodes. Peel and drag tests are used to compare the adhesion and cohesion strength of the electrodes. The strength of an electrode is sensitive to the particle size and the choice of polymeric binder. By optimizing the electrode composition, we were able to fabricate a high areal capacity (∼2 mAh/cm(2)) flexible lithium-ion battery with conventional metal-based current collectors that shows superior electrochemical and mechanical performance in comparison to that of batteries with standard composition.

  8. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury. PMID:28327610

  9. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury.

  10. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  11. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  12. The anisotropic mechanical behaviour of electro-spun biodegradable polymer scaffolds: Experimental characterisation and constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Limbert, Georges; Omar, Rodaina; Krynauw, Hugo; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Franz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Electro-spun biodegradable polymer fibrous structures exhibit anisotropic mechanical properties dependent on the degree of fibre alignment. Degradation and mechanical anisotropy need to be captured in a constitutive formulation when computational modelling is used in the development and design optimisation of such scaffolds. Biodegradable polyester-urethane scaffolds were electro-spun and underwent uniaxial tensile testing in and transverse to the direction of predominant fibre alignment before and after in vitro degradation of up to 28 days. A microstructurally-based transversely isotropic hyperelastic continuum constitutive formulation was developed and its parameters were identified from the experimental stress-strain data of the scaffolds at various stages of degradation. During scaffold degradation, maximum stress and strain in circumferential direction decreased from 1.02 ± 0.23 MPa to 0.38 ± 0.004 MPa and from 46 ± 11 % to 12 ± 2 %, respectively. In longitudinal direction, maximum stress and strain decreased from 0.071 ± 0.016 MPa to 0.010 ± 0.007 MPa and from 69 ± 24 % to 8 ± 2 %, respectively. The constitutive parameters were identified for both directions of the non-degraded and degraded scaffold for strain range varying between 0% and 16% with coefficients of determination r(2)>0.871. The six-parameter constitutive formulation proved versatile enough to capture the varying non-linear transversely isotropic behaviour of the fibrous scaffold throughout various stages of degradation.

  13. Daily Goals Formulation and Enhanced Visualization of Mechanical Ventilation Variance Improves Mechanical Ventilation Score.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Brian K; Smallwood, Craig; Rettig, Jordan; Kacmarek, Robert M; Thompson, John; Arnold, John H

    2017-03-01

    The systematic implementation of evidence-based practice through the use of guidelines, checklists, and protocols mitigates the risks associated with mechanical ventilation, yet variation in practice remains prevalent. Recent advances in software and hardware have allowed for the development and deployment of an enhanced visualization tool that identifies mechanical ventilation goal variance. Our aim was to assess the utility of daily goal establishment and a computer-aided visualization of variance. This study was composed of 3 phases: a retrospective observational phase (baseline) followed by 2 prospective sequential interventions. Phase I intervention comprised daily goal establishment of mechanical ventilation. Phase II intervention was the setting and monitoring of daily goals of mechanical ventilation with a web-based data visualization system (T3). A single score of mechanical ventilation was developed to evaluate the outcome. The baseline phase evaluated 130 subjects, phase I enrolled 31 subjects, and phase II enrolled 36 subjects. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between cohorts. A total of 171 verbalizations of goals of mechanical ventilation were completed in phase I. The use of T3 increased by 87% from phase I. Mechanical ventilation score improved by 8.4% in phase I and 11.3% in phase II from baseline (P = .032). The largest effect was in the low risk VT category, with a 40.3% improvement from baseline in phase I, which was maintained at 39% improvement from baseline in phase II (P = .01). mechanical ventilation score was 9% higher on average in those who survived. Daily goal formation and computer-enhanced visualization of mechanical ventilation variance were associated with an improvement in goal attainment by evidence of an improved mechanical ventilation score. Further research is needed to determine whether improvements in mechanical ventilation score through a targeted, process-oriented intervention will lead to improved

  14. A BEM formulation applied in the mechanical material modelling of viscoelastic cracked structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Hugo Luiz; Leonel, Edson Denner

    2016-12-01

    The present study aims at performing a mechanical analysis of 2D viscoelastic cracked structural materials using the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The mesh dimensionality reduction provided by the BEM and its accuracy in representing high gradient fields make this numerical method robust to solve fracture mechanics problems. Viscoelastic models address phenomena that provide changes on the mechanical material properties along time. Well-established viscoelastic models such as Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt and Boltzmann are used in this study. The numerical viscoelastic scheme, which is based on algebraic BEM equations, utilizes the Euler method for time derivative evaluation. Therefore, the unknown variables at the structural boundary and its variations along time are determined through an ordinary linear system of equations. Moreover, time-dependent boundary conditions may be considered, which represent loading phases. The dual BEM formulation is adopted for modelling the mechanical structural behaviour of cracks bodies. Three examples are considered to illustrate the robustness of the adopted formulation. The results achieved by the BEM are in good agreement with reported data and numerical stability is observed.

  15. A BEM formulation applied in the mechanical material modelling of viscoelastic cracked structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Hugo Luiz; Leonel, Edson Denner

    2017-03-01

    The present study aims at performing a mechanical analysis of 2D viscoelastic cracked structural materials using the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The mesh dimensionality reduction provided by the BEM and its accuracy in representing high gradient fields make this numerical method robust to solve fracture mechanics problems. Viscoelastic models address phenomena that provide changes on the mechanical material properties along time. Well-established viscoelastic models such as Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt and Boltzmann are used in this study. The numerical viscoelastic scheme, which is based on algebraic BEM equations, utilizes the Euler method for time derivative evaluation. Therefore, the unknown variables at the structural boundary and its variations along time are determined through an ordinary linear system of equations. Moreover, time-dependent boundary conditions may be considered, which represent loading phases. The dual BEM formulation is adopted for modelling the mechanical structural behaviour of cracks bodies. Three examples are considered to illustrate the robustness of the adopted formulation. The results achieved by the BEM are in good agreement with reported data and numerical stability is observed.

  16. Micro-mechanical modeling of perforating shock damage

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, R.P.; Krogh, K.E.; Behrmann, L.A.; Halleck, P.M.

    1997-11-17

    Shaped charge jet induced formation damage from perforation treatments hinders productivity. Manifestation of this damage is in the form of grain fragmentation resulting in fines that plug up pore throats along with the breakdown of inter-grain cementation. The authors use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method as a way to explicitly model, on a grain pore scale, the dynamic interactions of grains and grain/pores to calculate the damage resulting from perforation type stress wave loading. The SPH method is a continuum Lagrangian, meshless approach that features particles. Clusters of particles are used for each grain to provide representation of a grain pore structure that is similar to x-ray synchrotron microtomography images. Numerous damage models are available to portray fracture and fragmentation. In this paper the authors present the results of well defined impact loading on a grain pore structure that illustrate how the heterogeneity affects stress wave behavior and damage evolution. The SPH approach easily accommodates the coupling of multi-materials. Calculations for multi-material conditions with the pore space treated as a void, fluid filled, and/or clay filled show diverse effects on the stress wave propagation behavior and damage. SPH comparisons made with observed damage from recovered impacted sandstone samples in gas gun experiments show qualitatively the influence of stress intensity. The modeling approach presented here offers a unique way in concert with experiments to define a better understanding of formation damage resulting from perforation completion treatments.

  17. Qualitative sensing of mechanical damage by a fluorogenic "click" reaction.

    PubMed

    Döhler, Diana; Rana, Sravendra; Rupp, Harald; Bergmann, Henrik; Behzadi, Shahed; Crespy, Daniel; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2016-09-25

    A simple and unique damage-sensing tool mediated by a Cu(i)-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition reaction is reported, where a fluorogenic "click"-reaction highlights physical damage by a strong fluorescence increase accompanied by in situ monitoring of localized self-healing.

  18. Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, K.; Allen, D. W.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

  19. A damage mechanics approach for quantifying stress changes due to brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Natural fault zones or man-made injection or production of fluid impact the regional stress distribution in Earth's crust and can be responsible for localized stress discontinuities. Understanding the processes controlling fracturing of the porous rocks and mechanical behaviour of fault zones is therefore of interest for several applications including geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes controlling the deformation of porous rocks during and after brittle failure. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To illustrate the model, simulation of a compaction experiment of a sandstone leading to shear failure will be presented which allows to quantify the stress drop accompanying the failure. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field scale to simulate hydraulic fracturing and assess the resulting changes in the stress field.

  20. An adhesive contact mechanics formulation based on atomistically induced surface traction

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Houfu; Ren, Bo; Li, Shaofan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a novel multiscale computational contact formulation based on the generalized Derjuguin approximation for continua that are characterized by atomistically enriched constitutive relations in order to study macroscopic interaction between arbitrarily shaped deformable continua. The proposed adhesive contact formulation makes use of the microscopic interaction forces between individual particles in the interacting bodies. In particular, the double-layer volume integral describing the contact interaction (energy, force vector, matrix) is converted into a double-layer surface integral through a mathematically consistent approach that employs the divergence theorem and a special partitioning technique. The proposed contact model is formulated in the nonlinear continuum mechanics framework and implemented using the standard finite element method. With no large penalty constant, the stiffness matrix of the system will in general be well-conditioned, which is of great significance for quasi-static analysis. Three numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. Results indicate that with the same mesh configuration, the finite element computation based on the surface integral approach is faster and more accurate than the volume integral based approach. In addition, the proposed approach is energy preserving even in a very long dynamic simulation.

  1. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Damage in Keratinocytes by Pemphigus Vulgaris Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chen, Yumay; Deng, Wu; Chernyavsky, Alex; Marchenko, Steve; Wang, Ping H.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of nonhormonal treatment of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) has been hampered by a lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms leading to keratinocyte (KC) detachment and death in pemphigus. In this study, we sought to identify changes in the vital mitochondrial functions in KCs treated with the sera from PV patients and healthy donors. PV sera significantly increased proton leakage from KCs, suggesting that PV IgGs increase production of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species production showed a drastic increase of cell staining in response to treatment by PV sera, which was confirmed by FACS analysis. Exposure of KCs to PV sera also caused dramatic changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential detected with the JC-1 dye. These changes can trigger the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. Although sera from different PV patients elicited unique patterns of mitochondrial damage, the mitochondria-protecting drugs nicotinamide (also called niacinamide), minocycline, and cyclosporine A exhibited a uniform protective effect. Their therapeutic activity was validated in the passive transfer model of PV in neonatal BALB/c mice. The highest efficacy of mitochondrial protection of the combination of these drugs found in mitochondrial assay was consistent with the ability of the same drug combination to abolish acantholysis in mouse skin. These findings provide a theoretical background for clinical reports of the efficacy of mitochondria-protecting drugs in PV patients. Pharmacological protection of mitochondria and/or compensation of an altered mitochondrial function may therefore become a novel approach to development of personalized nonhormonal therapies of patients with this potentially lethal autoimmune blistering disease. PMID:23599429

  2. Mechanisms of mitochondrial damage in keratinocytes by pemphigus vulgaris antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chen, Yumay; Deng, Wu; Chernyavsky, Alex; Marchenko, Steve; Wang, Ping H; Grando, Sergei A

    2013-06-07

    The development of nonhormonal treatment of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) has been hampered by a lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms leading to keratinocyte (KC) detachment and death in pemphigus. In this study, we sought to identify changes in the vital mitochondrial functions in KCs treated with the sera from PV patients and healthy donors. PV sera significantly increased proton leakage from KCs, suggesting that PV IgGs increase production of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species production showed a drastic increase of cell staining in response to treatment by PV sera, which was confirmed by FACS analysis. Exposure of KCs to PV sera also caused dramatic changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential detected with the JC-1 dye. These changes can trigger the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. Although sera from different PV patients elicited unique patterns of mitochondrial damage, the mitochondria-protecting drugs nicotinamide (also called niacinamide), minocycline, and cyclosporine A exhibited a uniform protective effect. Their therapeutic activity was validated in the passive transfer model of PV in neonatal BALB/c mice. The highest efficacy of mitochondrial protection of the combination of these drugs found in mitochondrial assay was consistent with the ability of the same drug combination to abolish acantholysis in mouse skin. These findings provide a theoretical background for clinical reports of the efficacy of mitochondria-protecting drugs in PV patients. Pharmacological protection of mitochondria and/or compensation of an altered mitochondrial function may therefore become a novel approach to development of personalized nonhormonal therapies of patients with this potentially lethal autoimmune blistering disease.

  3. Fabrication and Mechanical Evaluation of Anatomically-Inspired Quasilaminate Hydrogel Structures with Layer-Specific Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hubert; Cuchiara, Maude L.; Durst, Christopher A.; Cuchiara, Michael P.; Lin, Chris J.; West, Jennifer L.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2012-01-01

    A major tissue engineering challenge is the creation of multilaminate scaffolds with layer-specific mechanical properties representative of native tissues, such as heart valve leaflets, blood vessels, and cartilage. For this purpose, poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels are attractive materials due to their tunable mechanical and biological properties. This study explored the fabrication of trilayer hydrogel quasilaminates. A novel sandwich method was devised to create quasilaminates with layers of varying stiffnesses. The trilayer structure was comprised of two “stiff” outer layers and one “soft” inner layer. Tensile testing of bilayer quasilaminates demonstrated that these scaffolds do not fail at the interface. Flexural testing showed that the bending modulus of acellular quasilaminates fell between the bending moduli of the “stiff” and “soft” hydrogel layers. The bending modulus and swelling of trilayer scaffolds with the same formulations were not significantly different than single layer gels of the same formulation. The encapsulation of cells and the addition of phenol red within the hydrogel layers decreased bending modulus of the trilayer scaffolds. The data presented demonstrates that this fabrication method can make quasilaminates with robust interfaces, integrating layers of different mechanical properties and biofunctionalization, and thus forming the foundation for a multilaminate scaffold that more accurately represents native tissue. PMID:23053300

  4. Fractal mechanism for characterizing singularity of mode shape for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, M. S.; Ostachowicz, W.; Bai, R. B.; Radzieński, M.

    2013-11-25

    Damage is an ordinary physical phenomenon jeopardizing structural safety; damage detection is an ongoing interdisciplinary issue. Waveform fractal theory has provided a promising resource for detecting damage in plates while presenting a concomitant problem: susceptibility to false features of damage. This study proposes a fractal dimension method based on affine transformation to address this problem. Physical experiments using laser measurement demonstrate that this method can substantially eliminate false features of damage and accurately identify complex cracks in plates, providing a fundamental mechanism that brings the merits of waveform fractal theory into full play in structural damage detection applications.

  5. Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

  6. Mechanisms controlling fatigue damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Damage in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composite materials can be quite complex since there are a number of different constituents (fiber, matrix, and the fiber/matrix interface) that can fail. Multidirectional lay-ups have an even greater number of possible damage orientations and mechanisms. Based on the simplifying assumption of equivalent constituent strain states in the absence of damage, a strain based failure criteria may be applied to determine when and where initial damage will occur. Based on the relative strain to fatigue failure of the fiber and matrix, the possible damage mechanisms of an MMC can be grouped into three categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, and (3) self-similar damage growth. A fourth type of damage development, fiber/matrix interface failure, is dependent on the relative strength of the fiber/matrix interface and the matrix yield strength. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  7. Damage mechanisms and influence of gradation for steep riprap

    SciTech Connect

    Rohan, K.; Belfadhel, M.B.; Lefebvre, G. ); Dascal, O. )

    1994-03-01

    Model tests in a laboratory flume were performed to verify certain hypotheses put forward to explain steep riprap behavior observed in the field at several embankment dam sites. The laboratory study has focused on riprap degradation under wave attack, and on the influence of fine blocks incorporated into riprap. Unlike flatter riprap, steep riprap is characterized by a low rate of damage until a point of acceleration, after which damage progresses rapidly. At that stage, damage is characterized by sliding and crumbling, which results in an upward propagation of damage toward the crest. The inclusion of a portion of small blocks into the riprap significantly reduces the stability of seep riprap. This detrimental effect is gradually reduced as the riprap slope becomes flatter.

  8. Mechanical relaxation of localized residual stresses associatedwith foreign object damage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, B.L.; Chen, X.; Peters, J.O.; Hutchinson, J.H.; Ritchie,R.O.

    2002-05-01

    Foreign-object damage associated with the ingestion ofdebris into aircraft turbine engines can lead to a marked degradation inthe high-cycle fatigue life of turbine components. This degradation isgenerally considered to be associated with the premature initiation offatigue cracks at or near the damage sites; this is suspected to be dueto, at least in part, the impact-induced residual stress state, which canbe strongly tensile in these locations.

  9. Discrete fracture modeling of hydro-mechanical damage processes in geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents a modeling approach for investigating coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior, including fracture development, within geomaterials and structures. In the model, the coupling procedure consists of an effective linkage between two codes: TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and an implementation of the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) method, a discrete (lattice) modeling approach to represent geomechanical behavior. One main advantage of linking these two codes is that they share the same geometrical mesh structure based on the Voronoi discretization, so that a straightforward representation of discrete fracture networks (DFN) is available for fluid flow processes. The capabilities of the TOUGH-RBSN model are demonstrated through simulations of hydraulic fracturing, where fluid pressure-induced fracturing and damage-assisted flow are well represented. The TOUGH-RBSN modeling methodology has been extended to enable treatment of geomaterials exhibiting anisotropic characteristics. In the RBSN approach, elastic spring coefficients and strength parameters are systematically formulated based on the principal bedding direction, which facilitate a straightforward representation of anisotropy. Uniaxial compression tests are simulated for a transversely isotropic material to validate the new modeling scheme. The model is also used to simulate excavation fracture damage for the HG-A microtunnel in the Opalinus Clay rock, located at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Opalinus Clay has transversely isotropic material properties caused by natural features such as bedding, foliation, and flow structures. Preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts were observed following excavation, which are believed to be strongly influenced by the mechanical anisotropy of the rock material. The simulation results are qualitatively

  10. Fatigue Damage Mechanisms in Advanced Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Rhymer, Donald W.; St.Clair, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates (HTCL) are a type of hybrid composite laminate with promise for high-speed aerospace applications, specifically designed for improved damage tolerance and strength at high-temperature (350 F, 177 C). However, in previous testing, HTCL demonstrated a propensity to excessive delamination at the titanium/PMC interface following titanium cracking. An advanced HTCL has been constructed with an emphasis on strengthening this interface, combining a PETI-5/IM7 PMC with Ti-15-3 foils prepared with an alkaline-perborate surface treatment. This paper discusses how the fatigue capabilities of the "advanced" HTCL compare to the first generation HTCL which was not modified for interface optimization, in both tension-tension (R = 0.1) and tension-compression (R=-0.2). The advanced HTCL under did not demonstrate a significant improvement in fatigue life, in either tension-tension or tension-compression loading. However, the advanced HTCL proved much more damage tolerant. The R = 0.1 tests revealed the advanced HTCL to increase the fatigue life following initial titanium ply damage up to 10X that of the initial HTCL at certain stress levels. The damage progression following the initial ply damage demonstrated the effect of the strengthened PMC/titanium interface. Acetate film replication of the advanced HTCL edges showed a propensity for some fibers in the adjacent PMC layers to fail at the point of titanium crack formation, suppressing delamination at the Ti/PMC interface. The inspection of failure surfaces validated these findings, revealing PMC fibers bonded to the majority of the titanium surfaces. Tension compression fatigue (R = -0.2) demonstrated the same trends in cycles between initial damage and failure, damage progression, and failure surfaces. Moreover, in possessing a higher resistance to delamination, the advanced HTCL did not exhibit buckling following initial titanium ply cracking under compression unlike the initial HTCL.

  11. Market-Based Coordination of Thermostatically Controlled Loads—Part I: A Mechanism Design Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sen; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on the coordination of a population of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs) with unknown parameters to achieve group objectives. The problem involves designing the bidding and market clearing strategy to motivate self-interested users to realize efficient energy allocation subject to a peak power constraint. Using the mechanism design approach, we propose a market-based coordination framework, which can effectively incorporate heterogeneous load dynamics, systematically deal with user preferences, account for the unknown load model parameters, and enable the real-world implementation with limited communication resources. This paper is divided into two parts. Part I presents a mathematical formulation of the problem and develops a coordination framework using the mechanism design approach. Part II presents a learning scheme to account for the unknown load model parameters, and evaluates the proposed framework through realistic simulations.

  12. Damage mechanisms avoided or managed for NIF large optics

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, K. R.; Spaeth, M. L.; Adams, J. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Bude, J. D.; Carr, C. W.; Conder, A. D.; DiNicola, J. M. G.; Dixit, S. N.; Feigenbaum, E.; Finucane, R. G.; Guss, G. M.; Henesian, M. A.; Honig, J.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kegelmeyer, L. M.; Liao, Z. M.; MacGowan, B. J.; Matthews, M. J.; Mehta, N. C.; Norton, M. A.; Nostrand, M. C.; Sacks, R. A.; Siegel, L. R.; Stolz, C. J.; Suratwala, T. I.; Trenholme, J. B.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yang, S. T.; McCandless, K. P.; Miller, P. E.; Negres, R. A.; Orth, C. D.; Cross, D. A.; Demos, S. G.

    2016-02-09

    After every other failure mode has been considered, in the end, the high-performance limit of all lasers is set by optical damage. The demands of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pushed lasers designed as ICF drivers into this limit from their very earliest days. The first ICF lasers were small, and their pulses were short. Their goal was to provide as much power to the target as possible. Typically, they faced damage due to high intensity on their optics. As requests for higher laser energy, longer pulse lengths, and better symmetry appeared, new kinds of damage also emerged, some of them anticipated and others unexpected. This paper will discuss the various types of damage to large optics that had to be considered, avoided to the extent possible, or otherwise managed as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser was designed, fabricated, and brought into operation. Furthermore, it has been possible for NIF to meet its requirements because of the experience gained in previous ICF systems and because NIF designers have continued to be able to avoid or manage new damage situations as they have appeared.

  13. Damage mechanisms avoided or managed for NIF large optics

    DOE PAGES

    Manes, K. R.; Spaeth, M. L.; Adams, J. J.; ...

    2016-02-09

    After every other failure mode has been considered, in the end, the high-performance limit of all lasers is set by optical damage. The demands of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pushed lasers designed as ICF drivers into this limit from their very earliest days. The first ICF lasers were small, and their pulses were short. Their goal was to provide as much power to the target as possible. Typically, they faced damage due to high intensity on their optics. As requests for higher laser energy, longer pulse lengths, and better symmetry appeared, new kinds of damage also emerged, some of themmore » anticipated and others unexpected. This paper will discuss the various types of damage to large optics that had to be considered, avoided to the extent possible, or otherwise managed as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser was designed, fabricated, and brought into operation. Furthermore, it has been possible for NIF to meet its requirements because of the experience gained in previous ICF systems and because NIF designers have continued to be able to avoid or manage new damage situations as they have appeared.« less

  14. Mitigating thermal mechanical damage potential during two-photon dermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Masters, Barry R; So, Peter T C; Buehler, Christof; Barry, Nicholas; Sutin, Jason D; Mantulin, William W; Gratton, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy allows in vivo high-resolution imaging of human skin structure and biochemistry with a penetration depth over 100 microm. The major damage mechanism during two-photon skin imaging is associated with the formation of cavitation at the epidermal-dermal junction, which results in thermal mechanical damage of the tissue. In this report, we verify that this damage mechanism is of thermal origin and is associated with one-photon absorption of infrared excitation light by melanin granules present in the epidermal-dermal junction. The thermal mechanical damage threshold for selected Caucasian skin specimens from a skin bank as a function of laser pulse energy and repetition rate has been determined. The experimentally established thermal mechanical damage threshold is consistent with a simple heat diffusion model for skin under femtosecond pulse laser illumination. Minimizing thermal mechanical damage is vital for the potential use of two-photon imaging in noninvasive optical biopsy of human skin in vivo. We describe a technique to mitigate specimen thermal mechanical damage based on the use of a laser pulse picker that reduces the laser repetition rate by selecting a fraction of pulses from a laser pulse train. Since the laser pulse picker decreases laser average power while maintaining laser pulse peak power, thermal mechanical damage can be minimized while two-photon fluorescence excitation efficiency is maximized.

  15. Intercomparison of chemical mechanisms for air quality policy formulation and assessment under North American conditions.

    PubMed

    Derwent, Richard

    2017-07-01

    The intercomparison of seven chemical mechanisms for their suitability for air quality policy formulation and assessment is described. Box modeling techniques were employed using 44 sets of background environmental conditions covering North America to constrain the chemical development of the longer lived species. The selected mechanisms were modified to enable an unbiased assessment of the adequacy of the parameterizations of photochemical ozone production from volatile organic compound (VOC) oxidation in the presence of NOx. Photochemical ozone production rates responded differently to 30% NOx and VOC reductions with the different mechanisms, despite the striking similarities between the base-case ozone production rates. The 30% reductions in NOx and VOCs also produced changes in OH. The responses in OH to 30% reductions in NOx and VOCs appeared to be more sensitive to mechanism choice, compared with the responses in the photochemical ozone production rates. Although 30% NOx reductions generally led to decreases in OH, 30% reductions in VOCs led to increases in OH, irrespective of mechanism choice and background environmental conditions. The different mechanisms therefore gave different OH responses to NOx and VOC reductions and so would give different responses in terms of changes in the fate and behavior of air toxics, acidification and eutrophication, and fine particle formation compared with others, in response to ozone control strategies. Policymakers need to understand that there are likely to be inherent differences in the responses to ozone control strategies between different mechanisms, depending on background environmental conditions and the extents of NOx and VOC reductions under consideration. The purpose of this paper is to compare predicted ozone responses to NOx and VOC reductions with seven chemical mechanisms under North American conditions. The good agreement found between the tested mechanisms should provide some support for their application

  16. Fatigue damage mechanisms in boron-aluminium composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between fatigue and shakedown in metal matrix composites is investigated theoretically and experimentally for unidirectional and laminated 6061 Al-B materials. It is shown that no fatigue damage takes place if the applied stress range is such that the material remains elastic, or shakes down, i.e., resumes elastic cyclic straining after a small number of plastic strain cycles. Fatigue damage occurs only in specimens subjected to stress ranges which cause sustained cyclic plastic straining in the aluminum matrix. If the applied stress range is smaller than that required for fatigue failure, after about 10 to the 6th cycles a saturation damage state is reached which remains essentially unchanged with increasing number of cycles.

  17. Conical intersections in solution: formulation, algorithm, and implementation with combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ganglong; Yang, Weitao

    2011-05-28

    The significance of conical intersections in photophysics, photochemistry, and photodissociation of polyatomic molecules in gas phase has been demonstrated by numerous experimental and theoretical studies. Optimization of conical intersections of small- and medium-size molecules in gas phase has currently become a routine optimization process, as it has been implemented in many electronic structure packages. However, optimization of conical intersections of small- and medium-size molecules in solution or macromolecules remains inefficient, even poorly defined, due to large number of degrees of freedom and costly evaluations of gradient difference and nonadiabatic coupling vectors. In this work, based on the sequential quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and QM/MM-minimum free energy path methods, we have designed two conical intersection optimization methods for small- and medium-size molecules in solution or macromolecules. The first one is sequential QM conical intersection optimization and MM minimization for potential energy surfaces; the second one is sequential QM conical intersection optimization and MM sampling for potential of mean force surfaces, i.e., free energy surfaces. In such methods, the region where electronic structures change remarkably is placed into the QM subsystem, while the rest of the system is placed into the MM subsystem; thus, dimensionalities of gradient difference and nonadiabatic coupling vectors are decreased due to the relatively small QM subsystem. Furthermore, in comparison with the concurrent optimization scheme, sequential QM conical intersection optimization and MM minimization or sampling reduce the number of evaluations of gradient difference and nonadiabatic coupling vectors because these vectors need to be calculated only when the QM subsystem moves, independent of the MM minimization or sampling. Taken together, costly evaluations of gradient difference and nonadiabatic coupling vectors in solution or

  18. Mechanisms of cell damage in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1986-01-01

    Cells growing on microcarriers may be damaged by collisions of the microcarrier against another microcarrier or the reactor agitator. Bead-bead collisions are caused by small-scale turbulence, which can also cause high local shear stress on the cells. The cells are also exposed to 10-20 Hz cyclic shear stress by bead rotation.

  19. Absorption mechanism of DHP107, an oral paclitaxel formulation that forms a hydrated lipidic sponge phase

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yura; Chung, Hye Jin; Hong, Jung Wan; Yun, Cheol-Won; Chung, Hesson

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a most widely used anticancer drug with low oral bioavailability, thus it is currently administered via intravenous infusion. DHP107 is a lipid-based paclitaxel formulation that can be administered as an oral solution. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of paclitaxel absorption after oral administration of DHP107 in mice and rats by changing the dosing interval, and evaluated the influence of bile excretion. DHP107 was orally administered to mice at various dosing intervals (2, 4, 8, 12, 24 h) to examine how residual DHP107 affected paclitaxel absorption during subsequent administration. Studies with small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) showed that DHP107 formed a lipidic sponge phase after hydration. The AUC values after the second dose were smaller than those after the first dose, which was correlated to the induction of expression of P-gp and CYP in the livers and small intestines from 2 h to 7 d after the first dose. The smaller AUC value observed after the second dose was also attributed to the intestinal adhesion of residual formulation. The adhered DHP107 may have been removed by ingested food, thus resulting in a higher AUC. In ex vivo and in vivo mucoadhesion studies, the formulation adhered to the villi for up to 24 h, and the amount of DHP107 that adhered was approximately half that of monoolein. The paclitaxel absorption after administration of DHP107 was not affected by bile in the cholecystectomy mice. The dosing interval and food intake affect the oral absorption of paclitaxel from DHP107, which forms a mucoadhesive sponge phase after hydration. Bile excretion does not affect the absorption of paclitaxel from DHP107 in vivo. PMID:27867185

  20. Absorption mechanism of DHP107, an oral paclitaxel formulation that forms a hydrated lipidic sponge phase.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yura; Chung, Hye Jin; Hong, Jung Wan; Yun, Cheol-Won; Chung, Hesson

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a most widely used anticancer drug with low oral bioavailability, thus it is currently administered via intravenous infusion. DHP107 is a lipid-based paclitaxel formulation that can be administered as an oral solution. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of paclitaxel absorption after oral administration of DHP107 in mice and rats by changing the dosing interval, and evaluated the influence of bile excretion. DHP107 was orally administered to mice at various dosing intervals (2, 4, 8, 12, 24 h) to examine how residual DHP107 affected paclitaxel absorption during subsequent administration. Studies with small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) showed that DHP107 formed a lipidic sponge phase after hydration. The AUC values after the second dose were smaller than those after the first dose, which was correlated to the induction of expression of P-gp and CYP in the livers and small intestines from 2 h to 7 d after the first dose. The smaller AUC value observed after the second dose was also attributed to the intestinal adhesion of residual formulation. The adhered DHP107 may have been removed by ingested food, thus resulting in a higher AUC. In ex vivo and in vivo mucoadhesion studies, the formulation adhered to the villi for up to 24 h, and the amount of DHP107 that adhered was approximately half that of monoolein. The paclitaxel absorption after administration of DHP107 was not affected by bile in the cholecystectomy mice. The dosing interval and food intake affect the oral absorption of paclitaxel from DHP107, which forms a mucoadhesive sponge phase after hydration. Bile excretion does not affect the absorption of paclitaxel from DHP107 in vivo.

  1. Non-Fourier based thermal-mechanical tissue damage prediction for thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-01-02

    Prediction of tissue damage under thermal loads plays important role for thermal ablation planning. A new methodology is presented in this paper by combing non-Fourier bio-heat transfer, constitutive elastic mechanics as well as non-rigid motion of dynamics to predict and analyze thermal distribution, thermal-induced mechanical deformation and thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues under thermal loads. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed methodology based on the non-Fourier bio-heat transfer can account for the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and predict tissue thermal damage more accurately than classical Fourier bio-heat transfer based model.

  2. Reducing the level of leaves damage of (Brassica rapa) caused by armyworm (Spodoptera litura F.) through liquid bioinsecticide formulation of bintaro (Cerbera odollam) leaves extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwani, Kristanti Indah; Nurhatika, Sri; Ermavitalini, Dini; Saputro, Triono Bagus; Budiarti, Dwi Setia

    2017-06-01

    Bioinsecticide formulation conducted by adjuvant addition to improve its effecetiveness in the application. Its addition was only help to work whereas active compound and ingredient as a main core originated from plant simplicia. This research was utilized bintaro (Cerbera odollam) as simplicia. It already began to use it as bioinsecticide against armyworm (Spodoptera litura F) even formulation approachment was not conducted in mustard (Brassica rapa) in previous research. Mustard commodity commonly measured based on leaves performences, when its performance broke by pest such as armyworm might decline the commercial value. So this research aimed to determine the effectiveness of liquid biopesticide formulation of the active ingredient from bintaro (Cerbera odollam) leaf extract in pressing the attack larvae of S. litura F. Larvae deployed in mustard leaves (16 HST). Liquid bioinsecticide concentration formulated in 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70%. Spraying method used to against S. litura F. consisted on preventive (15 HST) and curative (17 HST). Leaves damage observation conducted at day - 35th (HST). The result showed the formulation suppressed larvae from 40% concentration in preventive way 15 HST and 60% concentration as curative way at 17 HST.

  3. Mechanical Properties Studies of Components Formulation for Mixing Process Contain of Polypropylene, Polyethylene, and Aluminium Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamsi, A.; Dinzi, R.

    2017-03-01

    Certain powder and others components can induce toxic reactions if not properly handled in the mixing stage. During handling, the small particles can become airborne and be trapped in the lungs, another concern is inhomogeneities in the mixing process. Uniform quantities of the particles of the components are needed in all portions of the mixture. This paper reports the results of mechanical properties studies of mixing three components formulation for mixing process. Contain of Polyethylene (PE), Polyprophylene (PP) and Aluminium Powder. Powder mixer, Autodesk mold flow and computer based on excell method was carried out to study the influence of each formulation component on the flow %, PE 20% and Aluminium powder 2%. Macroscopic optic and macro photo was carried out to identify the homogenity of mixing, tensile test for identify the strength of component after mixing. Finally the optimal tensile test with composition PP 785,PE 20% and Aluminium powder 2% at speed 52 rpm, temperature 1500C, the tensile strength 20,92 N/mm2. At temperature 1600C, speed 100 rpm the optimum tensile strength 17,91 N/mm2. The result of simulation autodesk mold flow adviser the filling time 6 seconds. Otherwise on manual hot hidraulic press the time of filling 10 seconds.

  4. Direct Observations of Fracture and the Damage Mechanics of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-31

    microplasticity up to the fracture load. d. It shculd have low enough strength in tension and compression to enable strength measurements at easily accessible...15jm. SEM examination of the grains after large amounts of deformation indicated that the grains are brittle without any evidence of microplasticity . In...and microplasticity in polycrystalline alumina", J.Mater.Sci., 12(1977)791-796. 93. J Lankford, "Compressive microfracture and indentation damage in A1

  5. A geometric formulation of the Higgs mechanism via internal metric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, A.V. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part (chapters 1-3) formulates the Higgs mechanism for the standard model of electroweak interactions in terms of sesquilinear forms that govern the interactions of the leptonic spinors of the theory. It is shown that a geometric choice of a sesquilinear form that links the left- and right-handed components of the spinors reproduces the results of the Higgs's mechanism. The mass identifications (for the leptons and the bosons) in this model do not contain any terms arising from the sesquilinear form that is used to model the interactions. The second part (chapter 4) of this work is centered on the geometry of the internal fields in a general U(n)-type gauge theory. It is shown that the Higgs mechanism can be interpreted geometrically as the choice of a generalized metric field on the internal spaces of the theory. Existences and properties of such metric fields are discussed for Minkowski spacetime and a one point compactification of Minkowski spacetime which is diffeomorphic to S{sup 4}.

  6. Derivation of the Schrodinger Equation from the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation in Feynman's Path Integral Formulation of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the time-dependent Schrodinger equation may be simply derived from the dynamical postulate of Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of classical mechanics. Schrodinger's own published derivations of quantum wave equations, the first of which was also based on the Hamilton-Jacobi…

  7. Derivation of the Schrodinger Equation from the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation in Feynman's Path Integral Formulation of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the time-dependent Schrodinger equation may be simply derived from the dynamical postulate of Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of classical mechanics. Schrodinger's own published derivations of quantum wave equations, the first of which was also based on the Hamilton-Jacobi…

  8. Electron radiation damage mechanisms in 2D MoSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, T.; Lehtinen, O.; Algara-Siller, G.; Kaiser, U.

    2017-01-01

    The contributions of different damage mechanisms in single-layer MoSe2 were studied by investigating different MoSe2/graphene heterostructures by the aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (AC-HRTEM) at 80 keV. The damage cross-sections were determined by direct counting of atoms in the AC-HRTEM images. The contributions of damage mechanisms such as knock-on damage or ionization effects were estimated by comparing the damage rates in different heterostructure configurations, similarly to what has been earlier done with MoS2. The behaviour of MoSe2 was found to be nearly identical to that of MoS2, which is an unexpected result, as the knock-on mechanism should be suppressed in MoSe2 due to the high mass of Se, as compared to S.

  9. Hierarchical nanoreinforced composites: Computational analysis of damage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr.; Pontefisso, Alessandro; Dai, Gaoming

    2016-07-01

    The potential of hierarchical composites with secondary nanoreinforcement is discussed and analysed on the basis of the computational modelling. The concept of nanostructuring of interfaces as an important reserve of the improvement of the composite properties is discussed. The influence of distribution, shape, orientation of nanoparticles (carbon nanotube, graphene) in unidirectional polymer matrix composites on the strength and damage resistance of the composites is studied in computational studies. The possible directions of the improvement of nanoreinforced composites by controlling shapes, localization and other parameters of nanoreinforcements are reviewed.

  10. A physically-based continuum damage mechanics model for numerical prediction of damage growth in laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kevin Vaughan

    Rapid growth in use of composite materials in structural applications drives the need for a more detailed understanding of damage tolerant and damage resistant design. Current analytical techniques provide sufficient understanding and predictive capabilities for application in preliminary design, but current numerical models applicable to composites are few and far between and their development into well tested, rigorous material models is currently one of the most challenging fields in composite materials. The present work focuses on the development, implementation, and verification of a plane-stress continuum damage mechanics based model for composite materials. A physical treatment of damage growth based on the extensive body of experimental literature on the subject is combined with the mathematical rigour of a continuum damage mechanics description to form the foundation of the model. The model has been implemented in the LS-DYNA3D commercial finite element hydrocode and the results of the application of the model are shown to be physically meaningful and accurate. Furthermore it is demonstrated that the material characterization parameters can be extracted from the results of standard test methodologies for which a large body of published data already exists for many materials. Two case studies are undertaken to verify the model by comparison with measured experimental data. The first series of analyses demonstrate the ability of the model to predict the extent and growth of damage in T800/3900-2 carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) plates subjected to normal impacts over a range of impact energy levels. The predicted force-time and force-displacement response of the panels compare well with experimental measurements. The damage growth and stiffness reduction properties of the T800/3900-2 CFRP are derived using published data from a variety of sources without the need for parametric studies. To further demonstrate the physical nature of the model, a IM6

  11. Beyond debuttressing: Mechanics of paraglacial rock slope damage during repeat glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grämiger, Lorenz M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Gischig, Valentin S.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Loew, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Cycles of glaciation impose mechanical stresses on underlying bedrock as glaciers advance, erode, and retreat. Fracture initiation and propagation constitute rock mass damage and act as preparatory factors for slope failures; however, the mechanics of paraglacial rock slope damage remain poorly characterized. Using conceptual numerical models closely based on the Aletsch Glacier region of Switzerland, we explore how in situ stress changes associated with fluctuating ice thickness can drive progressive rock mass failure preparing future slope instabilities. Our simulations reveal that glacial cycles as purely mechanical loading and unloading phenomena produce relatively limited new damage. However, ice fluctuations can increase the criticality of fractures in adjacent slopes, which may in turn increase the efficacy of fatigue processes. Bedrock erosion during glaciation promotes significant new damage during first deglaciation. An already weakened rock slope is more susceptible to damage from glacier loading and unloading and may fail completely. We find that damage kinematics are controlled by discontinuity geometry and the relative position of the glacier; ice advance and retreat both generate damage. We correlate model results with mapped landslides around the Great Aletsch Glacier. Our result that most damage occurs during first deglaciation agrees with the relative age of the majority of identified landslides. The kinematics and dimensions of a slope failure produced in our models are also in good agreement with characteristics of instabilities observed in the field. Our results extend simplified assumptions of glacial debuttressing, demonstrating in detail how cycles of ice loading, erosion, and unloading drive paraglacial rock slope damage.

