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Sample records for damage response dna

  1. Deciphering the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2015-09-10

    This year's Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award honors Evelyn Witkin and Stephen J. Elledge, two pioneers in elucidating the DNA damage response, whose contributions span more than 40 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  3. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage.

  4. Sphingolipids in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Brittany; Donaldson, Jane Catalina; Obeid, Lina

    2015-05-01

    Recently, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have emerged as important targets of many chemotherapeutics and DNA damaging agents and therefore play significant roles in mediating the physiological response of the cell to DNA damage. In this review we will highlight points of connection between the DNA damage response (DDR) and sphingolipid metabolism; specifically how certain sphingolipid enzymes are regulated in response to DNA damage and how the bioactive lipids produced by these enzymes affect cell fate. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Sphingolipids in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Brittany; Donaldson, Cat; Obeid, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Recently, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have emerged as important targets of many chemotherapeutics and DNA damaging agents and therefore play significant roles in mediating the physiological response of the cell to DNA damage. In this review we will highlight points of connection between the DNA damage response (DDR) and sphingolipid metabolism; specifically how certain sphingolipid enzymes are regulated in response to DNA damage and how the bioactive lipids produced by these enzymes affect cell fate. PMID:25434743

  6. DNA damage response and transcription.

    PubMed

    Lagerwerf, Saskia; Vrouwe, Mischa G; Overmeer, René M; Fousteri, Maria I; Mullenders, Leon H F

    2011-07-15

    A network of DNA damage surveillance systems is triggered by sensing of DNA lesions and the initiation of a signal transduction cascade that activates genome-protection pathways including nucleotide excision repair (NER). NER operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and post-incision complexes. Recent work identifies RPA as a key regulator of the transition from dual incision to repair-synthesis in UV-irradiated non-cycling cells, thereby averting the generation of unprocessed repair intermediates. These intermediates could lead to recombinogenic events and trigger a persistent ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling. It is now evident that DNA damage signaling is not limited to NER proficient cells. ATR-dependent checkpoint activation also occurs in UV-exposed non-cycling repair deficient cells coinciding with the formation of endonuclease APE1-mediated DNA strand breaks. In addition, the encounter of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPIIo) with DNA damage lesions and its persistent stalling provides a strong DNA damage signaling leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and increased mutagenesis. The mechanism underlying the strong and strand specific induction of UV-induced mutations in NER deficient cells has been recently resolved by the finding that gene transcription itself increases UV-induced mutagenesis in a strand specific manner via increased deamination of cytosines. The cell removes the RNAPIIo-blocking DNA lesions by transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) without displacement of the DNA damage stalled RNAPIIo. Deficiency in TC-NER associates with mutations in the CSA and CSB genes giving rise to the rare human disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS). CSB functions as a repair coupling factor to attract NER proteins, chromatin remodelers and the CSA-E3-ubiquitin ligase complex to the stalled RNAPIIo; CSA is dispensable for attraction of NER proteins, yet in cooperation with CSB is required to recruit XAB2, the nucleosomal binding protein HMGN1

  7. Histone modifications in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lin-Lin; Shen, Changchun; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage is a relatively common event in eukaryotic cell and may lead to genetic mutation and even cancer. DNA damage induces cellular responses that enable the cell either to repair the damaged DNA or cope with the damage in an appropriate way. Histone proteins are also the fundamental building blocks of eukaryotic chromatin besides DNA, and many types of post-translational modifications often occur on tails of histones. Although the function of these modifications has remained elusive, there is ever-growing studies suggest that histone modifications play vital roles in several chromatin-based processes, such as DNA damage response. In this review, we will discuss the main histone modifications, and their functions in DNA damage response.

  8. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  9. DNA damage response, redox status and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Cary N; Ito, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to self-renew and differentiate into progenitors is essential for homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. The longevity of HSCs makes them vulnerable to accumulating DNA damage, which may be leukemogenic or result in senescence and cell death. Additionally, the ability of HSCs to self-renew and differentiate allows DNA damage to spread throughout the hematologic system, leaving the organism vulnerable to disease. In this review we discuss cell fate decisions made in the face of DNA damage and other cellular stresses, and the role of reactive oxygen species in the long-term maintenance of HSCs and their DNA damage response.

