Science.gov

Sample records for damage model capable

  1. How does a cadaver model work for testing ultrasound diagnostic capability for rheumatic-like tendon damage?

    PubMed

    Janta, Iustina; Morán, Julio; Naredo, Esperanza; Nieto, Juan Carlos; Uson, Jacqueline; Möller, Ingrid; Bong, David; Bruyn, George A W; D Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Filippucci, Emilio; Hammer, Hilde Berner; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Terslev, Lene; González, Jorge Murillo; Mérida, José Ramón; Carreño, Luis

    2016-06-01

    To establish whether a cadaver model can serve as an effective surrogate for the detection of tendon damage characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, we evaluated intraobserver and interobserver agreement in the grading of RA-like tendon tears shown by US, as well as the concordance between the US findings and the surgically induced lesions in the cadaver model. RA-like tendon damage was surgically induced in the tibialis anterior tendon (TAT) and tibialis posterior tendon (TPT) of ten ankle/foot fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. Of the 20 tendons examined, six were randomly assigned a surgically induced partial tear; six a complete tear; and eight left undamaged. Three rheumatologists, experts in musculoskeletal US, assessed from 1 to 5 the quality of US imaging of the cadaveric models on a Likert scale. Tendons were then categorized as having either no damage, (0); partial tear, (1); or complete tear (2). All 20 tendons were blindly and independently evaluated twice, over two rounds, by each of the three observers. Overall, technical performance was satisfactory for all items in the two rounds (all values over 2.9 in a Likert scale 1-5). Intraobserver and interobserver agreement for US grading of tendon damage was good (mean κ values 0.62 and 0.71, respectively), with greater reliability found in the TAT than the TPT. Concordance between US findings and experimental tendon lesions was acceptable (70-100 %), again greater for the TAT than for the TPT. A cadaver model with surgically created tendon damage can be useful in evaluating US metric properties of RA tendon lesions. PMID:26995000

  2. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  3. Project CAPABLE: Model Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madawaska School District, ME.

    Project CAPABLE (Classroom Action Program: Aim: Basic Learning Effectiveness) is a classroom approach which integrates the basic learning skills with content. The goal of the project is to use basic learning skills to enhance the learning of content and at the same time use the content to teach basic learning skills. This manual illustrates how…

  4. The People Capability Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wademan, Mark R.; Spuches, Charles M.; Doughty, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The People Capability Maturity Model[R] (People CMM[R]) advocates a staged approach to organizational change. Developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, this model seeks to bring discipline to the people side of management by promoting a structured, repeatable, and predictable approach for improving an…

  5. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  6. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ootegem, Luc; Verhofstadt, Elsy; Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  7. Mathematical Model for Mapping Students' Cognitive Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambunan, Hardi

    2016-01-01

    The quality mapping of educational unit program is important issue in education in Indonesia today in an effort to improve the quality of education. The objective of this study is to make a mathematical model to find out the map of students' capability in mathematics. It has been made a mathematical model to be used in the mapping of students'…

  8. Enhancement of the Feature Extraction Capability in Global Damage Detection Using Wavelet Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Ponnaluru, Gopi Krishna

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the specific capabilities of the defect energy parameter technique for global damage detection developed by Saleeb and coworkers. The feature extraction is the most important capability in any damage-detection technique. Features are any parameters extracted from the processed measurement data in order to enhance damage detection. The damage feature extraction capability was studied extensively by analyzing various simulation results. The practical significance in structural health monitoring is that the detection at early stages of small-size defects is always desirable. The amount of changes in the structure's response due to these small defects was determined to show the needed level of accuracy in the experimental methods. The arrangement of fine/extensive sensor network to measure required data for the detection is an "unlimited" ability, but there is a difficulty to place extensive number of sensors on a structure. Therefore, an investigation was conducted using the measurements of coarse sensor network. The white and the pink noises, which cover most of the frequency ranges that are typically encountered in the many measuring devices used (e.g., accelerometers, strain gauges, etc.) are added to the displacements to investigate the effect of noisy measurements in the detection technique. The noisy displacements and the noisy damage parameter values are used to study the signal feature reconstruction using wavelets. The enhancement of the feature extraction capability was successfully achieved by the wavelet theory.

  9. Predictive capability of chlorination disinfection byproducts models.

    PubMed

    Ged, Evan C; Chadik, Paul A; Boyer, Treavor H

    2015-02-01

    There are over 100 models that have been developed for predicting trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), bromate, and unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Until now no publication has evaluated the variability of previous THM and HAA models using a common data set. In this article, the standard error (SE), Marquardt's percent standard deviation (MPSD), and linear coefficient of determination (R(2)) were used to analyze the variability of 87 models from 23 different publications. The most robust models were capable of predicting THM4 with an SE of 48 μg L(-1) and HAA6 with an SE of 15 μg L(-1), both achieving R(2) > 0.90. The majority of models were formulated for THM4. There is a lack of published models evaluating total HAAs, individual THM and HAA species, bromate, and unregulated DBPs.

  10. Graphical workstation capability for reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Haley, Pamela J.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to computational capabilities, software tools for estimating the reliability of fault-tolerant digital computer systems must also provide a means of interfacing with the user. Described here is the new graphical interface capability of the hybrid automated reliability predictor (HARP), a software package that implements advanced reliability modeling techniques. The graphics oriented (GO) module provides the user with a graphical language for modeling system failure modes through the selection of various fault-tree gates, including sequence-dependency gates, or by a Markov chain. By using this graphical input language, a fault tree becomes a convenient notation for describing a system. In accounting for any sequence dependencies, HARP converts the fault-tree notation to a complex stochastic process that is reduced to a Markov chain, which it can then solve for system reliability. The graphics capability is available for use on an IBM-compatible PC, a Sun, and a VAX workstation. The GO module is written in the C programming language and uses the graphical kernal system (GKS) standard for graphics implementation. The PC, VAX, and Sun versions of the HARP GO module are currently in beta-testing stages.

  11. Integrated Modelling of Damage and Fracture in Sheet Metal Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerlings, R. H. J.; Mediavilla, J.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2007-05-01

    A framework for finite element simulations of ductile damage development and ductile fracture during metal forming is presented. The damage evolution is described by a phenomenological continuum damage model. Crack growth and fracture are treated as the ultimate consequences of the damage process. Computationally, the initiation and growth of cracks is traced by an adaptive remeshing strategy, thereby allowing for opening crack faces. The application of the method to the fabrication of food-can lids demonstrates its capabilities, but also some of its limitations.

  12. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  13. Overview of ASC Capability Computing System Governance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, Scott W.

    2012-07-11

    This document contains a description of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program's Capability Computing System Governance Model. Objectives of the Governance Model are to ensure that the capability system resources are allocated on a priority-driven basis according to the Program requirements; and to utilize ASC Capability Systems for the large capability jobs for which they were designed and procured.

  14. Modeling Coal Seam Damage in Cast Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.H.; Preece, D.S.

    1998-11-23

    A discrete element computer program named DMC_BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece & Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in two dimensions. DMC_BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts (Preece et al, 1993). Coal seam chilling refers to the shattering of a significant portion of the coal leaving unusable fines. It is also refereed to as coal damage. Chilling is caused during a blast by a combination of explosive shock energy and movement of the adjacent rock. Chilling can be minimized by leaving a buffer zone between the bottom of the blastholes and the coal seam or by changing the blast design to decrease the powder factor or by a combination of both. Blast design in coal mine cast blasting is usually a compromise between coal damage and rock fragmentation and movement (heave). In this paper the damage to coal seams from rock movement is examined using the discrete element computer code DMC_BLAST. A rock material strength option has been incorporated into DMC_BLAST by placing bonds/links between the spherical particles used to model the rock. These bonds tie the particles together but can be broken when the tensile, compressive or shear stress in the bond exceeds the defined strength. This capability has been applied to predict coal seam damage, particularly at the toe of a cast blast where drag forces exerted by movement of the overlying rock can adversely effect the top of the coal at the bench face. A simulation of coal mine cast blasting has been performed with special attention being paid to the strength of the coal and its behavior at t he bench face during movement of the overlying material.

  15. Microcapsule-Type Organogel-Based Self-Healing System Having Secondary Damage Preventing Capability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye-In; Kim, Dong-Min; Yu, Hwan-Chul; Chung, Chan-Moon

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a novel microcapsule-type organogel-based self-healing system in which secondary damage does not occur in the healed region. A mixture of an organogelator, poor and good solvents for the gelator is used as the healing agent; when the good solvent evaporates from this agent, a viscoelastic organogel forms. The healing agent is microencapsulated with urea-formaldehyde polymer, and the resultant microcapsules are integrated into a polymer coating to prepare self-healing coatings. When the coatings are scratched, they self-heal, as demonstrated by means of corrosion testing, electrochemical testing, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After the healed coatings are subjected to vigorous vibration, it is demonstrated that no secondary damage occurs in the healed region. The secondary damage preventing capability of the self-healing coating is attributable to the viscoelasticity of the organogel. The result can give insight into the development of a "permanent" self-healing system. PMID:27070306

  16. Predictive Capability Maturity Model for computational modeling and simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2007-10-01

    The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is a new model that can be used to assess the level of maturity of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) efforts. The development of the model is based on both the authors experience and their analysis of similar investigations in the past. The perspective taken in this report is one of judging the usefulness of a predictive capability that relies on the numerical solution to partial differential equations to better inform and improve decision making. The review of past investigations, such as the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model Integration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Department of Defense Technology Readiness Levels, indicates that a more restricted, more interpretable method is needed to assess the maturity of an M&S effort. The PCMM addresses six contributing elements to M&S: (1) representation and geometric fidelity, (2) physics and material model fidelity, (3) code verification, (4) solution verification, (5) model validation, and (6) uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis. For each of these elements, attributes are identified that characterize four increasing levels of maturity. Importantly, the PCMM is a structured method for assessing the maturity of an M&S effort that is directed toward an engineering application of interest. The PCMM does not assess whether the M&S effort, the accuracy of the predictions, or the performance of the engineering system satisfies or does not satisfy specified application requirements.

  17. Finite element modeling for validation of structural damage identification experimentation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemates, D. W.; Bennett, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    The project described in this report was performed to couple experimental and analytical techniques in the field of structural health monitoring and darnage identification. To do this, a finite dement model was Constructed of a simulated three-story building used for damage identification experiments. The model was used in conjunction with data from thie physical structure to research damage identification algorithms. Of particular interest was modeling slip in joints as a function of bolt torque and predicting the smallest change of torque that could be detected experimentally. After being validated with results from the physical structure, the model was used to produce data to test the capabilities of damage identification algorithms. This report describes the finite element model constructed, the results obtained, and proposed future use of the model.

  18. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  19. Wind turbine control system modeling capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, K.; Fingersh, L.J.

    1998-04-01

    At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s (NREL`s) National Wind Technology Center the authors are continuing to make progress in their ability to model complete wind turbine systems. An ADAMS{reg_sign} model of the NREL variable speed test bed turbine was developed to determine whether wind turbine control systems could be simulated and to investigate other control strategies for this turbine. Model simulations are compared with data from the operating turbine using the current mode of operation. In general, the simulations show good agreement with test data. Having established confidence in their ability to model the physical machine, the authors evaluated two other control methods. The methods studied are a generalized predictive control method and a bias estimation method. Simulation results using these methods are compared to simulation results of the current mode of operation of the turbine.

  20. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  1. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, Kin Fung

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  2. Plasma model for charging damage

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.; Lukaszek, W.; Current, M.I.; Tripsas, N.H.

    1994-07-01

    The mechanism responsible for charging damage is treated as beam/plasma driven differences in local floating potentials on the process surface. A cold plasma flood is shown to limit these potential differences. Beam/plasma J-V characteristics obtained with CHARM2 in a high current implanter are fit with the theory. With flood OFF, the fit corresponds to plasma buildup over the target surface.

  3. A Thermo-Optic Propagation Modeling Capability.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, Karl; Akau, Ron

    2014-10-01

    A new theoretical basis is derived for tracing optical rays within a finite-element (FE) volume. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The FE methodology (FEM) is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The method is implemented in the Matlab(TM) environment and compared to closed- form gradient index models. A software architecture is also developed for implementing the algorithms in the Zemax(TM) commercial ray-trace application. A controlled thermal environment was constructed in the laboratory, and measured data was collected to validate the structural, thermal, and optical modeling methods.

  4. Comprehensive model of damage accumulation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K. R. C.; Benistant, F.; Jaraiz, M.; Rubio, J. E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Ion implantation induced damage accumulation is crucial to the simulation of silicon processing. We present a physically based damage accumulation model, implemented in a nonlattice atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulator, that can simulate a diverse range of interesting experimental observations. The model is able to reproduce the ion-mass dependent silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature of a range of ions from C to Xe, the amorphous layer thickness for a range of amorphizing implants, the superlinear increase in damage accumulation with dose, and the two-layered damage distribution observed along the path of a high-energy ion. In addition, this model is able to distinguish between dynamic annealing and post-cryogenic implantation annealing, whereby dynamic annealing is more effective in removing damage than post-cryogenic implantation annealing at the same temperature.

  5. Modeling KDP Bulk Damage Curves for Prediction of Large-Area Damage Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Runkel, M.; Sharp, R.

    1999-12-16

    Over the past two years extensive experimentation has been carded out to determine the nature of bulk damage in KDP. Automated damage testing with small beams has made it possible to rapidly investigate damage statistics and its connection to growth parameter Variation. Over this time we have built up an encyclopedia of many damage curves but only relatively few samples have been tested with large beams. The scarcity of data makes it difficult to estimate how future crystals will perform on the NIF, and the campaign nature of large beam testing is not suitable for efficient testing of many samples with rapid turn-around, it is therefore desirable to have analytical tools in place that could make reliable predictions of large-beam performance based on small-beam damage probability measurements. To that end, we discuss the application of exponential and power law damage evolution within the framework of Poisson statistics in this memo. We describe the results of fitting these models to various damage probability curves on KDP including the heavily investigated KDP214 samples. We find that both models are capable of fitting the damage probability S-curves quite well but there are multiple parameter sets for each model that produce comparable {chi}{sup 2} values. In addition, the fit parameters from the exponential model do not agree well with the measured evolution from large-beam OSL experiments where pinpoint density was shown to evolve according to n(F)=n{sub 0}exp(bF). The largest discrepancy is in determination of the b values. For the O'Connell formalism the power law case developed here, we find that the best-fit powers have approximately the same magnitude as the Weibull exponent of Feit's formalism, but it is difficult to extract information about the defect concentration using the O'Connell approach. In addition, we found that the power law case provides slightly better {chi}{sup 2} values in roughly half of the cases. We discuss these results in terms of

  6. Flight Dynamics Modeling and Simulation of a Damaged Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gautam H.; Hill, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center to establish, demonstrate, and apply methodology for modeling and implementing the aerodynamic effects of MANPADS damage to a transport aircraft into real-time flight simulation, and to demonstrate a preliminary capability of using such a simulation to conduct an assessment of aircraft survivability. Key findings from this study include: superpositioning of incremental aerodynamic characteristics to the baseline simulation aerodynamic model proved to be a simple and effective way of modeling damage effects; the primary effect of wing damage rolling moment asymmetry may limit minimum airspeed for adequate controllability, but this can be mitigated by the use of sideslip; combined effects of aerodynamics, control degradation, and thrust loss can result in significantly degraded controllability for a safe landing; and high landing speeds may be required to maintain adequate control if large excursions from the nominal approach path are allowed, but high-gain pilot control during landing can mitigate this risk.

  7. Improving Flood Damage Assessment Models in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, M.; Mysiak, J.; Carrera, L.; Koks, E.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Stage-Damage Curve (SDC) models is prevalent in ex-ante assessments of flood risk. To assess the potential damage of a flood event, SDCs describe a relation between water depth and the associated potential economic damage over land use. This relation is normally developed and calibrated through site-specific analysis based on ex-post damage observations. In some cases (e.g. Italy) SDCs are transferred from other countries, undermining the accuracy and reliability of simulation results. Against this background, we developed a refined SDC model for Northern Italy, underpinned by damage compensation records from a recent flood event. Our analysis considers both damage to physical assets and production losses from business interruptions. While the first is calculated based on land use information, production losses are measured through the spatial distribution of Gross Value Added (GVA). An additional component of the model assesses crop-specific agricultural losses as a function of flood seasonality. Our results show an overestimation of asset damage from non-calibrated SDC values up to a factor of 4.5 for tested land use categories. Furthermore, we estimate that production losses amount to around 6 per cent of the annual GVA. Also, maximum yield losses are less than a half of the amount predicted by the standard SDC methods.

  8. Modelling blast induced damage from a fully coupled explosive charge

    PubMed Central

    Onederra, Italo A.; Furtney, Jason K.; Sellers, Ewan; Iverson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents one of the latest developments in the blasting engineering modelling field—the Hybrid Stress Blasting Model (HSBM). HSBM includes a rock breakage engine to model detonation, wave propagation, rock fragmentation, and muck pile formation. Results from two controlled blasting experiments were used to evaluate the code’s ability to predict the extent of damage. Results indicate that the code is capable of adequately predicting both the extent and shape of the damage zone associated with the influence of point-of-initiation and free-face boundary conditions. Radial fractures extending towards a free face are apparent in the modelling output and matched those mapped after the experiment. In the stage 2 validation experiment, the maximum extent of visible damage was of the order of 1.45 m for the fully coupled 38-mm emulsion charge. Peak radial velocities were predicted within a relative difference of only 1.59% at the nearest history point at 0.3 m from the explosive charge. Discrepancies were larger further away from the charge, with relative differences of −22.4% and −42.9% at distances of 0.46 m and 0.61 m, respectively, meaning that the model overestimated particle velocities at these distances. This attenuation deficiency in the modelling produced an overestimation of the damage zone at the corner of the block due to excessive stress reflections. The extent of visible damage in the immediate vicinity of the blasthole adequately matched the measurements. PMID:26412978

  9. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  10. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    observations. Our results indicate that the proposed CDAC model is capable of simulating both initial small magnitude damage as well as complete failure of AC tissue. The results of this study may help to elucidate the mechanisms of AC tissue damage, which initiate and propagate OA. PMID:26043366

  11. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    observations. Our results indicate that the proposed CDAC model is capable of simulating both initial small magnitude damage as well as complete failure of AC tissue. The results of this study may help to elucidate the mechanisms of AC tissue damage, which initiate and propagate OA.

  12. Electromagnetomechanical elastodynamic model for Lamb wave damage quantification in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2014-03-01

    Physics-based wave propagation computational models play a key role in structural health monitoring (SHM) and the development of improved damage quantification methodologies. Guided waves (GWs), such as Lamb waves, provide the capability to monitor large plate-like aerospace structures with limited actuators and sensors and are sensitive to small scale damage; however due to the complex nature of GWs, accurate and efficient computation tools are necessary to investigate the mechanisms responsible for dispersion, coupling, and interaction with damage. In this paper, the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) coupled with the sharp interface model (SIM) solution methodology is used to solve the fully coupled electro-magneto-mechanical elastodynamic equations for the piezoelectric and piezomagnetic actuation and sensing of GWs in fiber reinforced composite material systems. The final framework provides the full three-dimensional displacement as well as electrical and magnetic potential fields for arbitrary plate and transducer geometries and excitation waveform and frequency. The model is validated experimentally and proven computationally efficient for a laminated composite plate. Studies are performed with surface bonded piezoelectric and embedded piezomagnetic sensors to gain insight into the physics of experimental techniques used for SHM. The symmetric collocation of piezoelectric actuators is modeled to demonstrate mode suppression in laminated composites for the purpose of damage detection. The effect of delamination and damage (i.e., matrix cracking) on the GW propagation is demonstrated and quantified. The developed model provides a valuable tool for the improvement of SHM techniques due to its proven accuracy and computational efficiency.

  13. A robust operational model for predicting where tropical cyclone waves damage coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puotinen, Marji; Maynard, Jeffrey A.; Beeden, Roger; Radford, Ben; Williams, Gareth J.

    2016-05-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) waves can severely damage coral reefs. Models that predict where to find such damage (the ‘damage zone’) enable reef managers to: 1) target management responses after major TCs in near-real time to promote recovery at severely damaged sites; and 2) identify spatial patterns in historic TC exposure to explain habitat condition trajectories. For damage models to meet these needs, they must be valid for TCs of varying intensity, circulation size and duration. Here, we map damage zones for 46 TCs that crossed Australia’s Great Barrier Reef from 1985–2015 using three models – including one we develop which extends the capability of the others. We ground truth model performance with field data of wave damage from seven TCs of varying characteristics. The model we develop (4MW) out-performed the other models at capturing all incidences of known damage. The next best performing model (AHF) both under-predicted and over-predicted damage for TCs of various types. 4MW and AHF produce strikingly different spatial and temporal patterns of damage potential when used to reconstruct past TCs from 1985–2015. The 4MW model greatly enhances both of the main capabilities TC damage models provide to managers, and is useful wherever TCs and coral reefs co-occur.

  14. A robust operational model for predicting where tropical cyclone waves damage coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Puotinen, Marji; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Beeden, Roger; Radford, Ben; Williams, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) waves can severely damage coral reefs. Models that predict where to find such damage (the 'damage zone') enable reef managers to: 1) target management responses after major TCs in near-real time to promote recovery at severely damaged sites; and 2) identify spatial patterns in historic TC exposure to explain habitat condition trajectories. For damage models to meet these needs, they must be valid for TCs of varying intensity, circulation size and duration. Here, we map damage zones for 46 TCs that crossed Australia's Great Barrier Reef from 1985-2015 using three models - including one we develop which extends the capability of the others. We ground truth model performance with field data of wave damage from seven TCs of varying characteristics. The model we develop (4MW) out-performed the other models at capturing all incidences of known damage. The next best performing model (AHF) both under-predicted and over-predicted damage for TCs of various types. 4MW and AHF produce strikingly different spatial and temporal patterns of damage potential when used to reconstruct past TCs from 1985-2015. The 4MW model greatly enhances both of the main capabilities TC damage models provide to managers, and is useful wherever TCs and coral reefs co-occur. PMID:27184607

  15. A robust operational model for predicting where tropical cyclone waves damage coral reefs

    PubMed Central

    Puotinen, Marji; Maynard, Jeffrey A.; Beeden, Roger; Radford, Ben; Williams, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) waves can severely damage coral reefs. Models that predict where to find such damage (the ‘damage zone’) enable reef managers to: 1) target management responses after major TCs in near-real time to promote recovery at severely damaged sites; and 2) identify spatial patterns in historic TC exposure to explain habitat condition trajectories. For damage models to meet these needs, they must be valid for TCs of varying intensity, circulation size and duration. Here, we map damage zones for 46 TCs that crossed Australia’s Great Barrier Reef from 1985–2015 using three models – including one we develop which extends the capability of the others. We ground truth model performance with field data of wave damage from seven TCs of varying characteristics. The model we develop (4MW) out-performed the other models at capturing all incidences of known damage. The next best performing model (AHF) both under-predicted and over-predicted damage for TCs of various types. 4MW and AHF produce strikingly different spatial and temporal patterns of damage potential when used to reconstruct past TCs from 1985–2015. The 4MW model greatly enhances both of the main capabilities TC damage models provide to managers, and is useful wherever TCs and coral reefs co-occur. PMID:27184607

  16. A robust operational model for predicting where tropical cyclone waves damage coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Puotinen, Marji; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Beeden, Roger; Radford, Ben; Williams, Gareth J

    2016-05-17

    Tropical cyclone (TC) waves can severely damage coral reefs. Models that predict where to find such damage (the 'damage zone') enable reef managers to: 1) target management responses after major TCs in near-real time to promote recovery at severely damaged sites; and 2) identify spatial patterns in historic TC exposure to explain habitat condition trajectories. For damage models to meet these needs, they must be valid for TCs of varying intensity, circulation size and duration. Here, we map damage zones for 46 TCs that crossed Australia's Great Barrier Reef from 1985-2015 using three models - including one we develop which extends the capability of the others. We ground truth model performance with field data of wave damage from seven TCs of varying characteristics. The model we develop (4MW) out-performed the other models at capturing all incidences of known damage. The next best performing model (AHF) both under-predicted and over-predicted damage for TCs of various types. 4MW and AHF produce strikingly different spatial and temporal patterns of damage potential when used to reconstruct past TCs from 1985-2015. The 4MW model greatly enhances both of the main capabilities TC damage models provide to managers, and is useful wherever TCs and coral reefs co-occur.

  17. Projecting global tropical cyclone economic damages with validation of tropical cyclone economic damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseri, Y.; Iwasaki, A.; Miyazaki, C.; Kanae, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) sometimes cause serious damages to human society and thus possible changes of TC properties in the future have been concerned. In fact, the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) mentions likely increasing in intensity and rain rate of TCs. In addition, future change of socioeconomic condition (e.g. population growth) might worsen TC impacts in the future. Thereby, in this study, we developed regression models to estimate economic damages by TCs (hereafter TC damage model), and employed those models to project TC economic damages under several future climate and socioeconomic scenarios. We developed the TC damage models for each of 4 regions; western North Pacific, North American, North Indian, and Southern Hemisphere. The inputs for TC damage model are tropical cyclone central pressure, populations in the area exposed by tropical cyclone wind, and GDP (Gross Domestic Product) per capita. The TC damage models we firstly developed tended to overestimate very low damages and also underestimate very high damages. Thereby we modified structure of TC damage models to improve model performance, and then executed extensive validation of the model. The modified model presented better performance in estimating very low and high TC damages. After the modification and validation of the model, we determined the structure of TC damage models and projected TC economic damages. The result indicated increase in TC economic damage in global scale, while TC economic damage against world GDP would decrease in the future, which result is consistent with previous study.

  18. Progressive Damage Modeling of Notched Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitharaju, Venkat; Aashat, Satvir; Kia, Hamid; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip

    2016-01-01

    There is an increased interest in using non-crimp fabric reinforced composites for primary and secondary structural weight savings in high performance automobile applications. However, one of the main challenges in implementing these composites is the lack of understanding of damage progression under a wide variety of loading conditions for general configurations. Towards that end, researchers at GM and NASA are developing new damage models to predict accurately the progressive failure of these composites. In this investigation, the developed progressive failure analysis model was applied to study damage progression in center-notched and open-hole tension specimens for various laminate schemes. The results of a detailed study with respect to the effect of element size on the analysis outcome are presented.

  19. Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for Software Process Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Robert Y.

    2000-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Avionic Systems Division's implementation of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for improvements in the software development process. The presentation reviews the process involved in implementing the model and the benefits of using CMM to improve the software development process.

  20. Model capabilities for in-situ oil shale recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hommert, P.J.; Tyner, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    The extensive oil shale reserves of the United States are now under development as an energy source. One of the approaches for extracting oil from shale is the so-called modified in-situ retort. The operation of such retorts for maximum yield requires an understanding of oil loss mechanisms so that operating strategies that minimize these losses can be developed. The present modeling capabilities for describing the behavior and yield from a modified in-situ retort are discussed. It is shown how the advances made in describing retort chemistry have greatly increased the predictive capabilities of these models. Two models that have been subject to comparison with laboratory retorts are described. The first is a one-dimensional model that treats the retort as a packed bed reactor, the second is a quasi-two-dimensional examination of block retorting. Both models are capable of predicting retorting rates, off gas composition and oil yield losses to coking and combustion. The block model, for example, describes conditions where local oil yield losses can be as high as 50%. Areas for further model improvement include additional work on describing retort chemistry, such as the steam/char and gas phase combustion reactions. The major need for modeling now is expansion to multi-dimensional simulation. This is necessary if a predictive capability is to be developed for field situations where sweep efficiency losses and gravitational effects become important.

  1. Survey of four damage models for concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Leelavanichkul, Seubpong; Brannon, Rebecca Moss

    2009-08-01

    Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to statistical variability of material

  2. Simple model of laser damage initiation and conditioning in frequency conversion crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Trenholme, J B

    2005-10-28

    Laser conditioning, i.e. pre-exposure to less than damaging laser fluence, has been shown to improve the damage resistance of KDP/DKDP frequency conversion crystals. We have extended our damage model, small absorbing precursors with a distribution of sizes, to describe various damage related properties such as damage density and effects of laser conditioning in crystals. The model assumes the rate limiting process for both initiation and conditioning depends on temperature and that separate threshold temperatures exist for either conditioning or damage initiation to occur. This is reasonable in KDP/DKDP since the melting temperature is far below the temperatures associated with plasma formation and damage events. This model is capable of accounting for some recently observed damage-conditioning behaviors.

  3. Chemical Modeling for Studies of GeoTRACE Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Geostationary measurements of tropospheric pollutants with high spatial and temporal resolution will revolutionize the understanding and predictions of the chemically linked global pollutants aerosols and ozone. However, the capabilities of proposed geostationary instruments, particularly GeoTRACE, have not been thoroughly studied with model simulations. Such model simulations are important to answer the questions and allay the concerns that have been expressed in the atmospheric sciences community about the feasibility of such measurements. We proposed a suite of chemical transport model simulations using the EPA Models 3 chemical transport model, which obtains its meteorology from the MM-5 mesoscale model. The model output consists of gridded abundances of chemical pollutants and meteorological parameters every 30-60 minutes for cases that have occurred in the Eastern United States. This output was intended to be used to test the GeoTRACE capability to retrieve the tropospheric columns of these pollutants.

  4. Homogenization of intergranular fracture towards a transient gradient damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Poh, L. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on the intergranular fracture of polycrystalline materials, where a detailed model at the meso-scale is translated onto the macro-level through a proposed homogenization theory. The bottom-up strategy involves the introduction of an additional macro-kinematic field to characterize the average displacement jump within the unit cell. Together with the standard macro-strain field, the underlying processes are propagated onto the macro-scale by imposing the equivalence of power and energy at the two scales. The set of macro-governing equations and constitutive relations are next extracted naturally as per standard thermodynamics procedure. The resulting homogenized microforce balance recovers the so-called 'implicit' gradient expression with a transient nonlocal interaction. The homogenized gradient damage model is shown to fully regularize the softening behavior, i.e. the structural response is made mesh-independent, with the damage strain correctly localizing into a macroscopic crack, hence resolving the spurious damage growth observed in many conventional gradient damage models. Furthermore, the predictive capability of the homogenized model is demonstrated by benchmarking its solutions against reference meso-solutions, where a good match is obtained with minimal calibrations, for two different grain sizes.

  5. Integrated simulation and modeling capability for alternate magnetic fusion concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E.B.; Jarboe, T. R.; LoDestro, L. L.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    1998-11-03

    This document summarizes a strategic study addressing the development of a comprehensive modeling and simulation capability for magnetic fusion experiments with particular emphasis on devices that are alternatives to the mainline tokamak device. A code development project in this area supports two defined strategic thrust areas in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program: (1) comprehensive simulation and modeling of magnetic fusion experiments and (2) development, operation, and modeling of magnetic fusion alternate- concept experiment

  6. Space Weather Models at the CCMC And Their Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Rastatter, Lutz; MacNeice, Peter; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2007-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second focus of CCMC activities is on validation and verification of space weather models, and on the transition of appropriate models to space weather forecast centers. As part of the latter activity, the CCMC develops real-time simulation systems that stress models through routine execution. A by-product of these real-time calculations is the ability to derive model products, which may be useful for space weather operators. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the community-provided, space weather-relevant, model suite, which resides at CCMC. We will discuss current capabilities, and analyze expected future developments of space weather related modeling.

  7. Numerical Modelling and Damage Assessment of Rotary Wing Aircraft Cabin Door Using Continuum Damage Mechanics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyina, Gangadhara Rao T.; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; Subba Rao, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of ultimate strength remains the main challenge in the simulation of the mechanical response of composite structures. This paper examines continuum damage model to predict the strength and size effects for deformation and failure response of polymer composite laminates when subjected to complex state of stress. The paper also considers how the overall results of the exercise can be applied in design applications. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting prediction of size effects are compared against the standard benchmark solutions. The stress analysis for strength prediction of rotary wing aircraft cabin door is carried out. The goal of this study is to extend the proposed continuum damage model such that it can be accurately predict the failure around stress concentration regions. The finite element-based continuum damage mechanics model can be applied to the structures and components of arbitrary configurations where analytical solutions could not be developed.

  8. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  9. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Humberto; Burr, Tom; Coles, Garill A; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Garrett, Alfred; Gorensek, Maximilian; Hamm, Luther; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Tzanos, Constantine P; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  10. A continuum damage model of fatigue-induced damage in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented which predicts the stress-strain behavior of continuous fiber reinforced laminated composites in the presence of microstructural damage. The model is based on the concept of continuum damage mechanics and uses internal state variables to characterize the various damage modes. The associated internal state variable growth laws are mathematical models of the loading history induced development of microstructural damage. The model is demonstrated by using it to predict the response of damaged AS-4/3502 graphite/epoxy laminate panels.

  11. Aeroheating Mapping to Thermal Model for Autonomous Aerobraking Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal modeling has been performed to evaluate the potential for autonomous aerobraking of a spacecraft in the atmosphere of a planet. As part of this modeling, the aeroheating flux during aerobraking must be applied to the spacecraft solar arrays to evaluate their thermal response. On the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) mission, this was done via two separate thermal models and an extensive suite of mapping scripts. That method has been revised, and the thermal analysis of an aerobraking pass can now be accomplished via a single thermal model, using a new capability in the Thermal Desktop software. This capability, Boundary Condition Mapper, has the ability to input heating flux files that vary with time, position on the solar array, and with the skin temperature. A recently added feature to the Boundary Condition Mapper is that this module can also utilize files that describe the variation of aeroheating over the surface with atmospheric density (rather than time); this is the format of the MRO aeroheating files. This capability has allowed a huge streamlining of the MRO thermal process, simplifying the procedure for importing new aeroheating files and trajectory information. The new process, as well as the quantified time savings, is described.

  12. Flood damage modeling based on expert knowledge: Insights from French damage model for agricultural sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grelot, Frédéric; Agenais, Anne-Laurence; Brémond, Pauline

    2015-04-01

    In France, since 2011, it is mandatory for local communities to conduct cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of their flood management projects, to make them eligible for financial support from the State. Meanwhile, as a support, the French Ministry in charge of Environment proposed a methodology to fulfill CBA. Like for many other countries, this methodology is based on the estimation of flood damage. However, existing models to estimate flood damage were judged not convenient for a national-wide use. As a consequence, the French Ministry in charge of Environment launched studies to develop damage models for different sectors, such as: residential sector, public infrastructures, agricultural sector, and commercial and industrial sector. In this presentation, we aim at presenting and discussing methodological choices of those damage models. They all share the same principle: no sufficient data from past events were available to build damage models on a statistical analysis, so modeling was based on expert knowledge. We will focus on the model built for agricultural activities and more precisely for agricultural lands. This model was based on feedback from 30 agricultural experts who experienced floods in their geographical areas. They were selected to have a representative experience of crops and flood conditions in France. The model is composed of: (i) damaging functions, which reveal physiological vulnerability of crops, (ii) action functions, which correspond to farmers' decision rules for carrying on crops after a flood, and (iii) economic agricultural data, which correspond to featured characteristics of crops in the geographical area where the flood management project studied takes place. The two first components are generic and the third one is specific to the area studied. It is, thus, possible to produce flood damage functions adapted to different agronomic and geographical contexts. In the end, the model was applied to obtain a pool of damage functions giving

  13. Flood damage modeling based on expert knowledge: Insights from French damage model for agricultural sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grelot, Frédéric; Agenais, Anne-Laurence; Brémond, Pauline

    2014-05-01

    In France, since 2011, it is mandatory for local communities to conduct cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of their flood management projects, to make them eligible for financial support from the State. Meanwhile, as a support, the French Ministry in charge of Environment proposed a methodology to fulfill CBA. Like for many other countries, this methodology is based on the estimation of flood damage. Howerver, existing models to estimate flood damage were judged not convenient for a national-wide use. As a consequence, the French Ministry in charge of Environment launched studies to develop damage models for different sectors, such as: residential sector, public infrastructures, agricultural sector, and commercial and industrial sector. In this presentation, we aim at presenting and discussing methodological choices of those damage models. They all share the same principle: no sufficient data from past events were available to build damage models on a statistical analysis, so modeling was based on expert knowledge. We will focus on the model built for agricultural activities and more precisely for agricultural lands. This model was based on feedback from 30 agricultural experts who experienced floods in their geographical areas. They were selected to have a representative experience of crops and flood conditions in France. The model is composed of: (i) damaging functions, which reveal physiological vulnerability of crops, (ii) action functions, which correspond to farmers' decision rules for carrying on crops after a flood, and (iii) economic agricultural data, which correspond to featured characteristics of crops in the geographical area where the flood management project studied takes place. The two first components are generic and the third one is specific to the area studied. It is, thus, possible to produce flood damage functions adapted to different agronomic and geographical contexts. In the end, the model was applied to obtain a pool of damage functions giving

  14. Development of a fourth generation predictive capability maturity model.

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, Richard Guy; Witkowski, Walter R.; Urbina, Angel; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2013-09-01

    The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is an expert elicitation tool designed to characterize and communicate completeness of the approaches used for computational model definition, verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification associated for an intended application. The primary application of this tool at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been for physics-based computational simulations in support of nuclear weapons applications. The two main goals of a PCMM evaluation are 1) the communication of computational simulation capability, accurately and transparently, and 2) the development of input for effective planning. As a result of the increasing importance of computational simulation to SNLs mission, the PCMM has evolved through multiple generations with the goal to provide more clarity, rigor, and completeness in its application. This report describes the approach used to develop the fourth generation of the PCMM.

  15. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Airport Capacity and Delay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, David A.; Nelson, Caroline; Shapiro, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    The ASAC Airport Capacity Model and the ASAC Airport Delay Model support analyses of technologies addressing airport capacity. NASA's Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Airport Capacity Model estimates the capacity of an airport as a function of weather, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) procedures, traffic characteristics, and the level of technology available. Airport capacity is presented as a Pareto frontier of arrivals per hour versus departures per hour. The ASAC Airport Delay Model allows the user to estimate the minutes of arrival delay for an airport, given its (weather dependent) capacity. Historical weather observations and demand patterns are provided by ASAC as inputs to the delay model. The ASAC economic models can translate a reduction in delay minutes into benefit dollars.

  16. Interacting damage models mapped onto ising and percolation models

    SciTech Connect

    Toussaint, Renaud; Pride, Steven R.

    2004-03-23

    The authors introduce a class of damage models on regular lattices with isotropic interactions between the broken cells of the lattice. Quasistatic fiber bundles are an example. The interactions are assumed to be weak, in the sense that the stress perturbation from a broken cell is much smaller than the mean stress in the system. The system starts intact with a surface-energy threshold required to break any cell sampled from an uncorrelated quenched-disorder distribution. The evolution of this heterogeneous system is ruled by Griffith's principle which states that a cell breaks when the release in potential (elastic) energy in the system exceeds the surface-energy barrier necessary to break the cell. By direct integration over all possible realizations of the quenched disorder, they obtain the probability distribution of each damage configuration at any level of the imposed external deformation. They demonstrate an isomorphism between the distributions so obtained and standard generalized Ising models, in which the coupling constants and effective temperature in the Ising model are functions of the nature of the quenched-disorder distribution and the extent of accumulated damage. In particular, they show that damage models with global load sharing are isomorphic to standard percolation theory, that damage models with local load sharing rule are isomorphic to the standard ising model, and draw consequences thereof for the universality class and behavior of the autocorrelation length of the breakdown transitions corresponding to these models. they also treat damage models having more general power-law interactions, and classify the breakdown process as a function of the power-law interaction exponent. Last, they also show that the probability distribution over configurations is a maximum of Shannon's entropy under some specific constraints related to the energetic balance of the fracture process, which firmly relates this type of quenched-disorder based damage model

  17. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  18. Neural network modeling of a dolphin's sonar discrimination capabilities.

    PubMed

    Au, W W; Andersen, L N; Rasmussen, A R; Roitblat, H L; Nachtigall, P E

    1995-07-01

    The capability of an echolocating dolphin to discriminate differences in the wall thickness of cylinders was previously modeled by a counterpropagation neural network using only spectral information from the echoes. In this study, both time and frequency information were used to model the dolphin discrimination capabilities. Echoes from the same cylinders were digitized using a broadband simulated dolphin sonar signal with the transducer mounted on the dolphin's pen. The echoes were filtered by a bank of continuous constant-Q digital filters and the energy from each filter was computed in time increments of 1/bandwidth. Echo features of the standard and each comparison target were analyzed in pairs by a counterpropagation neural network, a backpropagation neural network, and a model using Euclidean distance measures. The backpropagation network performed better than both the counterpropagation network, and the Euclidean model, using either spectral-only features or combined temporal and spectral features. All models performed better using features containing both temporal and spectral information. The backpropagation network was able to perform better than the dolphins for noise-free echoes with Q values as low as 2 and 3. For a Q of 2, only temporal information was available. However, with noisy data, the network required a Q of 8 in order to perform as well as the dolphin.

  19. Damage Propagation Modeling for Aircraft Engine Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai; Simon, Don; Eklund, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how damage propagation can be modeled within the modules of aircraft gas turbine engines. To that end, response surfaces of all sensors are generated via a thermo-dynamical simulation model for the engine as a function of variations of flow and efficiency of the modules of interest. An exponential rate of change for flow and efficiency loss was imposed for each data set, starting at a randomly chosen initial deterioration set point. The rate of change of the flow and efficiency denotes an otherwise unspecified fault with increasingly worsening effect. The rates of change of the faults were constrained to an upper threshold but were otherwise chosen randomly. Damage propagation was allowed to continue until a failure criterion was reached. A health index was defined as the minimum of several superimposed operational margins at any given time instant and the failure criterion is reached when health index reaches zero. Output of the model was the time series (cycles) of sensed measurements typically available from aircraft gas turbine engines. The data generated were used as challenge data for the Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) data competition at PHM 08.

  20. Object-Oriented MDAO Tool with Aeroservoelastic Model Tuning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley; Lung, Shun-fat

    2008-01-01

    An object-oriented multi-disciplinary analysis and optimization (MDAO) tool has been developed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to automate the design and analysis process and leverage existing commercial as well as in-house codes to enable true multidisciplinary optimization in the preliminary design stage of subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. Once the structural analysis discipline is finalized and integrated completely into the MDAO process, other disciplines such as aerodynamics and flight controls will be integrated as well. Simple and efficient model tuning capabilities based on optimization problem are successfully integrated with the MDAO tool. More synchronized all phases of experimental testing (ground and flight), analytical model updating, high-fidelity simulations for model validation, and integrated design may result in reduction of uncertainties in the aeroservoelastic model and increase the flight safety.

  1. Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Vertical Nesting Capability

    2014-08-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with vertical nesting capability is an extension of the WRF model, which is available in the public domain, from www.wrf-model.org. The new code modifies the nesting procedure, which passes lateral boundary conditions between computational domains in the WRF model. Previously, the same vertical grid was required on all domains, while the new code allows different vertical grids to be used on concurrently run domains. This new functionality improvesmore » WRF's ability to produce high-resolution simulations of the atmosphere by allowing a wider range of scales to be efficiently resolved and more accurate lateral boundary conditions to be provided through the nesting procedure.« less

  2. Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Vertical Nesting Capability

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with vertical nesting capability is an extension of the WRF model, which is available in the public domain, from www.wrf-model.org. The new code modifies the nesting procedure, which passes lateral boundary conditions between computational domains in the WRF model. Previously, the same vertical grid was required on all domains, while the new code allows different vertical grids to be used on concurrently run domains. This new functionality improves WRF's ability to produce high-resolution simulations of the atmosphere by allowing a wider range of scales to be efficiently resolved and more accurate lateral boundary conditions to be provided through the nesting procedure.

  3. New Integrated Modeling Capabilities: MIDAS' Recent Behavioral Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian F.; Jarvis, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    The Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) is an integrated human performance modeling software tool that is based on mechanisms that underlie and cause human behavior. A PC-Windows version of MIDAS has been created that integrates the anthropometric character "Jack (TM)" with MIDAS' validated perceptual and attention mechanisms. MIDAS now models multiple simulated humans engaging in goal-related behaviors. New capabilities include the ability to predict situations in which errors and/or performance decrements are likely due to a variety of factors including concurrent workload and performance influencing factors (PIFs). This paper describes a new model that predicts the effects of microgravity on a mission specialist's performance, and its first application to simulating the task of conducting a Life Sciences experiment in space according to a sequential or parallel schedule of performance.

  4. Towards enhancing Sandia's capabilities in multiscale materials modeling and simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, John Bahram; Fang, Huei Eliot; Barbour, John Charles; Westrich, Henry Roger; Chen, Er-Ping

    2004-01-01

    We report our conclusions in support of the FY 2003 Science and Technology Milestone ST03-3.5. The goal of the milestone was to develop a research plan for expanding Sandia's capabilities in materials modeling and simulation. From inquiries and discussion with technical staff during FY 2003 we conclude that it is premature to formulate the envisioned coordinated research plan. The more appropriate goal is to develop a set of computational tools for making scale transitions and accumulate experience with applying these tools to real test cases so as to enable us to attack each new problem with higher confidence of success.

  5. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the

  6. A Thermodynamically Consistent Damage Model for Advanced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimi, Pere; Camanho, Pedro P.; Mayugo, Joan-Andreu; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A continuum damage model for the prediction of damage onset and structural collapse of structures manufactured in fiber-reinforced plastic laminates is proposed. The principal damage mechanisms occurring in the longitudinal and transverse directions of a ply are represented by a damage tensor that is fixed in space. Crack closure under load reversal effects are taken into account using damage variables established as a function of the sign of the components of the stress tensor. Damage activation functions based on the LaRC04 failure criteria are used to predict the different damage mechanisms occurring at the ply level. The constitutive damage model is implemented in a finite element code. The objectivity of the numerical model is assured by regularizing the dissipated energy at a material point using Bazant's Crack Band Model. To verify the accuracy of the approach, analyses of coupon specimens were performed, and the numerical predictions were compared with experimental data.

  7. Modeling and characterization of recompressed damaged materials

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Cazamias, J U; Kalantar, D H; LeBlanc, M M; Springer, H K

    2004-02-11

    Experiments have been performed to explore conditions under which spall damage is recompressed with the ultimate goal of developing a predictive model. Spall is introduced through traditional gas gun techniques or with laser ablation. Recompression techniques producing a uniaxial stress state, such as a Hopkinson bar, do not create sufficient confinement to close the porosity. Higher stress triaxialities achieved through a gas gun or laser recompression can close the spall. Characterization of the recompressed samples by optical metallography and electron microscopy reveal a narrow, highly deformed process zone. At the higher pressures achieved in the gas gun, little evidence of spall remains other than differentially etched features in the optical micrographs. With the very high strain rates achieved with laser techniques there is jetting from voids and other signs of turbulent metal flow. Simulations of spall and recompression on micromechanical models containing a single void suggest that it might be possible to represent the recompression using models similar to those employed for void growth. Calculations using multiple, randomly distributed voids are needed to determine if such models will yield the proper behavior for more realistic microstructures.

  8. Development of an Aeroelastic Modeling Capability for Transient Nozzle Side Load Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development during test. While three-dimensional, transient, turbulent, chemically reacting computational fluid dynamics methodology has been demonstrated to capture major side load physics with rigid nozzles, hot-fire tests often show nozzle structure deformation during major side load events, leading to structural damages if structural strengthening measures were not taken. The modeling picture is incomplete without the capability to address the two-way responses between the structure and fluid. The objective of this study is to develop a coupled aeroelastic modeling capability by implementing the necessary structural dynamics component into an anchored computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational fluid dynamics component is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, while the computational structural dynamics component is developed in the framework of modal analysis. Transient aeroelastic nozzle startup analyses of the Block I Space Shuttle Main Engine at sea level were performed. The computed results from the aeroelastic nozzle modeling are presented.

  9. Frameworks for Assessing the Quality of Modeling and Simulation Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, W. J.

    2012-12-01

    The importance of assuring quality in modeling and simulation has spawned several frameworks for structuring the examination of quality. The format and content of these frameworks provides an emphasis, completeness and flow to assessment activities. I will examine four frameworks that have been developed and describe how they can be improved and applied to a broader set of high consequence applications. Perhaps the first of these frameworks was known as CSAU [Boyack] (code scaling, applicability and uncertainty) used for nuclear reactor safety and endorsed the United States' Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). This framework was shaped by nuclear safety practice, and the practical structure needed after the Three Mile Island accident. It incorporated the dominant experimental program, the dominant analysis approach, and concerns about the quality of modeling. The USNRC gave it the force of law that made the nuclear industry take it seriously. After the cessation of nuclear weapons' testing the United States began a program of examining the reliability of these weapons without testing. This program utilizes science including theory, modeling, simulation and experimentation to replace the underground testing. The emphasis on modeling and simulation necessitated attention on the quality of these simulations. Sandia developed the PCMM (predictive capability maturity model) to structure this attention [Oberkampf]. PCMM divides simulation into six core activities to be examined and graded relative to the needs of the modeling activity. NASA [NASA] has built yet another framework in response to the tragedy of the space shuttle accidents. Finally, Ben-Haim and Hemez focus upon modeling robustness and predictive fidelity in another approach. These frameworks are similar, and applied in a similar fashion. The adoption of these frameworks at Sandia and NASA has been slow and arduous because the force of law has not assisted acceptance. All existing frameworks are

  10. Modeling continuous-fiber reinforced polymer composites for exploration of damage tolerant concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Peter J.

    This work aims to improve the predictive capability for fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite laminates using the finite element method. A new tool for modeling composite damage was developed which considers important modes of failure. Well-known micromechanical models were implemented to predict material values for material systems of interest to aerospace applications. These generated material values served as input to intralaminar and interlaminar damage models. A three-dimensional in-plane damage material model was implemented and behavior verified. Deficiencies in current state-of-the-art interlaminar capabilities were explored using the virtual crack closure technique and the cohesive zone model. A user-defined cohesive element was implemented to discover the importance of traction-separation material constitutive behavior. A novel method for correlation of traction-separation parameters was created. This new damage modeling tool was used for evaluation of novel material systems to improve damage tolerance. Classical laminate plate theory was used in a full-factorial study of layerwise-hybrid laminates. Filament-wound laminated composite cylindrical shells were subjected to quasi-static loading to validate the finite element computational composite damage model. The new tool for modeling provides sufficient accuracy and generality for use on a wide-range of problems.

  11. Micromechanics Modeling of Composites Subjected to Multiaxial Progressive Damage in the Constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Amold, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The high-fidelity generalized method of cells composite micromechanics model is extended to include constituent-scale progressive damage via a proposed damage model. The damage model assumes that all material nonlinearity is due to damage in the form of reduced stiffness, and it uses six scalar damage variables (three for tension and three for compression) to track the damage. Damage strains are introduced that account for interaction among the strain components and that also allow the development of the damage evolution equations based on the constituent material uniaxial stress strain response. Local final-failure criteria are also proposed based on mode-specific strain energy release rates and total dissipated strain energy. The coupled micromechanics-damage model described herein is applied to a unidirectional E-glass/epoxy composite and a proprietary polymer matrix composite. Results illustrate the capability of the coupled model to capture the vastly different character of the monolithic (neat) resin matrix and the composite in response to far-field tension, compression, and shear loading.

  12. ISO 9000 and/or Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gholston, Sampson E.

    2002-01-01

    For businesses and organizations to remain competitive today they must have processes and systems in place that will allow them to first identify customer needs and then develop products/processes that will meet or exceed the customers needs and expectations. Customer needs, once identified, are normally stated as requirements. Designers can then develop products/processes that will meet these requirements. Several functions, such as quality management and systems engineering management are used to assist product development teams in the development process. Both functions exist in all organizations and both have a similar objective, which is to ensure that developed processes will meet customer requirements. Are efforts in these organizations being duplicated? Are both functions needed by organizations? What are the similarities and differences between the functions listed above? ISO 9000 is an international standard of goods and services. It sets broad requirements for the assurance of quality and for management's involvement. It requires organizations to document the processes and to follow these documented processes. ISO 9000 gives customers assurance that the suppliers have control of the process for product development. Systems engineering can broadly be defined as a discipline that seeks to ensure that all requirements for a system are satisfied throughout the life of the system by preserving their interrelationship. The key activities of systems engineering include requirements analysis, functional analysis/allocation, design synthesis and verification, and system analysis and control. The systems engineering process, when followed properly, will lead to higher quality products, lower cost products, and shorter development cycles. The System Engineering Capability Maturity Model (SE-CMM) will allow companies to measure their system engineering capability and continuously improve those capabilities. ISO 9000 and SE-CMM seem to have a similar objective, which

  13. Capable of Suicide: A Functional Model of the Acquired Capability Component of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Phillip N.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2016-01-01

    The current review aims to present a functional model of the acquired capability for suicide; a component of Joiner’s (2005) Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide. This review is aimed at integrating the points discussed by Joiner into a unified and specific conceptualization of acquired capability. Additionally, we offer some points of elaboration; such as the interaction between specific diatheses with life events, the role of short-term bolstering of the capability for suicide, and how contextual factors moderate the experience of painful and provocative life events; thereby leading to fearlessness and pain insensitivity to the actions and ideas involved in suicide. PMID:20560748

  14. Systems Modeling to Implement Integrated System Health Management Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Jorge F.; Walker, Mark; Morris, Jonathan; Smith, Harvey; Schmalzel, John

    2007-01-01

    ISHM capability includes: detection of anomalies, diagnosis of causes of anomalies, prediction of future anomalies, and user interfaces that enable integrated awareness (past, present, and future) by users. This is achieved by focused management of data, information and knowledge (DIaK) that will likely be distributed across networks. Management of DIaK implies storage, sharing (timely availability), maintaining, evolving, and processing. Processing of DIaK encapsulates strategies, methodologies, algorithms, etc. focused on achieving high ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL). High FCL means a high degree of success in detecting anomalies, diagnosing causes, predicting future anomalies, and enabling health integrated awareness by the user. A model that enables ISHM capability, and hence, DIaK management, is denominated the ISHM Model of the System (IMS). We describe aspects of the IMS that focus on processing of DIaK. Strategies, methodologies, and algorithms require proper context. We describe an approach to define and use contexts, implementation in an object-oriented software environment (G2), and validation using actual test data from a methane thruster test program at NASA SSC. Context is linked to existence of relationships among elements of a system. For example, the context to use a strategy to detect leak is to identify closed subsystems (e.g. bounded by closed valves and by tanks) that include pressure sensors, and check if the pressure is changing. We call these subsystems Pressurizable Subsystems. If pressure changes are detected, then all members of the closed subsystem become suspect of leakage. In this case, the context is defined by identifying a subsystem that is suitable for applying a strategy. Contexts are defined in many ways. Often, a context is defined by relationships of function (e.g. liquid flow, maintaining pressure, etc.), form (e.g. part of the same component, connected to other components, etc.), or space (e.g. physically close

  15. The relationship between observed fatigue damage and life estimation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurath, Peter; Socie, Darrell F.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the surface of laboratory specimens subjected to axial and torsional fatigue loadings has resulted in the identification of three damage fatigue phenomena: crack nucleation, shear crack growth, and tensile crack growth. Material, microstructure, state of stress/strain, and loading amplitude all influence which of the three types of fatigue damage occurs during a dominant fatigue life fraction. Fatigue damage maps are employed to summarize the experimental observations. Appropriate bulk stress/strain damage parameters are suggested to model fatigue damage for the dominant fatigue life fraction. Extension of the damage map concept to more complex loadings is presented.