  12. Failure Behavior Simulation for Bolted Composite Joints Based on Damage Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yi; Ishikawa, Takashi

    This paper presents the development of an accumulative damage model based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to simulate the bearing failure and response in the bolted composite joints. The simulation is implemented into a general-purpose FEM code ABAQUS. The main damage mechanisms observed from experimental study are described as accumulated compressive damage that appeared by matrix compression failure and fiber compression-shear failure. The fundamental approach consists of contact problem at the pin/hole interface, progressive damage, large deformation problem and material nonlinear problem. A complex approach based on a nonlinear shear elasticity theory combined with a continuum damage mechanics approach can be also utilized to represent the material nonlinear behavior during loading. The damage accumulation criteria using the hybrid method based on Hashin and Yamada-Sun’s failure criteria are adopted, and the stress redistribution analysis using a degradation model for the damaged ply is performed. The accurate prediction results include progressive damage and strength response of the joints that agrees well with the existing experimental data.

  13. Investigation of Mechanism(s) of DNA Damage Induced by 4-Monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3) Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Kai; Robertson, Larry W.; Ludewig, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    4-Monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3) is readily converted by xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes to dihydroxy-metabolites and quinones. The PCB3 hydroquinone (PCB3-HQ; 2-(4’-chlorophenyl)-1,4-hydroquinone) induces chromosome loss in Chinese Hamster V79 cells, whereas the para-quinone (PCB3-pQ; 2-(4’-chlorophenyl)-1,4-benzoquinone) very efficiently induces gene mutations and chromosome breaks. Apparently, each of these two metabolites, which are a redox pair, has a different spectrum of genotoxic effects due to different, metabolite-specific mechanisms. We hypothesized that the HQ requires enzymatic activation by peroxidases with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as the ultimate genotoxin, whereas the pQ reacts directly with nucleophilic sites in DNA and/or proteins. To examine this hypothesis, we employed two cell lines with different myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities, MPO-rich HL-60 and MPO-deficient Jurkat cells, and measured cytotoxicity, DNA damage (COMET assay), MPO activity, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular free –SH groups (monochlorobimane assay, MCB) and free GSH contents (enzyme recycling method) after treatment with PCB3-HQ and PCB3-pQ. We also examined the modulation of these effects by normal/low temperature, pre-treatment with an MPO inhibitor (succinylacetone, SA), or GSH depletion. PCB3-p-Q increased intracellular ROS levels and induced DNA damage in both HL-60 and Jurkat cells at 37 °C and 6 °C, indicating a direct, MPO-independent mode of activity. It also strongly reduced intracellular free –SH groups and GSH levels in normal and GSH-depleted cells. Thus the ROS increase could be caused by reduced protection by GSH or non-enzymatic autoxidation of the resulting PCB3-HQ-GSH adduct. PCB3-HQ did not produce a significant reduction of intracellular GSH in HL-60 cells and reduced intracellular free –SH groups only at the highest concentration tested in GSH depleted cells. Moreover, PCB3-HQ induced DNA

  14. Progress in research on laser damage mechanisms and contamination problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitsuno, T.; Murakami, H.; Kato, K.; Sato, E.; Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Miyanaga, N.; Azechi, H.

    2014-09-01

    In high power laser systems, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in optical coating is very important parameters for obtaining high performances. Recently, LIDT was found to have strong temperature dependences in the bulk, surface of substrates, and in coatings. These temperature dependences of LIDT were carefully measured, and the damage formation model was constructed regarding to this temperature dependence. To explain this temperature dependence of LIDT, the temperature dependences of the initial electron generation and electron multiplication in the avalanche process were taken into account. On the other hand, LIDT in optical coating is very sensitive to organic contaminations accumulated in coating layers during storage and using condition. This paper also introduces the oil-contamination problem in LFEX laser system for First Ignition scheme in the laser fusion. We have analyzed contaminants and evaluated the effects of the contamination. We also developed new cleaning methods to remove contamination from the coating, and we have succeeded to prevent the degradation in LIDT for the duration of evacuation with Silica-gel in the chamber. The quantitative analysis of contamination on LIDT was made. We have investigated the characteristics of LIDT in dielectric coatings under the controlled contamination with several materials.

  15. AmBisome: liposomal formulation, structure, mechanism of action and pre-clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Adler-Moore, Jill; Proffitt, Richard T

    2002-02-01

    Amphotericin B is the treatment of choice for life-threatening systemic fungal infections such as candidosis and aspergillosis. To improve this drug's efficacy and reduce its acute and chronic toxicities, several lipid formulations of the drug have been developed, including AmBisome, a liposomal formulation of amphotericin B. The liposome is composed of high transition temperature phospholipids and cholesterol, designed to incorporate amphotericin B securely into the liposomal bilayer. AmBisome can bind to fungal cell walls, where the liposome is disrupted. The amphotericin B, after being released from the liposomes, is thought to transfer through the cell wall and bind to ergosterol in the fungal cell membrane. This mechanism of action of AmBisome results in its potent in vitro fungicidal activity while the integrity of the liposome is maintained in the presence of mammalian cells, for which it has minimal toxicity. In animal models, AmBisome is effective in treating both intracellular (leishmaniasis and histoplasmosis) and extracellular (candidosis and aspergillosis) systemic infections. Because of its low toxicity at the organ level, intravenous AmBisome can be safely delivered at markedly high doses of amphotericin B (1-30 mg/kg) for the treatment of systemic fungal infections. AmBisome has a circulating half-life of 5-24 h in animals, and in animal models appears to localize at sites of infection in the brain (cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, coccidioidomycosis), lungs (blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, aspergillosis) and kidneys (candidosis), delivering amphotericin B that remains bioavailable in tissues for several weeks following treatment.

  16. A cellular automaton for the signed particle formulation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, J. M.; Kapanova, K. G.; Dimov, I.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, a new formulation of quantum mechanics, based on the concept of signed particles, has been suggested. In this paper, we introduce a cellular automaton which mimics the dynamics of quantum objects in the phase-space in a time-dependent fashion. This is twofold: it provides a simplified and accessible language to non-physicists who wants to simulate quantum mechanical systems, at the same time it enables a different way to explore the laws of Physics. Moreover, it opens the way towards hybrid simulations of quantum systems by combining full quantum models with cellular automata when the former fail. In order to show the validity of the suggested cellular automaton and its combination with the signed particle formalism, several numerical experiments are performed, showing very promising results. Being this article a preliminary study on quantum simulations in phase-space by means of cellular automata, some conclusions are drawn about the encouraging results obtained so far and the possible future developments.

  17. Spermatogenesis, DNA damage and DNA repair mechanisms in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Sezgin; Al-Sadaan, Maha; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-09-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process of proliferation and differentiation during male germ cell development involving mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. Endogenous and exogenous physical, chemical and biological sources modify the genome of spermatozoa. The genomic integrity and stability of the sperm is protected by DNA repair mechanisms. In the male germline cells, DNA repair mechanisms include nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, DNA mismatch repair, double strand break repair and post-replication repair. Defects in repair mechanisms cause arrest of spermatogenesis and abnormal recombination, ultimately resulting in male infertility. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways, DNA repair defects and male infertility. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Damage Avoidance and DNA Repair Mechanisms of Extremophiles to Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. K.; Diruggiero, J.

    2010-04-01

    The results presented here support the idea that the radiation resistance of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is the product of mechanisms for cellular protection and detoxification and for the repair of oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules.

  19. [Role of rotenone in mitochondrial oxidative damage and the underlying mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Deng, Yong; Lu, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Rotenone is one of the typical inhibitors of the complex I on the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Numerous studies showed when applied to live animals or cells, rotenone could lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS augment, and thus oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Through exploring the process of ROS generation in mitochondria, the relationship between rotenone and mitochondrial ROS generation and the role of rotenone in DNA damage, we elucidated the mechanisms of rotenone induced-mitochondrial oxidative damage. At the same time, we attempted to explore the mtDNA damage and the mutation induced by rotenone.

  20. Mechanism of site-specific DNA damage induced by ozone.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiko; Inoue, Sumiko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2005-08-01

    Ozone has been shown to induce lung tumors in mice. The reactivity of ozone with DNA in an aqueous solution was investigated by a DNA sequencing technique using 32P-labeled DNA fragments. Ozone induced cleavages in the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of double-stranded DNA, which were reduced by hydroxyl radical scavengers, suggesting the participation of hydroxyl radicals in the cleavages. The ozone-induced DNA cleavages were enhanced with piperidine treatment, which induces cleavages at sites of base modification, but the inhibitory effect of hydroxyl radical scavengers on the piperidine-induced cleavages was limited. Main piperidine-labile sites were guanine and thymine residues. Cleavages at some guanine and thymine residues after piperidine treatment became more predominant with denatured single-stranded DNA. Exposure of calf thymus DNA to ozone resulted in a dose-dependent increase of the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine formation, which was partially inhibited by hydroxyl radical scavengers. ESR studies using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) showed that aqueous ozone produced the hydroxyl radical adduct of DMPO. In addition, the fluorescein-dependent chemiluminescence was detected during the decomposition of ozone in a buffer solution and the enhancing effect of D2O was observed, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen. However, no or little enhancing effect of D2O on the ozone-induced DNA damage was observed. These results suggest that DNA backbone cleavages were caused by ozone via the production of hydroxyl radicals, while DNA base modifications were mainly caused by ozone itself and the participation of hydroxyl radicals and/or singlet oxygen in base modifications is small, if any. A possible link of ozone-induced DNA damage to inflammation-associated carcinogenesis as well as air pollution-related carcinogenesis is discussed.

  1. True porosity measurement of hair: a new way to study hair damage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hessefort, Yin; Holland, Brian T; Cloud, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    This study employs a novel method, gas sorption (1), to quantify the porosity characteristics of hair by determining total pore volume, adsorption pore-size distribution, and the surface area of damaged hair. Damage mechanisms were studied by comparing the different pore volume and surface area resulting from two different types of damage: chemical and UV. Hair color measurement and tensile strength, both reflecting the changes in hair cortex, were also employed in this study. The results suggest that hair damage caused by oxidative bleach and UV oxidation follows different pathways. Chemical damage (oxidative bleach) nearly triples the hair surface area in the first minute of bleaching due to the increase in the number of pores, followed by a sudden drop after 10 min of bleaching from smaller pores breaking down into larger ones. In contrast, UV damage shows an immediate loss in surface area in the first 200 hr of exposure and a gradual increase as exposure time continues.

  2. A new arginine-based dental adhesive system: formulation, mechanical and anti-caries properties.

    PubMed

    Geraldeli, Saulo; Soares, Eveline F; Alvarez, Andres J; Farivar, Tanaz; Shields, Robert C; Sinhoreti, Mario A C; Nascimento, Marcelle M

    2017-08-01

    Secondary caries at the margins of composite restorations has been attributed to adhesive failure and consequent accumulation of cariogenic biofilms. To develop and evaluate an etch-and-rinse adhesive system containing arginine for sustainable release and recharge without affecting its mechanical properties. Arginine metabolism by oral bacteria generates ammonia, which neutralizes glycolytic acids and creates a neutral environmental pH that is less favorable to the growth of caries pathogens, thus reducing the caries risk at the tooth-composite interface. Experimental adhesives were formulated with methacrylate monomers and arginine at 5%, 7%, and 10% or no arginine (control). Adhesives were tested for: (i) mechanical properties of true stress (FS and UTS), modulus of elasticity (E), degree of conversion (DC), Knoop hardness number (KHN) and dentin microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS), (ii) arginine release and recharge, and (iii) antibacterial activities. Data was analyzed by t-test, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. FS and UTS results showed no statistically significant differences between the 7% arginine-adhesive and control, while the results for E, DC, KHN and μ-TBS showed no difference among all groups. The 7% arginine-adhesive showed a high release rate of arginine (75.0μmol/cm(2)) at 2h, and a more sustainable, controlled release rate (up to 0.2μmol/cm(2)) at 30days. Incorporation of 7% arginine did not affect the physical and mechanical properties of the adhesive. Arginine was released from the adhesive at a rate and concentration that exhibited antibacterial effects, regardless of shifts in biofilm conditions such as sugar availability and pH. Secondary caries is recognized as the main reason for failure of dental restorations. The development of an arginine-based adhesive system has the potential to dramatically reduce the incidence and severity of secondary caries in adhesive restorations in a very economical fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  3. Heat transfer in damaged material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruis, J.

    2013-10-01

    Fully coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of civil engineering problems is studied. The mechanical analysis is based on damage mechanics which is useful for modeling of behaviour of quasi-brittle materials, especially in tension. The damage is assumed to be isotropic. The heat transfer is assumed in the form of heat conduction governed by the Fourier law and heat radiation governed by the Stefan-Boltzmann law. Fully coupled thermo-mechanical problem is formulated.

  4. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model for the Static and Cyclic Fatigue of Cellular Composites

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Otto

    2017-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a cellular composite with an epoxy matrix and glass foam granules is analyzed and modeled by means of continuum damage mechanics. The investigated cellular composite is a particular type of composite foam, and is very similar to syntactic foams. In contrast to conventional syntactic foams constituted by hollow spherical particles (balloons), cellular glass, mineral, or metal place holders are combined with the matrix material (metal or polymer) in the case of cellular composites. A microstructural investigation of the damage behavior is performed using scanning electron microscopy. For the modeling of the fatigue behavior, the damage is separated into pure static and pure cyclic damage and described in terms of the stiffness loss of the material using damage models for cyclic and creep damage. Both models incorporate nonlinear accumulation and interaction of damage. A cycle jumping procedure is developed, which allows for a fast and accurate calculation of the damage evolution for constant load frequencies. The damage model is applied to examine the mean stress effect for cyclic fatigue and to investigate the frequency effect and the influence of the signal form in the case of static and cyclic damage interaction. The calculated lifetimes are in very good agreement with experimental results. PMID:28809806

  5. Navy Enhanced Sierra Mechanics (NESM): Toolbox for predicting Navy shock and damage

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Thomas; Stergiou, Jonathan; Reese, Garth; Luton, James; Abboud, Najib

    2016-05-25

    Here, the US Navy is developing a new suite of computational mechanics tools (Navy Enhanced Sierra Mechanics) for the prediction of ship response, damage, and shock environments transmitted to vital systems during threat weapon encounters. NESM includes fully coupled Euler-Lagrange solvers tailored to ship shock/damage predictions. NESM is optimized to support high-performance computing architectures, providing the physics-based ship response/threat weapon damage predictions needed to support the design and assessment of highly survivable ships. NESM is being employed to support current Navy ship design and acquisition programs while being further developed for future Navy fleet needs.

  6. Navy Enhanced Sierra Mechanics (NESM): Toolbox for predicting Navy shock and damage

    DOE PAGES

    Moyer, Thomas; Stergiou, Jonathan; Reese, Garth; ...

    2016-05-25

    Here, the US Navy is developing a new suite of computational mechanics tools (Navy Enhanced Sierra Mechanics) for the prediction of ship response, damage, and shock environments transmitted to vital systems during threat weapon encounters. NESM includes fully coupled Euler-Lagrange solvers tailored to ship shock/damage predictions. NESM is optimized to support high-performance computing architectures, providing the physics-based ship response/threat weapon damage predictions needed to support the design and assessment of highly survivable ships. NESM is being employed to support current Navy ship design and acquisition programs while being further developed for future Navy fleet needs.

  7. Simplified strategies based on damage mechanics for concrete under dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Mazars, Jacky; Grange, Stéphane

    2017-01-28

    Based on previous work, the µ damage model has been designed to figure out the various damage effects in concrete correlated with monotonic and cyclic loading, including unilateral effects. Assumptions are formulated to simplify constitutive relationships while still allowing for a correct description of the main nonlinear effects. In this context, the paper presents an enhanced simplified finite-element description including a damage description, based on the use of multifibre beam elements and including strain rate effects. Applications show that such a strategy leads to an efficient tool to simulate dynamic loading at low, medium and high velocities.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  8. Modeling the roles of damage accumulation and mechanical healing on rainfall-induced landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The abrupt release of rainfall-induced shallow landslides is preceded by local failures that may abruptly coalesce and form a continuous failure plane within a hillslope. The mechanical status of hillslopes reflects a competition between the extent of severity of accumulated local damage during prior rainfall events and the rates of mechanically healing (i.e. regaining of strength) by closure of micro-cracks, regrowth of roots, etc. The interplay of these processes affects the initial conditions for landslide modeling and shapes potential failure patterns during future rainfall events. We incorporated these competing mechanical processes in a hydro-mechanical landslide triggering model subjected to a sequence of rainfall scenarios. The model employs the Fiber Bundle Model (FBM) with bonds (fiber bundle) with prescribed threshold linking adjacent soil columns and soil to bedrock. Prior damage was represented by a fraction of broken fibers during previous rainfall events, and the healing of broken fibers was described by strength regaining models for soil and roots at different characteristic time scales. Results show that prior damage and healing introduce highly nonlinear response to landslide triggering. For small prior damage, mechanical bonds at soil-bedrock interface may fail early in next rainfall event but lead to small perturbations onto lateral bonds without triggering a landslide. For more severe damage weakening lateral bonds, excess load due to failure at soil-bedrock interface accumulates at downslope soil columns resulting in early soil failure with patterns strongly correlated with prior damage distribution. Increasing prior damage over the hillslope decreases the volume of first landslide and prolongs the time needed to trigger the second landslide due to mechanical relaxation of the system. The mechanical healing of fibers diminishes effects of prior damage on the time of failure, and shortens waiting time between the first and second landslides

  9. Mechanical damage to green and red lentil seeds.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Feizollah; Valizade, Saman; Dowlatshah, Ali

    2017-07-01

    In this research, the breakage susceptibility of two classes of lentil (green and red) was evaluated as affected by impact energy and seed moisture content. The experiments were conducted at impact energies of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 J, and moisture contents of 10, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20 and 25% (wet basis). Results showed that red lentil seeds had more breakage than green seeds and the difference in breakage percentage between green and red lentil seeds was significant at 0.01% level according to analysis of variance (p < .01). Percentage breakage of both green and red lentil seeds increased as the energy of impact increased. With increasing the seed moisture content of the both green and red lentils, the breakage percentage of seeds decreased. The average values of seeds breakage green and red lentil seeds varied from 100 to 67.7% and from 100 to 93.1%, respectively, as the seeds moisture content increased from 10 to 25%. The optimum seed moisture at which minimum damage was observed was 17.5% for green lentil and 15% for red lentil. Mathematical relationships composed of lentil seeds moisture content and energy of impact were developed for accurate description of the breakage percentage of green and red lentil seeds under impact loading.

  10. A fully coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Double Porosity Formulation for Modeling Multiphysics Problems in Geological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, M. J.; Gens, A.; Jarecki, Z.; Olivella, S.

    2012-12-01

    This work presents a coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) formulation developed to handle multiphysic problems in porous media with two dominant void levels. The proposed framework assumes the presence of two porous media linked through a mass transfer term between them. In many cases, the use of a double porosity formulation is more realistic because it is possible to take explicitly into account the different physical phenomena that take place in each void level, and also their mutual interactions. The formulation is especially suitable for cases in which the material exhibits a strong coupling between the mechanical and the hydraulic problem in both media. The problem is approached using a multi-phase, multi-species formulation that expresses mathematically the main coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical phenomena in terms of: balance equations, constitutive equations and equilibrium restrictions. In its more general form, the proposed approach allows the consideration of multiphase flow in the two pore levels coupled with the mechanical problem. The formulation presented is quite open and general, and able to incorporate different constitutive laws for each basic structural level considered; for the mechanical, hydraulic and thermal problems. The double structure formulation has been implemented in the finite element program CODE_BRIGHT and it has been used to analyze a variety of engineering problems associated with the design of radioactive waste disposal in deep geological media and petroleum engineering problems. This work presents two case studies; one is related to oil production in a heterogeneous reservoir, and the other case focuses on the analysis of a repository for nuclear waste in a clayed formation. Both cases show the potential of the proposed formation to tackle coupled multiphysics problems in porous media.

  11. An in vivo mechanism for the reduced peripheral neurotoxicity of NK105: a paclitaxel-incorporating polymeric micellar nanoparticle formulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Iwao; Ichimura, Eiji; Goda, Rika; Hayashi, Hitomi; Mashiba, Hiroko; Nagai, Daichi; Yokoyama, Hirofumi; Onda, Takeshi; Masuda, Akira

    2017-01-01

    In our previous rodent studies, the paclitaxel (PTX)-incorporating polymeric micellar nanoparticle formulation NK105 had showed significantly stronger antitumor effects and reduced peripheral neurotoxicity than PTX dissolved in Cremophor® EL and ethanol (PTX/CRE). Thus, to elucidate the mechanisms underlying reduced peripheral neurotoxicity due to NK105, we performed pharmacokinetic analyses of NK105 and PTX/CRE in rats. Among neural tissues, the highest PTX concentrations were found in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Moreover, exposure of DRG to PTX (Cmax_PTX and AUC0-inf._PTX) in the NK105 group was almost half that in the PTX/CRE group, whereas exposure of sciatic and sural nerves was greater in the NK105 group than in the PTX/CRE group. In histopathological analyses, damage to DRG and both peripheral nerves was less in the NK105 group than in the PTX/CRE group. The consistency of these pharmacokinetic and histopathological data suggests that high levels of PTX in the DRG play an important role in the induction of peripheral neurotoxicity, and reduced distribution of PTX to the DRG of NK105-treated rats limits the ensuing peripheral neurotoxicity. In further analyses of PTX distribution to the DRG, Evans blue (Eb) was injected with BODIPY®-labeled NK105 into rats, and Eb fluorescence was observed only in the DRG. Following injection, most Eb dye bound to albumin particles of ~8 nm and had penetrated the DRG. In contrast, BODIPY®–NK105 particles of ~90 nm were not found in the DRG, suggesting differential penetration based on particle size. Because PTX also circulates as PTX–albumin particles of ~8 nm following injection of PTX/CRE, reduced peripheral neurotoxicity of NK105 may reflect exclusion from the DRG due to particle size, leading to reduced PTX levels in rat DRG (275). PMID:28243090

  12. An in vivo mechanism for the reduced peripheral neurotoxicity of NK105: a paclitaxel-incorporating polymeric micellar nanoparticle formulation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Iwao; Ichimura, Eiji; Goda, Rika; Hayashi, Hitomi; Mashiba, Hiroko; Nagai, Daichi; Yokoyama, Hirofumi; Onda, Takeshi; Masuda, Akira

    2017-01-01

    In our previous rodent studies, the paclitaxel (PTX)-incorporating polymeric micellar nanoparticle formulation NK105 had showed significantly stronger antitumor effects and reduced peripheral neurotoxicity than PTX dissolved in Cremophor(®) EL and ethanol (PTX/CRE). Thus, to elucidate the mechanisms underlying reduced peripheral neurotoxicity due to NK105, we performed pharmacokinetic analyses of NK105 and PTX/CRE in rats. Among neural tissues, the highest PTX concentrations were found in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Moreover, exposure of DRG to PTX (Cmax_PTX and AUC0-inf._PTX) in the NK105 group was almost half that in the PTX/CRE group, whereas exposure of sciatic and sural nerves was greater in the NK105 group than in the PTX/CRE group. In histopathological analyses, damage to DRG and both peripheral nerves was less in the NK105 group than in the PTX/CRE group. The consistency of these pharmacokinetic and histopathological data suggests that high levels of PTX in the DRG play an important role in the induction of peripheral neurotoxicity, and reduced distribution of PTX to the DRG of NK105-treated rats limits the ensuing peripheral neurotoxicity. In further analyses of PTX distribution to the DRG, Evans blue (Eb) was injected with BODIPY(®)-labeled NK105 into rats, and Eb fluorescence was observed only in the DRG. Following injection, most Eb dye bound to albumin particles of ~8 nm and had penetrated the DRG. In contrast, BODIPY(®)-NK105 particles of ~90 nm were not found in the DRG, suggesting differential penetration based on particle size. Because PTX also circulates as PTX-albumin particles of ~8 nm following injection of PTX/CRE, reduced peripheral neurotoxicity of NK105 may reflect exclusion from the DRG due to particle size, leading to reduced PTX levels in rat DRG (275).

  13. Vascular damage, fibrosis, and chronic inflammation in mechanical back pain problems.

    PubMed

    Jayson, M I

    1989-05-01

    Our current hypothesis is that mechanical damage in the spine such as a disc prolapse can lead directly to pain. However, pain arising for this reason is usually of short duration. In many subjects, however, the mechanical problems lead to vascular damage and, in particular, venous obstruction and dilatation with endothelial damage, fibrin deposition, and intravascular thromboses. In turn, this is associated with perineural and intraneural fibrosis. There is a defect in the fibrinolytic system in the peripheral blood that may be the result of vascular damage but in turn may contribute to the persistence of this problem. Therefore, it seems likely that in many patients with chronic mechanical back pain there are important vascular, fibrotic, and inflammatory components to the problem. Treatment in the future should be directed specifically at these aspects of the disorder and hopefully can lead to better control of symptoms.

  14. Experimental Study on the Thermal Damage Characteristics of Limestone and Underlying Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Sun, Qiang; Hao, Shuqing; Wang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This work discusses an experimental investigation on the thermal damage characteristics of limestone and underlying mechanism. Cylindrical rock samples were heated to a specific temperature level of 25, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, and 900 °C. Then the thermal damage evolution equation was established based on the experimental results and the characteristics of thermal damage were analyzed. Last, possible mechanisms for the observed thermo-physical and mechanical response are discussed. The results show that with the increase of temperature in the tested range of temperature, the P-wave velocity, peak compressive strength and elastic modulus decrease, but the peak strain increases; the damage factors increase faster in 200-600 °C; the development of high-temperature-induced cracks conforms to the dislocation theory; the decomposition of magnesium carbonate and dolomite is the main reaction in the tested temperature range.

  15. Frame functions in finite-dimensional quantum mechanics and its Hamiltonian formulation on complex projective spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Valter; Pastorello, Davide

    2016-12-01

    This work concerns some issues about the interplay of standard and geometric (Hamiltonian) approaches to finite-dimensional quantum mechanics, formulated in the projective space. Our analysis relies upon the notion and the properties of so-called frame functions, introduced by Gleason to prove his celebrated theorem. In particular, the problem of associating quantum states with positive Liouville densities is tackled from an axiomatic point of view, proving a theorem classifying all possible correspondences. A similar result is established for classical-like observables (i.e. real scalar functions on the projective space) representing quantum ones. These correspondences turn out to be encoded in a one-parameter class and, in both cases, the classical-like objects representing quantum ones result to be frame functions. The requirements of U(n) covariance and (convex) linearity play a central role in the proof of those theorems. A new characterization of classical-like observables describing quantum observables is presented, together with a geometric description of the C∗-algebra structure of the set of quantum observables in terms of classical-like ones.

  16. Design of a dual nanostructured lipid carrier formulation based on physicochemical, rheological, and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, Carla; Alves, Luís; Antunes, Filipe E.; Sousa, João J.; Pais, Alberto A. C. C.

    2013-10-01

    The synergy between nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and chemical penetration enhancers provides the basis for a promising strategy to effectively deliver drugs through the skin. In the present work, focus is given to the study of the interaction of limonene, ethanol, and Carbopol Ultrez® 10NF, as the gelling agent, with a co-encapsulating NLC dispersion, containing both olanzapine and simvastatin. The analysis is based on rheological, mechanical, and physicochemical properties. The nanoparticle size ranged from 130 to 400 nm, depending on the system considered. The inclusion of carbopol resulted in a considerable increase in the NLC particle size, which was attributed to carbomer bridging nanoparticles, resulting in some particle aggregation. Rheological measurements indicated that the viscosity of the neat carbopol hydrogel was reduced by the enhancers and to a higher extent by the presence of NLC. A more apolar medium can be pointed out as a general explanation, while a polymer/nanoparticle hydrophobic interaction coupled with surfactant/polymer H-bonding provides the rationale for the NLC effect. The inclusion of enhancers and a carbomer largely contributed to the physicochemical stability of the NLC formulation, as revealed by the low transmission profiles and more negative zeta potential values.

  17. Mechanism of nitroimidazole damage to DNA: coulometric evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, R.J.; Edwards, D.I.; Knight, R.C.

    1984-08-01

    A high resolution coulometric technique has been developed to measure the electron requirement for reduction of 12 nitroimidazoles, both in the presence and absence of DNA. The cytotoxic species is shown to be a light sensitive intermediate of drug reduction and a common mechanism of cytotoxicity proposed which involves electron transfer from DNA to the one-electron radical anion (R-NO/sub 2//sup -/).

  18. Alphavirus Encephalomyelitis: Mechanisms and Approaches to Prevention of Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Diane E

    2016-07-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses are important causes of death and long-term neurologic disability due to encephalomyelitis. Studies of mice infected with the alphavirus Sindbis virus have shown that outcome is dependent on the age and genetic background of the mouse and virulence of the infecting virus. Age-dependent susceptibility reflects the acquisition by neurons of resistance to virus replication and virus-induced cell death with maturation. In mature mice, the populations of neurons most susceptible to infection are in the hippocampus and anterior horn of the spinal cord. Hippocampal infection leads to long-term memory deficits in mice that survive, while motor neuron infection can lead to paralysis and death. Neuronal death is immune-mediated, rather than a direct consequence of virus infection, and associated with entry and differentiation of pathogenic T helper 17 cells in the nervous system. To modulate glutamate excitotoxicity, mice were treated with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonists or a glutamine antagonist. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 protected hippocampal neurons but not motor neurons, and mice still became paralyzed and died. α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonists GYKI-52466 and talampanel protected both hippocampal and motor neurons and prevented paralysis and death. Glutamine antagonist 6-diazo-5-l-norleucine protected hippocampal neurons and improved memory generation in mice surviving infection with an avirulent virus. Surprisingly, in all cases protection was associated with inhibition of the antiviral immune response, reduced entry of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system, and delayed virus clearance, emphasizing the importance of treatment approaches that include prevention of immunopathologic damage.

  19. Experimental investigation on mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ranjith, P. G.; Huang, Yan-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Jing, Hong-Wen; Gui, Yi-Lin; Yu, Qing-Lei

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone subjected to cyclic loading is very significant to evaluate the stability and safety of deep excavation damage zones. However to date, there are very few triaxial experimental studies of sandstone under cyclic loading. Moreover, few X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) observations have been adopted to reveal the damage mechanism of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading. Therefore, in this research, a series of triaxial cyclic loading tests and X-ray micro-CT observations were conducted to analyse the mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone with respect to different confining pressures. The results indicated that at lower confining pressures, the triaxial strength of sandstone specimens under cyclic loading is higher than that under monotonic loading; whereas at confining pressures above 20 MPa, the triaxial strength of sandstone under cyclic loading is approximately equal to that under monotonic loading. With the increase of cycle number, the crack damage threshold of sandstone first increases, and then significantly decreases and finally remains constant. Based on the damage evolution of irreversible deformation, it appears that the axial damage value of sandstone is all higher than the radial damage value before the peak strength; whereas the radial damage value is higher than the axial damage value after the peak strength. The evolution of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of sandstone can be characterized as having four stages: (i) Stage I: material strengthening; (ii) Stage II: material degradation; (iii) Stage III: material failure and (iv) Stage IV: structure slippage. X-ray micro-CT observations demonstrated that the CT scanning surface images of sandstone specimens are consistent with actual surface crack photographs. The analysis of the cross-sections of sandstone supports that the system of crack planes under triaxial cyclic loading is much more complicated than that under triaxial

  20. Subsurface damage mechanism of high speed grinding process in single crystal silicon revealed by atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Zhang, Liangchi; Liu, Youwen

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the nanoscale grinding process of single crystal silicon using diamond tool. The effect of grinding speed on subsurface damage and grinding surface integrity by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and phase transformation are studied. We also establish an analytical model to calculate several important stress fields including hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress for studying subsurface damage mechanism, and obtain the dislocation density on the grinding subsurface. The results show that a higher grinding velocity in machining brittle material silicon causes a larger chip and a higher temperature, and reduces subsurface damage. However, when grinding velocity is above 180 m s-1, subsurface damage thickness slightly increases because a higher grinding speed leads to the increase in grinding force and temperature, which accelerate dislocation nucleation and motion. Subsurface damage is studied by the evolution of surface area at first time for more obvious observation on transition from ductile to brittle, that provides valuable reference for machining nanometer devices. The von Mises stress and the hydrostatic stress play an important role in the grinding process, and explain the subsurface damage though dislocation mechanism under high stress status. The dislocation nucleation and motion induced plastic deformation during grinding process can better reveal subsurface damage mechanism considering to stress and temperature acting on the dislocations.

  1. Structural and Mechanical Repair of Diffuse Damage in Cortical Bone in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Kennedy, Oran D.; Philemon, Claudy J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological wear and tear causes bone microdamage at several hierarchical levels, and these have different biological consequences. Bone remodeling is widely held to be the mechanism by which bone microdamage is repaired. However, recent studies showed that unlike typical linear microcracks, small crack damage, the clusters of submicron-sized matrix cracks also known as diffuse damage (Dif.Dx), does not activate remodeling. Thus, the fate of diffuse damage in vivo is not known. To examine this, we induced selectively Dif.Dx in rat ulnae in vivo by using end-load ulnar bending creep model. Changes in damage content were assessed by histomorphometry and mechanical testing immediately after loading (i.e., acute loaded) or at 14 days after damage induction (i.e., survival ulnae). Dif.Dx area was markedly reduced over the 14-day survival period after loading (p<0.02). We did not observe any intracortical resorption and there was no increase in cortical bone area in survival ulnae. The reduction in whole bone stiffness in acute loaded ulnae was restored to baseline levels in survival ulnae (p>0.6). Microindentation studies showed that Dif.Dx caused a highly localized reduction in elastic modulus in diffuse damage regions of the ulnar cortex. Moduli in these previously damaged bone areas were restored to control values by 14 days after loading. Our current findings indicate that small crack damage in bone can be repaired without bone remodeling, and suggest that alternative repair mechanisms exist in bone to deal with submicron-sized matrix cracks. Those mechanisms are currently unknown and further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which this direct repair occurs. PMID:25042459

  2. Cellular mechanisms of neurovascular damage and repair after stroke.

    PubMed

    Arai, Ken; Lok, Josephine; Guo, Shuzhen; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Xing, Changhong; Lo, Eng H

    2011-09-01

    The biological processes underlying stroke are complex, and patients have a narrow repertoire of therapeutic opportunities. After the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened the Stroke Progress Review Group in 2001, stroke research shifted from having a purely neurocentric focus to adopting a more integrated view wherein dynamic interactions between all cell types contribute to function and dysfunction in the brain. This so-called "neurovascular unit" provides a conceptual framework that emphasizes cell-cell interactions between neuronal, glial, and vascular elements. Under normal conditions, signaling within the neurovascular unit helps maintain homeostasis. After stroke, cell-cell signaling is disturbed, leading to pathophysiology. More recently, emerging data now suggest that these cell-cell signaling mechanisms may also mediate parallel processes of neurovascular remodeling during stroke recovery. Because plasticity is a signature feature of the young and developing brain, these concepts may have special relevance to how the pediatric brain responds after stroke.

  3. Neural network based system for damage identification and location in structural and mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.; Prime, M.B.; Cornwell, P.; Kam, M.; Straser, E.G.; Hoerst, B.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Recent advances in wireless, remotely monitored data acquisition systems coupled with the development of vibration-based damage detection algorithms make the possibility of self- or remotely-monitored structures and mechanical systems appear to be within the capabilities of current technology. However, before such a system can be relied upon to perform this monitoring, the variability of the vibration properties that are the basis for the damage detection algorithm must be understood and quantified. This understanding is necessary so that the artificial intelligence/expert system that is employed to discriminate when changes in modal properties are indicative of damage will not yield false indications of damage. To this end, this project has focused on developing statistical methods for quantifying variability in identified vibration proper ties of structural and mechanical systems.

  4. Mechanical damage assessment by means of thermo-electrical lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordatos, E. Z.; Exarchos, D. A.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-04-01

    The present work deals with the nondestructive assessment of the metallic materials' mechanical damage. An innovative Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) methodology based on two thermographic approaches was developed in order the state of fatigue damage to be assessed. The first approach allows the detection of heat waves generated by the thermomechanical coupling during the fatigue loading (online method). Specifically, both the thermo-elastic and intrinsic dissipated energy was correlated with the mechanical degradation and the remaining fatigue life. The second approach involves the monitoring of the materials' thermal behavior using a Peltier device for accurate thermal excitation (offline method). The correlation of the thermal behavior and the state of damage was achieved by the determination of the material's thermal response. The combination of these two approaches enables the rapid and accurate assessment of the cumulative damage.

  5. Effects of Thermal Damage and Confining Pressure on the Mechanical Properties of Coarse Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mengdi; Rong, Guan; Zhou, Chuangbing; Peng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Heating treatment generally causes thermal damage inside rocks, and the influence of thermal damage on mechanical properties of rocks is an important topic in rock mechanics. The coarse marble specimens drilled out from a rock block were first heated to a specific temperature level of 200, 400 and 600 °C except the control group left at 20 °C. A series of triaxial compression tests subjected to the confining pressure of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 MPa were conducted. Coupling effects of thermal damage and confining pressure on the mechanical properties of marbles including post-peak behaviors and failure modes, strength and deformation parameters, characteristic stresses in the progressive failure process had been investigated. Meanwhile, accompanied tests of physical properties were carried out to study the effect of thermal damage on microstructure, porosity and P-wave velocity. Finally, the degradation parameter was defined and a strength-degradation model to describe the peak strength was proposed. Physical investigations show that porosity increases slowly and P-wave velocity reduces dramatically, which could be re-demonstrated by the microscopy results. As for the post-peak behaviors and the failure modes, there is a brittle to ductile transition trend with increasing confining pressure and thermal effect reinforces the ductility to some degree. The comparative study on strength and deformation parameters concludes that heating causes damage and confining pressure inhibits the damage to develop. Furthermore, crack damage stress and crack initiation stress increase, while the ratios of crack damage stress to peak strength and crack initiation stress to peak strength show a decreasing trend with the increase of confining pressure; the magnitude of crack damage stress or crack initiation stress shows a tendency of decrease with the increasing heating temperature and the tendency vanishes subjected to high confinement.

  6. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Damage formation mechanisms of Si and Ge substrates by ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki; Morimoto, Tamotsu; Isobe, Michiro; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently the choice of materials for most advanced semiconductor devices, which typically have three dimensional (3D) structures rather than planer ones, has been changing from silicon to III-V compounds or germanium. Such changes have brought renewed interest in physical damages caused by ion bombardment because, in typical gate etching processes of 3D devices, the channel surfaces are exposed directly to the ion irradiation from the plasma. The angles of ion incidence on 3D device gates can be much larger than those on 2D planer devices. Therefore a better control of the damage layer formation on modern 3D devices requires a better understanding of the damage formation mechanisms on such new materials and structures. In this study, damage formation processes by energetic ion bombardment have been simulated for Si/Ge/SiGe substrates by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dependence of ion induced damages on species of incident ions and their doses has been examined. Based on the simulations results, damage formation mechanisms will be discussed and a semi-analytical model to predict the damage extent formed by ion bombardment will be also presented.

  8. Regulatory players of DNA damage repair mechanisms: Role in Cancer Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Hariharan, Sreedharan

    2017-09-01

    DNA damaging agents are most common in chemotherapeutic molecules that act against cancer. However, cancer cells possess inherent biological features to overcome DNA damages by activating various distinct repair mechanisms and pathways. Importantly, various oncogenes, cancer stem cells (CSCs), hypoxic environment, transcription factors and bystander signaling that are activated in the cancer cells influence DNA repair, thereby effectively repairing the DNA damage. Repaired cancer cells often become more resistance to further therapy and results in disease recurrence. In this review, we summarize how the various signaling pathways in cancer cells regulates DNA repair and induce chemoresistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms of damage to corals exposed to sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk; Lott, Christian; Polerecky, Lubos; Kohls, Katharina; Abed, Raeid M M; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Fabricius, Katharina E

    2012-06-12

    We investigated the mechanisms leading to rapid death of corals when exposed to runoff and resuspended sediments, postulating that the killing was microbially mediated. Microsensor measurements were conducted in mesocosm experiments and in naturally accumulated sediment on corals. In organic-rich, but not in organic-poor sediment, pH and oxygen started to decrease as soon as the sediment accumulated on the coral. Organic-rich sediments caused tissue degradation within 1 d, whereas organic-poor sediments had no effect after 6 d. In the harmful organic-rich sediment, hydrogen sulfide concentrations were low initially but increased progressively because of the degradation of coral mucus and dead tissue. Dark incubations of corals showed that separate exposures to darkness, anoxia, and low pH did not cause mortality within 4 d. However, the combination of anoxia and low pH led to colony death within 24 h. When hydrogen sulfide was added after 12 h of anoxia and low pH, colonies died after an additional 3 h. We suggest that sedimentation kills corals through microbial processes triggered by the organic matter in the sediments, namely respiration and presumably fermentation and desulfurylation of products from tissue degradation. First, increased microbial respiration results in reduced O(2) and pH, initiating tissue degradation. Subsequently, the hydrogen sulfide formed by bacterial decomposition of coral tissue and mucus diffuses to the neighboring tissues, accelerating the spread of colony mortality. Our data suggest that the organic enrichment of coastal sediments is a key process in the degradation of coral reefs exposed to terrestrial runoff.