  10. Dyskeratosis congenita and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Michael; Beswick, Richard; Walne, Amanda J; Hossain, Upal; Casimir, Colin; Vulliamy, Tom; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2011-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a heterogeneous bone marrow failure disorder with known mutations in components of telomerase and telomere shelterin. Recent work in a mouse model with a dyskerin mutation has implicated an increased DNA damage response as part of the cellular pathology, while mouse models with Terc and Tert mutations displayed a normal response. To clarify how these contradictory results might apply to DC pathology in humans, we studied the cellular phenotype in primary cells from DC patients of several genetic subtypes, focussing on T lymphocytes to remain close to the haematopoietic system. We observed novel cell cycle abnormalities in conjunction with impaired growth and an increase in apoptosis. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy we examined induction of the DNA damage proteins γ-H2AX and 53BP1 and the cell cycle protein TP53 (p53). We found an increase in damage foci at telomeres in lymphocytes and an increase in the basal level of DNA damage in fibroblasts, but crucially no increased response to DNA damaging agents in either cell type. As the response to induced DNA damage was normal and levels of global DNA damage were inconsistent between cell types, DNA damage may contribute differently to the pathology in different tissues. PMID:21477209

  11. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  12. Triplex-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Faye A; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik

    2013-12-13

    Cellular DNA damage response is critical to preserving genomic integrity following exposure to genotoxic stress. A complex series of networks and signaling pathways become activated after DNA damage and trigger the appropriate cellular response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. The response elicited is dependent upon the type and extent of damage sustained, with the ultimate goal of preventing propagation of the damaged DNA. A major focus of our studies is to determine the cellular pathways involved in processing damage induced by altered helical structures, specifically triplexes. Our lab has demonstrated that the TFIIH factor XPD occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. We have shown that XPD co-localizes with γH2AX, and its presence is required for the phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine142, which stimulates the signaling pathway to recruit pro-apoptotic factors to the damage site. Herein, we examine the cellular pathways activated in response to triplex formation and discuss our finding that suggests that XPD-dependent apoptosis plays a role in preserving genomic integrity in the presence of excessive structurally induced DNA damage.

  13. Ubiquitylation, neddylation and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica S.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Failure of accurate DNA damage sensing and repair mechanisms manifests as a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, immunodeficiency, infertility and cancer. The accuracy and efficiency of DNA damage detection and repair, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR), requires the recruitment and subsequent post-translational modification (PTM) of a complex network of proteins. Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) SUMO have established roles in regulating the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A role for other UBLs, such as NEDD8, is also now emerging. This article provides an overview of the DDR, discusses our current understanding of the process and function of PTM by ubiquitin and NEDD8, and reviews the literature surrounding the role of ubiquitylation and neddylation in DNA repair processes, focusing particularly on DNA DSB repair. PMID:25833379

  14. Ubiquitylation, neddylation and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica S; Jackson, Stephen P

    2015-04-01

    Failure of accurate DNA damage sensing and repair mechanisms manifests as a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, immunodeficiency, infertility and cancer. The accuracy and efficiency of DNA damage detection and repair, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR), requires the recruitment and subsequent post-translational modification (PTM) of a complex network of proteins. Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) SUMO have established roles in regulating the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A role for other UBLs, such as NEDD8, is also now emerging. This article provides an overview of the DDR, discusses our current understanding of the process and function of PTM by ubiquitin and NEDD8, and reviews the literature surrounding the role of ubiquitylation and neddylation in DNA repair processes, focusing particularly on DNA DSB repair.

  15. Historical Perspective on the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality. PMID:26507443

  16. Historical perspective on the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality.

  17. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  18. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  19. Targeting the DNA Damage Response in Cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mark J

    2015-11-19

    An underlying hallmark of cancers is their genomic instability, which is associated with a greater propensity to accumulate DNA damage. Historical treatment of cancer by radiotherapy and DNA-damaging chemotherapy is based on this principle, yet it is accompanied by significant collateral damage to normal tissue and unwanted side effects. Targeted therapy based on inhibiting the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancers offers the potential for a greater therapeutic window by tailoring treatment to patients with tumors lacking specific DDR functions. The recent approval of olaparib (Lynparza), the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor for treating tumors harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, represents the first medicine based on this principle, exploiting an underlying cause of tumor formation that also represents an Achilles' heel. This review highlights the different concepts behind targeting DDR in cancer and how this can provide significant opportunities for DDR-based therapies in the future.