  16. Current Capabilities of the Fuel Performance Modeling Code PARFUME

    SciTech Connect

    G. K. Miller; D. A. Petti; J. T. Maki; D. L. Knudson

    2004-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. A fuel performance modeling code (called PARFUME), which simulates the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation, is under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Among current capabilities in the code are: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 3) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, kernel migration, and thinning of the SiC caused by interaction of fission products with the SiC, 4) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 5) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products, that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 6) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. This paper presents an overview of the code.

  17. A procedure for utilization of a damage-dependent constitutive model for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, David C.; Allen, David H.; Harris, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the procedure for utilizing a damage constitutive model to predict progressive damage growth in laminated composites. In this model, the effects of the internal damage are represented by strain-like second order tensorial damage variables and enter the analysis through damage dependent ply level and laminate level constitutive equations. The growth of matrix cracks due to fatigue loading is predicted by an experimentally based damage evolutionary relationship. This model is incorporated into a computer code called FLAMSTR. This code is capable of predicting the constitutive response and matrix crack damage accumulation in fatigue loaded laminated composites. The structure and usage of FLAMSTR are presented along with sample input and output files to assist the code user. As an example problem, an analysis of crossply laminates subjected to two stage fatigue loading was conducted and the resulting damage accumulation and stress redistribution were examined to determine the effect of variations in fatigue load amplitude applied during the first stage of the load history. It was found that the model predicts a significant loading history effect on damage evolution.

  18. Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Investment Model-Cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jesse; Santmire, Tara

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Air Cargo Investment Model-Cargo (ACIMC), is to examine the economic effects of technology investment on the air cargo market, particularly the market for new cargo aircraft. To do so, we have built an econometrically based model designed to operate like the ACIM. Two main drivers account for virtually all of the demand: the growth rate of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and changes in the fare yield (which is a proxy of the price charged or fare). These differences arise from a combination of the nature of air cargo demand and the peculiarities of the air cargo market. The net effect of these two factors are that sales of new cargo aircraft are much less sensitive to either increases in GDP or changes in the costs of labor, capital, fuel, materials, and energy associated with the production of new cargo aircraft than the sales of new passenger aircraft. This in conjunction with the relatively small size of the cargo aircraft market means technology improvements to the cargo aircraft will do relatively very little to spur increased sales of new cargo aircraft.

  19. Geared rotor dynamic methodologies for advancing prognostic modeling capabilities in rotary-wing transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringer, David Blake

    The overarching objective in this research is the development of a robust, rotor dynamic, physics based model of a helicopter drive train as a foundation for the prognostic modeling for rotary-wing transmissions. Rotorcrafts rely on the integrity of their drive trains for their airworthiness. Drive trains rely on gear technology for their integrity and function. Gears alter the vibration characteristics of a mechanical system and significantly contribute to noise, component fatigue, and personal discomfort prevalent in rotorcraft. This research effort develops methodologies for generating a rotor dynamic model of a rotary-wing transmission based on first principles, through (i) development of a three-dimensional gear-mesh stiffness model for helical and spur gears and integration of this model in a finite element rotor dynamic model, (ii) linear and nonlinear analyses of a geared system for comparison and validation of the gear-mesh model, (iii) development of a modal synthesis technique for potentially providing model reduction and faster analysis capabilities for geared systems, and (iv) extension of the gear-mesh model to bevel and epicyclic configurations. In addition to model construction and validation, faults indigenous to geared systems are presented and discussed. Two faults are selected for analysis and seeded into the transmission model. Diagnostic vibration parameters are presented and used as damage indicators in the analysis. The fault models produce results consistent with damage experienced during experimental testing. The results of this research demonstrate the robustness of the physics-based approach in simulating multiple normal and abnormal conditions. The advantages of this physics-based approach, when combined with contemporary probabilistic and time-series techniques, provide a useful method for improving health monitoring technologies in mechanical systems.

  20. Optics damage modeling and analysis at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z. M.; Raymond, B.; Gaylord, J.; Fallejo, R.; Bude, J.; Wegner, P.

    2014-10-01

    Comprehensive modeling of laser-induced damage in optics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been performed on fused silica wedge focus lenses with a metric that compares the modeled damage performance to online inspections. The results indicate that damage models are successful in tracking the performance of the fused silica final optics when properly accounting for various optical finishes and mitigation processes. This validates the consistency of the damage models and allows us to further monitor and evaluate different system parameters that potentially can affect optics performance.

  1. NEW IMPROVEMENTS TO MFIRE TO ENHANCE FIRE MODELING CAPABILITIES

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, L.; Smith, A.C.; Yuan, L.

    2016-01-01

    NIOSH's mine fire simulation program, MFIRE, is widely accepted as a standard for assessing and predicting the impact of a fire on the mine ventilation system and the spread of fire contaminants in coal and metal/nonmetal mines, which has been used by U.S. and international companies to simulate fires for planning and response purposes. MFIRE is a dynamic, transient-state, mine ventilation network simulation program that performs normal planning calculations. It can also be used to analyze ventilation networks under thermal and mechanical influence such as changes in ventilation parameters, external influences such as changes in temperature, and internal influences such as a fire. The program output can be used to analyze the effects of these influences on the ventilation system. Since its original development by Michigan Technological University for the Bureau of Mines in the 1970s, several updates have been released over the years. In 2012, NIOSH completed a major redesign and restructuring of the program with the release of MFIRE 3.0. MFIRE's outdated FORTRAN programming language was replaced with an object-oriented C++ language and packaged into a dynamic link library (DLL). However, the MFIRE 3.0 release made no attempt to change or improve the fire modeling algorithms inherited from its previous version, MFIRE 2.20. This paper reports on improvements that have been made to the fire modeling capabilities of MFIRE 3.0 since its release. These improvements include the addition of fire source models of the t-squared fire and heat release rate curve data file, the addition of a moving fire source for conveyor belt fire simulations, improvement of the fire location algorithm, and the identification and prediction of smoke rollback phenomena. All the improvements discussed in this paper will be termed as MFIRE 3.1 and released by NIOSH in the near future. PMID:27375301

  2. Lidar Remote Sensing of Forests: New Instruments and Modeling Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Lidar instruments provide scientists with the unique opportunity to characterize the 3D structure of forest ecosystems. This information allows us to estimate properties such as wood volume, biomass density, stocking density, canopy cover, and leaf area. Structural information also can be used as drivers for photosynthesis and ecosystem demography models to predict forest growth and carbon sequestration. All lidars use time-in-flight measurements to compute accurate ranging measurements; however, there is a wide range of instruments and data types that are currently available, and instrument technology continues to advance at a rapid pace. This seminar will present new technologies that are in use and under development at NASA for airborne and space-based missions. Opportunities for instrument and data fusion will also be discussed, as Dr. Cook is the PI for G-LiHT, Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral, and Thermal airborne imager. Lastly, this talk will introduce radiative transfer models that can simulate interactions between laser light and forest canopies. Developing modeling capabilities is important for providing continuity between observations made with different lidars, and to assist the design of new instruments. Dr. Bruce Cook is a research scientist in NASA's Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at Goddard Space Flight Center, and has more than 25 years of experience conducting research on ecosystem processes, soil biogeochemistry, and exchange of carbon, water vapor and energy between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. His research interests include the combined use of lidar, hyperspectral, and thermal data for characterizing ecosystem form and function. He is Deputy Project Scientist for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM); Project Manager for NASA s Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) pilot project for local-scale forest biomass; and PI of Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral, and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager.

  3. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Noise Impact Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ege, Russell A.; Brown, Jerome; Bradley, Kevin; Grandi, Fabio

    1999-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the US aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The Noise Impact Model (NIM) has been developed as part of the ASAC. Its primary purpose is to enable users to examine the impact that quieter aircraft technologies and/or operation might have on community noise impact and air carrier operating efficiency at any of 16 large and medium size US airports. The analyst chooses an airport and case year for study, selects a runway use configuration and set of flight tracks for the scenario, and has the option of reducing the noise of the aircraft that operate at the airport by 3, 6, and 10 decibels, NIM computes the resultant noise impact and estimates any airline operational improvements. Community noise impact is characterized in three ways: the size of the noise contour footprint, the number of people living within the contours, and the number of homes located in the same contours. Distance and time savings are calculated by comparing the noise abatement flight path length to a less circuitous alternated routing. For a more efficient runway use configuration, the increase in capacity and reduction in delay are shown.

  4. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Noise Impact Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Ege, Russell; Burn, Melissa; Carey, Jeffrey; Bradley, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The Noise Impact Model (NIM) has been developed as part of the ASAC. Its primary purpose is to enable users to examine the impact that quieter aircraft technologies and/or operations might have on community noise impact and air carrier operating efficiency at any of 16 large- and medium-sized U.S. airports. The analyst chooses an airport and case year for study, selects a runway use configuration and set of flight tracks for the scenario, and has the option of reducing the noise of the aircraft that operate at the airport by 3, 6, or 10 decibels. NIM computes the resultant noise impact and estimates any airline operations improvements. Community noise impact is characterized in three ways: the size of the noise contour footprint, the number of people living within the.contours, and the number of homes located in the same contours. Distance and time savings are calculated by comparing the noise abatement flight path length to a less circuitous alternate routing. For a more efficient runway use configuration, the increase in capacity and reduction in delay are shown.

  5. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Tom; Gorensek, M. B.; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclearnonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facilitymodeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facilitymodeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facilitymodelingcapabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferationanalysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facilitymodeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facilitymodelingcapabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  6. Statistical updating of finite element model with Lamb wave sensing data for damage detection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanli, O. Arda; Jung, Sungmoon

    2014-01-01

    Health monitoring of large structures with embedded, distributed sensor systems is gaining importance. This study proposes a new probabilistic model updating method in order to improve the damage prediction capability of a finite element analysis (FEA) model with experimental observations from a Lamb-wave sensing system. The approach statistically calibrates unknown parameters of the FEA model and estimates a bias-correcting function to achieve a good match between the model predictions and sensor observations. An experimental validation study is presented in which a set of controlled damages are generated on a composite panel. Time-series signals are collected with the damage condition using a Lamb-wave sensing system and a one dimensional FEA model of the panel is constructed to quantify the damages. The damage indices from both the experiments and the computational model are used to calibrate assumed parameters of the FEA model and to estimate a bias-correction function. The updated model is used to predict the size (extent) and location of damage. It is shown that the proposed model updating approach achieves a prediction accuracy that is superior to a purely statistical approach or a deterministic model calibration approach.

  7. Model-Based Fatigue Prognosis of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Exhibiting Concurrent Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbetta, M.; Sbarufatti, C.; Saxena, A.; Giglio, M.; Goebel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics of large composite structures is a topic of increasing interest in the field of structural health monitoring for aerospace, civil, and mechanical systems. Along with recent advancements in real-time structural health data acquisition and processing for damage detection and characterization, model-based stochastic methods for life prediction are showing promising results in the literature. Among various model-based approaches, particle-filtering algorithms are particularly capable in coping with uncertainties associated with the process. These include uncertainties about information on the damage extent and the inherent uncertainties of the damage propagation process. Some efforts have shown successful applications of particle filtering-based frameworks for predicting the matrix crack evolution and structural stiffness degradation caused by repetitive fatigue loads. Effects of other damage modes such as delamination, however, are not incorporated in these works. It is well established that delamination and matrix cracks not only co-exist in most laminate structures during the fatigue degradation process but also affect each other's progression. Furthermore, delamination significantly alters the stress-state in the laminates and accelerates the material degradation leading to catastrophic failure. Therefore, the work presented herein proposes a particle filtering-based framework for predicting a structure's remaining useful life with consideration of multiple co-existing damage-mechanisms. The framework uses an energy-based model from the composite modeling literature. The multiple damage-mode model has been shown to suitably estimate the energy release rate of cross-ply laminates as affected by matrix cracks and delamination modes. The model is also able to estimate the reduction in stiffness of the damaged laminate. This information is then used in the algorithms for life prediction capabilities. First, a brief summary of the energy-based damage model

  8. A two-scale damage model with material length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dascalu, Cristian

    2009-09-01

    The Note presents the formulation of a class of two-scale damage models involving a micro-structural length. A homogenization method based on asymptotic developments is employed to deduce the macroscopic damage equations. The damage model completely results from energy-based micro-crack propagation laws, without supplementary phenomenological assumptions. We show that the resulting two-scale model has the property of capturing micro-structural lengths. When damage evolves, the micro-structural length is given by the ratio of the surface density of energy dissipated during the micro-crack growth and the macroscopic damage energy release rate per unit volume of the material. The use of fracture criteria based on resistance curves or power laws for sub-critical growth of micro-cracks leads to quasi-brittle and, respectively, time-dependent damage models. To cite this article: C. Dascalu, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  9. Damage modeling and damage detection for structures using a perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Akash

    This thesis is about using structural-dynamics based methods to address the existing challenges in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). Particularly, new structural-dynamics based methods are presented, to model areas of damage, to do damage diagnosis and to estimate and predict the sensitivity of structural vibration properties like natural frequencies to the presence of damage. Towards these objectives, a general analytical procedure, which yields nth-order expressions governing mode shapes and natural frequencies and for damaged elastic structures such as rods, beams, plates and shells of any shape is presented. Features of the procedure include the following: 1. Rather than modeling the damage as a fictitious elastic element or localized or global change in constitutive properties, it is modeled in a mathematically rigorous manner as a geometric discontinuity. 2. The inertia effect (kinetic energy), which, unlike the stiffness effect (strain energy), of the damage has been neglected by researchers, is included in it. 3. The framework is generic and is applicable to wide variety of engineering structures of different shapes with arbitrary boundary conditions which constitute self adjoint systems and also to a wide variety of damage profiles and even multiple areas of damage. To illustrate the ability of the procedure to effectively model the damage, it is applied to beams using Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko theories and to plates using Kirchhoff's theory, supported on different types of boundary conditions. Analytical results are compared with experiments using piezoelectric actuators and non-contact Laser-Doppler Vibrometer sensors. To illustrate the ability of the procedure to effectively model the damage, it is applied to beams using Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko theories and to plates using Kirchhoff's theory, supported on different types of boundary conditions. Analytical results are compared with experiments using piezoelectric actuators and

  10. Micromechanical Modeling of Impact Damage Mechanisms in Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Zhenqing

    2016-05-01

    Composite laminates are susceptible to the transverse impact loads resulting in significant damage such as matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delamination. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to predict the impact damage of composite laminates based on microstructure and various failure models of laminates. The fiber and matrix are represented by the isotropic and elastic-plastic solid, and their impact failure behaviors are modeled based on shear damage model. The delaminaton failure is modeling by the interface element controlled by cohesive damage model. Impact damage mechanisms of laminate are analyzed by using the micromechanical model proposed. In addition, the effects of impact energy and laminated type on impact damage behavior of laminates are investigated. Due to the damage of the surrounding matrix near the impact point caused by the fiber deformation, the surface damage area of laminate is larger than the area of ​​impact projectile. The shape of the damage area is roughly rectangle or elliptical with the major axis extending parallel to the fiber direction in the surface layer of laminate. The alternating laminated type with two fiber directions is more propitious to improve the impact resistance of laminates.

  11. Nonlinear creep damage constitutive model for soft rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Z.; Xie, H. Q.; He, J. D.; Xiao, M. L.; Zhuo, L.

    2016-06-01

    In some existing nonlinear creep damage models, it may be less rigorous to directly introduce a damage variable into the creep equation when the damage variable of the viscous component is a function of time or strain. In this paper, we adopt the Kachanov creep damage rate and introduce a damage variable into a rheological differential constitutive equation to derive an analytical integral solution for the creep damage equation of the Bingham model. We also propose a new nonlinear viscous component which reflects nonlinear properties related to the axial stress of soft rock in the steady-state creep stage. Furthermore, we build an improved Nishihara model by using this new component in series with the correctional Nishihara damage model that describes the accelerating creep, and deduce the rheological constitutive relation of the improved model. Based on superposition principle, we obtain the damage creep equation for conditions of both uniaxial and triaxial compression stress, and study the method for determining the model parameters. Finally, this paper presents the laboratory test results performed on mica-quartz schist in parallel with, or vertical to the schistosity direction, and applies the improved Nishihara model to the parameter identification of mica-quartz schist. Using a comparative analysis with test data, results show that the improved model has a superior ability to reflect the creep properties of soft rock in the decelerating creep stage, the steady-state creep stage, and particularly within the accelerating creep stage, in comparison with the traditional Nishihara model.

  12. A micro to macro approach to polymer matrix composites damage modeling : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    English, Shawn Allen; Brown, Arthur A.; Briggs, Timothy M.

    2013-12-01

    Capabilities are developed, verified and validated to generate constitutive responses using material and geometric measurements with representative volume elements (RVE). The geometrically accurate RVEs are used for determining elastic properties and damage initiation and propagation analysis. Finite element modeling of the meso-structure over the distribution of characterizing measurements is automated and various boundary conditions are applied. Plain and harness weave composites are investigated. Continuum yarn damage, softening behavior and an elastic-plastic matrix are combined with known materials and geometries in order to estimate the macroscopic response as characterized by a set of orthotropic material parameters. Damage mechanics and coupling effects are investigated and macroscopic material models are demonstrated and discussed. Prediction of the elastic, damage, and failure behavior of woven composites will aid in macroscopic constitutive characterization for modeling and optimizing advanced composite systems.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA damage and efficiency of ATP biosynthesis: mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Beregovskaya, N; Maiboroda, R

    1995-01-21

    The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ageing processes and in malignant transformation of a cell is discussed. A mathematical model of the mtDNA population in a cell and in tissue is constructed. The model describes the effects of mtDNA damages accumulated during ageing and some features of malignant transformation and regeneration.

  14. CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic modeling and reduced-order model computation capability for APECS system

    SciTech Connect

    Diwekar, Urmila; Shastri, Yogendra (Vishwamitra Research Institute Clarendon Hills, IL); Subrmanyan, Karthik; Zitney, S.E.

    2007-11-04

    APECS (Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator) is an integrated software suite that combines the power of process simulation with high-fidelity, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for improved design, analysis, and optimization of process engineering systems. The APECS system uses commercial process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and CFD (e.g., FLUENT) software integrated with the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (CO) interfaces. This breakthrough capability allows engineers to better understand and optimize the fluid mechanics that drive overall power plant performance and efficiency. The focus of this paper is the CAPE-OPEN complaint stochastic modeling and reduced order model computational capability around the APECS system. The usefulness of capabilities is illustrated with coal fired, gasification based, FutureGen power plant simulation. These capabilities are used to generate efficient reduced order models and optimizing model complexities.

  15. Modeling Fatigue Damage in Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2009-10-30

    This paper applies a fatigue damage model recently developed for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to predict the modulus reduction and fatigue lifetime of glass/polyamide 6,6 (PA6,6) specimens. The fatigue model uses a multiscale mechanistic approach to describe fatigue damage accumulation in these materials subjected to cyclic loading. Micromechanical modeling using a modified Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach combined with averaging techniques for fiber length and orientation distributions is performed to establish the stiffness reduction relation for the composite as a function of the microcrack volume fraction. Next, continuum damage mechanics and a thermodynamic formulation are used to derive the constitutive relations and the damage evolution law. The fatigue damage model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code and has been applied to analyze fatigue of the studied glass/PA6,6 specimens. The predictions agree well with the experimental results.

  16. Real-time Models at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center and their Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Real-time models at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center and their capabilities The Community Coordinated Modeling Center serves both scientific research and space weather operations communities through access to and evaluation of modern space environment models. Critical to both objectives is an unbiased assessment of model capabilities, which includes scientific validity, performance verification, and model robustness. While all of these assessments are relevant to operational customers, the latter plays a particularly important role. For this reason, as well as for testing model validity, CCMC established a set of fully automated real-time execution systems, which are based on models provided by the research community. This presentation will provide a summary of these activities, and a report on experiences and model validity. Finally, this presentation will invite feedback from CCMC customers regarding future directions of real time modeling at CCMC.

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Advanced Materials for Damage Prediction and Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Luke

    Advanced aerospace materials, including fiber reinforced polymer and ceramic matrix composites, are increasingly being used in critical and demanding applications, challenging the current damage prediction, detection, and quantification methodologies. Multiscale computational models offer key advantages over traditional analysis techniques and can provide the necessary capabilities for the development of a comprehensive virtual structural health monitoring (SHM) framework. Virtual SHM has the potential to drastically improve the design and analysis of aerospace components through coupling the complementary capabilities of models able to predict the initiation and propagation of damage under a wide range of loading and environmental scenarios, simulate interrogation methods for damage detection and quantification, and assess the health of a structure. A major component of the virtual SHM framework involves having micromechanics-based multiscale composite models that can provide the elastic, inelastic, and damage behavior of composite material systems under mechanical and thermal loading conditions and in the presence of microstructural complexity and variability. Quantification of the role geometric and architectural variability in the composite microstructure plays in the local and global composite behavior is essential to the development of appropriate scale-dependent unit cells and boundary conditions for the multiscale model. Once the composite behavior is predicted and variability effects assessed, wave-based SHM simulation models serve to provide knowledge on the probability of detection and characterization accuracy of damage present in the composite. The research presented in this dissertation provides the foundation for a comprehensive SHM framework for advanced aerospace materials. The developed models enhance the prediction of damage formation as a result of ceramic matrix composite processing, improve the understanding of the effects of architectural and

  18. MRAC Control with Prior Model Knowledge for Asymmetric Damaged Aircraft.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xieyu; Yang, Lingyu; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a novel state-tracking multivariable model reference adaptive control (MRAC) technique utilizing prior knowledge of plant models to recover control performance of an asymmetric structural damaged aircraft. A modification of linear model representation is given. With prior knowledge on structural damage, a polytope linear parameter varying (LPV) model is derived to cover all concerned damage conditions. An MRAC method is developed for the polytope model, of which the stability and asymptotic error convergence are theoretically proved. The proposed technique reduces the number of parameters to be adapted and thus decreases computational cost and requires less input information. The method is validated by simulations on NASA generic transport model (GTM) with damage. PMID:26180839

  19. MRAC Control with Prior Model Knowledge for Asymmetric Damaged Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xieyu; Yang, Lingyu; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a novel state-tracking multivariable model reference adaptive control (MRAC) technique utilizing prior knowledge of plant models to recover control performance of an asymmetric structural damaged aircraft. A modification of linear model representation is given. With prior knowledge on structural damage, a polytope linear parameter varying (LPV) model is derived to cover all concerned damage conditions. An MRAC method is developed for the polytope model, of which the stability and asymptotic error convergence are theoretically proved. The proposed technique reduces the number of parameters to be adapted and thus decreases computational cost and requires less input information. The method is validated by simulations on NASA generic transport model (GTM) with damage. PMID:26180839

  20. MRAC Control with Prior Model Knowledge for Asymmetric Damaged Aircraft.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xieyu; Yang, Lingyu; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a novel state-tracking multivariable model reference adaptive control (MRAC) technique utilizing prior knowledge of plant models to recover control performance of an asymmetric structural damaged aircraft. A modification of linear model representation is given. With prior knowledge on structural damage, a polytope linear parameter varying (LPV) model is derived to cover all concerned damage conditions. An MRAC method is developed for the polytope model, of which the stability and asymptotic error convergence are theoretically proved. The proposed technique reduces the number of parameters to be adapted and thus decreases computational cost and requires less input information. The method is validated by simulations on NASA generic transport model (GTM) with damage.

  1. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  2. Chemically induced intestinal damage models in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Oehlers, Stefan H; Flores, Maria Vega; Hall, Christopher J; Okuda, Kazuhide S; Sison, John Oliver; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    Several intestinal damage models have been developed using zebrafish, with the aim of recapitulating aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These experimentally induced inflammation models have utilized immersion exposure to an array of colitogenic agents (including live bacteria, bacterial products, and chemicals) to induce varying severity of inflammation. This technical report describes methods used to generate two chemically induced intestinal damage models using either dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods to monitor intestinal damage and inflammatory processes, and chemical-genetic methods to manipulate the host response to injury are also described.

  3. Micro-mechanical modeling of perforating shock damage

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, R.P.; Krogh, K.E.; Behrmann, L.A.; Halleck, P.M.

    1997-11-17

    Shaped charge jet induced formation damage from perforation treatments hinders productivity. Manifestation of this damage is in the form of grain fragmentation resulting in fines that plug up pore throats along with the breakdown of inter-grain cementation. The authors use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method as a way to explicitly model, on a grain pore scale, the dynamic interactions of grains and grain/pores to calculate the damage resulting from perforation type stress wave loading. The SPH method is a continuum Lagrangian, meshless approach that features particles. Clusters of particles are used for each grain to provide representation of a grain pore structure that is similar to x-ray synchrotron microtomography images. Numerous damage models are available to portray fracture and fragmentation. In this paper the authors present the results of well defined impact loading on a grain pore structure that illustrate how the heterogeneity affects stress wave behavior and damage evolution. The SPH approach easily accommodates the coupling of multi-materials. Calculations for multi-material conditions with the pore space treated as a void, fluid filled, and/or clay filled show diverse effects on the stress wave propagation behavior and damage. SPH comparisons made with observed damage from recovered impacted sandstone samples in gas gun experiments show qualitatively the influence of stress intensity. The modeling approach presented here offers a unique way in concert with experiments to define a better understanding of formation damage resulting from perforation completion treatments.

  4. Using Genome-Scale Models to Predict Biological Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Edward J.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) methods at the genome-scale have been under development since the first whole genome sequences appeared in the mid-1990s. A few years ago this approach began to demonstrate the ability to predict a range of cellular functions including cellular growth capabilities on various substrates and the effect of gene knockouts at the genome-scale. Thus, much interest has developed in understanding and applying these methods to areas such as metabolic engineering, antibiotic design, and organismal and enzyme evolution. This primer will get you started. PMID:26000478

  5. Advancing Space Weather Modeling Capabilities at the CCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. Leila; Kuznetsova, Maria; Boblitt, Justin; Chulaki, Anna; MacNeice, Peter; Mendoza, Michelle; Mullinix, Richard; Pembroke, Asher; Pulkkinen, Antti; Rastaetter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Wiegand, Chiu; Zheng, Yihua

    2016-04-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) serves as a community access point to an expanding collection of state-of-the-art space environment models and as a hub for collaborative development on next generation of space weather forecasting systems. In partnership with model developers and the international research and operational communities, the CCMC integrates new data streams and models from diverse sources into end-to-end space weather predictive systems, identifies weak links in data-model & model-model coupling and leads community efforts to fill those gaps. The presentation will focus on the latest model installations at the CCMC and advances in CCMC-led community-wide model validation projects.

  6. Fluorescein as a model molecular calculator with reset capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulies, David; Melman, Galina; Shanzer, Abraham

    2005-10-01

    The evolution of molecules capable of performing boolean operations has gone a long way since the inception of the first molecular AND logic gate, followed by other logic functions, such as XOR and INHIBIT, and has reached the stage where these tiny processors execute arithmetic calculations. Molecular logic gates that process a variety of chemical inputs can now be loaded with arrays of logic functions, enabling even a single molecular species to execute distinct algebraic operations: addition and subtraction. However, unlike electronic or optical signals, the accumulation of chemical inputs prevents chemical arithmetic systems from resetting. Consequently, a set of solutions is required to complete even the simplest arithmetic cycle. It has been suggested that these limitations can be overcome by washing off the input signals from solid supports. An alternative approach, which does not require solvent exchange or incorporation of bulk surfaces, is to reset the arithmetic system chemically. Ultimately, this is how some biological systems regenerate. Here we report a highly efficient and exceptionally simple molecular arithmetic system based on a plain fluorescein dye, capable of performing a full scale of elementary addition and subtraction algebraic operations. This system can be reset following each separate arithmetic step. The ability to selectively eradicate chemical inputs brings us closer to the realization of chemical computation.

  7. Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance Models in ACES: Design Implementation and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don; Satapathy, Goutam; Kumar, Anil; Khanna, Manu

    2006-01-01

    Presentation objectives include: a) Overview of the ACES/CNS System Models Design and Integration; b) Configuration Capabilities available for Models and Simulations using ACES with CNS Modeling; c) Descriptions of recently added, Enhanced CNS Simulation Capabilities; and d) General Concepts Ideas that Utilize CNS Modeling to Enhance Concept Evaluations.

  8. MODELS-3/CMAQ APPLICATIONS WHICH ILLUSTRATE CAPABILITY AND FUNCTIONALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Models-3/CMAQ developed by the U.S. Environmental Protections Agency (USEPA) is a third generation multiscale, multi-pollutant air quality modeling system within a high-level, object-oriented computer framework (Models-3). It has been available to the scientific community ...

  9. Model of flexural fatigue damage accumulation for cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Griffin, L V; Gibeling, J C; Martin, R B; Gibson, V A; Stover, S M

    1997-07-01

    Analytical models that predict modulus degradation in cortical bone subjected to uniaxial fatigue loading in tension and compression are presented. On the basis of experimental observations, damage was modeled as self-limiting for tension but not for compression. These mechanistic uniaxial damage models were then developed into a model for flexural fatigue of cortical bone based on laminated beam theory. The unknown coefficients in the uniaxial damage models were obtained by successfully fitting the resulting equations to uniaxial fatigue data from the literature on human cortical bone in tension and compression. Then, the predictions of the flexural model for the behavior of human cortical bone were compared with experimental results from a small but independent set of specimens tested at three different ranges of load in our laboratory. The behavior of the modulus degradation curves and the flexural fatigue lives of the specimens were in excellent agreement with the predictions of the model.

  10. NGNP Data Management and Analysis System Modeling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia D. Gentillon

    2009-09-01

    Projects for the very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. In addition, thermal-hydraulic experiments are conducted to validate codes used to assess reactor safety. The VHTR Program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the third NDMAS objective. It describes capabilities for displaying the data in meaningful ways and identifying relationships among the measured quantities that contribute to their understanding.

  11. Distributed Damage Estimation for Prognostics based on Structural Model Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Bregon, Anibal; Roychoudhury, Indranil

    2011-01-01

    Model-based prognostics approaches capture system knowledge in the form of physics-based models of components, and how they fail. These methods consist of a damage estimation phase, in which the health state of a component is estimated, and a prediction phase, in which the health state is projected forward in time to determine end of life. However, the damage estimation problem is often multi-dimensional and computationally intensive. We propose a model decomposition approach adapted from the diagnosis community, called possible conflicts, in order to both improve the computational efficiency of damage estimation, and formulate a damage estimation approach that is inherently distributed. Local state estimates are combined into a global state estimate from which prediction is performed. Using a centrifugal pump as a case study, we perform a number of simulation-based experiments to demonstrate the approach.

  12. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  13. Long-term predictive capability of erosion models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veerabhadra, P.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A brief overview of long-term cavitation and liquid impingement erosion and modeling methods proposed by different investigators, including the curve-fit approach is presented. A table was prepared to highlight the number of variables necessary for each model in order to compute the erosion-versus-time curves. A power law relation based on the average erosion rate is suggested which may solve several modeling problems.

  14. Development of an Aeroelastic Modeling Capability for Transient Nozzle Side Load Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development. Currently there is no fully coupled computational tool to analyze this fluid/structure interaction process. The objective of this study was to develop a fully coupled aeroelastic modeling capability to describe the fluid/structure interaction process during the transient nozzle operations. The aeroelastic model composes of three components: the computational fluid dynamics component based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, the computational structural dynamics component developed in the framework of modal analysis, and the fluid-structural interface component. The developed aeroelastic model was applied to the transient nozzle startup process of the Space Shuttle Main Engine at sea level. The computed nozzle side loads and the axial nozzle wall pressure profiles from the aeroelastic nozzle are compared with those of the published rigid nozzle results, and the impact of the fluid/structure interaction on nozzle side loads is interrogated and presented.

  15. Group force mobility model and its obstacle avoidance capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Sean A.; Huang, Dijiang

    2009-10-01

    Many mobility models attempt to provide realistic simulation to many real world scenarios. However, existing mobility models, such as RPGM [X. Hong, M. Gerla, G. Pei, C. Chiang, A group mobility model for ad hoc wireless networks, in: Proceedings of ACM/IEEE MSWiM'99, Seattle, WA, August 1999, pp. 53-60] and others, fail to address many aspects. These limitations range from mobile node (MN) collision avoidance, obstacle avoidance, and the interaction of MNs within a group. Our research, the group force mobility model (GFMM) [S.A. Williams, D. Huang, A group force mobility model, Appeared at 9th Communications and Networking Simulation Symposium, April 2006], proposes a novel idea which introduces the concept of attraction and repulsion forces to address many of these limitations. Williams and Huang [A group force mobility model, Appeared at 9th Communications and Networking Simulation Symposium, April 2006] described some of the limitations and drawbacks that many models neglect. This model effectively simulates the interaction of MNs within a group, the interaction of groups to one another, the coherency of a group, and the avoidance of collision with groups, nodes, and obstacles. This paper provides an overview of GFMM and particularly illustrates the GFMM's ability to avoid collision with obstacles, which is a vital property to posses in order to provide a realistic simulaition. We compare our model with the commonly used RPGM model and provide statistical assessments based on connectivity metrics such as link changed, link duration, and relative speed. All will be detailed and explained in this paper.

  16. Development and integration of sub-hourly rainfall-runoff modeling capability within a watershed model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing urbanization changes runoff patterns to be flashy and instantaneous with decreased base flow. A model with the ability to simulate sub-daily rainfall–runoff processes and continuous simulation capability is required to realistically capture the long-term flow and water quality trends in w...

  17. A mixed damage model for unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arson, Chloé; Gatmiri, Behrouz

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study is to present a framework for the modeling of damage in continuous unsaturated porous geomaterials. The damage variable is a second-order tensor. The model is formulated in net stress and suction independent state variables. Correspondingly, the strain tensor is split into two independent thermodynamic strain components. The proposed framework mixes micro-mechanical and phenomenological approaches. On the one hand, the effective stress concept of Continuum Damage Mechanics is used in order to compute the damaged rigidities. On the other hand, the concept of equivalent mechanical state is introduced in order to get a simple phenomenological formulation of the behavior laws. Cracking effects are also taken into account in the fluid transfer laws. To cite this article: C. Arson, B. Gatmiri, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  18. ASPH modeling of Material Damage and Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, J M

    2010-04-30

    We describe our new methodology for Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ASPH) and its application to problems in modeling material failure. We find that ASPH is often crucial for properly modeling such experiments, since in most cases the strain placed on materials is non-isotropic (such as a stretching rod), and without the directional adaptability of ASPH numerical failure due to SPH nodes losing contact in the straining direction can compete with or exceed the physical process of failure.

  19. Models Of Lower Extremity Damage In Mice: Time Course of Organ Damage & Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Christoph L; Pfeifer, Roman; Darwiche, Sophie S; Kobbe, Philipp; Gill, Roop; Shapiro, Richard A; Loughran, Patricia; Vodovotz, Yoram; Scott, Melanie J; Zenati, Mazen S; Billiar, Timothy R; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic inflammatory changes have been identified as major causes of altered organ function and failure. Both hemorrhage and soft tissue damage induce these inflammatory changes. Exposure to heterologous bone in animal models has recently been shown to mimic this inflammatory response in a stable and reproducible fashion. This follow-up study tests the hypothesis that inflammatory responses are comparable between a novel trauma model (“pseudofracture”, PFx) and a bilateral femur fracture (BFF) model. Materials and Methods In C57BL/6 mice, markers for remote organ dysfunction and inflammatory responses were compared in 4 groups (control/sham/BFF/PFx) at the time points 2, 4, and 6 hours. Results Hepatocellular damage in BFF and PFx was highly comparable in extent and evolution, as shown by similar levels of NFκB activation and plasma ALT. Pulmonary inflammatory responses were also comparably elevated in both trauma models as early as 2h after trauma as measured by myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). Muscle damage was provoked in both BFF and PFx mice over the time course, although BFF induced significantly higher AST and CK levels. IL-6 levels were also similar with early and sustained increases over time in both trauma models. Conclusions Both BFF and PFx create similar reproducible inflammatory and remote organ responses. PFx will be a useful model to study longer term inflammatory effects that cannot be studied using BFF. PMID:21276982

  20. Isothermal fatigue behavior and damage modeling of a high temperature woven PMC[Polymer Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Gyekenyesi, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    This study focuses on the fully reversed fatigue behavior exhibited by a carbon fiber/polyimide resin woven laminate at room and elevated temperatures. Nondestructive video edge view microscopy and destructive sectioning techniques were used to study the microscopic damage mechanisms that evolved. The elastic stiffness was monitored and recorded throughout the fatigue life of the coupon. In addition, residual compressive strength tests were conducted on fatigue coupons with various degrees of damage as quantified by stiffness reduction. Experimental results indicated that the monotonic tensile properties were only minimally influenced by temperature, while the monotonic compressive and fully reversed fatigue properties displayed greater reductions due to the elevated temperature. The stiffness degradation as a function of cycles, consisted of three stages; a short-lived high degradation period, a constant degradation rate segment covering the majority of the life, and a final stage demonstrating an increasing rate of degradation up to failure. Concerning the residual compressive strength tests at room and elevated temperatures, the elevated temperature coupons appeared much more sensitive to damage. At elevated temperatures, coupons experienced a much larger loss in compressive strength when compared to room temperature coupons with equivalent damage. The fatigue damage accumulation law proposed for the model incorporates a scalar representation for damage, but admits a multiaxial, anisotropic evolutionary law. The model predicts the current damage (as quantified by residual stiffness) and remnant life of a composite that has undergone a known load at temperature. The damage/life model is dependent on the applied multiaxial stress state as well as temperature. Comparisons between the model and data showed good predictive capabilities concerning stiffness degradation and cycles to failure.

  1. A damage model based on singular elastic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leguillon, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    At re-entrant corners in elastic structures, the stress field is known to increase to infinity following a power law. From the material viewpoint it is paradoxical that it can locally sustain such an overburden. To avoid this paradox we propose a damage model where the Young's modulus of the material decreases (damage) also following a power law and such that the resulting stress field remains bounded. To cite this article: D. Leguillon, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  2. Virtual Mie particle model of laser damage to optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kazuya; Haraguchi, Koshi

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, devices being developed for application systems have used laser beams that have high average power, high peak power, short pulse width, and short wavelength. Therefore, optical elements using such application systems require a high laser damage threshold. The laser damage threshold is provided by International Organization for Standardization 11254 (ISO11254). One of the measurement methods of the laser damage threshold provided by ISO11254 is an online method to measure the intensity of light scattering due to a laser damage trace. In this paper, we propose a measurement method for the laser damage threshold that realizes high sensitivity and high accuracy by using polarized light and lock-in detection. Since the scattering light with laser damage is modeled on the asperity of the optical element-surface as Mie particles (virtual Mie particles), we consider the intensity change of scattering light as a change in the radius of a virtual Mie particle. To evaluate this model, the laser damage trace on the optical element-surface was observed by an atomic force microscopy (AFM). Based on the observed AFM image, we analyzed the frequency domain by the Fourier transform, and estimated the dominant virtual Mie particle radius in the AFM measurement area. In addition, we measured the laser damage threshold. The light source was the fifth generation of a Nd:YAG laser (λ =213nm). The specifications of the laser were: repetition frequency 10Hz, pulse width 4ns, linear type polarization, laser pulse energy 4mJ, and laser transverse mode TEM00. The laser specifications were a repetition frequency, pulse width, pulse energy and beam diameter of 10Hz, 4ns, 4mJ and 13mm, respectively. The laser damage thresholds of an aluminum coated mirror and a dielectric multi-layer mirror designed at a wavelength of 213nm as measured by this method were 0.684 J/cm2 and 0.998J/cm2, respectively. These laser damage thresholds were 1/4 the laser damage thresholds measured based

  3. A Model of Strategic Changes: Universities and Dynamic Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallardo, Francisca Orihuela; Navarro, Jose Ruiz

    2003-01-01

    Describes the need for the strategic management of universities in a dynamic and changing environment that requires flexibility from complex institutions like universities. Proposes a model of strategic change that takes into consideration the experience of change in large, complex organizations and recent approaches to strategic management. (SLD)

  4. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  5. Model-based damage evaluation of layered CFRP structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Rafael; Bochud, Nicolas; Rus, Guillermo; Peralta, Laura; Melchor, Juan; Chiachío, Juan; Chiachío, Manuel; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    An ultrasonic evaluation technique for damage identification of layered CFRP structures is presented. This approach relies on a model-based estimation procedure that combines experimental data and simulation of ultrasonic damage-propagation interactions. The CFPR structure, a [0/90]4s lay-up, has been tested in an immersion through transmission experiment, where a scan has been performed on a damaged specimen. Most ultrasonic techniques in industrial practice consider only a few features of the received signals, namely, time of flight, amplitude, attenuation, frequency contents, and so forth. In this case, once signals are captured, an algorithm is used to reconstruct the complete signal waveform and extract the unknown damage parameters by means of modeling procedures. A linear version of the data processing has been performed, where only Young modulus has been monitored and, in a second nonlinear version, the first order nonlinear coefficient β was incorporated to test the possibility of detection of early damage. The aforementioned physical simulation models are solved by the Transfer Matrix formalism, which has been extended from linear to nonlinear harmonic generation technique. The damage parameter search strategy is based on minimizing the mismatch between the captured and simulated signals in the time domain in an automated way using Genetic Algorithms. Processing all scanned locations, a C-scan of the parameter of each layer can be reconstructed, obtaining the information describing the state of each layer and each interface. Damage can be located and quantified in terms of changes in the selected parameter with a measurable extension. In the case of the nonlinear coefficient of first order, evidence of higher sensitivity to damage than imaging the linearly estimated Young Modulus is provided.

  6. NASA Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM): Capabilities and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAfee, Julie; Culver, George; Naderi, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    NAFCOM is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. Uses cost estimating relationships (CERs) which correlate historical costs to mission characteristics to predict new project costs. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects. It is intended to be used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels and estimates development and production costs. NAFCOM is applicable to various types of missions (crewed spacecraft, uncrewed spacecraft, and launch vehicles). There are two versions of the model: a government version that is restricted and a contractor releasable version.

  7. Irreversible entropy model for damage diagnosis in resistors

    SciTech Connect

    Cuadras, Angel Crisóstomo, Javier; Ovejas, Victoria J.; Quilez, Marcos

    2015-10-28

    We propose a method to characterize electrical resistor damage based on entropy measurements. Irreversible entropy and the rate at which it is generated are more convenient parameters than resistance for describing damage because they are essentially positive in virtue of the second law of thermodynamics, whereas resistance may increase or decrease depending on the degradation mechanism. Commercial resistors were tested in order to characterize the damage induced by power surges. Resistors were biased with constant and pulsed voltage signals, leading to power dissipation in the range of 4–8 W, which is well above the 0.25 W nominal power to initiate failure. Entropy was inferred from the added power and temperature evolution. A model is proposed to understand the relationship among resistance, entropy, and damage. The power surge dissipates into heat (Joule effect) and damages the resistor. The results show a correlation between entropy generation rate and resistor failure. We conclude that damage can be conveniently assessed from irreversible entropy generation. Our results for resistors can be easily extrapolated to other systems or machines that can be modeled based on their resistance.

  8. Parameterization of Damage in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Model Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABDEL WAHAB, M. M.; DE ROECK, G.; PEETERS, B.

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes the application of finite element model updating to reinforced concrete beams in order to detect and quantify damage. Three simply supported beams are considered in this study: two of them are subjected to a single concentrated load while the third one to two concentrated loads. The static loading system is applied in different steps up to failure so that dynamic measurements can be carried out after each load step. The measured modal parameters are used afterwards to update a finite element model in order to localize and to quantify the damage. The updating algorithm is based on the sensitivity approach in which the discrepancies between the analytical and experimental modal data are minimized in an iterative manner. A new concept for damage parametrization is introduced. A damage function characterized by three parameters is proposed. In such a function, only three parameters are used to describe the damage pattern of the reinforced concrete beams. These parameters are related to the bending stiffness of the beams and updated so that the measured natural frequencies are reproduced. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed technique to quantify the damage pattern.

  9. Continuum damage modeling and simulation of hierarchical dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-05-01

    Dental enamel exhibits high fracture toughness and stiffness due to a complex hierarchical and graded microstructure, optimally organized from nano- to macro-scale. In this study, a 3D representative volume element (RVE) model is adopted to study the deformation and damage behavior of the fibrous microstructure. A continuum damage mechanics model coupled to hyperelasticity is developed for modeling the initiation and evolution of damage in the mineral fibers as well as protein matrix. Moreover, debonding of the interface between mineral fiber and protein is captured by employing a cohesive zone model. The dependence of the failure mechanism on the aspect ratio of the mineral fibers is investigated. In addition, the effect of the interface strength on the damage behavior is studied with respect to geometric features of enamel. Further, the effect of an initial flaw on the overall mechanical properties is analyzed to understand the superior damage tolerance of dental enamel. The simulation results are validated by comparison to experimental data from micro-cantilever beam testing at two hierarchical levels. The transition of the failure mechanism at different hierarchical levels is also well reproduced in the simulations.

  10. Prostaglandin ethanolamides attenuate damage in a human explant colitis model.

    PubMed

    Nicotra, Lauren L; Vu, Megan; Harvey, Benjamin S; Smid, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are protective in animal colitis models. As endocannabinoids also form novel prostaglandin ethanolamides (prostamides) via COX-2, we investigated the effects of prostamides and other COX-2 mediators on tissue damage in an ex vivo human mucosal explant colitis model. Healthy human colonic mucosae were incubated with pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β to elicit colitis-like tissue damage. The PGF-ethanolamide analogue, bimatoprost decreased colitis scores which were reversed by a prostamide-specific antagonist AGN 211334, but not the FP receptor antagonist AL-8810. PGF-ethanolamide and PGE-ethanolamide also reduced cytokine-evoked epithelial damage. Anandamide was protective in the explant colitis model; however COX-2 inhibition did not alter its effects, associated with a lack of COX-2 induction in explant mucosal tissue. These findings support an anti-inflammatory role for prostamides and endocannabinoids in the human colon. PMID:23380599

  11. Damage modeling and statistical analysis of optics damage performance in MJ-class laser systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhi M; Raymond, B; Gaylord, J; Fallejo, R; Bude, J; Wegner, P

    2014-11-17

    Modeling the lifetime of a fused silica optic is described for a multiple beam, MJ-class laser system. This entails combining optic processing data along with laser shot data to account for complete history of optic processing and shot exposure. Integrating with online inspection data allows for the construction of a performance metric to describe how an optic performs with respect to the model. This methodology helps to validate the damage model as well as allows strategic planning and identifying potential hidden parameters that are affecting the optic's performance.

  12. A damage-softening statistical constitutive model considering rock residual strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-liang; Li, Yong-chi; Wang, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    Under stress, the microcracks in rock evolve (initiation, growth and coalescence) from damage to fracture with a continuous process. In order to describe this continuous process, a damage-softening statistical constitutive model for rock was proposed based on the Weibull distribution of mesoscopic element strength. This model usually adopts the Drucker-Prager criterion as its distribution parameter of mesoscopic element strength, which may produce larger damage zone in numerical simulations. This paper mainly studies the effects of strength criteria and residual strength on the performance of this damage-softening statistical constitutive model of rock. Main works include following three aspects: Firstly, the mechanical behaviors of rock are comparatively studied when the Drucker-Prager and the Mohr-Coulomb criteria are employed, respectively, as the distribution parameter. Then, a coefficient is introduced to make this constitutive model be capable of describing the residual strength of rock. Finally, a user-defined subroutine is concisely developed for this model and checked through typical strain paths. The current work lays a good foundation for further application of this model in geotechnics and geosciences.

  13. Integrated developmental model of life-support capabilities in wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darnell, R. L.; Obrien, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a model for CO2, O2, H2O, and nitrogen use during the life cycle of wheat. Spreadsheets and accompanying graphs were developed to illustrate plant population reactions to environmental parameters established in the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program at Kennedy Space Center, Fl. The spreadsheets and graphs were produced using validated biomass production chamber (BPC) data from BWT931. Conditions of the BPC during the 83 day plant growth period were as follows: The BPC area is 27.8 m(exp 2), volume is 113 m(exp 3). Temperatures during the 83 day plant growth period ranged from 16.3 to 24.8 C during the light cycle (except for day 69, when the minimum and maximum temperatures were 7.7 C and 7.9 C, respectively) and 14.5 C and 23.6 C during the dark cycle (except for day 49, when the minimum and maximum temperatures were 11.1 C and 11.3 C, respectively). Relative humidity was 85 percent for the first seven days of plant growth, and 70 percent thereafter. The plant leaf canopy area was 10 m(exp 2). Presented is a list and explanation of each spreadsheet and accompanying graph(s), conditions under which the data were collected, and formulas used to obtain each result.

  14. Dynamic rupture in a damage-breakage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ilchev, Assen; Mendecki, Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    We present a thermodynamically based formulation for modelling dynamic rupture processes in the brittle crust using a continuum damage-breakage rheology. The model combines aspects of a continuum viscoelastic damage framework for brittle solids with a continuum breakage mechanics for granular flow within dynamically generated slip zones. The formulation accounts for the density of distributed cracking and other internal flaws in damaged rocks with a scalar damage parameter, and addresses the grain size distribution of a granular phase in the slip zone with a breakage parameter. A dynamic brittle instability is associated with a critical level of damage in the solid, leading to loss of convexity of the solid strain energy, localization and transition to a granular phase associated with lower energy level. The continuum damage-breakage rheology model treats the localization to a slip zone at the onset of dynamic rupture and post-failure recovery process as phase transitions between solid and granular states. The model generates sub- and supershear rupture velocities and pulse-type ruptures seen also in frictional models, and additional important features such as strong dynamic changes of volumetric strain near the rupture front and diversity of nucleation mechanisms. The propagation of rupture front and slip accumulation at a point are correlated with sharp dynamic dilation followed by a gradual decay to a level associated with the final volumetric change associated with the granular phase transition in the slipping zone. The local brittle failure process associated with the solid-granular transition is expected to produce isotropic radiation in addition to the deviatoric terms. The framework significantly extends the ability to model brittle processes in complex geometrical structures and allows analysing the roles of gouge thickness and other parameters on nucleation, rupture and radiation characteristics.

  15. Dynamic rupture in a damage-breakage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ilchev, Assen; Mendecki, Aleksander

    2016-05-01

    We present a thermodynamically-based formulation for modeling dynamic rupture processes in the brittle crust using a continuum damage-breakage rheology. The model combines aspects of a continuum viscoelastic damage framework for brittle solids with a continuum breakage mechanics for granular flow within dynamically generated slip zones. The formulation accounts for the density of distributed cracking and other internal flaws in damaged rocks with a scalar damage parameter, and addresses the grain size distribution of a granular phase in the slip zone with a breakage parameter. A dynamic brittle instability is associated with a critical level of damage in the solid, leading to loss of convexity of the solid strain energy, localization, and transition to a granular phase associated with lower energy level. The continuum damage-breakage rheology model treats the localization to a slip zone at the onset of dynamic rupture and post-failure recovery process as phase transitions between solid and granular states. The model generates sub- and super-shear rupture velocities and pulse-type ruptures seen also in frictional models, and additional important features such as strong dynamic changes of volumetric strain near the rupture front and diversity of nucleation mechanisms. The propagation of rupture front and slip accumulation at a point are correlated with sharp dynamic dilation followed by a gradual decay to a level associated with the final volumetric change associated with the granular phase transition in the slipping zone. The local brittle failure process associated with the solid-granular transition is expected to produce isotropic radiation in addition to the deviatoric terms. The framework significantly extends the ability to model brittle processes in complex geometrical structures and allows analyzing the roles of gouge thickness and other parameters on nucleation, rupture and radiation characteristics.

  16. Modeling Active Region Evolution - A New LWS TR and T Strategic Capability Model Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In 2006 the LWS TR&T Program funded us to develop a strategic capability model of slowly evolving coronal active regions. In this poster we report on the overall design, and status of our new modeling suite. Our design features two coronal field models, a non-linear force free field model and a global 3D MHD code. The suite includes supporting tools and a user friendly GUI which will enable users to query the web for relevant magnetograms, download them, process them to synthesize a sequence of photospheric magnetograms and associated photospheric flow field which can then be applied to drive the coronal model innner boundary, run the coronal models and finally visualize the results.