  10. Potential of human γD-crystallin for hair damage repair: insights into the mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A; Matamá, T; Cruz, C F; Gomes, A C; Cavaco-Paulo, A M

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a new strategy to physically 'repair' chemically damaged hair. Hence the human eye γD-crystallin, a protein from the superfamily characterized structurally by the Greek key motif, was studied. The human γD-crystallin was chosen based on the ability of proteins belonging to this superfamily to be involved in the coating of specific structures. Two crystallins were used on the study, the wild type (Protein Data Bank ID: 1HK0) and the mutant protein. The mutant form was intended to induce a strong and quick protein polymerization as well to have new possible points of anchorage to hair. The ability of both crystallins to bind to damaged hair and even penetrate into its cortex was checked by fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore the reinforcement of hair mechanical resistance, the potential cytotoxic/inflammatory effect of crystallins were studied in order to have a fully comprehension about the protein based formulation. Although the chemical over-bleaching treatment induced a decrease of 20% on the resistance of the hair, the crystallins which bind and penetrate the hair fibre were able to recover and even to improve its mechanical properties when compared to the virgin hair. Moreover none of the crystallins displayed a toxic effect in fibroblasts for all the range of tested concentrations upon 72 h of exposure. The active aggregation process of mutant crystallin induced an inflammatory response in fibroblasts in the first 24 h of contact, measured by the amount of released pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 to the medium. In contrast contact with wild type crystallin did not lead to significant inflammation. Outcome from protein formulation characterization supports the hypothesis that the γD-crystallin it is able to recover and improve the mechanical properties of chemical damaged hair. Therefore it can be considered as a very promising strengthening agent for the

  11. Progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanlei; Chang, Xinlong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Youhong

    A multiscale model based bridge theory is proposed for the progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading. The ablation model is adopted to calculate ablation temperature changing and ablation surface degradation. The polynomial strengthening model of matrix is used to improve bridging model for reducing parameter input. Stiffness degradation methods of bridging model are also improved in order to analyze the stress redistribution more accurately when the damage occurs. Thermal-mechanical analyses of the composite plate are performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit program with the developed model implemented in the VUMAT. The simulation results show that this model can be used to proclaim the mesoscale damage mechanism of composite laminates under coupled loading.

  12. Reducing Mechanical Formation Damage by Minimizing Interfacial Tension and Capillary Pressure in Tight Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Arshad; Talib Shuker, Muhannad; Rehman, Khalil; Bahrami, Hassan; Memon, Muhammad Khan

    2013-12-01

    Tight gas reservoirs incur problems and significant damage caused by low permeability during drilling, completion, stimulation and production. They require advanced improvement techniques to achieve flow gas at optimum rates. Water blocking damage (phase Trapping/retention of fluids) is a form of mechanical formation damage mechanism, which is caused by filtrate invasion in drilling operations mostly in fracturing. Water blocking has a noticeable impact on formation damage in gas reservoirs which tends to decrease relative permeability near the wellbore. Proper evaluation of damage and the factors which influence its severity is essential to optimize well productivity. Reliable data regarding interfacial tension between gas and water is required in order to minimize mechanical formation damage potential and to optimize gas production. This study was based on the laboratory experiments of interfacial tension by rising drop method between gas-brine, gas-condensate and gas-brine. The results showed gas condensate has low interfacial tension value 6 - 11 dynes/cm when compared to gas-brine and gas- diesel which were 44 - 58 dynes/cm and 14 - 19 dynes/cm respectively. In this way, the capillary pressure of brine-gas system was estimated as 0.488 psi, therefore diesel-gas system was noticed about 0.164 psi and 0.098 psi for condensate-gas system. A forecast model was used by using IFT values to predict the phase trapping which shows less severe phase trapping damage in case of condensate than diesel and brine. A reservoir simulation study was also carried out in order to better understand the effect of hysteresis on well productivity and flow efficiency affected due to water blocking damage in tight gas reservoirs.

  13. Effects of formulation design on niacin therapeutics: mechanism of action, metabolism, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dustin L; Murrell, Derek E; Roane, David S; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2015-07-25

    Niacin is a highly effective, lipid regulating drug associated with a number of metabolically induced side effects such as prostaglandin (PG) mediated flushing and hepatic toxicity. In an attempt to reduce the development of these adverse effects, scientists have investigated differing methods of niacin delivery designed to control drug release and alter metabolism. However, despite successful formulation of various orally based capsule and tablet delivery systems, patient adherence to niacin therapy is still compromised by adverse events such as PG-induced flushing. While the primary advantage of orally dosed formulations is ease of use, alternative delivery options such as transdermal delivery or polymeric micro/nanoparticle encapsulation for oral administration have shown promise in niacin reformulation. However, the effectiveness of these alternative delivery options in reducing inimical effects of niacin and maintaining drug efficacy is still largely unknown and requires more in-depth investigation. In this paper, we present an overview of niacin applications, its metabolic pathways, and current drug delivery formulations. Focus is placed on oral immediate, sustained, and extended release niacin delivery as well as combined statin and/or prostaglandin antagonist niacin formulation. We also examine and discuss current findings involving transdermal niacin formulations and polymeric micro/nanoparticle encapsulated niacin delivery.

  14. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  15. Strategies for the evaluation of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in cancer.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    DNA lesions and the repair mechanisms that maintain the integrity of genomic DNA are important in preventing carcinogenesis and its progression. Notably, mutations in DNA repair mechanisms are associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Additionally, these mechanisms maintain the genomic integrity of cancer cells. The majority of therapies established to treat cancer are genotoxic agents that induce DNA damage, promoting cancer cells to undergo apoptotic death. Effective methods currently exist to evaluate the diverse effects of genotoxic agents and the underlying molecular mechanisms that repair DNA lesions. The current study provides an overview of a number of methods that are available for the detection, analysis and quantification of underlying DNA repair mechanisms.

  16. Multiscale Approach to the Physics of Ion-Beam Therapy:. Thermo-Mechanical Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'yov, A. V.; Yakubovich, A. V.; Surdutovich, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the multiscale approach towards the understanding of processes responsible for the radiation damage caused by energetic ions. This knowledge is important because it can be utilized in the ion-beam cancer therapy, which is one of the most advanced modern techniques to cure certain types of cancer. The central element of the multiscale approach is the theoretical evaluation and quantification of DNA damage within cell environment. We consider different pathways of DNA damage and focus on the the illustration of the thermo-mechanical effects caused by the propagation of ions through the biological environment and in particular on the possibility of the creation of the shock waves in the vicinity of the ion tracks. We demonstrate that at the initial stages after ion's passage the shock wave is so strong that it can contribute to the DNA damage due to large pressure gradients developed at the distances of a few nanometers from the ionic tracks. This novel mechanism of the DNA damage provides an important contribution to the cumulative bio-damage caused by low-energy secondary electrons, holes and free radicals.

  17. Independent mechanisms recruit the cohesin loader protein NIPBL to sites of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Annika; Giordano, Fosco; Dantuma, Nico P.; Ström, Lena

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT NIPBL is required to load the cohesin complex on to DNA. While the canonical role of cohesin is to couple replicated sister chromatids together until the onset of mitosis, it also promotes tolerance to DNA damage. Here, we show that NIPBL is recruited to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle via independent mechanisms, influenced by type of damage. First, the heterochromatin protein HP1γ (also known as CBX3) recruits NIPBL to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through the corresponding HP1-binding motif within the N-terminus. By contrast, the C-terminal HEAT repeat domain is unable to recruit NIPBL to DSBs but independently targets NIPBL to laser microirradiation-induced DNA damage. Each mechanism is dependent on the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitylation pathway, while the recruitment of the HEAT repeat domain requires further ATM or ATR activity. Thus, NIPBL has evolved a sophisticated response to damaged DNA that is influenced by the form of damage, suggesting a highly dynamic role for NIPBL in maintaining genomic stability. PMID:28167679

  18. Independent mechanisms recruit the cohesin loader protein NIPBL to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bot, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Annika; Giordano, Fosco; Manjeera, Dharani E; Dantuma, Nico P; Ström, Lena

    2017-03-15

    NIPBL is required to load the cohesin complex on to DNA. While the canonical role of cohesin is to couple replicated sister chromatids together until the onset of mitosis, it also promotes tolerance to DNA damage. Here, we show that NIPBL is recruited to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle via independent mechanisms, influenced by type of damage. First, the heterochromatin protein HP1γ (also known as CBX3) recruits NIPBL to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through the corresponding HP1-binding motif within the N-terminus. By contrast, the C-terminal HEAT repeat domain is unable to recruit NIPBL to DSBs but independently targets NIPBL to laser microirradiation-induced DNA damage. Each mechanism is dependent on the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitylation pathway, while the recruitment of the HEAT repeat domain requires further ATM or ATR activity. Thus, NIPBL has evolved a sophisticated response to damaged DNA that is influenced by the form of damage, suggesting a highly dynamic role for NIPBL in maintaining genomic stability.

  19. Global trends, potential mechanisms and early detection of organ damage in SLE.

    PubMed

    Mak, Anselm; Isenberg, David A; Lau, Chak-Sing

    2013-05-01

    Increased longevity of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) leads to chronic organ damage accrual, which reduces the possibility of further survival improvement in patients with the disease. Observations from lupus centres worldwide revealed that the prevalence of damage occurring in the cardiovascular system in patients with SLE has increased over the past four decades. The results of a meta-analysis involving over 70 observational studies demonstrated that lupus-related organ damage involving the neuropsychiatric and renal systems also remains a major factor that limits survival improvement in patients with this disease. While efforts to halt acute lupus-related injury are continuing, through early diagnosis and effective use of immunosuppressive agents, a concomitant strategy to improve survival of patients with SLE would be early detection and timely treatment of lupus-related organ damage with meticulous monitoring. This Review discusses the pattern and trend of organ damage in patients with SLE worldwide, the potential serological and genetic mechanisms of organ damage, and the advances in research on potential tools for early detection of lupus-related organ damage, such as functional brain imaging techniques, measurement of endothelial function, identification of biomarkers from body fluids, and development of risk calculation models.

  20. Computational Simulation of Damage Progression of Composite Thin Shells Subjected to Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, P. K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Defect-free and defected composite thin shells with ply orientation (90/0/+/-75) made of graphite/epoxy are simulated for damage progression and fracture due to internal pressure and axial loading. The thin shells have a cylindrical geometry with one end fixed and the other free. The applied load consists of an internal pressure in conjunction with an axial load at the free end, the cure temperature was 177 C (350 F) and the operational temperature was 21 C (70 F). The residual stresses due to the processing are taken into account. Shells with defect and without defects were examined by using CODSTRAN an integrated computer code that couples composite mechanics, finite element and account for all possible failure modes inherent in composites. CODSTRAN traces damage initiation, growth, accumulation, damage propagation and the final fracture of the structure. The results show that damage initiation started with matrix failure while damage/fracture progression occurred due to additional matrix failure and fiber fracture. The burst pressure of the (90/0/+/- 75) defected shell was 0.092% of that of the free defect. Finally the results of the damage progression of the (90/0/+/- 75), defective composite shell was compared with the (90/0/+/- theta, where theta = 45 and 60, layup configurations. It was shown that the examined laminate (90/0/+/- 75) has the least damage tolerant of the two compared defective shells with the (90/0/+/- theta), theta = 45 and 60 laminates.

  1. Metal-mediated DNA damage and cell death: mechanisms, detection methods, and cellular consequences.

    PubMed

    Angelé-Martínez, Carlos; Goodman, Craig; Brumaghim, Julia

    2014-08-01

    The redox activity of metal ions can lead to the formation of highly reactive species that damage DNA, producing different oxidation products and types of damage depending upon the redox potentials of the DNA bases, formation of intermediate adducts, and identity of the reactive species. Other factors are also important in determining the degree of metal-mediated DNA damage, such as localization and redox chemistry of the metal ions or complexes and lifetimes of the reactive oxygen species generated. This review examines the types of DNA damage mediated by first-row transition metals under oxidative stress conditions, with emphasis on work published in the past ten years. Similarities and differences between DNA damage mechanisms of the first-row transition metals in vitro and in E. coli and human cells are compared and their relationship to disease development are discussed. Methods to detect this metal-mediated DNA damage, including backbone breakage, base oxidation, inter- and intra-strand crosslinking, and DNA-protein crosslinking are also briefly reviewed, as well as detection methods for reactive oxygen species generated by these metal ions. Understanding the conditions that cause metal-mediated DNA damage and metal generation of reactive oxygen species in vitro and in cells is required to develop effective drugs to prevent and treat chronic disease.

  2. DNA damage-dependent mechanisms of ageing and disease in the macro- and microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aarti V; Bennett, Martin R

    2017-03-25

    A decline in the function of the macro- and micro-vasculature occurs with ageing. DNA damage also accumulates with ageing, and thus DNA damage and repair have important roles in physiological ageing. Considerable evidence also supports a crucial role for DNA damage in the development and progression of macrovascular disease such as atherosclerosis. These findings support the concept that prolonged exposure to risk factors is a major stimulus for DNA damage within the vasculature, in part via the generation of reactive oxygen species. Genomic instability can directly affect vascular cellular function, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and premature vascular cell senescence. In contrast, the study of age-related impaired function and DNA damage mechanisms in the microvasculature is limited, although ageing is associated with microvessel endothelial dysfunction. This review examines current knowledge on the role of DNA damage and DNA repair systems in macrovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and microvascular disease. We also discuss the cellular responses to DNA damage to identify possible strategies for prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A fracture mechanics analysis of impact damage in a thick composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy filament-wound cases (FWC) for the solid rocket motors of the space shuttle are being made by NASA. The FWC cases are wound with AS4W graphite fiber impregnated with an epoxy resin and are about 1.4 inches or more thick. Graphite-epoxy composite laminates, unlike metals, can be damaged easily by low velocity impacts of objects like dropped tools. The residual tension strength of the FWC laminate, after impact, is being studied at Langley Research Center. The conditions that give minimum visual evidence of damage are being emphasized. A fracture mechanics analysis was developed to predict the residual strength, after impact, using radiographs to measure the size of the damage and an equivalent surface crack to represent the damage.

  4. Prediction of Size Effects in Notched Laminates Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, D. P.; Maimi, P.; Davila, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a continuum damage model to predict strength and size effects in notched carbon-epoxy laminates. The effects of size and the development of a fracture process zone before final failure are identified in an experimental program. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting predictions of size effects are compared with alternative approaches: the point stress and the inherent flaw models, the Linear-Elastic Fracture Mechanics approach, and the strength of materials approach. The results indicate that the continuum damage model is the most accurate technique to predict size effects in composites. Furthermore, the continuum damage model does not require any calibration and it is applicable to general geometries and boundary conditions.

  5. Earthquake Induced Damage Mechanism of Long Period Structures Using Energy Response

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yongfeng; Li Hui

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents a method of expounding the damage of RC long period frame structure using energy analysis method. Since the damage of structures usually occurs under major earthquakes, the structure is assumed to be in elasto-plastic state, and degraded Bouc-Wen model is used to describe the hysteretic component of the restoring force. A double index damage criterion defined by the maximum drift and energy absorption is used as the damage criterion. The energy transferring relation in a structure is derived, and both momentary and cumulative energy response is used to reflect the delay of the collapse of a long period structure. The mechanism of collapse delay of the long period structure is suggested through a numerical example combing the energy response and time history response.

  6. Study on fatigue damage characteristics of deformable mirrors under thermal-mechanical coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixia; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Nianchun

    2016-11-01

    In a wavefront correction process, both the mechanical effect and the irradiation of a high-power continuous-wave laser distort the deformable mirror (DM) surface, which inevitably speeds up the fatigue damage of the DM. By utilizing the stress analysis model for the fatigue damage of the DM, the fatigue damage effects are analyzed quantitatively on the consideration of thermal-mechanical coupling effects, and the fatigue life prediction model has further been proposed based on the S-N curve and Miner cumulative damage theory. On this basis, thermal-mechanical conditions have been analyzed, and the influence of laser parameters on the fatigue life of the DM has also been discussed in detail. The results indicate that the increasing of maximum temperature rise of the DM leads to the increasing of stress, and further brings about the decreasing of the fatigue life. Meanwhile, the position at the rear surface of the DM subjected to the maximum stress always presents the minimum fatigue life. Furthermore, the laser irradiation makes the DM more easily damaged when the DM is correcting a distorted wavefront, and the fatigue life decreases with the increasing of irradiation time and power density for a given peak and valley (PV) value of the corrected wavefront. Additionally, the fatigue life also decreases with the increasing of power density and the decreasing of spot radius for a certain total irradiation. On the other hand, for the given laser parameters, the influence of the mechanical effect on fatigue life is gradually apparent with increasing PV value of the corrected wavefront, and when the PV value is more than 2λ, the mechanical effect instead of the thermal effect becomes the key factor for fatigue damage of the DM.

  7. Alveolar overdistension is an important mechanism of persistent lung damage following severe protracted ARDS.

    PubMed

    Finfer, S; Rocker, G

    1996-10-01

    It is now widely accepted that mechanical ventilation may damage the lung, but the mechanism of lung damage is not clear. Possible causes include overdistension of aerated alveoli by inappropriately large tidal volumes (volutrauma), shear stresses generated during the recruitment and de-recruitment of lung units at the junction of aerated and collapsed lung, and infective or ischaemic necrosis of persistently collapsed lung. Computerized tomography allows noninvasive assessment of lung structure during and after acute lung injury, and may provide insight into the mechanism of lung damage. Using serial high resolution computed tomography we documented lung structure one month after recovery from severe protracted adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in three patients who required mechanical ventilation for between 86 and 97 days; the computed tomograms were repeated at between 5 and 14 months. All three patients had persistent abnormalities of lung structure which were most marked in the anterior regions of the lung. These findings suggest that overdistension of non-dependent lung regions in the main mechanism of lung damage persisting after recovery from severe protracted ARDS.

  8. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F. Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2017-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, E. coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:27234563

  9. Molecular mechanisms of light damage to the eye and its treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Joan E.; Bordeaux, Patrick A.; Hu, Dan-Ning; Lawless, DeSales

    1996-04-01

    The eye is continually subjected to ambient radiation. The benign function of this light is to direct vision and circadian rhythm. However, under intense light from artificial sources such as lasers and operating room microscopes the natural protection of eye against light damage may be undermined. The damage can be a result of a photochemical, thermal or mechanical injury which can all disrupt ocular tissues. The mechanism for the above damage involves the production free radical and reactive oxygen intermediates either as a primary effect of the absorbance of the light or as a secondary effect due to an inflammatory response to heat or mechanical injury. This can induce a cytokine cascade as well as induce the increased production of nitric oxide. Glutathione mimics can block light induced free radical and oxygen radical intermediates in the eye. For instance, singlet oxygen is scavenged at a rate of 106 M-1 s-1; hydroxyl radical is scavenged at a rate of 109 M-1 s-1 and superoxide is scavenged at a rate of 103 M-1 s-1. In addition thiols block nitric oxide and other intermediates involved in an inflammatory response. Glutathione mimics which have offered in vivo protection against light damage to the lens and retina, have the potential to protect against laser-induced damage to the human eye.

  10. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Escherichia coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Model-Based Fatigue Prognosis of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Exhibiting Concurrent Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbetta, M.; Sbarufatti, C.; Saxena, A.; Giglio, M.; Goebel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics of large composite structures is a topic of increasing interest in the field of structural health monitoring for aerospace, civil, and mechanical systems. Along with recent advancements in real-time structural health data acquisition and processing for damage detection and characterization, model-based stochastic methods for life prediction are showing promising results in the literature. Among various model-based approaches, particle-filtering algorithms are particularly capable in coping with uncertainties associated with the process. These include uncertainties about information on the damage extent and the inherent uncertainties of the damage propagation process. Some efforts have shown successful applications of particle filtering-based frameworks for predicting the matrix crack evolution and structural stiffness degradation caused by repetitive fatigue loads. Effects of other damage modes such as delamination, however, are not incorporated in these works. It is well established that delamination and matrix cracks not only co-exist in most laminate structures during the fatigue degradation process but also affect each other's progression. Furthermore, delamination significantly alters the stress-state in the laminates and accelerates the material degradation leading to catastrophic failure. Therefore, the work presented herein proposes a particle filtering-based framework for predicting a structure's remaining useful life with consideration of multiple co-existing damage-mechanisms. The framework uses an energy-based model from the composite modeling literature. The multiple damage-mode model has been shown to suitably estimate the energy release rate of cross-ply laminates as affected by matrix cracks and delamination modes. The model is also able to estimate the reduction in stiffness of the damaged laminate. This information is then used in the algorithms for life prediction capabilities. First, a brief summary of the energy-based damage model

  12. Deformation and damage mechanisms of zinc coatings on hot-dip galvanized steel sheets: Part II. Damage modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Rodolphe; Forest, Samuel; Pineau, André; Grillon, François; Demonet, Xavier; Mataigne, Jean-Michel

    2004-03-01

    Zinc-based coatings are widely used for protection against corrosion of steel-sheet products in the automotive industry. The objective of the present article is to investigate the damage modes at work in three different microstructures of a zinc coating on an interstitial-free steel substrate under tension, planestrain tension, and expansion loading. Plastic-deformation mechanisms are addressed in the companion article. Two main fracture mechanisms, namely, intergranular cracking and transgranular cleavage fracture, were identified in an untempered cold-rolled coating, a tempered cold-rolled coating, and a recrystallized coating. No fracture at the interface between the steel and zinc coating was observed that could lead to spalling, in the studied zinc alloy. A complex network of cleavage cracks and their interaction with deformation twinning is shown to develop in the material. An extensive quantitative analysis based on systematic image analysis provides the number and cumulative length of cleavage cracks at different strain levels for the three investigated microstructures and three loading conditions. Grain refinement by recrystallization is shown to lead to an improved cracking resistance of the coating. A model for crystallographic cleavage combining the stress component normal to the basal plane and the amount of plastic slip on the basal slip systems is proposed and identified from equibiaxial tension tests and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the cracked grains. This analysis requires the computation of the nonlinear stress-strain response of each grain using a crystal-plasticity constitutive model. The model is then applied successfully to other loading conditions and is shown to account for the preferred orientations of damaged grains observed in the case of plane-strain tension.

  13. Performance of mixed formulations for the particle finite element method in soil mechanics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monforte, Lluís; Carbonell, Josep Maria; Arroyo, Marcos; Gens, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for the numerical analysis of fluid-saturated porous media at large strains. The proposal relies, on one hand, on the particle finite element method (PFEM), known for its capability to tackle large deformations and rapid changing boundaries, and, on the other hand, on constitutive descriptions well established in current geotechnical analyses (Darcy's law; Modified Cam Clay; Houlsby hyperelasticity). An important feature of this kind of problem is that incompressibility may arise either from undrained conditions or as a consequence of material behaviour; incompressibility may lead to volumetric locking of the low-order elements that are typically used in PFEM. In this work, two different three-field mixed formulations for the coupled hydromechanical problem are presented, in which either the effective pressure or the Jacobian are considered as nodal variables, in addition to the solid skeleton displacement and water pressure. Additionally, several mixed formulations are described for the simplified single-phase problem due to its formal similitude to the poromechanical case and its relevance in geotechnics, since it may approximate the saturated soil behaviour under undrained conditions. In order to use equal-order interpolants in displacements and scalar fields, stabilization techniques are used in the mass conservation equation of the biphasic medium and in the rest of scalar equations. Finally, all mixed formulations are assessed in some benchmark problems and their performances are compared. It is found that mixed formulations that have the Jacobian as a nodal variable perform better.

  14. Performance of mixed formulations for the particle finite element method in soil mechanics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monforte, Lluís; Carbonell, Josep Maria; Arroyo, Marcos; Gens, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for the numerical analysis of fluid-saturated porous media at large strains. The proposal relies, on one hand, on the particle finite element method (PFEM), known for its capability to tackle large deformations and rapid changing boundaries, and, on the other hand, on constitutive descriptions well established in current geotechnical analyses (Darcy's law; Modified Cam Clay; Houlsby hyperelasticity). An important feature of this kind of problem is that incompressibility may arise either from undrained conditions or as a consequence of material behaviour; incompressibility may lead to volumetric locking of the low-order elements that are typically used in PFEM. In this work, two different three-field mixed formulations for the coupled hydromechanical problem are presented, in which either the effective pressure or the Jacobian are considered as nodal variables, in addition to the solid skeleton displacement and water pressure. Additionally, several mixed formulations are described for the simplified single-phase problem due to its formal similitude to the poromechanical case and its relevance in geotechnics, since it may approximate the saturated soil behaviour under undrained conditions. In order to use equal-order interpolants in displacements and scalar fields, stabilization techniques are used in the mass conservation equation of the biphasic medium and in the rest of scalar equations. Finally, all mixed formulations are assessed in some benchmark problems and their performances are compared. It is found that mixed formulations that have the Jacobian as a nodal variable perform better.

  15. DNA repair mechanisms and the bypass of DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-04-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage.

  16. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  17. In situ observation of mechanical damage within a SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucedo-Mora, L.; Lowe, T.; Zhao, S.; Lee, P. D.; Mummery, P. M.; Marrow, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites are candidate materials for fuel cladding in Generation IV nuclear fission reactors and as accident tolerant fuel clad in current generation plant. Experimental methods are needed that can detect and quantify the development of mechanical damage, to support modelling and qualification tests for these critical components. In situ observations of damage development have been obtained of tensile and C-ring mechanical test specimens of a braided nuclear grade SiC-SiC ceramic composite tube, using a combination of ex situ and in situ computed X-ray tomography observation and digital volume correlation analysis. The gradual development of damage by matrix cracking and also the influence of non-uniform loading are examined.

  18. Effects of composite formulation on the mechanical properties of biodegradable poly(propylene fumarate)/bone fiber scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xun; Liu, Nathan; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Lu, Lichun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the effects of composite formulation on the compressive modulus and ultimate strength of a biodegradable, in situ polymerizable poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and bone fiber scaffold. The following parameters were investigated: the incorporation of bone fibers (either mineralized or demineralized), PPF molecular weight, N-vinyl pyrrolidinone (NVP) crosslinker amount, benzoyl peroxide (BP) initiator amount, and sodium chloride porogen amount. Eight formulations were chosen based on a resolution III two level fractional factorial design. The compressive modulus and ultimate strength of these formulations were measured on a materials testing machine. Absolute values for compressive modulus varied from 21.3 to 271 MPa and 2.8 to 358 MPa for dry and wet samples, respectively. The ultimate strength of the crosslinked composites varied from 2.1 to 20.3 MPa for dry samples and from 0.4 to 16.6 MPa for wet samples. Main effects of each parameter on the measured property were calculated. The incorporation of mineralized bone fibers and an increase in PPF molecular weight resulted in higher compressive modulus and ultimate strength. Both mechanical properties also increased as the amount of benzoyl peroxide increased or the NVP amount decreased in the formulation. Sodium chloride had a dominating effect on the increase of mechanical properties in dry samples but showed little effects in wet samples. Demineralization of bone fibers led to a decrease in the compressive modulus and ultimate strength. Our results suggest that bone fibers are appropriate as structural enforcement components in PPF scaffolds. The desired orthopaedic PPF scaffold might be obtained by changing a variety of composite formulation parameters. PMID:22034584

  19. Effects of composite formulation on the mechanical properties of biodegradable poly(propylene fumarate)/bone fiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xun; Liu, Nathan; Yaszemski, Michael J; Lu, Lichun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the effects of composite formulation on the compressive modulus and ultimate strength of a biodegradable, in situ polymerizable poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and bone fiber scaffold. The following parameters were investigated: the incorporation of bone fibers (either mineralized or demineralized), PPF molecular weight, N-vinyl pyrrolidinone (NVP) crosslinker amount, benzoyl peroxide (BP) initiator amount, and sodium chloride porogen amount. Eight formulations were chosen based on a resolution III two level fractional factorial design. The compressive modulus and ultimate strength of these formulations were measured on a materials testing machine. Absolute values for compressive modulus varied from 21.3 to 271 MPa and 2.8 to 358 MPa for dry and wet samples, respectively. The ultimate strength of the crosslinked composites varied from 2.1 to 20.3 MPa for dry samples and from 0.4 to 16.6 MPa for wet samples. Main effects of each parameter on the measured property were calculated. The incorporation of mineralized bone fibers and an increase in PPF molecular weight resulted in higher compressive modulus and ultimate strength. Both mechanical properties also increased as the amount of benzoyl peroxide increased or the NVP amount decreased in the formulation. Sodium chloride had a dominating effect on the increase of mechanical properties in dry samples but showed little effects in wet samples. Demineralization of bone fibers led to a decrease in the compressive modulus and ultimate strength. Our results suggest that bone fibers are appropriate as structural enforcement components in PPF scaffolds. The desired orthopaedic PPF scaffold might be obtained by changing a variety of composite formulation parameters.

  20. Evaluation of mechanical and mucoadhesive properties of clomiphene citrate gel formulations containing carbomers and their thiolated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cevher, Erdal; Taha, M A M; Orlu, M; Araman, A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to prepare clomiphene citrate gel formulations that possess appropriate mechanical properties, stay on the vaginal mucosa for a long period of time, and provide sustained drug release for the local treatment of human papilloma virus infections. In this respect, 1% CLM gels including polyacrylic acid (PAA) polymers such as Carbopol 934P (C934P), Carbopol 971P (C971P), Carbopol 974P (C974P) in various concentrations, and their conjugates containing thiol groups were prepared. Polyacrylic acid-cysteine (PAA-Cys) conjugates were synthesized in laboratory conditions. Mechanical properties of the gels such as hardness, compressibility, elasticity, adhesiveness, and cohesiveness were measured by TA-XTPlus texture analyzer and the vaginal mucoadhesion of formulations was investigated by mucoadhesion test. Based on obtained data, gel formulations containing C934P and its conjugate had appropriate hardness and compressibility to be applied to the vaginal mucosa and highest elasticity to show good spreadability and highest cohesion to prevent the disintegration of gel in the vagina. The mucoadhesion of the gels changed significantly depending on the polymer type and concentration (p < 0.05). The addition of conjugates containing thiol groups caused an increase in mucoadhesion (p < 0.05). The gels containing C934P-Cys showed highest adhesiveness and mucoadhesion due to the highest amount of thiol groups. A significant decrease was observed in the drug release of gel formulations as the polymer concentration increased (p < 0.05). The increase in the drug release related to the conjugate addition was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). A change in the amount of CLM was not observed in all formulations at the end of the stability test.

  1. Nephro-protective effect of a novel formulation of unopened coconut inflorescence sap powder on gentamicin induced renal damage by modulating oxidative stress and inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Jose, Svenia P; S, Asha; Im, Krishnakumar; M, Ratheesh; Santhosh, Savitha; S, Sandya; B, Girish Kumar; C, Pramod

    2017-01-01

    Fresh oyster white translucent sap obtained from the tender unopened inflorescence of coconut trees (Cocos nucifera) is identified to have great health benefits. Drug induced Nephrotoxicity is one of the major causes of renal damage in present generation. As a therapeutic agent, gentamicin imparts direct toxicity to kidney, resulting in acute tubular necrosis, glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury, haemodynamically mediated damage and obstructive nephropathy.There exists an increasing demand for safe and natural agents for the treatment and/or preventionofchronic nephrotoxicity and pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Our study shows the nephro protective/curing effect of a novel powder formulation of micronutrient enriched, unfermented coconut flower sap (CSP). The study was performed on adult male Wistar rats. The animals were grouped into three and treated separately with vehicle, gentamicin and gentamicin+CSP for 16days. Initially, gentamicin treatment significantly (p<0.05)reduced thelevels of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GPx) and GSH and increased (p<0.05) the levels of creatinine, uric acid, urea, inflammatory markers (nitrite, IL-6, TNF- α, iNOS) and lipid peroxidation. Supplementation of coconut flower sap powder showed significant (p<0.05) reversal of all these biochemical parameters indicating an effective inhibition of the pathogenesis of nephrotoxicity and kidney disease.

  2. Changes of color coordinates of biological tissue with superficial skin damage due to mechanical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteruk, Vail; Mokanyuk, Olexander; Kvaternuk, Olena; Yakenina, Lesya; Kotyra, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dussembayeva, Shynar

    2015-12-01

    Change of color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues is based on calculated spectral diffuse reflection. The proposed color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues of skin provided using standard light sources, allowing accurately diagnose skin damage due to mechanical trauma with a blunt object for forensic problems.

  3. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  4. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  5. PARP-1 mechanism for coupling DNA damage detection to poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Langelier, Marie-France; Pascal, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates gene transcription, cell death signaling, and DNA repair through production of the posttranslational modification poly(ADP-ribose). During the cellular response to genotoxic stress PARP-1 rapidly associates with DNA damage, which robustly stimulates poly(ADP-ribose) production over a low basal level of PARP-1 activity. DNA damage-dependent PARP-1 activity is central to understanding PARP-1 biological function, but structural insights into the mechanisms underlying this mode of regulation have remained elusive, in part due to the highly modular six-domain architecture of PARP-1. Recent structural studies have illustrated how PARP-1 uses specialized zinc fingers to detect DNA breaks through sequence-independent interaction with exposed nucleotide bases, a common feature of damaged and abnormal DNA structures. The mechanism of coupling DNA damage detection to elevated poly(ADP-ribose) production has been elucidated based on a crystal structure of the essential domains of PARP-1 in complex with a DNA strand break. The multiple domains of PARP-1 collapse onto damaged DNA, forming a network of interdomain contacts that introduce destabilizing alterations in the catalytic domain leading to an enhanced rate of poly(ADP-ribose) production. PMID:23333033

  6. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanism of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Tissue Damage in the Feather Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage. PMID:24586618

  7. Dissecting the molecular mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced tissue damage in the feather follicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage.

  8. Modeling of thermo-mechanical fatigue and damage in shape memory alloy axial actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert W.; Hartl, Darren J.; Chemisky, Yves; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace, automotive, and energy industries have seen the potential benefits of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as solid state actuators. Thus far, however, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components or over-designed due to a lack of understanding regarding how SMAs undergo thermomechanical or actuation fatigue and the inability to accurately predict failure in an actuator during use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the actuation fatigue response of Nickel-Titanium-Hafnium (NiTiHf) axial actuators and, in turn, use this characterization to predict failure and monitor damage in dogbone actuators undergoing various thermomechanical loading paths. Calibration data was collected from constant load, full cycle tests ranging from 200-600MPa. Subsequently, actuator lifetimes were predicted for four additional loading paths. These loading paths consisted of linearly varying load with full transformation (300-500MPa) and step loads which transition from zero stress to 300-400MPa at various martensitic volume fractions. Thermal cycling was achieved via resistive heating and convective cooling and was controlled via a state machine developed in LabVIEW. A previously developed fatigue damage model, which is formulated such that the damage accumulation rate is general in terms of its dependence on current and local stress and actuation strain states, was utilized. This form allows the model to be utilized for specimens undergoing complex loading paths. Agreement between experiments and simulations is discussed.

  9. HMM and Auction-based Formulations of ISR Coordination Mechanisms for the Expeditionary Strike Group Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    targets, whose dynamics are modeled by linear Gauss -Markov processes. They formulated the sensor scheduling problem as one of minimizing the variance...have been developed for overcoming the computational intractability of determining the optimal sensor schedule. For a linear Gauss -Markov system...correspondence,” IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and vol. 1, pp. 296-271, 1959. ahramani and M. I. Jordan , “Factorial hidden Markov models,” Machine

  10. Mechanical behavior, damage tolerance and durability of fiber metal laminates for aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guocai

    This study systematically explores the mechanical behavior, damage tolerance and durability of fiber metal laminates, a promising candidate materials system for next generation aerospace structures. The experimental results indicated that GLARE laminates exhibited a bilinear deformation behavior under static in-plane loading. Both an analytical constitutive model based on a modified classical lamination theory which incorporates the elasto-plastic behavior of aluminum alloy and a numerical simulation based on finite element modeling are used to predict the nonlinear stress-strain response and deformation behavior of GLARE laminates. The blunt notched strength of GLARE laminates increased with decreasing specimen width and decreasing hole diameter. The notched strength of GLARE laminates was evaluated based on a modified point stress criterion. A computer simulation based on finite element method was performed to study stress concentration and distribution around the notch and verify the analytical and experimental results of notched strength. Good agreement is obtained between the model predictions and experimental results. Experimental results also indicate that GLARE laminates exhibited superior impact properties to those of monolithic 2024-T3 aluminum alloy at low velocity impact loading. The GLARE 5-2/1 laminate with 0°/90°/90°/0° fiber configuration exhibits a better impact resistance than the GLARE 4-3/2 laminate with 0°/90°/0° fiber orientation. The characteristic impact energies, the damage area, and the permanent deflection of laminates are used to evaluate the impact damage resistance. The post-impact residual tensile strength under various damage states ranging from the plastic dent, barely visible impact damage (BVID), clearly visible impact damage (CVID) up to the complete perforation was also measured and compared. The post-impact fatigue behavior under various stress levels and impact damage states was extensively explored. The damage

  11. Numerical simulation of thick sheet slitting processes: Modelling using continuum damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghozzi, Y.; Labergere, C.; Saanouni, K.

    2013-05-01

    This work consists on the modelling and numerical simulation of specific cutting processes of thick sheets using advanced constitutive equations accounting for elastoplasticity with mixed hardening and ductile damage. Strong coupling between all the mechanical fields and the ductile damage is accounted for. First the complex kinematics of the slitting process is described. Then, the fully and strongly coupled constitutive equations are presented. Finally the influence of the main technological parameters of the slitting process is studied focusing in the minimization of the cutting forces.

  12. Identification of Fracture Toughness for Discrete Damage Mechanics Analysis of Glass-Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, E. J.; Cosso, F. A.; Martinez, X.

    2014-08-01

    A methodology for determination of the intralaminar fracture toughness is presented, based on fitting discrete damage mechanics (DDM) model predictions to available experimental data. DDM is constitutive model that, when incorporated into commercial finite element software via user material subroutines, is able to predict intralaminar transverse and shear damage initiation and evolution in terms of the fracture toughness of the composite. The applicability of the DDM model is studied by comparison to available experimental data for Glass-Epoxy laminates. Sensitivity of the DDM model to h- and p-refinement is studied. Also, the effect of in-situ correction of strength is highlighted.

  13. A damage mechanics based method for fatigue life prediction of the metal graded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yang; Hu, Weiping; Meng, Qingchun

    2017-03-01

    Based on the continuum damage mechanics theory, the fatigue life prediction for TC4-TC11 graded material was conducted. At first, the damage evolution equation was derived, then the method to calibrate material parameters for TC4-TC11 graded material was proposed, and all the material parameters were obtained. A beam model with TC4-TC11 graded material was established by using the stratified method and finite element method. Finally, the fatigue life of TC4-TC11 graded beam was predicted.

  14. Hot switching damage mechanisms in MEMS contacts—evidence and understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban; Hennessy, Ryan P.; Adams, George G.; McGruer, Nicol E.

    2014-10-01

    Using an AFM-based test setup, experiments were performed on Ru microcontacts under a variety of leading and trailing edge hot switching conditions, including different voltages, different currents, different polarities (including bipolar and ac up to 20 MHz), and different approach and separation rates. It was found that hot switching damage is a complex phenomenon for microcontacts. It consists of a number of different mechanisms occurring simultaneously to different degrees depending on the hot switching conditions. It was determined through a combination of experiments and models that the mechanisms leading to contact erosion operate when the electrodes are separated by less than a few Å or are barely touching. For leading edge hot switching, i.e. hot switching when the contacts are closing, the main damage mechanism was found to be associated with currents less than 0.15 mA. Pre-contact currents were observed on uncleaned contacts and were not found to contribute to contact damage. Despite the damage caused by hot switching, it was found that unless the contact material is almost or completely eroded, hot switching does not lead to high contact resistance or high adhesion on Ru contacts. Under bipolar hot switching conditions, microcontacts with a 400 μN contact force maintained a contact resistance of less than 1 Ω and a pull-off force less than 60 μN for more than 100 million cycles.