  20. Epigenome Maintenance in Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Dabin, Juliette; Fortuny, Anna; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-06-02

    Organism viability relies on the stable maintenance of specific chromatin landscapes, established during development, that shape cell functions and identities by driving distinct gene expression programs. Yet epigenome maintenance is challenged during transcription, replication, and repair of DNA damage, all of which elicit dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the specialized mechanisms contributing to the restoration of epigenome structure and function after DNA damage in the mammalian cell nucleus. By drawing a parallel with epigenome maintenance during replication, we explore emerging concepts and highlight open issues in this rapidly growing field. In particular, we present our current knowledge of molecular players that support the coordinated maintenance of genome and epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage, and we highlight how nuclear organization impacts genome stability. Finally, we discuss possible functional implications of epigenome plasticity in response to genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Epigenome maintenance in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Dabin, Juliette; Fortuny, Anna; Polo, Sophie E.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Organism viability relies on the stable maintenance of specific chromatin landscapes, established during development, that shape cell functions and identities by driving distinct gene expression programs. Yet, epigenome maintenance is challenged during transcription, replication and repair of DNA damage, all of which elicit dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the specialized mechanisms contributing to the restoration of epigenome structure and function after DNA damage in the mammalian cell nucleus. By drawing a parallel with epigenome maintenance during replication, we explore emerging concepts and highlight open issues in this rapidly growing field. In particular, we present our current knowledge of molecular players that support the coordinated maintenance of genome and epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage, and we highlight how nuclear organization impacts genome stability. Finally, we discuss possible functional implications of epigenome plasticity in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27259203

  2. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields.

  3. Immunofluorescence Imaging of DNA Damage Response Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian T.; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Knight, Kendall L.

    2013-01-01

    Immunofluorescence imaging has provided captivating visual evidence for numerous cellular events, from vesicular trafficking, organelle maturation and cell division to nuclear processes including the appearance of various proteins and chromatin components in distinct foci in response to DNA damaging agents. With the advent of new super-resolution microscope technologies such as 4Pi microscopy, standard immunofluorescence protocols deserve some reevaluation in order to take full advantage of these new technological accomplishments. Here we describe several methodological considerations that will help overcome some of the limitations that may result from the use of currently applied procedures, with particular attention paid to the analysis of possible colocalization of fluorescent signals. We conclude with an example of how application of optimized methods led to a breakthrough in super-resolution imaging of nuclear events occurring in response to DNA damage. PMID:19245833

  4. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  5. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Kevin J; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways.

  6. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-02-27

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs.

  7. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Misri, S; Pandita, S; Kumar, R; Pandita, T K

    2008-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability.

  8. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Misri, S.; Pandita, S.; Kumar, R.; Pandita, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability. PMID:19188699

  9. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  10. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H; Hsieh, Peggy

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Salicylic Acid Activates DNA Damage Responses to Potentiate Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shunping; Wang, Wei; Marqués, Jorge; Mohan, Rajinikanth; Saleh, Abdelaty; Durrant, Wendy E.; Song, Junqi; Dong, Xinnian

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage is normally detrimental to living organisms. Here we show that it can also serve as a signal to promote immune responses in plants. We found that the plant immune hormone salicylic acid (SA) can trigger DNA damage in the absence of a genotoxic agent. The DNA damage sensor proteins, RAD17 and ATR, are required for effective immune responses. These sensor proteins are negatively regulated by a key immune regulator SNI1 (suppressor of npr1-1, inducible 1), which we discovered as a missing subunit of the Structural Maintenance of Chromosome (SMC) 5/6 complex required for controlling DNA damage. Elevated DNA damage caused by the sni1 mutation or treatment with a DNA-damaging agent markedly enhances SA-mediated defense gene expression. Our study suggests that activation of DNA damage responses is an intrinsic component of the plant immune responses. PMID:24207055

  12. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs. PMID:28239143

  13. Interplay of space radiation and microgravity in DNA damage and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Villanueva, María; Wong, Michael; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    In space, multiple unique environmental factors, particularly microgravity and space radiation, pose constant threat to the DNA integrity of living organisms. Specifically, space radiation can cause damage to DNA directly, through the interaction of charged particles with the DNA molecules themselves, or indirectly through the production of free radicals. Although organisms have evolved strategies on Earth to confront such damage, space environmental conditions, especially microgravity, can impact DNA repair resulting in accumulation of severe DNA lesions. Ultimately these lesions, namely double strand breaks, chromosome aberrations, micronucleus formation, or mutations, can increase the risk for adverse health effects, such as cancer. How spaceflight factors affect DNA damage and the DNA damage response has been investigated since the early days of the human space program. Over the years, these experiments have been conducted either in space or using ground-based analogs. This review summarizes the evidence for DNA damage induction by space radiation and/or microgravity as well as spaceflight-related impacts on the DNA damage response. The review also discusses the conflicting results from studies aimed at addressing the question of potential synergies between microgravity and radiation with regard to DNA damage and cellular repair processes. We conclude that further experiments need to be performed in the true space environment in order to address this critical question.