  17. Analysis of shape memory alloy sensory particles for damage detection via substructure and continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielefeldt, Brent R.; Benzerga, A. Amine; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to monitor and predict the structural health of an aircraft is of growing importance to the aerospace industry. Currently, structural inspections and maintenance are based upon experiences with similar aircraft operating in similar conditions. While effective, these methods are time-intensive and unnecessary if the aircraft is not in danger of structural failure. It is imagined that future aircraft will utilize non-destructive evaluation methods, allowing for the near real-time monitoring of structural health. A particularly interesting method involves utilizing the unique transformation response of shape memory alloy (SMA) particles embedded in an aircraft structure. By detecting changes in the mechanical and/or electromagnetic responses of embedded particles, operators could detect the formation or propagation of fatigue cracks in the vicinity of these particles. This work focuses on a finite element model of SMA particles embedded in an aircraft wing using a substructure modeling approach in which degrees of freedom are retained only at specified points of connection to other parts or the application of boundary conditions, greatly reducing computational cost. Previous work evaluated isolated particle response to a static crack to numerically demonstrate and validate this damage detection method. This paper presents the implementation of a damage model to account for crack propagation and examine for the first time the effect of particle configuration and/or relative placement with respect to the ability to detect damage.

  18. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  19. Thermomechanics of damageable materials under diffusion: modelling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent general-purpose model describing diffusion of a solute or a fluid in a solid undergoing possible phase transformations and damage, beside possible visco-inelastic processes. Also heat generation/consumption/transfer is considered. Damage is modelled as rate-independent. The applications include metal-hydrogen systems with metal/hydride phase transformation, poroelastic rocks, structural and ferro/para-magnetic phase transformation, water and heat transport in concrete, and if diffusion is neglected, plasticity with damage and viscoelasticity, etc. For the ensuing system of partial differential equations and inclusions, we prove existence of solutions by a carefully devised semi-implicit approximation scheme of the fractional-step type.

  20. Magnetic measurement of creep damage: modeling and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, Martin J.; Jiles, David C.

    1996-11-01

    Results of inspection of creep damage by magnetic hysteresis measurements on Cr-Mo steel are presented. It is shown that structure-sensitive parameters such as coercivity, remanence and hysteresis loss are sensitive to creep damage. Previous metallurgical studies have shown that creep changes the microstructure of he material by introducing voids, dislocations, and grain boundary cavities. As cavities develop, dislocations and voids move out to grain boundaries; therefore, the total pinning sources for domain wall motion are reduced.This, together with the introduction of a demagnetizing field due to the cavities, results in the decrease of both coercivity, remanence and hence, concomitantly, hysteresis loss. Incorporating these structural effects into a magnetomechanical hysteresis model developed previously by us produces numerical variations of coercivity, remanence and hysteresis loss consistent with what is measured. The magnetic model has therefore been used to obtain appropriately modified magnetization curves for each element of creep-damaged material in a finite element (FE) calculation. The FE calculation has been used to simulate magnetic detection of non-uniform creep damage around a seam weld in a 2.25 Cr 1Mo steam pipe. In particular, in the simulation, a magnetic C-core with primary and secondary coils was placed with its pole pieces flush against the specimen in the vicinity of the weld. The secondary emf was shown to be reduced when creep damage was present inside the pipe wall at the cusp of the weld and in the vicinity of the cusp. The calculation showed that the C- core detected creep damage best if it spanned the weld seam width and if the current in the primary was such that the C- core was not magnetically saturated. Experimental measurements also exhibited the dip predicted in emf, but the measurements are not yet conclusive because the effects of magnetic property changes of weld materials, heat- affected material, and base material have

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Dewetting Damage in Highly Filled Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geubelle, P. H.; Inglis, H. M.; Kramer, J. D.; Patel, J. J.; Kumar, N. C.; Tan, H.

    2008-02-01

    Particle debonding or dewetting constitutes one of the key damage processes in highly filled particulate composites such as solid propellant and other energetic materials. To analyze this failure process, we have developed a multiscale finite element framework that combines, at the microscale, a nonlinear description of the binder response with a cohesive model of the damage process taking place in a representative periodic unit cell (PUC). To relate micro-scale damage to the macroscopic constitutive response of the material, we employ the mathematical theory of homogenization (MTH). After a description of the numerical scheme, we present the results of the damage response of a highly filled particulate composite subjected to a uniaxial macroscopic strain, and show the direct correlation between the complex damage processes taking place in the PUC and the nonlinear macroscopic constitutive response. We also present a detailed study of the PUC size and a comparison between the finite element MTH-based study and a micromechanics model of the dewetting process.

  2. Physics based modeling for time-frequency damage classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debejyo; Soni, Sunilkumar; Wei, Jun; Kovvali, Narayan; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Cochran, Douglas; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2008-03-01

    We have recently proposed a method for classifying waveforms from healthy and damaged structures in a structural health monitoring framework. This method is based on the use of hidden Markov models with preselected feature vectors obtained from the time-frequency based matching pursuit decomposition. In order to investigate the performance of the classifier for different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), we simulate the response of a lug joint sample with different crack lengths using finite element modeling (FEM). Unlike experimental noisy data, the modeled data is noise free. As a result, different levels of noise can be added to the modeled data in order to obtain the true performance of the classifier under additive white Gaussian noise. We use the finite element package ABAQUS to simulate a lug joint sample with different crack lengths and piezoelectric sensor signals. A mesoscale internal state variable damage model defines the progressive damage and is incorporated in the macroscale model. We furthermore use a hybrid method (boundary element-finite element method) to model wave reflection as well as mode conversion of the Lamb waves from the free edges and scattering of the waves from the internal defects. The hybrid method simplifies the modeling problem and provides better performance in the analysis of high stress gradient problems.

  3. Role of interactions and damage in a cohesive fracture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Josesph; Rundle, John; Turcotte, Donald; Klein, William

    2012-02-01

    We study the influences of local and long range interactions in a numerical model of tensile fracture. Our model simulates fracture events on a 2D square lattice plane with a Metropolis algorithm. We chose a Hamiltonian that is written as a function of the crack separation (offset field) and includes contributions from an external field, interactions, as well as a cohesive energy across the crack surfaces. Included in our study is both a ferromagnetic-type (attractive) and antiferromagnetic-type (repulsive) interactions. We test both of these interactions individually as well as a hybrid interaction in which over a short range the interaction is antiferromagnetic and in the long range the interaction becomes ferromagnetic. This dual interaction approximates a Lennard-Jones potential. We also propose a characterization of damage and investigate the increase of damage in time for fractures occurring by a static-load as well as a time-dependent load. Damaged sites do not interact with neighboring sites and cannot hold any load. We compare our damage model to previous studies of fiber-bundle models.

  4. Neural networks-based damage detection for bridges considering errors in baseline finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Jae; Lee, Jong Won; Yi, Jin Hak; Yun, Chung Bang; Jung, Hie Young

    2005-02-01

    Structural health monitoring has become an important research topic in conjunction with damage assessment and safety evaluation of structures. The use of system identification approaches for damage detection has been expanded in recent years owing to the advancements in signal analysis and information processing techniques. Soft computing techniques such as neural networks and genetic algorithm have been utilized increasingly for this end due to their excellent pattern recognition capability. In this study, a neural networks-based damage detection method using the modal properties is presented, which can effectively consider the modelling errors in the baseline finite element model from which the training patterns are to be generated. The differences or the ratios of the mode shape components between before and after damage are used as the input to the neural networks in this method, since they are found to be less sensitive to the modelling errors than the mode shapes themselves. Two numerical example analyses on a simple beam and a multi-girder bridge are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results of laboratory test on a simply supported bridge model and field test on a bridge with multiple girders confirm the applicability of the present method.

  5. A prediction model for ocular damage - Experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Heussner, Nico; Vagos, Márcia; Spitzer, Martin S; Stork, Wilhelm

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing number of laser applications in medicine and technology, accidental as well as intentional exposure of the human eye to laser sources has become a major concern. Therefore, a prediction model for ocular damage (PMOD) is presented within this work and validated for long-term exposure. This model is a combination of a raytracing model with a thermodynamical model of the human and an application which determines the thermal damage by the implementation of the Arrhenius integral. The model is based on our earlier work and is here validated against temperature measurements taken with porcine eye samples. For this validation, three different powers were used: 50mW, 100mW and 200mW with a spot size of 1.9mm. Also, the measurements were taken with two different sensing systems, an infrared camera and a fibre optic probe placed within the tissue. The temperatures were measured up to 60s and then compared against simulations. The measured temperatures were found to be in good agreement with the values predicted by the PMOD-model. To our best knowledge, this is the first model which is validated for both short-term and long-term irradiations in terms of temperature and thus demonstrates that temperatures can be accurately predicted within the thermal damage regime. PMID:26267496

  6. Theoretical model of impact damage in structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a mechanistically consistent model of impact damage based on elastic failures due to tensile and shear overloading. An elastic axisymmetric finite element model is used to determine the dynamic stresses generated by a single particle impact. Local failures in a finite element are assumed to occur when the primary/secondary principal stresses or the maximum shear stress reach critical tensile or shear stresses, respectively. The succession of failed elements thus models macrocrack growth. Sliding motions of cracks, which closed during unloading, are resisted by friction and the unrecovered deformation represents the 'plastic deformation' reported in the literature. The predicted ring cracks on the contact surface, as well as the cone cracks, median cracks, radial cracks, lateral cracks, and damage-induced porous zones in the interior of hot-pressed silicon nitride plates, matched those observed experimentally. The finite element model also predicted the uplifting of the free surface surrounding the impact site.

  7. In vitro model that approximates retinal damage threshold trends.

    PubMed

    Denton, Michael L; Foltz, Michael S; Schuster, Kurt J; Noojin, Gary D; Estlack, Larry E; Thomas, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Without effective in vitro damage models, advances in our understanding of the physics and biology of laser-tissue interaction would be hampered due to cost and ethical limitations placed on the use of nonhuman primates. We extend our characterization of laser-induced cell death in an existing in vitro retinal model to include damage thresholds at 514 and 413 nm. The new data, when combined with data previously reported for 532 and 458 nm exposures, provide a sufficiently broad range of wavelengths and exposure durations (0.1 to 100 s) to make comparisons with minimum visible lesion (in vivo) data in the literature. Based on similarities between in vivo and in vitro action spectra and temporal action profiles, the cell culture model is found to respond to laser irradiation in a fundamentally similar fashion as the retina of the rhesus animal model. We further show that this response depends on the amount of intracellular melanin pigmentation.

  8. Nonlinear ultrasound modelling and validation of fatigue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, G. P. Malfense; Ciampa, F.; Ginzburg, D.; Onder, E.; Meo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear ultrasound techniques have shown greater sensitivity to microcracks and they can be used to detect structural damages at their early stages. However, there is still a lack of numerical models available in commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools that are able to simulate the interaction of elastic waves with the materials nonlinear behaviour. In this study, a nonlinear constitutive material model was developed to predict the structural response under continuous harmonic excitation of a fatigued isotropic sample that showed anharmonic effects. Particularly, by means of Landau's theory and Kelvin tensorial representation, this model provided an understanding of the elastic nonlinear phenomena such as the second harmonic generation in three-dimensional solid media. The numerical scheme was implemented and evaluated using a commercially available FEA software LS-DYNA, and it showed a good numerical characterisation of the second harmonic amplitude generated by the damaged region known as the nonlinear response area (NRA). Since this process requires only the experimental second-order nonlinear parameter and rough damage size estimation as an input, it does not need any baseline testing with the undamaged structure or any dynamic modelling of the fatigue crack growth. To validate this numerical model, the second-order nonlinear parameter was experimentally evaluated at various points over the fatigue life of an aluminium (AA6082-T6) coupon and the crack propagation was measured using an optical microscope. A good correlation was achieved between the experimental set-up and the nonlinear constitutive model.

  9. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  10. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  11. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q; Panduro, T E; Thorsen, B J; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, K

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, however, feasible for modelling the overall cost per day. The study also shows that in combining the insurance and regional data it is possible to establish clear relationships between occurrences of claims and hazard maps. In particular, the results indicate that with improvements to data collection and analysis, improved prediction of damage costs will be possible, for example based also on socioeconomic variables. Furthermore, the paper concludes that more collaboration between scientific research and insurance agencies is needed to improve inundation modelling and economic assessments for urban drainage designs.

  12. Modeling of progressive damage in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Solti, J.P.; Mall, S.; Robertson, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    This paper modifies an existing shear-lag model to analyze the damage progression within unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under a monotonic increasing load. The shear-lag model presented by Kuo and Chou is extended using the concept of a critical strain energy to determine analytical solutions for matrix cracking and fiber failure within these composite systems. In all, the damage mechanisms considered herein are matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interfacial debonding and fiber fracture. A priori knowledge of the composite`s proportional limit yields a complete closed form stress-strain solution. The utility of the proposed model lies in its ability to determine the laminate`s stress-strain response with minimum reliance on empirical data. Further, the proposed approach may offer an alternative means of estimating the interfacial strength through empirical fitting of crack density and stress-strain data.

  13. Sandia/Stanford Unified Creep Plasticity Damage Model for ANSYS

    2006-09-03

    A unified creep plasticity (UCP) model was developed, based upon the time-dependent and time-independent deformation properties of the 95.5Sn-3.9Ag-0.6Cu (wt.%) soldier that were measured at Sandia. Then, a damage parameter, D, was added to the equation to develop the unified creep plasticity damage (UCPD) model. The parameter, D, was parameterized, using data obtained at Sandia from isothermal fatigue experiments on a double-lap shear test. The softwae was validated against a BGA solder joint exposed tomore » thermal cycling. The UCPD model was put into the ANSYS finite element as a subroutine. So, the softwae is the subroutine for ANSYS 8.1.« less

  14. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  15. Multiple Damage Progression Paths in Model-Based Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    Model-based prognostics approaches employ domain knowledge about a system, its components, and how they fail through the use of physics-based models. Component wear is driven by several different degradation phenomena, each resulting in their own damage progression path, overlapping to contribute to the overall degradation of the component. We develop a model-based prognostics methodology using particle filters, in which the problem of characterizing multiple damage progression paths is cast as a joint state-parameter estimation problem. The estimate is represented as a probability distribution, allowing the prediction of end of life and remaining useful life within a probabilistic framework that supports uncertainty management. We also develop a novel variance control mechanism that maintains an uncertainty bound around the hidden parameters to limit the amount of estimation uncertainty and, consequently, reduce prediction uncertainty. We construct a detailed physics-based model of a centrifugal pump, to which we apply our model-based prognostics algorithms. We illustrate the operation of the prognostic solution with a number of simulation-based experiments and demonstrate the performance of the chosen approach when multiple damage mechanisms are active

  16. Modeling and Characterization of Damage Processes in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Saether, E.; Smith, S. W.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Yamakov, V. I.; Gupta, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a broad effort that is aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms of crack growth and using that understanding as a basis for designing materials and enabling predictions of fracture in materials and structures that have small characteristic dimensions. This area of research, herein referred to as Damage Science, emphasizes the length scale regimes of the nanoscale and the microscale for which analysis and characterization tools are being developed to predict the formation, propagation, and interaction of fundamental damage mechanisms. Examination of nanoscale processes requires atomistic and discrete dislocation plasticity simulations, while microscale processes can be examined using strain gradient plasticity, crystal plasticity and microstructure modeling methods. Concurrent and sequential multiscale modeling methods are being developed to analytically bridge between these length scales. Experimental methods for characterization and quantification of near-crack tip damage are also being developed. This paper focuses on several new methodologies in these areas and their application to understanding damage processes in polycrystalline metals. On-going and potential applications are also discussed.

  17. Modeling of two-phase porous flow with damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Bercovici, D.

    2009-12-01

    Two-phase dynamics has been broadly studied in Earth Science in a convective system. We investigate the basic physics of compaction with damage theory and present preliminary results of both steady state and time-dependent transport when melt migrates through porous medium. In our simple 1-D model, damage would play an important role when we consider the ascent of melt-rich mixture at constant velocity. Melt segregation becomes more difficult so that porosity is larger than that in simple compaction in the steady-state compaction profile. Scaling analysis for compaction equation is performed to predict the behavior of melt segregation with damage. The time-dependent of the compacting system is investigated by looking at solitary wave solutions to the two-phase model. We assume that the additional melt is injected to the fracture material through a single pulse with determined shape and velocity. The existence of damage allows the pulse to keep moving further than that in simple compaction. Therefore more melt could be injected to the two-phase mixture and future application such as carbon dioxide injection is proposed.

  18. Modeling the Study of DNA Damage Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Specks, Julia; Nieto-Soler, Maria; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Damaged DNA has a profound impact on mammalian health and overall survival. In addition to being the source of mutations that initiate cancer, the accumulation of toxic amounts of DNA damage can cause severe developmental diseases and accelerate ageing. Therefore, understanding how cells respond to DNA damage has become one of the most intense areas of biomedical research in the recent years. However, whereas most mechanistic studies derive from in vitro or in cellulo work, the impact of a given mutation on a living organism is largely unpredictable. For instance, why BRCA1 mutations preferentially lead to breast cancer whereas mutations compromising mismatch repair drive colon cancer is still not understood. In this context, evaluating the specific physiological impact of mutations that compromise genome integrity has become crucial for a better dimensioning of our knowledge. We here describe the various technologies that can be used for modeling mutations in mice, and provide a review of the genes and pathways that have been modeled so far in the context of DNA damage responses. PMID:25636482

  19. An empirical modified fatigue damage model for impacted GFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, S.; Hassan, M. A.; Bushroa, A. R.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the residual strength of GFRP laminates following a low-velocity impact event under cyclic loading. The residual strength is calculated using a linear fatigue damage model. According to an investigation into the effect of low-velocity impact on the fatigue behavior of laminates, it seems laminate fatigue life decreases after impact. By normalizing the fatigue stress against undamaged static strength, the Fatigue Damage parameter “FD” is presented with a linear relationship as its slope which is a linear function of the initial impact energy; meanwhile, the constants were attained from experimental data. FD is implemented into a plane-stress continuum damage mechanics based model for GFRP composite laminates, in order to predict damage threshold in composite structures. An S-N curve is implemented to indicate the fatigue behavior for 2 mm thickness encompassing both undamaged and impacted samples. A decline in lifespan is evident when the impact energy level increases. Finally, the FD is intended to capture the unique GFRP composite characteristics.

  20. Advances in National Capabilities for Consequence Assessment Modeling of Airborne Hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Nasstrom, J; Sugiyama, G; Foster, K; Larsen, S; Kosovic, B; Eme, B; Walker, H; Goldstein, P; Lundquist, J; Pobanz, B; Fulton, J

    2007-11-26

    This paper describes ongoing advancement of airborne hazard modeling capabilities in support of multiple agencies through the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Atmospheric Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). A suite of software tools developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and collaborating organizations includes simple stand-alone, local-scale plume modeling tools for end user's computers, Web- and Internet-based software to access advanced 3-D flow and atmospheric dispersion modeling tools and expert analysis from the national center at LLNL, and state-of-the-science high-resolution urban models and event reconstruction capabilities.

  1. Search-based model identification of smart-structure damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. J.; Macalou, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a combined model and parameter identification approach, based on modal analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, for identifying damage or flaws in a rotating truss structure incorporating embedded piezoceramic sensors. This smart structure example is representative of a class of structures commonly found in aerospace systems and next generation space structures. Artificial intelligence techniques of classification, heuristic search, and an object-oriented knowledge base are used in an AI-based model identification approach. A finite model space is classified into a search tree, over which a variant of best-first search is used to identify the model whose stored response most closely matches that of the input. Newly-encountered models can be incorporated into the model space. This adaptativeness demonstrates the potential for learning control. Following this output-error model identification, numerical parameter identification is used to further refine the identified model. Given the rotating truss example in this paper, noisy data corresponding to various damage configurations are input to both this approach and a conventional parameter identification method. The combination of the AI-based model identification with parameter identification is shown to lead to smaller parameter corrections than required by the use of parameter identification alone.

  2. Multistage carcinogenesis modeling including cell cycle and DNA damage states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, W.; Moolgavkar, S.

    The multistage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis is generalized to include cell cycle states and corresponding DNA damage states with imperfect repair for normal and initiated stem cells. Initiated cells may undergo transformation to a malignant state, eventually leading to cancer incidence or death. The model allows oxidative or radiation induced DNA damage, checkpoint delay, DNA repair, apoptosis, and transformation rates to depend on the cell cycle state or DNA damage state of normal and initiated cells. A probability generating function approach is used to represent the time dependent probability distribution for cells in all states. The continuous time coupled Markov system representing this joint distribution satisfies a partial differential equation (pde). Time dependent survival and hazard functions are found through numerical solution of the characteristic equations for the pde. Although the hazard and survival can be calculated numerically, number and size distributions of pre-malignant lesions from models that are developed will be approximated through simulation. We use the model to explore predictions for hazard and survival as parameters representing cell cycle regulation and arrest are modified. Modification of these parameters may influence rates for cell division, apoptosis and malignant transformation that are important in carcinogenesis. We also explore enhanced repair that may be important for low-dose hypersensitivity and adaptive response, and degradation of repair processes or loss of checkpoint control that may drive genetic instability.

  3. Towards Industrial Application of Damage Models for Sheet Metal Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, M.; Roll, K.

    2011-05-01

    Due to global warming and financial situation the demand to reduce the CO2-emission and the production costs leads to the permanent development of new materials. In the automotive industry the occupant safety is an additional condition. Bringing these arguments together the preferable approach for lightweight design of car components, especially for body-in-white, is the use of modern steels. Such steel grades, also called advanced high strength steels (AHSS), exhibit a high strength as well as a high formability. Not only their material behavior but also the damage behavior of AHSS is different compared to the performances of standard steels. Conventional methods for the damage prediction in the industry like the forming limit curve (FLC) are not reliable for AHSS. Physically based damage models are often used in crash and bulk forming simulations. The still open question is the industrial application of these models for sheet metal forming. This paper evaluates the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model and the model of Lemaitre within commercial codes with a goal of industrial application.

  4. Development of a robust DNA damage model including persistent telomere-associated damage with application to secondary cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Rastgou Talemi, Soheil; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been instrumental to understand kinetics of radiation-induced DNA damage repair and associated secondary cancer risk. The widely accepted two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model assumes two kinds of double strand breaks, simple and complex ones, with different repair rates. Recently, persistent DNA damage associated with telomeres was reported as a new kind of DNA damage. We therefore extended existing versions of the TLK model by new categories of DNA damage and re-evaluated those models using extensive data. We subjected different versions of the TLK model to a rigorous model discrimination approach. This enabled us to robustly select a best approximating parsimonious model that can both recapitulate and predict transient and persistent DNA damage after ionizing radiation. Models and data argue for i) nonlinear dose-damage relationships, and ii) negligible saturation of repair kinetics even for high doses. Additionally, we show that simulated radiation-induced persistent telomere-associated DNA damage foci (TAF) can be used to predict excess relative risk (ERR) of developing secondary leukemia after fractionated radiotherapy. We suggest that TAF may serve as an additional measure to predict cancer risk after radiotherapy using high dose rates. This may improve predicting risk-dose dependency of ionizing radiation especially for long-term therapies. PMID:26359627

  5. Development of a robust DNA damage model including persistent telomere-associated damage with application to secondary cancer risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rastgou Talemi, Soheil; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been instrumental to understand kinetics of radiation-induced DNA damage repair and associated secondary cancer risk. The widely accepted two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model assumes two kinds of double strand breaks, simple and complex ones, with different repair rates. Recently, persistent DNA damage associated with telomeres was reported as a new kind of DNA damage. We therefore extended existing versions of the TLK model by new categories of DNA damage and re-evaluated those models using extensive data. We subjected different versions of the TLK model to a rigorous model discrimination approach. This enabled us to robustly select a best approximating parsimonious model that can both recapitulate and predict transient and persistent DNA damage after ionizing radiation. Models and data argue for i) nonlinear dose-damage relationships, and ii) negligible saturation of repair kinetics even for high doses. Additionally, we show that simulated radiation-induced persistent telomere-associated DNA damage foci (TAF) can be used to predict excess relative risk (ERR) of developing secondary leukemia after fractionated radiotherapy. We suggest that TAF may serve as an additional measure to predict cancer risk after radiotherapy using high dose rates. This may improve predicting risk-dose dependency of ionizing radiation especially for long-term therapies. PMID:26359627

  6. GMI Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strode, Sarah; Rodriguez, Jose; Steenrod, Steve; Liu, Junhua; Strahan, Susan; Nielsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe the capabilities of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM) with a special focus on capabilities related to the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom). Several science results based on GMI hindcast simulations and preliminary results from the ATom simulations are highlighted. We also discuss the relationship between GMI and GEOS-5.

  7. A relaxation-based approach to damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Philipp; Schwarz, Stephan; Makowski, Jerzy; Hackl, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Material models, including softening effects due to, for example, damage and localizations, share the problem of ill-posed boundary value problems that yield mesh-dependent finite element results. It is thus necessary to apply regularization techniques that couple local behavior described, for example, by internal variables, at a spatial level. This can take account of the gradient of the internal variable to yield mesh-independent finite element results. In this paper, we present a new approach to damage modeling that does not use common field functions, inclusion of gradients or complex integration techniques: Appropriate modifications of the relaxed (condensed) energy hold the same advantage as other methods, but with much less numerical effort. We start with the theoretical derivation and then discuss the numerical treatment. Finally, we present finite element results that prove empirically how the new approach works.

  8. Application of ARMAV models to the identification and damage detection of mechanical and civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodeux, J. B.; Golinval, J. C.

    2001-06-01

    In this paper, the application of auto-regressive moving average vector models to system identification and damage detection is investigated. These parametric models have already been applied for the analysis of multiple input-output systems under ambient excitation. Their main advantage consists in the capability of extracting modal parameters from the recorded time signals, without the requirement of excitation measurement. The excitation is supposed to be a stationary Gaussian white noise. The method also allows the estimation of modal parameter uncertainties. On the basis of these uncertainties, a statistically based damage detection scheme is performed and it becomes possible to assess whether changes of modal parameters are caused by, e.g. some damage or simply by estimation inaccuracies. The paper reports first an example of identification and damage detection applied to a simulated system under random excitation. The `Steel-Quake' benchmark proposed in the framework of COST Action F3 `Structural Dynamics' is also analysed. This structure was defined by the Joint Research Centre in Ispra (Italy) to test steel building performance during earthquakes. The proposed method gives an excellent identification of frequencies and mode shapes, while damping ratios are estimated with less accuracy.

  9. Damage to DNA in bacterioplankton: a model of damage by ultraviolet radiation and its repair as influenced by vertical mixing.

    PubMed

    Huot, Y; Jeffrey, W H; Davis, R F; Cullen, J J

    2000-07-01

    A model of UV-induced DNA damage in oceanic bacterioplankton was developed and tested against previously published and novel measurements of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in surface layers of the ocean. The model describes the effects of solar irradiance, wind-forced mixing of bacterioplankton and optical properties of the water on net DNA damage in the water column. The biological part includes the induction of CPD by UV radiation and repair of this damage through photoreactivation and excision. The modeled damage is compared with measured variability of CPD in the ocean: diel variation in natural bacterioplankton communities at the surface and in vertical profiles under different wind conditions (net damage as influenced by repair and mixing); in situ incubation of natural assemblages of bacterioplankton (damage and repair, no mixing); and in situ incubation of DNA solutions (no repair, no mixing). The model predictions are generally consistent with the measurements, showing similar patterns with depth, time and wind speed. A sensitivity analysis assesses the effect on net DNA damage of varying ozone thickness, colored dissolved organic matter concentration, chlorophyll concentration, wind speed and mixed layer depth. Ozone thickness and mixed layer depth are the most important factors affecting net DNA damage in the mixed layer. From the model, the total amplification factor (TAF; a relative measure of the increase of damage associated with a decrease in ozone thickness) for net DNA damage in the euphotic zone is 1.7, as compared with 2.1-2.2 for irradiance weighted for damage to DNA at the surface.

  10. Chelyabinsk meteorite entry model and damage on the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, N.; Shuvalov, V.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we model an atmospheric entry of the Chelyabinsk meteorite to show that this event represents a typical behaviour of a large chondritic body in the Earth's atmosphere: it was fragmented, ablated, and decelerated to a free-fall velocity. Atmospheric shock waves reached the surface, caused on overpressure of up to 1500 Pa, and damaged on an area of about 50 km*100 km.

  11. Review of Hydrologic Models for Evaluating Use of Remote Sensing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, E. L.; Mcquivey, R. S.; Keefer, T.; Johnson, E. R.; Erekson, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrologic models most commonly used by federal agencies for hydrologic forecasting are reviewed. Six catchment models and one snow accumulation and ablation model are reviewed. Information on the structure, parameters, states, and required inputs is presented in schematic diagrams and in tables. The primary and secondary roles of parameters and state variables with respect to their function in the models are identified. The information will be used to evaluate the usefulness of remote sensing capabilities in the operational use of hydrologic models.

  12. Kinetic Modeling of Damage Repair, Genome Instability, and Neoplastic Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Robert D

    2007-03-17

    Inducible repair and pathway interactions may fundamentally alter the shape of dose-response curves because different mechanisms may be important under low- and high-dose exposure conditions. However, the significance of these phenomena for risk assessment purposes is an open question. This project developed new modeling tools to study the putative effects of DNA damage induction and repair on higher-level biological endpoints, including cell killing, neoplastic transformation and cancer. The project scope included (1) the development of new approaches to simulate the induction and base excision repair (BER) of DNA damage using Monte Carlo methods and (2) the integration of data from the Monte Carlo simulations with kinetic models for higher-level biological endpoints. Methods of calibrating and testing such multiscale biological simulations were developed. We also developed models to aid in the analysis and interpretation of data from experimental assays, such as the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay used to quantity the amount of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  13. Mesoscale modeling of solute precipitation and radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Schwen, Daniel; Ke, Huibin; Bai, Xianming; Hales, Jason

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes the low length scale effort during FY 2014 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution in reactor pressure vessels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation-induced defect accumulation and irradiation-enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering-scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. Atomic-scale efforts that supply information for the mesoscale capabilities are also included.

  14. Characterization of Indentation Response and Stiffness Reduction of Bone using a Continuum Damage Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingzhou; Michalenko, Michelle M.; Kuhl, Ellen; Ovaert, Timothy C.

    2009-01-01

    Indentation tests can be used to characterize the mechanical properties of bone at small load/length scales offering the possibility of utilizing very small test specimens, which can be excised using minimally-invasive procedures. In addition, the need for mechanical property data from bone may be a requirement for fundamental multi-scale experiments, changes in nano- and micro-mechanical properties (e.g., as affected by changes in bone mineral density) due to drug therapies, and/or the development of computational models. Load vs. indentation depth data, however, is more complex than those obtained from typical macro-scale experiments, primarily due to the mixed state of stress, and thus interpretation of the data and extraction of mechanical properties is more challenging. Previous studies have shown that cortical bone exhibits a visco-elastic response combined with permanent deformation during indentation tests, and that the load vs. indentation depth response can be simulated using a visco-elastic/plastic material model. The model successfully captures the loading and creep displacement behavior, however, it does not adequately reproduce the unloading response near the end of the unloading cycle, where a pronounced decrease in contact stiffness is observed. It is proposed that the stiffness reduction observed in bone results from an increase in damage; therefore, a plastic-damage model was investigated and shown capable of simulating a typical bone indentation response through an axisymmetric finite element simulation. The plastic-damage model was able to reproduce the full indentation response, especially the reduced stiffness behavior exhibited during the latter stages of unloading. The results suggest that the plastic-damage model is suitable for describing the complex indentation response of bone and may provide further insight into the relationship between model parameters and mechanical/physical properties. PMID:20129418

  15. Life prediction modeling based on cyclic damage accumulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    A high temperature, low cycle fatigue life prediction method was developed. This method, Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA), was developed for use in predicting the crack initiation lifetime of gas turbine engine materials, where initiation was defined as a 0.030 inch surface length crack. A principal engineering feature of the CDA method is the minimum data base required for implementation. Model constants can be evaluated through a few simple specimen tests such as monotonic loading and rapic cycle fatigue. The method was expanded to account for the effects on creep-fatigue life of complex loadings such as thermomechanical fatigue, hold periods, waveshapes, mean stresses, multiaxiality, cumulative damage, coatings, and environmental attack. A significant data base was generated on the behavior of the cast nickel-base superalloy B1900+Hf, including hundreds of specimen tests under such loading conditions. This information is being used to refine and extend the CDA life prediction model, which is now nearing completion. The model is also being verified using additional specimen tests on wrought INCO 718, and the final version of the model is expected to be adaptable to most any high-temperature alloy. The model is currently available in the form of equations and related constants. A proposed contract addition will make the model available in the near future in the form of a computer code to potential users.

  16. Multiscale modeling of damage in multidirectional composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandra Veer

    90°-plies. The predictions agree well with published experimental data as well as independent FE computations. Limited parametric studies are performed to show usability of SDM for more general laminates. To predict the initiation and growth of intralaminar cracks, an energy based model is proposed in which these cracks initiate and multiply when the work required to form new set of cracks exceeds a laminate dependent critical energy release rate. The approach requires determination of average crack opening and sliding displacements at varying crack spacing. This task is performed through a suitable 3-D FE analysis. In case of off-axis ply cracking, a mixed mode fracture criterion is utilized, where the critical energy release rates in normal and shear modes are determined by fitting the damage model with the experimental data for a reference laminate. The predictions from the model for [0/+/-theta4/01/2]s and [0/90/∓45]s laminates show remarkable agreement with the experimental results. The methodology and the results covered in this dissertation will be of interest to mechanics of materials researchers as well as to engineers in industry where composite materials for structural applications are of interest.

  17. Surface Modeling, Solid Modeling and Finite Element Modeling. Analysis Capabilities of Computer-Assisted Design and Manufacturing Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, John G.; Kare, Audhut P.

    1987-01-01

    Explores several concepts in computer assisted design/computer assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Defines, evaluates, reviews and compares advanced computer-aided geometric modeling and analysis techniques. Presents the results of a survey to establish the capabilities of minicomputer based-systems with the CAD/CAM packages evaluated. (CW)

  18. User's instructions for the GE cardiovascular model to simulate LBNP and tilt experiments, with graphic capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The present form of this cardiovascular model simulates both 1-g and zero-g LBNP (lower body negative pressure) experiments and tilt experiments. In addition, the model simulates LBNP experiments at any body angle. The model is currently accessible on the Univac 1110 Time-Shared System in an interactive operational mode. Model output may be in tabular form and/or graphic form. The graphic capabilities are programmed for the Tektronix 4010 graphics terminal and the Univac 1110.

  19. A Developmental Model of Financial Capability: A Framework for Promoting a Successful Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serido, Joyce; Shim, Soyeon; Tang, Chuanyi

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a developmental model of financial capability to understand the process by which young adults acquire the financial knowledge and behaviors needed to manage full-time adult social roles and responsibilities. The model integrates financial knowledge, financial self-beliefs, financial behavior, and well-being into a single…

  20. Formation damage and filter cake buildup in laboratory core tests: Modeling and model-assisted analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Civan, F.

    1996-03-01

    A mathematical model for the analysis of formation damage in laboratory core tests is presented. The model considers filter cake buildup on sand face, invasion of external particles, release of formation fines, migration and retention of external particles and formation fines, interphase transfer of particles, and alteration of porosity and permeability. The effects of wettabilities of fine particles and pore surfaces, relative permeabilities and capillary pressure on formation damage in two-phase flow conditions are also included. Simulation results from the model are in good agreement with experimental results from core tests. This model can be used for the analysis of formation damage due to particulate processes in laboratory core tests.

  1. Measurement and modeling of strength distributions associated with grinding damage

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, J.A.; Nemeth, N.N.; Powers, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    The strength of ceramic material is typically measured in accordance with ASTM C1161 which specifies the machined specimens be ground uniaxially in the longitudinal direction and tested so that the maximum principal stress is longitudinal. Such a grinding process typically induces minimal damage in the transverse direction, but significant damage in the longitudinal direction, resulting in an anisotropic flaw distribution on the surface of the specimen. Additionally, investigations of the strength anisotropy due to grinding may provide a means to measure a materials strength response under mixed mode (I & II) conditions, thereby providing information that can be applied to isotropic cases (e.g. polished or as-processed material). The objective of this work was to measure and model the effects of a typical, uniaxial grinding process on the strength distribution of a ceramic material under various lading conditions. The fast-fracture strength of a sintered alpha silicon carbide was measured in four-point flexure with the principal stress oriented at angles between 0 and 90{degrees} relative to the grinding direction. Also, uniaxially ground plate specimens were loaded biaxial flexure. Finally, flexure specimens were tested in an annealed condition to determine if the machining damage could be healed. Modeling of the strength distributions was done with two and three parameter Weibull models and shear sensitive and insensitive models. Alpha silicon carbide was chosen because it exhibits a very low fracture toughness, no crack growth resistance, high elastic modulus and a very low susceptibility to slow crack growth (static fatigue). Such properties should make this an ideal ceramic for the verification of fast fracture reliability models and codes.

  2. Urban public transit systems modeling capabilities. Final report, January 1993-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Tyer, K.D.; Rao, K.S.; Oumarou, A.; Krammes, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    A former assessment of current transit and HOV modeling capabilities was conducted, with emphasis on CORFLO, which is uniquely suited among U.S. public-domain models for detailed evaluations of traffic conditions in urban corridors. Other models assessed include CONTRAM, INTEGRATION, JAM, LATM, MICRO-ASSIGNMENT, NETSIM, SATURN, TRAFFICQ, and TRANSYT. SATURN and CORFLO were the most highly rated with respect to their modeling approach, transit and HOV supply/demand modeling, and output measures of effectiveness. A detailed analysis of CORFLO`s logic and code and a case study evaluation of transit and HOV alternatives using a CORFLO model of the North Central Expressway Corridor in Dallas, Texas, revealed several areas in which CORFLO should be enhanced to improve its urban public transit systems modeling capabilities.

  3. Progressive damage and delamination in composite plates under dynamic loading: Analytical modeling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, David Jennings

    A general methodology for determining and tracking progressive damage in woven fabric laminated composite plates subjected to dynamic loads has been developed and experimentally validated. The progressive damage theory is based on three-dimensional rate-dependent elasticity and nonlinear anisotropic plasticity which utilizes distinct in-plane and transverse failure criteria and post failure behavior. Delamination is accounted for using two different methods (shear degradation and cohesive layer modeling) and the relative merits of these two approaches are evaluated. The progressive damage theory and delamination modeling capability are implemented in a commercial finite element (FE) code and used to perform validation simulations. Results from off-axis tension tests at different loading rates were used to determine the in-plane material properties for the progressive damage theory. FE simulations of the off-axis tension tests demonstrate that the theory is able to reproduce the observed test results very well over two orders of magnitude of strain rate and at high strains (up to 15%). This includes tracking of the nonlinear stress-strain behavior, prediction of failure load and prediction of the failure mechanism. Results from short beam shear tests are used to determine the transverse material properties for the progressive damage theory and to provide experimental validation of the three-dimensional theory with delamination modeling included. A novel method to determine transverse shear properties based on a 0° short beam shear test is developed and used. Simulations of additional off-axis short beam shear tests with delamination modeling are performed and compared to experimental results for validation. Excellent agreement between the test and simulation results is obtained. Additional validation of the progressive damage theory with delamination modeling was conducted using transversely loaded thick composite disk specimens. The loading rate was adjusted to

  4. Modelling Of Anticipated Damage Ratio On Breakwaters Using Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercan, D. E.; Yagci, O.; Kabdasli, S.

    2003-04-01

    In breakwater design the determination of armour unit weight is especially important in terms of the structure's life. In a typical experimental breakwater stability study, different wave series composed of different wave heights; wave period and wave steepness characteristics are applied in order to investigate performance the structure. Using a classical approach, a regression equation is generated for damage ratio as a function of characteristic wave height. The parameters wave period and wave steepness are not considered. In this study, differing from the classical approach using a fuzzy logic, a relationship between damage ratio as a function of mean wave period (T_m), wave steepness (H_s/L_m) and significant wave height (H_s) was further generated. The system's inputs were mean wave period (T_m), wave steepness (H_s/L_m) and significant wave height (H_s). For fuzzification all input variables were divided into three fuzzy subsets, their membership functions were defined using method developed by Mandani (Mandani, 1974) and the rules were written. While for defuzzification the centroid method was used. In order to calibrate and test the generated models an experimental study was conducted. The experiments were performed in a wave flume (24 m long, 1.0 m wide and 1.0 m high) using 20 different irregular wave series (P-M spectrum). Throughout the study, the water depth was 0.6 m and the breakwater cross-sectional slope was 1V/2H. In the armour layer, a type of artificial armour unit known as antifer cubes were used. The results of the established fuzzy logic model and regression equation model was compared with experimental data and it was determined that the established fuzzy logic model gave a more accurate prediction of the damage ratio on this type of breakwater. References Mandani, E.H., "Application of Fuzzy Algorithms for Control of Simple Dynamic Plant", Proc. IEE, vol. 121, no. 12, December 1974.

  5. A viscoelastic model of shear-induced blood damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwatz, Gilad; Smits, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for blood damage (hemolysis) have been studied since the mid-1960s, and it is now widely accepted that the level of shear stress and exposure time play important roles. Several models for hemolysis have been previously proposed. However, these models are purely empirical and limited to a narrow range of shear stress and exposure time and mostly, they lack any physical basis. In this study, we propose a new non-dimensional model that captures the mechanics of the red blood cells breakdown by taking into account the viscoelastic nature of their membrane. We validate our model against experimental measurements of hemolysis caused by laminar shear stress ranging from 50Pa to 500 Pa and exposure times extending from 60 s to 300 s. Funding provided by Princeton University's Project X.

  6. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  7. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Lu, Wei-Yang; Scherzinger, William M.; Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Lo, Chi S.

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  8. Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

    2008-01-01

    The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

  9. Elastic-plastic models for multi-site damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Actis, Ricardo L.; Szabo, Barna A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in advanced analysis methods for the computation of stress site damage. The method of solution is based on the p-version of the finite element method. Its implementation was designed to permit extraction of linear stress intensity factors using a superconvergent extraction method (known as the contour integral method) and evaluation of the J-integral following an elastic-plastic analysis. Coarse meshes are adequate for obtaining accurate results supported by p-convergence data. The elastic-plastic analysis is based on the deformation theory of plasticity and the von Mises yield criterion. The model problem consists of an aluminum plate with six equally spaced holes and a crack emanating from each hole. The cracks are of different sizes. The panel is subjected to a remote tensile load. Experimental results are available for the panel. The plasticity analysis provided the same limit load as the experimentally determined load. The results of elastic-plastic analysis were compared with the results of linear elastic analysis in an effort to evaluate how plastic zone sizes influence the crack growth rates. The onset of net-section yielding was determined also. The results show that crack growth rate is accelerated by the presence of adjacent damage, and the critical crack size is shorter when the effects of plasticity are taken into consideration. This work also addresses the effects of alternative stress-strain laws: The elastic-ideally-plastic material model is compared against the Ramberg-Osgood model.

  10. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  11. Existing and Required Modeling Capabilities for Evaluating ATM Systems and Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odoni, Amedeo R.; Bowman, Jeremy; Delahaye, Daniel; Deyst, John J.; Feron, Eric; Hansman, R. John; Khan, Kashif; Kuchar, James K.; Pujet, Nicolas; Simpson, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    ATM systems throughout the world are entering a period of major transition and change. The combination of important technological developments and of the globalization of the air transportation industry has necessitated a reexamination of some of the fundamental premises of existing Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts. New ATM concepts have to be examined, concepts that may place more emphasis on: strategic traffic management; planning and control; partial decentralization of decision-making; and added reliance on the aircraft to carry out strategic ATM plans, with ground controllers confined primarily to a monitoring and supervisory role. 'Free Flight' is a case in point. In order to study, evaluate and validate such new concepts, the ATM community will have to rely heavily on models and computer-based tools/utilities, covering a wide range of issues and metrics related to safety, capacity and efficiency. The state of the art in such modeling support is adequate in some respects, but clearly deficient in others. It is the objective of this study to assist in: (1) assessing the strengths and weaknesses of existing fast-time models and tools for the study of ATM systems and concepts and (2) identifying and prioritizing the requirements for the development of additional modeling capabilities in the near future. A three-stage process has been followed to this purpose: 1. Through the analysis of two case studies involving future ATM system scenarios, as well as through expert assessment, modeling capabilities and supporting tools needed for testing and validating future ATM systems and concepts were identified and described. 2. Existing fast-time ATM models and support tools were reviewed and assessed with regard to the degree to which they offer the capabilities identified under Step 1. 3 . The findings of 1 and 2 were combined to draw conclusions about (1) the best capabilities currently existing, (2) the types of concept testing and validation that can be carried

  12. Modeling and simulation for collateral damage estimation in combat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Steven C.; Martin, Douglas D.

    2005-05-01

    Modeling and simulation (M&S) is increasingly used for decision support during combat operations: M&S is going to war! One of the key operational uses of M&S in combat is collateral damage estimation (CDE). Reducing undesired collateral damage (CD) in war and in operations other than war is important to the United States of America. Injuries to noncombatants and damage to protected sites are uniformly avoided by our forces whenever possible in planning and executing combat operations. This desire to limit unwanted CD presents unique challenges to command and control (C2), especially for time-sensitive targeting (TST). The challenges begin the moment a target is identified because CD estimates must meet specified criteria before target approval is granted. Therefore, CDE tools must be accurate, responsive, and human-factored, with graphics that aid C2 decisions. This paper will describe how CDE tools are used to build three-dimensional models of potential target areas and select appropriate munitions, fusing, and delivery in order to minimize predicted CD. The paper will cover the evolution of CDE from using only range rings around the target to improvements through Operation Allied Force, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Positive CDE feedback from various sources, including the Secretary of Defense, lessons learned, and warfighters will be presented. Current CDE tools in the field and CDE tools used in reachback are being improved, and short-term and long-term improvements in those tools and in the CDE methodology will be described in this paper.

  13. Modeling ductile metals under large strain, pressure and high strain rates incorporating damage and microstructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannitti, Gianluca; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Dichiaro, Simone

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a constitutive modeling that couples plasticity, grain size evolution (due to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization) and ductile damage has been developed. The effect of grain size on the material yield stress (Hall-Petch) and on the melting temperature has been considered. The model has been used to investigate computationally the behaviour of high purity copper in dynamic tensile extrusion test (DTE). An extensive numerical simulation work, using implicit finite element code with direct integration, has been performed and the results have been compared with available experimental data. The major finding is that the proposed model is capable to predict most of the observed features such as the increase of material ductility with the decreasing average grain size, the overall number and size of fragments and the average grain size distribution in the fragment trapped into the dime.

  14. Modeling ductile metals under large strain, pressure and high strain rate incorporating damage and microstructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannitti, Gianluca; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Dichiaro, Simone

    2012-03-01

    In this work, a constitutive modeling that couples plasticity, grain size evolution (due to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization) and ductile damage has been developed. The effect of grain size on the material yield stress (Hall-Petch) and on the melting temperature has been considered. The model has been used to investigate computationally the behavior of high purity copper in dynamic tensile extrusion test (DTE). An extensive numerical simulation work, using implicit finite element code with direct integration, has been performed and the results have been compared with available experimental data. The major finding is that the proposed model is capable to predict most of the observed features such as the increase of material ductility with the decreasing average grain size, the overall number and size of fragments and the average grain size distribution in the fragment trapped into the dime.

  15. COMPUTATIONAL TOXICOLOGY ADVANCES: EMERGING CAPABILITIES FOR DATA EXPLORATION AND SAR MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Toxicology Advances: Emerging capabilities for data exploration and SAR model development
    Ann M. Richard and ClarLynda R. Williams, National Health & Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; email: richard.ann@epa.gov

  16. University-Industry Research Collaboration: A Model to Assess University Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramo, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Di Costa, Flavia

    2011-01-01

    Scholars and policy makers recognize that collaboration between industry and the public research institutions is a necessity for innovation and national economic development. This work presents an econometric model which expresses the university capability for collaboration with industry as a function of size, location and research quality. The…

  17. Using a Capability Maturity Model to Build on the Generational Approach to Student Engagement Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, K.; Clarke, J.; Stoodley, I.; Creagh, T.

    2015-01-01

    The generational approach to conceptualising first-year student learning behaviour has made a useful contribution to understanding student engagement. It has an explicit focus on student behaviour and we suggest that a Capability Maturity Model interpretation may provide a complementary extension of that understanding as it builds on the…

  18. Modeling of Indentation Damage in Single and Multilayer Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Bull, S. J.

    In many coating applications damage resistance is controlled by the mechanical properties of the coating, interface and substrate. As coatings become thinner and more complex, with multilayer and graded architectures now in widespread use, it is very important to obtain the mechanical properties (such as hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, etc.) of individual coating layers for use in design calculations and have failure-related design criteria which are valid for such multilayer systems. Nanoindentation testing is often the only viable approach to assess the damage mechanisms and properties of very thin coatings (< 1 µm) since it can operate at the required scale and provides fingerprint of the indentation response of the coating/substrate system. Finite element analysis of indentation load displacement curves can be used to extract materials properties for design; as coating thicknesses decrease it is observed that the yield strength required to fit the curves increases and scale-dependent materials properties are essential for design. Similarly the assessment of fracture response of very thin coatings requires modeling of the indentation stress field and how it is modified by plasticity during the indentation cycle. An FE approach using a cohesive zone model has been used to assess the locus of failure and demonstrates the complexity of adhesive failure around indentations for multilayer coatings.

  19. The Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Capability Roadmap Vision for Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas; Lieber, Mike; Norton, Charles; Fucik, Karen

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes a subset of the Advanced Modeling Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap that was developed for NASA in 2005. The AMSA Capability Roadmap Team was chartered to "To identify what is needed to enhance NASA's capabilities to produce leading-edge exploration and science missions by improving engineering system development, operations, and science understanding through broad application of advanced modeling, simulation and analysis techniques." The AMSA roadmap stressed the need for integration, not just within the science, engineering and operations domains themselves, but also across these domains. Here we discuss the roadmap element pertaining to integration within the engineering domain, with a particular focus on implications for future observatory missions. The AMSA products supporting the system engineering function are mission information, bounds on information quality, and system validation guidance. The Engineering roadmap element contains 5 sub-elements: (1) Large-Scale Systems Models, (2) Anomalous Behavior Models, (3) advanced Uncertainty Models, (4) Virtual Testing Models, and (5) space-based Robotics Manufacture and Servicing Models.

  20. Report Initial Work on Developing Plasma Modeling Capability in WARP for NDCX Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Vay, J

    2007-12-14

    This milestone has been accomplished. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) has developed and implemented an initial beam-in-plasma implicit modeling capability in Warp; has carried out tests validating the behavior of the models employed; has compared the results of electrostatic and electromagnetic models when applied to beam expansion in an NDCX-I relevant regime; has compared Warp and LSP results on a problem relevant to NDCX-I; has modeled wave excitation by a rigid beam propagating through plasma; and has implemented and begun testing a more advanced implicit method that correctly captures electron drift motion even when timesteps too large to resolve the electron gyro-period are employed. The HIFS-VNL is well on its way toward having a state-of-the-art source-to-target simulation capability that will enable more effective support of ongoing experiments in the NDCX series and allow more confident planning for future ones.

  1. Developing a Model-based Capability to Analyze Requirements for the Climate Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Models are foundational for estimating states of the earth's climate system, both as tools to extrapolate information in time and space, and as observation 'operators' used to relate what is analyzed and predicted to what is observed. Expanding the simulation approach further, observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are designed to mimic the complete process of analyzing the climate state by replacing real observations with entirely simulated ones determined from a model-based depiction of nature. OSSEs provide a framework to 'fly' simulated satellite instruments through a synthetic atmosphere and investigate the trade-spaces of measurements for various satellite configurations and sampling strategies, and assess their measurement impact on modeling and forecasting capabilities. Such a tool is a crucial but as yet unfulfilled need for future mission selection and design. The components of a state-of-the-art OSSE system are being assembled at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO, Code 610.1) at NASA/GSFC, leveraging on the GMAO's existing modeling and data assimilation infrastructure for numerical weather prediction (NWP). The OSSE framework is based on the GMAO's Goddard Earth Observing System atmospheric general circulation model, version 5 (GEOS-5) and the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) observational analysis scheme, combined with the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) model developed by the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Branch (Code 613.3). This system is an evolving, key component of Goddard's planned development of an Integrated Earth System Analysis (IESA) capability, which will bring together into a single, fully interactive system Goddard's modeling and assimilation efforts in atmosphere, ocean and chemistry and aerosols to provide a comprehensive analysis and prediction system for weather and climate In addition to providing a state-of-the-art capability for assimilating current observation

  2. Extrapolative Capability of Two Models That Estimating Soil Water Retention Curve between Saturation and Oven Dryness

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Sun, Shiyou

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimation of soil water retention curve (SWRC) at the dry region is required to describe the relation between soil water content and matric suction from saturation to oven dryness. In this study, the extrapolative capability of two models for predicting the complete SWRC from limited ranges of soil water retention data was evaluated. When the model parameters were obtained from SWRC data in the 0–1500 kPa range, the FX model (Fredlund and Xing, 1994) estimations agreed well with measurements from saturation to oven dryness with RMSEs less than 0.01. The GG model (Groenevelt and Grant, 2004) produced larger errors at the dry region, with significantly larger RMSEs and MEs than the FX model. Further evaluations indicated that when SWRC measurements in the 0–100 kPa suction range was applied for model establishment, the FX model was capable of producing acceptable SWRCs across the entire water content range. For a higher accuracy, the FX model requires soil water retention data at least in the 0- to 300-kPa range to extend the SWRC to oven dryness. Comparing with the Khlosi et al. (2006) model, which requires measurements in the 0–500 kPa range to reproduce the complete SWRCs, the FX model has the advantage of requiring less SWRC measurements. Thus the FX modeling approach has the potential to eliminate the processes for measuring soil water retention in the dry range. PMID:25464503

  3. Next Generation Whole Atmosphere Model (NGWAM) for ionospheric simulation and forecast: status, plans, requirements, and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmaev, R. A.; Yudin, V. A.; Viereck, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) has been developed in collaboration of the NOAA Space Weather Prediction and Environmental Modeling Centers (SWPC and EMC) by vertical extension of the operational Global Forecast System (GFS) model over the last decade. The model has demonstrated remarkable performance in simulating climatology and daily variability of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere driven from below. Coupled to ionosphere-electrodynamics models it not only reproduced dramatic variations of ionospheric plasma drifts and density distribution observed during sudden stratospheric warmings but also demonstrated predictive capability with lead times up to 2 weeks. WAM has reached a level of maturity to be implemented into operations at the National Weather Service (NWS) in the next few years. Within the same timeframe NWS also plans to substantially upgrade GFS to the Next Generation Global Prediction System (NGGPS). Specific capabilities of NGGPS include in particular a nonhydrostatic dynamical core and the ability to directly simulate important processes such as tropospheric convection at very high resolution globally and without the need for parameterization. This opens an opportunity for development of NGWAM. Specific requirements for extension of NGGPS into NGWAM will be discussed and capabilities of the new models in application to the upper atmosphere and ionosphere dynamics, simulation, and prediction presented.