  15. Mechanisms of MDMA (ecstasy)-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and organ damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Byoung-Joon; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Upreti, Vijay V; Eddington, Natalie D; Lee, Insong J

    2010-08-01

    Despite numerous reports about the acute and sub-chronic toxicities caused by MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, ecstasy), the underlying mechanism of organ damage is poorly understood. The aim of this review is to present an update of the mechanistic studies on MDMA-mediated organ damage partly caused by increased oxidative/nitrosative stress. Because of the extensive reviews on MDMA-mediated oxidative stress and tissue damage, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and consequences of oxidative-modifications of mitochondrial proteins, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. We briefly describe a method to systematically identify oxidatively-modified mitochondrial proteins in control and MDMA-exposed rats by using biotin-N-maleimide (biotin-NM) as a sensitive probe for oxidized proteins. We also describe various applications and advantages of this Cys-targeted proteomics method and alternative approaches to overcome potential limitations of this method in studying oxidized proteins from MDMA-exposed tissues. Finally we discuss the mechanism of synergistic drug-interaction between MDMA and other abused substances including alcohol (ethanol) as well as application of this redox-based proteomics method in translational studies for developing effective preventive and therapeutic agents against MDMA-induced organ damage.

  16. Role of damage mechanics in nanoindentation of lamellar bone at multiple sizes: experiments and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, Riccardo; Carnelli, Davide; Ponzoni, Matteo; Bertarelli, Emanuele; Gastaldi, Dario; Vena, Pasquale

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that damage mechanisms can account for the response of lamellar bone to nanoindentation tests, with particular regards to the decrease of indentation stiffness with increasing penetration depth and to the loss of contact stiffness during the unloading phase of the test. For this purpose, indentation experiments on bovine cortical bone samples along axial and transverse directions have been carried out at five penetration depths from 50 to 450 nm; furthermore, a continuum damage model has been implemented into finite element analyses, which are able to simulate indentation experiments. Experiments along the axial direction have shown a decrease of about 20% of the indentation modulus with indentation depth; a similar trend was found along the transverse direction. All unloading branches of the force-displacement indentation curves exhibited relevant stiffness loss (curve concavity). The numerical model with damage was able to correctly predict the indentation stiffness and hardness at 300 nm penetration depth along both axial and transverse directions. Furthermore, stiffness loss during unloading was simulated with both qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments. A final validation has been provided by simulating axial indentation experiments at the remaining penetration depths using the same set of constitutive parameters as those used to simulate the experiments at 300 nm depth. These results support the hypothesis that damage plays a relevant role in the mechanics of lamellar bone and should be taken into account when studying bone mechanical properties at multiple scales.

  17. Mechanisms of MDMA (Ecstasy)-Induced Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Organ Damage

    PubMed Central

    Song, Byoung-Joon; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Upreti, Vijay V.; Eddington, Natalie D.; Lee, Insong J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite numerous reports about the acute and sub-chronic toxicities caused by MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, ecstasy), the underlying mechanism of organ damage is poorly understood. The aim of this review is to present an update of the mechanistic studies on MDMA-mediated organ damage partly caused by increased oxidative/nitrosative stress. Because of the extensive reviews on MDMA-mediated oxidative stress and tissue damage, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and consequences of oxidative-modifications of mitochondrial proteins, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. We briefly describe a method to systematically identify oxidatively-modified mitochondrial proteins in control and MDMA-exposed rats by using biotin-N-maleimide (biotin-NM) as a sensitive probe for oxidized proteins. We also describe various applications and advantages of this Cys-targeted proteomics method and alternative approaches to overcome potential limitations of this method in studying oxidized proteins from MDMA-exposed tissues. Finally we discuss the mechanism of synergistic drug-interaction between MDMA and other abused substances including alcohol (ethanol) as well as application of this redox-based proteomics method in translational studies for developing effective preventive and therapeutic agents against MDMA-induced organ damage. PMID:20420575

  18. The rodent endovascular puncture model of subarachnoid hemorrhage: mechanisms of brain damage and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) represents a considerable health problem. To date, limited therapeutic options are available. In order to develop effective therapeutic strategies for SAH, the mechanisms involved in SAH brain damage should be fully explored. Here we review the mechanisms of SAH brain damage induced by the experimental endovascular puncture model. We have included a description of similarities and distinctions between experimental SAH in animals and human SAH pathology. Moreover, several novel treatment options to diminish SAH brain damage are discussed. SAH is accompanied by cerebral inflammation as demonstrated by an influx of inflammatory cells into the cerebral parenchyma, upregulation of inflammatory transcriptional pathways and increased expression of cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, various cell death pathways including cerebral apoptosis, necrosis, necroptosis and autophagy are involved in neuronal damage caused by SAH. Treatment strategies aiming at inhibition of inflammatory or cell death pathways demonstrate the importance of these mechanisms for survival after experimental SAH. Moreover, neuroregenerative therapies using stem cells are discussed as a possible strategy to repair the brain after SAH since this therapy may extend the window of treatment considerably. We propose the endovascular puncture model as a suitable animal model which resembles the human pathology of SAH and which could be applied to investigate novel therapeutic therapies to combat this debilitating insult. PMID:24386932

  19. Damage mechanisms and failure modes of cortical bone under components of physiological loading.

    PubMed

    George, W T; Vashishth, D

    2005-09-01

    Fatigue damage development in cortical bone was investigated in vitro under different mechanical components of physiological loading including tension, compression, and torsion. During each test, stress and strain data were collected continuously to monitor and statistically determine the occurrence of the primary, secondary, and tertiary stages associated with fatigue and/or creep failure of bone. The resultant microdamage and failure modes were identified by histological and fractographic analysis, respectively. The tensile group demonstrated Mode I cracking and the three classic stages of fatigue and creep suggesting a low crack initiation threshold, steady crack propagation and final failure by coalescence of microcracks. In contrast, the compressive group displayed Mode II cracking and a two-stage fatigue behavior with limited creep suggesting a high crack initiation threshold followed by a sudden fracture. The torsion group also displayed a two-stage fatigue profile but demonstrated extensive damage from mixed mode (Modes II and III) microcracking and predominant time-dependent damage. Thus, fatigue behavior of bone was found to be uniquely related to the individual mechanical components of physiological loading and the latter determined the specific damage mechanisms associated with fatigue fracture.

  20. Damage Patterns at the Head-Stem Taper Junction Helps Understand the Mechanisms of Material Loss.

    PubMed

    Hothi, Harry S; Panagiotopoulos, Andreas C; Whittaker, Robert K; Bills, Paul J; McMillan, Rebecca A; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2017-01-01

    Material loss at the taper junction of metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties has been implicated in their early failure. The mechanisms of material loss are not fully understood; analysis of the patterns of damage at the taper can help us better understand why material loss occurs at this junction. We mapped the patterns of material loss in a series of 155 metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties received at our center by scanning the taper surface using a roundness-measuring machine. We examined these material loss maps to develop a 5-tier classification system based on visual differences between different patterns. We correlated these patterns to surgical, implant, and patient factors known to be important for head-stem taper damage. We found that 63 implants had "minimal damage" at the taper (material loss <1 mm(3)), and the remaining 92 implants could be categorized by 4 distinct patterns of taper material loss. We found that (1) head diameter and (2) time to revision were key significant variables separating the groups. These material loss maps allow us to suggest different mechanisms that dominate the cause of the material loss in each pattern: (1) corrosion, (2) mechanically assisted corrosion, or (3) intraoperative damage or poor size tolerances leading to toggling of trunnion in taper. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impaired Facilitatory Mechanisms of Auditory Attention After Damage of the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie; Buchanan, Kelly G.; Viswanath, Humsini; Black, Jessica; Scabini, Donatella; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Knight, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that auditory selective attention operates via distinct facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms enabling selective enhancement and suppression of sound processing, respectively. The lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) plays a crucial role in the top-down control of selective attention. However, whether the LPFC controls facilitatory, inhibitory, or both attentional mechanisms is unclear. Facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms were assessed, in patients with LPFC damage, by comparing event-related potentials (ERPs) to attended and ignored sounds with ERPs to these same sounds when attention was equally distributed to all sounds. In control subjects, we observed 2 late frontally distributed ERP components: a transient facilitatory component occurring from 150 to 250 ms after sound onset; and an inhibitory component onsetting at 250 ms. Only the facilitatory component was affected in patients with LPFC damage: this component was absent when attending to sounds delivered in the ear contralateral to the lesion, with the most prominent decreases observed over the damaged brain regions. These findings have 2 important implications: (i) they provide evidence for functionally distinct facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms supporting late auditory selective attention; (ii) they show that the LPFC is involved in the control of the facilitatory mechanisms of auditory attention. PMID:24925773

  2. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  3. Impaired Facilitatory Mechanisms of Auditory Attention After Damage of the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie; Buchanan, Kelly G; Viswanath, Humsini; Black, Jessica; Scabini, Donatella; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Knight, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    There is growing evidence that auditory selective attention operates via distinct facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms enabling selective enhancement and suppression of sound processing, respectively. The lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) plays a crucial role in the top-down control of selective attention. However, whether the LPFC controls facilitatory, inhibitory, or both attentional mechanisms is unclear. Facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms were assessed, in patients with LPFC damage, by comparing event-related potentials (ERPs) to attended and ignored sounds with ERPs to these same sounds when attention was equally distributed to all sounds. In control subjects, we observed 2 late frontally distributed ERP components: a transient facilitatory component occurring from 150 to 250 ms after sound onset; and an inhibitory component onsetting at 250 ms. Only the facilitatory component was affected in patients with LPFC damage: this component was absent when attending to sounds delivered in the ear contralateral to the lesion, with the most prominent decreases observed over the damaged brain regions. These findings have 2 important implications: (i) they provide evidence for functionally distinct facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms supporting late auditory selective attention; (ii) they show that the LPFC is involved in the control of the facilitatory mechanisms of auditory attention.

  4. Chitosan gels for the vaginal delivery of lactic acid: relevance of formulation parameters to mucoadhesion and release mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Giunchedi, Paolo; Scalia, Santo; Rossi, Silvia; Sandri, Giuseppina; Caramella, Carla

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of formulation parameters of a mucoadhesive vaginal gel based on chitosan and lactic acid, and to highlight its release mechanisms. Two molecular weight chitosans were used to prepare gels with 2 lactic acid concentrations. Both chitosan molecular weight and lactic acid concentration had a significant and mutually dependent influence on mucoadhesion, measured on pig vaginal mucosa. Similarly, the lactate release profiles were found to be dependent on lactic acid content and polymer molecular weight. One gel formulation based on the stoichiometric lactate to chitosan ratio was subjected to release test in media with 2 different counterions and increasing ionic strength. This test demonstrated that the lactate release is mainly due to ionic displacement.

  5. Deterministic and Probabilistic Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancement to CARES/Creep: Multiaxial Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Structures Using Continuum Damage Mechanics and the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep ripture criterion However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of stress, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and

  6. Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Nanocolloidal Ceria Slurry for Low-Damage Planarization of Dielectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuzaki, Daisuke; Hoshi, Yosuke; Machii, Yoichi; Koyama, Naoyuki; Sakurai, Haruaki; Ashizawa, Toranosuke

    2012-03-01

    New chemical mechanical polishing processes using nanocolloidal ceria slurry are proposed for high-precision and low-damage planarization of silicon-dioxide-based dielectric films. In the polishing process of a shallow trench isolation structure, a hard pad and a cationic polymer additive are used in combination with the slurry. The new process is effective in improving the planarity and reducing the microscratch count in comparison with a conventional polishing process with calcined ceria slurry and a standard pad. In the polishing process of an interconnect structure with ultralow-k interlayer dielectrics (ULK-ILDs), the standard pad should be used since the ULK-ILDs are easily damaged. By employing a spin-on-type ULK-ILD having a self-planarizing effect, a high planarity is obtained when using the nanocolloidal ceria slurry with the standard pad. The electrical measurement of the interconnect structure indicates that dielectric damage due to the process is successfully suppressed.

  7. Single shot damage mechanism of Mo/Si multilayer optics under intense pulsed XUV-exposure.

    PubMed

    Khorsand, A R; Sobierajski, R; Louis, E; Bruijn, S; van Hattum, E D; van de Kruijs, R W E; Jurek, M; Klinger, D; Pelka, J B; Juha, L; Burian, T; Chalupsky, J; Cihelka, J; Hajkova, V; Vysin, L; Jastrow, U; Stojanovic, N; Toleikis, S; Wabnitz, H; Tiedtke, K; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Shymanovich, U; Krzywinski, J; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Gleeson, A; Gullikson, E M; Bijkerk, F

    2010-01-18

    We investigated single shot damage of Mo/Si multilayer coatings exposed to the intense fs XUV radiation at the Free-electron LASer facility in Hamburg - FLASH. The interaction process was studied in situ by XUV reflectometry, time resolved optical microscopy, and "post-mortem" by interference-polarizing optical microscopy (with Nomarski contrast), atomic force microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microcopy. An ultrafast molybdenum silicide formation due to enhanced atomic diffusion in melted silicon has been determined to be the key process in the damage mechanism. The influence of the energy diffusion on the damage process was estimated. The results are of significance for the design of multilayer optics for a new generation of pulsed (from atto- to nanosecond) XUV sources.

  8. Incorporation of the Deshpande-Evans mechanism-based damage model into the EPIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, Timothy J.; Johnson, Gordon R.

    2012-03-01

    This article presents the incorporation of a mechanism-based failure model into the EPIC code. The model was developed by Deshpande and Evans (DE) and is based on micromechanics and wing-crack theory. The model includes the effects of flaw size, flaw density, fracture toughness, friction, crack shape, and crack growth rate. It is also fully 3-dimensional and covers both compression and tension. Specifically, this work incorporates the DE damage model into the Johnson-Holmquist- Beissel (JHB) ceramic model providing a micromechanical approach for computing damage. A discussion of the DE damage model and its incorporation into the JHB model is provided. Computations are presented for two ballistic impact experiments into 99.5% - Al2O3 ceramic including some parametric effects.

  9. Forward models for extending the mechanical damage evaluation capability of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodlet, B R; Torbet, C J; Biedermann, E J; Jauriqui, L M; Aldrin, J C; Pollock, T M

    2017-02-08

    Finite element (FE) modeling has been coupled with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of high temperature damage induced by mechanical loading. Forward FE models predict mode-specific changes in resonance frequencies (ΔfR), inform RUS measurements of mode-type, and identify diagnostic resonance modes sensitive to individual or multiple concurrent damage mechanisms. The magnitude of modeled ΔfR correlate very well with the magnitude of measured ΔfR from RUS, affording quantitative assessments of damage. This approach was employed to study creep damage in a polycrystalline Ni-based superalloy (Mar-M247) at 950°C. After iterative applications of creep strains up to 8.8%, RUS measurements recorded ΔfR that correspond to the accumulation of plastic deformation and cracks in the gauge section of a cylindrical dog-bone specimen. Of the first 50 resonance modes that occur, ranging from 3 to 220kHz, modes classified as longitudinal bending were most sensitive to creep damage while transverse bending modes were found to be largely unaffected. Measure to model comparisons of ΔfR show that the deformation experienced by the specimen during creep, specifically uniform elongation of the gauge section, is responsible for a majority of the measured ΔfR until at least 6.1% creep strain. After 8.8% strain considerable surface cracking along the gauge section of the dog-bone was observed, for which FE models indicate low-frequency longitudinal bending modes are significantly affected. Key differences between historical implementations of RUS for NDE and the FE model-based framework developed herein are discussed, with attention to general implementation of a FE model-based framework for NDE of damage.

  10. Oxidative damage and cellular defense mechanisms in sea urchin models of aging.

    PubMed

    Du, Colin; Anderson, Arielle; Lortie, Mae; Parsons, Rachel; Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    The free radical, or oxidative stress, theory of aging proposes that the accumulation of oxidative cellular damage is a major contributor to the aging process and a key determinant of species longevity. This study investigates the oxidative stress theory in a novel model for aging research, the sea urchin. Sea urchins present a unique model for the study of aging because of the existence of species with tremendously different natural life spans, including some species with extraordinary longevity and negligible senescence. Cellular oxidative damage, antioxidant capacity, and proteasome enzyme activities were measured in the tissues of three sea urchin species: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, which has an intermediate life span. Levels of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal measured in tissues (muscle, nerve, esophagus, gonad, coelomocytes, ampullae) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine measured in cell-free coelomic fluid showed no general increase with age. The fluorescent age pigment lipofuscin, measured in muscle, nerve, and esophagus, increased with age; however, it appeared to be predominantly extracellular. Antioxidant mechanisms (total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase) and proteasome enzyme activities were maintained with age. In some instances, levels of oxidative damage were lower and antioxidant activity higher in cells or tissues of the long-lived species compared to the short-lived species; however, further studies are required to determine the relationship between oxidative damage and longevity in these animals. Consistent with the predictions of the oxidative stress theory of aging, the results suggest that negligible senescence is accompanied by a lack of accumulation of cellular oxidative damage with age, and maintenance of antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities may be important mechanisms to mitigate damage.

  11. Oxidative Damage and Cellular Defense Mechanisms in Sea Urchin Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Du, Colin; Anderson, Arielle; Lortie, Mae; Parsons, Rachel; Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The free radical or oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that the accumulation of oxidative cellular damage is a major contributor to the aging process and a key determinant of species longevity. This study investigates the oxidative stress theory in a novel model for aging research, the sea urchin. Sea urchins present a unique model for the study of aging due to the existence of species with tremendously different natural life spans including some species with extraordinary longevity and negligible senescence. Cellular oxidative damage, antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities were measured in the tissues of three sea urchin species: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus which has an intermediate lifespan. Levels of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) measured in tissues (muscle, nerve, esophagus, gonad, coelomocytes, ampullae) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) measured in cell-free coelomic fluid showed no general increase with age. The fluorescent age-pigment lipofuscin measured in muscle, nerve and esophagus, increased with age however it appeared to be predominantly extracellular. Antioxidant mechanisms (total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase) and proteasome enzyme activities were maintained with age. In some instances, levels of oxidative damage were lower and antioxidant activity higher in cells or tissues of the long-lived species compared to the short-lived species, however further studies are required to determine the relationship between oxidative damage and longevity in these animals. Consistent with the predictions of the oxidative stress theory of aging, the results suggest that negligible senescence is accompanied by a lack of accumulation of cellular oxidative damage with age and maintenance of antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities may be important mechanisms to mitigate damage. PMID:23707327

  12. Effects of chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate in a dietary bar formulation on inflammation, interleukin-1beta, matrix metalloprotease-9, and cartilage damage in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chou, May M; Vergnolle, Nathalie; McDougall, Jason J; Wallace, John L; Marty, Stephanie; Teskey, Val; Buret, Andre G

    2005-04-01

    This study examined the effects of chondroitin sulfate (CS) alone and CS plus glucosamine sulfate (GS) in a dietary bar formulation on inflammatory parameters of adjuvant-induced arthritis and on the synthesis of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9). Following 25 days pretreatment with dietary bars containing either CS alone, CS plus GS, or neither CS nor GS, rats were either sham injected or injected with Freund's complete adjuvant into the tail vein. Rats were fed their respective bars for another 17 days after inoculation. Parameters of disease examined included clinical score (combination of joint temperature, edema, hyperalgesia, and standing and walking limb function), incidence of disease, levels of IL-1beta in the serum and paw joints, levels of MMP-9 in the paw joints, paw joint histology, and joint cartilage thickness. Treatment with CS plus GS, but not CS alone, significantly reduced clinical scores, incidences of disease, joint temperatures, and joint and serum IL-1beta levels. Treatment with CS alone and CS plus GS inhibited the production of edema and prevented raised levels of joint MMP-9 associated with arthritis. Similarly, CS alone and CS plus GS treatment also prevented the development of cartilage damage associated with arthritis. Combination CS plus GS treatment in a dietary bar formulation ameliorates clinical, inflammatory, and histologic parameters of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The benefits of CS and GS in combination are more pronounced than those of CS alone. The reduction of arthritic disease by CS plus GS is associated with a reduction of IL-1beta and MMP-9 synthesis.

  13. Damage and failure mechanisms of continuous glass fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, F.; Hiltner, A.; Baer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The damage that accompanies flexural deformation of a unidirectional glass fiber composite of polyphenylene sulfide was examined by AE and SEM. These complementary techniques were used to identify damage mechanisms at the microscale and correlate them with the macroscopic stress state in four-point bending. The flexural stress-strain curve was nominally linear to about 1.0 percent strain, but the onset of damage detectable by AE occurred at 0.3 percent strain. Two peaks in the AE amplitude distribution were observed at 35 dB and 60 dB. Low-amplitude events were detected along the entire length of the specimen, and correlation with direct observations of damage made by deforming the composite on the SEM stage suggested that these events arose from matrix cracking and fiber debonding concentrated at flaws on the composite. High amplitude events occurred primarily in the region of highest flexural stress between the inner loading points. They were attributed to fracture of glass fibers on the tension side and surface damage on the compressive side.

  14. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Körber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The continuous development of laser systems towards more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices (CCD). These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, also micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) like a digital micromirror device (DMD) are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW) lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructed device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects like persisting dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  15. Induction of oxidative DNA damage by flavonoids of propolis: its mechanism and implication about antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chih; Wang, Yi-Hsiang; Liou, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Yu-Cun; Huang, Haimei; Liu, Yin-Chang

    2012-01-13

    Propolis from beehives is commonly used as a home remedy for various purposes including as a topical antiseptic. Despite its antioxidant capacity, propolis induces oxidative DNA damage. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we found that the induction of oxidative DNA damage is attributed to the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) produced by propolis. The formation of H(2)O(2) can take place without the participation of cells but requires the presence of transition metal ions such as iron. Flavonoids such as galangin, chrysin, and pinocembrin that are commonly detected in propolis have the capacity to induce oxidative DNA damage, and that capacity correlates with the production of H(2)O(2), suggesting the involvement of flavonoids in propolis in this process. On the basis of these results, we propose that the flavonoids of propolis serve as temporary carriers of electrons received from transition metal ions that are relayed to oxygen molecules to subsequently generate superoxide and H(2)O(2). In addition, propolis induces oxidative DNA damage that is subject to repair, and propolis-treated cells show a lower level of DNA damage level when challenged with another oxidative agent such as amoxicillin. This is reminiscent of an adaptive response that might contribute to the beneficial effects of propolis.

  16. Failure Mechanisms and Damage Model of Ductile Cast Iron Under Low-Cycle Fatigue Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Sloss, Clayton

    2014-10-01

    Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were conducted on ductile cast iron (DCI) at strain rates of 0.02, 0.002, and 0.0002/s in the temperature range from room temperature to 1073 K (800 °C). A constitutive-damage model was developed within the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) framework on the premise of strain decomposition into rate-independent plasticity and time-dependent creep. Four major damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement (IE), (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation were considered in a nonlinear creep-fatigue interaction model which represents the overall damage accumulation process consisting of oxidation-assisted fatigue crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage ( e.g., IE and creep), leading to final fracture. The model was found to agree with the experimental observations of the complex DCI-LCF phenomena, for which the linear damage summation rule would fail.

  17. Simulations of pulsatile suspension flow through bileaflet mechanical heart valves to quantify platelet damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Brian; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and long exposure times on platelets have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). This numerical study quantifies the platelet damage incurred in pulsatile flow through various BMHV designs. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) was implemented to simulate pulsatile flow and capture the dynamics and surface shear stresses of modeled platelets with realistic geometry. The platelets are released in key regions of interest in the geometry as well as at various times of the cardiac cycle. The platelet damage is quantified using a linear shear stress-exposure time blood damage index (BDI) model. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during the pulsatile flow has been validated as being able to accurately capture bulk BMHV fluid flow and for accurately quantifying platelet damage in BMHV flows. These simulations will further knowledge of the geometric features and cardiac cycle times that most affect platelet damage. This study will ultimately lead to optimization of BMHV design in order to minimize thromboembolic complications.

  18. Damage and failure mechanisms of continuous glass fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, F.; Hiltner, A.; Baer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The damage that accompanies flexural deformation of a unidirectional glass fiber composite of polyphenylene sulfide was examined by AE and SEM. These complementary techniques were used to identify damage mechanisms at the microscale and correlate them with the macroscopic stress state in four-point bending. The flexural stress-strain curve was nominally linear to about 1.0 percent strain, but the onset of damage detectable by AE occurred at 0.3 percent strain. Two peaks in the AE amplitude distribution were observed at 35 dB and 60 dB. Low-amplitude events were detected along the entire length of the specimen, and correlation with direct observations of damage made by deforming the composite on the SEM stage suggested that these events arose from matrix cracking and fiber debonding concentrated at flaws on the composite. High amplitude events occurred primarily in the region of highest flexural stress between the inner loading points. They were attributed to fracture of glass fibers on the tension side and surface damage on the compressive side.

  19. Application of the damage mechanics to the description of multiple cracks development in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    Oil and gas shales are one of the most perspective sources of hydrocarbons. Damage processes are in the focus of any technology of oil shales development because of their extremely low permeability. As a rule the aim of stimulation treatments is to make a system of multiple cracks. Real rock masses are almost heterogeneous. Strength of layered rocks like shales has anisotropic properties. Damage mechanics gives one of the natural ways of description of multiple cracks development. The phenomenological model of multiple cracks evolution in porous media based on general principles of thermodynamics [Kondaurov V.I., Izvekov O.Y., 2009] was generalized to the case of layered rocks. This model takes into account elastic domain existence, dependency of elastic domain on orientation of axis of anisotropy, reduction of elasticity modulus in active process, permeability and porosity change. The model involves latent energy of damage and elastic energy release due to damage evolution. In the report some coupled problems of damage and filtration are discussed. This work was supported by Russian President Grant for Young Scientists MK-7249.2013.5. Kondaurov V.I., Izvekov O.Y. A Model of Saturated Porous Media with an Elastic Brittle Skeleton // Proc. of the 4-th Biot Conference on Poromechanics, POROMECHANICS IV. - EStech Publications, Inc., PA,USA, 2009.

  20. Passive and active thermography for in situ damage monitoring in woven composites during mechanical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, J.-M.; Balageas, D.; Lamboul, B.; Bai, G.; Passilly, F.; Mavel, A.; Grail, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to highlight the contribution of both passive and active infrared thermography for in situ damage detection and monitoring in a 2D woven composite, during a mechanical testing constituted of multiple sequences of loadings and intermediate pauses. During the monotonic tensile loadings, damages such as matrix cracking and fiber-matrix debondings are monitored by passive thermography. Their thermal signatures are analyzed and the released heat, which is assumed to be a relevant index of their severity, is evaluated and correlated to the associated acoustic energies, simultaneously recorded. Finally, the contribution of the TSR (Thermographic Signal Reconstruction) advanced processing technique to provide a qualitative overview of the detected damages is underlined. As for the constant stress plateau levels, a nondestructive damage inspection of the tested specimen is carried out by pulsed thermography. The difficulties, due to the woven structure of the composite, in detecting any damage are put into relief. Once more, it is shown that the TSR technique can be useful.

  1. Damage Mechanisms of Filled Siloxanes for Predictive Multiscale Modeling of Aging Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, B; Maxwell, R; de Teresa, S; Dinh, L; Gee, R

    2002-04-02

    Predictions of component performance versus lifetime are often risky for complex materials in which there may be many underlying aging or degradation mechanisms. In order to develop more accurate predictive models for silica-filled siloxane components, we are studying damage mechanisms over a broad range of size domains, linked together through several modeling efforts. Atomistic and molecular dynamic modeling has elucidated the chemistry of the silica filler to polymer interaction, as this interaction plays a key role in this material's aging behavior. This modeling work has been supported by experimental data on the removal of water from the silica surface, the effect of the surrounding polymer on this desiccation, and on the subsequent change in the mechanical properties of the system. Solid State NMR efforts have characterized the evolution of the polymer and filler dynamics as the material is damaged through irradiation or desiccation. These damage signatures have been confirmed by direct measurements of changes in polymer crosslink density and filler interaction as measured by solvent swelling, and by mechanical property tests. Data from the changes at these molecular levels are simultaneously feeding the development of age-aware constitutive models for polymer behavior. In addition, the microstructure of the foam, including under load, has been determined by Computed Tomography, and this data is being introduced into Finite Element Analysis codes to allow component level models. All of these techniques are directed towards the incorporation of molecular and microstructural aging signatures into predictive models for overall component performance.

  2. Trans-chalcone added in topical formulation inhibits skin inflammation and oxidative stress in a model of ultraviolet B radiation skin damage in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Renata M; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Vale, David L; Steffen, Vinicius S; Vicentini, Fabiana T M C; Vignoli, Josiane A; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rubia

    2017-06-01

    Trans-chalcone (TC) is a common precursor of flavonoids. However, the pharmacological properties of TC remain to be fully understood. The present study investigated whether topical formulation containing TC (TFcTC) presents therapeutic effect in UVB radiation-induced skin damage using disease, enzyme activity, antioxidant activity, protein and mRNA parameters. Control topical formulation (CTF) and TFcTC were applied in hairless mice before and after exposure to UVB radiation. Dorsal skin samples were collected after UVB exposure to evaluate: i) skin edema (weight) was measured by punch biopsy; ii) spectrophotometric assays were used to measure myeloperoxidase (MPO) and catalase activities, ferric (FRAP) and ABTS cation reducing antioxidant power, superoxide anion production and levels of reduced glutathione (GSH); iii) enzymography was used to measure matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity; iv) chemiluminescence was used to measure the lipid peroxidation (LPO); v) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels; vi) reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to measure cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), gp91(phox) (NADPH oxidase sub-unity), glutathione peroxidase-1 (Gpx1), glutathione reductase (Gr), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA expression. TFcTC inhibited UVB-induced skin edema, MPO activity, MMP-9 activity, TNF-α production, and COX-2 mRNA expression. TFcTC inhibited UVB-induced LPO, down-regulated superoxide anion levels and gp91(phox) mRNA expression, and improved antioxidant potential and GSH skin levels. The mRNA expression of detoxification systems such as Nrf2, HO-1, Gpx1 and Gr, and catalase activity were also enhanced by treatment with TFcTC. In conclusion, TFcTC protects mice skin from UVB radiation by inhibiting inflammation, and improving antioxidant and detoxification systems. Therefore, topical treatment with TC is a novel

  3. Endogenous recovery after brain damage: molecular mechanisms that balance neuronal life/death fate.

    PubMed

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Penagos-Puig, Andrés; Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal survival depends on multiple factors that comprise a well-fueled energy metabolism, trophic input, clearance of toxic substances, appropriate redox environment, integrity of blood-brain barrier, suppression of programmed cell death pathways and cell cycle arrest. Disturbances of brain homeostasis lead to acute or chronic alterations that might ultimately cause neuronal death with consequent impairment of neurological function. Although we understand most of these processes well when they occur independently from one another, we still lack a clear grasp of the concerted cellular and molecular mechanisms activated upon neuronal damage that intervene in protecting damaged neurons from death. In this review, we summarize a handful of endogenously activated mechanisms that balance molecular cues so as to determine whether neurons recover from injury or die. We center our discussion on mechanisms that have been identified to participate in stroke, although we consider different scenarios of chronic neurodegeneration as well. We discuss two central processes that are involved in endogenous repair and that, when not regulated, could lead to tissue damage, namely, trophic support and neuroinflammation. We emphasize the need to construct integrated models of neuronal degeneration and survival that, in the end, converge in neuronal fate after injury. Under neurodegenerative conditions, endogenously activated mechanisms balance out molecular cues that determine whether neurons contend toxicity or die. Many processes involved in endogenous repair may as well lead to tissue damage depending on the strength of stimuli. Signaling mediated by trophic factors and neuroinflammation are examples of these processes as they regulate different mechanisms that mediate neuronal demise including necrosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. In this review, we discuss recent findings on balanced regulation and their involvement in neuronal death. © 2015 International

  4. Nebulization of ultradeformable liposomes: the influence of aerosolization mechanism and formulation excipients.

    PubMed

    Elhissi, Abdelbary M A; Giebultowicz, Joanna; Stec, Anna A; Wroczynski, Piotr; Ahmed, Waqar; Alhnan, Mohamed Albed; Phoenix, David; Taylor, Kevin M G

    2012-10-15

    Ultradeformable liposomes are stress-responsive phospholipid vesicles that have been investigated extensively in transdermal delivery. In this study, the suitability of ultradeformable liposomes for pulmonary delivery was investigated. Aerosols of ultradeformable liposomes were generated using air-jet, ultrasonic or vibrating-mesh nebulizers and their stability during aerosol generation was evaluated using salbutamol sulphate as a model hydrophilic drug. Although delivery of ultradeformable liposome aerosols in high fine particle fraction was achievable, the vesicles were very unstable to nebulization so that up to 98% drug losses were demonstrated. Conventional liposomes were relatively less unstable to nebulization. Moreover, ultradeformable liposomes tended to aggregate during nebulization whilst conventional vesicles demonstrated a "size fractionation" behaviour, with smaller liposomes delivered to the lower stage of the impinger and larger vesicles to the upper stage. A release study conducted for 2 h showed that ultradeformable liposomes retained only 30% of the originally entrapped drug, which was increased to 53% by inclusion of cholesterol within the formulations. By contrast, conventional liposomes retained 60-70% of the originally entrapped drug. The differences between ultradeformable liposomes and liposomes were attributed to the presence of ethanol or Tween 80 within the elastic vesicle formulations. Overall, this study demonstrated, contrary to our expectation, that materials included with the aim of making the liposomes more elastic and ultradeformable to enhance delivery from nebulizers were in fact responsible for vesicle instability during nebulization and high leakage rates of the drug. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. The results from these various techniques have resulted in an understanding of consequences of radiation damage to DNA from the early ionization event to the production of non-radical lesions (discussed in detail in Comprehensive Report). In this year`s work we have found the hydroxyl radical in DNA`s hydration layer. This is an important result which impacts the hole transfer hypothesis and the understanding of the direct vs. indirect effect in DNA. Further we have found the first ESR evidence for sugar radicals as a result of direct radiation damage to DNA nucleotides in an aqueous environment. This is significant as it impacts the biological endpoint of radiation damage to DNA and suggests future work in DNA. Work with DNA-polypeptides show clear evidence for electron transfer to DNA from the polypeptide which we believe is a radioprotective mechanism. Our work with ab initio molecular orbital theory has gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics involved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this year`s work to new, more accurate values for the electron affinities of the DNA bases, understanding of the relative stability of all possible sugar radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction on the deoxyribose group, hydration effects on, thiol radioprotectors, and an ongoing study of radical intermediates formed from initial DNA ion radicals. During this fiscal year five articles have been published, three are in press, two are submitted and several more are in preparation.

  6. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the {open_quotes}Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNA{close_quotes}.

  7. Dual wavelength laser damage mechanisms in the ultra-short pulse regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyamfi, Mark; Costella, Marion; Willemsen, Thomas; Jürgens, Peter; Mende, Mathias; Jensen, Lars; Ristau, Detlev

    2016-12-01

    New ultrashort pulse laser systems exhibit an ever increasing performance which includes shorter pulses and higher pulse energies. Optical components used in these systems are facing increasing requirements regarding their durability, and therefore understanding of the damage mechanism is crucial. In the ultra-short pulse regime electron ionization processes control the damage mechanisms. For the single wavelength, single pulse regime the Keldysh [1] and the Drude model [2] allow a quantitative description of these ionization processes. However, in this model, the electrical field is restricted to a single wavelength, and therefore it cannot be applied in the case of irradiation with two pulses at different wavelengths. As frequency conversion is becoming more common in ultra-short pulse applications, further research is needed in this field to predict the damage resistance of optical components. We investigate the damage behavior of high reflective mirrors made of different metal oxide materials under simultaneous exposure to ultra-short pulses at the wavelengths 387.5 nm and 775 nm, respectively.

  8. Mechanical Blood Trauma in Assisted Circulation: Sublethal RBC Damage Preceding Hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Olia, Salim E.; Maul, Timothy M.; Antaki, James F.; Kameneva, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    After many decades of improvements in mechanical circulatory assist devices (CADs), blood damage remains a serious problem during support contributing to variety of adverse events, and consequently affecting patient survival and quality of life. The mechanisms of cumulative cell damage in continuous-flow blood pumps are still not fully understood despite numerous in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies of blood trauma. Previous investigations have almost exclusively focused on lethal blood damage, namely hemolysis, which is typically negligible during normal operation of current generation CADs. The measurement of plasma free hemoglobin (plfHb) concentration to characterize hemolysis is straightforward, however sublethal trauma is more difficult to detect and quantify since no simple direct test exists. Similarly, while multiple studies have focused on thrombosis within blood pumps and accessories, sublethal blood trauma and its sequelae have yet to be adequately documented or characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding of sublethal trauma to red blood cells (RBCs) produced by exposure of blood to flow parameters and conditions similar to those within CADs. It also suggests potential strategies to reduce and/or prevent RBC sublethal damage in a clinically-relevant context, and encourages new research into this relatively uncharted territory. PMID:27034320

  9. Comparison of damage localization in mechanical systems based on Stochastic Subspace Identification method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Guillaume; Delwar Hossain Bhuyan, Md; D öhler, Michael; Mevel, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Damage identification in mechanical systems under vibration excitation relates to the monitoring of the changes in the dynamical properties of the corresponding linear system, and thus reflects changes in modal parameters (frequencies, damping, mode shapes) and finally in the finite element model of the structure [1]. Damage localization can be performed using ambient vibration data collected from sensors in the reference and possibly damaged state and information from a finite element model (FEM). Two approaches are considered in this framework, the Stochastic Dynamic Damage Location Vector (SDDLV) approach [2, 3] and the Subspace Fitting (SF) approach [4, 5]. The SDDLV is based on finite element (FE) model of the structure and modal parameters estimated from measurements in both reference and damaged states. From the measurements, a load vector is computed in the kernel of the transfer matrix difference between both states and then applied to the FE model of the structure. This load vector leads to zero (or close to zero) stress over the damaged elements. A joint statistical evaluation has been proposed, where several stress estimates and their uncertainties are computed from multiple mode sets and different Laplace variables for robustness of the approach. SF approach is a finite element model updating. The approach makes use of subspace-based system identification, where an observability matrix is estimated from vibration measurements. Finite element model updating is performed by correlating a finite element model observability matrix with the estimated one. SF is applied to damage localization where damages are assumed to be modeled in terms of mean variations of element stiffness matrices. Localization algorithm is improved by taking into account the estimation uncertainties of the underlying finite element model parameters. Both localization algorithms are presented and their performance is illustrated and compared on simulated and experimental vibration

  10. Fracture-Based Mesh Size Requirements for Matrix Cracks in Continuum Damage Mechanics Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Mabson, Gerald E.; Ramnath, Madhavadas; Hyder, Imran

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the ability of progressive damage analysis (PDA) finite element (FE) models to predict transverse matrix cracks in unidirectional composites. The results of the analyses are compared to closed-form linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) solutions. Matrix cracks in fiber-reinforced composite materials subjected to mode I and mode II loading are studied using continuum damage mechanics and zero-thickness cohesive zone modeling approaches. The FE models used in this study are built parametrically so as to investigate several model input variables and the limits associated with matching the upper-bound LEFM solutions. Specifically, the sensitivity of the PDA FE model results to changes in strength and element size are investigated.

  11. Bromination of deoxycytidine by eosinophil peroxidase: A mechanism for mutagenesis by oxidative damage of nucleotide precursors

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Byun, Jaeman; Williams, Michelle V.; McCormick, Michael L.; Parks, William C.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidants generated by eosinophils during chronic inflammation may lead to mutagenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. Eosinophil peroxidase, a heme enzyme released by eosinophils, generates hypobromous acid that damages tissue in inflammatory conditions. We show that human eosinophils use eosinophil peroxidase to produce 5-bromodeoxycytidine. Flow cytometric, immunohistochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses all demonstrated that 5-bromodeoxycytidine generated by eosinophil peroxidase was taken up by cultured cells and incorporated into genomic DNA as 5-bromodeoxyuridine. Although previous studies have focused on oxidation of chromosomal DNA, our observations suggest another mechanism for oxidative damage of DNA. In this scenario, peroxidase-catalyzed halogenation of nucleotide precursors yields products that subsequently can be incorporated into DNA. Because the thymine analog 5-BrUra mispairs with guanine in DNA, generation of brominated pyrimidines by eosinophils might constitute a mechanism for cytotoxicity and mutagenesis at sites of inflammation. PMID:11172002

  12. Propagation of damage in brain tissue: coupling the mechanics of oedema and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Lang, Georgina E; Vella, Dominic; Waters, Sarah L; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Brain tissue swelling, or oedema, is a dangerous consequence of traumatic brain injury and stroke. In particular, a locally swollen region can cause the injury to propagate further through the brain: swelling causes mechanical compression of the vasculature in the surrounding tissue and so can cut off that tissue's oxygen supply. We use a triphasic mathematical model to investigate this propagation, and couple tissue mechanics with oxygen delivery. Starting from a fully coupled, finite elasticity, model, we show that simplifications can be made that allow us to express the volume of the propagating region of damage analytically in terms of key parameters. Our results show that performing a craniectomy, to alleviate pressure in the brain and allow the tissue to swell outwards, reduces the propagation of damage; this finding agrees with experimental observations.