  4. Extending the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal - New Capabilities and New Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, B.; Law, E.; Arevalo, E.; Bui, B.; Chang, G.; Dodge, K.; Kim, R.; Malhotra, S.; Sadaqathullah, S.; Schmidt, G.; Bailey, B.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP) provides a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, lunar scientists, and engineers to access mapped lunar data products from past and current lunar missions (http://lmmp.nasa.gov). During the past year, the capabilities and data served by LMMP have been significantly expanded. New interfaces are providing improved ways to access and visualize data. At the request of NASA's Science Mission Directorate, LMMP's technology and capabilities are now being extended to additional planetary bodies. New portals for Vesta and Mars are the first of these new products to be released. This presentation will provide an overview of LMMP, Vesta Trek, and Mars Trek, demonstrate their uses and capabilities, highlight new features, and preview coming enhancements.

  5. Extending the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal - New Capabilities and New Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, B.; Law, E.; Arevalo, E.; Bui, B.; Chang, G.; Dodge, K.; Kim, R.; Malhotra, S.; Sadaqathullah, S.; Schmidt, G.; Bailey, B.

    2015-10-01

    NASA's Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP) provides a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, lunar scientists, and engineers to access mapped lunar data products from past and current lunar missions (http://lmmp.nasa.gov). During the past year, the capabilities and data served by LMMP have been significantly expanded. New interfaces are providing improved ways to access and visualize data. At the request of NASA's Science Mission Directorate, LMMP's technology and capabilities are now being extended to additional planetary bodies. New portals for Vesta and Mars are the first of these new products to be released. This presentation will provide an overview of LMMP, Vesta Trek, and Mars Trek, demonstrate their uses and capabilities, highlight new features, and preview coming enhancements.

  6. Improving flood forecasting capability of physically based distributed hydrological models by parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Xu, H.

    2016-01-01

    Physically based distributed hydrological models (hereafter referred to as PBDHMs) divide the terrain of the whole catchment into a number of grid cells at fine resolution and assimilate different terrain data and precipitation to different cells. They are regarded to have the potential to improve the catchment hydrological process simulation and prediction capability. In the early stage, physically based distributed hydrological models are assumed to derive model parameters from the terrain properties directly, so there is no need to calibrate model parameters. However, unfortunately the uncertainties associated with this model derivation are very high, which impacted their application in flood forecasting, so parameter optimization may also be necessary. There are two main purposes for this study: the first is to propose a parameter optimization method for physically based distributed hydrological models in catchment flood forecasting by using particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and to test its competence and to improve its performances; the second is to explore the possibility of improving physically based distributed hydrological model capability in catchment flood forecasting by parameter optimization. In this paper, based on the scalar concept, a general framework for parameter optimization of the PBDHMs for catchment flood forecasting is first proposed that could be used for all PBDHMs. Then, with the Liuxihe model as the study model, which is a physically based distributed hydrological model proposed for catchment flood forecasting, the improved PSO algorithm is developed for the parameter optimization of the Liuxihe model in catchment flood forecasting. The improvements include adoption of the linearly decreasing inertia weight strategy to change the inertia weight and the arccosine function strategy to adjust the acceleration coefficients. This method has been tested in two catchments in southern China with different sizes, and the results show

  7. Modeling nonlinearities of ultrasonic waves for fatigue damage characterization: theory, simulation, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Wang, Qiang; Cheng, Li; Qing, Xinlin

    2014-03-01

    A dedicated modeling technique for comprehending nonlinear characteristics of ultrasonic waves traversing in a fatigued medium was developed, based on a retrofitted constitutive relation of the medium by considering the nonlinearities originated from material, fatigue damage, as well as the "breathing" motion of fatigue cracks. Piezoelectric wafers, for exciting and acquiring ultrasonic waves, were integrated in the model. The extracted nonlinearities were calibrated by virtue of an acoustic nonlinearity parameter. The modeling technique was validated experimentally, and the results showed satisfactory consistency in between, both revealing: the developed modeling approach is able to faithfully simulate fatigue crack-incurred nonlinearities manifested in ultrasonic waves; a cumulative growth of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter with increasing wave propagation distance exists; such a parameter acquired via a sensing path is nonlinearly related to the offset distance from the fatigue crack to that sensing path; and neither the incidence angle of the probing wave nor the length of the sensing path impacts on the parameter significantly. This study has yielded a quantitative characterization strategy for fatigue cracks using embeddable piezoelectric sensor networks, facilitating deployment of structural health monitoring which is capable of identifying small-scale damage at an embryo stage and surveilling its growth continuously.

  8. A multicontinuum progressive damage model for composite materials motivated by the kinetic theory of fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Shane Christian

    2002-01-01

    A conventional composite material for structural applications is composed of stiff reinforcing fibers embedded in a relatively soft polymer matrix, e.g. glass fibers in an epoxy matrix. Although composites have numerous advantages over traditional materials, the presence of two vastly different constituent materials has confounded analysts trying to predict failure. The inability to accurately predict the inelastic response of polymer based composites along with their ultimate failure is a significant barrier to their introduction to new applications. Polymer based composite materials also tend to exhibit rate and time dependent failure characteristics. Lack of knowledge about the rate dependent response and progressive failure of composite structures has led to the current practice of designing these structures with static properties. However, high strain rate mechanical properties can vary greatly from the static properties. The objective of this research is to develop a finite element based failure analysis tool for composite materials that incorporates strain rate hardening effects in the material failure model. The analysis method, referred to as multicontinuum theory (MCT) retains the identity of individual constituents by treating them as separate but linked continua. Retaining the constituent identities allows one to extract continuum phase averaged stress/strain fields for the constituents in a routine structural analysis. Time dependent failure is incorporated in MCT by introducing a continuum damage model into MCT. In addition to modeling time and rate dependent failure, the damage model is capable of capturing the nonlinear stress-strain response observed in composite materials.

  9. A model for damage of microheterogeneous kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeri, Andrew J.; Zohdi, Tarek I.; Blake, John R.

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, a theoretical framework is developed for the mechanics of kidney stones with an isotropic, random microstructure-such as those comprised of cystine or struvite. The approach is based on a micromechanical description of kidney stones comprised of crystals in a binding matrix. Stress concentration functions are developed to determine load sharing of the particle phase and the binding matrix phase. As an illustration of the theory, the fatigue of kidney stones subject to shock wave lithotripsy is considered. Stress concentration functions are used to construct fatigue life estimates for each phase, as a function of the volume fraction and of the mechanical properties of the constituents, as well as the loading from SWL. The failure of the binding matrix is determined explicitly in a model for the accumulation of distributed damage. Also considered is the amount of material damaged in a representative non-spherical collapse of a cavitation bubble near the stone surface. The theory can be used to assess the importance of microscale heterogeneity on the comminution of renal calculi and to estimate the number of cycles to failure in terms of measurable material properties.

  10. A biophysical model of cell evolution after cytotoxic treatments: Damage, repair and cell response.

    PubMed

    Tomezak, M; Abbadie, C; Lartigau, E; Cleri, F

    2016-01-21

    We present a theoretical agent-based model of cell evolution under the action of cytotoxic treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The major features of cell cycle and proliferation, cell damage and repair, and chemical diffusion are included. Cell evolution is based on a discrete Markov chain, with cells stepping along a sequence of discrete internal states from 'normal' to 'inactive'. Probabilistic laws are introduced for each type of event a cell can undergo during its life: duplication, arrest, senescence, damage, reparation, or death. We adjust the model parameters on a series of cell irradiation experiments, carried out in a clinical LINAC, in which the damage and repair kinetics of single- and double-strand breaks are followed. Two showcase applications of the model are then presented. In the first one, we reconstruct the cell survival curves from a number of published low- and high-dose irradiation experiments. We reobtain a very good description of the data without assuming the well-known linear-quadratic model, but instead including a variable DSB repair probability. The repair capability of the model spontaneously saturates to an exponential decay at increasingly high doses. As a second test, we attempt to simulate the two extreme possibilities of the so-called 'bystander' effect in radiotherapy: the 'local' effect versus a 'global' effect, respectively activated by the short-range or long-range diffusion of some factor, presumably secreted by the irradiated cells. Even with an oversimplified simulation, we could demonstrate a sizeable difference in the proliferation rate of non-irradiated cells, the proliferation acceleration being much larger for the global than the local effect, for relatively small fractions of irradiated cells in the colony.

  11. Time dependent reliability model incorporating continuum damage mechanics for high-temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Presently there are many opportunities for the application of ceramic materials at elevated temperatures. In the near future ceramic materials are expected to supplant high temperature metal alloys in a number of applications. It thus becomes essential to develop a capability to predict the time-dependent response of these materials. The creep rupture phenomenon is discussed, and a time-dependent reliability model is outlined that integrates continuum damage mechanics principles and Weibull analysis. Several features of the model are presented in a qualitative fashion, including predictions of both reliability and hazard rate. In addition, a comparison of the continuum and the microstructural kinetic equations highlights a strong resemblance in the two approaches.

  12. A comprehensive model to build improvement capability in a pediatric academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gerry M; Schoettker, Pamela J; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Luzader, Carolyn; Kotagal, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center developed a comprehensive model to build quality improvement (QI) capability to support its goal to transform its delivery system through a series of training courses. Two online modules orient staff to basic concepts and terminology and prepare them to participate more effectively in QI teams. The basic program (Rapid Cycle Improvement Collaborative, RCIC) is focused on developing the capability to use basic QI tools and complete a narrow-scoped project in approximately 120 days. The Intermediate Improvement Science Series (I(2)S(2)) program is a leadership course focusing on improvement skills and developing a broader and deeper understanding of QI in the context of the organization and external environment. The Advanced Improvement Methods (AIM) course and Quality Scholars Program stimulate the use of more sophisticated methods and prepare Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and external faculty to undertake QI research. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems (AILS) sessions enable interprofessional care delivery system leadership teams to effectively lead a system of care, manage a portfolio of projects, and to deliver on CCHMC's strategic plan. Implementing these programs has shown us that 1) a multilevel curricular approach to building improvement capability is pragmatic and effective, 2) an interprofessional learning environment is critical to shifting mental models, 3) repetition of project experience with coaching and feedback solidifies critical skills, knowledge and behaviors, and 4) focusing first on developing capable interprofessional improvement leaders, versus engaging in broad general QI training across the whole organization, is effective. PMID:24369867

  13. A Parallel Ocean Model With Adaptive Mesh Refinement Capability For Global Ocean Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Herrnstein, Aaron R.

    2005-12-01

    An ocean model with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability is presented for simulating ocean circulation on decade time scales. The model closely resembles the LLNL ocean general circulation model with some components incorporated from other well known ocean models when appropriate. Spatial components are discretized using finite differences on a staggered grid where tracer and pressure variables are defined at cell centers and velocities at cell vertices (B-grid). Horizontal motion is modeled explicitly with leapfrog and Euler forward-backward time integration, and vertical motion is modeled semi-implicitly. New AMR strategies are presented for horizontal refinement on a B-grid, leapfrog time integration, and time integration of coupled systems with unequal time steps. These AMR capabilities are added to the LLNL software package SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) and validated with standard benchmark tests. The ocean model is built on top of the amended SAMRAI library. The resulting model has the capability to dynamically increase resolution in localized areas of the domain. Limited basin tests are conducted using various refinement criteria and produce convergence trends in the model solution as refinement is increased. Carbon sequestration simulations are performed on decade time scales in domains the size of the North Atlantic and the global ocean. A suggestion is given for refinement criteria in such simulations. AMR predicts maximum pH changes and increases in CO2 concentration near the injection sites that are virtually unattainable with a uniform high resolution due to extremely long run times. Fine scale details near the injection sites are achieved by AMR with shorter run times than the finest uniform resolution tested despite the need for enhanced parallel performance. The North Atlantic simulations show a reduction in passive tracer errors when AMR is applied instead of a uniform coarse resolution. No

  14. Oxidative stress and antioxidants at skin biosurface: a novel antioxidant from lemon oil capable of inhibiting oxidative damage to the skin.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, V; Scapagnini, G; Randazzo, S D; Randazzo, G; Catalano, C; Geraci, G; Morganti, P

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pollutants are an important source of oxidative and nitrosative stress both to terrestrial plants and to animals. Skin, which has a highly differentiated and certainly complex organizational structure, is particularly vulnerable to free radical damage because of its contact with oxygen and with other environmental stimuli. Fruit and vegetables contain several classes of compounds that when ingested can potentially contribute to antioxidant defenses. In the present study we employed a novel gas chromatographic method to assess the antioxidant properties of a natural compound isolated from lemon oil, which we have called Lem1. We provide experimental evidence that Lem1 is endowed with a strong antioxidant activity and that it is capable of inhibiting free radical-mediated reactions, as evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The present study extends our previous findings and demonstrates that topical application of Lem1 in healthy volunteers significantly increases the antioxidative potential of skin biosurface, thus highlighting the effectiveness of a natural antioxidant biotechnology in the antiaging management of skin.

  15. Improvements in Modeling Thruster Plume Erosion Damage to Spacecraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Carlos; Olsen, Randy; Steagall, Courtney; Huang, Alvin; Mikatarian, Ron; Myers, Brandon; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft bipropellant thrusters impact spacecraft surfaces with high speed droplets of unburned and partially burned propellant. These impacts can produce erosion damage to optically sensitive hardware and systems (e.g., windows, camera lenses, solar cells and protective coatings). On the International Space Station (ISS), operational constraints are levied on the position and orientation of the solar arrays to mitigate erosion effects during thruster operations. In 2007, the ISS Program requested evaluation of erosion constraint relief to alleviate operational impacts due to an impaired Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). Boeing Space Environments initiated an activity to identify and remove sources of conservatism in the plume induced erosion model to support an expanded range of acceptable solar array positions ? The original plume erosion model over-predicted plume erosion and was adjusted to better correlate with flight experiment results. This paper discusses findings from flight experiments and the methodology employed in modifying the original plume erosion model for better correlation of predictions with flight experiment data. The updated model has been successful employed in reducing conservatism and allowing for enhanced flexibility in ISS solar array operations.

  16. Phase field modeling of damage in glassy polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuesong; Kravchenko, Oleksandr G.; Pipes, R. Byron; Koslowski, Marisol

    2016-08-01

    Failure mechanisms in amorphous polymers are usually separated into two types, shear yielding and crazing due to the differences in the yield surface. Experiments show that the yield surface follows a pressure modified von Mises relation for shear yielding but this relation does not hold during crazing failure. In the past different yield conditions were used to represent each type of failure. Here, we show that the same damage model can be used to study failure under shear yielding and crazing conditions. The simulations show that different yield surfaces are obtained for craze and shear yielding if the microstructure is included explicitly in the simulations. In particular the breakdown of the pressure modified von Mises relation during crazing can be related to the presence of voids and other defects in the sample.

  17. A 3D Orthotropic Strain-Rate Dependent Elastic Damage Material Model.

    SciTech Connect

    English, Shawn Allen

    2014-09-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage and cohesive based fracture is implemented for a general polymer matrix composite lamina. The formulation assumes the possibility of distributed (continuum) damage followed b y localized damage. The current damage activation functions are simply partially interactive quadratic strain criteria . However, the code structure allows for changes in the functions without extraordinary effort. The material model formulation, implementation, characterization and use cases are presented.

  18. Statistical model for economic damage from pluvial floods in Japan using rainfall data and socioeconomic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Rajan; Yoshimura, Kei; Seto, Shinta; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Oki, Taikan

    2016-05-01

    The assessment of flood risk is important for policymakers to evaluate damage and for disaster preparation. Large population densities and high property concentration make cities more vulnerable to floods and having higher absolute damage per year. A number of major cities in the world suffer from flood inundation damage every year. In Japan, approximately USD 1 billion in damage occurs annually due to pluvial floods only. The amount of damage was typically large in large cities, but regions with lower population density tended to have more damage per capita. Our statistical approach gives the probability of damage following every daily rainfall event and thereby the annual damage as a function of rainfall, population density, topographical slope and gross domestic product. Our results for Japan show reasonable agreement with area-averaged annual damage for the period 1993-2009. We report a damage occurrence probability function and a damage cost function for pluvial flood damage, which makes this method flexible for use in future scenarios and also capable of being expanded to different regions.

  19. Micromechanics Fatigue Damage Analysis Modeling for Fabric Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Xue, D.; Shi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis modeling method was developed to analyze the damage progression and fatigue failure of fabric reinforced composite structures, especially for the brittle ceramic matrix material composites. A repeating unit cell concept of fabric reinforced composites was used to represent the global composite structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of the repeating unit cell were considered as the same as those of the global composite structure. The three-phase micromechanics, the shear-lag, and the continuum fracture mechanics models were integrated with a statistical model in the repeating unit cell to predict the progressive damages and fatigue life of the composite structures. The global structure failure was defined as the loss of loading capability of the repeating unit cell, which depends on the stiffness reduction due to material slice failures and nonlinear material properties in the repeating unit cell. The present methodology is demonstrated with the analysis results evaluated through the experimental test performed with carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix plain weave composite specimens.

  20. Platelet Activation Due to Hemodynamic Shear Stresses: Damage Accumulation Model and Comparison to In Vitro Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nobili, Matteo; Sheriff, Jawaad; Morbiducci, Umberto; Redaelli, Alberto; Bluestein, Danny

    2009-01-01

    The need to optimize the thrombogenic performance of blood recirculating cardiovascular devices, e.g., prosthetic heart valves (PHV) and ventricular assist devices (VAD), is accentuated by the fact that most of them require lifelong anticoagulation therapy that does not eliminate the risk of thromboembolic complications. The formation of thromboemboli in the flow field of these devices is potentiated by contact with foreign surfaces and regional flow phenomena that stimulate blood clotting, especially platelets. With the lack of appropriate methodology, device manufacturers do not specifically optimize for thrombogenic performance. Such optimization can be facilitated by formulating a robust numerical methodology with predictive capabilities of flow-induced platelet activation. In this study, a phenomenological model for platelet cumulative damage, identified by means of genetic algorithms (GAs), was correlated with in vitro experiments conducted in a Hemodynamic Shearing Device (HSD). Platelets were uniformly exposed to flow shear representing the lower end of the stress levels encountered in devices, and platelet activity state (PAS) was measured in response to six dynamic shear stress waveforms representing repeated passages through a device, and correlated to the predictions of the damage accumulation model. Experimental results demonstrated an increase in PAS with a decrease in “relaxation” time between pulses. The model predictions were in very good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:18204318

  1. Climate-Driven Phenological Change: Developing Robust Spatiotemporal Modeling and Projection Capability.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Carmen; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Our possibility to appropriately detect, interpret and respond to climate-driven phenological changes depends on our ability to model and predict the changes. This ability may be hampered by non-linearity in climate-phenological relations, and by spatiotemporal variability and scale mismatches of climate and phenological data. A modeling methodology capable of handling such complexities can be a powerful tool for phenological change projection. Here we develop such a methodology using citizen scientists' observations of first flight dates for orange tip butterflies (Anthocharis cardamines) in three areas extending along a steep climate gradient. The developed methodology links point data of first flight observations to calculated cumulative degree-days until first flight based on gridded temperature data. Using this methodology we identify and quantify a first flight model that is consistent across different regions, data support scales and assumptions of subgrid variability and observation bias. Model application to observed warming over the past 60 years demonstrates the model usefulness for assessment of climate-driven first flight change. The cross-regional consistency of the model implies predictive capability for future changes, and calls for further application and testing of analogous modeling approaches to other species, phenological variables and parts of the world. PMID:26545112

  2. A simple 2-D inundation model for incorporating flood damage in urban drainage planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, A.; Tsegaye, S.; Gersonius, B.; Vairavamoorthy, K.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper a new inundation model code is developed and coupled with Storm Water Management Model, SWMM, to relate spatial information associated with urban drainage systems as criteria for planning of storm water drainage networks. The prime objective is to achive a model code that is simple and fast enough to be consistently be used in planning stages of urban drainage projects. The formulation for the two-dimensional (2-D) surface flow model algorithms is based on the Navier Stokes equation in two dimensions. An Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) finite difference numerical scheme is applied to solve the governing equations. This numerical scheme is used to express the partial differential equations with time steps split into two halves. The model algorithm is written using C++ computer programming language. This 2-D surface flow model is then coupled with SWMM for simulation of both pipe flow component and surcharge induced inundation in urban areas. In addition, a damage calculation block is integrated within the inundation model code. The coupled model is shown to be capable of dealing with various flow conditions, as well as being able to simulate wetting and drying processes that will occur as the flood flows over an urban area. It has been applied under idealized and semi-hypothetical cases to determine detailed inundation zones, depths and velocities due to surcharged water on overland surface.

  3. The Ensemble Space Weather Modeling System (eSWMS): Status, Capabilities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, C. D.; Eccles, J. V.; Reich, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Marking a milestone in space weather forecasting, the Space Weather Modeling System (SWMS) successfully completed validation testing in advance of operational testing at Air Force Weather Agency’s primary space weather production center. This is the first coupling of stand-alone, physics-based space weather models that are currently in operations at AFWA supporting the warfighter. Significant development effort went into ensuring the component models were portable and scalable while maintaining consistent results across diverse high performance computing platforms. Coupling was accomplished under the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The coupled space weather models are the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry version 2 (HAFv2) solar wind model and GAIM1, the ionospheric forecast component of the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) model. The SWMS was developed by team members from AFWA, Explorations Physics International, Inc. (EXPI) and Space Environment Corporation (SEC). The successful development of the SWMS provides new capabilities beyond enabling extended lead-time, data-driven ionospheric forecasts. These include ingesting diverse data sets at higher resolution, incorporating denser computational grids at finer time steps, and performing probability-based ensemble forecasts. Work of the SWMS development team now focuses on implementing the ensemble-based probability forecast capability by feeding multiple scenarios of 5 days of solar wind forecasts to the GAIM1 model based on the variation of the input fields to the HAFv2 model. The ensemble SWMS (eSWMS) will provide the most-likely space weather scenario with uncertainty estimates for important forecast fields. The eSWMS will allow DoD mission planners to consider the effects of space weather on their systems with more advance warning than is currently possible. The payoff is enhanced, tailored support to the warfighter with improved capabilities, such as point-to-point HF propagation forecasts

  4. Spatial Preference Modelling for equitable infrastructure provision: an application of Sen's Capability Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismadi, Arif; Zuidgeest, Mark; Brussel, Mark; van Maarseveen, Martin

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether the inclusion of spatial neighbourhood comparison factors in Preference Modelling allows spatial decision support systems (SDSSs) to better address spatial equity, we introduce Spatial Preference Modelling (SPM). To evaluate the effectiveness of this model in addressing equity, various standardisation functions in both Non-Spatial Preference Modelling and SPM are compared. The evaluation involves applying the model to a resource location-allocation problem for transport infrastructure in the Special Province of Yogyakarta in Indonesia. We apply Amartya Sen's Capability Approach to define opportunity to mobility as a non-income indicator. Using the extended Moran's I interpretation for spatial equity, we evaluate the distribution output regarding, first, `the spatial distribution patterns of priority targeting for allocation' (SPT) and, second, `the effect of new distribution patterns after location-allocation' (ELA). The Moran's I index of the initial map and its comparison with six patterns for SPT as well as ELA consistently indicates that the SPM is more effective for addressing spatial equity. We conclude that the inclusion of spatial neighbourhood comparison factors in Preference Modelling improves the capability of SDSS to address spatial equity. This study thus proposes a new formal method for SDSS with specific attention on resource location-allocation to address spatial equity.

  5. Spatial Preference Modelling for equitable infrastructure provision: an application of Sen's Capability Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismadi, Arif; Zuidgeest, Mark; Brussel, Mark; van Maarseveen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether the inclusion of spatial neighbourhood comparison factors in Preference Modelling allows spatial decision support systems (SDSSs) to better address spatial equity, we introduce Spatial Preference Modelling (SPM). To evaluate the effectiveness of this model in addressing equity, various standardisation functions in both Non-Spatial Preference Modelling and SPM are compared. The evaluation involves applying the model to a resource location-allocation problem for transport infrastructure in the Special Province of Yogyakarta in Indonesia. We apply Amartya Sen's Capability Approach to define opportunity to mobility as a non-income indicator. Using the extended Moran's I interpretation for spatial equity, we evaluate the distribution output regarding, first, `the spatial distribution patterns of priority targeting for allocation' (SPT) and, second, `the effect of new distribution patterns after location-allocation' (ELA). The Moran's I index of the initial map and its comparison with six patterns for SPT as well as ELA consistently indicates that the SPM is more effective for addressing spatial equity. We conclude that the inclusion of spatial neighbourhood comparison factors in Preference Modelling improves the capability of SDSS to address spatial equity. This study thus proposes a new formal method for SDSS with specific attention on resource location-allocation to address spatial equity.

  6. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  7. Discrete fracture modeling of hydro-mechanical damage processes in geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents a modeling approach for investigating coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior, including fracture development, within geomaterials and structures. In the model, the coupling procedure consists of an effective linkage between two codes: TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and an implementation of the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) method, a discrete (lattice) modeling approach to represent geomechanical behavior. One main advantage of linking these two codes is that they share the same geometrical mesh structure based on the Voronoi discretization, so that a straightforward representation of discrete fracture networks (DFN) is available for fluid flow processes. The capabilities of the TOUGH-RBSN model are demonstrated through simulations of hydraulic fracturing, where fluid pressure-induced fracturing and damage-assisted flow are well represented. The TOUGH-RBSN modeling methodology has been extended to enable treatment of geomaterials exhibiting anisotropic characteristics. In the RBSN approach, elastic spring coefficients and strength parameters are systematically formulated based on the principal bedding direction, which facilitate a straightforward representation of anisotropy. Uniaxial compression tests are simulated for a transversely isotropic material to validate the new modeling scheme. The model is also used to simulate excavation fracture damage for the HG-A microtunnel in the Opalinus Clay rock, located at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Opalinus Clay has transversely isotropic material properties caused by natural features such as bedding, foliation, and flow structures. Preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts were observed following excavation, which are believed to be strongly influenced by the mechanical anisotropy of the rock material. The simulation results are qualitatively

  8. Neural Network Modelling of Oscillatory Loads and Fatigue Damage Estimation of Helicopter Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Fuller, C. R.; O'Brien, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    A neural network for the prediction of oscillatory loads used for on-line health monitoring of flight critical components in an AH-64A helicopter is described. The neural network is used to demonstrate the potential for estimating loads in the rotor system from fixed-system information. Estimates of the range of the pitch link load are determined by the neural network from roll, pitch, and yaw rates, airspeed, and other fixed-system information measured by the flight control computer on the helicopter. The predicted load range is then used to estimate fatigue damage to the pitch link. Actual flight loads data from an AH-64A helicopter are used to demonstrate the process. The predicted load ranges agree well with measured values for both training and test data. A linear model is also used to predict the load ranges, and its accuracy is noticeably worse than that of the neural network, especially at higher load values that cause fatigue damage. This demonstrates the necessity of the non-linear modelling capabilities of the neural network for this problem.

  9. Mechanical damage to Escherichia coli cells in a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Okutani, Satoshi; Iwai, Takayoshi; Iwatani, Shintaro; Kondo, Kazuya; Osumi, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimoto, Nobuharu; Matsuno, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the mechanical damage to the Escherichia coli cell caused by polyvinyl chloride particles as a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation. Our results indicated that the glucose-consumption rate and the intracellular ATP concentration temporarily increased by the mechanical damage, and decreased after considerable damage had occurred on cell membrane. PMID:22153714

  10. Nucleation phenomena in an annealed damage model: statistics of times to failure.

    PubMed

    Abaimov, S G; Cusumano, J P

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the statistical behavior of an annealed continuous damage model. For different model variations we study distributions of times to failure and compare these results with the classical case of metastable nucleation in statistical physics. We show that our model has a tuning parameter, related to the degree of damage reversibility, that determines the model's behavior. Depending on the value of this parameter, our model exhibits statistical behavior either similar to classical reversible nucleation phenomena in statistical physics or to an absolutely different type of behavior intrinsic to systems with damage. This comparison allows us to investigate possible similarities and differences between damage phenomena and reversible nucleation.

  11. Investigating the Effect of Damage Progression Model Choice on Prognostics Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Narasimhan, Sriram; Saha, Sankalita; Saha, Bhaskar; Goebel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    The success of model-based approaches to systems health management depends largely on the quality of the underlying models. In model-based prognostics, it is especially the quality of the damage progression models, i.e., the models describing how damage evolves as the system operates, that determines the accuracy and precision of remaining useful life predictions. Several common forms of these models are generally assumed in the literature, but are often not supported by physical evidence or physics-based analysis. In this paper, using a centrifugal pump as a case study, we develop different damage progression models. In simulation, we investigate how model changes influence prognostics performance. Results demonstrate that, in some cases, simple damage progression models are sufficient. But, in general, the results show a clear need for damage progression models that are accurate over long time horizons under varied loading conditions.

  12. Evaluation of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability emergency response model for explosive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Freis, R.P.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1993-10-07

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses a modeling system to calculate the impact of accidental radiological or toxic releases to the atmosphere anywhere in the world. Operated for the US Departments of Energy and Defense, ARAC has responded to over 60 incidents in the past 18 years, and conducts over 100 exercises each year. Explosions are one of the most common mechanisms by which toxic particulates are injected into the atmosphere during accidents. Automated algorithms with default assumptions have been developed to estimate the source geometry and the amount of toxic material aerosolized. The paper examines the sensitivity of ARAC`s dispersion model to the range of input values for explosive sources, and analyzes the model`s accuracy using two field measurement programs.

  13. Computational Performance of Ultra-High-Resolution Capability in the Community Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, John; Vertenstein, Mariana; Worley, Patrick H; Mirin, Arthur A.; Craig, Anthony; Jacob, Robert L.; Mickelson, Sheri A.

    2012-01-01

    With the fourth release of the Community Climate System Model, the ability to perform ultra-high resolution climate simulations is now possible, enabling eddy-resolving ocean and sea ice models to be coupled to a finite-volume atmosphere model for a range of atmospheric resolutions. This capability was made possible by enabling the model to use large scale parallelism, which required a significant refactoring of the software infrastructure. We describe the scalability of two ultra-high-resolution coupled configurations on leadership class computing platforms. We demonstrate the ability to utilize over 30,000 processor cores on a Cray XT5 system and over 60,000 cores on an IBM Blue Gene/P system to obtain climatologically relevant simulation rates for these configurations.

  14. Transitioning Enhanced Land Surface Initialization and Model Verification Capabilities to the Kenya Meteorological Department (KMD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Limaye, Ashutosh; Blankenship, Clay B.

    2016-01-01

    Flooding, severe weather, and drought are key forecasting challenges for the Kenya Meteorological Department (KMD), based in Nairobi, Kenya. Atmospheric processes leading to convection, excessive precipitation and/or prolonged drought can be strongly influenced by land cover, vegetation, and soil moisture content, especially during anomalous conditions and dry/wet seasonal transitions. It is thus important to represent accurately land surface state variables (green vegetation fraction, soil moisture, and soil temperature) in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. The NASA SERVIR and the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) programs in Huntsville, AL have established a working partnership with KMD to enhance its regional modeling capabilities. SPoRT and SERVIR are providing experimental land surface initialization datasets and model verification capabilities for capacity building at KMD. To support its forecasting operations, KMD is running experimental configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF; Skamarock et al. 2008) model on a 12-km/4-km nested regional domain over eastern Africa, incorporating the land surface datasets provided by NASA SPoRT and SERVIR. SPoRT, SERVIR, and KMD participated in two training sessions in March 2014 and June 2015 to foster the collaboration and use of unique land surface datasets and model verification capabilities. Enhanced regional modeling capabilities have the potential to improve guidance in support of daily operations and high-impact weather and climate outlooks over Eastern Africa. For enhanced land-surface initialization, the NASA Land Information System (LIS) is run over Eastern Africa at 3-km resolution, providing real-time land surface initialization data in place of interpolated global model soil moisture and temperature data available at coarser resolutions. Additionally, real-time green vegetation fraction (GVF) composites from the Suomi-NPP VIIRS instrument is being incorporated

  15. Automated 3D Damaged Cavity Model Builder for Lower Surface Acreage Tile on Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belknap, Shannon; Zhang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Automated Thermal Tool for Damaged Acreage Tile Math Model builder was developed to perform quickly and accurately 3D thermal analyses on damaged lower surface acreage tiles and structures beneath the damaged locations on a Space Shuttle Orbiter. The 3D model builder created both TRASYS geometric math models (GMMs) and SINDA thermal math models (TMMs) to simulate an idealized damaged cavity in the damaged tile(s). The GMMs are processed in TRASYS to generate radiation conductors between the surfaces in the cavity. The radiation conductors are inserted into the TMMs, which are processed in SINDA to generate temperature histories for all of the nodes on each layer of the TMM. The invention allows a thermal analyst to create quickly and accurately a 3D model of a damaged lower surface tile on the orbiter. The 3D model builder can generate a GMM and the correspond ing TMM in one or two minutes, with the damaged cavity included in the tile material. A separate program creates a configuration file, which would take a couple of minutes to edit. This configuration file is read by the model builder program to determine the location of the damage, the correct tile type, tile thickness, structure thickness, and SIP thickness of the damage, so that the model builder program can build an accurate model at the specified location. Once the models are built, they are processed by the TRASYS and SINDA.

  16. Evaluating the capabilities of watershed-scale models in estimating sediment yield at field-scale.

    PubMed

    Sommerlot, Andrew R; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Woznicki, Sean A; Giri, Subhasis; Prohaska, Michael D

    2013-09-30

    Many watershed model interfaces have been developed in recent years for predicting field-scale sediment loads. They share the goal of providing data for decisions aimed at improving watershed health and the effectiveness of water quality conservation efforts. The objectives of this study were to: 1) compare three watershed-scale models (Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), Field_SWAT, and the High Impact Targeting (HIT) model) against calibrated field-scale model (RUSLE2) in estimating sediment yield from 41 randomly selected agricultural fields within the River Raisin watershed; 2) evaluate the statistical significance among models; 3) assess the watershed models' capabilities in identifying areas of concern at the field level; 4) evaluate the reliability of the watershed-scale models for field-scale analysis. The SWAT model produced the most similar estimates to RUSLE2 by providing the closest median and the lowest absolute error in sediment yield predictions, while the HIT model estimates were the worst. Concerning statistically significant differences between models, SWAT was the only model found to be not significantly different from the calibrated RUSLE2 at α = 0.05. Meanwhile, all models were incapable of identifying priorities areas similar to the RUSLE2 model. Overall, SWAT provided the most correct estimates (51%) within the uncertainty bounds of RUSLE2 and is the most reliable among the studied models, while HIT is the least reliable. The results of this study suggest caution should be exercised when using watershed-scale models for field level decision-making, while field specific data is of paramount importance.

  17. Development of Modeling Capabilities for Launch Pad Acoustics and Ignition Transient Environment Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putnam, Gabriel C.; Liever, Peter A.; Williams, Brandon R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts to establish modeling capabilities for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics and ignition transient environment predictions. Peak acoustic loads experienced by the launch vehicle occur during liftoff with strong interaction between the vehicle and the launch facility. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical models are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. Modeling approaches are needed that capture the important details of the plume flow environment including the ignition transient, identify the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the effects of launch pad geometric details and acoustic mitigation measures such as water injection. This paper presents a status of the CFD tools developed by the MSFC Fluid Dynamics Branch featuring advanced multi-physics modeling capabilities developed towards this goal. Validation and application examples are presented along with an overview of application in the prediction of liftoff environments and the design of targeted mitigation measures such as launch pad configuration and sound suppression water placement.

  18. Rate sensitive continuum damage models and mesh dependence in finite element analyses.

    PubMed

    Ljustina, Goran; Fagerström, Martin; Larsson, Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    The experiences from orthogonal machining simulations show that the Johnson-Cook (JC) dynamic failure model exhibits significant element size dependence. Such mesh dependence is a direct consequence of the utilization of local damage models. The current contribution is an investigation of the extent of the possible pathological mesh dependence. A comparison of the resulting JC model behavior combined with two types of damage evolution is considered. The first damage model is the JC dynamic failure model, where the development of the "damage" does not affect the response until the critical state is reached. The second one is a continuum damage model, where the damage variable is affecting the material response continuously during the deformation. Both the plasticity and the damage models are rate dependent, and the damage evolutions for both models are defined as a postprocessing of the effective stress response. The investigation is conducted for a series of 2D shear tests utilizing different FE representations of the plane strain plate with pearlite material properties. The results show for both damage models, using realistic pearlite material parameters, that similar extent of the mesh dependence is obtained and that the possible viscous regularization effects are absent in the current investigation. PMID:25530994

  19. Complex network model of the Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Feng-jing; Sui, Yi; Zhou, Yong-hong; Sun, Ren-cheng

    2016-10-01

    Investigating the underlying principles of the Treatise on Cold Damage Disorder is meaningful and interesting. In this study, we investigated the symptoms, herbal formulae, herbal drugs, and their relationships in this treatise based on a multi-subnet composited complex network model (MCCN). Syndrome subnets were constructed for the symptoms and a formula subnet for herbal drugs. By subnet compounding using MCCN, a composited network was obtained that described the treatment relationships between syndromes and formulae. The results obtained by topological analysis suggested some prescription laws that could be validated in clinics. After subnet reduction using the MCCN, six channel (Tai-yang, Yang-ming, Shao-yang, Tai-yin, Shao-yin, and Jue-yin) subnets were obtained. By analyzing the strengths of the relationships among these six channel subnets, we found that the Tai-yang channel and Yang-ming channel were related most strongly with each other, and we found symptoms that implied pathogen movements and transformations among the six channels. This study could help therapists to obtain a deeper understanding of this ancient treatise.

  20. Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Don Shirey

    2008-02-28

    EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An

  1. Adaptive Planning: Understanding Organizational Workload to Capability/ Capacity through Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hase, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In August 2003, the Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) established the Adaptive Planning (AP) initiative [1] with an objective of reducing the time necessary to develop and revise Combatant Commander (COCOM) contingency plans and increase SECDEF plan visibility. In addition to reducing the traditional plan development timeline from twenty-four months to less than twelve months (with a goal of six months)[2], AP increased plan visibility to Department of Defense (DoD) leadership through In-Progress Reviews (IPRs). The IPR process, as well as the increased number of campaign and contingency plans COCOMs had to develop, increased the workload while the number of planners remained fixed. Several efforts from collaborative planning tools to streamlined processes were initiated to compensate for the increased workload enabling COCOMS to better meet shorter planning timelines. This paper examines the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP) directed contingency planning and staffing requirements assigned to a combatant commander staff through the lens of modeling and simulation. The dynamics of developing a COCOM plan are captured with an ExtendSim [3] simulation. The resulting analysis provides a quantifiable means by which to measure a combatant commander staffs workload associated with development and staffing JSCP [4] directed contingency plans with COCOM capability/capacity. Modeling and simulation bring significant opportunities in measuring the sensitivity of key variables in the assessment of workload to capability/capacity analysis. Gaining an understanding of the relationship between plan complexity, number of plans, planning processes, and number of planners with time required for plan development provides valuable information to DoD leadership. Through modeling and simulation AP leadership can gain greater insight in making key decisions on knowing where to best allocate scarce resources in an effort to meet DoD planning objectives.

  2. Free radical mediated x-ray damage of model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, A; Caffrey, M

    1996-01-01

    The damaging effects of synchrotron-derived x rays on aqueous phospholipid dispersions have been evaluated. The effect of degree of lipid hydration, phospholipid chemical structure, mesophase identity, aqueous medium composition, and incident flux on the severity and progress of damage was quantified using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and chromatographic analysis of damage products. Electron spin resonance measurements of spin-trapped intermediates generated during irradiation suggest a free radical-mediated process. Surprisingly, radiation damage effects revealed by x-ray diffraction were imperceptible when the lamellar phases were prepared under water-stressed conditions, despite the fact that x-ray-induced chemical breakdown of the lipid occurred regardless of hydration level. Of the fully hydrated lipid systems studied, saturated diacyl-phosphatidylcholines were most sensitive to radiation damage compared to the ester- and ether-linked phosphatidylethanolamines and the ether-linked phosphatidylcholines. The inclusion of buffers or inorganic salts in the dispersing medium had only a minor effect in reducing damage development. A small inverse dose-rate effect was found when the x-ray beam intensity was changed 15-fold. These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of radiation damage, to our appreciation of the importance of monitoring both structure and composition when evaluating biomaterials radiation sensitivity, and to the development of strategies for eliminating or reducing the severity of damage due to an increasingly important source of x rays, synchrotron radiation. Because damage is shown to be free radical mediated, these results have an important bearing on age-related accumulation of free radicals in cells and how these might compromise membrane integrity, culminating in cell death. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 PMID:9172745

  3. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D.; Seyler, Charles E.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm's law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  4. LWR codes capability to address SFR BDBA scenarios: Modeling of the ABCOVE tests

    SciTech Connect

    Herranz, L. E.; Garcia, M.; Morandi, S.

    2012-07-01

    The sound background built-up in LWR source term analysis in case of a severe accident, make it worth to check the capability of LWR safety analysis codes to model accident SFR scenarios, at least in some areas. This paper gives a snapshot of such predictability in the area of aerosol behavior in containment. To do so, the AB-5 test of the ABCOVE program has been modeled with 3 LWR codes: ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR. Through the search of a best estimate scenario and its comparison to data, it is concluded that even in the specific case of in-containment aerosol behavior, some enhancements would be needed in the LWR codes and/or their application, particularly with respect to consideration of particle shape. Nonetheless, much of the modeling presently embodied in LWR codes might be applicable to SFR scenarios. These conclusions should be seen as preliminary as long as comparisons are not extended to more experimental scenarios. (authors)

  5. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D.; Seyler, Charles E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm’s law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  6. Capabilities of Reynolds stress turbulence model in applications to thermal stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Bottoni, M.

    1994-06-01

    In the safety analysis of advanced fast breeder reactors, licensing authorities require that inherent safety capabilities be proved by numerical simulation with well-validated computer programs. Even in the worst case of loss of power to the primary pumps. natural convection circulation must provide, through intermediate heat exchangers. a heat sink sufficient to prevent coolant temperatures from reaching saturation and triggering development of a two-phase flow domain with subsequent induction of coolant capabilities and loss of com integrity. Numerical simulations of reactor coolant behavior require the modeling of turbulent flows in the critical transition phase between forced and natural convection. A Reynolds stress turbulence model (RSM) has been implemented in the COMMIX code, together with transport equations describing turbulent heat fluxes, variance of temperature fluctuations, and dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy. This article outlines the model, explains the verifications performed thus far. and discusses potential applications of the RSM in the analysis of thermal stratification in engineering systems. The problem of analyzing, thermal stratification and minimizing the impact of thermal stresses on structures is of concern in both nuclear and conventional industries.

  7. Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models and Mahalanobis distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavi, A. A.; Dickey, D.; Seracino, R.; Rizkalla, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study for identifying damage locations in an idealized steel bridge girder using the ambient vibration measurements. A sensitive damage feature is proposed in the context of statistical pattern recognition to address the damage detection problem. The study utilizes an experimental program that consists of a two-span continuous steel beam subjected to ambient vibrations. The vibration responses of the beam are measured along its length under simulated ambient vibrations and different healthy/damage conditions of the beam. The ambient vibration is simulated using a hydraulic actuator, and damages are induced by cutting portions of the flange at two locations. Multivariate vector autoregressive models were fitted to the vibration response time histories measured at the multiple sensor locations. A sensitive damage feature is proposed for identifying the damage location by applying Mahalanobis distances to the coefficients of the vector autoregressive models. A linear discriminant criterion was used to evaluate the amount of variations in the damage features obtained for different sensor locations with respect to the healthy condition of the beam. The analyses indicate that the highest variations in the damage features were coincident with the sensors closely located to the damages. The presented method showed a promising sensitivity to identify the damage location even when the induced damage was very small.

  8. A continuum thermo-inelastic model for damage and healing in self-healing glass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2014-07-08

    Self-healing glass, a recent advancement in the class of smart sealing materials, has attracted great attention from both research and industrial communities because of its unique capability of repairing itself at elevated temperatures. However, further development and optimization of this material rely on a more fundamental and thorough understanding of its essential thermo-mechanical response characteristics, which is also pivotal in predicting the coupling and interactions between the nonlinear stress and temperature dependent damage and healing behaviors. In the current study, a continuum three-dimensional thermo-inelastic damage-healing constitutive framework has been developed for the compliant self-healing glass material. The important feature of the present model is that various phenomena governing the mechanical degradation and recovery process, i.e. the nucleation, growth, and healing of the cracks and pores, are described with distinct mechanism-driven kinetics, where the healing constitutive relations are propagated from lower-length scale simulations. The proposed formulations are implemented into finite element analyses and the effects of various loading conditions and material properties on the material’s mechanical resistance are investigated.

  9. A New Damage Constitutive Model for Thermal Deformation of AA6111 Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenyu; Wang, Baoyu; Bian, Jianhua; Tang, Xuefeng; Yang, Lei; Huo, Yuanming

    2015-06-01

    Hot tensile tests were conducted using a Gleeble 1500, at the temperature range of 623 K to 823 K (350 °C to 550 °C) and strain rate range of 0.1 to 10 s-1. Flow stress is significantly affected by temperature and strain rate. As strain increases; the flow stress first rapidly increases, subsequently maintains a steady state, and finally drops sharply because of damage evolution. The features and mechanism of the damage were studied utilizing a scanning electron microscope. Micro-void nucleation, growth, and coalescence result in the failure of the hot-formed specimen. A damage equation based on continuum damage mechanics and damage mechanism in hot metal forming was proposed. A unified viscoplastic damage model coupled with strain, strain rate, temperature, dislocation, hardening, damage, damage rate, and so on was developed and calibrated for AA6111 using Genetic Algorism Tool in three steps. This model can be used to describe viscoplastic flow behavior and damage evolution at various temperatures and strain rates. The model was implemented into the finite element (FE) model in ABAQUS platform via the variable user material subroutine. Thus, the FE model could be employed to study the damage distribution and the effects of blank holder force (BHF) and forming velocity on hot cylindrical deep drawing. It is revealed that lower BHF and higher velocity are beneficial for drawability. A good agreement between simulated and experimental results has been achieved.

  10. Tridimensional modelling of damage and fracture in woven composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chafra, M.; Baltov, A.; Vinh, T.

    1995-12-31

    Woven composite materials extensively used in industry has given rise to an abundant literature. Elastic homogenization computational method and other aspects have been investigated. Elastic degradation and damage of the material in general have also been extensively studied. This paper presents an attempt to formulate the problem of the reduction of elastic stiffness on one hand and damage and fracture at macrolevel of such materials on the other hand.

  11. New Capabilities for Modeling Intense Beams in Heavy Ion Fusion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Bieniosek, F M; Celata, C M; Cohen, R H; Davidson, R C; Grote, D P; Haber, I; Henestroza, E; Lee, E P; Lund, S M; Qin, H; Sharp, W M; Startsev, E; Vay, J L

    2003-09-09

    Significant advances have been made in modeling the intense beams of heavy-ion beam-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (Heavy Ion Fusion). In this paper, a roadmap for a validated, predictive driver simulation capability, building on improved codes and experimental diagnostics, is presented, as are examples of progress. The Mesh Refinement and Particle-in-Cell methods were integrated in the WARP code; this capability supported an injector experiment that determined the achievable current rise time, in good agreement with calculations. In a complementary effort, a new injector approach based on the merging of {approx}100 small beamlets was simulated, its basic feasibility established, and an experimental test designed. Time-dependent 3D simulations of the High Current Experiment (HCX) were performed, yielding voltage waveforms for an upcoming study of bunch-end control. Studies of collective beam modes which must be taken into account in driver designs were carried out. The value of using experimental data to tomographically ''synthesize'' a 4D beam particle distribution and so initialize a simulation was established; this work motivated further development of new diagnostics which yield 3D projections of the beam phase space. Other developments, including improved modeling of ion beam focusing and transport through the fusion chamber environment and onto the target, and of stray electrons and their effects on ion beams, are briefly noted.

  12. Present capabilities and new developments in antenna modeling with the numerical electromagnetics code NEC

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.J.

    1988-04-08

    Computer modeling of antennas, since its start in the late 1960's, has become a powerful and widely used tool for antenna design. Computer codes have been developed based on the Method-of-Moments, Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, or integration of Maxwell's equations. Of such tools, the Numerical Electromagnetics Code-Method of Moments (NEC) has become one of the most widely used codes for modeling resonant sized antennas. There are several reasons for this including the systematic updating and extension of its capabilities, extensive user-oriented documentation and accessibility of its developers for user assistance. The result is that there are estimated to be several hundred users of various versions of NEC world wide. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  13. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Cost-Benefit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Eric M.; Edlich, Alexander; Santmire, Tara S.; Wingrove, Earl R.., III

    1999-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. Therefore, NASA is developing the ability to evaluate the potential impact of various advanced technologies. By thoroughly understanding the economic impact of advanced aviation technologies and by evaluating how the new technologies will be used in the integrated aviation system, NASA aims to balance its aeronautical research program and help speed the introduction of high-leverage technologies. To meet these objectives, NASA is building the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). NASA envisions ASAC primarily as a process for understanding and evaluating the impact of advanced aviation technologies on the U.S. economy. ASAC consists of a diverse collection of models and databases used by analysts and other individuals from the public and private sectors brought together to work on issues of common interest to organizations in the aviation community. ASAC also will be a resource available to the aviation community to analyze; inform; and assist scientists, engineers, analysts, and program managers in their daily work. The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. Commercial air carriers, in particular, are an important stakeholder in this community. Therefore, to fully evaluate the implications of advanced aviation technologies, ASAC requires a flexible financial analysis tool that credibly links the technology of flight with the financial performance of commercial air carriers. By linking technical and financial information, NASA ensures that its technology programs will continue to benefit the user community. In addition, the analysis tool must be capable of being incorporated into the

  14. Rate Sensitive Continuum Damage Models and Mesh Dependence in Finite Element Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Fagerström, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The experiences from orthogonal machining simulations show that the Johnson-Cook (JC) dynamic failure model exhibits significant element size dependence. Such mesh dependence is a direct consequence of the utilization of local damage models. The current contribution is an investigation of the extent of the possible pathological mesh dependence. A comparison of the resulting JC model behavior combined with two types of damage evolution is considered. The first damage model is the JC dynamic failure model, where the development of the “damage” does not affect the response until the critical state is reached. The second one is a continuum damage model, where the damage variable is affecting the material response continuously during the deformation. Both the plasticity and the damage models are rate dependent, and the damage evolutions for both models are defined as a postprocessing of the effective stress response. The investigation is conducted for a series of 2D shear tests utilizing different FE representations of the plane strain plate with pearlite material properties. The results show for both damage models, using realistic pearlite material parameters, that similar extent of the mesh dependence is obtained and that the possible viscous regularization effects are absent in the current investigation. PMID:25530994

  15. Test analysis of detection of damage to a complicated spatial model structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Long-He; Li, Zhong-Xian; Qian, Jia-Ru

    2011-06-01

    A two-stage damage detection approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a complicated spatial model structure with a limited number of measurements. In the experiment, five known damage patterns, including 3 brace damage cases and 2 joint damage cases, were simulated by removing braces and weakening beam-column connections in the structure. The limited acceleration response data generated by hammer impact were used for system identification, and modal parameters were extracted by using the eigensystem realization algorithm. In the first stage, the possible damaged locations are determined by using the damage index and the characteristics of the analytical model itself, and the extent of damage for those substructures identified at stage I is estimated in the second stage by using a second-order eigen-sensitivity approximation method. The main contribution of this paper is to test the two-stage method by using the real dynamic data of a complicated spatial model structure with limited sensors. The analysis results indicate that the two-stage approach is able to detect the location of both damage cases, only the severity of brace damage cases can be assessed, and the reasonable analytical model is critical for successful damage detection.