  13. Continuum Mechanics Based Bi-linear Shear Deformable Shell Element Using Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-07

    the convergent solution in the case of the continuum mechanics based bi- linear shear deformable ANCF shell element. 5.3 Slit Annular Plate Subjected...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. #24515 CONTINUUM MECHANICS BASED BI- LINEAR SHEAR DEFORMABLE SHELL ELEMENT...MAR 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED 07-01-2014 to 04-03-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CONTINUUM MECHANICS BASED BI- LINEAR

  14. Fluorescent protein senses and reports mechanical damage in glass-fiber-reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Makyła, Katarzyna; Müller, Christoph; Lörcher, Samuel; Winkler, Thomas; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Eder, Michaela; Bruns, Nico

    2013-05-21

    Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is used as a mechanoresponsive layer at the fiber/resin interface in glass-fiber-reinforced composites. The protein loses its fluorescence when subjected to mechanical stress. Within the material, it reports interfacial shear debonding and barely visible impact damage by a transition from a fluorescent to a non-fluorescent state. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Understanding the Mechanisms Leading to Gas Permeation in Thermally Damaged PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, G. R.; Dickson, P. M.; Asay, B. W.; Smilowitz, L. B.; Henson, B. F.; Perry, W. L.

    2006-07-01

    We present data that indicate that thermally damaged PBX 9501 is substantially more permeable than the pristine material and that this may have a significant effect on the pre-ignition slow cook-off process, as well as the post-ignition flame spread process. Experiments indicate that the mechanism responsible for the formation of interconnected matrix porosity is likely dominated by nitroplasticizer decomposition in the early stages of the permeability evolution followed by secondary, slower HMX decomposition.

  16. Comparison of Phases Formation Process in Initial and Mechanically Activated Ceramic Batches with Pyrochlore Formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Chizhevskaya, S. V.; Yudintsev, S. V.

    2002-02-25

    Formation of two pyrochlore ceramics with formulations CaZr0.25U0.75Ti2O7 and CaUTi2O7 within the temperature range 1000-1500 C from batches prepared by grinding of oxide powders in a mortar and an activator with hydrostatic yokes AGO-2U as well as soaking of a Ca, Zr, and Ti oxide mixture with uranylnitrate solution was studied. The pyrochlore ceramics are produced through intermediate calcium uranate formation. Phase formation reactions in the batch pre-treated in the AGO-2U unit were completed within the temperature range 1000-1100 C that is lower than in the batches prepared by two other methods.

  17. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum group hormone in humans during sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.; Young, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Plasma growth hormone concentrations during sleep were determined experimentally. An elevated level of plasma growth hormone was observed during the initial phase of sleep and remained elevated for approximately 3 hr before returning to the steady-state level. Moreover, subsequent to a prolonged interruption of sleep, of the order of 2-3 hr, an elevated level of plasma growth hormone was again observed during the initial phase of resumed sleep. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum growth hormone in humans was used to account for the growth hormone responses observed.

  18. Antiasthmatic Role of "Pentapala -04" a Herbal Formulation Against Ova Albumin and Aluminium HydroxideInduced LungDamage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, D Srinivasa; Jayaraaj, Indira A; Jayaraaj, R

    2005-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a clinical syndrome characterized by proximal dysphasia and wheeze due to increased resistance to the flow of air through the narrowed bronchi. Asthma has become the most common chronic disease in the world and epidemiological studies suggest that its prevalence, severity and mortality are rising at a time when mortality from other common treatable conditions is falling. The reasons for the above statistics are environmental factors such as increased exposure to allergens and atmospheric pollutants. Antiasthmatic treatment includes corticosteroids, which are very effective in the treatment of asthma. But corticosteroids are costly and if given systemically, have many severe adverse effects. Hence, the present research work involves the use of a herbal compound formulation Pentapala -04 prepared from five medicinal plants namely, Adhatoda vasica Need, Ocimum sanctum Linn, Coleus aromaticus Benth, Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn and Alpiania galangal Sw.The effect of "Pentapala-04" on ova albumin and aluminium hydroxide induced lung damage in albino wistar rats was investigated. The rats were divided into three groups of four animals each. Group I, II and III serves as control, toxic and post treatment group respectively. Our results showed that their was increased level of lipid peroxidation and secreased level of antioxidants in toxic group animals. But the levels of antioxidant enzymes were restored in post-treated groups of animals, which might be due to the ability of "ability of "Pentapala-04 to scavenge the reactive oxygen species.

  19. Antiasthmatic Role of “Pentapala -04” a Herbal Formulation Against Ova Albumin and Aluminium HydroxideInduced LungDamage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rao, D. Srinivasa; Jayaraaj, Indira A.; Jayaraaj, R.

    2005-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a clinical syndrome characterized by proximal dysphasia and wheeze due to increased resistance to the flow of air through the narrowed bronchi. Asthma has become the most common chronic disease in the world and epidemiological studies suggest that its prevalence, severity and mortality are rising at a time when mortality from other common treatable conditions is falling. The reasons for the above statistics are environmental factors such as increased exposure to allergens and atmospheric pollutants. Antiasthmatic treatment includes corticosteroids, which are very effective in the treatment of asthma. But corticosteroids are costly and if given systemically, have many severe adverse effects. Hence, the present research work involves the use of a herbal compound formulation Pentapala -04 prepared from five medicinal plants namely, Adhatoda vasica Need, Ocimum sanctum Linn, Coleus aromaticus Benth, Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn and Alpiania galangal Sw. The effect of “Pentapala-04” on ova albumin and aluminium hydroxide induced lung damage in albino wistar rats was investigated. The rats were divided into three groups of four animals each. Group I, II and III serves as control, toxic and post treatment group respectively. Our results showed that their was increased level of lipid peroxidation and secreased level of antioxidants in toxic group animals. But the levels of antioxidant enzymes were restored in post-treated groups of animals, which might be due to the ability of “ability of “Pentapala-04 to scavenge the reactive oxygen species. PMID:22557168

  20. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  1. Preventive Effects of Poloxamer 188 on Muscle Cell Damage Mechanics Under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sing Wan; Yao, Yifei; Hong, Ye; Ma, Zhiyao; Kok, Stanton H L; Sun, Shan; Cho, Michael; Lee, Kenneth K H; Mak, Arthur F T

    2017-04-01

    High oxidative stress can occur during ischemic reperfusion and chronic inflammation. It has been hypothesized that such oxidative challenges could contribute to clinical risks such as deep tissue pressure ulcers. Skeletal muscles can be challenged by inflammation-induced or reperfusion-induced oxidative stress. Oxidative stress reportedly can lower the compressive damage threshold of skeletal muscles cells, causing actin filament depolymerization, and reduce membrane sealing ability. Skeletal muscles thus become easier to be damaged by mechanical loading under prolonged oxidative exposure. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of poloxamer 188 (P188) on skeletal muscle cells against extrinsic oxidative challenges (H2O2). It was found that with 1 mM P188 pre-treatment for 1 h, skeletal muscle cells could maintain their compressive damage threshold. The actin polymerization dynamics largely remained stable in term of the expression of cofilin, thymosin beta 4 and profilin. Laser photoporation demonstrated that membrane sealing ability was preserved even as the cells were challenged by H2O2. These findings suggest that P188 pre-treatment can help skeletal muscle cells retain their normal mechanical integrity in oxidative environments, adding a potential clinical use of P188 against the combined challenge of mechanical-oxidative stresses. Such effect may help to prevent deep tissue ulcer development.

  2. Tertiary mechanisms of brain damage: a new hope for treatment of cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Fleiss, Bobbi; Gressens, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Cerebral palsy is caused by injury or developmental disturbances to the immature brain and leads to substantial motor, cognitive, and learning deficits. In addition to developmental disruption associated with the initial insult to the immature brain, injury processes can persist for many months or years. We suggest that these tertiary mechanisms of damage might include persistent inflammation and epigenetic changes. We propose that these processes are implicit in prevention of endogenous repair and regeneration and predispose patients to development of future cognitive dysfunction and sensitisation to further injury. We suggest that treatment of tertiary mechanisms of damage might be possible by various means, including preventing the repressive effects of microglia and astrocyte over-activation, recapitulating developmentally permissive epigenetic conditions, and using cell therapies to stimulate repair and regeneration Recognition of tertiary mechanisms of damage might be the first step in a complex translational task to tailor safe and effective therapies that can be used to treat the already developmentally disrupted brain long after an insult. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A detailed fluid mechanics study of tilting disk mechanical heart valve closure and the implications to blood damage.

    PubMed

    Manning, Keefe B; Herbertson, Luke H; Fontaine, Arnold A; Deutsch, Steven

    2008-08-01

    Hemolysis and thrombosis are among the most detrimental effects associated with mechanical heart valves. The strength and structure of the flows generated by the closure of mechanical heart valves can be correlated with the extent of blood damage. In this in vitro study, a tilting disk mechanical heart valve has been modified to measure the flow created within the valve housing during the closing phase. This is the first study to focus on the region just upstream of the mitral valve occluder during this part of the cardiac cycle, where cavitation is known to occur and blood damage is most severe. Closure of the tilting disk valve was studied in a "single shot" chamber driven by a pneumatic pump. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure all three velocity components over a 30 ms period encompassing the initial valve impact and rebound. An acrylic window placed in the housing enabled us to make flow measurements as close as 200 microm away from the closed occluder. Velocity profiles reveal the development of an atrial vortex on the major orifice side of the valve shed off the tip of the leaflet. The vortex strength makes this region susceptible to cavitation. Mean and maximum axial velocities as high as 7 ms and 20 ms were recorded, respectively. At closure, peak wall shear rates of 80,000 s(-1) were calculated close to the valve tip. The region of the flow examined here has been identified as a likely location of hemolysis and thrombosis in tilting disk valves. The results of this first comprehensive study measuring the flow within the housing of a tilting disk valve may be helpful in minimizing the extent of blood damage through the combined efforts of experimental and computational fluid dynamics to improve mechanical heart valve designs.

  4. Second-generation locking mechanisms and ethylene oxide sterilization reduce tibial insert backside damage in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Michael G; Roy, Marcel E; Whiteside, Leo A

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of polyethylene quality and locking mechanism on damage to the nonarticulating (backside) surface of retrieved tibial inserts in total knee arthroplasty. Inserts with peripheral capture (PC) locking mechanisms and ethylene oxide (EtO)-sterilized polyethylene were hypothesized to prevent major backside damage. A total of 156 inserts were sorted by locking mechanism and sterilization method and analyzed by damage scoring methods. Ninety-seven specimens exhibited burnishing. Significant positive linear correlations were observed between damage score and age in vivo for all combinations, but damage occurred at a significantly lower rate for second-generation PC implants with EtO sterilization. Most specimens in this group were undamaged (46/72), with others exhibiting only burnishing. Sex, body mass index, and weight did not influence backside damage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The evaluation of damage mechanism of unreinforced masonry buildings after Van (2011) and Elazig (2010) Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güney, D.; Aydin, E.; Öztürk, B.

    2015-07-01

    On March 8th, 2010 Karakocan-Elazig earthquake of magnitude 6.0 occurred at a region where masonry and adobe construction is very common. Karakocan-Elazig is located in a high seismicity region on Eastern Anatolian Fault System (EAFS). Due to the earthquake, 42 people were killed and 14’113 buildings were damaged. Another city, Van located at South east of Turkey is hit by earthquakes with M = 7.2 occurred on October 23rd, 2011 at 13:41 (local time), whose epicenter was about 16 km north of Van (Tabanli village) and M = 5.6 on November 9th, 2011 with an epicenter near the town of Edremit, south of Van and caused the loss of life and heavy damages. Both earthquakes killed 644 people and 2608 people were injured. Approximately 10’000 buildings were seriously damaged. There are many traditional types of structures existing in the region hit by earthquakes (both Van and Elazig). These buildings were built as adobe, unreinforced masonry or mixed type. These types of buildings are very common in rural areas (especially south and east) of Turkey because of easy workmanship and cheap construction cost. Many of those traditional type structures experienced serious damages. The use of masonry is very common in some of the world's most hazard-prone regions, such as in Latin America, Africa, the Indian subcontinent and other parts of Asia, the Middle East, and southern Europe. Based on damage and failure mechanism of those buildings, the parameters affecting the seismic performance of those traditional buildings are analyzed in this paper. The foundation type, soil conditions, production method of the masonry blocks, construction method, the geometry of the masonry walls, workmanship quality, existence of wooden beams, type of roof, mortar between adobe blocks are studied in order to understand the reason of damage for these types of buildings.

  6. Theoretical research on damage mechanism of ultrafast laser ablation crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junfeng; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng

    2013-09-01

    High peak power picosecond laser ablation of silicon draws great attention in solar cell manufacture,laser optoelectric countermeasure applications, eta. This paper reports the damage process of ultrafast lasers interaction with silicon,which is based on Two-Temperature Model(TTM) and 1-on-1 damage threshold test method. Pulsed laser caused damage manifests in several ways, such as heat damage, mechanical effect and even eletrical effect. In this paper, a modified Two Temperature Model is applied in ultrashort laser interaction with silicon.The traditional Two-Temperature Model methods is proposed by Anismov in 1970s to calculate the interaction between ultrafast laser with metals, which is composed of free electrons and lattice. Beyond the carrier and lattice temperture model, an additional excited term and Auger recombination term of carriers is taken into account in this modified Two-Temperature Model model to reflect the characteristics in semicondutors. Under the same pulse-duration condition, the damage threshold is found to be 161 mJ/cm2 and a characteritic double-peak shape shows up. As the pulse energy density rises from 50mJ/cm2 to 161 mJ/cm2, the difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down proportionally.Also,a detailed interaction process between photon-electron and electron-phonon is discussed. Electron and lattice temperature evolutes distinctly different, while the former is much higher than the latter until heat tranfer finished at 200 picoseconds. Two-peak feature of electron temperature is also identified. As the pulse duration increases from 20 picosecond to 60 picosecond, the he difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down significantly. The calculated damage threshold does not change fundamentally, remaining approximately 0.16J/cm2. Also, the damage mechanism is found to be thermal heating with the pulse width between 20 and 60 picoseconds at threshold fluences which is identical to experiment test result

  7. Insight into mechanism of lanthanum (III) induced damage to plant photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Li, Yueli; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    A great deal of literature is available regarding the environmental and ecological effects of rare earth element pollution on plants. These studies have shown that excess lanthanum (La) (III) in the environment can inhibit plant growth and even cause plant death. Moreover, inhibition of plant photosynthesis is known to be one of the physiological bases of these damages. However, the mechanism responsible for these effects is still unclear. In this study, the mechanism of La(III)-induced damage to plant photosynthesis was clarified from the viewpoint of the chloroplast ultrastructure, the contents of chloroplast mineral elements and chlorophyll, the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits and chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, in which rice was selected as a study object. Following treatment with low level of La(III), the chloroplast ultrastructure of rice was not changed, and the contents of chloroplast mineral elements (Mg, P, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) increased, but the chlorophyll content did not change significantly. Moreover, the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits, chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, the net photosynthetic rate and growth indices increased. Following treatment with high levels of La(III), the chloroplast ultrastructure was damaged, chloroplast mineral elements (except Cu and Zn) and chlorophyll contents decreased, and the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits, chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, the net photosynthetic rate and growth indices decreased. Based on these results, a possible mechanism of La(III)-induced damage to plant photosynthesis was proposed to provide a reference for scientific evaluation of the potential ecological risk of rare earth elements in the environment.

  8. An investigation of the influence of process and formulation variables on mechanical properties of high shear granules using design of experiment.

    PubMed

    Mangwandi, Chirangano; Adams, Michael J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2012-05-10

    Being able to predict the properties of granules from the knowledge of the process and formulation variables is what most industries are striving for. This research uses experimental design to investigate the effect of process variables and formulation variables on mechanical properties of pharmaceutical granules manufactured from a classical blend of lactose and starch using hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) as the binder. The process parameters investigated were granulation time and impeller speed whilst the formulation variables were starch-to-lactose ratio and HPC concentration. The granule properties investigated include granule packing coefficient and granule strength. The effect of some components of the formulation on mechanical properties would also depend on the process variables used in granulation process. This implies that by subjecting the same formulation to different process conditions results in products with different properties.

  9. Analysis of the Damage Mechanism Related to CO2 Laser Cochleostomy on Guinea Pig Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang; Qian, Xiao-qing; Ma, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Different types of lasers have been used in inner ear surgery. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to avoid damage to the inner ear (e.g., hyperthermia and acoustic effects) caused by the use of such lasers. The aim of this study was to use a high powered fibre-enabled CO2 laser (10 W, 606 J/cm2) to perform cochleostomies on guinea pig cochlea and to investigate the possible laser-induced damage mechanisms. The temperature changes in the round window membrane, auditory evoked brainstem response, and morphological of the hair cells were measured and recorded before and after laser application. All of the outcomes differed in comparison with the control group. A rise in temperature and subsequent increased hearing loss were observed in animals that underwent surgery with a 10 W CO2 laser. These findings correlated with increased injury to the cochlear ultrastructure and a higher positive expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in the damaged organ of Corti. We assume that enhanced cell-cell adhesion and the activated β-catenin-related canonical Wnt-signalling pathway may play a role in the protection of the cochlea to prevent further damage. PMID:28070426

  10. A comprehensive monitoring system for damage identification and location in large structural and mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.; Prime, M.B.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has focused on developing and experimentally verifying a suite of analytical tools for identifying the onset of damage in structural and mechanical systems from changes in their vibration characteristics. A MATLAB-based computer code referred to as Damage Identification And Modal Analysis of Data (DIAMOND) was developed. The code was then extensively exercised on data obtained from a variety of test structures. The most notable structure was an in situ bridge located ten mile north of Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. The suite of tools contained in DIAMOND is now being applied to the nuclear weapons enhanced surveillance program and an industrial partner has asked to enter into a partnership so that they can implement routines from DIAMOND into their commercial damage assessment hardware for large civil engineering structures. Because of the large volume of requests from around the world for DIAMOND, it can now be downloaded from the web site: http://esaea-www.esa.lanl.gov/damage{_}id.

  11. Preventive role of lens antioxidant defense mechanism against riboflavin-mediated sunlight damaging of lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Anbaraki, Afrooz; Khoshaman, Kazem; Ghasemi, Younes; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The main components of sunlight reaching the eye lens are UVA and visible light exerting their photo-damaging effects indirectly by the aid of endogenous photosensitizer molecules such as riboflavin (RF). In this study, lens proteins solutions were incubated with RF and exposed to the sunlight. Then, gel mobility shift analysis and different spectroscopic assessments were applied to examine the structural damaging effects of solar radiation on these proteins. Exposure of lens proteins to direct sunlight, in the presence of RF, leads to marked structural crosslinking, oligomerization and proteolytic instability. These structural damages were also accompanied with reduction in the emission fluorescence of Trp and Tyr and appearance of a new absorption peak between 300 and 400nm which can be related to formation of new chromophores. Also, photo-oxidation of lens crystallins increases their oligomeric size distribution as examined by dynamic light scattering analysis. The above mentioned structural insults, as potential sources of sunlight-induced senile cataract and blindness, were significantly attenuated in the presence of ascorbic acid and glutathione which are two important components of lens antioxidant defense system. Therefore, the powerful antioxidant defense mechanism of eye lens is an important barrier against molecular photo-damaging effects of solar radiations during the life span.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of DNA damage induced by procarbazine in the presence of Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Murata, Mariko; Sugimura, Yoshiki; Kawamura, Juichi; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2003-08-05

    Procarbazine [N-isopropyl-alpha-(2-methylhydrazino)-p-toluamide], a hydrazine derivative, which has been shown to have effective antineoplastic activity, induces cancer in some experimental animals and humans. To clarify a new mechanism for its carcinogenic effect, we examined DNA damage induced by procarbazine in the presence of metal ion, using 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human p53 tumor suppressor gene and the c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene. Procarbazine plus Cu(II) induced piperidine-labile and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase-sensitive lesions at the 5'-ACG-3' sequence, complementary to a hotspot of the p53 gene, and the 5'-TG-3' sequence. Catalase partially inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that not only H(2)O(2) but also other reactive species are involved. Procarbazine plus Cu(II) significantly increased the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, which was completely inhibited by calatase. Electron spin resonance spin-trapping experiments revealed that methyl radicals were generated from procarbazine and Cu(II). On the basis of these findings, it is considered that procarbazine causes DNA damage through non-enzymatic formation of the Cu(I)-hydroperoxo complex and methyl radicals. In conclusion, in addition to alkylation, oxidative DNA damage may play important roles in not only antitumor effects but also mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by procarbazine.

  13. Mechanisms of DNA Damage Response to Targeted Irradiation in Organotypic 3D Skin Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  14. The effect of the formulation of silicon-based composite anode on its mechanical, storage and electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Daniel; Assresahegn, Birhanu Desalegn

    2017-08-23

    In this work, the effect of the formulation of silicon-based composite anode on its mechanical, storage and electrochemical properties was investigated. The formulation of the electrode was changed by using hydrogenated or modified (through covalent attachment of a binding additive eg. polyacrylic acid) silicon and acetylene black or graphene sheets, as conducting additive. We found that the composite anode with the covalently grafted binder has the highest elongation without break and strong adhesion to the current collector. It was also found that these mechanical properties are significantly dependent on the conductive carbon additive used and that the use of graphene sheets instead of acetylene black can significantly improve elongation and adhesion. Upon storage at ambient conditions during 180 days, the electronic conductivity and discharge capacity of the modified silicon electrode showed a much smaller decrease than the hydrogenated silicon composite electrode suggesting that the modification can play a passivation role to maintain a constant active material composition. Moreover, it was shown that this composite Si anode has high packing density and consequently thin film electrodes having a very high material loading can be prepared without penalizing its electrochemical performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Identification of substrates for transglutaminase in Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mold, upon cellular mechanical damage.

    PubMed

    Wada, Fumitaka; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Nakamura, Akio; Sugimura, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Narie; Shibata, Hideki; Maki, Masatoshi; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2007-06-01

    Transglutaminases are Ca(2+)-dependent enzymes that post-translationally modify proteins by crosslinking or polyamination at specific polypeptide-bound glutamine residues. Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mold, is the evolutionarily lowest organism expressing a transglutimase whose primary structure is similar to that of mammalian transglutimases. We observed transglutimase reaction products at injured sites in Physarum macroplasmodia upon mechanical damage. With use of a biotin-labeled primary amine, three major proteins constituting possible transglutimase substrates were affinity-purified from the damaged slime mold. The purified proteins were Physarum actin, a 40 kDa Ca(2+)-binding protein with four EF-hand motifs (CBP40), and a novel 33 kDa protein highly homologous to the eukaryotic adenine nucleotide translocator, which is expressed in mitochondria. Immunochemical analysis of extracts from the damaged macroplasmodia indicated that CBP40 is partly dimerized, whereas the other proteins migrated as monomers on SDS/PAGE. Of the three proteins, CBP40 accumulated most significantly around injured areas, as observed by immunofluoresence. These results suggested that transglutimase reactions function in the response to mechanical injury.

  16. Duration of emission of volatile organic compounds from mechanically damaged plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lincoln; Beck, John J

    2015-09-01

    Classical biological control of invasive alien weeds depends on the use of arthropod herbivores that are sufficiently host specific to avoid risk of injuring nontarget plants. Host plant specificity is usually evaluated by using a combination of behavioral and developmental experiments under choice, no-choice and field conditions. Secondary plant compounds are likely to have an important influence on host plant specificity. However, relatively little is known about the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by target and nontarget plants, and how environmental conditions may affect their emission. Previous studies have shown that mechanical damage of leaves increases the composition and content of VOCs emitted. In this study we measured the VOC emissions of five species of plants in the subtribe Centaureinae (Asteraceae)--Carthamus tinctorius, Centaurea cineraria, Centaurea melitensis, Centaurea rothrockii, and Centaurea solstitialis--that have previously been used in host specificity experiments for a prospective biological control agent of yellow starthistle (C. solstitialis). Leaves of each plant were punctured with a needle and the VOCs were collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) periodically over 48 h and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 49 compounds were detected. Damage caused an immediate increase of 200-600% in the composition of VOCs emitted from each plant species, and the amounts generally remained high for at least 48 h. The results indicate that a very unspecific mechanical damage can cause a prolonged change in the VOC profile of plants. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage: from mechanism to disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Amy M.; Schaich, Matthew A.; Smith, Mallory S.; Flynn, Tony S.; Freudenthal, Bret. D.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species continuously assault the structure of DNA resulting in oxidation and fragmentation of the nucleobases. Both oxidative DNA damage itself and its repair mediate the progression of many prevalent human maladies. The major pathway tasked with removal of oxidative DNA damage, and hence maintaining genomic integrity, is base excision repair (BER). The aphorism that structure often dictates function has proven true, as numerous recent structural biology studies have aided in clarifying the molecular mechanisms used by key BER enzymes during the repair of damaged DNA. This review focuses on the mechanistic details of the individual BER enzymes and the association of these enzymes during the development and progression of human diseases, including cancer and neurological diseases. Expanding on these structural and biochemical studies to further clarify still elusive BER mechanisms, and focusing our efforts toward gaining an improved appreciation of how these enzymes form co-complexes to facilitate DNA repair is a crucial next step toward understanding how BER contributes to human maladies and how it can be manipulated to alter patient outcomes. PMID:28199214

  18. Tension Strength, Failure Prediction and Damage Mechanisms in 2D Triaxial Braided Composites with Notch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy L.; Anglin, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unnotched and notched (open hole) tensile strength and failure mechanisms of two-dimensional (2D) triaxial braided composites were examined. The effect of notch size and notch position were investigated. Damage initiation and propagation in notched and unnotched coupons were also examined. Theory developed to predict the normal stress distribution near an open hole and failure for tape laminated composites was evaluated for its applicability to 2D triaxial braided textile composite materials. Four different fiber architectures were considered; braid angle, yarn and braider size, percentage of longitudinal yarns and braider angle varied. Tape laminates equivalent to textile composites were also constructed for comparison. Unnotched tape equivalents were stronger than braided textiles but exhibited greater notch sensitivity. Notched textiles and tape equivalents have roughly the same strength at large notch sizes. Two common damage mechanisms were found: braider yarn cracking and near notch longitudinal yarn splitting. Cracking was found to initiate in braider yarns in unnotched and notched coupons, and propagate in the direction of the braider yarns until failure. Damage initiation stress decreased with increasing braid angle. No significant differences in prediction of near notch strain between textile and tape equivalents could be detected for small braid angle, but the correlations were weak for textiles with large braid angle. Notch strength could not be predicted using existing anisotropic theory for braided textiles due to their insensitivity to notch.

  19. Programmatic features of aging originating in development: aging mechanisms beyond molecular damage?

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The idea that aging follows a predetermined sequence of events, a program, has been discredited by most contemporary authors. Instead, aging is largely thought to occur due to the accumulation of various forms of molecular damage. Recent work employing functional genomics now suggests that, indeed, certain facets of mammalian aging may follow predetermined patterns encoded in the genome as part of developmental processes. It appears that genetic programs coordinating some aspects of growth and development persist into adulthood and may become detrimental. This link between development and aging may occur due to regulated processes, including through the action of microRNAs and epigenetic mechanisms. Taken together with other results, in particular from worms, these findings provide evidence that some aging changes are not primarily a result of a build-up of stochastic damage but are rather a product of regulated processes. These processes are interpreted as forms of antagonistic pleiotropy, the product of a “shortsighted watchmaker,” and thus do not assume aging evolved for a purpose. Overall, it appears that the genome does, indeed, contain specific instructions that drive aging in animals, a radical shift in our perception of the aging process.—de Magalhães, J. P. Programmatic features of aging originating in development: aging mechanisms beyond molecular damage? PMID:22964300

  20. Mechanical damage in a lithium-ion pouch cell under indentation loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hailing; Xia, Yong; Zhou, Qing

    2017-07-01

    The short circuit of lithium-ion batteries induced by mechanical abuse is a great concern in electric vehicle design. It remains a challenge to fully understand the nature of the mechanical damage process with the aim of improving battery crash safety. The present paper investigates the evolution of the damage process for a lithium-ion pouch cell under indentation by loading the cell to various force levels. A significant inflection point on the force-indentation curve is observed before the force peak. Post-mortem examinations indicate that the characteristic change in the local slope of the curve is related to the change occurring at the local interfaces, including three phenomena - formation of tight adhesion on the anode-separator interfaces, delamination in the separators and decoating of graphite particles from the anodes. Analysis of the fracture sequence at the onset of short circuit clearly shows that the number of short-circuited electrode pairs is equal to the number of anode layers adhered with delaminated separator material before fracture occurs. The experimental study in the present paper implies that the inflection point on the force-indentation curve may be an indicator of damage initiation inside pouch cells under indentation.

  1. Microcavitation as a Neuronal Damage Mechanism in Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Christian; Estrada, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a leading cause of injury in the armed forces. Diffuse axonal injury, the hallmark feature of blunt TBI, has been investigated in direct mechanical loading conditions. However, recent evidence suggests inertial cavitation as a possible bTBI mechanism, particularly in the case of exposure to blasts. Cavitation damage to free surfaces has been well-studied, but bubble interactions within confined 3D environments, in particular their stress and strain signatures are not well understood. The structural damage due to cavitation in living tissues - particularly at the cellular level - are incompletely understood, in part due to the rapid bubble formation and deformation strain rates of up to ~ 105-106 s-1. This project aims to characterize material damage in 2D and 3D cell culture environments by utilizing a novel high-speed red-blue diffraction assisted image correlation method at speeds of up to 106 frames per second. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Office of Naval Research (POC: Dr. Tim Bentley).

  2. Mutational strand asymmetries in cancer genomes reveal mechanisms of DNA damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Haradhvala, Nicholas J.; Polak, Paz; Stojanov, Petar; Covington, Kyle R.; Shinbrot, Eve; Hess, Julian; Rheinbay, Esther; Kim, Jaegil; Maruvka, Yosef; Braunstein, Lior Z.; Kamburov, Atanas; Hanawalt, Philip C.; Wheeler, David A.; Koren, Amnon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes constantly shape the somatic genome, leading to immunity, aging, and other diseases. When cancer is the outcome, we are afforded a glimpse into these processes by the clonal expansion of the malignant cell. Here, we characterize a less explored layer of the mutational landscape of cancer: mutational asymmetries between the two DNA strands. Analyzing whole genome sequences of 590 tumors from 14 different cancer types, we reveal widespread asymmetries across mutagenic processes, with transcriptional (“T-class”) asymmetry dominating UV-, smoking-, and liver-cancer-associated mutations, and replicative (“R-class”) asymmetry dominating POLE-, APOBEC-, and MSI-associated mutations. We report a striking phenomenon of Transcription-Coupled Damage (TCD) on the non-transcribed DNA strand, and provide evidence that APOBEC mutagenesis occurs on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication. As more genomes are sequenced, studying and classifying their asymmetries will illuminate the underlying biological mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. PMID:26806129

  3. Simulation of Mechanical Behavior and Damage of a Large Composite Wind Turbine Blade under Critical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarfaoui, M.; Nachtane, M.; Khadimallah, H.; Saifaoui, D.

    2017-07-01

    Issues such as energy generation/transmission and greenhouse gas emissions are the two energy problems we face today. In this context, renewable energy sources are a necessary part of the solution essentially winds power, which is one of the most profitable sources of competition with new fossil energy facilities. This paper present the simulation of mechanical behavior and damage of a 48 m composite wind turbine blade under critical wind loads. The finite element analysis was performed by using ABAQUS code to predict the most critical damage behavior and to apprehend and obtain knowledge of the complex structural behavior of wind turbine blades. The approach developed based on the nonlinear FE analysis using mean values for the material properties and the failure criteria of Tsai-Hill to predict failure modes in large structures and to identify the sensitive zones.

  4. MECHANISMS FOR COUNTERING OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DAMAGE IN RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; O’Mealey, Gary B.; Szweda, Luke I.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence supports that chronic oxidative stress is a primary contributing factor to numerous retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Eyes obtained postmortem from AMD patients have extensive free radical damage to the proteins, lipids, DNA, and mitochondria of their retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In addition, several mouse models of chronic oxidative stress develop many of the pathological hallmarks of AMD. However, the extent to which oxidative stress is an etiologic component versus its involvement in disease progression remains a major unanswered question. Further, whether the primary target of oxidative stress and damage is photoreceptors or RPE cells, or both, is still unclear. In this review, we discuss the major functions of RPE cells with an emphasis on the oxidative challenges these cells encounter and the endogenous antioxidant mechanisms employed to neutralize the deleterious effects that such stresses can elicit if left unchecked. PMID:22878106

  5. Incorporation of the Deshpande-Evans Mechanism-Based Damage Model into the EPIC Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, Timothy

    2011-06-01

    This article presents the incorporation of a mechanism-based failure model into the EPIC code. The model was developed by Deshpande and Evans (DE) and is based on micromechanics and wing-crack theory. The model includes the effects of flaw size, flaw density, fracture toughness, friction, crack shape, and crack growth rate. It is also fully 3-dimensional and covers both compression and tension. This work incorporates the DE model into the Johnson-Holmquist-Beissel (JHB) ceramic model and provides an optional, micromechanical, approach for computing damage. A discussion of the DE damage model including the theory and its incorporation into the JHB model is provided. Computations are also presented for several ballistic impact experiments into 99.5 alumina ceramic including some parametric effects.

  6. The Double-Well Potential in Quantum Mechanics: A Simple, Numerically Exact Formulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelic, V.; Marsiglio, F.

    2012-01-01

    The double-well potential is arguably one of the most important potentials in quantum mechanics, because the solution contains the notion of a state as a linear superposition of "classical" states, a concept which has become very important in quantum information theory. It is therefore desirable to have solutions to simple double-well potentials…

  7. The Double-Well Potential in Quantum Mechanics: A Simple, Numerically Exact Formulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelic, V.; Marsiglio, F.

    2012-01-01

    The double-well potential is arguably one of the most important potentials in quantum mechanics, because the solution contains the notion of a state as a linear superposition of "classical" states, a concept which has become very important in quantum information theory. It is therefore desirable to have solutions to simple double-well potentials…

  8. A possible mechanism for combined arsenic and fluoride induced cellular and DNA damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Flora, Swaran J S; Mittal, Megha; Pachauri, Vidhu; Dwivedi, Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and fluoride are major contaminants of drinking water. Mechanisms of toxicity following individual exposure to arsenic or fluoride are well known. However, it is not explicit how combined exposure to arsenic and fluoride leads to cellular and/or DNA damage. The present study was planned to assess (i) oxidative stress during combined chronic exposure to arsenic and fluoride in drinking water, (ii) correlation of oxidative stress with cellular and DNA damage and (iii) mechanism of cellular damage using IR spectroscopy. Mice were exposed to arsenic and fluoride (50 ppm) either individually or in combination for 28 weeks. Arsenic or fluoride exposure individually led to a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated oxidative stress in blood, liver and brain. Individual exposure to the two toxicants showed significant depletion of blood glutathione (GSH) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity, and single-stranded DNA damage using a comet assay in lymphocytes. We also observed an increase in the activity of ATPase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and a decreased, reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH : GSSG) ratio in the liver and brain. Antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were decreased and increased in liver and brain respectively. The changes were more pronounced in liver compared to brain suggesting liver to be more susceptible to the toxic effects of arsenic and fluoride. Interestingly, combined exposure to arsenic and fluoride resulted in less pronounced toxic effects compared to their individual effects based on biochemical variables, IR spectra, DNA damage (TUNEL and comet assays) and histopathological observations. IR spectra suggested that arsenic or fluoride perturbs the strength of protein and amide groups; however, the shifts in peaks were not pronounced during combined exposure. These results thus highlight the role of

  9. Evaluation of subsurface damage in GaN substrate induced by mechanical polishing with diamond abrasives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, Hideo; Takeda, Hidetoshi; Kim, Seong-Woo; Aota, Natsuko; Koyama, Koji; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Doi, Toshiro

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between the depth of the subsurface damage (SSD) and the size of the diamond abrasive used for mechanical polishing (MP) of GaN substrates was investigated in detail. GaN is categorized as a hard, brittle material, and material removal in MP proceeds principally to the fracture of GaN crystals. Atomic force microscopy and cathodoluminescence imaging revealed that the mechanical processing generated surface scratches and SSD. The SSD depth reduced as the diamond abrasive size reduced. A comparison of the relationship between the SSD depth and the diamond abrasive size used in the MP of GaN with the same relationship for typical brittle materials such as glass substrates suggests that the MP of GaN substrates proceeds via the same mechanism as glass.

  10. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials. PMID:26289729

  11. Chromatin Modifications during Repair of Environmental Exposure-Induced DNA Damage: A Potential Mechanism for Stable Epigenetic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to environmental toxicants and toxins cause epigenetic changes that likely play a role in the development of diseases associated with exposure. The mechanism behind these exposure-induced epigenetic changes is currently unknown. One commonality between most environmental exposures is that they cause DNA damage either directly or through causing an increase in reactive oxygen species, which can damage DNA. Like transcription, DNA damage repair must occur in the context of chromatin requiring both histone modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling. These chromatin changes aid in DNA damage accessibility and signaling. Several proteins and complexes involved in epigenetic silencing during both development and cancer have been found to be localized to sites of DNA damage. The chromatin-based response to DNA damage is considered a transient event, with chromatin being restored to normal as DNA damage repair is completed. However, in individuals chronically exposed to environmental toxicants or with chronic inflammatory disease, repeated DNA damage-induced chromatin rearrangement may ultimately lead to permanent epigenetic alterations. Understanding the mechanism behind exposure-induced epigenetic changes will allow us to develop strategies to prevent or reverse these changes. This review focuses on epigenetic changes and DNA damage induced by environmental exposures, the chromatin changes that occur around sites of DNA damage, and how these transient chromatin changes may lead to heritable epigenetic alterations at sites of chronic exposure. PMID:24259318

  12. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  13. Effect of heat treatments on mechanical properties and damage evolution of thixoformed aluminium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; Cerri, E.; Leo, P.

    2005-07-15

    In the present work, the effects of heat treatments on mechanical properties, microstructure evolution and damage resulting from plastic deformation of thixoformed A319 and A356 aluminium alloys, are studied. The thixoforming process can lead to the production of components that are characterized by very good mechanical properties and low porosity with a globular microstructure which is fine and uniform. The mechanical properties can be further improved through heat treatments such as T5 and T6. The prime factor influencing the damage in the alloys belonging to the Al-Si system is represented by decohesion of silicon particles resulting from the stress concentration at the particle-matrix interfaces. A statistical analysis of fractured particles after tensile tests in the as-cast and as-treated condition has been carried out in the present work; optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques have been used to characterize the microstructure and fracture surfaces of the specimens and the results are fully presented.

  14. Effects of tissue mechanical properties on susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Kim, Yohan; Owens, Gabe; Roberts, William; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive tissue ablation method capable of fractionating tissue by controlling acoustic cavitation. To determine the fractionation susceptibility of various tissues, we investigated histotripsy-induced damage on tissue phantoms and ex vivo tissues with different mechanical strengths. A histotripsy bubble cloud was formed at tissue phantom surfaces using 5-cycle long ultrasound pulses with peak negative pressure of 18 MPa and PRFs of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz. Results showed significantly smaller lesions were generated in tissue phantoms of higher mechanical strength. Histotripsy was also applied to 43 different ex vivo porcine tissues with a wide range of mechanical properties. Gross morphology demonstrated stronger tissues with higher ultimate stress, higher density, and lower water content were more resistant to histotripsy damage in comparison to weaker tissues. Based on these results, a self-limiting vessel-sparing treatment strategy was developed in an attempt to preserve major vessels while fractionating the surrounding target tissue. This strategy was tested in porcine liver in vivo. After treatment, major hepatic blood vessels and bile ducts remained intact within a completely fractionated liver volume. These results identify varying susceptibilities of tissues to histotripsy therapy and provide a rational basis to optimize histotripsy parameters for treatment of specific tissues.