  16. Time-series models for identifying damage location in structural members subjected to ambient vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavi, Amir A.; Dickey, David; Seracino, Rudolf; Rizkalla, Sami H.

    2010-03-01

    This paper compares two different approaches to identify damage locations in structural members subjected to ambient vibrations. The concept is demonstrated using a simply supported two span steel beam. An electro-hydraulic actuator was used to simulate ambient loading by applying random loads. The vibration time histories were collected for the undamaged and damaged conditions. The structural damages were introduced by cutting notches of different sizes in the flange at different locations. The two different approaches used time-series models in the context of statistical pattern recognition to extract sensitive damage features. In the first method, the damage features were extracted using the errors from fitting autoregressive models with exogenous inputs (ARX) to the collected time histories. The fitted ARX models had been developed based on the undamaged beam. The calculated damage probability from this method could not clearly discriminate the physical damage locations although the change in the condition of the beam was identified. In the second method, variations in the coefficients of multivariate autoregressive models which had been fitted to the acceleration time histories were investigated, and the damage features were extracted by measuring the magnitude of these variations. The findings showed the sensors close to the physical damage locations are related to the larger damage features.

  17. Coupled Plasticity and Damage Modeling and Their Applications in a Three-Dimensional Eulerian Hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, Michael W.; Clancy, Sean P.; Maudlin, Paul J.; Holian, Kathleen S.

    2004-07-01

    Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for continuum-level anisotropic elastoplastic material strength and an isotropic damage model TEPLA have been implemented in the three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamics code known as CONEJO. The anisotropic constitutive modeling is posed in an unrotated material frame of reference using the theorem of polar decomposition to compute rigid-body rotation. TEPLA is based upon the Gurson flow surface (a potential function used in conjunction with the associated flow law). The original TEPLA equation set has been extended to include anisotropic elastoplasticity and has been recast into a new implicit solution algorithm based upon an eigenvalue scheme to accommodate the anisotropy. This algorithm solves a two-by-two system of nonlinear equations using a Newton-Raphson iteration scheme. Simulations of a shaped-charge jet formation, a Taylor cylinder impact, and an explosively loaded hemishell were selected to demonstrate the utility of this modeling capability. The predicted deformation topology, plastic strain, and porosity distributions are shown for the three simulations.

  18. Multi-scale damage modelling in a ceramic matrix composite using a finite-element microstructure meshfree methodology.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Mora, L; Marrow, T J

    2016-07-13

    The problem of multi-scale modelling of damage development in a SiC ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC matrix ceramic composite tube is addressed, with the objective of demonstrating the ability of the finite-element microstructure meshfree (FEMME) model to introduce important aspects of the microstructure into a larger scale model of the component. These are particularly the location, orientation and geometry of significant porosity and the load-carrying capability and quasi-brittle failure behaviour of the fibre tows. The FEMME model uses finite-element and cellular automata layers, connected by a meshfree layer, to efficiently couple the damage in the microstructure with the strain field at the component level. Comparison is made with experimental observations of damage development in an axially loaded composite tube, studied by X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Recommendations are made for further development of the model to achieve greater fidelity to the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  19. Multi-scale damage modelling in a ceramic matrix composite using a finite-element microstructure meshfree methodology.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Mora, L; Marrow, T J

    2016-07-13

    The problem of multi-scale modelling of damage development in a SiC ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC matrix ceramic composite tube is addressed, with the objective of demonstrating the ability of the finite-element microstructure meshfree (FEMME) model to introduce important aspects of the microstructure into a larger scale model of the component. These are particularly the location, orientation and geometry of significant porosity and the load-carrying capability and quasi-brittle failure behaviour of the fibre tows. The FEMME model uses finite-element and cellular automata layers, connected by a meshfree layer, to efficiently couple the damage in the microstructure with the strain field at the component level. Comparison is made with experimental observations of damage development in an axially loaded composite tube, studied by X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Recommendations are made for further development of the model to achieve greater fidelity to the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242308

  20. A time series generalized functional model based method for vibration-based damage precise localization in structures consisting of 1D, 2D, and 3D elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, C. S.; Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage precise localization via data-based, time series type, methods for structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements. A Generalized Functional Model Based method is postulated based on an expanded Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled ARX (VFP-ARX) model form, capable of accounting for an arbitrary structural topology. The FP model's operating parameter vector elements are properly constrained to reflect any given topology. Damage localization is based on operating parameter vector estimation within the specified topology, so that the location estimate and its uncertainty bounds are statistically optimal. The method's effectiveness is experimentally demonstrated through damage precise localization on a laboratory spatial truss structure using various damage scenarios and a single pair of random excitation - vibration response signals in a low and limited frequency bandwidth.

  1. Modification of the Decision-Making Capability in the Social Force Model for the Evacuation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuddin, Zarita; Shuaib, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The Social Force Model is one of the most successful microscopic pedestrian models that represent the well-organized phenomena of the pedestrian flow. The model has been modified for evacuation process by incorporating physical forces when contact exists, on one hand, and incorporating factors into the preferred velocity to govern the individual's behavior corresponding to the situation under consideration (normal or evacuation) on the other hand. The latter incorporation has enhanced the ability of the model to represent the decision-making process of pedestrians. However, the variety of pedestrian's abilities to make decisions in emergency situations has not been incorporated properly into the model. In this article we enhance the decision-making capability of the independent pedestrians first by improving the assessment process of selecting an exit from the set of exits available in the physical environment by considering a new factor (crowd at exits); and second, by incorporating following crowds as a new feature for those who are independent. A simulation of an emergency situation inside a room is performed to validate our work.

  2. A continuous model of the dynamical systems capable to memorise multiple shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudashkin, Alexander

    2008-10-01

    This paper proposes the novel approach to the mathematical synthesis of continuous self-organising systems capable to memorise and restore own multiple shapes defined by means of functions of single spatial variable or parametric models in two-dimensional space. The model is based on the certain universal form of the integral operator with the kernel representing the system memory. The technique for memorising shapes uses the composition of singular kernels of integral operators. The whole system is described by the potential function, whose minimisation leads to the non-linear dynamics of shape reconstruction by integro-differential non-linear equations with partial derivatives. The corresponding models are proposed and analysed for both parametric and non-parametric shape definitions. Main features of the proposed model are considered, and the results of numerical simulation are shown in case of three shapes memorising and retrieval. The proposed model can be used in theory of smart materials, artificial intelligence and some other branches of non-linear sciences where the effect of multiple shapes memorising and retrieval appears as the core feature.

  3. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  4. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Seaton, Michael; Todorov, Ilian; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia has been viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and was consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as a nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with the account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely disjoint from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  5. New insights into continental rifting from a damage rheology modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Segev, Amit; Weinberger, Ram; Schattner, Uri

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies have discussed how tectonic processes could produce relative tension to initiate and propagate rift zones and estimated the magnitude of the rift-driving forces. Both analytic and semi-analytic models as well as numerical simulations assume that the tectonic force required to initiate rifting is available. However, Buck (2004, 2006) estimated the minimum tectonic force to allow passive rifting and concluded that the available forces are probably not large enough for rifting of thick and strong lithosphere in the absence of basaltic magmatism (the "Tectonic Force" Paradox). The integral of the yielding stress needed for rifting over the thickness of the normal or thicker continental lithosphere are well above the available tectonic forces and tectonic rifting cannot happen (Buck, 2006). This conclusion is based on the assumption that the tectonic stress has to overcome simultaneously the yielding stress over the whole lithosphere thickness and ignore gradual weakening of the brittle rocks under long-term loading. In this study we demonstrate that the rifting process under moderate tectonic stretching is feasible due to gradual weakening and "long-term memory" of the heavily fractured brittle rocks, which makes it significantly weaker than the surrounding intact rock. This process provides a possible solution for the tectonic force paradox. We address these questions utilizing 3-D lithosphere-scale numerical simulations of the plate motion and faulting process base on the damage mechanics. The 3-D modeled volume consists of three main lithospheric layers: an upper layer of weak sediments, middle layer of crystalline crust and lower layer of the lithosphere mantle. Results of the modeling demonstrate gradual formation of the rift zone in the continental lithosphere with the flat layered structure. Successive formation of the rift system and associated seismicity pattern strongly depend not only on the applied tectonic force, but also on the healing

  6. Extending the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal - New Capabilities and New Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Brian; Law, Emily

    2015-11-01

    NASA’s Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP) provides a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, lunar scientists, and engineers to access mapped lunar data products from past and current lunar missions (http://lmmp.nasa.gov). During the past year, the capabilities and data served by LMMP have been significantly expanded. New interfaces are providing improved ways to access and visualize data. Many of the recent enhancements to LMMP have been specifically in response to the requirements of NASA's proposed Resource Prospector lunar rover, and as such, provide an excellent example of the application of LMMP to mission planning.At the request of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, LMMP’s technology and capabilities are now being extended to additional planetary bodies. New portals for Vesta and Mars are the first of these new products to be released.On March 31, 2015, the LMMP team released Vesta Trek (http://vestatrek.jpl.nasa.gov), a web-based application applying LMMP technology to visualize the asteroid Vesta. Data gathered from multiple instruments aboard Dawn have been compiled into Vesta Trek’s user-friendly set of tools, enabling users to study the asteroid’s features.Released on July 1, 2015, Mars Trek replicates the functionality of Vesta Trek for the surface of Mars. While the entire surface of Mars is covered, higher levels of resolution and greater numbers of data products are provided for special areas of interest. Early releases focus on past, current, and future robotic sites of operation. Future releases will add many new data products and analysis tools as Mars Trek has been selected for use in site selection for the Mars 2020 rover and in identifying potential human landing sites on Mars.Other destinations will follow soon. The Solar Sytem Exploration Research Virtual Institute, which manages the project, invites the user community to provide suggestions and requests as the

  7. Extending the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal - New Capabilities and New Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, B. H.; Law, E.; Arevalo, E.; Bui, B.; Chang, G.; Dodge, K.; Kim, R. M.; Malhotra, S.; Sadaqathullah, S.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP) provides a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, lunar scientists, and engineers to access mapped lunar data products from past and current lunar missions (http://lmmp.nasa.gov). During the past year, the capabilities and data served by LMMP have been significantly expanded. New interfaces are providing improved ways to access and visualize data. Many of the recent enhancements to LMMP have been specifically in response to the requirements of NASA's proposed Resource Prospector lunar rover, and as such, provide an excellent example of the application of LMMP to mission planning. At the request of NASA's Science Mission Directorate, LMMP's technology and capabilities are now being extended to additional planetary bodies. New portals for Vesta and Mars are the first of these new products to be released. On March 31, 2015, the LMMP team released Vesta Trek (http://vestatrek.jpl.nasa.gov), a web-based application applying LMMP technology to visualizations of the asteroid Vesta. Data gathered from multiple instruments aboard Dawn have been compiled into Vesta Trek's user-friendly set of tools, enabling users to study the asteroid's features. With an initial release on July 1, 2015, Mars Trek replicates the functionality of Vesta Trek for the surface of Mars. While the entire surface of Mars is covered, higher levels of resolution and greater numbers of data products are provided for special areas of interest. Early releases focus on past, current, and future robotic sites of operation. Future releases will add many new data products and analysis tools as Mars Trek has been selected for use in site selection for the Mars 2020 rover and in identifying potential human landing sites on Mars. Other destinations will follow soon. The user community is invited to provide suggestions and requests as the development team continues to expand the capabilities of LMMP

  8. Continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials and its application to multilayer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellmann, Roman; Ricoeur, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a micromechanical continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials is presented. As a constitutive law it is implemented into a finite element (FE) code. The model is based on micromechanical considerations of domain switching and its interaction with microcrack growth and coalescence. A FE analysis of a multilayer actuator is performed, showing the initiation of damage zones at the electrode tips during the poling process. Further, the influence of mechanical pre-stressing on damage evolution and actuating properties is investigated. The results provided in this work give useful information on the damage of advanced piezoelectric devices and their optimization.

  9. Capabilities of a Global 3D MHD Model for Monitoring Extremely Fast CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. C.; Plunkett, S. P.; Liou, K.; Socker, D. G.; Wu, S. T.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since the start of the space era, spacecraft have recorded many extremely fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which have resulted in severe geomagnetic storms. Accurate and timely forecasting of the space weather effects of these events is important for protecting expensive space assets and astronauts and avoiding communications interruptions. Here, we will introduce a newly developed global, three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model (G3DMHD). The model takes the solar magnetic field maps at 2.5 solar radii (Rs) and intepolates the solar wind plasma and field out to 18 Rs using the algorithm of Wang and Sheeley (1990, JGR). The output is used as the inner boundary condition for a 3D MHD model. The G3DMHD model is capable of simulating (i) extremely fast CME events with propagation speeds faster than 2500 km/s; and (ii) multiple CME events in sequence or simultaneously. We will demonstrate the simulation results (and comparison with in-situ observation) for the fastest CME in record on 23 July 2012, the shortest transit time in March 1976, and the well-known historic Carrington 1859 event.

  10. The SCEC Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME) - An Overview of its Architecture and Current Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Minster, B.; Moore, R.; Kesselman, C.; SCEC ITR Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), in collaboration with the San Diego Supercomputer Center, the USC Information Sciences Institute, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, and the U.S. Geological Survey, is developing the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Modeling Environment (CME) under a five-year grant from the National Science Foundation's Information Technology Research (ITR) Program jointly funded by the Geosciences and Computer and Information Science & Engineering Directorates. The CME system is an integrated geophysical simulation modeling framework that automates the process of selecting, configuring, and executing models of earthquake systems. During the Project's first three years, we have performed fundamental geophysical and information technology research and have also developed substantial system capabilities, software tools, and data collections that can help scientist perform systems-level earthquake science. The CME system provides collaborative tools to facilitate distributed research and development. These collaborative tools are primarily communication tools, providing researchers with access to information in ways that are convenient and useful. The CME system provides collaborators with access to significant computing and storage resources. The computing resources of the Project include in-house servers, Project allocations on USC High Performance Computing Linux Cluster, as well as allocations on NPACI Supercomputers and the TeraGrid. The CME system provides access to SCEC community geophysical models such as the Community Velocity Model, Community Fault Model, Community Crustal Motion Model, and the Community Block Model. The organizations that develop these models often provide access to them so it is not necessary to use the CME system to access these models. However, in some cases, the CME system supplements the SCEC community models with utility codes that make it easier to use or access

  11. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  12. Multi-physics modeling of multifunctional composite materials for damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujidkul, Thanyawalai

    This study presents a modeling of multifunction composite materials for damage detection with its verification and validation to mechanical behavior predictions of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer composites (CFRPs), CFRPs laminated composites, and woven SiC/SiC matrix composites that are subjected to fracture damage. Advantages of those materials are low cost, low density, high strength-to-weight ratio, and comparable specific tensile properties, the special of SiC/SiC is good environmental stability at high temperature. Resulting in, the composite has been used for many important structures such as helicopter rotors, aerojet engines, gas turbines, hot control surfaces, sporting goods, and windmill blades. Damage or material defect detection in a mechanical component can provide vital information for the prediction of remaining useful life, which will result in the prevention of catastrophic failures. Thus the understanding of the mechanical behavior have been challenge to the prevent damage and failure of composites in different scales. The damage detection methods in composites have been investigated widely in recent years. Non-destructive techniques are the traditional methods to detect the damage such as X-ray, acoustic emission and thermography. However, due to the invisible damage in composite can be occurred, to prevent the failure in composites. The developments of damage detection methods have been considered. Due to carbon fibers are conductive materials, in resulting CFRPs can be self-sensing to detect damage. As is well known, the electrical resistance has been shown to be a sensitive measure of internal damage, and also this work study in thermal resistance can detect damage in composites. However, there is a few number of different micromechanical modeling schemes has been proposed in the published literature for various types of composites. This works will provide with a numerical, analytical, and theoretical failure models in different damages to

  13. An existence result for a model of complete damage in elastic materials with reversible evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Elena; Freddi, Francesco; Segatti, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a model describing evolution of damage in elastic materials, in which stiffness completely degenerates once the material is fully damaged. The model is written by using a phase transition approach, with respect to the damage parameter. In particular, a source of damage is represented by a quadratic form involving deformations, which vanishes in the case of complete damage. Hence, an internal constraint is ensured by a maximal monotone operator. The evolution of damage is considered "reversible", in the sense that the material may repair itself. We can prove an existence result for a suitable weak formulation of the problem, rewritten in terms of a new variable (an internal stress). Some numerical simulations are presented in agreement with the mathematical analysis of the system.

  14. Formation of damage zone and seismic velocity variations during hydraulic stimulation: numerical modelling and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Calò, Marco; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    During hydraulic stimulations, a complex interaction is observed between the injected flux and pressure, number and magnitude of induced seismic events, and changes in seismic velocities. In this paper, we model formation and propagation of damage zones and seismicity patterns induced by wellbore fluid injection. The model includes the coupling of poroelastic deformation and groundwater flow with damage evolution (weakening and healing) and its effect on the elastic and hydrologic parameters of crystalline rocks. Results show that three subsequent interactions occur during stimulation. (1) Injected flux-pressure interaction: typically, after a flux increase, the wellbore pressure also rises to satisfy the flux conditions. Thereafter, the elevated pore pressure triggers damage accumulation and seismic activity, that is, accompanied by permeability increase. As a result, wellbore pressure decreases retaining the target injected flux. (2) Wellbore pressure-seismicity interaction: damage processes create an elongated damage zone in the direction close to the main principal stress. The rocks within the damage zone go through partial healing and remain in a medium damage state. Damage that originates around the injection well propagates within the damage zone away from the well, raising the damage state of the already damaged rocks, and is followed by compaction and fast partial healing back to a medium damage state. This `damage wave' behaviour is associated with the injected flux changes only in early stages while fracture's height (h) is larger than its length (l). The ratio h/l controls the deformation process that is responsible for several key features of the damage zone. (3) Stress- and damage-induced variations of the seismic P-wave velocities (Vp). Vp gradually decreases as damage is accumulated and increases after rock failure as the shear stress is released and healing and compaction are dominant. Typically, Vp decreases within the damage zone and increases in

  15. A New In Vitro Model to Study Cellular Responses after Thermomechanical Damage in Monolayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hettler, Alice; Werner, Simon; Eick, Stefan; Laufer, Stefan; Weise, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Although electrosurgical instruments are widely used in surgery to cut tissue layers or to achieve hemostasis by coagulation (electrocautery), only little information is available concerning the inflammatory or immune response towards the debris generated. Given the elevated local temperatures required for successful electrocautery, the remaining debris is likely to contain a plethora of compounds entirely novel to the intracorporal setting. A very common in vitro method to study cell migration after mechanical damage is the scratch assay, however, there is no established model for thermomechanical damage to characterise cellular reactions. In this study, we established a new in vitro model to investigate exposure to high temperature in a carefully controlled cell culture system. Heatable thermostat-controlled aluminium stamps were developed to induce local damage in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The thermomechanical damage invoked is reproducibly locally confined, therefore allowing studies, under the same experimental conditions, of cells affected to various degrees as well as of unaffected cells. We show that the unaffected cells surrounding the thermomechanical damage zone are able to migrate into the damaged area, resulting in a complete closure of the ‘wound’ within 48 h. Initial studies have shown that there are significant morphological and biological differences in endothelial cells after thermomechanical damage compared to the mechanical damage inflicted by using the unheated stamp as a control. Accordingly, after thermomechanical damage, cell death as well as cell protection programs were activated. Mononuclear cells adhered in the area adjacent to thermomechanical damage, but not to the zone of mechanical damage. Therefore, our model can help to understand the differences in wound healing during the early phase of regeneration after thermomechanical vs. mechanical damage. Furthermore, this model lends itself to study the

  16. Relativistic Modeling Capabilities in PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as hybrid X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. We have overcome a major challenge of a relativistic fluid implementation, namely the recovery of primitive variables (density, velocity, pressure) from conserved quantities at each time step of a simulation. Our code recovers non-relativistic results along with important features of published Particle-In-Cell simulation results for a laser penetrating a super-critical hydrogen gas with Fast Ignition applications. In particular, we recover the penetration of magnetized relativistic electron jets ahead of the laser. Our code also reveals new physics in the modeling of a laser incident on a thin foil. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  17. Development of explosive event scale model testing capability at Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Davie, N.T.; Calderone, J.J.

    1998-02-01

    Geotechnical structures such as underground bunkers, tunnels, and building foundations are subjected to stress fields produced by the gravity load on the structure and/or any overlying strata. These stress fields may be reproduced on a scaled model of the structure by proportionally increasing the gravity field through the use of a centrifuge. This technology can then be used to assess the vulnerability of various geotechnical structures to explosive loading. Applications of this technology include assessing the effectiveness of earth penetrating weapons, evaluating the vulnerability of various structures, counter-terrorism, and model validation. This document describes the development of expertise in scale model explosive testing on geotechnical structures using Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility. This study focused on buried structures such as hardened storage bunkers or tunnels. Data from this study was used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of existing hydrocodes and structural dynamics codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories (such as Pronto/SPH, Pronto/CTH, and ALEGRA). 7 refs., 50 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  19. A damage model for rock fragmentation and comparison of calculations with blasting experiments in granite

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, B.J.

    1990-10-01

    Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried to late times. An improved damage model allows finite element calculations which remain stable at late times. Reasonable agreement between crater profiles calculated with this model using the PRONTO finite element program and excavated crater profiles from blasting experiments in granite demonstrate a successful application of this model. Detailed instructions for use of this new damage model with the PRONTO finite element programs are included. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  20. CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic modeling and reduced-order model coputation capaability for APECS system. ORIGINAL TITLE: CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic modeling capability

    SciTech Connect

    Diwekar, U.; Shastri, Y.; Subramanayan, K.; Zitney, S.

    2007-01-01

    APECS (Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator) is an integrated software suite that combines the power of process simulation with high-fidelity, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for improved design, analysis, and optimization of process engineering systems. The APECS system uses commercial process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and CFD (e.g., FLUENT) software integrated with the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (CO) interfaces. This breakthrough capability allows engineers to better understand and optimize the fluid mechanics that drive overall power plant performance and efficiency. The focus of this paper is the CAPE-OPEN complaint stochastic modeling and reduced order model computational capability around the APECS system. The usefulness of capabilities is illustrated with coal fired, gasification based, FutureGen power plant simulation. These capabilities are used to generate efficient reduced order models and optimizing model complexities.

  1. Unusual plastic deformation and damage features in titanium: Experimental tests and constitutive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil-Baudard, Benoit; Cazacu, Oana; Flater, Philip; Chandola, Nitin; Alves, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental study on plastic deformation and damage of polycrystalline pure HCP Ti, as well as modeling of the observed behavior. Mechanical characterization data were conducted, which indicate that the material is orthotropic and displays tension-compression asymmetry. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray tomography measurements conducted reveal that damage distribution and evolution in this HCP Ti material is markedly different than in a typical FCC material such as copper. Stewart and Cazacu (2011) anisotropic elastic/plastic damage model is used to describe the behavior. All the parameters involved in this model have a clear physical significance, being related to plastic properties, and are determined from very few simple mechanical tests. It is shown that this model predicts correctly the anisotropy in plastic deformation, and its strong influence on damage distribution and damage accumulation. Specifically, for a smooth axisymmetric specimen subject to uniaxial tension, damage initiates at the center of the specimen, and is diffuse; the level of damage close to failure being very low. On the other hand, for a notched specimen subject to the same loading the model predicts that damage initiates at the outer surface of the specimen, and further grows from the outer surface to the center of the specimen, which corroborates with the in-situ tomography data.

  2. Improving Modeling of Iodine-129 Groundwater Contamination Plumes Using the System Assessment Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkes, J.; Nichols, W.E.; Wurstner, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    Years of production of radioactive materials at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has resulted in contamination of surface, subsurface, and surface water environments. Cleanup of the site has been aided by various tools, including computer software used to predict contaminant migration in the future and estimate subsequent impacts. The System Assessment Capability (SAC) is a total systems tool designed to simulate the movement of contaminants from all waste sites at Hanford through the vadose zone, the unconfined aquifer, and the Columbia River. Except for iodine-129, most of the contaminants modeled by SAC have acceptably matched field measurements. The two most likely reasons for the inconsistency between the measured field data and SAC modeled predictions are an underestimated inventory and an overestimated sorption value (Kd). Field data tend to be point measurements taken from near the surface of the unconfined aquifer. Thus, the depth of the iodine-129 contamination plume on the site is not well characterized. Geostatistical analyses of the measured data were conducted to determine the mass of iodine-129 for four assumed plume depths within the unconfined aquifer. Several simulations for two different Kd’s using the initial SAC inventory were run to determine the effect of an overestimated sorption value on SAC modeled predictions. The initial SAC inventory was then increased for the two different Kd’s to determine the influence of an underestimated inventory on SAC modeled predictions. It was found that evidence for both an underestimated inventory and for an overestimated sorption value for iodine-129 exist. These results suggest that the Kd for iodine-129 should be reevaluated and that a more complete inventory must be generated in order to more accurately model iodine-129 groundwater contamination plumes that match available field data.

  3. Stand-damage model: A component of the gypsy moth life system model (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Stand-Damage Model (a component of the Gypsy Moth Life System Model) simulates the growth of a mixed hardwood forest and incorporates the effects of defoliation by gypsy moth or tree harvesting as prescribed by the user. It can be used to assess the damage from expected defoliation, view the differences between various degrees of defoliation, and describe the effects of defoliation on a standard under user-defined silvicultural prescriptions and defoliation scenarios. The user`s guide provides the information necessary to install and use the model software on DOS microcomputers. A reference section provides a more experienced user with a structure map of the system.

  4. DAMAGE MODELING OF INJECTION-MOLDED SHORT- AND LONG-FIBER THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2009-10-30

    This article applies the recent anisotropic rotary diffusion – reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model for predicting fiber orientation and a new damage model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to analyze progressive damage leading to total failure of injection-molded long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens. The ARD-RSC model was implemented in a research version of the Autodesk Moldflow Plastics Insight (MPI) processing code, and it has been used to simulate injection-molding of a long-glass-fiber/PP plaque. The damage model combines micromechanical modeling with a continuum damage mechanics description to predict the nonlinear behavior due to plasticity coupled with damage in LFTs. This model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code via user-subroutines and has been used in the damage analyses of tensile specimens removed from the injection-molded long-glass-fiber/PP plaques. Experimental characterization and mechanical testing were performed to provide input data to support and validate both process modeling and damage analyses. The predictions are in agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Application of a damage model for rock fragmentation to the Straight Creek Mine blast experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, B.J.

    1991-09-01

    Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried past the fragmentation limit. More recently, the improved damage model PRONTO has allowed finite element calculations which remain stable and yield good agreement between calculated fragmented regions and excavated crater profiles for blasting experiments in granite. Application of this damage model to blast experiments at the Straight Creek Mine in Bell County, Kentucky were complicated by anisotropic conditions and uncertainties in material properties. It appears that significant modifications to the damage model and extensive material testing may be necessary in order to estimate damage in these anisotropic materials. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  6. Indentation experiments and simulation of ovine bone using a viscoelastic-plastic damage model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Wu, Ziheng; Turner, Simon; MacLeay, Jennifer; Niebur, Glen L.; Ovaert, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Indentation methods have been widely used to study bone at the micro- and nanoscales. It has been shown that bone exhibits viscoelastic behavior with permanent deformation during indentation. At the same time, damage due to microcracks is induced due to the stresses beneath the indenter tip. In this work, a simplified viscoelastic-plastic damage model was developed to more closely simulate indentation creep data, and the effect of the model parameters on the indentation curve was investigated. Experimentally, baseline and 2-year postovariectomized (OVX-2) ovine (sheep) bone samples were prepared and indented. The damage model was then applied via finite element analysis to simulate the bone indentation data. The mechanical properties of yielding, viscosity, and damage parameter were obtained from the simulations. The results suggest that damage develops more quickly for OVX-2 samples under the same indentation load conditions as the baseline data. PMID:26136623

  7. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Capability and Systems Engineering Capability Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikins, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: General Background and Introduction of Capability Roadmaps. Agency Objective. Strategic Planning Transformation. Advanced Planning Organizational Roles. Public Involvement in Strategic Planning. Strategic Roadmaps and Schedule. Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  8. The Louvain-la-Neuve sea ice model LIM3.5: global and regional capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, C.; Vancoppenolle, M.; Madec, G.; Fichefet, T.; Flavoni, S.; Barthélemy, A.; Benshila, R.; Chanut, J.; Levy, C.; Masson, S.; Vivier, F.

    2015-04-01

    We present the new 3.5 version of the Louvain-la-Neuve sea ice model (LIM) integrated in NEMO 3.6. The main novelty is the improvement of model robustness and versatility for a wide range of applications, from global to regional scales. Several modifications to the code were required. First, the time stepping scheme of the model was changed from parallel to sequential (ice dynamics first, then thermodynamics). Such a scheme enables to diagnose the different physical processes responsible for exchanges through the air-ice-ocean interfaces, as well as the online inspection of mass, heat and salt conservation properties of the code. In the course of these developments, several minor conservation leaks were found and fixed, so that LIM3.5 is exactly conservative. Second, lateral boundary conditions for regional ice-covered configurations have been implemented. To illustrate the new capabilities, two simulations are performed. One is a global simulation at a nominal 2° resolution forced by atmospheric climatologies and is found reasonably realistic although no specific tuning was done. The other is a regional simulation at 2 km resolution around the Svalbard Archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, with prescribed conditions at the four boundaries including tides. The simulation is able to resolve small-scale features and transient events such as the opening and closing of coastal polynyas. The ice mass budgets for both simulations are illustrated and mostly differ by the strength of ice formation in open water. LIM3.5 now forms a solid base for future scientific studies and model developments.

  9. Some remarks on a model for rate-independent damage in thermo-visco-elastodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, Giuliano; Rossi, Riccarda; Thomas, Marita; Toader, Rodica

    2016-06-01

    This note deals with the analysis of a model for partial damage, where the rate- independent, unidirectional flow rule for the damage variable is coupled with the rate-dependent heat equation, and with the momentum balance featuring inertia and viscosity according to Kelvin-Voigt rheology. The results presented here combine the approach from Roubicek [1, 2] with the methods from Lazzaroni/Rossi/Thomas/Toader [3]. The present analysis encompasses, differently from [2], the monotonicity in time of damage and the dependence of the viscous tensor on damage and temperature, and, unlike [3], a nonconstant heat capacity and a time-dependent Dirichlet loading.

  10. Recent Developments of the Local Effect Model (LEM) - Implications of clustered damage on cell transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, Thilo

    Exposure to radiation of high-energy and highly charged ions (HZE) causes a major risk to human beings, since in long term space explorations about 10 protons per month and about one HZE particle per month hit each cell nucleus (1). Despite the larger number of light ions, the high ionisation power of HZE particles and its corresponding more complex damage represents a major hazard for astronauts. Therefore, in order to get a reasonable risk estimate, it is necessary to take into account the entire mixed radiation field. Frequently, neoplastic cell transformation serves as an indicator for the oncogenic potential of radiation exposure. It can be measured for a small number of ion and energy combinations. However, due to the complexity of the radiation field it is necessary to know the contribution to the radiation damage of each ion species for the entire range of energies. Therefore, a model is required which transfers the few experimental data to other particles with different LETs. We use the Local Effect Model (LEM) (2) with its cluster extension (3) to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neoplastic transformation. It was originally developed in the framework of hadrontherapy and is applicable for a large range of ions and energies. The input parameters for the model include the linear-quadratic parameters for the induction of lethal events as well as for the induction of transformation events per surviving cell. Both processes of cell inactivation and neoplastic transformation per viable cell are combined to eventually yield the RBE for cell transformation. We show that the Local Effect Model is capable of predicting the RBE of neoplastic cell transformation for a broad range of ions and energies. The comparison of experimental data (4) with model calculations shows a reasonable agreement. We find that the cluster extension results in a better representation of the measured RBE values. With this model it should be possible to better

  11. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; Cesar Sa, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-05-17

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths.

  12. Amelioration of oxidative DNA damage in mouse peritoneal macrophages by Hippophae salicifolia due to its proton (H+) donation capability: Ex vivo and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mainak; Karmakar, Indrajit; Haldar, Sagnik; Das, Avratanu; Bala, Asis; Haldar, Pallab Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The present study evaluates the antioxidant effect of methanol extract of Hippophae salicifolia (MEHS) bark with special emphasis on its role on oxidative DNA damage in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Material and Methods: In vitro antioxidant activity was estimated by standard antioxidant assays whereas the antioxidant activity concluded the H+ donating capacity. Mouse erythrocytes’ hemolysis and peritoneal macrophages’ DNA damage were determined spectrophotometrically. In vivo antioxidant activity of MEHS was determined in carbon tetrachloride-induced mice by studying its effect on superoxide anion production in macrophages cells, superoxide dismutase in the cell lysate, DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and reduces glutathione. Results: The extract showed good in vitro antioxidant activities whereas the inhibitory concentrations values ranged from 5.80 to 106.5 μg/ml. MEHS significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the oxidative DNA damage. It also attenuated the oxidative conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin and elevation of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant in cells. Conclusion: The result indicates MEHS has good in vitro-in vivo antioxidant property as well as the protective effect on DNA and red blood cell may be due to its H+ donating property. PMID:27413349

  13. Modeling crater formation in femtosecond-pulse laser damage from basic principles.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert A; Schumacher, Douglass W; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-05-15

    We present the first fundamental simulation method for the determination of crater morphology due to femtosecond-pulse laser damage. To this end we have adapted the particle-in-cell (PIC) method commonly used in plasma physics for use in the study of laser damage and developed the first implementation of a pair potential for PIC codes. We find that the PIC method is a complementary approach to modeling laser damage, bridging the gap between fully ab-initio molecular dynamics approaches and empirical models. We demonstrate our method by modeling a femtosecond-pulse laser incident on a flat copper slab for a range of intensities. PMID:26393696

  14. Modeling crater formation in femtosecond-pulse laser damage from basic principles.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert A; Schumacher, Douglass W; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-05-15

    We present the first fundamental simulation method for the determination of crater morphology due to femtosecond-pulse laser damage. To this end we have adapted the particle-in-cell (PIC) method commonly used in plasma physics for use in the study of laser damage and developed the first implementation of a pair potential for PIC codes. We find that the PIC method is a complementary approach to modeling laser damage, bridging the gap between fully ab-initio molecular dynamics approaches and empirical models. We demonstrate our method by modeling a femtosecond-pulse laser incident on a flat copper slab for a range of intensities.

  15. Predictive Capabilities of Multiphysics and Multiscale Models in Modeling Solidification of Steel Ingots and DC Casting of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combeau, Hervé; Založnik, Miha; Bedel, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of solidification defects, such as macrosegregation and inhomogeneous microstructures, constitutes a key issue for industry. The development of models of casting processes needs to account for several imbricated length scales and different physical phenomena. For example, the kinetics of the growth of microstructures needs to be coupled with the multiphase flow at the process scale. We introduce such a state-of-the-art model and outline its principles. We present the most recent applications of the model to casting of a heavy steel ingot and to direct chill casting of a large Al alloy sheet ingot. Their ability to help in the understanding of complex phenomena, such as the competition between nucleation and growth of grains in the presence of convection of the liquid and of grain motion is shown, and its predictive capabilities are discussed. Key issues for future developments and research are addressed.

  16. Predictive Capabilities of Multiphysics and Multiscale Models in Modeling Solidification of Steel Ingots and DC Casting of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combeau, Hervé; Založnik, Miha; Bedel, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of solidification defects, such as macrosegregation and inhomogeneous microstructures, constitutes a key issue for industry. The development of models of casting processes needs to account for several imbricated length scales and different physical phenomena. For example, the kinetics of the growth of microstructures needs to be coupled with the multiphase flow at the process scale. We introduce such a state-of-the-art model and outline its principles. We present the most recent applications of the model to casting of a heavy steel ingot and to direct chill casting of a large Al alloy sheet ingot. Their ability to help in the understanding of complex phenomena, such as the competition between nucleation and growth of grains in the presence of convection of the liquid and of grain motion is shown, and its predictive capabilities are discussed. Key issues for future developments and research are addressed.

  17. An Elastic-Plastic Damage Model for Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2009-08-11

    This article proposes an elastic-plastic damage model that combines micromechanical modeling with continuum damage mechanics to predict the stress-strain response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics. The model accounts for distributions of orientation and length of elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic matrix whose behavior is elastic-plastic and damageable. The elastic-plastic damage behavior of the matrix is described by the modified Ramberg-Osgood relation and the three-dimensional damage model in deformation assuming isotropic hardening. Fiber/matrix debonding is accounted for using a parameter that governs the fiber/matrix interface compliance. A linear relationship between this parameter and the matrix damage variable is assumed. First, the elastic-plastic damage behavior of the reference aligned-fiber composite containing the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite is computed using an incremental Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka mean field approach. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  18. Brain damage in a new hemorrhagic shock model in the rat using long-term recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Y.; Kato, H.; Kogure, K. )

    1990-03-01

    A new shock model in the rat using hemorrhagic hypotension for production of brain damage is described. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by lowering arterial blood pressure with bleeding. The MABP was maintained at approximately 25 mm Hg, accompanied by isoelectric EEG, and then shed blood was retransfused. At 1 week of recovery, morphological and 45Ca autoradiographic changes were examined. No brain damage was observed in rats after 1 min of isoelectric EEG. Mild neuronal damage in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was seen in some animals after 2 min of isoelectric EEG. Severe and consistent neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was recognized after 3 min of isoelectric EEG. Additional damage was also seen in the dentate hilus and the thalamus in some animals. This model can be used to study the pathophysiology of postshock brain damage and to assess new therapies following shock.

  19. Immune Modulating Capability of Two Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bifidobacterium Strains in a Wistar Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; Moran, Javier; Cabello, Estefanía; Suárez, Ana; González, Celestino; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2014-01-01

    Fermented dairy products are the usual carriers for the delivery of probiotics to humans, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus being the most frequently used bacteria. In this work, the strains Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 and Bifidobacterium longum IPLA E44 were tested for their capability to modulate immune response and the insulin-dependent glucose homeostasis using male Wistar rats fed with a standard diet. Three intervention groups were fed daily for 24 days with 10% skimmed milk, or with 109 cfu of the corresponding strain suspended in the same vehicle. A significant increase of the suppressor-regulatory TGF-β cytokine occurred with both strains in comparison with a control (no intervention) group of rats; the highest levels were reached in rats fed IPLA R1. This strain presented an immune protective profile, as it was able to reduce the production of the proinflammatory IL-6. Moreover, phosphorylated Akt kinase decreased in gastroctemius muscle of rats fed the strain IPLA R1, without affecting the glucose, insulin, and HOMA index in blood, or levels of Glut-4 located in the membrane of muscle and adipose tissue cells. Therefore, the strain B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 is a probiotic candidate to be tested in mild grade inflammation animal models. PMID:24971309

  20. How reduced vacuum pumping capability in a coating chamber affects the laser damage resistance of HfO2/SiO2 antireflection and high reflection coatings.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Field, Ella Suzanne; Bellum, John Curtis; Kletecka, Damon E.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coatings with the highest laser damage thresholds rely on clean conditions in the vacuum chamber during the coating deposition process. A low base pressure in the coating chamber, as well as the ability of the vacuum system to maintain the required pressure during deposition, are important aspects of limiting the amount of defects in an optical coating that could induce laser damage. Our large optics coating chamber at Sandia National Laboratories normally relies on three cryo pumps to maintain low pressures for e-beam coating processes. However, on occasion, one or more of the cryo pumps have been out ofmore » commission. In light of this circumstance, we explored how deposition under compromised vacuum conditions resulting from the use of only one or two cryo pumps affects the laser-induced damage thresholds of optical coatings. Finally, the coatings of this study consist of HfO2 and SiO2 layer materials and include antireflection coatings for 527 nm at normal incidence, and high reflection coatings for 527 nm, 45⁰ angle of incidence (AOI), in P-polarization (P-pol).« less

  1. Modeling Progressive Damage Using Local Displacement Discontinuities Within the FEAMAC Multiscale Modeling Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranatunga, Vipul; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    A method for performing progressive damage modeling in composite materials and structures based on continuum level interfacial displacement discontinuities is presented. The proposed method enables the exponential evolution of the interfacial compliance, resulting in unloading of the tractions at the interface after delamination or failure occurs. In this paper, the proposed continuum displacement discontinuity model has been used to simulate failure within both isotropic and orthotropic materials efficiently and to explore the possibility of predicting the crack path, therein. Simulation results obtained from Mode-I and Mode-II fracture compare the proposed approach with the cohesive element approach and Virtual Crack Closure Techniques (VCCT) available within the ABAQUS (ABAQUS, Inc.) finite element software. Furthermore, an eccentrically loaded 3-point bend test has been simulated with the displacement discontinuity model, and the resulting crack path prediction has been compared with a prediction based on the extended finite element model (XFEM) approach.

  2. Tissue specific response to DNA damage: C. elegans as role model.

    PubMed

    Lans, Hannes; Vermeulen, Wim

    2015-08-01

    The various symptoms associated with hereditary defects in the DNA damage response (DDR), which range from developmental and neurological abnormalities and immunodeficiency to tissue-specific cancers and accelerated aging, suggest that DNA damage affects tissues differently. Mechanistic DDR studies are, however, mostly performed in vitro, in unicellular model systems or cultured cells, precluding a clear and comprehensive view of the DNA damage response of multicellular organisms. Studies performed in intact, multicellular animals models suggest that DDR can vary according to the type, proliferation and differentiation status of a cell. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become an important DDR model and appears to be especially well suited to understand in vivo tissue-specific responses to DNA damage as well as the impact of DNA damage on development, reproduction and health of an entire multicellular organism. C. elegans germ cells are highly sensitive to DNA damage induction and respond via classical, evolutionary conserved DDR pathways aimed at efficient and error-free maintenance of the entire genome. Somatic tissues, however, respond differently to DNA damage and prioritize DDR mechanisms that promote growth and function. In this mini-review, we describe tissue-specific differences in DDR mechanisms that have been uncovered utilizing C. elegans as role model. PMID:25957488

  3. A continuous damage model based on stepwise-stress creep rupture tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    A creep damage accumulation model is presented that makes use of the Kachanov damage rate concept with a provision accounting for damage that results from a variable stress history. This is accomplished through the introduction of an additional term in the Kachanov rate equation that is linear in the stress rate. Specification of the material functions and parameters in the model requires two types of constituting a data base: (1) standard constant-stress creep rupture tests, and (2) a sequence of two-step creep rupture tests.

  4. Modeling of laser-induced damage and optic usage at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi M.; Nostrand, Mike; Carr, Wren; Bude, Jeff; Suratwala, Tayyab I.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of laser-induced optics damage has been introduced to benchmark existing optic usage at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which includes the number of optics exchanged for damage repair. NIF has pioneered an optics recycle strategy to allow it to run the laser at capacity since fully commissioned in 2009 while keeping the cost of optics usage manageable. We will show how the damage model is being used to evaluate strategies to streamline our optics loop efficiency, as we strive to increase the laser shot rate without increasing operating costs.

  5. Empirical modeling of the cross section of damage formation in ion implanted III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wendler, E.; Wendler, L.

    2012-05-07

    In this letter, the cross section of damage formation per individual ion is measured for III-V compound semiconductors ion implanted at 15 K, applying Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. An empirical model is proposed that explains the measured cross sections in terms of quantities representing the primary energies deposited in the displacement of lattice atoms and in electronic interactions. The resulting formula allows the prediction of damage formation for low temperatures and low ion fluences in these materials and can be taken as a starting point for further quantitative modeling of damage formation including secondary effects such as temperature and ion flux.

  6. Ductile damage prediction in metal forming processes: Advanced modeling and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saanouni, K.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the needs required in modern virtual metal forming including both sheet and bulk metal forming of mechanical components. These concern the advanced modeling of thermo-mechanical behavior including the multiphysical phenomena and their interaction or strong coupling, as well as the associated numerical aspects using fully adaptive simulation strategies. First a survey of advanced constitutive equations accounting for the main thermomechanical phenomena as the thermo-elasto-plastic finite strains with isotropic and kinematic hardenings fully coupled with ductile damage will be presented. Only the macroscopic phenomenological approach with state variables (monoscale approach) will be discussed in the general framework of the rational thermodynamics for generalized micromorphic continua. The micro-macro (multi-scales approach) in the framework of polycrystalline inelasticity is not presented here for the sake of shortness but will be presented during the oral presentation. The main numerical aspects related to the resolution of the associated initial and boundary value problem will be outlined. A fully adaptive numerical methodology will be briefly described and some numerical examples will be given in order to show the high predictive capabilities of this adaptive methodology for virtual metal forming simulations.

  7. Remote sensing detection model of damaged forest by tomicus piniperda in Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xieqiong; Zhao, Shuhe; Luo, Weijia; Feng, Xuezhi; Yang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hongping; Xu, Hong

    2006-01-01

    Remote sensing detection model of damaged forest by tomicus piniperda was studied. It analyzed different detection models using multiple types of remote sensing data, such as TM, CBERS-1, AVHRR and MODIS data. The spectral features of the above remote sensing data (March, 2001) were given. And two detection models were put forward according to the spectral changing characteristics. One was named Difference Rate (DR) model with NIR and VIR data, which applied for TM, CBERS-1, AVHRR and MODIS. If DR was bigger, the forest grew healthier. Based on the typical sample, the different guidelines distinguished healthy and damaged forests were obtained. The other model was named Disaster Index (DI) model with thermal and NIR data, only suitable for MODIS. The guidelines of healthy and damaged forest were determined too. Greater DI was, the forest was stricken more badly. In conclusion, it will help monitor and assess the vermin occurrence and impact by remote sensing detection model.

  8. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, Rossella; Comi, Claudia; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  9. Model of a neural network inertial satellite navigation system capable of estimating the earth's gravitational field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devyatisil'nyi, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    A model for recognizing inertial and satellite data on an object's motion that are delivered by a set of distributed onboard sensors (newtonmeters, gyros, satellite receivers) has been described. Specifically, the model is capable of estimating the parameters of the gravitational field.

  10. A new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Joussineau, G.; Aydin, A.

    2006-12-01

    Faults may either impede or enhance fluid flow in the subsurface, which is relevant to a number of economic issues (hydrocarbon migration and entrapment, formation and distribution of mineral deposits) and environmental problems (movement of contaminants). Fault zones typically comprise a low-permeability core made up of intensely deformed fault rock and a high-permeability damage zone defined by fault-related fractures. The geometry, petrophysical properties and continuity of both the fault core and the damage zone have an important influence on the mechanical properties of the fault systems and on subsurface fluid flow. Information about fault components from remote seismic methods is limited and is available only for large faults (slip larger than 20-100m). It is therefore essential to characterize faults and associated damage zones in field analogues, and to develop conceptual models of how faults and related structures form and evolve. Here we present such an attempt to better understand the evolution of fault damage zones in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone of the Valley of Fire State Park (SE Nevada). We document the formation and evolution of the damage zone associated with strike-slip faults through detailed field studies of faults of increasing slip magnitudes. The faults initiate as sheared joints with discontinuous pockets of damage zone located at fault tips and fault surface irregularities. With increasing slip (slip >5m), the damage zone becomes longer and wider by progressive fracture infilling, and is organized into two distinct components with different geometrical and statistical characteristics. The first component of the damage zone is the inner damage zone, directly flanking the fault core, with a relatively high fracture frequency and a thickness that scales with the amount of fault slip. Parts of this inner zone are integrated into the fault core by the development of the fault rock, contributing to the core's progressive widening. The second

  11. Probabilistic, multi-variate flood damage modelling using random forests and Bayesian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Schröter, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Decisions on flood risk management and adaptation are increasingly based on risk analyses. Such analyses are associated with considerable uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention recently, they are hardly applied in flood damage assessments. Most of the damage models usually applied in standard practice have in common that complex damaging processes are described by simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. This presentation will show approaches for probabilistic, multi-variate flood damage modelling on the micro- and meso-scale and discuss their potential and limitations. Reference: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64. Schröter, K., Kreibich, H., Vogel, K., Riggelsen, C., Scherbaum, F., Merz, B. (2014): How useful are complex flood damage models? - Water Resources Research, 50, 4, p. 3378-3395.

  12. A holistic numerical model to predict strain hardening and damage of UHMWPE under multiple total knee replacement kinematics and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Willing, Ryan; Kim, Il Yong

    2009-11-13

    Experimental wear testing is an essential step in the evaluation of total knee replacement (TKR) design. Unfortunately, experiments can be prohibitively expensive and time consuming, which has made computational wear simulation a more desirable alternative for screening designs. While previous attempts have demonstrated positive results, few models have fully incorporated the affect of strain hardening (or cross shear), or tested the model under more than one loading condition. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate the performance of a new holistic TKR damage model, capable of predicting damage caused by wear, including the effects of strain hardening and creep. For the first time, a frictional work-based damage model was compared against multiple sets of experimental TKR wear testing data using different input kinematics. The wear model was tuned using experimental measurements and was then able to accurately predict the volumetric polyethylene wear volume during experiments with different kinematic inputs. The size and shape of the damage patch on the surface of the polyethylene inserts were also accurately predicted under multiple input kinematics. The ability of this model to predict implant damage under multiple loading profiles by accounting for strain hardening makes it ideal for screening new implant designs, since implant kinematics are largely a function of the shape of the components. PMID:19647828

  13. Structural damage identification of the highway bridge Z24 by FE model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teughels, A.; De Roeck, G.

    2004-12-01

    The development of a methodology for accurate and reliable condition assessment of civil structures has become very important. The finite element (FE) model updating method provides an efficient, non-destructive, global damage identification technique, which is based on the fact that the modal parameters (eigenfrequencies and mode shapes) of the structure are affected by structural damage. In the FE model the damage is represented by a reduction of the stiffness properties of the elements and can be identified by tuning the FE model to the measured modal parameters. This paper describes an iterative sensitivity based FE model updating method in which the discrepancies in both the eigenfrequencies and unscaled mode shape data obtained from ambient tests are minimized. Furthermore, the paper proposes the use of damage functions to approximate the stiffness distribution, as an efficient approach to reduce the number of unknowns. Additionally the optimization process is made more robust by using the trust region strategy in the implementation of the Gauss-Newton method, which is another original contribution of this work. The combination of the damage function approach with the trust region strategy is a practical alternative to the pure mathematical regularization techniques such as Tikhonov approach. Afterwards the updating procedure is validated with a real application to a prestressed concrete bridge. The damage in the highway bridge is identified by updating the Young's and the shear modulus, whose distribution over the FE model are approximated by piecewise linear functions.

  14. Micro-Macro Analysis and Phenomenological Modelling of Salt Viscous Damage and Application to Salt Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Pouya, Ahmad; Arson, Chloé

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to gain fundamental understanding of the microscopic mechanisms that control the transition between secondary and tertiary creep around salt caverns in typical geological storage conditions. We use a self-consistent inclusion-matrix model to homogenize the viscoplastic deformation of halite polycrystals and predict the number of broken grains in a Representative Elementary Volume of salt. We use this micro-macro modeling framework to simulate creep tests under various axial stresses, which gives us the critical viscoplastic strain at which grain breakage (i.e., tertiary creep) is expected to occur. The comparison of simulation results for short-term and long-term creep indicates that the initiation of tertiary creep depends on the stress and the viscoplastic strain. We use the critical viscoplastic deformation as a yield criterion to control the transition between secondary and tertiary creep in a phenomenological viscoplastic model, which we implement into the Finite Element Method program POROFIS. We model a 850-m-deep salt cavern of irregular shape, in axis-symmetric conditions. Simulations of cavern depressurization indicate that a strain-dependent damage evolution law is more suitable than a stress-dependent damage evolution law, because it avoids high damage concentrations and allows capturing the formation of a damaged zone around the cavity. The modeling framework explained in this paper is expected to provide new insights to link grain breakage to phenomenological damage variables used in Continuum Damage Mechanics.

  15. Continuum Fatigue Damage Modeling for Critical Design, Control, and Fault Prognosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper develops a simplified continuum (continuous with respect to time, stress, etc.) fatigue damage model for use in critical design, Life Extending Control and fault prognosis. The work is based on the local strain cyclic damage modeling method. New nonlinear explicit equation forms of cyclic damage in terms of stress amplitude are derived to facilitate the continuum modelling. Stress based continuum models are derived. Extension to plastic strain-strain rate models is also presented. Progress toward a non-zero mean stress based is presented. Also new nonlinear explicit equation forms in terms of stress amplitude are derived for this case. Application of the various models to design, control, and fault prognosis is considered.

  16. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-09-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, which rotate and elongate until interaction with neighbouring micro-cracks gives coalescence. Thus, the failure mechanism is very different from that under tensile loading. Also, the Gurson model has recently been extended to describe failure in shear, by adding a damage term to the expression for the growth of the void volume fraction, and it has been shown that this extended model can represent experimental observations. Here, numerical studies are carried out to compare predictions of the shear-extended Gurson model with the shear failures predicted by the micro-mechanical cell model. Both models show a strong dependence on the level of hydrostatic tension. Even though the reason for this pressure dependence is different in the two models, as the shear-extended Gurson model does not describe voids flattening out and the associated failure mechanism by micro-cracks interacting with neighbouring micro-cracks, it is shown that the trends of the predictions are in good agreement.

  17. A visco-poroelastic damage model for modelling compaction and brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells is often used to increase heat extraction from deep geothermal reservoirs. Initiation and propagation of fractures due to pore pressure build-up increase the effective permeability of the porous medium. Understanding the processes controlling the initiation of fractures, the evolution of their geometries and the hydro-mechanical impact on transport properties of the porous medium is therefore of great interest for geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes occurring during deformation of a porous rock. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To validate and illustrate the model, simulations of the deformation behaviour of cylindrical porous Bentheimer sandstone samples under different confining pressures are compared to experiments. The first experiment under low confining pressure leads to shear failure, the second for high confining pressure leads to cataclastic compaction and the third one with intermediate confining pressure correspond to a transitional regime between the two firsts. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field

  18. A Modified Nonlinear Damage Accumulation Model for Fatigue Life Prediction Considering Load Interaction Effects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Zhong; Yuan, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Many structures are subjected to variable amplitude loading in engineering practice. The foundation of fatigue life prediction under variable amplitude loading is how to deal with the fatigue damage accumulation. A nonlinear fatigue damage accumulation model to consider the effects of load sequences was proposed in earlier literature, but the model cannot consider the load interaction effects, and sometimes it makes a major error. A modified nonlinear damage accumulation model is proposed in this paper to account for the load interaction effects. Experimental data of two metallic materials are used to validate the proposed model. The agreement between the model prediction and experimental data is observed, and the predictions by proposed model are more possibly in accordance with experimental data than that by primary model and Miner's rule. Comparison between the predicted cumulative damage by the proposed model and an existing model shows that the proposed model predictions can meet the accuracy requirement of the engineering project and it can be used to predict the fatigue life of welded aluminum alloy joint of Electric Multiple Units (EMU); meanwhile, the accuracy of approximation can be obtained from the proposed model though more simple computing process and less material parameters calling for extensive testing than the existing model. PMID:24574866

  19. Full-scale testing and progressive damage modeling of sandwich composite aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    A comprehensive experimental and computational investigation was conducted to characterize the fracture behavior and structural response of large sandwich composite aircraft fuselage panels containing artificial damage in the form of holes and notches. Full-scale tests were conducted where panels were subjected to quasi-static combined pressure, hoop, and axial loading up to failure. The panels were constructed using plain-weave carbon/epoxy prepreg face sheets and a Nomex honeycomb core. Panel deformation and notch tip damage development were monitored during the tests using several techniques, including optical observations, strain gages, digital image correlation (DIC), acoustic emission (AE), and frequency response (FR). Additional pretest and posttest inspections were performed via thermography, computer-aided tap tests, ultrasound, x-radiography, and scanning electron microscopy. The framework to simulate damage progression and to predict residual strength through use of the finite element (FE) method was developed. The DIC provided local and full-field strain fields corresponding to changes in the state-of-damage and identified the strain components driving damage progression. AE was monitored during loading of all panels and data analysis methodologies were developed to enable real-time determination of damage initiation, progression, and severity in large composite structures. The FR technique has been developed, evaluating its potential as a real-time nondestructive inspection technique applicable to large composite structures. Due to the large disparity in scale between the fuselage panels and the artificial damage, a global/local analysis was performed. The global FE models fully represented the specific geometries, composite lay-ups, and loading mechanisms of the full-scale tests. A progressive damage model was implemented in the local FE models, allowing the gradual failure of elements in the vicinity of the artificial damage. A set of modifications

  20. Modeling extreme hurricane damage in the United States using generalized Pareto distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Asim Kumer

    Extreme value distributions are used to understand and model natural calamities, man made catastrophes and financial collapses. Extreme value theory has been developed to study the frequency of such events and to construct a predictive model so that one can attempt to forecast the frequency of a disaster and the amount of damage from such a disaster. In this study, hurricane damages in the United States from 1900-2012 have been studied. The aim of the paper is three-fold. First, normalizing hurricane damage and fitting an appropriate model for the normalized damage data. Secondly, predicting the maximum economic damage from a hurricane in future by using the concept of return period. Finally, quantifying the uncertainty in the inference of extreme return levels of hurricane losses by using a simulated hurricane series, generated by bootstrap sampling. Normalized hurricane damage data are found to follow a generalized Pareto distribution. tion. It is demonstrated that standard deviation and coecient of variation increase with the return period which indicates an increase in uncertainty with model extrapolation.

  1. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel.

  2. Evaluation of microcrack thermal shock damage in ceramics: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Y. C.; Hefetz, M.; Rokhlin, S. I.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental and theoretical study of the effect of microcrack damage on ceramic properties. For the experimental investigation, ceramic samples of aluminum oxide and reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) are used. Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Both surface and bulk ultrasonic wave methods are used to correlate the change of elastic constants to microstructural degradation and to determine the change in elastic anisotropy induced by microcrack damage. For the theoretical investigation, damage mechanics, which relates microstructural damage to material service life and mechanical failure, is used. The change in elastic properties due to microcrack damage calculated from the theoretical model is compared with the experimental results for determination of the applicability of damage theory. It is shown that two independent experimental methods (bulk wave and surface wave) give the same results for shear moduli of damaged ceramics. The experimental results aagree reasonably well with the moduli predicted from the cracked solid model.

  3. Experimental characterization and numerical modelling of polymeric film damage, constituting the stratospheric super pressurized balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaabane, Makram; Chaabane, Makram; Dalverny, Olivier; Deramecourt, Arnaud; Mistou, Sébastien

    The super-pressure balloons developed by CNES are a great challenge in scientific ballooning. Whatever the balloon type considered (spherical, pumpkin...), it is necessary to have good knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the envelope regarding to the flight level and the lifespan of the balloon. It appears during the working stages of the super pressure balloons that these last can exploded prematurely in the course of the first hours of flight. For this reason CNES and LGP are carrying out research programs about experimentations and modelling in order to predict a good stability of the balloons flight and guarantee a life time in adequacy with the technical requirement. This study deals with multilayered polymeric film damage which induce balloons failure. These experimental and numerical study aims, are a better understanding and predicting of the damage mechanisms bringing the premature explosion of balloons. The following damages phenomena have different origins. The firsts are simple and triple wrinkles owed during the process and the stocking stages of the balloons. The second damage phenomenon is associated to the creep of the polymeric film during the flight of the balloon. The first experimental results we present in this paper, concern the mechanical characterization of three different damage phenomena. The severe damage induced by the wrinkles of the film involves a significant loss of mechanical properties. In a second part the theoretical study, concerns the choice and the development of a non linear viscoelastic coupled damage behavior model in a finite element code.

  4. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel. PMID:27294283

  5. Multiscale Modeling of Nano-scale Phenomena: Towards a Multiphysics Simulation Capability for Design and Optimization of Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; McElfresh, M; Lee, C; Balhorn, R; White, D

    2003-12-01

    In this white paper, a road map is presented to establish a multiphysics simulation capability for the design and optimization of sensor systems that incorporate nanomaterials and technologies. The Engineering Directorate's solid/fluid mechanics and electromagnetic computer codes will play an important role in both multiscale modeling and integration of required physics issues to achieve a baseline simulation capability. Molecular dynamic simulations performed primarily in the BBRP, CMS and PAT directorates, will provide information for the construction of multiscale models. All of the theoretical developments will require closely coupled experimental work to develop material models and validate simulations. The plan is synergistic and complimentary with the Laboratory's emerging core competency of multiscale modeling. The first application of the multiphysics computer code is the simulation of a ''simple'' biological system (protein recognition utilizing synthesized ligands) that has a broad range of applications including detection of biological threats, presymptomatic detection of illnesses, and drug therapy. While the overall goal is to establish a simulation capability, the near-term work is mainly focused on (1) multiscale modeling, i.e., the development of ''continuum'' representations of nanostructures based on information from molecular dynamics simulations and (2) experiments for model development and validation. A list of LDRDER proposals and ongoing projects that could be coordinated to achieve these near-term objectives and demonstrate the feasibility and utility of a multiphysics simulation capability is given.

  6. A Coupled Damage and Reaction Model for Simulating Energetic Material Response to Impact Hazards

    SciTech Connect

    BAER,MELVIN R.; DRUMHELLER,D.S.; MATHESON,E.R.

    1999-09-01

    The Baer-Nunziato multiphase reactive theory for a granulated bed of energetic material is extended to allow for dynamic damage processes, that generate new surfaces as well as porosity. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is employed to constrain the constitutive forms of the mass, momentum, and energy exchange functions as well as those for the mechanical damage model ensuring that the models will be dissipative. The focus here is on the constitutive forms of the exchange functions. The mechanical constitutive modeling is discussed in a companion paper. The mechanical damage model provides dynamic surface area and porosity information needed by the exchange functions to compute combustion rates and interphase momentum and energy exchange rates. The models are implemented in the CTH shock physics code and used to simulate delayed detonations due to impacts in a bed of granulated energetic material and an undamaged cylindrical sample.

  7. Calculation of Forming Limits for Sheet Metal using an Enhanced Continuous Damage Fracture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Trung; Kim, Dae-Young; Kim, Heon Young

    2011-08-01

    An enhanced continuous damage fracture model was introduced in this paper to calculate forming limits of sheet metal. The fracture model is a combination of a fracture criterion and a continuum damage constitutive law. A modified McClintock void growth fracture criterion was incorporated with a coupled damage-plasticity Gurson-type constitutive law. Also, by introducing a Lode angle dependent parameter to define the loading asymmetry condition, the shear effect was phenomenologically taken into account. The proposed fracture model was implemented using user-subroutines in commercial finite element software. The model was calibrated and correlated by the uniaxial tension, shear and notched specimens tests. Application of the fracture model for the LDH tests was discussed and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data.

  8. Creep crack growth predictions in INCO 718 using a continuum damage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Wilson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Creep crack growth tests have been carried out in compact type specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). Theoretical creep crack growth predictions have been carried out by incorporating a unified viscoplastic constitutive model and a continuum damage model into the ARAQUS nonlinear finite element program. Material constants for both the viscoplastic model and the creep continuum damage model were determined from tests carried out on uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). A comparison of the theoretical creep crack growth rates obtained from the finite element predictions with the experimentally observed creep crack growth rates indicates that the viscoplastic/continuum damage model can be used to successfully predict creep crack growth in compact type specimens using material constants obtained from uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C).

  9. A numerical model for predicting crack path and modes of damage in unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G.; Tan, T. M.; Lau, A. C. W.; Awerbuch, J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-based numerical technique has been developed to simulate damage growth in unidirectional composites. This technique incorporates elastic-plastic analysis, micromechanics analysis, failure criteria, and a node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm to create crack surfaces. Any combination of fiber and matrix properties can be used. One of the salient features of this technique is that damage growth can be simulated without pre-specifying a crack path. In addition, multiple damage mechanisms in the forms of matrix cracking, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix debonding and plastic deformation are capable of occurring simultaneously. The prevailing failure mechanism and the damage (crack) growth direction are dictated by the instantaneous near-tip stress and strain fields. Once the failure mechanism and crack direction are determined, the crack is advanced via the node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm. Simulations of the damage growth process in center-slit boron/aluminum and silicon carbide/titanium unidirectional specimens were performed. The simulation results agreed quite well with the experimental observations.

  10. A creep-damage model for mesoscale simulations of concrete expansion-degradation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B; Le Pape, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Long-term performance of aging concrete in nuclear power plants (NPPs) requires a careful examination of the physical phenomena taking place in the material. Concrete under high neutron irradiation is subjected to large irreversible deformations as well as mechanical damage, caused by a swelling of the aggregates. However, these results, generally obtained in accelerated conditions in test reactors, cannot be directly applied to NPP irradiated structures, i.e., the biological shield, operating conditions due to difference in time scale and environmental conditions (temperature, humidity). Mesoscale numerical simulations are performed to separate the underlying mechanisms and their interactions. The cement paste creep-damage model accounts for the effect of the loading rate on the apparent damage properties of the material and uses an event-based approach to capture the competition between creep and damage. The model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the literature and shows a good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  12. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-15

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  13. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  14. Integrating hydrodynamic models and COSMO-SkyMed derived products for flood damage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffra, Flavio; Boni, Giorgio; Pulvirenti, Luca; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Rudari, Roberto; Fiorini, Mattia

    2015-04-01

    Floods are the most frequent weather disasters in the world and probably the most costly in terms of social and economic losses. They may have a strong impact on infrastructures and health because the range of possible damages includes casualties, loss of housing and destruction of crops. Presently, the most common approach for remotely sensing floods is the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Key features of SAR data for inundation mapping are the synoptic view, the capability to operate even in cloudy conditions and during both day and night time and the sensitivity of the microwave radiation to water. The launch of a new generation of instruments, such as TerraSAR-X and COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) allows producing near real time flood maps having a spatial resolution in the order of 1-5 m. Moreover, the present (CSK) and upcoming (Sentinel-1) constellations permit the acquisition of radar data characterized by a short revisit time (in the order of some hours for CSK), so that the production of frequent inundation maps can be envisaged. Nonetheless, gaps might be present in the SAR-derived flood maps because of the limited area imaged by SAR; moreover, the detection of floodwater may be complicated by the presence of very dense vegetation or urban settlements. Hence the need to complement SAR-derived flood maps with the outputs of physical models. Physical models allow delivering to end users very useful information for a complete flood damage assessment, such as data on water depths and flow directions, which cannot be directly derived from satellite remote sensing images. In addition, the flood extent predictions of hydraulic models can be compared to SAR-derived inundation maps to calibrate the models, or to fill the aforementioned gaps that can be present in the SAR-derived maps. Finally, physical models enable the construction of risk scenarios useful for emergency managers to take their decisions and for programming additional SAR acquisitions in order to

  15. An Assessment of Radiation Damage Models and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Mansur, Louis K

    2005-05-01

    The current state of development of the primary models used for investigating and simulating irradiation effects in structural alloys of interest to the U.S. DOE's Generation-IV reactor program are discussed. The underlying theory that supports model development is also described where appropriate. First, the key processes that underlie radiation-induced changes in material properties are summarized, and the types of radiation effects that subsequently arise are described. Future development work needed in order for theory, modeling, and computational materials science to support and add value to the Gen IV reactor materials program are then outlined. The expected specific outcomes and overall benefits of the required effort are: the knowledge to extrapolate material behavior to conditions for which there are no experimental data; systematic understanding of mechanisms and processes to enable confident interpolation between point-by-point experimental observations; acceleration of the development, selection, and qualification of materials for reactor service; and prediction of material response to real-world operating load histories which often involve a complicated superposition of time, temperature, radiation dose rate, and mechanical loading conditions. Opportunities for international collaboration to accelerate progress in all of the required research areas are briefly discussed, particularly in the context of two well coordinated, broad-based research projects on modeling and simulation of radiation effects on materials that are currently funded in Europe. In addition to providing the opportunity for substantial leveraging of the DOE-funded activities in this area, these projects may serve as models for future development within the Gen-IV program. The larger of these two projects, which involves 12 European research laboratories and 16 universities, is called PERFECT and is funded by the European Union. A smaller effort focusing on developing predictive

  16. Fatigue damage modeling for coated single crystal superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, David M.

    1988-01-01

    A high temperature, low-cycle fatigue life prediction method for coated single crystal nickel-base superalloys is being developed. The method is being developed for use in predicting crack initiation life of coated single crystal turbine airfoils. Although the models are being developed using coated single crystal PWA 1480, they should be readily adaptable to other coated nickel-base single crystal materials. The coatings choosen for this effort were of two generic types: a low pressure plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY overlay, designated PWA 286, and an aluminide diffusion, designated PWA 273. In order to predict the useful crack initiation life of airfoils, the constitutive and failure behavior of the coating/substrate combination must be taken into account. Coatings alter the airfoil surface microstructure and are a primary source from which cracks originate. The adopted life prediction approach addresses this complexity by separating the coating and single crystal crack initiation regimes. This provides a flexible means for using different life model formulations for the coating and single crystal materials. At the completion of this program, all constitutive and life model formulations will be available in equation form and as software. The software will use the MARC general purpose finite element code to drive the constitutive models and calculate life parameters.

  17. Mathematical models for estimating earthquake casualties and damage cost through regression analysis using matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop mathematical models for estimating earthquake casualties such as death, number of injured persons, affected families and total cost of damage. To quantify the direct damages from earthquakes to human beings and properties given the magnitude, intensity, depth of focus, location of epicentre and time duration, the regression models were made. The researchers formulated models through regression analysis using matrices and used α = 0.01. The study considered thirty destructive earthquakes that hit the Philippines from the inclusive years 1968 to 2012. Relevant data about these said earthquakes were obtained from Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. Data on damages and casualties were gathered from the records of National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. The mathematical models made are as follows: This study will be of great value in emergency planning, initiating and updating programs for earthquake hazard reductionin the Philippines, which is an earthquake-prone country.

  18. An anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete at transient elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Baker, Graham; de Borst, René

    2005-11-15

    The behaviour of concrete at elevated temperatures is important for an assessment of integrity (strength and durability) of structures exposed to a high-temperature environment, in applications such as fire exposure, smelting plants and nuclear installations. In modelling terms, a coupled thermomechanical analysis represents a generalization of the computational mechanics of fracture and damage. Here, we develop a fully coupled anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete under high stress and transient temperature, with emphasis on the adherence of the model to the laws of thermodynamics. Specific analytical results are given, deduced from thermodynamics, of a novel interpretation on specific heat, evolution of entropy and the identification of the complete anisotropic, thermomechanical damage surface. The model is also shown to be stable in a computational sense, and to satisfy the laws of thermodynamics. PMID:16243703

  19. A model for predicting damage dependent response of inelastic media with microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.H.; DeVries, K.L.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a model developed for predicting the mechanical response of inelastic media with heterogeneous microstructure. Particular emphasis is given to the development of microstructural damage along grains. The model is developed within the concepts of continuum mechanics, with special emphasis on the development of internal boundaries in the continuum by utilizing fracture mechanics-based cohesive zone models. In addition, the grains are assumed to be characterized by nonlinear viscoplastic material behavior. Implementation of the model to a finite element computational algorithm is also briefly described, and example solutions are obtained. Finally, homogenization procedures are discussed for obtaining macroscopic damage dependent mechanical constitutive equations that may then be utilized to construct a well-posed boundary value problem for the macroscopically homogenized damage dependent medium.

  20. Statistical model for economic damage from pluvial flood in Japan using rainfall data and socio-economic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Yoshimura, K.; Seto, S.; Nakamura, S.; Oki, T.

    2015-10-01

    The assessment of flood risk is important for policy makers to evaluate damage and for disaster preparation. Large population densities and high property concentration make cities more vulnerable to floods and having higher absolute damage per year. A number of major cities in the world suffer from flood inundation damage every year. In Japan, approximately JPY 100 billion in damage occurs annually due to pluvial flood only. The amount of damage was typically large in large cities, but regions with lower population density tended to have more damage per capita. Our statistical approach gives the probability of damage following every daily rainfall event and thereby the annual damage as a function of rainfall, population density, topographical slope, and gross domestic product. Our results for Japan show reasonable agreement with area-averaged annual damage for the period 1993-2009. We report a damage occurrence probability function and a damage cost function for pluvial flood damage, which makes this method flexible for use in future scenarios and also capable of being expanded to different regions.

  1. Differential continuum damage mechanics models for creep and fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three multiaxial isothermal continuum damage mechanics models for creep, fatigue, and creep/fatigue interaction of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element are presented, only one of which will be discussed in depth. Each model is phenomenological and stress based, with varying degrees of complexity to accurately predict the initiation and propagation of intergranular and transgranular defects over a wide range of loading conditions. The development of these models is founded on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, static fracture surface, normalized stress amplitude function and isochronous creep damage failure surface, from which both fatigue and creep damage evolutionary laws can be obtained. The anisotropy of each model is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. All three transversely isotropic models have been shown, when taken to their isotropic limit, to directly simplify to previously developed and validated creep and fatigue continuum damage theories. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation when attempting to characterize a large class of composite materials, and (2) its ability to predict anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Additionally, the potential for the inclusion of various micromechanical effects (e.g., fiber/matrix bond strength, fiber volume fraction, etc.), into the phenomenological anisotropic parameters is noted, as well as a detailed discussion regarding the necessary exploratory and characterization experiments needed to utilize the featured damage theories.

  2. Damage and Plastic Deformation Modeling of Beishan Granite Under Compressive Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, J. F.; Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Jia, Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Based on experimental investigations, we propose a coupled elastoplastic damage model to simulate the mechanical behavior of granite under compressive stress conditions. The granite is taken from the Beishan area, a preferable region for China's high-level radioactive waste repository. Using a 3D acoustic emission monitoring system in mechanical tests, we focus on the cracking process and its influence on the macroscopic mechanical behavior of the granite samples. It is verified that the crack propagation coupled with fractional sliding along the cracks is the principal mechanism controlling the failure process and nonlinear mechanical behavior of granite under compressive stress conditions. Based on this understanding, the coupled elastoplastic damage model is formulated in the framework of the thermodynamics theory. In the model, the coupling between damage and plastic deformation is simulated by introducing the independent damage variable in the plastic yield surface. As a preliminary validation of the model, a series of numerical simulations are performed for compressive tests conducted under different confining pressures. Comparisons between the numerical and simulated results show that the proposed model can reproduce the main features of the mechanical behavior of Beishan granite, particularly the damage evolution under compressive stress conditions.

  3. A bone remodelling model including the effect of damage on the steering of BMUs.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Reina, J; Reina, I; Domínguez, J; García-Aznar, J M

    2014-04-01

    Bone remodelling in cortical bone is performed by the so-called basic multicellular units (BMUs), which produce osteons after completing the remodelling sequence. Burger et al. (2003) hypothesized that BMUs follow the direction of the prevalent local stress in the bone. More recently, Martin (2007) has shown that BMUs must be somehow guided by microstructural damage as well. The interaction of both variables, strain and damage, in the guidance of BMUs has been incorporated into a bone remodelling model for cortical bone. This model accounts for variations in porosity, anisotropy and damage level. The bone remodelling model has been applied to a finite element model of the diaphysis of a human femur. The trajectories of the BMUs have been analysed throughout the diaphysis and compared with the orientation of osteons measured experimentally. Some interesting observations, like the typical fan arrangement of osteons near the periosteum, can be explained with the proposed remodelling model. Moreover, the efficiency of BMUs in damage repairing has been shown to be greater if BMUs are guided by damage.

  4. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Lin; Rang, Camilla Ulla; Proenca, Audrey Menegaz; Chao, Jasper Ubirajara

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother's old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother's old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington's genetic assimilation

  5. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Lin; Rang, Camilla Ulla; Proenca, Audrey Menegaz; Chao, Jasper Ubirajara

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother’s old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother’s old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington’s genetic

  6. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS PLUS IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING OF DAMAGED LX-04 CHARGES

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. The LX-04 charges were damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermal damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for a long enough time for the beta to delta phase transition to occur and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while the thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. The pristine LX-04 Ignition and Growth model, modified only by igniting a larger amount of explosive during shock compression based on the damaged charge density, accurately calculated the increased shock sensitivity of the three damaged charges.

  7. Model-Trained Neural Networks and Electronic Holography Demonstrated to Detect Damage in Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Fite, E. Brian; Mehmed, Oral; Thorp, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    Detect Damage in Blades Electronic holography can show damaged regions in fan blades at 30 frames/sec. The electronic holograms are transformed by finite-element-model-trained artificial neural networks to visualize the damage. The trained neural networks are linked with video and graphics to visualize the bending-induced strain distribution, which is very sensitive to damage. By contrast, it is very difficult to detect damage by viewing the raw, speckled, characteristic fringe patterns. For neural-network visualization of damage, 2 frames or 2 fields are used, rather than the 12 frames normally used to compute the displacement distribution from electronic holograms. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, finite element models are used to compute displacement and strain distributions for the vibration modes of undamaged and cracked blades. A model of electronic time-averaged holography is used to transform the displacement distributions into finite-element-resolution characteristic fringe patterns. Then, a feedforward neural network is trained with the fringe-pattern/strain-pattern pairs, and the neural network, electronic holography, and video are implemented on a workstation. Now that the neural networks have been tested successfully at 30 frames/sec on undamaged and cracked cantilevers, the electronic holography and neural-network processing are being adapted for onsite damage inspection of twisted fan blades and rotormounted blades. Our conclusion is that model-trained neural nets are effective when they are trained with good models whose application is well understood. This work supports the aeromechanical testing portion of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Project.

  8. Damage Prediction Models for Advanced Materials and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Ming; Ahmad, Jalees; Grady, Joseph E. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the assessment and evaluation of various acoustic tile designs were conducted using three-dimensional finite element analysis, which included static analysis, thermal analysis and modal analysis of integral and non-integral tile design options. Various benchmark specimens for acoustic tile designs, including CMC integral T-joint and notched CMC plate, were tested in both room and elevated temperature environment. Various candidate ceramic matrix composite materials were used in the numerical modeling and experimental study. The research effort in this program evolved from numerical modeling and concept design to a combined numerical analysis and experimental study. Many subjects associated with the design and performance of the acoustic tile in jet engine exhaust nozzle have been investigated.

  9. The Design and Implementation of a Model Evaluation Capability. 1975-76 Final Report. Title III Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    The Austin Independent School District received an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title III grant in 1973 to develop an internal research and evaluation capability. Funding was provided the resulting Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) for three years. The foci of the original grant were (1) to develop a district evaluation model, (2)…

  10. Implementation of the TEPLA Damage Model in a 3D Eulerian Hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holian, Kathleen S.; Clancy, Sean P.; Maudlin, Paul J.

    2007-06-01

    A sophisticated damage model (TEPLA) has been implemented into a three-dimensional (Cartesian) computer code (Pagosa) used here at Los Alamos National Laboratory. TEPLA was originally an isotropic damage model based upon the Gurson flow surface (a potential function used in conjunction with the associated flow law) that models damage due to both porosity growth and plastic strain. It has since been modified to model anisotropic elastoplastic material strength as well. Pagosa is an Eulerian hydrodynamics code that has the following special features: a predictor-corrector Lagrangian step that advances the state variables in time, a high-order advection algorithm that remaps the problem back to the original mesh every time step, and a material interface tracking scheme with van Leer monotonic advection. It also includes a variety of equation of state, strength, fracture, and high explosive burn models. We will describe the physics of the TEPLA model (that models both strength and damage) and will show preliminary results of test problems that are used to validate the model. The four test problems (simple shear, stretching rod, Taylor anvil, and plate impact) can be compared with either analytic solutions or with experimental data.

  11. Experimental Verification of a Progressive Damage Model for IM7/5260 Laminates Subjected to Tension-Tension Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    The durability and damage tolerance of laminated composites are critical design considerations for airframe composite structures. Therefore, the ability to model damage initiation and growth and predict the life of laminated composites is necessary to achieve structurally efficient and economical designs. The purpose of this research is to experimentally verify the application of a continuum damage model to predict progressive damage development in a toughened material system. Damage due to monotonic and tension-tension fatigue was documented for IM7/5260 graphite/bismaleimide laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables to predict stiffness loss in unnotched laminates. A damage dependent finite element code predicted the stiffness loss for notched laminates with good agreement to experimental data. It was concluded that the continuum damage model can adequately predict matrix damage progression in notched and unnotched laminates as a function of loading history and laminate stacking sequence.

  12. Kinetic Modeling of the X-ray-induced Damage to a Metalloprotein

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Katherine M.; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that biological samples undergo x-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring x-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of x-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC MnIII/IV ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of x-ray-induced damage at variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of x-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of damage deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and x-ray FEL sources. PMID:23815809

  13. Damage In Rock Massives, Evidences From Microseismic Monitoring and Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitrano, D.; Gruber, S.; Girard, L.

    2014-12-01

    Damage is an active process in rock massives that can progressively lead to their collapse. Microseismic monitoring appears as a powerful tool for detecting damage and identifying the parameters controlling its occurrence parameter. In this presentation, we first present results of seismic monitoring performed on different sites and highlighting different control parameters, including freezing/thawing cycling, long term creeping, rainfall. These observations reveal common features as power-law distribution of the seismic event size and of their temporal distribution. The evolution of these distributions can be used for forecasting the failure, as successfully tested on a cliff that undergone macroscopic failure. In a second part we present numerical modelling of damage that successfully reproduce the major part of the in-situ observations. The simulations based on short or long term damage and taking into account the action of fluids, have been applied to realistic cases and show promising results in good agreements with field observation.

  14. Interpretation of the Superpave IDT strength test using a viscoelastic-damage constitutive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onifade, Ibrahim; Balieu, Romain; Birgisson, Bjorn

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new interpretation for the Superpave IDT strength test based on a viscoelastic-damage framework. The framework is based on continuum damage mechanics and the thermodynamics of irreversible processes with an anisotropic damage representation. The new approach introduces considerations for the viscoelastic effects and the damage accumulation that accompanies the fracture process in the interpretation of the Superpave IDT strength test for the identification of the Dissipated Creep Strain Energy (DCSE) limit from the test result. The viscoelastic model is implemented in a Finite Element Method (FEM) program for the simulation of the Superpave IDT strength test. The DCSE values obtained using the new approach is compared with the values obtained using the conventional approach to evaluate the validity of the assumptions made in the conventional interpretation of the test results. The result shows that the conventional approach over-estimates the DCSE value with increasing estimation error at higher deformation rates.

  15. Integrating Machine Learning into a Crowdsourced Model for Earthquake-Induced Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Oommen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    On January 12th, 2010, a catastrophic 7.0M earthquake devastated the country of Haiti. In the aftermath of an earthquake, it is important to rapidly assess damaged areas in order to mobilize the appropriate resources. The Haiti damage assessment effort introduced a promising model that uses crowdsourcing to map damaged areas in freely available remotely-sensed data. This paper proposes the application of machine learning methods to improve this model. Specifically, we apply work on learning from multiple, imperfect experts to the assessment of volunteer reliability, and propose the use of image segmentation to automate the detection of damaged areas. We wrap both tasks in an active learning framework in order to shift volunteer effort from mapping a full catalog of images to the generation of high-quality training data. We hypothesize that the integration of machine learning into this model improves its reliability, maintains the speed of damage assessment, and allows the model to scale to higher data volumes.

  16. Multiscale Modeling and Analysis of an Ultra-Precision Damage Free Machining Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Chaoliang; Peng, Wenqiang

    2016-06-01

    Under the condition of high laser flux, laser induced damage of optical element does not occur is the key to success of laser fusion ignition system. US government survey showed that the processing defects caused the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) to decrease is one of the three major challenges. Cracks and scratches caused by brittle and plastic removal machining are fatal flaws. Using hydrodynamic effect polishing method can obtain damage free surface on quartz glass. The material removal mechanism of this typical ultra-precision machining process was modeled in multiscale. In atomic scale, chemical modeling illustrated the weakening and breaking of chemical bond energy. In particle scale, micro contact modeling given the elastic remove mode boundary of materials. In slurry scale, hydrodynamic flow modeling showed the dynamic pressure and shear stress distribution which are relations with machining effect. Experiment was conducted on a numerically controlled system, and one quartz glass optical component was polished in the elastic mode. Results show that the damages are removed away layer by layer as the removal depth increases due to the high damage free machining ability of the HEP. And the LIDT of sample was greatly improved.

  17. Re-assessment of chronic radio-induced tissue damage in a rat hindlimb model

    PubMed Central

    PHULPIN, BÉRENGÈRE; DOLIVET, GILLES; MARIE, PIERRE-YVES; POUSSIER, SYLVAIN; GALLET, PATRICE; LEROUX, AGNÈS; GRAFF, PIERRE; GROUBACH, FREDERIQUE; BRAVETTI, PIERRE; MERLIN, JEAN-LOUIS; TRAN, NGUYEN

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is successfully used to treat neoplastic lesions, but may adversely affect normal tissues within the irradiated volume. However, additional clinical and para-clinical data are required for a comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis of this damage. We assessed a rat model using clinical records and medical imaging to gain a better understanding of irradiation-induced tissue damage. The hindlimbs of the rats in this model were irradiated with a single dose of 30 or 50 Gy. Sequential analysis was based on observation records of stage and planar scintigraphy. Additional radiography, radiohistology and histology studies were performed to detect histological alterations. All animals developed acute and late effects, with an increased severity after a dose of 50 Gy. The bone uptake of 99mTc-HDP was significantly decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histologically, significant tissue damage was observed. After the 50 Gy irradiation, the animals developed lesions characteristic of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Radiographic and histological studies provided evidence of lytic bone lesions. Our rat model developed tissue damage characteristic of radiation injury after a single 30 Gy irradiation and tissue degeneration similar to that which occurs during human ORN after a 50 Gy irradiation. The development of this animal model is an essential step in exploring the pathogenesis of irradiation-induced tissue damage, and may be used to test the efficacy of new treatments. PMID:22993575

  18. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  19. Modelling of damage accumulation and failure of structural members subjected to strong seismic actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Oleg Vladimirovich

    2009-09-01

    Following the total Lagrangian approach, an incremental formulation for three-dimensional Timoshenko beam element taking into account large displacements and rotations is developed. For the failure analysis of reinforced concrete structural members, subjected to extreme loads, a new elastoplastic damage constitutive model is proposed on the level of cross-sectional variables. The model is based on the concept of the yield surface and associated flow rule. The effects of softening and strength deterioration are accounted for by the introduction of damage variables. To assure the objectivity of the numerical simulation a non-local treatment of damage variables is implemented. Comparison to different experimental results on biaxial cyclic tests is performed. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed model effectively reproduces softening, strength deterioration, coupling between different components of the generalized force vector and other nonlinear effects accompanying the inelastic structural response under three-dimensional seismic loading.

  20. Prediction of anisotropic behavior of nano/micro composite based on damage mechanics with cell modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dock-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Moon-Ki; Choi, Jae-Boong; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Liu, Wing Kam

    2011-01-01

    New advanced composite materials have recently been of great interest. Especially, many researchers have studied on nano/micro composites based on matrix filled with nano-particles, nano-tubes, nano-wires and so forth, which have outstanding characteristics on thermal, electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical properties. Therefore, the need of numerical approach for design and development of the advanced materials has been recognized. In this paper, finite element analysis based on multi-resolution continuum theory is carried out to predict the anisotropic behavior of nano/micro composites based on damage mechanics with a cell modeling. The cell modeling systematically evaluates constitutive relationships from microstructure of the composite material. Effects of plastic anisotropy on deformation behavior and damage evolution of nano/micro composite are investigated by using Hill's 48 yield function and also compared with those obtained from Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman isotropic damage model based on von Mises yield function.

  1. Comprehensive review of modeling of impact damage in ceramics. Final technical report, March-October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, A.M.; Cook, W.H.

    1988-12-01

    This report reviews high-strain-rate experimental and analytical methods available for characterizing ceramic-material behavior. Also, a discussion on the ceramic failure mechanisms upon impact-loading conditions is provided. Theoretical basis for constitutive and failure modeling of ceramic-type brittle material is discussed. Models that are reported in open literature are reviewed and categorized based on their theoretical approaches. The salient features of a few recently reported constitutive/damage theories, which combine either the micromechanics or the continuum-damage mechanics for the stress-strain relationship with fracture mechanics for damage-accumulation description, are described and tabulated. Recent attempts to employ such models in the calculation of armor-penetration problems are briefly discussed.

  2. Modeling femtosecond pulse laser damage using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass; Chowdhury, Enam

    2014-12-01

    We present, to our knowledge, the first adaptation of the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method for use in the study of femtosecond pulse laser damage, including the first implementation of the Morse pair-potential for PIC codes. We compare the PIC method to a wide variety of currently used modeling schemes, ranging from purely ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to semi-empirical models with many fitting parameters and show how PIC simulations can provide a complementary approach by filling the gap in theoretical methodology between the two cases. We detail the necessity and implementation of an interatomic pair-potential in PIC studies of laser damage. Finally, we use our model to treat the full laser damage process of a copper target and show that our results compare well to simple scaling laws for crater size.

  3. Modeling femtosecond pulse laser damage on conductors using Particle-In-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass; Chowdhury, Enam

    2013-11-01

    We present, to our knowledge, the first adaptation of the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation method for use in the study of femtosecond pulse laser damage, including the first implementation of the Morse potential for PIC codes. We compare the PIC method to a wide variety of currently used modeling schemes, ranging from purely ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations to semi-empirical models with many fitting parameters, and show how PIC simulations can provide a complementary approach by filling the gap in theoretical methodology between the two cases. We detail the necessity and implementation of an inter-atomic pair-potential in PIC studies of laser damage. Lastly, we use our model to treat the full laser damage process of a copper target, and show that our results compare well to simple scaling laws for crater size.

  4. A methodology for incorporating geomechanically-based fault damage zones models into reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Pijush Kanti

    In the fault damage zone modeling study for a field in the Timor Sea, I present a methodology to incorporate geomechanically-based fault damage zones into reservoir simulation. In the studied field, production history suggests that the mismatch between actual production and model prediction is due to preferential fluid flow through the damage zones associated with the reservoir scale faults, which is not included in the baseline petrophysical model. I analyzed well data to estimate stress heterogeneity and fracture distributions in the reservoir. Image logs show that stress orientations are homogenous at the field scale with a strike-slip/normal faulting stress regime and maximum horizontal stress oriented in NE-SW direction. Observed fracture zones in wells are mostly associated with well scale fault and bed boundaries. These zones do not show any anomalies in production logs or well test data, because most of the fractures are not optimally oriented to the present day stress state, and matrix permeability is high enough to mask any small anomalies from the fracture zones. However, I found that fracture density increases towards the reservoir scale faults, indicating high fracture density zones or damage zones close to these faults, which is consistent with the preferred flow direction indicated by interference and tracer test done between the wells. It is well known from geologic studies that there is a concentration of secondary fractures and faults in a damage zone adjacent to larger faults. Because there is usually inadequate data to incorporate damage zone fractures and faults into reservoir simulation models, in this study I utilized the principles of dynamic rupture propagation from earthquake seismology to predict the nature of fractured/damage zones associated with reservoir scale faults. The implemented workflow can be used to more routinely incorporate damage zones into reservoir simulation models. Applying this methodology to a real reservoir utilizing

  5. Forming limits in the hole-flanging process by coupled and uncoupled damage models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacem, A.; Jégat, A.; Krichen, A.; Manach, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to identify the limits of the hole-flanging process under different conditions. A 3D finite element model was developed to predict failure in hole-flanging process for sheet aluminium alloys. The Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) coupled damage model and the Bao-Wierzbicki (BW) uncoupled damage model were used. The parameters of both coupled and uncoupled models were identified by inverse analysis based on uniaxial tensile test. Experiments were conducted to analyse the types of failure that appear during the process. Numerical results were compared with experimental datas to check the validity of both models in predicting failure during the hole-flanging process. The comparative study showed that the GTN model predicts more accurately almost all types of failure while fracture occurrence can be only predicted by the BW model.

  6. Evaluation of prediction capability, robustness, and sensitivity in non-linear landslide susceptibility models, Guantánamo, Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchiorre, C.; Castellanos Abella, E. A.; van Westen, C. J.; Matteucci, M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes a procedure for landslide susceptibility assessment based on artificial neural networks, and focuses on the estimation of the prediction capability, robustness, and sensitivity of susceptibility models. The study is carried out in the Guantanamo Province of Cuba, where 186 landslides were mapped using photo-interpretation. Twelve conditioning factors were mapped including geomorphology, geology, soils, landuse, slope angle, slope direction, internal relief, drainage density, distance from roads and faults, rainfall intensity, and ground peak acceleration. A methodology was used that subdivided the database in 3 subsets. A training set was used for updating the weights. A validation set was used to stop the training procedure when the network started losing generalization capability, and a test set was used to calculate the performance of the network. A 10-fold cross-validation was performed in order to show that the results are repeatable. The prediction capability, the robustness analysis, and the sensitivity analysis were tested on 10 mutually exclusive datasets. The results show that by means of artificial neural networks it is possible to obtain models with high prediction capability and high robustness, and that an exploration of the effect of the individual variables is possible, even if they are considered as a black-box model.

  7. Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

    2008-02-11

    In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

  8. Use of Displacement Damage Dose in an Engineering Model of GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, T. L.; Chock, R.; Long, K. J.; Bailey, S.; Messenger, S. R.; Walters, R. J.; Summers, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    Current methods for calculating damage to solar cells are well documented in the GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook (JPL 96-9). An alternative, the displacement damage dose (D(sub d)) method, has been developed by Summers, et al. This method is currently being implemented in the SAVANT computer program.

  9. Deformation-induced damage and recovery in model hydrogels - A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidek, Jan; Milchev, Andrey; Jancar, Josef; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation of a model hybrid cross-link hydrogel, we investigate the network damage evolution and the related structure transformations. We model the hydrogel structure as a network-connected assembly of crosslinked clusters whereby deformation-induced damage is considered along with network recovery. The two principal mechanisms involved in hydrogel recovery from deformation include segment hops of the building structure units (segments) between clusters and cluster shape modification. These mechanisms act either instantaneously, or with a certain time delay after the onset of deformation. By elucidating the conditions under which one of the mechanisms prevails, one may design hydrogel materials with a desired response to deformation.

  10. Evaluation of Progressive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Impact Damage in Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is leading an evaluation effort in advanced destructive and nondestructive testing of composite pressure vessels and structures. WSTF is using progressive finite element analysis methods for test design and for confirmation of composite pressure vessel performance. Using composite finite element analysis models and failure theories tested in the World-Wide Failure Exercise, WSTF is able to estimate the static strength of composite pressure vessels. Additionally, test and evaluation on composites that have been impact damaged is in progress so that models can be developed to estimate damage tolerance and the degradation in static strength.

  11. Regolith modeling and its relation to earthquake induced building damage: A remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafique, Muhammad; van der Meijde, Mark; Ullah, Saleem

    2011-07-01

    Regolith thickness is known as a major factor in influencing the intensity of earthquake induced ground shaking and consequently building damages. It is, however, often simplified or ignored due to its variable and complex nature. To evaluate the role of regolith thickness on earthquake induced building damage, a remote sensing based methodology is developed to model the spatial variation of regolith thickness, based on DEM derived topographic attributes and geology. Regolith thickness samples were evenly collected in geological formations at representative sites of topographic attributes. Topographic attributes (elevation, slope, TWI, distance from stream) computed from the ASTER derived DEM and a geology map were used to explore their role in spatial variation of regolith thickness. Stepwise regression was used to model the spatial variation of regolith thickness in erosional landscape of the study area. Topographic attributes and geology, explain 60% of regolith thickness variation in the study area. To test, if the modeled regolith can be used for prediction of seismic induced building damages, it is compared with the 2005 Kashmir earthquake induced building damages derived from high resolution remote sensing images and field data. The comparison shows that the structural damages increase with increasing regolith thickness. The predicted regolith thickness can be used for demarcating site prone to amplified seismic response.

  12. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    SciTech Connect

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  13. Evaluation of Creep-Fatigue Damage Based on Simplified Model Test Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Tianlei; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2013-01-01

    Current methods used in the ASME Code, Subsection NH for the evaluation of creep-fatigue damage are based on the separation of elevated temperature cyclic damage into two parts, creep damage and fatigue damage. This presents difficulties in both evaluation of test data and determination of cyclic damage in design. To avoid these difficulties, an alternative approach was identified, called the Simplified Model Test or SMT approach based on the use of creep-fatigue hold time test data from test specimens with elastic follow-up conservatively designed to bound the response of general structural components of interest. A key feature of the methodology is the use of the results of elastic analysis directly in design evaluation similar to current methods in the ASME Code, Subsection NB. Although originally developed for current material included in Subsection NH, recent interest in the application of Alloy 617 for components operating at very high temperatures has caused renewed interest in the SMT approach because it provides an alternative to the proposed restriction on the use of current Subsection NH simplified methods at very high temperatures. A comprehensive review and assessment of five representative simplified methods for creep-fatigue damage evaluation is presented in Asayama [1]. In this review the SMT methodology was identified as the best long term approach but the need for test data precluded its near term implementation. Asayama and Jetter [2] is a summary of the more comprehensive report by Asayama [1] with a summary of the SMT approach presented by Jetter [3].

  14. Three-Dimensional Characterization and Modeling of Microstructural Weak Links for Spall Damage in FCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Kapil; Brown, Andrew; Wayne, Leda; Vo, Johnathan; Opie, Saul; Lim, Harn; Peralta, Pedro; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Byler, Darrin; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Koskelo, Aaron; Dickerson, Robert

    2014-11-25

    Local microstructural weak links for spall damage were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) characterization in multicrystalline copper samples (grain size ≈ 450 µm) shocked with laser-driven plates at low pressures (2 to 4 GPa). The thickness of samples and flyer plates, approximately 1000 and 500 µm respectively, led to short pressure pulses that allowed isolating microstructure effects on local damage characteristics. Electron Backscattering Diffraction and optical microscopy were used to relate the presence, size, and shape of porosity to local microstructure. The experiments were complemented with 3-D finite element simulations of individual grain boundaries (GBs) that resulted in large damage volumes using crystal plasticity coupled with a void nucleation and growth model. Results from analysis of these damage sites show that the presence of a GB-affected zone, where strain concentration occurs next to a GB, correlates strongly with damage localization at these sites, most likely due to the inability of maintaining strain compatibility across these interfaces, with additional effects due to the inclination of the GB with respect to the shock. Results indicate that strain compatibility plays an important role on intergranular spall damage in metallic materials.

  15. Three-Dimensional Characterization and Modeling of Microstructural Weak Links for Spall Damage in FCC Metals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krishnan, Kapil; Brown, Andrew; Wayne, Leda; Vo, Johnathan; Opie, Saul; Lim, Harn; Peralta, Pedro; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Byler, Darrin; McClellan, Kenneth J.; et al

    2014-11-25

    Local microstructural weak links for spall damage were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) characterization in multicrystalline copper samples (grain size ≈ 450 µm) shocked with laser-driven plates at low pressures (2 to 4 GPa). The thickness of samples and flyer plates, approximately 1000 and 500 µm respectively, led to short pressure pulses that allowed isolating microstructure effects on local damage characteristics. Electron Backscattering Diffraction and optical microscopy were used to relate the presence, size, and shape of porosity to local microstructure. The experiments were complemented with 3-D finite element simulations of individual grain boundaries (GBs) that resulted in large damage volumesmore » using crystal plasticity coupled with a void nucleation and growth model. Results from analysis of these damage sites show that the presence of a GB-affected zone, where strain concentration occurs next to a GB, correlates strongly with damage localization at these sites, most likely due to the inability of maintaining strain compatibility across these interfaces, with additional effects due to the inclination of the GB with respect to the shock. Results indicate that strain compatibility plays an important role on intergranular spall damage in metallic materials.« less

  16. Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

    2008-10-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

  17. Proposed damage evolution model for large-scale finite element modeling of the dual coolant US-ITER TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafat, S.; El-Awady, J.; Liu, S.; Diegele, E.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    2007-08-01

    Large-scale finite element modeling (FEM) of the US Dual Coolant Lead Lithium ITER Test Blanket Module including damage evolution is under development. A comprehensive rate-theory based radiation damage creep deformation code was integrated with the ABACUS FEM code. The advantage of this approach is that time-dependent in-reactor deformations and radiation damage can now be directly coupled with 'material properties' of FEM analyses. The coupled FEM-Creep damage model successfully simulated the simultaneous microstructure and stress evolution in small tensile test-bar structures. Applying the integrated Creep/FEM code to large structures is still computationally prohibitive. Instead, for thermo-structural analysis of the DCLL TBM structure the integrated FEM-creep damage model was used to develop true stress-strain behavior of F82H ferritic steel. Based on this integrated damage evolution-FEM approach it is proposed to use large-scale FEM analysis to identify and isolate critical stress areas for follow up analysis using detailed and fully integrated creep-FEM approach.

  18. A numerical modeling capability for the interplay between surface energy and elasticity in soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henann, David; Wang, Yuhao

    Surface energy is an important factor in the deformation of fluids but is typically a minimal or negligible effect in solids. However, when a solid is soft and its characteristic dimension is small, forces due to surface energy can become important and induce significant elastic deformation. The interplay between surface energy and elasticity can lead to interesting elasto-capillary phenomena. We have developed a finite-element formulation for problems involving these effects in both 2D and 3D settings and will demonstrate the simulation capability by examining two elasto-capillary problems. (1) The Rayleigh-Plateau instability in an elastic material - In a fluid, this instability causes fluid jets to break up into droplets; however, as shown in recent experiments (Mora et al., PRL, 2010), break-up is prohibited in an elastic material, resulting in a stable undulatory configuration. (2) The effect of fluid-filled droplet inclusions on a soft solid - When the matrix material is stiff, the presence of fluid-filled inclusions leads to a more compliant composite material; however, recent experiments (Style, et al., Nature Physics, 2014) have shown that when the matrix material is more compliant, the presence of droplets leads to stiffening. In this talk, we will show that our simulation capability predicts all experimentally observed phenomena and provides a straightforward route for describing nonlinear aspects of elasto-capillarity, which are difficult to address via analytics.

  19. Track structure model for damage to mammalian cell cultures during solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Katz, R.

    1992-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) occur infrequently and unpredictably, thus representing a potential hazard to interplanetary space missions. Biological damage from SPEs will be produced principally through secondary electron production in tissue, including important contributions due to delta rays from nuclear reaction products. We review methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of SPEs using a high energy proton model and the parametric cellular track model. Results of the model are presented for several of the historically largest flares using typical levels and body shielding.

  20. Rats anticipate damaged rungs on the elevated ladder: Applications for rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, Daniel; Caputo, Nicole; Damphousse, Chelsey; Pandey, Siyaram; Cohen, Jerome

    2015-03-01

    The present study examined rats' ability to anticipate undetectable wider gaps between rungs produced when they stepped on and dislodged damaged rungs while they traversed a slightly inclined elevated ladder. Rats in the first of three experiments reduced running speeds when they encountered four evenly spaced damaged rungs either always placed on the first or second half of the ladder (the break-a-way (BW) phase) but quickly recovered to their baseline (BL) levels when damaged rungs where replaced with intact rungs (the recovery phase). Rats previously exposed to damaged rungs over the first half of the ladder increased their speeds above BL on its second "safer" half during the recovery phase, a delayed "relief-like" positive contrast effect. In Experiment 2, other rats decreased their speeds more as they approached a single damaged rung at a fixed location when it occurred before than after the mid-point of the ladder. Although they quickly recovered to BL speeds on the portion of the ladder after the damaged rung or replaced intact rung, they never showed any "relief-like"/escape effects. Rats also reduced their likelihood of dislodging the damaged rung with a fore paw over extended BW training. In the third experiment rats encountered a more easily dislodged damaged rung that was signaled by a closer intact rung on half the trials. Under these conditions rats displayed a more reliable positive contrast "relief-like" effect. We discussed how traditional associative and cognitive theories of aversive conditioning account for these findings and their relationship to normal changes in dopamine production and possible effects of reduced production from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) in the Basal ganglia in rodent models of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25747570

  1. Damage evaluation by a guided wave-hidden Markov model based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Hanfei; Yuan, Shenfang; Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Jinjin

    2016-02-01

    Guided wave based structural health monitoring has shown great potential in aerospace applications. However, one of the key challenges of practical engineering applications is the accurate interpretation of the guided wave signals under time-varying environmental and operational conditions. This paper presents a guided wave-hidden Markov model based method to improve the damage evaluation reliability of real aircraft structures under time-varying conditions. In the proposed approach, an HMM based unweighted moving average trend estimation method, which can capture the trend of damage propagation from the posterior probability obtained by HMM modeling is used to achieve a probabilistic evaluation of the structural damage. To validate the developed method, experiments are performed on a hole-edge crack specimen under fatigue loading condition and a real aircraft wing spar under changing structural boundary conditions. Experimental results show the advantage of the proposed method.

  2. A simple nonlocal damage model for predicting failure of notched laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    The ability to predict failure loads in notched composite laminates is a requirement in a variety of structural design circumstances. A complicating factor is the development of a zone of damaged material around the notch tip. The objective of this study was to develop a computational technique that simulates progressive damage growth around a notch in a manner that allows the prediction of failure over a wide range of notch sizes. This was accomplished through the use of a relatively simple, nonlocal damage model that incorporates strain-softening. This model was implemented in a two-dimensional finite element program. Calculations were performed for two different laminates with various notch sizes under tensile loading, and the calculations were found to correlate well with experimental results.

  3. Micromechanical modeling of short glass-fiber reinforced thermoplastics-Isotropic damage of pseudograins

    SciTech Connect

    Kammoun, S.; Brassart, L.; Doghri, I.; Delannay, L.; Robert, G.

    2011-05-04

    A micromechanical damage modeling approach is presented to predict the overall elasto-plastic behavior and damage evolution in short fiber reinforced composite materials. The practical use of the approach is for injection molded thermoplastic parts reinforced with short glass fibers. The modeling is proceeded as follows. The representative volume element is decomposed into a set of pseudograins, the damage of which affects progressively the overall stiffness and strength up to total failure. Each pseudograin is a two-phase composite with aligned inclusions having same aspect ratio. A two-step mean-field homogenization procedure is adopted. In the first step, the pseudograins are homogenized individually according to the Mori-Tanaka scheme. The second step consists in a self-consistent homogenization of homogenized pseudograins. An isotropic damage model is applied at the pseudograin level. The model is implemented as a UMAT in the finite element code ABAQUS. Model is shown to reproduce the strength and the anisotropy (Lankford coefficient) during uniaxial tensile tests on samples cut under different directions relative to the injection flow direction.

  4. Damage-plasticity model of the host rock in a nuclear waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Kruis, Jaroslav

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes damage-plasticity model for the modelling of the host rock environment of a nuclear waste repository. Radioactive Waste Repository Authority in Czech Republic assumes the repository to be in a granite rock mass which exhibit anisotropic behaviour where the strength in tension is lower than in compression. In order to describe this phenomenon, the damage-plasticity model is formulated with the help of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion which can be set to capture the compression behaviour while the tensile stress states is described with the help of scalar isotropic damage model. The concept of damage-plasticity model was implemented in the SIFEL finite element code and consequently, the code was used for the simulation of the Äspö Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) which was performed in order to determine yielding strength under various conditions in similar granite rocks as in Czech Republic. The results from the performed analysis are presented and discussed in the paper.