  15. Switch telomerase to ALT mechanism by inducing telomeric DNA damages and dysfunction of ATRX and DAXX.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Laichen; Li, Feng; Jiang, Yuanling; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Wenbin; Zhao, Yong; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2016-08-31

    Activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is necessary for tumours to escape from dysfunctional telomere-mediated senescence. Anti-telomerase drugs might be effective in suppressing tumour growth in approximately 85-90% of telomerase-positive cancer cells. However, there are still chances for these cells to bypass drug treatment after switching to the ALT mechanism to maintain their telomere integrity. But the mechanism underlying this switch is unknown. In this study, we used telomerase-positive cancer cells (HTC75) to discover the mechanism of the telomerase-ALT switch by inducing telomere-specific DNA damage, alpha-thalassemia X-linked syndrome protein (ATRX) knockdown and deletion of death associated protein (DAXX). Surprisingly, two important ALT hallmarks in the ALT-like HTC75 cells were observed after treatments: ALT-associated promyelocytic leukaemia bodies (APBs) and extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats. Moreover, knocking out hTERT by utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 technique led to telomere elongation in a telomerase-independent manner in ALT-like HTC75 cells. In summary, this is the first report to show that inducing telomeric DNA damage, disrupting the ATRX/DAXX complex and inhibiting telomerase activity in telomerase-positive cancer cells lead to the ALT switch.

  16. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites: Plasticity and damage mechanisms, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms for the SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-15-3 system were studied at 538 C (1000 F) using a combination of mechanical measurements and detailed microstructural examinations. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall MMC response, and to compare the room temperature and elevated temperature deformation behaviors. Four different laminates were studied: (0)8, (90)8,(+ or -45)2s, and (0/90)2s, with the primary emphasis on the unidirectional (0)8, and (90)8 systems. The elevated temperature responses were similar to those at room temperature, involving a two-stage elastic-plastic type of response for the (0)8 system, and a characteristic three-stage deformation response for the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s systems. The primary effects of elevated temperatures included: (1) reduction in the 'yield' and failure strengths; (2) plasticity through diffused slip rather than concentrated planar slip (which occurred at room temperature); and (3) time-dependent deformation. The inelastic deformation mechanism for the (0)8 MMC was dominated by plasticity at both temperatures. For the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s MMCs, a combination of damage and plasticity contributed to the deformation at both temperatures.

  17. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  18. Molecular mechanisms for uremic toxin-induced oxidative tissue damage via a cardiovascular-renal connection.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), marked by a progressive loss in renal function, is a leading cause of hemodialysis initiation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). There are currently 13.3 million patients with CKD and 300 thousand patients are currently undergoing hemodialysis in Japan. Therefore, preventing the initiation of dialysis and reducing the risk of cardiovascular death are high-priority issues from the viewpoint of public health and economic implications. Understanding the molecular mechanism responsible for the progression of CKD and cardiovascular damage regarding crosstalk between the kidney and cardiovascular system is an important issue in controlling the pathogenesis of CKD-CVD. However, the mechanisms involved in CKD-CVD are not well understood. This hinders the development of new treatment strategies. We have been investigating the role of protein bound uremic toxins, that are difficult to remove by hemodialysis, on the onset and progression of CKD and CVD. The relationship between their redox properties and the pathogenesis of CKD-CVD was examined. In this review, we focus on two sulfate conjugated uremic toxins, namely, indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (PCS), and summarize recent studies that provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms responsible for uremic toxin-induced oxidative tissue damage via a cardiovascular-renal connection.

  19. Molecular and sensory mechanisms to mitigate sunlight-induced DNA damage in treefrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André P; Lipinski, Victor M; Santos, Mauricio B; Santos, Caroline P; Jardim, Sinara S; Cechin, Sonia Z; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2015-10-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been proposed as an environmental stressor, which may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations worldwide. Despite growing knowledge regarding the UV-induced biological effects in several amphibian models, little is known about the efficacy of DNA repair pathways. In addition, little attention has been given to the interplay between these molecular mechanisms with other physiological strategies that avoid the damage induced by sunlight. Here, DNA lesions induced by environmental doses of solar UVB and UVA radiation were detected in genomic DNA samples of treefrog tadpoles (Hypsiboas pulchellus) and their DNA repair activity was evaluated. These data were complemented by monitoring the induction of apoptosis in blood cells and tadpole survival. Furthermore, the tadpoles' ability to perceive and escape from UV wavelengths was evaluated as an additional strategy of photoprotection. The results show that tadpoles are very sensitive to UVB light, which could be explained by the slow DNA repair rates for both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6,4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6,4PPs). However, they were resistant to UVA, probably as a result of the activation of photolyases during UVA irradiation. Surprisingly, a sensory mechanism that triggers their escape from UVB and UVA light avoids the generation of DNA damage and helps to maintain the genomic integrity. This work demonstrates the genotoxic impact of both UVB and UVA radiation on tadpoles and emphasizes the importance of the interplay between molecular and sensory mechanisms to minimize the damage caused by sunlight. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Micro-mechanical modelling of mechanical and electrical properties in homogeneous piezoelectric ceramic by using boundary integral formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biglar, M.; Stachowicz, F.; Trzepiecinski, T.; Gromada, M.

    2017-02-01

    Recent experiments on polycrystalline materials show that microcrystalline materials have a strong dependency ona grain size. In this study, mechanical and electrical properties of polycrystalline materials in micro level were studied by using averaging theorems. To completely understand the size-dependency of polycrystalline materials, an integral non-local approach that can predict the stress-strain relations for these materials was presented. In microcrystalline materials, crystalline and grain-boundary were considered as two separate phases. Mechanical properties of the crystalline phase were modelled using crystalline brittle material and is composed of randomly distributed and orientated single crystal anisotropic elastic grains. For microcrystalline materials, the surface-to-volume ratio of the grain boundaries is low enough to ignore its contribution to the elastic deformation. Therefore, the grain boundary phase was not considered in microcrystalline materials and mechanical properties of the crystalline phase were modelled using appropriate integral non-local approach. Finally, the constitutive equations for polycrystalline materials were implemented into a boundary integral equation and the results and some examples are provided for piezoelectric ceramic.

  1. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  2. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  3. Formulation of the information capacity of the optical-mechanical line-scan imaging process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Park, S. K.

    1975-01-01

    An expression for the information capacity of the optical-mechanical line-scan imaging process is derived which includes the effects of blurring of spatial, photosensor noise, aliasing, and quantization. Both the information capacity for a fixed data density and the information efficiency (the ratio of information capacity to data density) exhibit a distinct single maximum when displayed as a function of sampling rate, and the location of this maximum was determined by the system frequency-response shape, signal-to-noise ratio, and quantization interval.

  4. Mechanisms of radiation damage to Sc/Si multilayer mirrors under EUV laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershyn, Y. P.; Zubarev, E. N.; Voronov, D. L.; Sevryukova, V. A.; Kondratenko, V. V.; Vaschenko, G.; Grisham, M.; Menoni, C. S.; Rocca, J. J.; Artioukov, I. A.; Uspenskii, Y. A.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2009-06-01

    Specific structural changes in Sc/Si multilayer mirrors irradiated with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser single pulses (λ = 46.9 nm) at near damage threshold fluences (0.04-0.23 J cm-2) are analysed. We have identified melting of surface layers as the basic degradation mechanism for the mirrors. Both heat generation during silicide formation and low heat conduction of the layered system significantly decreases the degradation threshold of Sc/Si multilayer mirrors compared with bulk materials. The results are relevant to the use of the multilayer mirrors for shaping and directing the intense beams produced by the new generation of coherent EUV sources.

  5. A Possible Cumulative Shear Mechanism For Tissue Damage Initiation In SWL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan B.

    2007-04-01

    In shock-wave lithotripsy, inertial cavitation is observed in kidney tissue after hundreds of shocks are delivered, which seems to correspond with the onset of wide-spread injury. However, it is unclear what initiates the process. It is possible, and has been suggested before, that hemorrhage is a prelude to cavitation damage. We investigate the possibility that the net shear of multiple shocks can accumulate to cause this initial hemorrhage. A mathematical model is used to show that the larger interstitial volume fraction in the medulla toward the papilla tip would make it particularly sensitive there to this mechanism. This is consistent with observations.

  6. Mechanism and Site of Attack for Direct Damage to DNA by Low-Energy Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, X.; Sanche, L.

    2005-05-20

    We report results on the desorption of OH{sup -} induced by 0-19 eV electrons incident on self-assembled monolayer films made of single and double DNA strands of different orientations with respect to a gold substrate. Such measurements make it possible to deduce the mechanism and site of OH{sup -} formation within a biomolecule as complex as DNA. This type of damage is attributed to dissociative electron attachment to the phosphate group of DNA, when it contains the counterion H{sup +}.

  7. Synthesis of a novel photopolymerized nanocomposite hydrogel for the treatment of acute mechanical damage to cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Kathryn; Copeland-Johnson, Trishelle; Goodman, Matthew; Lipert, Robert; McKinley, Todd; Martin, James; Mallapragada, Surya; Lin, Zhiqun

    2011-03-01

    Posttraumatic osteoarthritis is caused by a cascade of pathobiologic and pathomechanical events starting with intraarticular fractures in the cartilage. Currently, treatment of fractures is completely focused on restoration of the macroanatomy of the joint. The premise is that restoring the macroanatomy will prevent ongoing stresses and in turn prevent cartilage degeneration. However, current treatment ignores acute mechanical damage sustained by cartilage at the time of injury. This study describes the initial development of a novel nanocomposite photopolymerizing copolymer that has potential to restore local structural integrity to acutely injured cartilage, and subsequently act as a carrier for chondrocyte-enhancing bioactive agents.

  8. Failure mechanism analysis of electromigration dominated damage in TiSi2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chen-Xia; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Xin-Zheng; Song, Xue-Feng; Yu, Da-Peng

    2009-06-01

    Electromigration-induced damage has been an important concern in very large scale integrated circuit design for a long time and will be a major road block in the pursuit of nanoelectronics devices and next generation power electronics. In this letter, the failure mechanism analysis on two-terminal TiSi2 nanowire devices was reported. Electromigration dominant mass migration is observed and verified by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The contribution of thermomigration is discussed based on temperature simulation. This work provides useful reference for future devices and the failure analysis on nanostructures.

  9. Mechanism of cross-sectoral coordination between nature protection and forestry in the Natura 2000 formulation process in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Sarvašová, Zuzana; Sálka, Jaroslav; Dobšinská, Zuzana

    2013-09-01

    Nature protection as a policy sector is not isolated and is directly or indirectly influenced by many other sectors (e.g. forestry, water management, rural development, energy, etc.). These policy sectors are neither completely segmented nor unaffected by the decisions taken in other policy sectors. Policy formulation in nature protection is therefore also influenced by different sectors. For that reason it is inevitable to stress the need for inter-sectoral coordination to assure their policy coherence. The aim of this article is to describe the mechanism and modes of cross-sectoral coordination and to analyze the relevant actors and their interaction, using the case of the Natura 2000 formulation process in Slovakia. The European Union (EU) set up an ecological network of special protected areas, known as Natura 2000 to ensure biodiversity by conserving natural habitats and wild fauna and flora in the territory of the Member States. An optimized nature protection must therefore carefully consider existing limits and crossdisciplinary relationships at the EU, national and regional levels. The relations between forestry and biodiversity protection are analyzed using the advocacy coalition framework (ACF). The ACF is used for analyzing how two coalitions, in this case ecological and forest owners' coalitions, advocate or pursue their beliefs from the nature protection and forestry policy field. The whole process is illustrated at the regional scale on the case study of Natura 2000 sites formulation in the Slovak Republic. For better reliability and validity of research, a combination of various empiric research methods was used, supported by existing theories. So called triangulation of sociological research or triangulation of methods consists of mutual results testing of individual methodological steps through identifying corresponding political-science theories, assessing their formal points using primary and secondary document analysis and assessing their

  10. Mechanics and mechanisms of surface damage in Al-Si alloys under ultra-mild wear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming

    Al-Si alloys intended for use in engine components must operate under ultra-mild wear (UMW) conditions to fit an acceptable amount of wear during a typical vehicle life. This study simulated surface damage in a UMW regime on five chemically etched Al-Si alloy surfaces using a pin-on-disc tribometer at low loads (0.5-2.0 N) under boundary lubricated conditions. The five alloys contained 11 to 25 wt.% Si and differed in matrix hardness, silicon particle morphology, and size. The mechanisms leading to the UMW damage and the role that the matrix hardness and microstructure play on said mechanisms were studied. Quantitative measurement methods based on statistical analysis of particle height changes and material loss from elevated aluminum using a profilometer technique were developed and used to assess UMW. The Greenwood and Tripp's numerical model was adapted to analyze the contact that occurred between Al-Si alloys with silicon particles protruding above the aluminum and steel balls. The estimation of the real contact pressure applied to the silicon particles was used to rationalize the damage mechanisms. The UMW mechanisms consisted of (i) abrasive wear on the top of the silicon particle surfaces; (ii) sinking-in of the silicon particles; (iii) piling-up of the aluminium around sunken-in particles and (vi) wear of the aluminium by the counterface, which eventually led to the initiation of UMW-II. Increasing the size or areal density of silicon particles with small aspect ratios delayed the onset of UMW-II by providing resistance against the silicon particles sinking-in and the aluminum piling-up. The UMW wear rates, however, began to decrease after long sliding cycles once an oil residue layer supported by hardened ultra-fine subsurface grains formed on the deformed aluminium matrix. The layer formation depended on the microstructure and applied load. Overall experimental observations suggested that Al-11% Si with small silicon particles exhibited optimal long

  11. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    The present study investigates interfacial damage mechanism of modular implants due to synergetic action of mechanical contact loading and corrosion. Modular implants are manufactured such that surfaces have a characteristic degree of roughness determined by tool tip size and motion of tool path or feeding speed. The central hypothesis for this work is that during contact loading of metallic implants, mechanisms of damage and dissolution are determined by contact loads, plastic deformation, residual stresses and environmental conditions at the nanoscale surface asperities; while during subsequent rest periods, mechanism of metallic dissolution is determined by the environmental conditions and residual stress field induced due to long range elastic interactions of the plastically deformed asperities. First part of the thesis is focused on investigating the mechanisms underlying surface roughness evolution due to stress-assisted dissolution during the rest period. The latter part is focused on investigating material removal mechanisms during single asperity contact of implant surfaces. Experimental study was performed to elucidate the roughness evolution mechanism by combined effect of multi-asperity contact and environmental corrosion. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum specimen was subjected to either contact loading alone or alternating contact loading and exposure to reactive environment. Roughness of the specimen surface was monitored by optical profilometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation was used to characterize the evolving behavior of roughness modes. Finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to identify influences of surface morphological configurations and contact pressures on the residual stress development. Analytical model of multi-asperity contact has been developed for prediction of residual stress field for different roughness configurations during varying magnitude of contact loads based on elastic inclusion theory. Experimental results

  12. Molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition for mammalian nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    For faithful DNA repair, it is crucial for cells to locate lesions precisely within the vast genome. In the mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, this difficult task is accomplished through multiple steps, in which the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex plays a central role. XPC senses the presence of oscillating 'normal' bases in the DNA duplex, and its binding properties contribute to the extremely broad substrate specificity of NER. Unlike XPC, which acts as a versatile sensor of DNA helical distortion, the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) is more specialized, recognizing UV-induced photolesions and facilitating recruitment of XPC. Recent single-molecule analyses and structural studies have advanced our understanding of how UV-DDB finds its targets, particularly in the context of chromatin. After XPC binds DNA, it is necessary to verify the presence of damage in order to avoid potentially deleterious incisions at damage-free sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that XPA and the helicase activity of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) cooperate to verify abnormalities in DNA chemistry. This chapter reviews recent findings about the mechanisms underlying the efficiency, versatility, and accuracy of NER. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of DNA damage by photoexcited 9-methyl-β-carbolines.

    PubMed

    Vignoni, Mariana; Rasse-Suriani, Federico A O; Butzbach, Kathrin; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Epe, Bernd; Cabrerizo, Franco M

    2013-08-28

    It has been well documented that β-carboline alkaloids, particularly the 9-methyl derivatives, are efficient photosensitizers. However, structure-activity relationships are missing and the photochemical mechanisms involved in the DNA photodamage still remain unknown. In the present work, we examined the capability of three 9-methyl-β-carbolines (9-methyl-norharmane, 9-methyl-harmane and 9-methyl-harmine) to induce DNA damage upon UVA excitation at physiological pH. The type and extent of the damage was analyzed together with the photophysical and binding properties of the β-carboline derivatives investigated. The results indicate that even at neutral pH most of the DNA damage is generated from the protonated form of the excited β-carbolines in a type-I reaction. Oxidized purine residues are produced in high excess over oxidized pyrimidines, single-strand breaks and sites of base loss. In addition, the excited neutral form of the β-carbolines is responsible for significant generation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) by triplet-triplet-energy transfer. In the case of 9-methyl-norharmane, the yield of CPDs is increased in D2O, probably due to less rapid protonation in the deuterated solvent.

  14. Recurrent Initiation: A Mechanism for Triggering p53 Pulses in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Eric; Mock, Caroline; Bhan, Irun; Loewer, Alexander; Lahav, Galit

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage initiates a series of p53 pulses. Although much is known about the interactions surrounding p53, little is known about which interactions contribute to p53’s dynamical behavior. The simplest explanation is that these pulses are oscillations intrinsic to the p53/Mdm2 negative feedback loop. Here we present evidence that this simple mechanism is insufficient to explain p53 pulses; we show that p53 pulses are externally driven by pulses in the upstream signaling kinases, ATM and Chk2, and that the negative feedback between p53 and ATM, via Wip1, is essential for maintaining the uniform shape of p53 pulses. We propose that p53 pulses result from repeated initiation by ATM which is re-activated by persistent DNA damage. Our study emphasizes the importance of collecting quantitative dynamic information at high temporal resolution for understanding the regulation of signaling pathways and opens new ways to manipulate p53 pulses to ask questions about their function in response to DNA damage. PMID:18471974

  15. ANALYSES OF VARIOUS DAMAGE MECHANISMS IN TRANSPARENT ARMOR SUBJECT TO PROJECTILE IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2009-01-23

    Design and manufacturing of transparent armor have been historically carried out using experimental approaches. In this study, we use advanced computational modeling tools to study the various stress components during the impact event and to identify the different crack/damage driving mechanisms for the different cracking patterns. Experimentally observed damage patterns for a thick glass laminate under fragmentation simulation projectile (FSP) impact are used to compare with the modeling results. AHPCRC developed modeling software EPIC’06 [1] is used in predicting the penetration resistance of transparent armor systems. It is found that a 1-parameter single state model can be used to predict the impact penetration depth with relatively good accuracy. In addition, hoop stress and circumferential stresses are found to produce ripple cracks, needle cracks and radial cracks. It is also found that a region of high hoop stress and circumferential stress is produced by the impact at the back side of the target plate, causing the floret damage region possibly leading to higher penetration depth for thinner laminates or higher velocity impact.

  16. Newly identified precipitating factors in mechanical ventilation-induced brain damage: implications for treating ICU delirium.

    PubMed

    González-López, Adrián; Albaiceta, Guillermo M; Talbot, Konrad

    2014-06-01

    Delirium is 1.5 to 4.1 times as likely in intensive care unit patients when they are mechanically ventilated. While progress in treatment has occurred, delirium is still a major problem in mechanically ventilated patients. Based on studies of a murine mechanical ventilation model, we summarize evidence here for a novel mechanism by which such ventilation can quickly initiate brain damage likely to cause cognitive deficits expressed as delirium. That mechanism consists of aberrant vagal sensory input driving sustained dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) signaling in the hippocampal formation, which induces apoptosis in that brain area within 90 min without causing hypoxia, oxidative stress, or inflammatory responses. This argues for minimizing the duration and tidal volumes of mechanical ventilation and for more effectively reducing sustained D2R signaling than achieved with haloperidol alone. The latter might be accomplished by reducing D2R cell surface expression and D2R-mediated Akt inhibition by elevating protein expression of dysbindin-1C.

  17. Anisotropic mechanical properties of zircon and the effect of radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Bismayer, Ulrich; Boatner, Lynn A.; Isaacson, Scott G.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2016-10-01

    This study provides new insights into the relationship between radiation-dose-dependent structural damage due to natural U and Th impurities and the anisotropic mechanical properties (Poisson's ratio, elastic modulus and hardness) of zircon. Natural zircon samples from Sri Lanka (see Muarakami et al. in Am Mineral 76:1510-1532, 1991) and synthetic samples, covering a dose range of zero up to 6.8 × 1018 α-decays/g, have been studied by nanoindentation. Measurements along the [100] crystallographic direction and calculations, based on elastic stiffness constants determined by Özkan (J Appl Phys 47:4772-4779, 1976), revealed a general radiation-induced decrease in stiffness (~54 %) and hardness (~48 %) and an increase in the Poisson's ratio (~54 %) with increasing dose. Additional indentations on selected samples along the [001] allowed one to follow the amorphization process to the point that the mechanical properties are isotropic. This work shows that the radiation-dose-dependent changes of the mechanical properties of zircon can be directly correlated with the amorphous fraction as determined by previous investigations with local and global probes (Ríos et al. in J Phys Condens Matter 12:2401-2412, 2000a; Farnan and Salje in J Appl Phys 89:2084-2090, 2001; Zhang and Salje in J Phys Condens Matter 13:3057-3071, 2001). The excellent agreement, revealed by the different methods, indicates a large influence of structural and even local phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical properties. Therefore, this study indicates the importance of acquiring better knowledge about the mechanical long-term stability of radiation-damaged materials.

  18. Edible films and coatings from whey proteins: a review on formulation, and on mechanical and bioactive properties.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Oscar L; Fernandes, João C; Silva, Sara I; Pintado, Manuela E; Malcata, F Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The latest decade has witnessed joint efforts by the packaging and the food industries to reduce the amount of residues and wastes associated with food consumption. The recent increase in environmental awareness has also contributed toward development of edible packaging materials. Viable edible films and coatings have been successfully produced from whey proteins; their ability to serve other functions, viz. carrier of antimicrobials, antioxidants, or other nutraceuticals, without significantly compromising the desirable primary barrier and mechanical properties as packaging films, will add value for eventual commercial applications. These points are tackled in this review, in a critical manner. The supply of whey protein-based films and coatings, formulated to specifically address end-user needs, is also considered.

  19. Characterization of damage mechanisms associated with reference point indentation in human bone.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bryan G; Kennedy, Oran D

    2015-06-01

    Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) is the clinical gold standard in cases of compromised skeletal integrity, such as with osteoporosis. While BMD is a useful measurement to index skeletal health, it is also limited since it cannot directly assess any mechanical properties. The ability to directly assess mechanical properties of bone tissue would be clinically important. Reference point indentation (RPI) is a technology that has been designed to try and achieve this goal. While RPI has been shown to detect altered bone tissue properties, the underlying physical mechanism of these measurements has not been characterized. Thus, we designed a study whereby the contribution of (1) test cycle number and (2) test load level to RPI test-induced sub-surface damage was characterized and quantified. Standardized specimens were prepared from cadaveric human tibiae (n=6), such that 12 replicates of each testing condition could be carried out. A custom rig was fabricated to accurately position and map indentation sites. One set of tests was carried out with 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles (Max Load: 8 N, Freq: 2 Hz), and a second set of tests was carried out with Load levels of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 N (Cycle number: 20, Freq: 2 Hz). The RPI parameter Loading Slope (LS) was cycle dependent at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles (p<0.05). First Cycle Indentation Distance (ID 1st), Total Indentation Distance (TID), Mean Energy Dissipation (ED), First Cycle Unloading Slope (US 1st), Mean Unloading Slope (US) and LS were significantly different at 6, 8 and 10 N compared to 2 N (p<0.05). From the histomorphometric measurements, damage zone span was significantly different after 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles compared with 1 cycle while indent profile width and indent profile depth were significantly different at 10, 15 and 20 cycles (p<0.05). With the load varying protocol, each of these parameters differed significantly at each increased load level (4, 6, 8, 10 N) compared with the basal level of 2 N (p<0

  20. Characterization of HTPB-based solid fuel formulations: Performance, mechanical properties, and pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, L. T.; Galfetti, L.; Maggi, F.; Colombo, G.; Merotto, L.; Boiocchi, M.; Paravan, C.; Reina, A.; Tadini, P.; Fanton, L.

    2013-12-01

    Features such as safety, low-cost, and throttleability make hybrid rocket engines an attractive option for suborbital flights and space exploration missions in general. While the domain of possible liquid oxidizers is well characterized, the choice of a suitable solid fuel is still a matter of investigation. Space Propulsion Laboratory (SPLab) at Politecnico di Milano has developed a series of proprietary techniques to evaluate, on a relative grading, the quality of innovative solid fuels while visualizing at the same time their flame structure. But a serious alert was recently notified that soot emission from hydrocarbon fuels has the potential to contribute to global climate change. In this paper, HTPB polymer has been taken as baseline and characterized at laboratory level in terms of ballistic properties, mechanical testing, and thermochemical calculations.

  1. Mechanisms underpinning protection against eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage by ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexander; Behringer, Michael; Nosaka, Kazunori; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Mayer, Constantin; Zilkens, Christoph; Schumann, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Eccentric exercise training is effective for increasing muscle mass and strength, and improving insulin sensitivity and blood lipid profiles. However, potential muscle damage symptoms such as prolonged loss of muscle function and delayed onset of muscle soreness may restrict the use of eccentric exercise, especially in clinical populations. Therefore, strategies to reduce eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) are necessary, and an extensive number of scientific studies have tried to identify potential intervention modalities to perform eccentric exercises without adverse effects. The present paper is based on a narrative review of current literature, and provides a novel hypothesis by which an ischemic preconditioning (IPC) of the extremities may reduce EIMD. IPC consists of an intermittent application of short-time non-lethal ischemia to an extremity (e.g. using a tourniquet) followed by reperfusion and was discovered in clinical settings in an attempt to minimize inflammatory responses induced by ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion-injury (I/R-Injury) during surgery. The present hypothesis is based on morphological and biochemical similarities in the pathophysiology of skeletal muscle damage during clinical surgery and EIMD. Even though the primary origin of stress differs between I/R-Injury and EIMD, subsequent cellular alterations characterized by an intracellular accumulation of Ca(2+), an increased production of reactive oxygen species or increased apoptotic signaling are essential elements for both. Moreover, the incipient immune response appears to be similar in I/R-Injury and EIMD, which is indicated by an infiltration of leukocytes into the damaged soft-tissue. Thus far, IPC is considered as a potential intervention strategy in the area of cardiovascular or orthopedic surgery and provides significant impact on soft-tissue protection and downregulation of undesired excessive inflammation induced by I/R-Injury. Based on the known major impact of IPC

  2. Mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced in the developing brain of mice and rats by DNA-damaging chemicals.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    It is not widely known how the developing brain responds to extrinsic damage, although the developing brain is considered to be sensitive to diverse environmental factors including DNA-damaging agents. This paper reviews the mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced in the developing brain of mice and rats by six chemicals (ethylnitrosourea, hydroxyurea, 5-azacytidine, cytosine arabinoside, 6-mercaptopurine and etoposide), which cause DNA damage in different ways, especially from the viewpoints of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in neural progenitor cells. In addition, this paper also reviews the repair process following damage in the developing brain.

  3. Electron irradiation-induced change of structure and damage mechanisms in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Qun; Li, Xing-Ji; Liu, Chao-Ming; Ma, Guo-Liang; Gao, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Owing to their unique structure and excellent electrical property, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as an ideal candidate for making future electronic components have great application potentiality. In order to meet the requirements for space application in electronic components, it is necessary to study structural changes and damage mechanisms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), caused by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons. In the paper, the changes of structure and damage mechanisms in the irradiated MWCNTs, induced by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons, are investigated. The changes in surface morphology and structure of the irradiated MWCNT film are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. It is found that the MWCNTs show different behaviors in structural changes after 70 and 110 keV electron irradiation due to different damage mechanisms. SEM results reveal that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons does not change surface morphology of the MWCNT film, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons with a high fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 leads to evident morphological changes, such as the formation of a rough surface, the entanglement of nanotubes and the shrinkage of nanotubes. Based on Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and XRD analyses, it is confirmed that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons increases the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and disorders their structure through electronic excitations and ionization effects, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons obviously reduces the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and improves their graphitic order through knock-on atom displacements. The improvement of the irradiated MWCNTs by 110 keV electrons is attributed to the restructuring of defect sites induced by knock-on atom displacements. EPR spectroscopic analyses reveal that the MWCNTs exposed

  4. Coupled hydro-mechanical properties of Cobourg limestone with special reference to excavation damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, Mohammad H.; Sehizadeh, Mahdi; Ye, Sheng; Su, Grant; Nguyen, Son; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Argillaceous rock formations being considered as potential host or cap rocks for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes are usually characterized by the presence of bedding planes, resulting in anisotropy of their strength and deformation properties. A laboratory experimental program was performed at the Rock Fracture Dynamics Facility at the University of Toronto to determine the coupled hydro-mechanical properties of the Cobourg limestone with special reference to its potential for damage. The program consists of triaxial tests with measurement of permeability using the pulse decay method and measurement of the seismic wave velocity at different stress levels. The tests were carried out on specimens parallel and perpendicular to the foliation planes within a geophysical imaging cell under different stress levels up to and beyond their peak strength. The specimens are characterized by random and irregular clay pockets and discontinuous argillaceous weak layers. Permeability of the specimens was measured with the pulse decay method under different pre - and post- failure deviatoric stresses. The specimens tested parallel to foliation planes show higher triaxial compressive strengths and higher axial strains at failure in comparison to the specimens tested perpendicular to the foliation planes. The permeability (k) values measured under different stress levels for all specimens show a consistent trend. The k value decreases with the stress increase at the beginning due to the closure of pre-existing fissures and beddings. The k value then increases continuously with the increase in the stress level with highest k values obtained at the post-failure stage. The evolution of the compressional and shear-wave velocities and shear wave splitting as a function of the axial stress is compatible with preferably oriented weak planes and with the evolution of the hydro-mechanical properties of the Cobourg limestone. From the test results, it can be interpreted that at

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of Lipid Mesophase Structural Changes Induced by Pressure and X-Radiation Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Anchi

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of structural changes occurring in phase transformations in liquid crystalline phases of hydrated lipids were studied using synchrotron -based time-resolved x-ray diffraction. Pressure-induced phase transitions. An experimental arrangement for studying hydrated lipid phase transitions under pressures up to 1800 bar and at temperatures up to 90^circC was developed. It was capable of performing both transient (pressure-jump) and stationary (pressure oscillation) relaxation kinetic measurements. The observables included x-ray diffraction and in-sample pressure and temperature. The setup was evaluated and used for studying the chain order/disorder transition in the lamellar phases of hydrated lipids. The lamellar gel (L_{beta '})-to-lamellar liquid crystalline (L_alpha) transition in hydrated 1,2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine was studied by constructing its pressure-temperature phase diagram in the range of 1 to 1200 bar and 65 to 90 ^ circC and using large amplitude (400 to 1300 bars) pressure-jumps. The phase diagram provided the phase boundary locations as well as the equilibrium thermomechanical properties of the material. The P-jumps showed that the limiting transit time of the L_{beta '}-to-L_alpha transition was ca. 1 s, while that of the reverse transition was <=q50 ms. Also observed was that the lipid responded rapidly to the P-jump in the L_{beta'} phase up to the rate-determining L_{ beta'}-to-Lalpha transition. Analysis of the structure response spectra for the main transition of hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero -3-phosphocholine and monoelaidin shows that the transition mechanism is consistent with the Avrami-Kolmogorov model with an effective growth dimensionality of ca. 1. A layer -by-layer transition mechanism was proposed. Results of the thermal response have been evaluated. X-Radiation damage induced structural and phase changes. The use of intense synchrotron x-radiation is limited by sample radiation

  6. Damage-Resistant Composites Using Electrospun Nanofibers: A Multiscale Analysis of the Toughening Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Daelemans, Lode; van der Heijden, Sam; De Baere, Ives; Rahier, Hubert; Van Paepegem, Wim; De Clerck, Karen

    2016-05-11

    Today, fiber-reinforced polymer composites are a standard material in applications where a high stiffness and strength are required at minimal weight, such as aerospace structures, ultralight vehicles, or even flywheels for highly efficient power storage systems. Although fiber-reinforced polymer composites show many advantages compared to other materials, delamination between reinforcing plies remains a major problem limiting further breakthrough. Traditional solutions that have been proposed to toughen the interlaminar region between reinforcing plies have already reached their limit or have important disadvantages such as a high cost or the need for adapted production processes. Recently, electrospun nanofibers have been suggested as a more viable interlaminar toughening method. Although the expected benefits are numerous, the research on composite laminates enhanced with electrospun nanofibrous veils is still very limited. The work that has been done so far is almost exclusively focused on interlaminar fracture toughness tests with different kinds of nanofibers, where typically a trial and error approach has been used. A thorough understanding of the micromechanical fracture mechanisms and the parameters to obtain toughened composites has not been reported as of yet, but it is crucial to advance the research and design highly damage-resistant composites. This article provides such insight by analyzing the nanofiber toughening effect on three different levels for several nanofiber types. Only by combining the results from different levels, a thorough understanding can be obtained. These levels correspond to the hierarchical nature of a composite: the laminate, the interlaminar region, and the matrix resin. It is found that each level corresponds to certain mechanisms that result in a toughening effect. The bridging of microcracks by electrospun nanofibers is the main toughening mechanism resulting in damage resistance. Nevertheless, the way in which the

  7. γ-Ray irradiation stability and damage mechanism of glycidyl amine epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Feiyu; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yujian; Fang, Jun; Luan, Weilin

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation stability of triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP) epoxy resins was evaluated according to the changes of physico-chemical and mechanical properties under 60Co γ-ray irradiation with a dose rate of 10 kGy/h. The result shows that with the increase of radiation dose, bending strength, thermal stability, free radical concentration and storage modulus of epoxy resin decrease first, then increase slightly, and decline sharply at the end with a dose of 960 kGy, due to competition effects between radiation-induced degradation and cross-linking reaction. The damage mechanism was derived by analyzing structure and composition change of AFG-90 resins after irradiation via IR and XPS. Irradiation will result in weak bond breaking such as Csbnd C and Csbnd N bond, and new bond forming like Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O.

  8. Mechanisms of Damage to DNA Labeled with Electrophilic Nucleobases Induced by Ionizing or UV Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rak, Janusz; Chomicz, Lidia; Wiczk, Justyna; Westphal, Kinga; Zdrowowicz, Magdalena; Wityk, Paweł; Żyndul, Michał; Makurat, Samanta; Golon, Łukasz

    2015-07-02

    Hypoxia--a hallmark of solid tumors--makes hypoxic cells radioresistant. On the other hand, DNA, the main target of anticancer therapy, is not sensitive to the near UV photons and hydrated electrons, one of the major products of water radiolysis under hypoxic conditions. A possible way to overcome these obstacles to the efficient radio- and photodynamic therapy of cancer is to sensitize the cellular DNA to electrons and/or ultraviolet radiation. While incorporated into genomic DNA, modified nucleosides, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in particular, sensitize cells to both near-ultraviolet photons and γ rays. It is believed that, in both sensitization modes, the reactive nucleobase radical is formed as a primary product which swiftly stabilizes, leading to serious DNA damage, like strand breaks or cross-links. However, despite the apparent similarity, such radio- and photosensitization of DNA seems to be ruled by fundamentally different mechanisms. In this review, we demonstrate that the most important factors deciding on radiodamage to the labeled DNA are (i) the electron affinity (EA) of modified nucleoside (mNZ), (ii) the local surroundings of the label that significantly influences the EA of mNZ, and (iii) the strength of the chemical bond holding together the substituent and a nucleobase. On the other hand, we show that the UV damage to sensitized DNA is governed by long-range photoinduced electron transfer, the efficiency of which is controlled by local DNA sequences. A critical review of the literature mechanisms concerning both types of damage to the labeled biopolymer is presented. Ultimately, the perspectives of studies on DNA sensitization in the context of cancer therapy are discussed.

  9. Causes of excitation-induced muscle cell damage in isometric contractions: mechanical stress or calcium overload?

    PubMed

    Fredsted, Anne; Gissel, Hanne; Madsen, Klavs; Clausen, Torben

    2007-06-01

    Prolonged or unaccustomed exercise leads to muscle cell membrane damage, detectable as release of the intracellular enzyme lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH). This is correlated to excitation-induced influx of Ca2+, but it cannot be excluded that mechanical stress contributes to the damage. We here explore this question using N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS), which specifically blocks muscle contraction. Extensor digitorum longus muscles were prepared from 4-wk-old rats and mounted on holders for isometric contractions. Muscles were stimulated intermittently at 40 Hz for 15-60 min or exposed to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Electrical stimulation increased 45Ca influx 3-5 fold. This was followed by a progressive release of LDH, which was correlated to the influx of Ca2+. BTS (50 microM) caused a 90% inhibition of contractile force but had no effect on the excitation-induced 45Ca influx. After stimulation, ATP and creatine phosphate levels were higher in BTS-treated muscles, most likely due to the cessation of ATP-utilization for cross-bridge cycling, indicating a better energy status of these muscles. No release of LDH was observed in BTS-treated muscles. However, when exposed to anoxia, electrical stimulation caused a marked increase in LDH release that was not suppressed by BTS but associated with a decrease in the content of ATP. Dynamic passive stretching caused no increase in muscle Ca2+ content and only a minor release of LDH, whereas treatment with A23187 markedly increased LDH release both in control and BTS-treated muscles. In conclusion, after isometric contractions, muscle cell membrane damage depends on Ca2+ influx and energy status and not on mechanical stress.

  10. A constitutive formulation of arterial mechanics including vascular smooth muscle tone.

    PubMed

    Zulliger, Martin A; Rachev, Alexander; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2004-09-01

    A pseudo-strain energy function (pseudo-SEF) describing the biomechanical properties of large conduit arteries under the influence of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) tone is proposed. In contrast to previous models that include the effects of smooth muscle contraction through generation of an active stress, in this study we consider the vascular muscle as a structural element whose contribution to load bearing is modulated by the contraction. This novel pseudo-SEF models not only arterial mechanics at maximal VSM contraction but also the myogenic contraction of the VSM in response to local increases in stretch. The proposed pseudo-SEF was verified with experimentally obtained pressure-radius curves and zero-stress state configurations from rat carotid arteries displaying distinct differences in VSM tone: arteries from normotensive rats displaying minimal VSM tone and arteries from hypertensive rats exhibiting significant VSM tone. The pressure-radius curves were measured in three different VSM states: fully relaxed, maximally contracted, and normal VSM tone. The model fitted the experimental data very well (r2 > 0.99) in both the normo- and hypertensive groups for all three states of VSM activation. The pseudo-SEF was used to illustrate the localized reduction of circumferential stress in the arterial wall due to normal VSM tone, suggesting that the proposed pseudo-SEF can be of general utility for describing stress distribution not only under passive VSM conditions, as most SEFs proposed so far, but also under physiological and pathological conditions with varying levels of VSM tone.

  11. Plasma damage mechanisms in low k organosilicate glass and their inhibition by Ar ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Kazi, Haseeb; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2014-03-15

    In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons with or without O{sub 2}, and O radicals point to distinct mechanisms of carbon abstraction in nanoporous organosilicate glass (OSG) films. VUV alone in the absence of O{sub 2} results in Si-CH{sub 3} bond scission and recombination preferentially at silicon monomethyl sites, obeying diffusion kinetics. In contrast, the presence of O{sub 2} interferes with recombination, resulting in diffusion-dominated carbon loss kinetics, enhanced Si oxidation, and greatly accelerating the rate of carbon loss in both the near surface and bulk regions of the OSG, at both monomethyl and dimethyl sites. Carbon abstraction due to exposure to (O({sup 3}P)) does not follow diffusion kinetics, and such interactions yield a SiO{sub 2}-like surface layer inhibiting further O diffusion. Results indicate that diffusion-dominated carbon abstraction kinetics previously observed for OSG exposure to O{sub 2} plasma damage is primarily attributable to the diffusion of O{sub 2} down OSG nanopores, reacting at photoactivated sites, rather than the diffusion of O radicals. OSG pretreatment by 900 eV Ar{sup +} bombardment effectively inhibits both VUV + O{sub 2} and O damage mechanisms by formation of ∼1 nm thick SiO{sub 2}-like surface region that inhibits both O and O{sub 2} diffusion.

  12. Mechanical Properties and Elastic Constants Due to Damage Accumulation and Amorphization in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-06-28

    Damage accumulation due to cascade overlap, which was simulated previously, has been used to study the changes of elastic constants, bulk and elastic moduli as a function of dose. These mechanical properties generally decrease with increasing dose, and the rapid decrease at low-dose level indicates that point defects and small clusters play an important role in the changes of elastic constants rather than topological disorder. The internal strain relaxation has no effect on the elastic constants, C11 and C12, in perfect SiC, but it has a significant influence on all elastic constants calculated in damaged SiC. The elastic constants in the cascade-amorphized (CA) SiC decrease about 19%, 29% and 46% for C11, C12 and C44, respectively. The bulk modulus decrease 23% and the elastic modulus decreases 29%, which is consistent with experimental measurements. The stability of both the perfect SiC and CA-SiC under hydrostatic tension has been also investigated. All mechanical properties in the CA-SiC exhibit behavior similar to that in perfect SiC, but the critical stress at which the CA-SiC becomes structurally unstable is one order of magnitude smaller than that for perfect SiC.