  5. Copper damage modeling with the tensile hopkinson bar and gas gun

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D. L.; Thissell, W. R.; Trujillo, C. P.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile damage nucleation in recovered copper tensile Hopkinson bar specimens has been modeled using the 2D EPIC code. The model has also been successfully applied to spallation gas gun data to greatly expand the pressure range. The split tensile Hopkinson pressure bar permits the creation of damage at fairly high strain rates (10{sup 4}/s) with large plastic strains (100%). Careful momentum trapping allows incipient damage states to be arrested and recovered for metallurgical examination. The use of notched samples allows the pressure - flow stress, or triaxiality, to be varied from 1/3 to about 1.2 to study the interplay of pressure and deviatoric stress. In this paper, we will concentrate on modeling the nucleation of ductile damage in pure copper (Hitachi). With the same material, we also study spallation in a gas gun experiment to obtain the nucleation stress under high pressure and small plastic strain. The goal of the modeling is to obtain a unified nucleation model suitable for both.

  6. Damage-based long-term modelling of a large alpine rock slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Federico; Agliardi, Federico; Amitrano, David; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    The morphology and stability of large alpine rock slopes result from the long-term interplay of different factors, following a complex history spanning several glacial cycles over thousands of years in changing morpho-climatic settings. Large rock slopes often experience slow long-term, creep-like movements interpreted as the macroscopic evidence of progressive failure in subcritically stressed rock masses. Slope damage and rock mass weakening associated to deglaciation are considered major triggers of these processes in alpine environments. Depending on rock mass properties, slope topography and removed ice thickness, valley flanks can progressively evolve over time into rockslides showing seasonal displacement trends, interpreted as evidence of hydro-mechanically coupled responses to hydrologic perturbations. The processes linking the long-term evolution of deglaciated rock slopes and their changing sensitivity to hydrologic triggers until rockslide failure, with significant implications in risk management and Early Warning, are not fully understood. We suggest that modelling long-term rock mass damage under changing conditions may provide such a link. We simulated the evolution of the Spriana rock slope (Italian Central Alps). This is affected by a 50 Mm3 rockslide, significantly active since the late 19th century and characterized by massive geological and geotechnical investigations and monitoring during the last decades. Using an improved version of the 2D Finite-Element, damage-based brittle creep model proposed by Amitrano and Helmstetter (2006) and Lacroix and Amitrano (2013), we combined damage and time-to-failure laws to reproduce diffused damage, strain localization and the long-term creep deformation of the slope. The model was implemented for application to real slopes, by accounting for: 1) fractured rock mass properties upscaling based on site characterization data; 2) fluid pressures in a progressive failure context, relating fluid occurrence to

  7. Intraarterial administration of norcantharidin attenuates ischemic stroke damage in rodents when given at the time of reperfusion: novel uses of endovascular capabilities.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imad S; Odom, Mitchell; Ehtesham, Moneeb; Colvin, Daniel; Quarles, C Chad; McLaughlin, BethAnn; Singer, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) plays a critical role in infarct progression, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and vasogenic edema. While systemic administration of MMP-9 inhibitors has shown neuroprotective promise in ischemic stroke, there has been little effort to incorporate these drugs into endovascular modalities. By modifying the rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model to allow local intraarterial delivery of drugs, one has the ability to mimic endovascular delivery of therapeutics. Using this model, the authors sought to maximize the protective potential of MMP-9 inhibition by intraarterial administration of an MMP-9 inhibitor, norcantharidin (NCTD). METHODS Spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to 90-minute MCAO followed immediately by local intraarterial administration of NCTD. The rats' neurobehavioral performances were scored according to the ladder rung walking test results and the Garcia neurological test for as long as 7 days after stroke. MRI was also conducted 24 hours after the stroke to assess infarct volume and BBB disruption. At the end of the experimental protocol, rat brains were used for active MMP-9 immunohistochemical analysis to assess the degree of MMP-9 inhibition. RESULTS NCTD-treated rats showed significantly better neurobehavioral scores for all days tested. MR images also depicted significantly decreased infarct volumes and BBB disruption 24 hours after stroke. Inhibition of MMP-9 expression in the ischemic region was depicted on immunohistochemical analysis, wherein treated rats showed decreased active MMP-9 staining compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS Intraarterial NCTD significantly improved outcome when administered at the time of reperfusion in a spontaneously hypertensive rat stroke model. This study suggests that supplementing endovascular revascularization with local neuroprotective drug therapy may be a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:26544777

  8. Incorporation of Plasticity and Damage Into an Orthotropic Three-Dimensional Model with Tabulated Input Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blackenhorn, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites under impact conditions is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased usage in the aerospace and automotive industries. While there are several composite material models currently available within commercial transient dynamic finite element codes, several features have been identified as being lacking in the currently available material models that could substantially enhance the predictive capability of the impact simulations. A specific desired feature pertains to the incorporation of both plasticity and damage within the material model. Another desired feature relates to using experimentally based tabulated stress-strain input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to specifying discrete input properties (such as modulus and strength) and employing analytical functions to track the response of the material. To begin to address these needs, a combined plasticity and damage model suitable for use with both solid and shell elements is being developed for implementation within the commercial code LS-DYNA. The plasticity model is based on extending the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a strain-hardening based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The evolution of the yield surface is determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions and is tracked using the effective plastic strain. The effective plastic strain is computed by using the non-associative flow rule in combination with appropriate numerical methods. To compute the evolution of damage, a strain equivalent semi-coupled formulation is used, in which a load in one direction results in a stiffness reduction in multiple coordinate directions. A specific laminated composite is examined to demonstrate the process of characterizing and analyzing the response of a composite using the developed

  9. A matter of life or death: modeling DNA damage and repair in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Karschau, Jens; de Almeida, Camila; Richard, Morgiane C; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P S

    2011-02-16

    DNA damage is a hazard all cells must face, and evolution has created a number of mechanisms to repair damaged bases in the chromosome. Paradoxically, many of these repair mechanisms can create double-strand breaks in the DNA molecule which are fatal to the cell. This indicates that the connection between DNA repair and death is far from straightforward, and suggests that the repair mechanisms can be a double-edged sword. In this report, we formulate a mathematical model of the dynamics of DNA damage and repair, and we obtain analytical expressions for the death rate. We predict a counterintuitive relationship between survival and repair. We can discriminate between two phases: below a critical threshold in the number of repair enzymes, the half-life decreases with the number of repair enzymes, but becomes independent of the number of repair enzymes above the threshold. We are able to predict quantitatively the dependence of the death rate on the damage rate and other relevant parameters. We verify our analytical results by simulating the stochastic dynamics of DNA damage and repair. Finally, we also perform an experiment with Escherichia coli cells to test one of the predictions of our model. PMID:21320424

  10. Validation of a Model for Prediction of Host Damage by Two Nematode Species

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Larry W.; Ferris, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Plant roots were mechanically injured or subjected to nematode parasitism to test the model of host damage by two nematode species: y = m' + (l - m')c'z₁P₁₁z₂P₁₂ for y ≤ 1.0 and y = 1.0 for y > 1.0, where m' = m₁ + (m₂ - m₁) (1 - y₂)/[(1 - y₁) + (l - y₂)] and c' = (z₁-T₁ + z₂-T₂)/2. Damage functions for greenhouse-grown radish plants (cv. Cherry Belle) mechanically injured with small or large steel needles were used to predict growth of plants injured by both needles. Growth predictions accounted for 94%, 87%, and 82% of mean treatment variation in plant height, stem weight, and root weight, respectively. Cowpea (cv. California Blackeye No. 5) damage functions, based on preplant population levels of Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica, were used to predict seed yield of plants concomitantly infected with various levels of each species. Single species damage functions and population growth curves indicated significant host resistance to M. incognita and significantly lower virulence of that species compared to M. javanica. Model predictions accounted for 88% of mean seed yield variation in two-species treatments. In a separate experiment, mean top weights of 30-day-old cowpea plants, nniformly inoculated with 20,000 M. javanica eggs, increased with increasing levels of concomitantly inoculated M. incognita eggs. It is speculated that competitive interactions between M. incognita and M. javanica mitigated host damage by the more virulent species. PMID:19295796

  11. Numerical modelling of thermal decomposition processes and associated damage in carbon fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, R. D.; Golosnoy, I. O.; Lewin, P. L.

    2014-09-01

    Thermo-chemical degradation of carbon fibre composite (CFC) materials under intensive heat fluxes are modelled. The model couples together heat diffusion, polymer pyrolysis with associated gas production and convection through partially decomposed CFCs, and changes in transport properties of the material due to the damage. The model is verified by laser ablation experiments with controlled heat input. The numerical predictions indicate that the thermal gas transport has a minimal effect on the decomposition extent. On the other hand, the model shows that the internal gas pressure is large enough to cause fracture and delamination, and the damage extent may go far beyond the decomposition region as witnessed from experimental verification of the model.

  12. Modeling of delamination damage evolution in laminated composites subjected to low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, David C.; Allen, David H.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the delamination evolution, under quasi-static conditions, of laminated polymeric composites with mechanically nonlinear resin rich interfaces. The constitutive behavior of the interface is represented by two models developed by Needleman and Tvegaard. These models assumed that the interfacial tractions, a function of only the interfacial displacement, will behave similarly to the interatomic forces generated during the interatomic seperation. The interface material's parameters control the load at which the delamination growth initiates and the final delamination size. A wide range of damage accumulation responses have been obtained by varying the model parameters. These results show that Tvergaard's model has been found to be better suited of the two models in predicting damage evolution for the configurations examined.

  13. Air-handling capabilities of blood cardioplegia delivery systems in a simulated pediatric model.

    PubMed

    Palanzo, David; Guan, Yulong; Wan, Caihong; Baer, Larry; Kunselman, Allen; Qiu, Feng; Undar, Akif

    2010-11-01

    Blood cardioplegia delivery systems are employed in most pediatric open heart cases to arrest the heart and keep it preserved during aortic cross-clamping. They are also used as part of a modified ultrafiltration system at the end of cardiopulmonary bypass. We evaluated and compared the air-handling capabilities of different types of blood cardioplegia delivery devices. A simple circuit incorporating a cardiotomy reservoir, a roller pump, a cardioplegia test system, and two emboli detection and classification sensors were used to investigate the air-handling capabilities of the following cardioplegia delivery systems: GISH Vision, Maquet Plegiox, Medtronic Trillium MYOtherm XP, Sorin Group BCD Vanguard, Sorin Group CSC14, and Terumo Sarns Conducer and Bubble Trap. The 0.25-in. circuit was primed with 400mL of Lactated Ringer's. Outdated packed red blood cells were added to obtain a hematocrit of 24-28%. System pressure was maintained at 50mmHg. Air (0.1, 0.3, 0.5mL) was injected at a speed of 0.1mL/s into the circuit just after the pump head. Gaseous microemboli (GME) were measured prior to the cardioplegia system and after the device to evaluate the air-handling characteristics. The tests were run at 100, 200, and 400mL/min blood flow for both 4 and 37°C. There were no significant differences among the groups when comparing precardioplegia delivery system GME, thus demonstrating that all devices received the same amount of injected air. When comparing the groups for postcardioplegia delivery system GME, significant differences were noted especially at the 400mL/min blood flow rate. These results suggest that for the devices compared in this study, the Maquet Plegiox and the Medtronic Trillium MYOtherm XP eliminated GME the best.

  14. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  15. Predictive capability of long-term cavitation and liquid impingement erosion models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    A brief overview of long-term cavitation and liquid impingement erosion and modeling methods proposed by different investigators, including the curve-fit approach is presented. A table was prepared to highlight the number of variables necessary for each model in order to compute the erosion-versus-time curves. A power law relation based on the average erosion rate is suggested which may solve several modeling problems. Previously announced in STAR as N83-22386

  16. Using Local Second Gradient Model and Shear Strain Localisation to Model the Excavation Damaged Zone in Unsaturated Claystone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Benoît; Levasseur, Séverine; Collin, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The drilling of galleries induces damage propagation in the surrounding medium and creates, around them, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The prediction of the extension and fracture structure of this zone remains a major issue, especially in the context of underground nuclear waste storage. Experimental studies on geomaterials indicate that localised deformation in shear band mode usually appears prior to fractures. Thus, the excavation damaged zone can be modelled by considering the development of shear strain localisation bands. In the classical finite element framework, strain localisation suffers a mesh-dependency problem. Therefore, an enhanced model with a regularisation method is required to correctly model the strain localisation behaviour. Among the existing methods, we choose the coupled local second gradient model. We extend it to unsaturated conditions and we include the solid grain compressibility. Furthermore, air ventilation inside underground galleries engenders a rock-atmosphere interaction that could influence the damaged zone. This interaction has to be investigated in order to predict the damaged zone behaviour. Finally, a hydro-mechanical modelling of a gallery excavation in claystone is presented and leads to a fairly good representation of the EDZ. The main objectives of this study are to model the fractures by considering shear strain localisation bands, and to investigate if an isotropic model accurately reproduces the in situ measurements. The numerical results provide information about the damaged zone extension, structure and behaviour that are in very good agreement with in situ measurements and observations. For instance, the strain localisation bands that develop in chevron pattern during the excavation and rock desaturation, due to air ventilation, are observed close to the gallery.

  17. Improvement of capabilities of the Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for investigating SOFC long term performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Galdamez, Rinaldo A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.

    2012-04-30

    This report provides an overview of the work performed for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) modeling during the 2012 Winter/Spring Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). A brief introduction on the concept, operation basics and applications of fuel cells is given for the general audience. Further details are given regarding the modifications and improvements of the Distributed Electrochemistry (DEC) Modeling tool developed by PNNL engineers to model SOFC long term performance. Within this analysis, a literature review on anode degradation mechanisms is explained and future plans of implementing these into the DEC modeling tool are also proposed.

  18. Neuronal NOS and cyclooxygenase-2 contribute to DNA damage in a mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tuan; Choi, Dong-Kug; Nagai, Makiko; Wu, Du-Chu; Nagata, Tetsuya; Prou, Delphine; Wilson, Glenn L; Vila, Miquel; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Przedborski, Serge

    2009-10-01

    DNA damage is a proposed pathogenic factor in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease. To probe the underpinning mechanism of such neuronal perturbation, we sought to produce an experimental model of DNA damage. We thus first assessed DNA damage by in situ nick translation and emulsion autoradiography in the mouse brain after administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP; 4 x 20 mg/kg, ip, every 2 h), a neurotoxin known to produce a model of Parkinson disease. Here we show that DNA strand breaks occur in vivo in this mouse model of Parkinson disease with kinetics and a topography that parallel the degeneration of substantia nigra neurons, as assessed by FluoroJade labeling. Previously, nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were found to modulate MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal death. We thus assessed the contribution of these enzymes to DNA damage in mice lacking neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), or Cox-2. We found that the lack of Cox-2 and nNOS activities but not of iNOS activity attenuated MPTP-related DNA damage. We also found that not only nuclear, but also mitochondrial, DNA is a target for the MPTP insult. These results suggest that the loss of genomic integrity can be triggered by the concerted actions of nNOS and Cox-2 and provide further support to the view that DNA damage may contribute to the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson disease. PMID:19616617

  19. Validity and Applicability of Two Simple Hysteresis Models to Assess Progressive Seismic Damage in R/c Asymmetric Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S. C.; Das, P. K.

    2002-10-01

    The coupled lateral-torsional vibration in R/C asymmetric structures under seismic loading leads to larger lateral deformation in the load-resisting elements located at one edge, compared to the other resisting elements. This may cause earlier yielding of the elements of that edge in localized form. Strength and stiffness degradation due to successive inelastic excursions of these R/C structural elements at one edge may make these elements more flexible and weaker as compared to those at the opposite edge. This may cause progressive shifting of stiffness and strength centres away from this flexible edge, leading to consequent increase of effective eccentricity in successive loading cycles. This, in turn, causes a progressive increase in torsional effect in R/C structures. This damaging effect cannot be predicted by using the bilinear hysteresis models devoid of degradation characteristics. Existing sophisticated hysteresis models representing the degrading behaviour of the R/C structural load-resisting elements require a number of parameters to be specified, the evaluation of which requires extremely case-specific calibration study. In this context, the present paper studies the suitability of two alternative simplified hysteresis models, which are capable of predicting the strength and stiffness degrading behaviours with simple input parameters. Responses of idealized asymmetric R/C building systems are studied using these two hysteresis models under design spectrum-consistent synthetic ground motions and idealized near-fault ground motions. The comparison between the responses of the R/C asymmetric structures with deteriorating structural elements and the similar structures having elasto-plastic structural elements proves the suitability of the proposed models in recognizing the progressive damaging effect of torsion in R/C asymmetric buildings.

  20. Social Factors in Creating an Integrated Capability for Health System Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglio, Paul P.; Cefkin, Melissa; Haas, Peter J.; Selinger, Pat

    The health system is a complex system of systems - changes in agriculture, transportation, economics, family life, medical practices, and many other things can have a profound influence on health and health costs. Yet today, policy-level investment decisions are frequently made by modeling individual systems in isolation. We describe two sets of issues that we face in trying to develop a platform, method, and service for integrating expert models from different domains to support health policy and investment decisions. The first set of questions concerns how to develop accurate social and behavioral health models and integrate them with engineering models of transportation, clinic operations, and so forth. The second set of questions concerns the design of an environment that will encourage and facilitate collaboration between the health modelers themselves, who come from a wide variety of disciplines.

  1. Evaluation of the capability of local helioseismology to discern between monolithic and spaghetti sunspot models

    SciTech Connect

    Felipe, T.; Crouch, A. D.; Birch, A. C.

    2014-06-20

    The helioseismic properties of the wave scattering generated by monolithic and spaghetti sunspots are analyzed by means of numerical simulations. In these computations, an incident f- or p {sub 1}-mode travels through the sunspot model, which produces absorption and phase shift of the waves. The scattering is studied by inspecting the wavefield, computing travel-time shifts, and performing Fourier-Hankel analysis. The comparison between the results obtained for both sunspot models reveals that the differences in the absorption coefficient can be detected above noise level. The spaghetti model produces a steep increase of the phase shift with the degree of the mode at short wavelengths, while mode mixing is more efficient for the monolithic model. These results provide a clue for what to look for in solar observations to discern the constitution of sunspots between the proposed monolithic and spaghetti models.

  2. A simplified ab initio cosmic-ray modulation model: construction and predictive capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloto, Katlego; Burger, Renier; Engelbrecht, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    A simplified ab initio approach is followed to model cosmic-ray modulation using a steady-state three-dimensional stochastic solver of the Parker transport equation. Standard diffusion coefficients based on Quasilinear Theory (QLT) and Nonlinear Guiding Center Theory (NLGC) are used. The spatial dependence of turbulence quantities required as input for the drift- and diffusion coefficients, follow from parametric fits to results from a turbulence transport model. Effective values are used for the solar wind speed, magnetic field magnitude and tilt angle in the modulation model. The unusually high cosmic-ray intensities observed during the 2009 solar minimum follow naturally from the current model for most of the energies considered. This demonstrates that changes in turbulence contribute significantly to than usual cosmic-ray intensities during the 2009 solar minimum. We also discuss and illustrate how this model can be used to predict future cosmic-ray intensities, and comment on the reliability of such predictions.

  3. Development of a building wake/stack height numerical modeling capability

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; McCallen, R.C.

    1991-09-06

    We are developing state-of-the-art numerical tools which can be used to provide reliable estimates of potential emissions at various LLNL sites. In particular we have focused our efforts in generating models which can simulate the wind flow and dispersion of airborne pollutants around surface-mounted structures such as buildings or building complexes. To achieve this goal, we have adopted two different but complementary approaches in the modeling of this complex problem. The first approach employs a Reynolds-averaged set of equations whose solution results in a description of the mean flow and concentration pattern. In the second approach, we are developing a more advanced model based on the large eddy simulation (LES) concept. In this report, we describe the progress in the development of the two approaches. We begin by discussing the calculational procedure which has been chosen for the Reynolds-averaged model, namely: prediction of the mean flow via a turbulent flow model, and; employment of the calculated flow field to drive a particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC). The performance of this model is benchmarked against experimental data obtained for flow over a backward-facing step. The backward-facing step problem can be viewed as a simplification of a rectangular-shaped surface mounted obstacle. We next include a brief description of the LES method, the continuum and discretized LES equations, the numerical methodology, and some preliminary flow calculations. As with the Reynolds-averaged model, the backward- facing step is used to benchmark the LES model development. The results are in agreement with the calculations of other researchers. We conclude by discussing several improvements which will be considered as we continue the development of both the Reynolds-averaged and the LES models. 40 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A thermochemical model of radiation damage and annealing applied to GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Calculations of the equilibrium conditions for continuous radiation damage and thermal annealing are reported. The calculations are based on a thermochemical model developed to analyze the incorporation of point imperfections in GaAs, and modified by introducing the radiation to produce native lattice defects rather than high-temperature and arsenic atmospheric pressure. The concentration of a set of defects, including vacancies, divacancies, and impurity vacancy complexes, are calculated as a function of temperature. Minority carrier lifetimes, short circuit current, and efficiency are deduced for a range of equilibrium temperatures. The results indicate that GaAs solar cells could have a mission life which is not greatly limited by radiation damage.

  5. A Rate-Dependent Viscoelastic Damage Model for Simulation of Solid Propellant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, Erik

    2005-07-01

    A viscoelastic deformation and damage model (VED) for solid rocket propellants has been developed based on an extensive set of mechanical properties experiments. Monotonic tensile tests performed at several strain rates showed rate and dilatation effects. During cyclic tensile tests, hysteresis and a rate-dependent shear modulus were observed. A tensile relaxation experiment showed significant stress decay in the sample. Taylor impact tests exhibited large dilatations without significant crack growth. Extensive modifications to a viscoelastic-viscoplastic model (VEP) necessary to capture these experimental results have led to development of the VED model. In particular, plasticity has been eliminated in the model, and the multiple Maxwell viscoelastic formulation has been replaced with a time-dependent shear modulus. Furthermore, the loading and unloading behaviors of the material are modeled independently. To characterize the damage and dilatation behavior, the Tensile Damage and Distention (TDD) model is run in conjunction with VED. The VED model is connected to a single-cell driver as well as to the CTH shock physics code. Simulations of tests show good comparisons with tensile tests and some aspects of the Taylor tests.

  6. A Rate-Dependent Viscoelastic Damage Model for Simulation of Solid Propellant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, E. R.; Nguyen, D. Q.

    2006-07-01

    A viscoelastic deformation and damage model (VED) for solid rocket propellants has been developed based on an extensive set of mechanical properties experiments. Monotonic tensile tests performed at several strain rates showed rate and dilatation effects. During cyclic tensile tests, hysteresis and a rate-dependent shear modulus were observed. A tensile relaxation experiment showed significant stress decay in the sample. Taylor impact tests exhibited large dilatations without significant crack growth. Extensive modifications to a viscoelastic-viscoplastic model (VEP) necessary to capture these experimental results have led to development of the VED model. In particular, plasticity has been eliminated in the model, and the multiple Maxwell viscoelastic formulation has been replaced with a time-dependent shear modulus. Furthermore, the loading and unloading behaviors of the material are modeled independently. To characterize the damage and dilatation behavior, the Tensile Damage and Distention (TDD) model is run in conjunction with VED. The VED model is connected to a single-cell driver as well as to the CTH shock physics code. Simulations of tests show good comparisons with tensile tests and some aspects of the Taylor tests.

  7. Damage Mechanisms of Filled Siloxanes for Predictive Multiscale Modeling of Aging Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, B; Maxwell, R; de Teresa, S; Dinh, L; Gee, R

    2002-04-02

    Predictions of component performance versus lifetime are often risky for complex materials in which there may be many underlying aging or degradation mechanisms. In order to develop more accurate predictive models for silica-filled siloxane components, we are studying damage mechanisms over a broad range of size domains, linked together through several modeling efforts. Atomistic and molecular dynamic modeling has elucidated the chemistry of the silica filler to polymer interaction, as this interaction plays a key role in this material's aging behavior. This modeling work has been supported by experimental data on the removal of water from the silica surface, the effect of the surrounding polymer on this desiccation, and on the subsequent change in the mechanical properties of the system. Solid State NMR efforts have characterized the evolution of the polymer and filler dynamics as the material is damaged through irradiation or desiccation. These damage signatures have been confirmed by direct measurements of changes in polymer crosslink density and filler interaction as measured by solvent swelling, and by mechanical property tests. Data from the changes at these molecular levels are simultaneously feeding the development of age-aware constitutive models for polymer behavior. In addition, the microstructure of the foam, including under load, has been determined by Computed Tomography, and this data is being introduced into Finite Element Analysis codes to allow component level models. All of these techniques are directed towards the incorporation of molecular and microstructural aging signatures into predictive models for overall component performance.

  8. Finite strain formulation of viscoelastic damage model for simulation of fabric reinforced polymers under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treutenaere, S.; Lauro, F.; Bennani, B.; Matsumoto, T.; Mottola, E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of fabric reinforced polymers in the automotive industry is growing significantly. The high specific stiffness and strength, the ease of shaping as well as the great impact performance of these materials widely encourage their diffusion. The present model increases the predictability of explicit finite element analysis and push the boundaries of the ongoing phenomenological model. Carbon fibre composites made up various preforms were tested by applying different mechanical load up to dynamic loading. This experimental campaign highlighted the physical mechanisms affecting the initial mechanical properties, namely intra- and interlaminar matrix damage, viscoelasticty and fibre failure. The intralaminar behaviour model is based on the explicit formulation of the matrix damage model developed by the ONERA as the given damage formulation correlates with the experimental observation. Coupling with a Maxwell-Wiechert model, the viscoelasticity is included without losing the direct explicit formulation. Additionally, the model is formulated under a total Lagrangian scheme in order to maintain consistency for finite strain. Thus, the material frame-indifference as well as anisotropy are ensured. This allows reorientation of fibres to be taken into account particularly for in-plane shear loading. Moreover, fall within the framework of the total Lagrangian scheme greatly makes the parameter identification easier, as based on the initial configuration. This intralaminar model thus relies upon a physical description of the behaviour of fabric composites and the numerical simulations show a good correlation with the experimental results.

  9. Petroleum system modeling capabilities for use in oil and gas resource assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, Debra K.; Lewan, Michael; Roberts, Laura N.R.; Henry, Mitchell E.

    2006-01-01

    Summary: Petroleum resource assessments are among the most highly visible and frequently cited scientific products of the U.S. Geological Survey. The assessments integrate diverse and extensive information on the geologic, geochemical, and petroleum production histories of provinces and regions of the United States and the World. Petroleum systems modeling incorporates these geoscience data in ways that strengthen the assessment process and results are presented visually and numerically. The purpose of this report is to outline the requirements, advantages, and limitations of one-dimensional (1-D), two-dimensional (2-D), and three-dimensional (3-D) petroleum systems modeling that can be applied to the assessment of oil and gas resources. Primary focus is on the application of the Integrated Exploration Systems (IES) PetroMod? software because of familiarity with that program as well as the emphasis by the USGS Energy Program on standardizing to one modeling application. The Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) is used to demonstrate the use of the PetroMod? software. Petroleum systems modeling quantitatively extends the 'total petroleum systems' (TPS) concept (Magoon and Dow, 1994; Magoon and Schmoker, 2000) that is employed in USGS resource assessments. Modeling allows integration of state-of-the-art analysis techniques, and provides the means to test and refine understanding of oil and gas generation, migration, and accumulation. Results of modeling are presented visually, numerically, and statistically, which enhances interpretation of the processes that affect TPSs through time. Modeling also provides a framework for the input and processing of many kinds of data essential in resource assessment, including (1) petroleum system elements such as reservoir, seal, and source rock intervals; (2) timing of depositional, hiatus, and erosional events and their influences on petroleum systems; (3) incorporation of vertical and lateral distribution and lithologies of

  10. Evaluation of the 3d Urban Modelling Capabilities in Geographical Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogru, A. O.; Seker, D. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Geographical Information System (GIS) Technology, which provides successful solutions to basic spatial problems, is currently widely used in 3 dimensional (3D) modeling of physical reality with its developing visualization tools. The modeling of large and complicated phenomenon is a challenging problem in terms of computer graphics currently in use. However, it is possible to visualize that phenomenon in 3D by using computer systems. 3D models are used in developing computer games, military training, urban planning, tourism and etc. The use of 3D models for planning and management of urban areas is very popular issue of city administrations. In this context, 3D City models are produced and used for various purposes. However the requirements of the models vary depending on the type and scope of the application. While a high level visualization, where photorealistic visualization techniques are widely used, is required for touristy and recreational purposes, an abstract visualization of the physical reality is generally sufficient for the communication of the thematic information. The visual variables, which are the principle components of cartographic visualization, such as: color, shape, pattern, orientation, size, position, and saturation are used for communicating the thematic information. These kinds of 3D city models are called as abstract models. Standardization of technologies used for 3D modeling is now available by the use of CityGML. CityGML implements several novel concepts to support interoperability, consistency and functionality. For example it supports different Levels-of-Detail (LoD), which may arise from independent data collection processes and are used for efficient visualization and efficient data analysis. In one CityGML data set, the same object may be represented in different LoD simultaneously, enabling the analysis and visualization of the same object with regard to different degrees of resolution. Furthermore, two CityGML data sets

  11. SWAT2000: current capabilities and research opportunities in applied watershed modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. G.; Fohrer, N.

    2005-02-01

    SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) is a conceptual, continuous time model that was developed in the early 1990s to assist water resource managers in assessing the impact of management and climate on water supplies and non-point source pollution in watersheds and large river basins. SWAT is the continuation of over 30 years of model development within the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and was developed to scale up past field-scale models to large river basins. Model components include weather, hydrology, erosion/sedimentation, plant growth, nutrients, pesticides, agricultural management, stream routing and pond/reservoir routing. The latest version, SWAT2000, has several significant enhancements that include: bacteria transport routines; urban routines; Green and Ampt infiltration equation; improved weather generator; ability to read in daily solar radiation, relative humidity, wind speed and potential ET; Muskingum channel routing; and modified dormancy calculations for tropical areas. A complete set of model documentation for equations and algorithms, a user manual describing model inputs and outputs, and an ArcView interface manual are now complete for SWAT2000. The model has been recoded into Fortran 90 with a complete data dictionary, dynamic allocation of arrays and modular subroutines. Current research is focusing on bacteria, riparian zones, pothole topography, forest growth, channel downcutting and widening, and input uncertainty analysis.The model SWAT is meanwhile used in many countries all over the world. Recent developments in European Environmental Policy, such as the adoption of the European Water Framework directive in December 2000, demand tools for integrative river basin management. The model SWAT is applicable for this purpose. It is a flexible model that can be used under a wide range of different environmental conditions, as this special issue will show. The papers compiled here are the result of the first

  12. A Damage Model for the Simulation of Delamination in Advanced Composites under Variable-Mode Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turon, A.; Camanho, P. P.; Costa, J.; Davila, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    A thermodynamically consistent damage model is proposed for the simulation of progressive delamination in composite materials under variable-mode ratio. The model is formulated in the context of Damage Mechanics. A novel constitutive equation is developed to model the initiation and propagation of delamination. A delamination initiation criterion is proposed to assure that the formulation can account for changes in the loading mode in a thermodynamically consistent way. The formulation accounts for crack closure effects to avoid interfacial penetration of two adjacent layers after complete decohesion. The model is implemented in a finite element formulation, and the numerical predictions are compared with experimental results obtained in both composite test specimens and structural components.

  13. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. I. Trap mediated interstitial cluster diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-04-21

    The microstructure that develops under low temperature irradiation in ferritic alloys is dominated by a high density of small (2–5 nm) defects. These defects have been widely observed to move via occasional discrete hops during in situ thin film irradiation experiments. Cluster dynamics models are used to describe the formation of these defects as an aggregation process of smaller clusters created as primary damage. Multiple assumptions regarding the mobility of these damage features are tested in the models, both with and without explicit consideration of such irradiation induced hops. Comparison with experimental data regarding the density of these defects demonstrates the importance of including such motions in a valid model. In particular, discrete hops inform the limited dependence of defect density on irradiation temperature observed in experiments, which the model was otherwise incapable of producing.

  14. Incorporation of NREL Solar Advisor Model Photovoltaic Capabilities with GridLAB-D

    SciTech Connect

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Hammerstrom, Janelle L.; Singh, Ruchi

    2012-10-19

    This report provides a summary of the work updating the photovoltaic model inside GridLAB-D. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Advisor Model (SAM) was utilized as a basis for algorithms and validation of the new implementation. Subsequent testing revealed that the two implementations are nearly identical in both solar impacts and power output levels. This synergized model aides the system-level impact studies of GridLAB-D, but also allows more specific details of a particular site to be explored via the SAM software.

  15. Potential capabilities of Reynolds stress turbulence model in the COMMIX-RSM code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, F. C.; Bottoni, M.

    1994-01-01

    A Reynolds stress turbulence model has been implemented in the COMMIX code, together with transport equations describing turbulent heat fluxes, variance of temperature fluctuations, and dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy. The model has been verified partially by simulating homogeneous turbulent shear flow, and stable and unstable stratified shear flows with strong buoyancy-suppressing or enhancing turbulence. This article outlines the model, explains the verifications performed thus far, and discusses potential applications of the COMMIX-RSM code in several domains, including, but not limited to, analysis of thermal striping in engineering systems, simulation of turbulence in combustors, and predictions of bubbly and particulate flows.

  16. Modelling of the shielding capabilities of the existing solid radioactive waste storages at Ignalina NPP.

    PubMed

    Smaizys, Arturas; Poskas, Povilas; Ragaisis, Valdas

    2005-01-01

    There is only one nuclear power plant in Lithuania--Ignalina NPP (INPP). The INPP operates two similar units with design electrical power of 1500 MW. The units were commissioned in 1983 and 1987 respectively. From the beginning of the INPP operation all generated solid radioactive waste was collected and stored at the Soviet type solid radwaste facility located at INPP site. The INPP solid radwaste storage facility consists of four buildings, namely building No. 155, No. 155/1, No. 157 and No. 157/1. The buildings of the INPP solid radwaste storage facility are reinforced concrete structures above ground. State Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (VATESI) has specified that particular safety analysis must be performed for existing radioactive waste storage facilities of the INPP. As part of the safety analysis, shielding capabilities of the walls and roofs of these buildings were analysed. This paper presents radiation shielding analysis of the buildings No. 157 and No. 157/1 that are still in operation. The buildings No. 155 and No. 155/1 are already filled up with the waste and no additional waste loading is expected. PMID:16604672

  17. Micromechanical Modeling of Anisotropic Damage-Induced Permeability Variation in Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yifeng; Hu, Shaohua; Zhou, Chuangbing; Jing, Lanru

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a study on the initiation and progress of anisotropic damage and its impact on the permeability variation of crystalline rocks of low porosity. This work was based on an existing micromechanical model considering the frictional sliding and dilatancy behaviors of microcracks and the recovery of degraded stiffness when the microcracks are closed. By virtue of an analytical ellipsoidal inclusion solution, lower bound estimates were formulated through a rigorous homogenization procedure for the damage-induced effective permeability of the microcracks-matrix system, and their predictive limitations were discussed with superconducting penny-shaped microcracks, in which the greatest lower bounds were obtained for each homogenization scheme. On this basis, an empirical upper bound estimation model was suggested to account for the influences of anisotropic damage growth, connectivity, frictional sliding, dilatancy, and normal stiffness recovery of closed microcracks, as well as tensile stress-induced microcrack opening on the permeability variation, with a small number of material parameters. The developed model was calibrated and validated by a series of existing laboratory triaxial compression tests with permeability measurements on crystalline rocks, and applied for characterizing the excavation-induced damage zone and permeability variation in the surrounding granitic rock of the TSX tunnel at the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada, with an acceptable agreement between the predicted and measured data.

  18. Experimental investigation of the predictive capabilities of data driven modeling techniques in hydrology - Part 2: Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshorbagy, A.; Corzo, G.; Srinivasulu, S.; Solomatine, D. P.

    2010-10-01

    In this second part of the two-part paper, the data driven modeling (DDM) experiment, presented and explained in the first part, is implemented. Inputs for the five case studies (half-hourly actual evapotranspiration, daily peat soil moisture, daily till soil moisture, and two daily rainfall-runoff datasets) are identified, either based on previous studies or using the mutual information content. Twelve groups (realizations) were randomly generated from each dataset by randomly sampling without replacement from the original dataset. Neural networks (ANNs), genetic programming (GP), evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), Support vector machines (SVM), M5 model trees (M5), K-nearest neighbors (K-nn), and multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques are implemented and applied to each of the 12 realizations of each case study. The predictive accuracy and uncertainties of the various techniques are assessed using multiple average overall error measures, scatter plots, frequency distribution of model residuals, and the deterioration rate of prediction performance during the testing phase. Gamma test is used as a guide to assist in selecting the appropriate modeling technique. Unlike two nonlinear soil moisture case studies, the results of the experiment conducted in this research study show that ANNs were a sub-optimal choice for the actual evapotranspiration and the two rainfall-runoff case studies. GP is the most successful technique due to its ability to adapt the model complexity to the modeled data. EPR performance could be close to GP with datasets that are more linear than nonlinear. SVM is sensitive to the kernel choice and if appropriately selected, the performance of SVM can improve. M5 performs very well with linear and semi linear data, which cover wide range of hydrological situations. In highly nonlinear case studies, ANNs, K-nn, and GP could be more successful than other modeling techniques. K-nn is also successful in linear situations, and it should

  19. Experimental investigation of the predictive capabilities of data driven modeling techniques in hydrology - Part 2: Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshorbagy, A.; Corzo, G.; Srinivasulu, S.; Solomatine, D. P.

    2009-11-01

    In this second part of the two-part paper, the data driven modeling (DDM) experiment, presented and explained in the first part, is implemented. Inputs for the five case studies (half-hourly actual evapotranspiration, daily peat soil moisture, daily till soil moisture, and two daily rainfall-runoff datasets) are identified, either based on previous studies or using the mutual information content. Twelve groups (realizations) were randomly generated from each dataset by randomly sampling without replacement from the original dataset. Neural networks (ANNs), genetic programming (GP), evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), Support vector machines (SVM), M5 model trees (M5), K nearest neighbors (K-nn), and multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques are implemented and applied to each of the 12 realizations of each case study. The predictive accuracy and uncertainties of the various techniques are assessed using multiple average overall error measures, scatter plots, frequency distribution of model residuals, and the deterioration rate of prediction performance during the testing phase. Gamma test is used as a guide to assist in selecting the appropriate modeling technique. Unlike the two nonlinear soil moisture case studies, the results of the experiment conducted in this research study show that ANNs were a sub-optimal choice for the actual evapotranspiration and the two rainfall-runoff case studies. GP is the most successful technique due to its ability to adapt the model complexity to the modeled data. EPR performance could be close to GP with datasets that are more linear than nonlinear. SVM is sensitive to the kernel choice and if appropriately selected, the performance of SVM can improve. M5 performs very well with linear and semi linear data, which cover wide range of hydrological situations. In highly nonlinear case studies, ANNs, K-nn, and GP could be more successful than other modeling techniques. K-nn is also successful in linear situations, and it

  20. A model-based, multichannel, real-time capable sawtooth crash detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brand, H.; de Baar, M. R.; van Berkel, M.; Blanken, T. C.; Felici, F.; Westerhof, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-07-01

    Control of the time between sawtooth crashes, necessary for ITER and DEMO, requires real-time detection of the moment of the sawtooth crash. In this paper, estimation of sawtooth crash times is demonstrated using the model-based interacting multiple model (IMM) estimator, based on simplified models for the sawtooth crash. In contrast to previous detectors, this detector uses the spatial extent of the sawtooth crash as detection characteristic. The IMM estimator is tuned and applied to multiple ECE channels at once. A model for the sawtooth crash is introduced, which is used in the IMM algorithm. The IMM algorithm is applied to seven datasets from the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Five crash models with different mixing radii are used. All sawtooth crashes that have been identified beforehand by visual inspection of the data, are detected by the algorithm. A few additional detections are made, which upon closer inspection are seen to be sawtooth crashes, which show a partial reconnection. A closer inspection of the detected normal crashes shows that about 42% are not well fitted by any of the full reconnection models and show some characteristics of a partial reconnection. In some case, the measurement time is during the sawtooth crashes, which also results in an incorrect estimate of the mixing radius. For data provided at a sampling rate of 1 kHz, the run time of the IMM estimator is below 1 ms, thereby fulfilling real-time requirements.

  1. Time evolution of damage due to environmentally assisted aging in a fiber bundle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz-Sassinek, S.; Main, I. G.; Danku, Z.; Kun, F.

    2013-09-01

    Damage growth in composite materials is a complex process which is of interest in many fields of science and engineering. We consider this problem in a fiber bundle model where fibers undergo an aging process due to the accumulation of damage driven by the locally acting stress in a chemically active environment. By subjecting the bundle to a constant external load, fibers fail either when the load on them exceeds their individual intrinsic strength or when the accumulated internal damage exceeds a random threshold. We analyze the time evolution of the breaking process under low external loads where aging of fibers dominates. In the mean field limit, we show analytically that the aging system continuously accelerates in a way which can be characterized by an inverse power law of the event rate with a singularity that defines a failure time. The exponent is not universal; it depends on the details of the aging process. For localized load sharing, a more complex damage process emerges which is dominated by distinct spatial regions of the system with different degrees of stress concentration. Analytical calculations revealed that the final acceleration to global failure is preceded by a stationary accumulation of damage. When the disorder is strong, the accelerating phase has the same functional behavior as in the mean field limit. The analytical results are verified by computer simulations.

  2. Oxidative Damage and Cellular Defense Mechanisms in Sea Urchin Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Du, Colin; Anderson, Arielle; Lortie, Mae; Parsons, Rachel; Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The free radical or oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that the accumulation of oxidative cellular damage is a major contributor to the aging process and a key determinant of species longevity. This study investigates the oxidative stress theory in a novel model for aging research, the sea urchin. Sea urchins present a unique model for the study of aging due to the existence of species with tremendously different natural life spans including some species with extraordinary longevity and negligible senescence. Cellular oxidative damage, antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities were measured in the tissues of three sea urchin species: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus which has an intermediate lifespan. Levels of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) measured in tissues (muscle, nerve, esophagus, gonad, coelomocytes, ampullae) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) measured in cell-free coelomic fluid showed no general increase with age. The fluorescent age-pigment lipofuscin measured in muscle, nerve and esophagus, increased with age however it appeared to be predominantly extracellular. Antioxidant mechanisms (total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase) and proteasome enzyme activities were maintained with age. In some instances, levels of oxidative damage were lower and antioxidant activity higher in cells or tissues of the long-lived species compared to the short-lived species, however further studies are required to determine the relationship between oxidative damage and longevity in these animals. Consistent with the predictions of the oxidative stress theory of aging, the results suggest that negligible senescence is accompanied by a lack of accumulation of cellular oxidative damage with age and maintenance of antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities may be important mechanisms to mitigate damage. PMID:23707327

  3. Damage Model and Progressive Failure Analyses for Filament Wound Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Marcelo Leite; Vandepitte, Dirk; Tita, Volnei

    2013-10-01

    Recent improvements in manufacturing processes and materials properties associated with excellent mechanical characteristics and low weight have made composite materials very attractive for application on civil aircraft structures. However, even new designs are still very conservative, because the composite failure phenomenon is very complex. Several failure criteria and theories have been developed to describe the damage process and how it evolves, but the solution of the problem is still open. Moreover, modern filament winding techniques have been used to produce a wide variety of structural shapes not only cylindrical parts, but also “flat” laminates. Therefore, this work presents the development of a damage model and its application to simulate the progressive failure of flat composite laminates made using a filament winding process. The damage model was implemented as a UMAT (User Material Subroutine), in ABAQUSTM Finite Element (FE) framework. Progressive failure analyses were carried out using FE simulation in order to simulate the failure of flat filament wound composite structures under different loading conditions. In addition, experimental tests were performed in order to identify parameters related to the material model, as well as to evaluate both the potential and the limitations of the model. The difference between numerical and the average experimental results in a four point bending set-up is only 1.6 % at maximum load amplitude. Another important issue is that the model parameters are not so complicated to be identified. This characteristic makes this model very attractive to be applied in an industrial environment.

  4. Repairable-conditionally repairable damage model based on dual Poisson processes.

    PubMed

    Lind, B K; Persson, L M; Edgren, M R; Hedlöf, I; Brahme, A

    2003-09-01

    The advent of intensity-modulated radiation therapy makes it increasingly important to model the response accurately when large volumes of normal tissues are irradiated by controlled graded dose distributions aimed at maximizing tumor cure and minimizing normal tissue toxicity. The cell survival model proposed here is very useful and flexible for accurate description of the response of healthy tissues as well as tumors in classical and truly radiobiologically optimized radiation therapy. The repairable-conditionally repairable (RCR) model distinguishes between two different types of damage, namely the potentially repairable, which may also be lethal, i.e. if unrepaired or misrepaired, and the conditionally repairable, which may be repaired or may lead to apoptosis if it has not been repaired correctly. When potentially repairable damage is being repaired, for example by nonhomologous end joining, conditionally repairable damage may require in addition a high-fidelity correction by homologous repair. The induction of both types of damage is assumed to be described by Poisson statistics. The resultant cell survival expression has the unique ability to fit most experimental data well at low doses (the initial hypersensitive range), intermediate doses (on the shoulder of the survival curve), and high doses (on the quasi-exponential region of the survival curve). The complete Poisson expression can be approximated well by a simple bi-exponential cell survival expression, S(D) = e(-aD) + bDe(-cD), where the first term describes the survival of undamaged cells and the last term represents survival after complete repair of sublethal damage. The bi-exponential expression makes it easy to derive D(0), D(q), n and alpha, beta values to facilitate comparison with classical cell survival models.

  5. Homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage model for ductile failure of materials containing heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Bai, Jie; Paquet, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This paper develops an accurate and computationally efficient homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage (HCPD) model for macroscopic analysis of ductile failure in porous ductile materials containing brittle inclusions. Example of these materials are cast alloys such as aluminum and metal matrix composites. The overall framework of the HCPD model follows the structure of the anisotropic Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) type elasto-plasticity model for porous ductile materials. The HCPD model is assumed to be orthotropic in an evolving material principal coordinate system throughout the deformation history. The GTN model parameters are calibrated from homogenization of evolving variables in representative volume elements (RVE) of the microstructure containing inclusions and voids. Micromechanical analyses for this purpose are conducted by the locally enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) [Hu, C., Ghosh, S., 2008. Locally enhanced Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) for simulating evolving fracture in ductile microstructures containing inclusions. Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. 76(12), 1955-1992]. The model also introduces a novel void nucleation criterion from micromechanical damage evolution due to combined inclusion and matrix cracking. The paper discusses methods for estimating RVE length scales in microstructures with non-uniform dispersions, as well as macroscopic characteristic length scales for non-local constitutive models. Comparison of results from the anisotropic HCPD model with homogenized micromechanics shows excellent agreement. The HCPD model has a huge efficiency advantage over micromechanics models. Hence, it is a very effective tool in predicting macroscopic damage in structures with direct reference to microstructural composition.

  6. Accounting for anatomical noise in search-capable model observers for planar nuclear imaging.

    PubMed

    Sen, Anando; Gifford, Howard C

    2016-01-01

    Model observers intended to predict the diagnostic performance of human observers should account for the effects of both quantum and anatomical noise. We compared the abilities of several visual-search (VS) and scanning Hotelling-type models to account for anatomical noise in a localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) study involving simulated nuclear medicine images. Our VS observer invoked a two-stage process of search and analysis. The images featured lesions in the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. Lesion contrast and the geometric resolution and sensitivity of the imaging collimator were the study variables. A set of anthropomorphic mathematical phantoms was imaged with an analytic projector based on eight parallel-hole collimators with different sensitivity and resolution properties. The LROC study was conducted with human observers and the channelized nonprewhitening, channelized Hotelling (CH) and VS model observers. The CH observer was applied in a "background-known-statistically" protocol while the VS observer performed a quasi-background-known-exactly task. Both of these models were applied with and without internal noise in the decision variables. A perceptual search threshold was also tested with the VS observer. The model observers without inefficiencies failed to mimic the average performance trend for the humans. The CH and VS observers with internal noise matched the humans primarily at low collimator sensitivities. With both internal noise and the search threshold, the VS observer attained quantitative agreement with the human observers. Computational efficiency is an important advantage of the VS observer.

  7. Computable General Equilibrium Model Fiscal Year 2013 Capability Development Report - April 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Brian Keith; Rivera, Michael K.; Boero, Riccardo

    2014-04-01

    This report documents progress made on continued developments of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) Computable General Equilibrium Model (NCGEM), developed in fiscal year 2012. In fiscal year 2013, NISAC the treatment of the labor market and tests performed with the model to examine the properties of the solutions computed by the model. To examine these, developers conducted a series of 20 simulations for 20 U.S. States. Each of these simulations compared an economic baseline simulation with an alternative simulation that assumed a 20-percent reduction in overall factor productivity in the manufacturing industries of each State. Differences in the simulation results between the baseline and alternative simulations capture the economic impact of the reduction in factor productivity. While not every State is affected in precisely the same way, the reduction in manufacturing industry productivity negatively affects the manufacturing industries in each State to an extent proportional to the reduction in overall factor productivity. Moreover, overall economic activity decreases when manufacturing sector productivity is reduced. Developers ran two additional simulations: (1) a version of the model for the State of Michigan, with manufacturing divided into two sub-industries (automobile and other vehicle manufacturing as one sub-industry and the rest of manufacturing as the other subindustry); and (2) a version of the model for the United States, divided into 30 industries. NISAC conducted these simulations to illustrate the flexibility of industry definitions in NCGEM and to examine the simulation properties of in more detail.

  8. Application of Laboratory and Modeling Capabilities to Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Astrophysical Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.; Liedahl, D.A.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2000-02-25

    Work funded by the subject LDRD proposal has produced the following results. First, a comprehensive catalog of EUV lines from M-shell iron (Fe IX-XVI) in the 60-140 {angstrom} waveband. Second, a revised estimate of the radiative cooling of high-temperature plasmas by Fe, which dominates the cooling in cosmic-abundance plasmas from 4 x 10{sup 5}K to 1 x 10{sup 7}K. Third, laboratory data to correct theoretical atomic models and develop reliable spectral models of M-shell Fe in the EUV. Fourth, a solution of the origin of the quasi-continuum in EUV spectra of late-type stars, which has been variously ascribed to a high-temperature tail on the emission measure distribution of stellar coronae, reduced metal abundances, resonant scattering (destruction) of emission lines, and incompleteness of atomic models.

  9. Predictive Capabilities of a Relaxation Model for Parcel-Based Granular Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radl, Stefan; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2011-11-01

    Parcel-based methods have a great potential to reduce the computational cost of particle simulations for dense flows. Here we investigate a relaxation model, similar to that of Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK), when applied to such a parcel-based simulation method. Specifically, we have chosen the simulation methodology initially proposed by Patankar and Joseph, and combined it with the relaxation model published by O'Rourke and Snider. We show that a relaxation model is key to correctly predicting macroscopic flow features, e.g., the scattering pattern of a granular jet impinging on a flat surface, studied experimentally by Cheng et al.. Simple shear flow simulations reveal that calculation of the locally-averaged velocity is a critical ingredient to correctly predict streaming and collisional stresses. SR acknowledges the support of the Austrian Science Foundation through the Erwin-Schroedinger fellowship J-3072.

  10. Transient Mathematical Modeling for Liquid Rocket Engine Systems: Methods, Capabilities, and Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seymour, David C.; Martin, Michael A.; Nguyen, Huy H.; Greene, William D.

    2005-01-01

    The subject of mathematical modeling of the transient operation of liquid rocket engines is presented in overview form from the perspective of engineers working at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The necessity of creating and utilizing accurate mathematical models as part of liquid rocket engine development process has become well established and is likely to increase in importance in the future. The issues of design considerations for transient operation, development testing, and failure scenario simulation are discussed. An overview of the derivation of the basic governing equations is presented along with a discussion of computational and numerical issues associated with the implementation of these equations in computer codes. Also, work in the field of generating usable fluid property tables is presented along with an overview of efforts to be undertaken in the future to improve the tools use for the mathematical modeling process.

  11. Transient Mathematical Modeling for Liquid Rocket Engine Systems: Methods, Capabilities, and Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Michael A.; Nguyen, Huy H.; Greene, William D.; Seymout, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The subject of mathematical modeling of the transient operation of liquid rocket engines is presented in overview form from the perspective of engineers working at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The necessity of creating and utilizing accurate mathematical models as part of liquid rocket engine development process has become well established and is likely to increase in importance in the future. The issues of design considerations for transient operation, development testing, and failure scenario simulation are discussed. An overview of the derivation of the basic governing equations is presented along with a discussion of computational and numerical issues associated with the implementation of these equations in computer codes. Also, work in the field of generating usable fluid property tables is presented along with an overview of efforts to be undertaken in the future to improve the tools use for the mathematical modeling process.

  12. Assessing the capability of high resolution climatic model experiments to simulate Mediterranean cyclonic tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzaki, M.; Flocas, H. A.; Giannakopoulos, C.; Kostopoulou, E.; Kouroutzoglou, I.; Keay, K.; Simmonds, I.