  13. UV damage and sun care: deciphering mechanics of skin to develop next generation therapies.

    PubMed

    Levi, Kemal

    2013-12-01

    Some ultraviolet radiation (UV) is essential to the body as it stimulates the production of vitamin D, yet overexposure has deleterious consequences for the skin. UV induces structural and cellular changes across the different layers of skin tissue leading to mechanical and oxidative stress. Both are critical parameters that can help us better understand and assess dermatological photodamage. While there is a developing body of research to quantify biomarkers of oxidative stress in skin, our knowledge of the magnitude of mechanical stresses in skin has been limited until recently due to the scarcity of methods to quantify the stress state of the tissue. In this regard, what is really exciting is that thin-film characterization and image correlation techniques have recently been successful in measuring the stress state of the tissue both in vitro and in vivo. In the next decade, quantifying UV-induced damage and the efficacy of sunscreens in preventing and treating photodamage will become an increasing focus in skin science research. An improved understanding of the magnitude of skin stresses will help us to better understand skin damage and appearance processes, such as cracking and wrinkling, and measure with accuracy both short-term and long-term effects of treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Damage mechanisms of MoN/SiN multilayer optics for next-generation pulsed XUV light sources.

    PubMed

    Sobierajski, R; Bruijn, S; Khorsand, A R; Louis, E; van de Kruijs, R W E; Burian, T; Chalupsky, J; Cihelka, J; Gleeson, A; Grzonka, J; Gullikson, E M; Hajkova, V; Hau-Riege, S; Juha, L; Jurek, M; Klinger, D; Krzywinski, J; London, R; Pelka, J B; Płociński, T; Rasiński, M; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S; Vysin, L; Wabnitz, H; Bijkerk, F

    2011-01-03

    We investigated the damage mechanism of MoN/SiN multilayer XUV optics under two extreme conditions: thermal annealing and irradiation with single shot intense XUV pulses from the free-electron laser facility in Hamburg - FLASH. The damage was studied "post-mortem" by means of X-ray diffraction, interference-polarizing optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Although the timescale of the damage processes and the damage threshold temperatures were different (in the case of annealing it was the dissociation temperature of Mo2N and in the case of XUV irradiation it was the melting temperature of MoN) the main damage mechanism is very similar: molecular dissociation and the formation of N2, leading to bubbles inside the multilayer structure.

  15. Thermodynamic damage mechanism of Ni/Cr film on neutral density filter by 1064-nm pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinghua; Li, Yaguo; Han, Wei; Feng, Guoying; Zhang, Qiuhui; Hu, Ruifeng; Liu, Yanyan

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the damage characteristics and mechanism of neutral density filters consisting of metal film on K9 glass substrate by 1064-nm pulsed laser. The damage morphologies present marked differences with different laser pulse energies. Specifically, with the increase of laser fluence, the damage pits density increase as well, and at the same time, the cracks appear around the pits and interconnect, which lead to the abscission of film. The damage mechanism has been studied from the viewpoint of embedded impurities in the film. The theoretical results show that the difference between the thermodynamic properties of impurities and film can lead to thermos-elastic stress, which plays important roles in deformation of film, nucleation and propagation of cracks. Last, methods have been proposed to improve the laser damage resistance by controlling the size distribution of impurity particles and increasing the film tensile strength.

  16. The Split Second Effect: The Mechanism of How Equinus Can Damage the Human Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Amis, James

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in the process of discovering that many, if not the majority, of the non-traumatic acquired adult foot and ankle problems are caused by a singular etiology: non-neuromuscular equinus or the isolated gastrocnemius contracture. There is no question that this biomechanical association exists and in time much more will be uncovered. There are three basic questions that must be answered: why would our calves tighten as we normally age, how does a tight calf, or equinus, actually cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle, and how do the forces produced by equinus cause so many seemingly unrelated pathologies in the foot and ankle? The purpose of this paper is to address the second question: how does a tight calf mechanically cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle? There has been little evidence in the literature addressing the biomechanical mechanisms by which equinus creates damaging forces upon the foot and ankle, and as a result, a precise, convincing mechanism is still lacking. Thus, the mere concept that equinus has anything to do with foot pathology is generally unknown or disregarded. The split second effect, described here, defines exactly how the silent equinus contracture creates incremental and significant damage and injury to the human foot and ankle resulting in a wide variety of pathological conditions. The split second effect is a dissenting theory based on 30 years of clinical and academic orthopedic foot and ankle experience, keen clinical observation along the way, and review of the developing literature, culminating in examination of many hours of slow motion video of normal and abnormal human gait. To my knowledge, no one has ever described the mechanism in detail this precise.

  17. The Split Second Effect: The Mechanism of How Equinus Can Damage the Human Foot and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Amis, James

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in the process of discovering that many, if not the majority, of the non-traumatic acquired adult foot and ankle problems are caused by a singular etiology: non-neuromuscular equinus or the isolated gastrocnemius contracture. There is no question that this biomechanical association exists and in time much more will be uncovered. There are three basic questions that must be answered: why would our calves tighten as we normally age, how does a tight calf, or equinus, actually cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle, and how do the forces produced by equinus cause so many seemingly unrelated pathologies in the foot and ankle? The purpose of this paper is to address the second question: how does a tight calf mechanically cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle? There has been little evidence in the literature addressing the biomechanical mechanisms by which equinus creates damaging forces upon the foot and ankle, and as a result, a precise, convincing mechanism is still lacking. Thus, the mere concept that equinus has anything to do with foot pathology is generally unknown or disregarded. The split second effect, described here, defines exactly how the silent equinus contracture creates incremental and significant damage and injury to the human foot and ankle resulting in a wide variety of pathological conditions. The split second effect is a dissenting theory based on 30 years of clinical and academic orthopedic foot and ankle experience, keen clinical observation along the way, and review of the developing literature, culminating in examination of many hours of slow motion video of normal and abnormal human gait. To my knowledge, no one has ever described the mechanism in detail this precise. PMID:27512692

  18. Low-damage direct patterning of silicon oxide mask by mechanical processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To realize the nanofabrication of silicon surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the etching of mechanically processed oxide masks using potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. The dependence of the KOH solution etching rate on the load and scanning density of the mechanical pre-processing was evaluated. Particular load ranges were found to increase the etching rate, and the silicon etching rate also increased with removal of the natural oxide layer by diamond tip sliding. In contrast, the local oxide pattern formed (due to mechanochemical reaction of the silicon) by tip sliding at higher load was found to have higher etching resistance than that of unprocessed areas. The profile changes caused by the etching of the mechanically pre-processed areas with the KOH solution were also investigated. First, protuberances were processed by diamond tip sliding at lower and higher stresses than that of the shearing strength. Mechanical processing at low load and scanning density to remove the natural oxide layer was then performed. The KOH solution selectively etched the low load and scanning density processed area first and then etched the unprocessed silicon area. In contrast, the protuberances pre-processed at higher load were hardly etched. The etching resistance of plastic deformed layers was decreased, and their etching rate was increased because of surface damage induced by the pre-processing. These results show that etching depth can be controlled by controlling the etching time through natural oxide layer removal and mechanochemical oxide layer formation. These oxide layer removal and formation processes can be exploited to realize low-damage mask patterns. PMID:24948891

  19. Collagen insulated from tensile damage by domains that unfold reversibly: in situ X-ray investigation of mechanical yield and damage repair in the mussel byssus

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Matthew J.; Gupta, Himadri S.; Fratzl, Peter; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The byssal threads of the California mussel, Mytilus californianus, are highly hysteretic, elastomeric fibers that collectively perform a holdfast function in wave-swept rocky seashore habitats. Following cyclic loading past the mechanical yield point, threads exhibit a damage-dependent reduction in mechanical performance. However, the distal portion of the byssal thread is capable of recovering initial material properties through a time-dependent healing process in the absence of active cellular metabolism. Byssal threads are composed almost exclusively of multi-domain hybrid collagens known as preCols, which largely determine the mechanical properties of the thread. Here, the structure-property relationships that govern thread mechanical performance are further probed. The molecular rearrangements that occur during yield and damage repair were investigated using time-resolved in situ wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) coupled with cyclic tensile loading of threads and through thermally enhanced damage-repair studies. Results indicate that the collagen domains in byssal preCols are mechanically protected by the unfolding of sacrificial non-collagenous domains that refold on a slower time-scale. Time-dependent healing is primarily attributed to stochastic recoupling of broken histidine-metal coordination complexes. PMID:19275941

  20. Collagen insulated from tensile damage by domains that unfold reversibly: in situ X-ray investigation of mechanical yield and damage repair in the mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Matthew J; Gupta, Himadri S; Fratzl, Peter; Waite, J Herbert

    2009-07-01

    The byssal threads of the California mussel, Mytilus californianus, are highly hysteretic, elastomeric fibers that collectively perform a holdfast function in wave-swept rocky seashore habitats. Following cyclic loading past the mechanical yield point, threads exhibit a damage-dependent reduction in mechanical performance. However, the distal portion of the byssal thread is capable of recovering initial material properties through a time-dependent healing process in the absence of active cellular metabolism. Byssal threads are composed almost exclusively of multi-domain hybrid collagens known as preCols, which largely determine the mechanical properties of the thread. Here, the structure-property relationships that govern thread mechanical performance are further probed. The molecular rearrangements that occur during yield and damage repair were investigated using time-resolved in situ wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) coupled with cyclic tensile loading of threads and through thermally enhanced damage-repair studies. Results indicate that the collagen domains in byssal preCols are mechanically protected by the unfolding of sacrificial non-collagenous domains that refold on a slower time-scale. Time-dependent healing is primarily attributed to stochastic recoupling of broken histidine-metal coordination complexes.

  1. A Hertzian contact mechanics based formulation to improve ultrasound elastography assessment of uterine cervical tissue stiffness.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Brandi N; Stender, Michael E; Muljadi, Patrick M; Donnelly, Meghan A; Winn, Virginia D; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-06-25

    Clinical practice requires improved techniques to assess human cervical tissue properties, especially at the internal os, or orifice, of the uterine cervix. Ultrasound elastography (UE) holds promise for non-invasively monitoring cervical stiffness throughout pregnancy. However, this technique provides qualitative strain images that cannot be linked to a material property (e.g., Young's modulus) without knowledge of the contact pressure under a rounded transvaginal transducer probe and correction for the resulting non-uniform strain dissipation. One technique to standardize elastogram images incorporates a material of known properties and uses one-dimensional, uniaxial Hooke's law to calculate Young's modulus within the compressed material half-space. However, this method does not account for strain dissipation and the strains that evolve in three-dimensional space. We demonstrate that an analytical approach based on 3D Hertzian contact mechanics provides a reasonable first approximation to correct for UE strain dissipation underneath a round transvaginal transducer probe and thus improves UE-derived estimates of tissue modulus. We validate the proposed analytical solution and evaluate sources of error using a finite element model. As compared to 1D uniaxial Hooke's law, the Hertzian contact-based solution yields significantly improved Young's modulus predictions in three homogeneous gelatin tissue phantoms possessing different moduli. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to image human cervical tissue, where UE-derived moduli estimations for the uterine cervix anterior lip agreed well with published, experimentally obtained values. Overall, UE with an attached reference standard and a Hertzian contact-based correction holds promise for improving quantitative estimates of cervical tissue modulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Biowastes Released by Mechanically Damaged Muscle Cells on the Propagation of Deep Tissue Injury: A Multiphysics Study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yifei; Da Ong, Lucas Xian; Li, Xiaotong; Wan, Kinlun; Mak, Arthur F T

    2017-03-01

    Deep tissue injuries occur in muscle tissues around bony prominences under mechanical loading leading to severe pressure ulcers. Tissue compression can potentially compromise lymphatic transport and cause accumulation of metabolic biowastes, which may cause further cell damage under continuous mechanical loading. In this study, we hypothesized that biowastes released by mechanically damaged muscle cells could be toxic to the surrounding muscle cells and could compromise the capability of the surrounding muscle cells to withstand further mechanical loadings. In vitro, we applied prolonged low compressive stress (PLCS) and short-term high compressive stress to myoblasts to cause cell damage and collected the biowastes released by the damaged cells under the respective loading scenarios. In silico, we used COMSOL to simulate the compressive stress distribution and the diffusion of biowastes in a semi-3D buttock finite element model. In vitro results showed that biowastes collected from cells damaged under PLCS were more toxic and could compromise the capability of normal myoblasts to resist compressive damage. In silico results showed that higher biowastes diffusion coefficient, higher biowastes release rate, lower biowastes tolerance threshold and earlier timeline of releasing biowastes would cause faster propagation of tissue damage. This study highlighted the importance of biowastes in the development of deep tissue injury to clinical pressure ulcers under prolonged skeletal compression.

  3. Mechanism for enhanced absorption of a solid dispersion formulation of LY2300559 using the artificial stomach duodenum model.

    PubMed

    Polster, Christopher S; Wu, Sy-Juen; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Sperry, David C

    2015-04-06

    An artificial stomach duodenum (ASD) model has been used to demonstrate the performance difference between two formulations of LY2300559, a low-solubility acidic developmental drug. The two formulations investigated were a conventional high-shear wet granulation (HSWG) formulation and a solid dispersion formulation. A pharmacokinetic study in humans demonstrated the enhanced performance of the solid dispersion formulation relative to the HSWG formulation. The Cmax and AUC of the solid dispersion was 2.6 and 1.9 times greater, respectively, compared to the HSWG formulation. In the ASD, the solid dispersion formulation performance was characterized by three main phases: (1) rapid release in the stomach, creating a supersaturated concentration of drug, (2) precipitation in the stomach, and (3) rapid redissolution of the precipitate in the duodenum to concentration levels that are supersaturated relative to crystalline drug. A series of complementary experiments were employed to describe this performance behavior mechanistically. Imaging experiments with a pH indicating dye showed that local pH gradients from meglumine in the solid dispersion formulation were responsible for creating a high initial supersaturation concentration in the stomach. Upon dissipation of meglumine, the drug precipitated in the stomach as an amorphous solid. Because the precipitated drug is in an amorphous form, it can then rapidly redissolve as it transits to the more neutral environment of the duodenum. This unexpected sequence of physical state changes gives a mechanistic explanation for the enhanced in vivo performance of the solid dispersion formulation relative to the HSWG formulation.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Damage Processes in Aluminum Alloys: Grain-Scale Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhalter, J. D.; Veilleux, M. G.; Bozek, J. E.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper has two goals related to the development of a physically-grounded methodology for modeling the initial stages of fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy. The aluminum alloy, AA 7075-T651, is susceptible to fatigue cracking that nucleates from cracked second phase iron-bearing particles. Thus, the first goal of the paper is to validate an existing framework for the prediction of the conditions under which the particles crack. The observed statistics of particle cracking (defined as incubation for this alloy) must be accurately predicted to simulate the stochastic nature of microstructurally small fatigue crack (MSFC) formation. Also, only by simulating incubation of damage in a statistically accurate manner can subsequent stages of crack growth be accurately predicted. To maintain fidelity and computational efficiency, a filtering procedure was developed to eliminate particles that were unlikely to crack. The particle filter considers the distributions of particle sizes and shapes, grain texture, and the configuration of the surrounding grains. This filter helps substantially reduce the number of particles that need to be included in the microstructural models and forms the basis of the future work on the subsequent stages of MSFC, crack nucleation and microstructurally small crack propagation. A physics-based approach to simulating fracture should ultimately begin at nanometer length scale, in which atomistic simulation is used to predict the fundamental damage mechanisms of MSFC. These mechanisms include dislocation formation and interaction, interstitial void formation, and atomic diffusion. However, atomistic simulations quickly become computationally intractable as the system size increases, especially when directly linking to the already large microstructural models. Therefore, the second goal of this paper is to propose a method that will incorporate atomistic simulation and small-scale experimental characterization into the existing multiscale

  5. DNA damage drives accelerated bone aging via an NF-κB-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Kai; Robinson, Andria R.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Blair, Harry C.; Robbins, Paul D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Ouyang, Hongjiao

    2013-01-01

    Advanced age is one of the most important risk factors for osteoporosis. Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed to contribute to age-related deregulation of osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. ERCC1 (Excision Repair Cross Complementary group 1)-XPF (Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group F) is an evolutionarily conserved structure-specific endonuclease that is required for multiple DNA repair pathways. Inherited mutations affecting expression of ERCC1-XPF cause a severe progeroid syndrome in humans, including early onset of osteopenia and osteoporosis, or anomalies in skeletal development. Herein, we used progeroid ERCC1-XPF deficient mice, including Ercc1-null (Ercc1−/−) and hypomorphic (Ercc1−/Δ) mice, to investigate the mechanism by which DNA damage leads to accelerated bone aging. Compared to their wild-type littermates, both Ercc1−/− and Ercc1−/Δ mice display severe, progressive osteoporosis caused by reduced bone formation and enhanced osteoclastogenesis. ERCC1 deficiency leads to atrophy of osteoblastic progenitors in the bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) population. There is increased cellular senescence of BMSCs and osteoblastic cells, as characterized by reduced proliferation, accumulation of DNA damage and a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). This leads to enhanced secretion of inflammatory cytokines known to drive osteoclastogenesis, such as IL-6, TNFα, and RANKL and thereby induces an inflammatory bone microenvironment favoring osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, we found that the transcription factor NF-κB is activated in osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells of the Ercc1 mutant mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that haploinsufficiency of the p65 NF-κB subunit partially rescued the osteoporosis phenotype of Ercc1−/Δ mice. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of the NF-κB signaling via an IKK inhibitor reversed cellular senescence and SASP in Ercc1−/Δ BMSCs. These results demonstrate that DNA damage drives

  6. Mixing monoclonal antibody formulations using bottom-mounted mixers: impact of mechanism and design on drug product quality.

    PubMed

    Gikanga, Benson; Chen, Yufei; Stauch, Oliver B; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2015-01-01

    raised concerns about their impact on drug product quality and process performance. However, investigations into the effects of their use for biopharmaceutical products, particularly monoclonal antibody formulations, are rarely published. The purpose of this study is three-fold: (1) to understand the impact of bottom-mounted disposable mixer design on drug product quality and process performance, (2) to identify the mixing mechanism that is most gentle to protein particle formation, (3) to apply the learning to practical mixing operations using bottom-mounted mixers. The outcomes of this study will benefit scientists and engineers who develop biologic product manufacturing process by providing a better understanding of mixing principles and challenges. © PDA, Inc. 2015.

  7. Anisotropic mechanical properties of zircon and the effect of radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Bismayer, Ulrich; Boatner, Lynn A.; Isaacson, Scott G.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2016-06-02

    Our study provides new insights into the relationship between radiation-dose-dependent structural damage, due to natural U and Th impurities, and the anisotropic mechanical properties (Poisson s ratio, elastic modulus and hardness) of zircon. Natural zircon samples from Sri Lanka (see Muarakami et al. 1991) and synthetic samples, covering a dose range of zero up to 6.8 x 1018 -decays/g, have been studied by nanoindentation. Measurements along the [100] crystallographic direction and calculations, based on elastic stiffness constants determined by zkan (1976), revealed a general radiation-induced decrease in stiffness (~ 54 %) and hardness (~ 48 %) and an increase of the Poisson s ratio (~ 54 %) with increasing dose. Additional indentations on selected samples along the [001] allowed one to follow the amorphization process to the point that the mechanical properties are isotropic. This work shows that the radiation-dose-dependent changes of the mechanical properties of zircon can be directly correlated with the amorphous fraction as determined by previous investigations with local and global probes (Rios et al. 2000a; Farnan and Salje 2001; Zhang and Salje 2001). This agreement, revealed by the different methods, indicates a huge influence of structural and even local phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical properties.

  8. Anisotropic mechanical properties of zircon and the effect of radiation damage

    DOE PAGES

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Bismayer, Ulrich; ...

    2016-06-02

    Our study provides new insights into the relationship between radiation-dose-dependent structural damage, due to natural U and Th impurities, and the anisotropic mechanical properties (Poisson s ratio, elastic modulus and hardness) of zircon. Natural zircon samples from Sri Lanka (see Muarakami et al. 1991) and synthetic samples, covering a dose range of zero up to 6.8 x 1018 -decays/g, have been studied by nanoindentation. Measurements along the [100] crystallographic direction and calculations, based on elastic stiffness constants determined by zkan (1976), revealed a general radiation-induced decrease in stiffness (~ 54 %) and hardness (~ 48 %) and an increase ofmore » the Poisson s ratio (~ 54 %) with increasing dose. Additional indentations on selected samples along the [001] allowed one to follow the amorphization process to the point that the mechanical properties are isotropic. This work shows that the radiation-dose-dependent changes of the mechanical properties of zircon can be directly correlated with the amorphous fraction as determined by previous investigations with local and global probes (Rios et al. 2000a; Farnan and Salje 2001; Zhang and Salje 2001). This agreement, revealed by the different methods, indicates a huge influence of structural and even local phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical properties.« less

  9. Anisotropic mechanical properties of zircon and the effect of radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Bismayer, Ulrich; Boatner, Lynn A.; Isaacson, Scott G.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2016-06-02

    Our study provides new insights into the relationship between radiation-dose-dependent structural damage, due to natural U and Th impurities, and the anisotropic mechanical properties (Poisson s ratio, elastic modulus and hardness) of zircon. Natural zircon samples from Sri Lanka (see Muarakami et al. 1991) and synthetic samples, covering a dose range of zero up to 6.8 x 1018 -decays/g, have been studied by nanoindentation. Measurements along the [100] crystallographic direction and calculations, based on elastic stiffness constants determined by zkan (1976), revealed a general radiation-induced decrease in stiffness (~ 54 %) and hardness (~ 48 %) and an increase of the Poisson s ratio (~ 54 %) with increasing dose. Additional indentations on selected samples along the [001] allowed one to follow the amorphization process to the point that the mechanical properties are isotropic. This work shows that the radiation-dose-dependent changes of the mechanical properties of zircon can be directly correlated with the amorphous fraction as determined by previous investigations with local and global probes (Rios et al. 2000a; Farnan and Salje 2001; Zhang and Salje 2001). This agreement, revealed by the different methods, indicates a huge influence of structural and even local phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical properties.

  10. A cumulative shear mechanism for tissue damage initiation in shock-wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jonathan B.; Colonius, Tim; Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests that inertial cavitation plays an important role in the renal injury incurred during shock-wave lithotripsy. However, it is unclear how tissue damage is initiated, and significant injury typically occurs only after a sufficient dose of shock waves. While it has been suggested that shock-induced shearing might initiate injury, estimates indicate that individual shocks do not produce sufficient shear to do so. In this paper, we hypothesize that the cumulative shear of the many shocks is damaging. This mechanism depends upon whether there is sufficient time between shocks for tissue to relax to its unstrained state. We investigate the mechanism with a physics-based simulation model wherein the the basement membranes that define the tubules and vessels in the inner medulla are represented as elastic shells surrounded by viscous fluid. Material properties are estimated from in vitro tests of renal basement membranes and documented mechanical properties of cells and extracellular gels. Estimates for the net shear deformation from a typical lithotripter shock (~ 0.1%) are found from a separate dynamic shock simulation. The results suggest that the larger interstitial volume (~ 40%) near the papilla tip gives the tissue there a relaxation time comparable to clinical shock delivery rates (~ 1Hz), thus allowing shear to accumulate. Away from the papilla tip, where the interstitial volume is smaller (≲ 20%), the model tissue relaxes completely before the next shock would be delivered. Implications of the model are that slower delivery rates and broader focal zones should both decrease injury, consistent with some recent observations. PMID:17507147

  11. Mechanism of plasma-induced damage to low-k SiOCH films during plasma ashing of organic resists

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Keigo; Miyawaki, Yudai; Takashima, Seigo; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Oshima, Keiji; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Hori, Masaru

    2011-02-01

    Plasma-induced damage to porous SiOCH (p-SiOCH) films during organic resist film ashing using dual-frequency capacitively coupled O{sub 2} plasmas was investigated using the pallet for plasma evaluation method developed by our group. The damage was characterized by ellipsometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Individual and synergetic damage associated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and UV radiation, radicals, and ions in the O{sub 2} plasma were clarified. It was found that the damage was caused not only by radicals but also by synergetic reactions of radicals with VUV and UV radiation emitted by the plasmas. It is noteworthy that the damage induced by plasma exposure without ion bombardment was larger than the damage with ion bombardment. These results differed from those obtained using an H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma for resist ashing. Finally, the mechanism of damage to p-SiOCH caused by O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma ashing of organic resist films is discussed. These results are very important in understanding the mechanism of plasma-induced damage to p-SiOCH films.

  12. Mechanisms of Direct Radiation Damage in DNA, Based on a Study of the Yields of Base Damage, Deoxyribose Damage, and Trapped Radicals in d(GCACGCGTGC)2

    PubMed Central

    Swarts, Steven G.; Gilbert, David C.; Sharma, Kiran K.; Razskazovskiy, Yuriy; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Naumenko, Katerina A.; Bernhard, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Dose–response curves were measured for the formation of direct-type DNA products in X-irradiated d(GCACGCGTGC)2 prepared as dry films and as crystalline powders. Damage to deoxyribose (dRib) was assessed by HPLC measurements of strand break products containing 3′ or 5′ terminal phosphate and free base release. Base damage was measured using GC/MS after acid hydrolysis and trimethylsilylation. The yield of trappable radicals was measured at 4 K by EPR of films X-irradiated at 4 K. With exception of those used for EPR, all samples were X-irradiated at room temperature. There was no measurable difference between working under oxygen or under nitrogen. The chemical yields (in units of nmol/J) for trapped radicals, free base release, 8-oxoGua, 8-oxoAde, diHUra and diHThy were Gtotal(fr) = 618 ± 60, G(fbr) = 93 ± 8, G(8-oxoGua) = 111 ± 62, G(8-oxoAde) = 4 ± 3, G(diHUra) = 127 ± 160, and G(diHThy) = 39 ± 60, respectively. The yields were determined and the dose–response curves explained by a mechanistic model consisting of three reaction pathways: (1) trappable-radical single-track, (2) trappable-radical multiple-track, and (3) molecular. If the base content is projected from the decamer’s GC:AT ratio of 4:1 to a ratio of 1:1, the percentage of the total measured damage (349 nmol/J) would partition as follows: 20 ± 16% 8-oxoGua, 3 ± 3% 8-oxoAde, 28 ± 46% diHThy, 23 ± 32% diHUra, and 27 ± 17% dRib damage. With a cautionary note regarding large standard deviations, the projected yield of total damage is higher in CG-rich DNA because C combined with G is more prone to damage than A combined with T, the ratio of base damage to deoxyribose damage is ~3:1, the yield of diHUra is comparable to the yield of diHThy, and the yield of 8-oxoAde is not negligible. While the quantity and quality of the data fall short of proving the hypothesized model, the model provides an explanation for the dose–response curves of the more prevalent end products and provides a

  13. Self-sealing of thermal fatigue and mechanical damage in fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Jericho L.

    Fiber reinforced composite tanks provide a promising method of storage for liquid oxygen and hydrogen for aerospace applications. The inherent thermal fatigue of these vessels leads to the formation of microcracks, which allow gas phase leakage across the tank walls. In this dissertation, self-healing functionality is imparted to a structural composite to effectively seal microcracks induced by both mechanical and thermal loading cycles. Two different microencapsulated healing chemistries are investigated in woven glass fiber/epoxy and uni-weave carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Self-healing of mechanically induced damage was first studied in a room temperature cured plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite with encapsulated dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) monomer and wax protected Grubbs' catalyst healing components. A controlled amount of microcracking was introduced through cyclic indentation of opposing surfaces of the composite. The resulting damage zone was proportional to the indentation load. Healing was assessed through the use of a pressure cell apparatus to detect nitrogen flow through the thickness direction of the damaged composite. Successful healing resulted in a perfect seal, with no measurable gas flow. The effect of DCPD microcapsule size (51 microm and 18 microm) and concentration (0--12.2 wt%) on the self-sealing ability was investigated. Composite specimens with 6.5 wt% 51 microm capsules sealed 67% of the time, compared to 13% for the control panels without healing components. A thermally stable, dual microcapsule healing chemistry comprised of silanol terminated poly(dimethyl siloxane) plus a crosslinking agent and a tin catalyst was employed to allow higher composite processing temperatures. The microcapsules were incorporated into a satin weave E-glass fiber/epoxy composite processed at 120°C to yield a glass transition temperature of 127°C. Self-sealing ability after mechanical damage was assessed for different microcapsule sizees (25 microm and 42

  14. Structure and Activation Mechanism of the CHK2 DNA Damage Checkpoint Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Chehab, N; Pavletich, N

    2009-01-01

    The CHK2 protein kinase is an important transducer of DNA damage checkpoint signals, and its mutation contributes to hereditary and sporadic cancer. CHK2 activation is triggered by the phosphorylation of Thr68 by the DNA damage-activated ATM kinase. This leads to transient CHK2 dimerization, in part through intermolecular phosphoThr68-FHA domain interactions. Dimerization promotes kinase activation through activation-loop autophosphorylation, but the mechanism of this process has not been clear. The dimeric crystal structure of CHK2, described here, in conjunction with biochemical and mutational data reveals that productive CHK2 dimerization additionally involves intermolecular FHA-kinase domain and FHA-FHA interactions. Ile157, mutated in the Li-Fraumeni cancer-predisposition syndrome, plays a central role in the FHA-kinase domain interface, explaining the lack of dimerization and autophosphorylation of this mutant. In the dimer, the kinase active sites face each other in close proximity, indicating that dimerization may also serve to optimally position the kinase active sites for efficient activation loop transphosphorylation.

  15. Mechanism investigation of dioscin against CCl4-induced acute liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Binan; Xu, Yousong; Xu, Lina; Cong, Xiaonan; Yin, Lianhong; Li, Hua; Peng, Jinyong

    2012-09-01

    The mechanisms of the ameliorating effects of dioscin against CCl(4) induced acute liver damage are investigated in this study. Dioscin significantly inhibited (p<0.01) the increases of serum ALT and AST activities compared with the CCl(4)-treated animals. The hepatic lipid peroxidation formation and, concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were also decreased. Liver histopathologic studies and a DNA laddering assay indicated that dioscin protected hepatocytes against CCl(4)-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Furthermore, dioscin decreased the protein expressions of Fas/FasL, increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio, inhibited the release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion to cytosol and attenuated CCl(4)-induced caspase-3 and -8 activities. The expressions of ICAM-1, vimentin, prohibitin, HGF, c-MET and GSTA1 were also regulated by dioscin and iNOS was also involved in the effects of this agent. These protective effects against CCl(4) induced acute liver damage might be through inhibiting lipid peroxidation, inflammatory cytokines, necrosis and apoptosis, and dioscin shows promise for development toward the treatment of acute chemically mediated liver injury.

  16. Mechanism of chronic dietary iron overload-induced liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; He, Huan; Yin, Dong; Que, Ailing; Tang, Lei; Liao, Zhangping; Huang, Qiren; He, Ming

    2013-04-01

    Chronic iron overload may result in hepatic fibrosis and even neoplastic transformation due to a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondria have been proposed to be important in the production of ROS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in the burst of ROS, and to clarify the mechanism whereby ROS induced by iron overload results in hepatic damage. It has been demonstrated that when ferrocene-induced iron-overloaded mice were fed the cyclosporin A (CsA), a specific inhibitor of the mPTP, diet (10 mg/kg/day) for 50 days, liver-to-body weight ratio, serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST), ROS production, mitochondrial swelling, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ) and hepatocyte apoptosis decreased. However, the total antioxidant status, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase activities, increased. The protective effect of CsA on the liver of iron-overloaded mice may be due to inhibition of the ROS burst and a successive antioxidant effect. To the best of our knowledge, these data provide the first support for the theory that ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR) may be involved in the burst of ROS in the liver and greatly contribute to the hepatic damage initiated by iron overload.

  17. Circadian clock as possible protective mechanism to pollution induced keratinocytes damage.

    PubMed

    Benedusi, Mascia; Frigato, Elena; Beltramello, Mattia; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2017-08-30

    Ozone is among the most toxic environmental stressors to which we are continuously exposed. Due to its critical location, skin is one of the most susceptible tissues to oxidative stress damaging effect of ozone. An increasing collection of data suggests a significant role of circadian system in regulation of cellular response to oxidative stress. However, the molecular mechanism linking circadian clock and antioxidant pathway it is not completely understood. Here we investigated a possible protective role of entrained circadian clock to ozone induced damage in keratinocytes, the main cellular component of human epidermis. Our results showed that, clock-synchronized keratinocytes compared to arrhythmic ones exhibited a more efficient antioxidant response, attested by a faster activation of the master antioxidant regulatory factor NRF2. Moreover, analysis of clock gene expression profiles reveals a more rapid induction of the cardinal clock gene Bmal1 in entrained cells. Based on these findings, we suppose that an adequate coordination of circadian system and antioxidant pathway might be essential to maintain homeostasis in the skin. Alteration of metabolic pathways occurred in neurological diseases or in irregular schedule of life activity could negatively influence tissue gene expression programs and associated organ physiology via its effect on the circadian system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  19. Representing Matrix Cracks Through Decomposition of the Deformation Gradient Tensor in Continuum Damage Mechanics Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented to represent the large-deformation kinematics of intraply matrix cracks and delaminations in continuum damage mechanics (CDM) constitutive material models. The method involves the additive decomposition of the deformation gradient tensor into 'crack' and 'bulk material' components. The response of the intact bulk material is represented by a reduced deformation gradient tensor, and the opening of an embedded cohesive interface is represented by a normalized cohesive displacement-jump vector. The rotation of the embedded interface is tracked as the material deforms and as the crack opens. The distribution of the total local deformation between the bulk material and the cohesive interface components is determined by minimizing the difference between the cohesive stress and the bulk material stress projected onto the cohesive interface. The improvements to the accuracy of CDM models that incorporate the presented method over existing approaches are demonstrated for a single element subjected to simple shear deformation and for a finite element model of a unidirectional open-hole tension specimen. The material model is implemented as a VUMAT user subroutine for the Abaqus/Explicit finite element software. The presented deformation gradient decomposition method reduces the artificial load transfer across matrix cracks subjected to large shearing deformations, and avoids the spurious secondary failure modes that often occur in analyses based on conventional progressive damage models.

  20. Shock sensitivity of energetic material and nanometric damage mechanisms in silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ken-Ichi

    This dissertation focuses on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of shock sensitivity of energetic material (EM) and nanometric damage mechanisms in amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2). A scalable parallel MD algorithm incorporating first principles-based reactive force fields (ReaxFF) has been implemented to perform multimillion-to-billion atom chemically reactive MD simulations. Mechanical stimuli in energetic materials initiate chemical reactions at shock fronts prior to detonation. Multimillion-atom ReaxFF-MD simulations are performed to investigate atomistic mechanisms of shock-induced reaction initiation in 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) crystal. The simulation reveals a bi-modal molecular response against a planar shock loading, which creates a nanoscale layered-structure of molecular dipole behind a shock front. The sensitivity of energetic crystals changes with defects such as voids, grain boundaries and cracks. By performing million-atom ReaxFF-MD simulations, the effects of microstructures in crystal on shock sensitivity have been investigated. MD simulation reveals the formation of a nanojet which focuses into a narrow beam as the void collapses. By increasing particle velocity, a pinning-depinning transition of the shock wave front at the void occurs. Shock loading simulation in a nanophase RDX crystal reveals a deformation mechanism that is mediated by molecular reorientation and conformation changes. Molecular rotation and deformation significantly reduce the energy barrier for the onset of slip. In contrast to crystalline solids, damage, flow and fracture in glass are still controversial areas. We have performed multimillion-atom MD simulations to investigate initiation and growth of wing cracks in confined silica glass. Under dynamic compression, frictional sliding of precrack surfaces nucleates nanovoids which evolve into nanocrack columns at the precrack tip. Nanocrack columns merge to form a wing crack, which grows via coalescence with nanovoids in the

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

    2004-12-01

    The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can

  2. Damage mechanism at different transpassive potentials of solution-annealed 316 and 316l stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed Behbahani, K.; Pakshir, M.; Abbasi, Z.; Najafisayar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), anodic polarization and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to investigate the damage mechanism in the transpassive potential region of AISI 316 and AISI 316L solution-annealed stainless steels (SS) with different degrees of sensitization. Depending on the DC potential applied during EIS tests, the AC responses in the transpassive region included three different regions: the first one associated with anodic dissolution of the passive layer, the second one contributed to the dissolution at the area near grain boundaries, and the last one attributed to pitting corrosion. In addition, the fitting results to experimental data showed that as the DC bias during the EIS test increases the charge transfer resistance ( R ct) decreases. Moreover, the R ct values decreased as the sensitization temperature increases but the AISI 316L SS samples exhibited a higher resistance to intergranular corrosion than 316 SS samples.

  3. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  4. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  5. The Response to Oxidative DNA Damage in Neurons: Mechanisms and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Narciso, Laura; Parlanti, Eleonora; Racaniello, Mauro; Simonelli, Valeria; Cardinale, Alessio; Merlo, Daniela; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the mechanisms that control genome stability are of key importance in the development and function of the nervous system. The major threat for neurons is oxidative DNA damage, which is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Functional mutations of enzymes that are involved in the processing of single-strand breaks (SSB) that are generated during BER have been causally associated with syndromes that present important neurological alterations and cognitive decline. In this review, the plasticity of BER during neurogenesis and the importance of an efficient BER for correct brain function will be specifically addressed paying particular attention to the brain region and neuron-selectivity in SSB repair-associated neurological syndromes and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26942017

  6. Time dependent reliability model incorporating continuum damage mechanics for high-temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Presently there are many opportunities for the application of ceramic materials at elevated temperatures. In the near future ceramic materials are expected to supplant high temperature metal alloys in a number of applications. It thus becomes essential to develop a capability to predict the time-dependent response of these materials. The creep rupture phenomenon is discussed, and a time-dependent reliability model is outlined that integrates continuum damage mechanics principles and Weibull analysis. Several features of the model are presented in a qualitative fashion, including predictions of both reliability and hazard rate. In addition, a comparison of the continuum and the microstructural kinetic equations highlights a strong resemblance in the two approaches.

  7. In situ damage monitoring in vibration mechanics: diagnostics and predictive maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basseville, M.; Benveniste, A.; Gach-Devauchelle, B.; Goursat, M.; Bonnecase, D.; Dorey, P.; Prevosto, M.; Olagnon, M.

    1993-09-01

    A system identification approach is presented for damage monitoring in vibration mechanics. Identification, detection, and diagnostics are performed using accelerometer measurements from the system at work so that the excitation is not controlled, usually not observed and may involve turbulent phenomena. Targeted applications include power engineering (rotating machines, core and pipes of nuclear power plants), civil engineering (large buildings subject to hurricanes or earthquakes, bridges, dams, offshore structures), aeronautics (wings and other structures subject to strength), automobile, rail transportation etc. The method is illustrated by a laboratory example, and the results of 3 years industrial usage. This paper is a progress report on a 10 year project involving three people almost permanently. We describe here the whole approach but omit the technical details which are available in previous papers.

  8. Genome damage in induced pluripotent stem cells: assessing the mechanisms and their consequences.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Samer M I; Elbaz, Judith; Nagy, Andras A

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, Shinya Yamanaka and colleagues discovered how to reprogram terminally differentiated somatic cells to a pluripotent stem cell state. The resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) made a paradigm shift in the field, further nailing down the disproval of the long-held dogma that differentiation is unidirectional. The prospect of using iPSCs for patient-specific cell-based therapies has been enticing. This promise, however, has been questioned in the last two years as several studies demonstrated intrinsic epigenetic and genomic anomalies in these cells. Here, we not only review the recent critical studies addressing the genome integrity during the reprogramming process, but speculate about the underlying mechanisms that could create de novo genome damage in iPSCs. Finally, we discuss how much an elevated mutation load really matters considering the safety of future therapies with cells heavily cultured in vitro.

  9. [Occupational therapy for work-related damage induced by mechanical vibration].

    PubMed

    Foti, C; Ciocchetti, E; Antignani, E; Pitruzzella, M; Laurini, A

    2010-01-01

    Vibrations are defined as repeated oscillatory movements of a body; they can be transmitted by contact to humans. From the point of view of physics, vibrations can be differentiated on the basis of frequency, wavelength, amplitude of the oscillation, velocity and acceleration. As far as concerns occupational hazards, two risk factors have been identified: the first involves low frequency vibrations (vehicle drivers), while the second involves high frequency vibrations (manual percussion tools). The transmission of vibration energy can be localized or generalized. Tertiary prevention of exposure to vibrations is based on the use of anti-vibration gloves (for vibrations of the hand and arm) and on anti-vibration shoes (for vibrations of the whole body). The damage caused by vibrations is due to reduced blood circulation and mechanical stimulation in the joints exposed.

  10. Theoretical study of fast repair of DNA damage by cistanoside C and analogs: mechanism and docking.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, O; Fan, B T; Zakrzewska, K; Jia, Z J; Zheng, R L; Panaye, A; Doucet, J P; El Fassi, N

    2002-03-01

    Experiments show that the natural substances phenylpropanoid glycosides (PPGs) extracted from pelicularis spicata are capable of repairing DNA damaged by oxygen radicals. Based on kinetic measurements and experiments on tumor cells, a theoretical study of the interaction between PPG molecules and isolated DNA bases, as well as a DNA fragment has been performed. An interaction mechanism reported early has been refined. The docking calculations performed using junction minimization of nucleic acids (JUMNA) software showed that the PPG molecules can be docked into the minor groove of DNA and form complexes with the geometry suitable for an electron transfer between guanine radical and the ligand. Such complexes can be formed without major distortions of DNA structure and are further stabilized by the interaction with the rhamnosyl side-groups.

  11. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites. PMID:25562780

  12. Iron-Induced Damage in Cardiomyopathy: Oxidative-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gammella, Elena; Recalcati, Stefania; Rybinska, Ilona; Buratti, Paolo; Cairo, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of cardiomyopathy in patients with hemosiderosis, particularly in transfusional iron overload, strongly indicates that iron accumulation in the heart plays a major role in the process leading to heart failure. In this context, iron-mediated generation of noxious reactive oxygen species is believed to be the most important pathogenetic mechanism determining cardiomyocyte damage, the initiating event of a pathologic progression involving apoptosis, fibrosis, and ultimately cardiac dysfunction. However, recent findings suggest that additional mechanisms involving subcellular organelles and inflammatory mediators are important factors in the development of this disease. Moreover, excess iron can amplify the cardiotoxic effect of other agents or events. Finally, subcellular misdistribution of iron within cardiomyocytes may represent an additional pathway leading to cardiac injury. Recent advances in imaging techniques and chelators development remarkably improved cardiac iron overload detection and treatment, respectively. However, increased understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of iron overload cardiomyopathy is needed to pave the way for the development of improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:25878762

  13. Towards mechanism-based simulation of impact damage using exascale computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shterenlikht, Anton; Margetts, Lee; McDonald, Samuel; Bourne, Neil K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, the finite element method has been very successful in modelling deformation in engineering structures. However the method requires the definition of constitutive models that represent the response of the material to applied loads. There are two issues. Firstly, the models are often difficult to define. Secondly, there is often no physical connection between the models and the mechanisms that accommodate deformation. In this paper, we present a potentially disruptive two-level strategy which couples the finite element method at the macroscale with cellular automata at the mesoscale. The cellular automata are used to simulate mechanisms, such as crack propagation. The stress-strain relationship emerges as a continuum mechanics scale interpretation of changes at the micro- and meso-scales. Iterative two-way updating between the cellular automata and finite elements drives the simulation forward as the material undergoes progressive damage at high strain rates. The strategy is particularly attractive on large-scale computing platforms as both methods scale well on tens of thousands of CPUs.

  14. Effects of edge grinding and sealing on mechanical properties of machine damaged laminate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmatulu, Ramazan; Yeoh, Jason; Alarifi, Ibrahim M.; Alharbi, Abdulaziz

    2016-04-01

    Fiber reinforced composites have been utilized for a number of different applications, including aircraft, wind turbine, automobile, construction, manufacturing, and many other industries. During the fabrication, machining (waterjet, diamond and band saws) and assembly of these laminate composites, various edge and hole delamination, fiber pullout and other micro and nanocracks can be formed on the composite panels. The present study mainly focuses on the edge grinding and sealing of the machine damaged fiber reinforced composites, such as fiberglass, plain weave carbon fiber and unidirectional carbon fiber. The MTS tensile test results confirmed that the composite coupons from the grinding process usually produced better and consistent mechanical properties compared to the waterjet cut samples only. In addition to these studies, different types of high strength adhesives, such as EPON 828 and Loctite were applied on the edges of the prepared composite coupons and cured under vacuum. The mechanical tests conducted on these coupons indicated that the overall mechanical properties of the composite coupons were further improved. These processes can lower the labor costs on the edge treatment of the composites and useful for different industrial applications of fiber reinforced composites.

  15. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung -Hyun

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Lastly, kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  16. Nitric oxide-mediated mitochondrial damage in the brain: mechanisms and implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, J P; Almeida, A; Stewart, V; Peuchen, S; Land, J M; Clark, J B; Heales, S J

    1997-06-01

    Within the CNS and under normal conditions, nitric oxide (.NO) appears to be an important physiological signalling molecule. Its ability to increase cyclic GMP concentration suggests that .NO is implicated in the regulation of important metabolic pathways in the brain. Under certain circumstances .NO synthesis may be excessive and .NO may become neurotoxic. Excessive glutamate-receptor stimulation may lead to neuronal death through a mechanism implicating synthesis of both .NO and superoxide (O2.-) and hence peroxynitrite (ONOO-) formation. In response to lipopolysaccharide and cytokines, glial cells may also be induced to synthesize large amounts of .NO, which may be deleterious to the neighbouring neurones and oligodendrocytes. The precise mechanism of .NO neurotoxicity is not fully understood. One possibility is that it may involve neuronal energy deficiency. This may occur by ONOO- interfering with key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial calcium metabolism, or DNA damage with subsequent activation of the energy-consuming pathway involving poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase. Possible mechanisms whereby ONOO- impairs the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the relevance for neurotoxicity are discussed. The intracellular content of reduced glutathione also appears important in determining the sensitivity of cells to ONOO- production. It is concluded that neurotoxicity elicited by excessive .NO production may be mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction leading to an energy deficiency state.

  17. Towards mechanism-based simulation of impact damage using Exascale computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shterenlikht, Anton; Margetts, Lee; McDonald, Samuel; Bourne, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 60 years, the finite element method has been very successful in modelling deformation in engineering structures. However the method requires the definition of constitutive models that represent the response of the material to applied loads. There are two issues. Firstly, the models are often difficult to define. Secondly, there is often no physical connection between the models and the mechanisms that accommodate deformation. In this paper, we present a potentially disruptive two-level strategy which couples the finite element method in the macroscale with cellular automata in the mesoscale. The cellular automata are used to simulate mechanisms, such as crack propagation. The stress-strain relationship emerges as a continuum mechanics scale interpretation of changes at the micro- and meso-scales. Iterative two-way updating between the cellular automata and finite elements drives the simulation forward as the material undergoes progressive damage at high strain rates. The strategy is particularly attractive on large-scale computing platforms as both methods scale well on tens of thousands of CPUs. Supported by the ARCHER Service (e347) and the Hartree Centre (HCP010).

  18. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  19. Update of cell damage mechanisms in thiamine deficiency: focus on oxidative stress, excitotoxicity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Alan S; Butterworth, Roger F

    2009-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) is a well-established model of Wernicke's encephalopathy. Although the neurologic dysfunction and brain damage resulting from the biochemical consequences of TD is well characterized, the mechanism(s) that lead to the selective histological lesions characteristic of this disorder remain a mystery. Over the course of many years, various structural and functional changes have been identified that could lead to cell death in this disorder. However, despite a concerted effort to explain the consequences of TD in terms of these changes, our understanding of the pathophysiology of this disorder remains unclear. This review will focus on three of these processes, i.e. oxidative stress, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity and inflammation and their role in selective vulnerability in TD. Since TD inhibits oxidative metabolism, a feature of many neurodegenerative disease states, it represents a model system with which to explore pathological mechanisms inherent in such maladies, with the potential to yield new insights into their possible treatment and prevention.

  20. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; ...

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivitymore » arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.« less

  1. Investigations of the damage mechanisms during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Wick, Sebastian; Laible, Maike; Rapp, Stephan; Kuznetsova, Julia; Homann, Christian; Huber, Heinz P.; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    Several investigations of dental tissue ablation with ultrashort pulsed lasers suggest that these lasers enable precise and selective material removal and reduce the formation of micro cracks and thermal effects, when compared to ns-pulses. In this study, two damage mechanisms are presented occurring during ablation of dentin using a laser emitting pulses of a duration of 380 fs at a wavelength of 1040 nm. First, it was found that nano cracks appear around the craters after single fs-pulse ablation. These cracks are directed to the crater and cross the dentinal tubules. Transient investigation of the single fs-pulse ablation process by pump-probe microscopy suggest that the driving mechanism could be a pressure wave that is released after stress confinement. Second, squared ablation holes were created by moving the laser focus at scan speeds between 0.5 mm/s and 2.0 m/s and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. It was found that deep cracks appear at the edges of the squared holes, if the scan speed is about 0.5 m/s. The fluence has only a minor impact on the crack formation. The crack propagation was investigated in the depth using x-ray micro tomography and optical coherence tomography. It was found that these cracks appear in the depth down to the dental pulp. These findings suggest that fast scanning of the laser beam is the key for damage free processing using ultrashort pulse lasers. Then, ablation rates of about 2.5 - 3.5 mm3/min/W can be achieved in dentine with pulse durations of 380 fs.

  2. Multi scale analysis by acoustic emission of damage mechanisms in natural fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnafous, C.; Touchard, F.; Chocinski-Arnault, L.

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes to develop an experimental program to characterize the type and the development of damage in composite with complex microstructure. A multi-scale analysis by acoustic emission has been developed and applied to hemp fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composite. The experimental program consists of tensile tests performed on single yarn, neat epoxy resin and composite materials to identify their AE amplitude signatures. A statistical analysis of AE amplitude signals has been realised and correlated with microscopic observations. Results have enabled to identify three types of damage in composites and their associated AE amplitudes: matrix cracking, interfacial debonding and reinforcement damage and fracture. Tracking of these damage mechanisms in hemp/epoxy composites has been performed to show the process of damage development in natural fibre reinforced composites.

  3. Mechanism of Pole-mounted Transformer Damage by Backflow Lightning and Measures against the Damage on Low-voltage Distribution Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Hideki; Hongo, Yasuji; Kado, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeu

    Pole-mounted transformer is one of the equipment that is easier to receive lightning damage. As our information society advances, the needs for supply reliability of electric power become higher, and the decreasing of lightning damages of pole-mounted transformers becomes necessary. In recent years, lightning protective devices (surge arresters) have been installed around the primary bushing of the transformers. Therefore, the number of disconnections around the primary bushing caused by lightning has been decreasing. However, the surge arrester that installed at the primary side of transformer cannot protect the transformer against backflow lightning that invades to the secondary side of transformer. The characteristic of the transformer damage by the backflow lightning is that electro-magnetic force occurring by the current flowing into the secondary side of transformer deforms the windings of the transformer. In this paper, the mechanism of transformer damage by the current flowing into the secondary side is clarified by the comparison between actual lightning damage case and the results of verification test using short-circuit generator. Effective counter measures against the damage of transformer by the backflow lightning are examined by EMTP calculations. From the calculation results, neutral grounding on low-voltage distribution line is the most effective measures in the point of decreasing of the amount of current flowing into the transformer. The less the grounding resistance, the less the amount of current flowing into the transformer. Moreover, decreasing the voltage of the secondary-side of the transformer is important to protect the bushing of the secondary-side. By the calculation result, it is clarified that the surge arresters installed around the secondary side of the transformer are effective for decreasing the voltage of the secondary side of the transformer.

  4. Different mechanisms for the photoinduced production of oxidative DNA damage by fluoroquinolones differing in photostability.

    PubMed

    Spratt, T E; Schultz, S S; Levy, D E; Chen, D; Schlüter, G; Williams, G M

    1999-09-01

    Several fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents exhibit an adverse phototoxic effect in humans and are photo-cocarcinogenic in mice. The UV-induced production of reactive oxygen species plays a role in the toxicity and may be involved in carcinogenicity. Four fluoroquinolones were examined for the ability to photochemically produce oxidative damage in naked DNA. The major structural difference in the fluoroquinolones that would have an effect on their photostability is the functionality at the 8-position. At this position, 1-cyclopropyl-7-(2,8-diazbicyclo[4.3.0]non-8-yl)-6, 8-difluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (BAY y3118) contains a chlorine atom, lomefloxacin a fluorine atom, ciprofloxacin a proton, and moxifloxacin a methoxy group. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) in calf thymus DNA was assessed by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and strand breaks were measured in pBR322 with agarose gel electrophoresis. The relative photolability of the fluoroquinolones correlated to the extent of production of 8-oxodGuo and strand breaks, with both UVA and UVB irradiation, in the following order: BAY y3118 approximately lomefloxacin > ciprofloxacin > moxifloxacin. Experiments were performed to determine whether the mechanism of damage was due to a type I (radical) or type II (singlet oxygen) pathway. Nitrogen depletion of oxygen resulted in a decrease in the extent of formation of 8-oxodGuo, suggesting that oxygen was involved. The use of selective radical or singlet oxygen inhibitors was inconclusive with respect to which pathway was involved. The use of D(2)O as a solvent, which would extend the lifetime of singlet oxygen, suggested that this species is involved in the formation of 8-oxodGuo by moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin, but not by lomefloxacin and BAY y3118. Similarly, it was found that singlet oxygen was not involved in strand break formation. Thus, the evidence suggests that fluoroquinolones can photochemically

  5. Potential mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and comparative cellular response to DNA damage in humans

    DOE PAGES

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; ...

    2015-10-08

    Here, evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Design, Setting, and Participants A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n=644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro inmore » the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n=8), patients with LFS (n=10), and age-matched human controls (n=11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. Exposures Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]; African wild dog, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; lion, 2% [95% CI, 0%-7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95% CI, 3.14%-6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25% cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In response to DNA damage, elephant lymphocytes

  6. Potential mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and comparative cellular response to DNA damage in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J.; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2015-10-08

    Here, evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Design, Setting, and Participants A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n=644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n=8), patients with LFS (n=10), and age-matched human controls (n=11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. Exposures Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]; African wild dog, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; lion, 2% [95% CI, 0%-7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95% CI, 3.14%-6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25% cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In response to DNA damage, elephant lymphocytes

  7. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans.

    PubMed

    Abegglen, Lisa M; Caulin, Aleah F; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S; Kiso, Wendy K; Schmitt, Dennis L; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T; Maley, Carlo C; Schiffman, Joshua D

    2015-11-03

    Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]; African wild dog, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; lion, 2% [95% CI, 0%-7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95% CI, 3.14%-6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25% cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In response to DNA damage, elephant lymphocytes underwent p53-mediated apoptosis

  8. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. OBJECTIVE To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. EXPOSURES Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. RESULTS Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95%CI, 0%–5%]; African wild dog, 8%[95%CI, 0%–16%]; lion, 2%[95%CI, 0% –7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95%CI, 3.14%–6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25%cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain

  9. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  10. Irreparable telomeric DNA damage and persistent DDR signalling as a shared causative mechanism of cellular senescence and ageing.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Francesca; Herbig, Utz; Longhese, Maria Pia; Fumagalli, Marzia; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA repair and halts cell cycle. If damage is not resolved, cells can enter into an irreversible state of proliferative arrest called cellular senescence. Organismal ageing in mammals is associated with accumulation of markers of cellular senescence and DDR persistence at telomeres. Since the vast majority of the cells in mammals are non-proliferating, how do they age? Are telomeres involved? Also oncogene activation causes cellular senescence due to altered DNA replication and DDR activation in particular at the telomeres. Is there a common mechanism shared among apparently distinct types of cellular senescence? And what is the role of telomeric DNA damage?

  11. Experimental verification of thermal damage mechanism in single junction GaAs solar cells irradiated by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunpeng; Feng, Guobin; Zhang, Jianmin; Lin, Xinwei; Shi, Yubin; Dou, Pengcheng

    2017-05-01

    Three types of laser irradiating experiments on single junction GaAs solar cells with the same laser energy coupling intensity were carried out, which were irradiated by in-band (808 nm) and out-of-band (1.07 μm) continuous wave lasers respectively and simultaneously. On the basis of the changes of current-voltage characteristic curves of irradiated solar cells, the damage degrees could be divided into three stages which were gently, seriously and thoroughly damaged stages. The damage mechanism was studied from two aspects: output changes of solar cell equivalent circuit under different configuration settings, thermal analysis model. The results show that damage degrees of gently and thoroughly damaged stages is insensitive to irradiation intensity. However, the damage degree of seriously damaged stage is sensitive to irradiation intensity and this is regarded to be related to thermal decomposition of GaAs. Moreover, the increase of PN junction defects leads to performance degradation of irradiated solar cells. In conclusion, the thermal damage leads to the increase of PN junction defects, thus results in the performance degradation of cells.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of silk gland damage caused by phoxim exposure and protection of phoxim-induced damage by cerium chloride in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Sun, Qingqing; Yu, Xiaohong; Xie, Yi; Hong, Jie; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sang, Xuezi; Shen, Weide; Hong, Fashui

    2015-09-01

    It is known that exposure to organophosphorus pesticides (OP) including phoxim can produce oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, and greatly attenuate cocooning rate in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Cerium treatment has been demonstrated to relieve phoxim-induced toxicity in B. mori; however, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of silk gland injury due to OP exposure and protection of gland damage due to cerium pretreatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate silk gland damage and its molecular mechanisms in phoxim-induced silkworm toxicity and the protective mechanisms of cerium following exposure to phoxim. The results showed that phoxim exposure resulted in severe gland damage, reductions in protein synthesis and the cocooning rate of silkworms. Cerium (Ce) attenuated gland damage caused by phoxim, promoted protein synthesis, increased the antioxidant capacity of the gland and increased the cocooning rate of B. mori. Furthermore, digital gene expression data suggested that phoxim exposure led to significant up-regulation of 714 genes and down-regulation of 120 genes. Of these genes, 122 were related to protein metabolism, specifically, the down-regulated Ser2, Ser3, Fib-L, P25, and CYP450. Ce pretreatment resulted in up-regulation of 162 genes, and down-regulation of 141 genes, importantly, Ser2, Ser3, Fib-L, P25, and CYP333B8 were up-regulated. Treatment with CeCl3 + phoxim resulted in higher levels of Fib-L, P25, Ser2, Ser3, CAT, TPx, and CYP333B8 expression in the silk gland of silkworms. These findings indicated that Ce increased cocooning rate via the promotion of silk protein synthesis-related gene expression in the gland under phoxim-induced toxicity. These findings may expand the application of rare earths in sericulture. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mechanical problem-solving strategies in left-brain damaged patients and apraxia of tool use.

    PubMed

    Osiurak, François; Jarry, Christophe; Lesourd, Mathieu; Baumard, Josselin; Le Gall, Didier

    2013-08-01

    Left brain damage (LBD) can impair the ability to use familiar tools (apraxia of tool use) as well as novel tools to solve mechanical problems. Thus far, the emphasis has been placed on quantitative analyses of patients' performance. Nevertheless, the question still to be answered is, what are the strategies employed by those patients when confronted with tool use situations? To answer it, we asked 16 LBD patients and 43 healthy controls to solve mechanical problems by means of several potential tools. To specify the strategies, we recorded the time spent in performing four kinds of action (no manipulation, tool manipulation, box manipulation, and tool-box manipulation) as well as the number of relevant and irrelevant tools grasped. We compared LBD patients' performance with that of controls who encountered difficulties with the task (controls-) or not (controls+). Our results indicated that LBD patients grasped a higher number of irrelevant tools than controls+ and controls-. Concerning time allocation, controls+ and controls- spent significantly more time in performing tool-box manipulation than LBD patients. These results are inconsistent with the possibility that LBD patients could engage in trial-and-error strategies and, rather, suggest that they tend to be perplexed. These findings seem to indicate that the inability to reason about the objects' physical properties might prevent LBD patients from following any problem-solving strategy.

  14. Revisiting the Molecular Mechanism of Neurological Manifestations in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Beyond Vascular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Carecchio, M.; Cantello, R.; Comi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a multiorgan disease often affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Typically, neurological manifestations of APS include thrombosis of cerebral vessels leading to stroke and requiring prompt initiation of treatment with antiplatelet drugs or anticoagulant therapy. In these cases, alterations of the coagulation system at various levels caused by multiple effects of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) have been postulated to explain the vascular damage to the CNS in APS. However, several nonvascular neurological manifestations of APS have progressively emerged over the past years. Nonthrombotic, immune-mediated mechanisms altering physiological basal ganglia function have been recently suggested to play a central role in the pathogenesis of these manifestations that include, among others, movement disorders such as chorea and behavioral and cognitive alterations. Similar clinical manifestations have been described in other autoimmune CNS diseases such as anti-NMDAR and anti-VGCK encephalitis, suggesting that the spectrum of immune-mediated basal ganglia disorders is expanding, possibly sharing some pathophysiological mechanisms. In this review, we will focus on thrombotic and nonthrombotic neurological manifestations of APS with particular attention to immune-mediated actions of aPL on the vascular system and the basal ganglia. PMID:24741580

  15. Repair of radiation-induced damage to the cell division mechanism of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Adler, H I; Fisher, W D; Hardigree, A A; Stapleton, G E

    1966-02-01

    Adler, Howard I. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn.), William D. Fisher, Alice A. Hardigree, and George E. Stapleton. Repair of radiation-induced damage to the cell division mechanism of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 91:737-742. 1966.-Microscopic observations of irradiated populations of filamentous Escherichia coli cells indicated that filaments can be induced to divide by a substance donated by neighboring cells. We have made this observation the basis for a quantitative technique in which filaments are incubated in the presence of nongrowing donor cells. The presence of "donor" organisms promotes division and subsequent colony formation in filaments. "Donor" bacteria do not affect nonfilamentous cells. An extract of "donor" cells retains the division-promoting activity. The extract has been partially fractionated, and consists of a heat-stable and a heat-labile component. The heat-stable component is inactive in promoting cell division, but enhances the activity of the heat-labile component. The division-promoting system is discussed as a radiation repair mechanism and as a normal component of the cell division system in E. coli.

  16. Characterization of mechanical damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials. Technical report, 23 May 1987-24 May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, J.

    1988-09-01

    High-strain-rate compressive failure mechanisms in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite materials were characterized. These are contrasted with composite damage development at low-strain rates, and with the dynamic failure of monolithic ceramics. It is shown that it is possible to derive major strain-rate strengthening benefits if a major fraction of the fiber reinforcement is aligned with the load axis. This effect considerably exceeds the inertial microfracture strengthening observed in monolithic ceramics, and non-aligned composites. Its basis is shown to be the trans-specimen propagation time period for heterogeneously-nucleated, high-strain kink bands. A brief study on zirconia focused on the remarkable inverse strength-strain rate result previously observed for both fully and partially-stabilized zirconia single crystals, whereby the strength decreased with increasing strain rate. Based on the hypothesis that the suppression of microplastic flow, hence, local stress relaxation, might be responsible for this behavior, fully stabilized (i.e., non-transformable) specimens were strain-gaged and subjected to compressive microstrain. The rather stunning observation was that the crystals are highly microplastic, exhibiting plastic yield on loading and anelasticity and reverse plasticity upon unloading. These results clearly support the hypothesis that with increasing strain rate, microcracking is favored at the expense of microplasticity.

  17. Damage mechanics approach to remove the constraint dependence of elastic-plastic fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.-J.; Kuang, Z.-B.

    1995-02-01

    It is now generally agreed that the applicability of a one-parameter J-based ductile fracture approach is limited to so-called high constraint crack geometries, and that the elastic-plastic fracture toughness J(Ic) is not a material constant but strongly specimen geometry constraint-dependent. In this paper, the constraint effect on elastic-plastic fracture toughness is investigated by use of a continuum damage mechanics approach. Based on a new local damage theory for ductile fracture (proposed by the author) which has a clear physical meaning and can describe both deformation and constraint effects on ductile fracture, a relationship is described between the conventional elastic-plastic fracture toughness, J(Ic), and crack tip constraint, characterized by crack tip stress triaxiality T. Then, a new parameter J(dc) (and associated criterion, J(d) = J(dc)) for ductile fracture is proposed. Experiments show that toughness variation with specimen geometry constraint changes can effectively be removed by use of the constraint correction procedure proposed in this paper, and that the new parameter J(dc) is a material constant independent of specimen geometry (constraint). This parameter can serve as a new parameter to differentiate the elastic-plastic fracture toughness of engineering materials, which provides a new approach for fracture assessments of structures. It is not necessary to determine which laboratory specimen matches the structural constraint; rather, any specimen geometry can be tested to measure the size-independent fracture toughness J(dc). The potential advantage is clear and the results are very encouraging.

  18. Sub-surface mechanical damage distributions during grinding of fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Wong, L L; Miller, P E; Feit, M D; Menapace, J A; Steele, R A; Davis, P A; Walmer, D

    2005-11-28

    The distribution and characteristics of surface cracking (i.e. sub-surface damage or SSD) formed during standard grinding processes has been investigated on fused silica glass. The SSD distributions of the ground surfaces were determined by: (1) creating a shallow (18-108 {micro}m) wedge/taper on the surface by magneto-rheological finishing; (2) exposing the SSD by HF acid etching; and (3) performing image analysis of the observed cracks from optical micrographs taken along the surface taper. The observed surface cracks are characterized as near-surface lateral and deeper trailing indent type fractures (i.e., chatter marks). The SSD depth distributions are typically described by a single exponential distribution followed by an asymptotic cutoff in depth (c{sub max}). The length of the trailing indent is strongly correlated with a given process. Using established fracture indentation relationships, it is shown that only a small fraction of the abrasive particles are being mechanically loaded and causing fracture, and it is likely the larger particles in the abrasive particle size distribution that bear the higher loads. The SSD depth was observed to increase with load and with a small amount of larger contaminant particles. Using a simple brittle fracture model for grinding, the SSD depth distribution has been related to the SSD length distribution to gain insight into ''effective'' size distribution of particles participating in the fracture. Both the average crack length and the surface roughness were found to scale linearly with the maximum SSD depth (c{sub max}). These relationships can serve as useful rules-of-thumb for nondestructively estimating SSD depth and to identify the process that caused the SSD. In certain applications such as high intensity lasers, SSD on the glass optics can serve as a reservoir for minute amounts of impurities that absorb the high intensity laser light and lead to subsequent laser-induced surface damage. Hence a more scientific

  19. Mechanism of Action of Lung Damage Caused by a Nanofilm Spray Product

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Dallot, Constantin; Larsen, Susan W.; Rose, Fabrice; Poulsen, Steen S.; Nørgaard, Asger W.; Hansen, Jitka S.; Sørli, Jorid B.; Nielsen, Gunnar D.; Foged, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of waterproofing spray products has on several occasions caused lung damage, which in some cases was fatal. The present study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of a nanofilm spray product, which has been shown to possess unusual toxic effects, including an extremely steep concentration-effect curve. The nanofilm product is intended for application on non-absorbing flooring materials and contains perfluorosiloxane as the active film-forming component. The toxicological effects and their underlying mechanisms of this product were studied using a mouse inhalation model, by in vitro techniques and by identification of the binding interaction. Inhalation of the aerosolized product gave rise to increased airway resistance in the mice, as evident from the decreased expiratory flow rate. The toxic effect of the waterproofing spray product included interaction with the pulmonary surfactants. More specifically, the active film-forming components in the spray product, perfluorinated siloxanes, inhibited the function of the lung surfactant due to non-covalent interaction with surfactant protein B, a component which is crucial for the stability and persistence of the lung surfactant film during respiration. The active film-forming component used in the present spray product is also found in several other products on the market. Hence, it may be expected that these products may have a toxicity similar to the waterproofing product studied here. Elucidation of the toxicological mechanism and identification of toxicological targets are important to perform rational and cost-effective toxicological studies. Thus, because the pulmonary surfactant system appears to be an important toxicological target for waterproofing spray products, study of surfactant inhibition could be included in toxicological assessment of this group of consumer products. PMID:24863969

  20. Mechanism of action of lung damage caused by a nanofilm spray product.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren T; Dallot, Constantin; Larsen, Susan W; Rose, Fabrice; Poulsen, Steen S; Nørgaard, Asger W; Hansen, Jitka S; Sørli, Jorid B; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Foged, Camilla

    2014-08-01

    Inhalation of waterproofing spray products has on several occasions caused lung damage, which in some cases was fatal. The present study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of a nanofilm spray product, which has been shown to possess unusual toxic effects, including an extremely steep concentration-effect curve. The nanofilm product is intended for application on non-absorbing flooring materials and contains perfluorosiloxane as the active film-forming component. The toxicological effects and their underlying mechanisms of this product were studied using a mouse inhalation model, by in vitro techniques and by identification of the binding interaction. Inhalation of the aerosolized product gave rise to increased airway resistance in the mice, as evident from the decreased expiratory flow rate. The toxic effect of the waterproofing spray product included interaction with the pulmonary surfactants. More specifically, the active film-forming components in the spray product, perfluorinated siloxanes, inhibited the function of the lung surfactant due to non-covalent interaction with surfactant protein B, a component which is crucial for the stability and persistence of the lung surfactant film during respiration. The active film-forming component used in the present spray product is also found in several other products on the market. Hence, it may be expected that these products may have a toxicity similar to the waterproofing product studied here. Elucidation of the toxicological mechanism and identification of toxicological targets are important to perform rational and cost-effective toxicological studies. Thus, because the pulmonary surfactant system appears to be an important toxicological target for waterproofing spray products, study of surfactant inhibition could be included in toxicological assessment of this group of consumer products. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Toxicological Sciences.

  1. Mechanisms of larval midgut damage following exposure to phoxim and repair of phoxim-induced damage by cerium in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohong; Sun, Qingqing; Li, Bing; Xie, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Hong, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Sang, Xuezi; Gui, Suxin; Wang, Ling; Shen, Weide; Hong, Fashui

    2015-04-01

    Bombyx mori is an important economic animal for silk production. However, it is liable to be infected by organophosphorus pesticide that can contaminate its food and growing environment. It has been known that organophosphorus pesticide including phoxim exposure may damage the digestive systems, produce oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in silkworm B. mori, whereas cerium treatment has been demonstrated to relieve phoxim-induced toxicity in B. mori. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of midgut injury due to phoxim exposure and B. mori protection after cerium pretreatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the midgut damage and its molecular mechanisms, and the protective role of cerium in B. mori following exposure to phoxim. The results showed that phoxim exposure led to severe midgut damages and oxidative stress; whereas cerium relieved midgut damage and oxidative stress caused by phoxim in B. mori. Furthermore, digital gene expression suggested that phoxim exposure led to significant up-regulation of 94 genes and down-regulation of 52 genes. Of these genes, 52 genes were related with digestion and absorption, specifically, the significant alterations of esterase, lysozyme, amylase 48, and lipase expressions. Cerium pretreatment resulted in up-regulation of 116 genes, and down-regulation of 29 genes, importantly, esterase 48, lipase, lysozyme, and α-amylase were up-regulated. Treatment with Phoxim + CeCl3 resulted in 66 genes up-regulation and 39 genes down-regulation; specifically, levels of esterase 48, lipase, lysozyme, and α-amylase expression in the midgut of silkworms were significantly increased. Therefore, esterase 48, lipase, lysozyme, and α-amylase may be potential biomarkers of midgut toxicity caused by phoxim exposure. These findings may expand the application of rare earths in sericulture. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A phenomenological model for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, damage, and plasticity of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Raykin, Julia; Rachev, Alexander I; Gleason, Rudolph L

    2009-10-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to dramatically improve mechanical and functional properties of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs). Adjusting factors such as cell source, type of extracellular matrix, cross-linking, magnitude, frequency, and time course of mechanical stimuli (among many other factors) make interpretation of experimental results challenging. Interpretation of data from such multifactor experiments requires modeling. We present a modeling framework and simulations for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, plasticity, and damage of gel-derived TEBVs that merge ideas from classical plasticity, volumetric growth, and continuum damage mechanics. Our results are compared with published data and suggest that this model framework can predict the evolution of geometry and material behavior under common experimental loading scenarios.

  3. A Phenomenological Model for Mechanically Mediated Growth, Remodeling, Damage, and Plasticity of Gel-Derived Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Raykin, Julia; Rachev, Alexander I.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to dramatically improve mechanical and functional properties of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs). Adjusting factors such as cell source, type of extracellular matrix, cross-linking, magnitude, frequency, and time course of mechanical stimuli (among many other factors) make interpretation of experimental results challenging. Interpretation of data from such multifactor experiments requires modeling. We present a modeling framework and simulations for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, plasticity, and damage of gel-derived TEBVs that merge ideas from classical plasticity, volumetric growth, and continuum damage mechanics. Our results are compared with published data and suggest that this model framework can predict the evolution of geometry and material behavior under common experimental loading scenarios. PMID:19831486

  4. Mechanical damage of tympanic membrane in relation to impulse pressure waveform - A study in chinchillas.

    PubMed

    Gan, Rong Z; Nakmali, Don; Ji, Xiao D; Leckness, Kegan; Yokell, Zachary

    2016-10-01

    Mechanical damage to middle ear components in blast exposure directly causes hearing loss, and the rupture of the tympanic membrane (TM) is the most frequent injury of the ear. However, it is unclear how the severity of injury graded by different patterns of TM rupture is related to the overpressure waveforms induced by blast waves. In the present study, the relationship between the TM rupture threshold and the impulse or overpressure waveform has been investigated in chinchillas. Two groups of animals were exposed to blast overpressure simulated in our lab under two conditions: open field and shielded with a stainless steel cup covering the animal head. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and wideband tympanometry were measured before and after exposure to check the hearing threshold and middle ear function. Results show that waveforms recorded in the shielded case were different from those in the open field and the TM rupture threshold in the shielded case was lower than that in the open field (3.4 ± 0.7 vs. 9.1 ± 1.7 psi or 181 ± 1.6 vs. 190 ± 1.9 dB SPL). The impulse pressure energy spectra analysis of waveforms demonstrates that the shielded waveforms include greater energy at high frequencies than that of the open field waves. Finally, a 3D finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear was used to compute the distributions of stress in the TM and the TM displacement with impulse pressure waves. The FE model-derived change of stress in response to pressure loading in the shielded case was substantially faster than that in the open case. This finding provides the biomechanical mechanisms for blast induced TM damage in relation to overpressure waveforms. The TM rupture threshold difference between the open and shielded cases suggests that an acoustic role of helmets may exist, intensifying ear injury during blast exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Simple and exact approach to the electronic polarization effect on the solvation free energy: formulation for quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical system and its applications to aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Omi, Atsushi; Morita, Akihiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2012-06-07

    We present a simple and exact numerical approach to compute the free energy contribution δμ in solvation due to the electron density polarization and fluctuation of a quantum-mechanical solute in the quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) simulation combined with the theory of the energy representation (QM/MM-ER). Since the electron density fluctuation is responsible for the many-body QM-MM interactions, the standard version of the energy representation method cannot be applied directly. Instead of decomposing the QM-MM polarization energy into the pairwise additive and non-additive contributions, we take sum of the polarization energies in the QM-MM interaction and adopt it as a new energy coordinate for the method of energy representation. Then, it is demonstrated that the free energy δμ can be exactly formulated in terms of the energy distribution functions for the solution and reference systems with respect to this energy coordinate. The benchmark tests were performed to examine the numerical efficiency of the method with respect to the changes in the individual properties of the solvent and the solute. Explicitly, we computed the solvation free energy of a QM water molecule in ambient and supercritical water, and also the free-energy change associated with the isomerization reaction of glycine from neutral to zwitterionic structure in aqueous solution. In all the systems examined, it was demonstrated that the computed free energy δμ agrees with the experimental value, irrespective of the choice of the reference electron density of the QM solute. The present method was also applied to a prototype reaction of adenosine 5'-triphosphate hydrolysis where the effect of the electron density fluctuation is substantial due to the excess charge. It was demonstrated that the experimental free energy of the reaction has been accurately reproduced with the present approach.

  6. Evaluation of the joint effect of the incorporation of mechanically deboned meat and grape extract on the formulation of chicken nuggets.

    PubMed

    Tournour, Hernán H; Cunha, Luís M; Magalhães, Luís M; Lima, Rui C; Segundo, Marcela A

    2017-06-01

    The proximate composition, instrumental and perceived appearance of chicken nuggets formulated with varying contents of mechanically deboned chicken meat and varying concentrations of grape pomace extract were evaluated, with the choice of formulations following a central composite design. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in fat content were mainly associated to the extent of mechanically deboned chicken meat incorporation. Colour variables ( CIE a* and b*, and Whiteness index) varied significantly (P < 0.05), with redness (a*) being the variable most influenced by the incorporation of mechanically deboned chicken meat. Whiteness index decreased with added mechanically deboned chicken meat and grape pomace extract. Response surface was applied to identify formulations with higher acceptance scores. Correspondence analysis of open-ended comments complemented the information obtained from overall acceptance, adding valuable descriptive attributes of nugget samples. Thus, addition of grape pomace extract up to 120 mg/kg and mechanically deboned chicken meat up to 15 g/100 g did not adversely affect the perceived appearance of chicken nuggets. Mechanically deboned chicken meat and grape pomace extract can be successfully used for the elaboration of novel products, for different market segments, with healthy connotations highlighted by antioxidant properties retained by the grape pomace extract.

  7. A smart sensor using a mechanical memory for structural health monitoring of a damage-controlled building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Akira; Takhira, Shinpei

    2003-04-01

    A smart sensor using a mechanical memory that can monitor peak strain or displacement was developed. The mechanism of the mechanical memory relies on the pure plastic extension of the sensing section that is realized by elastic buckling of a thin wire. The change in length of the sensing section is detected via a change in resistance, inductance or capacitance. In addition, by introducing an LC-circuit into the sensor we can add a capability for wireless retrieval of the measured data. Basically, the sensor does not need any power supply for measurements. A small power supply is required only when the data retrieval becomes necessary. Theoretical and experimental studies show the feasibility of using the sensor developed for structural health monitoring of damage-controlled structures. Though the sensor is designed to memorize the peak strain or displacement only, it can be easily modified to measure other damage indices that are physical values well correlated with the critical damage in a structure. Typical damage indices include peak strain, peak displacement, peak acceleration, absorbed energy and accumulated plastic deformation. Simple and inexpensive passive sensors that can monitor such damage indices are particularly useful for quantifying the performance of a damage-controlled building, as most damaging energy due to a large earthquake is taken care of by structural control devices. The devices are usually covered by a wall or a fire-protection material, so a simple inspection by eye is not possible without removing cover materials. We believe the installation of the sensors developed will ensure the safety of such a building with minimal cost.

  8. Susceptibility to DNA Damage as a Molecular Mechanism for Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Sunaga, Daniele Yumi; Francis-West, Philippa; Kuta, Anna; Almada, Bruno Vinícius Pimenta; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; de Andrade-Lima, Leonardo Carmo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Raposo-Amaral, Cássio Eduardo; Menck, Carlos Frederico; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2013-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCL/P) is a complex, frequent congenital malformation, determined by the interplay between genetic and environmental factors during embryonic development. Previous findings have appointed an aetiological overlap between NSCL/P and cancer, and alterations in similar biological pathways may underpin both conditions. Here, using a combination of transcriptomic profiling and functional approaches, we report that NSCL/P dental pulp stem cells exhibit dysregulation of a co-expressed gene network mainly associated with DNA double-strand break repair and cell cycle control (p = 2.88×10−2–5.02×10−9). This network included important genes for these cellular processes, such as BRCA1, RAD51, and MSH2, which are predicted to be regulated by transcription factor E2F1. Functional assays support these findings, revealing that NSCL/P cells accumulate DNA double-strand breaks upon exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, we show that E2f1, Brca1 and Rad51 are co-expressed in the developing embryonic orofacial primordia, and may act as a molecular hub playing a role in lip and palate morphogenesis. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cellular defences against DNA damage may take part in determining the susceptibility to NSCL/P. These results are in accordance with the hypothesis of aetiological overlap between this malformation and cancer, and suggest a new pathogenic mechanism for the disease. PMID:23776525

  9. The axon-glia unit in white matter stroke: mechanisms of damage and recovery.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Shira; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-10-14

    Approximately one quarter of all strokes in humans occur in white matter, and the progressive nature of white matter lesions often results in severe physical and mental disability. Unlike cortical grey matter stroke, the pathology of white matter stroke revolves around disrupted connectivity and injured axons and glial cells, rather than neuronal cell bodies. Consequently, the mechanisms behind ischemic damage to white matter elements, the regenerative responses of glial cells and their signaling pathways, all differ significantly from those in grey matter. Development of effective therapies for white matter stroke would require an enhanced understanding of the complex cellular and molecular interactions within the white matter, leading to the identification of new therapeutic targets. This review will address the unique propert