    2010-09-01

    In this study, a comparison of a reanalysis driven simulation to a GCM driven simulation of a regional climate model is performed in order to assess the model's ability to capture the climatic characteristics of cyclonic tracks in the Mediterranean in the present climate. The ultimate scope of the study will be to perform a future climate projection related to cyclonic tracks in order to better understand and assess climate change in the Mediterranean. The climatology of the cyclonic tracks includes inter-monthly variations, classification of tracks according to their origin domain, dynamic and kinematic characteristics, as well as trend analysis. For this purpose, the ENEA model is employed based on PROTHEUS system composed of the RegCM atmospheric regional model and the MITgcm ocean model, coupled through the OASIS3 flux coupler. These model data became available through the EU Project CIRCE which aims to perform, for the first time, climate change projections with a realistic representation of the Mediterranean Sea. Two experiments are employed; a) the ERA402 with lateral Boundary conditions from ERA40 for the 43-year period 1958-2000, and b) the EH5OM_20C3M where the lateral boundary conditions for the atmosphere (1951-2000) are taken from the ECHAM5-MPIOM 20c3m global simulation (run3) included in the IPCC-AR4. The identification and tracking of cyclones is performed with the aid of the Melbourne University algorithm (MS algorithm), according to the Lagrangian perspective. MS algorithm characterizes a cyclone only if a vorticity maximum could be connected with a local pressure minimum. This approach is considered to be crucial, since open lows are also incorporated into the storm life-cycle, preventing possible inappropriate time series breaks, if a temporary weakening to an open-low state occurs. The model experiments verify that considerable inter-monthly variations of track density occur in the Mediterranean region, consistent with previous studies. The

  13. An integrated PHY-MAC analytical model for IEEE 802.15.7 VLC network with MPR capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hai-feng; Chi, Xue-fen; Liu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Considering that the collision caused by hidden terminal is particularly serious due to the narrow beams of optical devices, the multi-packet reception (MPR) is introduced to mitigate the collisions for IEEE 802.15.7 visible light communication (VLC) system. To explore the impact of MPR on system performance and investigate the interaction between physical (PHY) layer and media access control (MAC) layer, a three dimensional (3D) integrated PHY-MAC analytical model of carrier sense multiple access/collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) is established based on Markov chain theory for VLC system, in which MPR is implemented through the use of orthogonal code sequence. Throughput is derived to evaluate the performance of VLC system with MPR capability under imperfect optical channel. The results can be used for the performance optimization of a VLC system with MPR capability.

  14. Modeling the Non-Linear Response of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Using a Combined Damage/Plasticity Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuecker, Clara; Davila, Carlos G.; Pettermann, Heinz E.

    2008-01-01

    The present work is concerned with modeling the non-linear response of fiber reinforced polymer laminates. Recent experimental data suggests that the non-linearity is not only caused by matrix cracking but also by matrix plasticity due to shear stresses. To capture the effects of those two mechanisms, a model combining a plasticity formulation with continuum damage has been developed to simulate the non-linear response of laminates under plane stress states. The model is used to compare the predicted behavior of various laminate lay-ups to experimental data from the literature by looking at the degradation of axial modulus and Poisson s ratio of the laminates. The influence of residual curing stresses and in-situ effect on the predicted response is also investigated. It is shown that predictions of the combined damage/plasticity model, in general, correlate well with the experimental data. The test data shows that there are two different mechanisms that can have opposite effects on the degradation of the laminate Poisson s ratio which is captured correctly by the damage/plasticity model. Residual curing stresses are found to have a minor influence on the predicted response for the cases considered here. Some open questions remain regarding the prediction of damage onset.

  15. EUTROPHICATION MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR WATER QUALITY AND INTEGRATION TOWARDS ECOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A primary environmental focus for the use of mathematical models is for characterization of sources of nutrients and sediments and their relative loadings from large river basins, and the impact of land uses from smaller sub-basins on water quality in rivers, lakes, and estuaries...

  16. Autoregressive modeling with state-space embedding vectors for damage detection under operational and environmental variability

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles; Figueiredo, Eloi; Todd, Michael; Flynn, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinear time series approach is presented to detect damage in systems by using a state-space reconstruction to infer the geometrical structure of a deterministic dynamical system from observed time series response at multiple locations. The unique contribution of this approach is using a Multivariate Autoregressive (MAR) model of a baseline condition to predict the state space, where the model encodes the embedding vectors rather than scalar time series. A hypothesis test is established that the MAR model will fail to predict future response if damage is present in the test condition, and this test is investigated for robustness in the context of operational and environmental variability. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated using acceleration time series from a base-excited 3-story frame structure.

  17. An homogenization-based hyperelastic damage model: formulation and application to an EPDM/PP composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchart, Vanessa; Brieu, Mathias; Kondo, Djimedo; Naït-Abdelaziz, Moussa

    2008-05-01

    The present Note concerns the formulation, implementation and a first application of a micromechanically based hyperelastic damage model. The approach is based on the second order homogenization method proposed by Lopez-Pamies and Ponte Castañeda (2000) for hyperelastic composites and recently developed by Lopez-Pamies and Ponte Castañeda (2007) in the case of porous elastomers. We first implement the method and proceed to its verification by comparison with Finite Element simulations on a unit cell. Taking advantage of this validation and by using standard thermodynamics arguments, we propose an hyperelastic damage model founded on voids growth phenomena. Finally, we provide an example of validation of the model by comparison with experimental data obtained on an EPDM/PP composite. To cite this article: V. Bouchart et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  18. Modeling composite wing aeroelastic behavior with uncertain damage severity and material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, G.; Manan, A.; Cooper, J. E.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of uncertain material properties and severity of damage on the aeroelastic behavior of a finite element composite wing model are predicted by applying the Polynomial Chaos Expansion method (PCE). Different damage modes, including the transverse matrix cracking and broken fibers, are induced into pre-defined locations in the laminates and the aeroelastic stability and dynamic response of the wing due to "1-cosine" vertical gusts are evaluated. For this purpose, PCE models that predict the variation due to uncertainty of the flutter speed and an "Interesting Quantity" (root shear force) of the wing box are developed based upon a small sample of observations, exploiting the efficient Latin Hypercube sampling technique. The uncertainty propagation on the output responses, in the form of probability density functions, is evaluated at low computational cost, implementing the PCE models and verified successfully against the actual results.

  19. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus. These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world. PMID:27286824

  20. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M; Aziz, Ramy K; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2016-06-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world.

  1. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M; Aziz, Ramy K; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2016-06-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world. PMID:27286824

  2. Assessing the capability of CORDEX models in simulating onset of rainfall in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounkaila, Moussa S.; Abiodun, Babatunde J.; `Bayo Omotosho, J.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable forecasts of rainfall-onset dates (RODs) are crucial for agricultural planning and food security in West Africa. This study evaluates the ability of nine CORDEX regional climate models (RCMs: ARPEGE, CRCM5, RACMO, RCA35, REMO, RegCM3, PRECIS, CCLM and WRF) in simulating RODs over the region. Four definitions are used to compute RODs, and two observation datasets (GPCP and TRMM) are used in the model evaluation. The evaluation considers how well the RCMs, driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis (ERAIN), simulate the observed mean, standard deviation and inter-annual variability of RODs over West Africa. It also investigates how well the models link RODs with the northward movement of the monsoon system over the region. The model performances are compared to that of the driving reanalysis—ERAIN. Observations show that the mean RODs in West Africa have a zonal distribution, and the dates increase from the Guinea coast northward. ERAIN fails to reproduce the spatial distribution of the RODs as observed. The performance of some RCMs in simulating the RODs depends on the ROD definition used. For instance, ARPEGE, RACMO, PRECIS and CCLM produce a better ROD distribution than that of ERAIN when three of the ROD definitions are used, but give a worse ROD distribution than that of ERAIN when the fourth definition is used. However, regardless of the definition used, CCRM5, RCA35, REMO, RegCM3 and WRF show a remarkable improvement over ERAIN. The study shows that the ability of the RCMs in simulating RODs over West Africa strongly depends on how well the models reproduce the northward movement of the monsoon system and the associated features. The results show that there are some differences in the RODs obtained between the two observation datasets and RCMs, and the differences are magnified by differences in the ROD definitions. However, the study shows that most CORDEX RCMs have remarkable skills in predicting the RODs in West Africa.

  3. A Progressive Damage Model for unidirectional Fibre Reinforced Composites with Application to Impact and Penetration Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschbaum, M.; Hopmann, C.

    2016-06-01

    The computationally efficient simulation of the progressive damage behaviour of continuous fibre reinforced plastics is still a challenging task with currently available computer aided engineering methods. This paper presents an original approach for an energy based continuum damage model which accounts for stress-/strain nonlinearities, transverse and shear stress interaction phenomena, quasi-plastic shear strain components, strain rate effects, regularised damage evolution and consideration of load reversal effects. The physically based modelling approach enables experimental determination of all parameters on ply level to avoid expensive inverse analysis procedures. The modelling strategy, implementation and verification of this model using commercially available explicit finite element software are detailed. The model is then applied to simulate the impact and penetration of carbon fibre reinforced cross-ply specimens with variation of the impact speed. The simulation results show that the presented approach enables a good representation of the force-/displacement curves and especially well agreement with the experimentally observed fracture patterns. In addition, the mesh dependency of the results were assessed for one impact case showing only very little change of the simulation results which emphasises the general applicability of the presented method.

  4. On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

  5. Economic damages of ozone air pollution to crops using combined air quality and GIS modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachokostas, Ch.; Nastis, S. A.; Achillas, Ch.; Kalogeropoulos, K.; Karmiris, I.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Chourdakis, E.; Banias, G.; Limperi, N.

    2010-09-01

    This study aims at presenting a combined air quality and GIS modelling methodological approach in order to estimate crop damages from photochemical air pollution, depict their spatial resolution and assess the order of magnitude regarding the corresponding economic damages. The analysis is conducted within the Greater Thessaloniki Area, Greece, a Mediterranean territory which is characterised by high levels of photochemical air pollution and considerable agricultural activity. Ozone concentration fields for 2002 and for specific emission reduction scenarios for the year 2010 were estimated with the Ozone Fine Structure model in the area under consideration. Total economic damage to crops turns out to be significant and estimated to be approximately 43 M€ for the reference year. Production of cotton presents the highest economic loss, which is over 16 M€, followed by table tomato (9 M€), rice (4.2 M€), wheat (4 M€) and oilseed rape (2.8 M€) cultivations. Losses are not spread uniformly among farmers and the major losses occur in areas with valuable ozone-sensitive crops. The results are very useful for highlighting the magnitude of the total economic impacts of photochemical air pollution to the area's agricultural sector and can potentially be used for comparison with studies worldwide. Furthermore, spatial analysis of the economic damage could be of importance for governmental authorities and decision makers since it provides an indicative insight, especially if the economic instruments such as financial incentives or state subsidies to farmers are considered.

  6. Application and Comparison of Tsunami Vulnerability and Damage Models for the Town of Siracusa, Sicily, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnoni, Gianluca; Tinti, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Siracusa is one of the most important cities of the eastern coast of Sicily, which according to historical records and to the present knowledge of the tectonic setting, is exposed to tsunamis generated by landslides on the Malta escarpment and by local and remote (e.g., Eastern Hellenic Arc) earthquakes. For this reason, the area of Siracusa has been selected as one of the test sites to conduct specific studies within the European FP7 project ASTARTE. In this frame, this work focuses on the assessment of tsunami vulnerability of (and damage to) the building stock of the town. The analysis is carried out following two different models, namely the SCHEMA and the Papathoma Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment (PTVA-3) methods. Topographic and building stock data in the potentially flooded areas are taken from detailed digital databases produced by the region of Sicily, integrated with satellite and photographic imagery from Google Earth and further validated by field surveys. We have explored three inundation scenarios corresponding to a constant-level tsunami flooding with assumed sea level rise of 1, 3 and 5 m, and evaluated the damage to the town buildings using both methods that make use of a 5-degree scale. The main result is that the level of damage of both models is not consistent, and that consistency may be improved if one changes from a 5- to a 3-degree damage scale.

  7. Predictive modeling of interfacial damage in substructured steels: application to martensitic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, F.; Kouznetsova, V. G.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2016-02-01

    Metallic composite phases, like martensite present in conventional steels and new generation high strength steels exhibit microscale, locally lamellar microstructures characterized by alternating layers of phases or crystallographic variants. The layers can be sub-micron down to a few nanometers thick, and they are often characterized by high contrasts in plastic properties. As a consequence, fracture in these lamellar microstructures generally occurs along the layer interfaces or within one of the layers, typically parallel to the interface. This paper presents a computational framework that addresses the lamellar nature of these microstructures, by homogenizing the plastic deformation at the mesoscale by using the microscale response of the laminates. Failure is accounted for by introducing a family of damaging planes that are parallel to the layer interface. Mode I, mode II and mixed-mode opening are incorporated. The planes along which failure occurs are captured using a smeared damage approach. Coupling of damage with isotropic or anisotropic plasticity models, like crystal plasticity, is straightforward. The damaging planes and directions do not need to correspond to crystalline slip planes, and normal opening is also included. Focus is given on rate-dependent formulations of plasticity and damage, i.e. converged results can be obtained without further regularization techniques. The validation of the model using experimental observations in martensite-austenite lamellar microstructures in steels reveals that the model correctly predicts the main features of the onset of failure, e.g. the necking point, the failure initiation region and the failure mode. Finally, based on the qualitative results obtained, some material design guidelines are provided for martensitic and multi-phase steels.

  8. Structural Model Tuning Capability in an Object-Oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2008-01-01

    Updating the finite element model using measured data is a challenging problem in the area of structural dynamics. The model updating process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of dynamic properties of structures. Accurate rigid body dynamics are important for flight control system design and aeroelastic trim analysis. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. In this research, a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization [MDAO] tool is introduced to optimize the objective function and constraints such that the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data as well as the mass matrix being orthogonalized.

  9. Structural Model Tuning Capability in an Object-Oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2008-01-01

    Updating the finite element model using measured data is a challenging problem in the area of structural dynamics. The model updating process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of dynamic properties of structures. Accurate rigid body dynamics are important for flight control system design and aeroelastic trim analysis. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. In this research, a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool is introduced to optimize the objective function and constraints such that the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data as well as the mass matrix being orthogonalized.

  10. Development of Detonation Modeling Capabilities for Rocket Test Facilities: Hydrogen-Oxygen-Nitrogen Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the presented work was to develop validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based methodologies for predicting propellant detonations and their associated blast environments. Applications of interest were scenarios relevant to rocket propulsion test and launch facilities. All model development was conducted within the framework of the Loci/CHEM CFD tool due to its reliability and robustness in predicting high-speed combusting flow-fields associated with rocket engines and plumes. During the course of the project, verification and validation studies were completed for hydrogen-fueled detonation phenomena such as shock-induced combustion, confined detonation waves, vapor cloud explosions, and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) processes. The DDT validation cases included predicting flame acceleration mechanisms associated with turbulent flame-jets and flow-obstacles. Excellent comparison between test data and model predictions were observed. The proposed CFD methodology was then successfully applied to model a detonation event that occurred during liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen rocket diffuser testing at NASA Stennis Space Center.

  11. 3-D world modeling with updating capability based on combinatorial geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, M.; Pin, F.G.; de Saussure, G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a 3-D world modeling technique using range data. Range data quantify the distances from the sensor focal plane to the object surface, i.e., the 3-D coordinates of discrete points on the object surface are known. The approach proposed herein for 3-D world modeling is based on the Combinatorial Geometry (CG) Method which is widely used in Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. First, each measured point on the object surface is surrounded by a small sphere with a radius determined by the range to that point. Then, the 3-D shapes of the visible surfaces are obtained by taking the (Boolean) union of all the spheres. The result is an unambiguous representation of the object's boundary surfaces. The ''pre-learned'' partial knowledge of the environment can be also represented using the CG Method with a relatively small amount of data. Using the CG type of representation, distances in desired directions to boundary surfaces of various objects are efficiently calculated. This feature is particularly useful for continuously verifying the world model against the data provided by a range finder, and for integrating range data from successive locations of the robot during motion. The efficiency of the proposed approach is illustrated by simulations of a spherical robot in a 3-D room in the presence of moving obstacles and inadequate prelearned partial knowledge of the environment.

  12. The 3-D world modeling with updating capability based on combinatorial geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.; Pin, F. G.; Desaussure, G.; Weisbin, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 3-D world modeling technique using range data is discribed. Range data quantify the distances from the sensor focal plane to the object surface, i.e., the 3-D coordinates of discrete points on the object surface are known. The approach proposed herein for 3-D world modeling is based on the Combinatorial Geometry (CG) method which is widely used in Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. First, each measured point on the object surface is surrounded by a small sphere with a radius determined by the range to that point. Then, the 3-D shapes of the visible surfaces are obtained by taking the (Boolean) union of all the spheres. The result is an unambiguous representation of the object's boundary surfaces. The pre-learned partial knowledge of the environment can be also represented using the CG Method with a relatively small amount of data. Using the CG type of representation, distances in desired directions to boundary surfaces of various objects are efficiently calculated. This feature is particularly useful for continuously verifying the world model against the data provided by a range finder, and for integrating range data from successive locations of the robot during motion. The efficiency of the proposed approach is illustrated by simulations of a spherical robot in a 3-D room in the presence of moving obstacles and inadequate prelearned partial knowledge of the environment.

  13. E-Learning Applications for Urban Modelling and Ogc Standards Using HTML5 Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, R.; König, G.; Malchow, C.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports on the development of HTML5 based web-content related to urban modelling with special focus on GML and CityGML, allowing participants to access it regardless of the device platform. An essential part of the learning modules are short video lectures, supplemented by exercises and tests during the lecture to improve students' individual progress and success. The evaluation of the tests is used to guide students through the course content, depending on individual knowledge. With this approach, we provide learning applications on a wide range of devices, either mobile or desktop, fulfil the needs of just-in-time knowledge, and increase the emphasis on lifelong learning.

  14. QMU as an approach to strengthening the predictive capabilities of complex models.

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Genetha Anne.; Boggs, Paul T.; Grace, Matthew D.

    2010-09-01

    Complex systems are made up of multiple interdependent parts, and the behavior of the entire system cannot always be directly inferred from the behavior of the individual parts. They are nonlinear and system responses are not necessarily additive. Examples of complex systems include energy, cyber and telecommunication infrastructures, human and animal social structures, and biological structures such as cells. To meet the goals of infrastructure development, maintenance, and protection for cyber-related complex systems, novel modeling and simulation technology is needed. Sandia has shown success using M&S in the nuclear weapons (NW) program. However, complex systems represent a significant challenge and relative departure from the classical M&S exercises, and many of the scientific and mathematical M&S processes must be re-envisioned. Specifically, in the NW program, requirements and acceptable margins for performance, resilience, and security are well-defined and given quantitatively from the start. The Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) process helps to assess whether or not these safety, reliability and performance requirements have been met after a system has been developed. In this sense, QMU is used as a sort of check that requirements have been met once the development process is completed. In contrast, performance requirements and margins may not have been defined a priori for many complex systems, (i.e. the Internet, electrical distribution grids, etc.), particularly not in quantitative terms. This project addresses this fundamental difference by investigating the use of QMU at the start of the design process for complex systems. Three major tasks were completed. First, the characteristics of the cyber infrastructure problem were collected and considered in the context of QMU-based tools. Second, UQ methodologies for the quantification of model discrepancies were considered in the context of statistical models of cyber activity. Third

  15. Numerical Simulation of Damage using an Elastic-Viscoplastic Model with Directional Tensile Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I

    2003-03-17

    A new continuum model for directional tensile failure has been developed that can simulate weakening and void formation due to directional tensile failure. The model is developed within the context of a properly invariant nonlinear thermomechanical theory. A second order damage tensor is introduced which allows simulation of weakening to tension applied in one direction, without weakening to subsequent tension applied in perpendicular directions. This damage tensor can be advected using standard methods in computer codes. Porosity is used as an isotropic measure of volumetric void strain and its evolution is influenced by tensile failure. The rate of dissipation due to directional tensile failure takes a particularly simple form, which can be analyzed easily. Specifically, the model can be combined with general constitutive equations for porous compaction and dilation, as well as viscoplasticity. A robust non-iterative numerical scheme for integrating these evolution equations is proposed. This constitutive model has been implemented into an Eulerian shock wave code with adaptive mesh refinement. A number of simulations of complicated shock loading of different materials have been performed including problems of fracture of rock. These simulations show that directionality of damage can play a significant role in material failure.

  16. Visco-poroelastic damage model for brittle-ductile failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Zhu, Wenlu; Shalev, Eyal

    2015-04-01

    The coupling between damage accumulation, dilation, and compaction during loading of sandstones is responsible for different structural features such as localized deformation bands and homogeneous inelastic deformation. We distinguish and quantify the role of each deformation mechanism using new mathematical model and its numerical implementation. Formulation includes three different deformation regimes: (I) quasi-elastic deformation characterized by material strengthening and compaction; (II) cataclastic flow characterized by damage increase and compaction; and (III) brittle failure characterized by damage increase, dilation, and shear localization. Using a three-dimensional numerical model, we simulate the deformation behavior of cylindrical porous Berea sandstone samples under different confining pressures. The obtained stress, strain, porosity changes and macroscopic deformation features well reproduce the laboratory results. The model predicts different rock behavior as a function of confining pressures. The quasi-elastic and brittle regimes associated with formation of shear and/or dilatant bands occur at low effective pressures. The model also successfully reproduces cataclastic flow and homogeneous compaction under high pressures. Complex behavior with overlap of common features of all regimes is simulated under intermediate pressures, resulting with localized compaction or shear enhanced compaction bands. Numerical results elucidate three steps in the formation of compaction bands: (1) dilation and subsequent shear localization, (2) formation of shear enhanced compaction band, and (3) formation of pure compaction band.

  17. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  18. Application of cyclic damage accumulation life prediction model to high temperature components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    A high temperature, low cycle fatigue life prediction method was developed. This method, Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA), was developed for use in predicting the crack initiation lifetime of gas turbine engine materials, but it can be applied to other materials as well. The method is designed to account for the effects on creep-fatigue life of complex loading such as thermomechanical fatigue, hold periods, waveshapes, mean stresses, multiaxiality, cumulative damage, coatings, and environmental attack. Several features of this model were developed to make it practical for application to actual component analysis, such as the ability to handle nonisothermal loading (including TMF), arbitrary cycle paths, and multiple damage modes. The CDA life prediction model was derived from extensive specimen tests conducted on cast nickel-base superalloy B1900 + Hf. These included both monotonic tests (tensile and creep) and strain-controlled fatigue experiments (uniaxial, biaxial, TMF, mixed creep-fatigue, and controlled mean stress). Additional specimen tests were conducted on wrought INCO 718 to verify the applicability of the final CDA model to other high-temperature alloys. The model will be available to potential users in the near future in the form of a FORTRAN-77 computer program.

  19. Assessment of damage localization based on spatial filters using numerical crack propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2011-07-01

    This paper is concerned with vibration based structural health monitoring with a focus on non-model based damage localization. The type of damage investigated is cracking of concrete structures due to the loss of prestress. In previous works, an automated method based on spatial filtering techniques applied to large dynamic strain sensor networks has been proposed and tested using data from numerical simulations. In the simulations, simplified representations of cracks (such as a reduced Young's modulus) have been used. While this gives the general trend for global properties such as eigen frequencies, the change of more local features, such as strains, is not adequately represented. Instead, crack propagation models should be used. In this study, a first attempt is made in this direction for concrete structures (quasi brittle material with softening laws) using crack-band models implemented in the commercial software DIANA. The strategy consists in performing a non-linear computation which leads to cracking of the concrete, followed by a dynamic analysis. The dynamic response is then used as the input to the previously designed damage localization system in order to assess its performances. The approach is illustrated on a simply supported beam modeled with 2D plane stress elements.

  20. Insights into the damage zones in fault-bend folds from geomechanical models and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Hou, Guiting; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the rock mass deformation and stress states, the fracture development and distribution are critical to a range of endeavors including oil and gas exploration and development, and geothermal reservoir characterization and management. Geomechanical modeling can be used to simulate the forming processes of faults and folds, and predict the onset of failure and the type and abundance of deformation features along with the orientations and magnitudes of stresses. This approach enables the development of forward models that incorporate realistic mechanical stratigraphy (e.g., the bed thickness, bedding planes and competence contrasts), include faults and bedding-slip surfaces as frictional sliding interfaces, reproduce the geometry of the fold structures, and allow tracking strain and stress through the whole deformation process. In this present study, we combine field observations and finite element models to calibrate the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds, and discuss the mechanical controls (e.g., the slip displacement, ramp cutoff angle, frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults) that are able to influence the development and distribution of fractures during fault-bend folding. A linear relationship between the slip displacement and the fracture damage zone, the ramp cutoff angle and the fracture damage zone, and the frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults and the fracture damage zone was established respectively based on the geomechanical modeling results. These mechanical controls mentioned above altogether contribute to influence and control the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds.

  1. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  2. Rapid architecture alternative modeling (RAAM): A framework for capability-based analysis of system of systems architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, Joseph V.

    problem domain by establishing an effective means to communicate the semantics from the RAAM framework. These techniques make it possible to include diverse multi-metric models within the RAAM framework in addition to system and operational level trades. A canonical example was used to explore the uses of the methodology. The canonical example contains all of the features of a full system of systems architecture analysis study but uses fewer tasks and systems. Using RAAM with the canonical example it was possible to consider both system and operational level trades in the same analysis. Once the methodology had been tested with the canonical example, a Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD) capability model was developed. Due to the sensitive nature of analyses on that subject, notional data was developed. The notional data has similar trends and properties to realistic Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses data. RAAM was shown to be traceable and provided a mechanism for a unified treatment of a variety of metrics. The SEAD capability model demonstrated lower computer runtimes and reduced model creation complexity as compared to methods currently in use. To determine the usefulness of the implementation of the methodology on current computing hardware, RAAM was tested with system of system architecture studies of different sizes. This was necessary since system of systems may be called upon to accomplish thousands of tasks. It has been clearly demonstrated that RAAM is able to enumerate and evaluate the types of large, complex design spaces usually encountered in capability based design, oftentimes providing the ability to efficiently search the entire decision space. The core algorithms for generation and evaluation of alternatives scale linearly with expected problem sizes. The SEAD capability model outputs prompted the discovery a new issue, the data storage and manipulation requirements for an analysis. Two strategies were developed to counter large data sizes, the use

  3. Linking asphalt binder fatigue to asphalt mixture fatigue performance using viscoelastic continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaei, Farinaz; Castorena, Cassie; Kim, Y. Richard

    2016-08-01

    Fatigue cracking is a major form of distress in asphalt pavements. Asphalt binder is the weakest asphalt concrete constituent and, thus, plays a critical role in determining the fatigue resistance of pavements. Therefore, the ability to characterize and model the inherent fatigue performance of an asphalt binder is a necessary first step to design mixtures and pavements that are not susceptible to premature fatigue failure. The simplified viscoelastic continuum damage (S-VECD) model has been used successfully by researchers to predict the damage evolution in asphalt mixtures for various traffic and climatic conditions using limited uniaxial test data. In this study, the S-VECD model, developed for asphalt mixtures, is adapted for asphalt binders tested under cyclic torsion in a dynamic shear rheometer. Derivation of the model framework is presented. The model is verified by producing damage characteristic curves that are both temperature- and loading history-independent based on time sweep tests, given that the effects of plasticity and adhesion loss on the material behavior are minimal. The applicability of the S-VECD model to the accelerated loading that is inherent of the linear amplitude sweep test is demonstrated, which reveals reasonable performance predictions, but with some loss in accuracy compared to time sweep tests due to the confounding effects of nonlinearity imposed by the high strain amplitudes included in the test. The asphalt binder S-VECD model is validated through comparisons to asphalt mixture S-VECD model results derived from cyclic direct tension tests and Accelerated Loading Facility performance tests. The results demonstrate good agreement between the asphalt binder and mixture test results and pavement performance, indicating that the developed model framework is able to capture the asphalt binder's contribution to mixture fatigue and pavement fatigue cracking performance.

  4. The Hill equation: a review of its capabilities in pharmacological modelling.

    PubMed

    Goutelle, Sylvain; Maurin, Michel; Rougier, Florent; Barbaut, Xavier; Bourguignon, Laurent; Ducher, Michel; Maire, Pascal

    2008-12-01

    The Hill equation was first introduced by A.V. Hill to describe the equilibrium relationship between oxygen tension and the saturation of haemoglobin. In pharmacology, the Hill equation has been extensively used to analyse quantitative drug-receptor relationships. Many pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models have used the Hill equation to describe nonlinear drug dose-response relationships. Although the Hill equation is widely used, its many properties are not all well known. This article aims at reviewing the various properties of the Hill equation. The descriptive aspects of the Hill equation, in particular mathematical and graphical properties, are examined, and related to Hill's original work. The mechanistic aspect of the Hill equation, involving a strong connection with the Guldberg and Waage law of mass action, is also described. Finally, a probabilistic view of the Hill equation is examined. Here, we provide some new calculation results, such as Fisher information and Shannon entropy, and we introduce multivariate probabilistic Hill equations. The main features and potential applications of this probabilistic approach are also discussed. Thus, within the same formalism, the Hill equation has many different properties which can be of great interest for those interested in mathematical modelling in pharmacology and biosciences.

  5. A refined one-dimensional rotordynamics model with three-dimensional capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, E.; Filippi, M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper evaluates the vibration characteristics of various rotating structures. The present methodology exploits the one-dimensional Carrera Unified Formulation (1D CUF), which enables one to go beyond the kinematic assumptions of classical beam theories. According to the component-wise (CW) approach, Lagrange-like polynomial expansions (LE) are here adopted to develop the refined displacement theories. The LE elements make it possible to model each structural component of the rotor with an arbitrary degree of accuracy using either different displacement theories or localized mesh refinements. Hamilton's Principle is used to derive the governing equations, which are solved by the Finite Element Method. The CUF one-dimensional theory includes all the effects due to rotation, namely the Coriolis term, spin softening and geometrical stiffening. The numerical simulations have been performed considering a thin ring, discs and bladed-deformable shafts. The effects of the number and the position of the blades on the dynamic stability of the rotor have been evaluated. The results have been compared, when possible, with the 2D and 3D solutions that are available in the literature. CUF models appear very practical to investigate the dynamics of complex rotating structures since they provide 2D and quasi-3D results, while preserving the computational effectiveness of one-dimensional solutions.

  6. A Micromechanics-Based Damage Model for [+/- Theta/90n]s Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayugo, Joan-Andreu; Camanho, Pedro P.; Maimi, Pere; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A new damage model based on a micromechanical analysis of cracked [+/- Theta/90n]s laminates subjected to multiaxial loads is proposed. The model predicts the onset and accumulation of transverse matrix cracks in uniformly stressed laminates, the effect of matrix cracks on the stiffness of the laminate, as well as the ultimate failure of the laminate. The model also accounts for the effect of the ply thickness on the ply strength. Predictions relating the elastic properties of several laminates and multiaxial loads are presented.

  7. Development of a Process Model for CO(2) Laser Mitigation of Damage Growth in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Boley, C; Rotter, M D

    2003-11-01

    A numerical model of CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of damage growth in fused silica has been constructed that accounts for laser energy absorption, heat conduction, radiation transport, evaporation of fused silica and thermally induced stresses. This model will be used to understand scaling issues and effects of pulse and beam shapes on material removal, temperatures reached and stresses generated. Initial calculations show good agreement of simulated and measured material removal. The model has also been applied to LG-770 glass as a prototype red blocker material.

  8. Modelling the Shear Behaviour of Rock Joints with Asperity Damage Under Constant Normal Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indraratna, Buddhima; Thirukumaran, Sivanathan; Brown, E. T.; Zhu, Song-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The shear behaviour of a rough rock joint depends largely on the surface properties of the joint, as well as the boundary conditions applied across the joint interface. This paper proposes a new analytical model to describe the complete shear behaviour of rough joints under constant normal stiffness (CNS) boundary conditions by incorporating the effect of damage to asperities. In particular, the effects of initial normal stress levels and joint surface roughness on the shear behaviour of joints under CNS conditions were studied, and the analytical model was validated through experimental results. Finally, the practical application of the model to a jointed rock slope stability analysis is presented.

  9. A comprehensive analysis of earthquake damage patterns using high dimensional model representation feature selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşkin Kaya, Gülşen

    2013-10-01

    Recently, earthquake damage assessment using satellite images has been a very popular ongoing research direction. Especially with the availability of very high resolution (VHR) satellite images, a quite detailed damage map based on building scale has been produced, and various studies have also been conducted in the literature. As the spatial resolution of satellite images increases, distinguishability of damage patterns becomes more cruel especially in case of using only the spectral information during classification. In order to overcome this difficulty, textural information needs to be involved to the classification to improve the visual quality and reliability of damage map. There are many kinds of textural information which can be derived from VHR satellite images depending on the algorithm used. However, extraction of textural information and evaluation of them have been generally a time consuming process especially for the large areas affected from the earthquake due to the size of VHR image. Therefore, in order to provide a quick damage map, the most useful features describing damage patterns needs to be known in advance as well as the redundant features. In this study, a very high resolution satellite image after Iran, Bam earthquake was used to identify the earthquake damage. Not only the spectral information, textural information was also used during the classification. For textural information, second order Haralick features were extracted from the panchromatic image for the area of interest using gray level co-occurrence matrix with different size of windows and directions. In addition to using spatial features in classification, the most useful features representing the damage characteristic were selected with a novel feature selection method based on high dimensional model representation (HDMR) giving sensitivity of each feature during classification. The method called HDMR was recently proposed as an efficient tool to capture the input

  10. New distortional hardening model capable of predicting eight ears for textured aluminum sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J. H.; Cazacu, O.; Yoon, J. W.; Dick, R. E.

    2011-05-04

    The effects of the anisotropy evolution and of the directionality in hardening on the predictions of the earing profile of a strongly textured aluminum alloy are investigated using a new distortional hardening model that incorporates multiple hardening curves corresponding to uniaxial tension along several orientations with respect to the rolling direction, and to biaxial tension. Yielding is described using a form of CPB06ex2 yield function (Plunkett et al. (2008)) which is tailored for metals with no tension-compression asymmetry. It is shown that even if directional hardening and its evolution are neglected, this yield function predicts a cup with eight ears as was observed experimentally. However, directional hardening can be of considerable importance for improved accuracy in prediction of the non-uniformity of the cup height profile.

  11. Modeling the capability of penetrating a jammed crowd to eliminate freezing transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed Mahmod, Shuaib

    2016-05-01

    Frozen state from jammed state is one of the most interesting aspects produced when simulating the multidirectional pedestrian flow of high density crowds. Cases of real life situations for such a phenomenon are not exhaustively treated. Our observations in the Hajj crowd show that freezing transition does not occur very often. On the contrary, penetrating a jammed crowd is a common aspect. We believe the kindness of pedestrians facing others whose walking is blocked is a main factor in eliminating the frozen state as well as in relieving the jammed state. We refine the social force model by incorporating a new social force to enable the simulated pedestrians to mimic the real behavior observed in the Hajj area. Simulations are performed to validate the work qualitatively.

  12. On Using Residual Voltage to Estimate Electrode Model Parameters for Damage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ashwati; Kelly, Shawn K.

    2016-01-01

    Current technology has enabled a significant increase in the number of electrodes for electrical stimulation. For large arrays of electrodes, it becomes increasingly difficult to monitor and detect failures at the stimulation site. In this paper, we propose the idea that the residual voltage from a biphasic electrical stimulation pulse can serve to recognize damage at the electrode-tissue interface. We use a simple switch circuit approach to estimate the relaxation time constant of the electrode model, which essentially models the residual voltage in biphasic electrical stimulation, and compare it with standard electrode characterization techniques. Out of 15 electrodes in a polyimide-based SIROF array, our approach highlights 3 damaged electrodes, consistent with measurements made using cyclic voltammetry and electrode impedance spectroscopy. PMID:27231725

  13. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space.

  14. Numerical damage models using a structural approach: application in bones and ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, P. J.; Bonnoit, J.; Chabrand, P.; Jean, M.; Pithioux, M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to apply knowledge of structural properties to perform numerical simulations with models of bones and knee ligaments exposed to dynamic tensile loading leading to tissue damage. Compact bones and knee ligaments exhibit the same geometrical pattern in their different levels of structural hierarchy from the tropocollagen molecule to the fibre. Nevertheless, their mechanical behaviours differ considerably at the fibril level. These differences are due to the contribution of the joints in the microfibril-fibril-fibre assembly and to the mechanical properties of the structural components. Two finite element models of the fibrous bone and ligament structure were used to describe damage in terms of elastoplastic laws or joint decohesion processes.

  15. Capability of models to predict leaf N and P across four seasons for six sub-tropical forest evergreen trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Deventer, H.; Cho, M. A.; Mutanga, O.; Ramoelo, A.

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient phenology of evergreen subtropical forests of southern Africa is poorly understood. Foliar nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) forms key components of photosynthesis and are vulnerable to global change stressors. Remote sensing techniques can potentially map and monitor nutrient phenology, yet models to predict across species, seasons and climatic regions are deficient. This study evaluates the capability of various models, developed from leaf spectra of selected spectral regions and seasons, to predict nutrient concentration across season and species. Seasonal differences in foliar N and P were assessed using a one-way ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA). The relationship between leaf spectra and nutrients was assessed using linear regressions between the foliar nutrients and spectral indices. The predictive capability of three models was compared using root mean square error (RMSE) values. Amongst the four seasons, winter leaves showed the highest mean N (2.16%, p < 0.01). However, winter showed the lowest variability of foliar N (coefficient of variation = 8%) compared to the variability of the other three seasons (coefficient of variance > 35%). In fact, between winter and spring, the variability in foliar N increased by 294%. Foliar P did not significantly differ between the four seasons. Predictive models for leaf N concentration developed for each season showed a higher level of accuracy, particularly for winter, whereas predictive models for leaf P showed low accuracies. Models developed from a single season showed a slight increase in error for the summer and autumn, however a larger increase in error for the winter season for the evergreen trees. The results suggest that spectral measurements can be potentially be used to quantify nutrient phenology at regional scale and monitor the impacts of global change on nutrient phenology and photosynthesis.

  16. A simple model of proton damage in GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Walker, G. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A simple proton damage model for GaAs solar cells is derived and compared to experimental values of change in short circuit currents. The recombination cross section associated with the defects was determined from the experimental comparison to be approximately 1.2 x 10 to the -13th power sq cm in fair agreement with values determined from the deep level transient spectroscopy technique.

  17. Dermal absorption and skin damage following hydrofluoric acid exposure in an ex vivo human skin model.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Kilo, Sonja; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Korinth, Gintautas; Drexler, Hans

    2016-04-25

    The wide industrial use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) poses a high risk for accidental dermal exposure. Despite local and systemic hazards associated with HF, information on percutaneous penetration and tissue damage is rare. In the present ex vivo study, the dermal absorption of HF (detected in terms of fluoride ions) was quantified and the skin damaging potential as a function of concentration and exposure duration was assessed. Percutaneous penetration of HF (c=5, 30, and 50%) at 3 exposure durations (3, 5, and 10 min) was investigated in a static diffusion cell model using freshly excised human skin. Alterations of skin were histologically evaluated. HF rapidly penetrated through skin under formation of a considerable intradermal reservoir (∼ 13-67% of total absorbed fluoride). Histologically, epidermal alterations were detected already after exposure to 5% HF for 3 min. The degree of skin damage increased with rising concentration and exposure duration leading to coagulation necrosis. For HF concentrations of ≥ 30%, skin damage progressed into deeper skin layers. Topically applied HF concentration was the principal parameter determining HF induced skin effects. The intradermal HF retention capacity associated with progression and prolongation of HF induced skin effects must be considered in the review of skin decontamination procedures.

  18. Amelioration of inflammation and tissue damage in sickle cell model mice by Nrf2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Keleku-Lukwete, Nadine; Suzuki, Mikiko; Otsuki, Akihito; Tsuchida, Kouhei; Katayama, Saori; Hayashi, Makiko; Naganuma, Eriko; Moriguchi, Takashi; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James Douglas; Imaizumi, Masue; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene, leading to the production of abnormally shaped red blood cells. Sickle cells are prone to hemolysis and thereby release free heme into plasma, causing oxidative stress and inflammation that in turn result in damage to multiple organs. The transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the antioxidant cell-defense system. Here we show that constitutive Nrf2 activation by ablation of its negative regulator Keap1 (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) significantly improves symptoms in SCD model mice. SCD mice exhibit severe liver damage and lung inflammation associated with high expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules compared with normal mice. Importantly, these symptoms subsided after Nrf2 activation. Although hemolysis and stress erythropoiesis did not change substantially in the Nrf2-activated SCD mice, Nrf2 promoted the elimination of plasma heme released by sickle cells’ hemolysis and thereby reduced oxidative stress and inflammation, demonstrating that Nrf2 activation reduces organ damage and segregates inflammation from prevention of hemolysis in SCD mice. Furthermore, administration of the Nrf2 inducer CDDO-Im (2-cyano-3, 12 dioxooleana-1, 9 diene-28-imidazolide) also relieved inflammation and organ failure in SCD mice. These results support the contention that Nrf2 induction may be an important means to protect organs from the pathophysiology of sickle cell-induced damage. PMID:26371321

  19. Amelioration of inflammation and tissue damage in sickle cell model mice by Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Keleku-Lukwete, Nadine; Suzuki, Mikiko; Otsuki, Akihito; Tsuchida, Kouhei; Katayama, Saori; Hayashi, Makiko; Naganuma, Eriko; Moriguchi, Takashi; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James Douglas; Imaizumi, Masue; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-09-29

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene, leading to the production of abnormally shaped red blood cells. Sickle cells are prone to hemolysis and thereby release free heme into plasma, causing oxidative stress and inflammation that in turn result in damage to multiple organs. The transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the antioxidant cell-defense system. Here we show that constitutive Nrf2 activation by ablation of its negative regulator Keap1 (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) significantly improves symptoms in SCD model mice. SCD mice exhibit severe liver damage and lung inflammation associated with high expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules compared with normal mice. Importantly, these symptoms subsided after Nrf2 activation. Although hemolysis and stress erythropoiesis did not change substantially in the Nrf2-activated SCD mice, Nrf2 promoted the elimination of plasma heme released by sickle cells' hemolysis and thereby reduced oxidative stress and inflammation, demonstrating that Nrf2 activation reduces organ damage and segregates inflammation from prevention of hemolysis in SCD mice. Furthermore, administration of the Nrf2 inducer CDDO-Im (2-cyano-3, 12 dioxooleana-1, 9 diene-28-imidazolide) also relieved inflammation and organ failure in SCD mice. These results support the contention that Nrf2 induction may be an important means to protect organs from the pathophysiology of sickle cell-induced damage.

  20. Preliminary flight evaluation of F100 engine model derivative airstart capability in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, T. K.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A series of airstarts was conducted in an F-15 airplane with two prototype F100 engine model derivative (EMD) engines equipped with digital electronic engine control (DEEC) systems. The airstart envelope and time required for airstarts were defined. The success of an airstart is most heavily dependent on airspeed. Spooldown airstarts at 200 knots and higher were all successful. Spooldown airstart times ranged from 53 sec at 250 knots to 170 sec at 175 knots. Jet fuel starter (JFS) assisted airstarts were conducted at 175 knots at two altitudes, and airstart times were 50 and 60 sec, significantly faster than unassisted airstart. The effect of altitude on airstarts was small. In addition, the airstart characteristics of the two test engines were found to closely resemble each other. The F100 EMD airstart characteristics were very similar to the DEEC equipped F100 engine tested previously. Finally, the time required to spool down from intermediate power compressor rotor speed to a given compressor rotor speed was found to be a strong function of altitude and a weaker function of airspeed.

  1. Optimal selection of autoregressive model coefficients for early damage detectability with an application to wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, Simon; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Data-driven vibration-based damage detection techniques can be competitive because of their lower instrumentation and data analysis costs. The use of autoregressive model coefficients (ARMCs) as damage sensitive features (DSFs) is one such technique. So far, like with other DSFs, either full sets of coefficients or subsets selected by trial-and-error have been used, but this can lead to suboptimal composition of multivariate DSFs and decreased damage detection performance. This study enhances the selection of ARMCs for statistical hypothesis testing for damage presence. Two approaches for systematic ARMC selection, based on either adding or eliminating the coefficients one by one or using a genetic algorithm (GA) are proposed. The methods are applied to a numerical model of an aerodynamically excited large composite wind turbine blade with disbonding damage. The GA out performs the other selection methods and enables building multivariate DSFs that markedly enhance early damage detectability and are insensitive to measurement noise.

  2. Modeling of surface thermodynamics and damage thresholds in the IR and THz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, C. D., III; Thomas, Robert J.; Maseberg, Paul D. S.; Buffington, Gavin D.; Irvin, Lance J.; Stolarski, Jacob; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2007-02-01

    The Air Force Research Lab has developed a configurable, two-dimensional, thermal model to predict laser-tissue interactions, and to aid in predictive studies for safe exposure limits. The model employs a finite-difference, time-dependent method to solve the two-dimensional cylindrical heat equation (radial and axial) in a biological system construct. Tissues are represented as multi-layer structures, with optical and thermal properties defined for each layer, are homogeneous throughout the layer. Multiple methods for computing the source term for the heat equation have been implemented, including simple linear absorption definitions and full beam propagation through finite-difference methods. The model predicts the occurrence of thermal damage sustained by the tissue, and can also determine damage thresholds for total optical power delivered to the tissue. Currently, the surface boundary conditions incorporate energy loss through free convection, surface radiation, and evaporative cooling. Implementing these boundary conditions is critical for correctly calculating the surface temperature of the tissue, and, therefore, damage thresholds. We present an analysis of the interplay between surface boundary conditions, ambient conditions, and blood perfusion within tissues.

  3. Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-09-21

    Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

  4. Experimental validation of a simple model capable of predicting the phase contrast imaging capabilities of any x-ray imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivo, A.; Speller, R.

    2006-06-01

    Phase contrast (PC) imaging is one of the most exciting emerging x-ray imaging techniques, with the potential of removing some of the main limitations of conventional radiology. After extensive experimentation carried out particularly at synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities, the scientific community agrees that it is now time to translate these ideas towards the first clinical implementations. In this framework, a complete model, based on Fresnel/Kirchoff diffraction integrals, was devised. This model accounts for source dimensions, beam spectrum and divergence and detector point spread function (PSF), and can thus be applied to any x-ray imaging system. In particular, by accepting in input the above parameters along with the ones describing the sample, the model can be used to optimize the geometry of the set-up, i.e. to assess the source-to-sample and sample-to-detector distances which maximize feature detection. The model was evaluated by acquiring a range of images of different samples with a laboratory source, and a good agreement was found between simulated and experimental data in all cases. In order to maximize the generality of the results, all acquisitions were carried out using a polychromatic source and an energy-resolving detector; in this way, a range of monochromatic images could be obtained as well as polychromatic images, which can be created by integrating different parts of the acquired spectra. One of the most notable results obtained is that in many practical cases polychromatic PC imaging can provide the same image quality as its monochromatic counterpart. This is an important step in the wider application of PC using conventional sources.

  5. Melanin granule model for laser-induced thermal damage in the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.R.; Rogers, M.E.; Gerstman, B.S.; Jacques, S.L.

    1996-05-01

    An analytical model for thermal damage of retinal tissue due to absorption of laser energy by finite-sized melanin granules is developed. Since melanin is the primary absorber of visible and near-IR light in the skin and in the retina, bulk heating of tissue can be determined by superposition of individual melanin granule effects. Granules are modeled as absorbing spheres surrounded by an infinite medium of water. Analytical solutions to the heat equation result in computations that are quick and accurate. Moreover, the model does not rely on symmetric beam profiles, and so arbitrary images can be studied. The important contribution of this model is to provide a more accurate biological description of submillisecond pulse exposures than previous retinal models, while achieving agreement for longer pulses. This model can also be naturally extended into the sub-microsecond domain by including vaporization as a damage mechanism. It therefore represents the beginning of a model which can be applied across the entire pulse duration domain.

  6. Melanin granule model for laser-induced thermal damage in the retina.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C R; Gerstman, B S; Jacques, S L; Rogers, M E

    1996-05-01

    An analytical model for thermal damage of retinal tissue due to absorption of laser energy by finite-sized melanin granules is developed. Since melanin is the primary absorber of visible and near-IR light in the skin and in the retina, bulk heating of tissue can be determined by superposition of individual melanin granule effects. Granules are modeled as absorbing spheres surrounded by an infinite medium of water. Analytical solutions to the heat equation result in computations that are quick and accurate. Moreover, the model does not rely on symmetric beam profiles, and so arbitrary images can be studied. The important contribution of this model is to provide a more accurate biological description of sub-millisecond pulse exposures than previous retinal models, while achieving agreement for longer pulses. This model can also be naturally extended into the sub-microsecond domain by including vaporization as a damage mechanism. It therefore represents the beginning of a model which can be applied across the entire pulse duration domain.

  7. Evaluation of a Linear Cumulative Damage Failure Model for Epoxy Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David E.; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia; Macon, David; Totman, Peter; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a significant amount of work has been conducted to provide more complex and accurate material models for use in the evaluation of adhesive bondlines. Some of this has been prompted by recent studies into the effects of residual stresses on the integrity of bondlines. Several techniques have been developed for the analysis of bondline residual stresses. Key to these analyses is the criterion that is used for predicting failure. Residual stress loading of an adhesive bondline can occur over the life of the component. For many bonded systems, this can be several years. It is impractical to directly characterize failure of adhesive bondlines under a constant load for several years. Therefore, alternative approaches for predictions of bondline failures are required. In the past, cumulative damage failure models have been developed. These models have ranged from very simple to very complex. This paper documents the generation and evaluation of some of the most simple linear damage accumulation tensile failure models for an epoxy adhesive. This paper shows how several variations on the failure model were generated and presents an evaluation of the accuracy of these failure models in predicting creep failure of the adhesive. The paper shows that a simple failure model can be generated from short-term failure data for accurate predictions of long-term adhesive performance.

  8. Automatic Building Damage Detection Method Using High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images and 3d GIS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jihui; Sui, Haigang; Feng, Wenqing; Song, Zhina

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a novel approach of building damaged detection is proposed using high resolution remote sensing images and 3D GIS-Model data. Traditional building damage detection method considers to detect damaged building due to earthquake, but little attention has been paid to analyze various building damaged types(e.g., trivial damaged, severely damaged and totally collapsed.) Therefore, we want to detect the different building damaged type using 2D and 3D feature of scenes because the real world we live in is a 3D space. The proposed method generalizes that the image geometric correction method firstly corrects the post-disasters remote sensing image using the 3D GIS model or RPC parameters, then detects the different building damaged types using the change of the height and area between the pre- and post-disasters and the texture feature of post-disasters. The results, evaluated on a selected study site of the Beichuan earthquake ruins, Sichuan, show that this method is feasible and effective in building damage detection. It has also shown that the proposed method is easily applicable and well suited for rapid damage assessment after natural disasters.

  9. Seismic damage analysis of the outlet piers of arch dams using the finite element sub-model method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liangfeng; Wu, Mingxin; Wang, Jinting; Xu, Yanjie

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to analyze seismic damage of reinforced outlet piers of arch dams by the nonlinear finite element (FE) sub-model method. First, the dam-foundation system is modeled and analyzed, in which the effects of infinite foundation, contraction joints, and nonlinear concrete are taken into account. The detailed structures of the outlet pier are then simulated with a refined FE model in the sub-model analysis. In this way the damage mechanism of the plain (unreinforced) outlet pier is analyzed, and the effects of two reinforcement measures (i.e., post-tensioned anchor cables and reinforcing bar) on the dynamic damage to the outlet pier are investigated comprehensively. Results show that the plain pier is damaged severely by strong earthquakes while implementation of post-tensioned anchor cables strengthens the pier effectively. In addition, radiation damping strongly alleviates seismic damage to the piers.

  10. Model development of plasma implanted hydrogenic diffusion and trapping in ion beam damaged tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, J. L.; Wang, Y. Q.; Doerner, R. P.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    A Cu ion beam is used to induce controlled levels of damage (10-3, 10-2, and 10-1 dpa) in room temperature W samples. A single 5 MeV beam energy yielding a peaked damage profile 0.8 μm into the material, or three beam energies (0.5, 2, and 5 MeV) producing a relatively uniform damage profile from the near surface up to 0.8 μm were used. The W samples were then exposed to a D plasma ion fluence of 1024 ions m-2 at 380 K, and the resulting D retention was measured using the D(3He,p)4He reaction analysis (NRA) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). We observe that within experimental error there is no significant difference in retention whether the damage profile is peaked or uniform. The increase in retention is observed to increase proportional to \\text{dp}{{\\text{a}}0.66} estimated from the dpa peak calculated from the SRIM program. A simplified retention model is proposed that provides concentration profiles that can be directly compared to NRA data and total retention measurements. Taking the trapping energies due to three defect types calculated from density functional theory (DFT), the only free-parameters are three defect densities of in-grain monovacancies, dislocations, and grain boundary vacancies, and we assume these defects to be the dominant trapping locations. The model can fit D retention data in a pristine W sample within the experimental error of the measurements, and in subsequent modeling these intrinsic defect densities are then fixed. We model the retention profile after ion damage by adding the SRIM predicted vacancy profile to the intrinsic monovacancy defect density. Since the increase in retention, and therefore the increase in vacancy production, does not increase linearly with dpa, a correction factor is multiplied to the predicted vacancy profile to fit the data. A new diffusion coefficient is calculated with the model that is a function of the concentration of trapped atoms. This calculation may resolve discrepancies of various

  11. Rapid architecture alternative modeling (RAAM): A framework for capability-based analysis of system of systems architectures

    NASA Astrophysics