  14. Eukaryotic DNA damage responses: Homologous recombination factors and ubiquitin modification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Soo; Kim, Soomi; Jung, Yong Woo; Kim, Hongtae

    2017-05-06

    To prevent genomic instability disorders, cells have developed a DNA damage response. The response involves various proteins that sense damaged DNA, transduce damage signals, and effect DNA repair. In addition, ubiquitin modifications modulate the signaling pathway depending on cellular context. Among various types of DNA damage, double-stranded breaks are highly toxic to genomic integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) repair is an essential mechanism that fixes DNA damage because of its high level of accuracy. Although factors in the repair pathway are well established, pinpointing the exact mechanisms of repair and devising therapeutic applications requires more studies. Moreover, essential functions of ubiquitin modification in the DNA damage signaling pathway have emerged. In this review, to explore the eukaryotic DNA damage response, we will mention the functions of main factors in the HR repair pathway and ubiquitin modification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy. PMID:26427872

  16. Profiling DNA damage response following mitotic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    S. Pedersen, Ronni; Karemore, Gopal; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Rask, Maj-Britt; Neumann, Beate; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Pepperkok, Rainer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Lukas, Jiri; Lukas, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity relies on precise coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Whereas replication stress attracted much attention, the consequences of mitotic perturbations for genome integrity are less understood. Here, we knockdown 47 validated mitotic regulators to show that a broad spectrum of mitotic errors correlates with increased DNA breakage in daughter cells. Unexpectedly, we find that only a subset of these correlations are functionally linked. We identify the genuine mitosis-born DNA damage events and sub-classify them according to penetrance of the observed phenotypes. To demonstrate the potential of this resource, we show that DNA breakage after cytokinesis failure is preceded by replication stress, which mounts during consecutive cell cycles and coincides with decreased proliferation. Together, our results provide a resource to gauge the magnitude and dynamics of DNA breakage associated with mitotic aberrations and suggest that replication stress might limit propagation of cells with abnormal karyotypes. PMID:27976684

  17. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  18. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  19. Replication fork dynamics and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Petermann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Prevention and repair of DNA damage is essential for maintenance of genomic stability and cell survival. DNA replication during S-phase can be a source of DNA damage if endogenous or exogenous stresses impair the progression of replication forks. It has become increasingly clear that DNA-damage-response pathways do not only respond to the presence of damaged DNA, but also modulate DNA replication dynamics to prevent DNA damage formation during S-phase. Such observations may help explain the developmental defects or cancer predisposition caused by mutations in DNA-damage-response genes. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which DNA-damage-response pathways control and promote replication dynamics in vertebrate cells. In particular, DNA damage pathways contribute to proper replication by regulating replication initiation, stabilizing transiently stalled forks, promoting replication restart and facilitating fork movement on difficult-to-replicate templates. If replication fork progression fails to be rescued, this may lead to DNA damage and genomic instability via nuclease processing of aberrant fork structures or incomplete sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

  20. Systemic DNA damage responses in aging and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ribezzo, Flavia; Shiloh, Yosef; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The genome is constantly attacked by a variety of genotoxic insults. The causal role for DNA damage in aging and cancer is exemplified by genetic defects in DNA repair that underlie a broad spectrum of acute and chronic human disorders that are characterized by developmental abnormalities, premature aging, and cancer predisposition. The disease symptoms are typically tissue-specific with uncertain genotype-phenotype correlation. The cellular DNA damage response (DDR) has been extensively investigated ever since yeast geneticists discovered DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms, several decades ago. In recent years, it has become apparent that not only cell-autonomous but also systemic DNA damage responses determine the outcome of genome instability in organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of non-cell-autonomous DNA damage responses will provide important new insights into the role of genome instability in human aging and a host of diseases including cancer and might better explain the complex phenotypes caused by genome instability. PMID:26773346

  1. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy.

  2. Pseudo-DNA damage response in senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Pospelova, Tatyana V; Demidenko, Zoya N; Bukreeva, Elena I; Pospelov, Valery A; Gudkov, Andrei V; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2009-12-15

    Cellular senescence is currently viewed as a response to DNA damage. In this report, we showed that non-damaging agents such as sodium butyrate-induced p21 and ectopic expression of either p21 or p16 cause cellular senescence without detectable DNA breaks. Nevertheless, senescent cells displayed components of DNA damage response (DDR) such as gammaH2AX foci and uniform nuclear staining for p-ATM. Importantly, there was no accumulation of 53BP1 in gammaH2AX foci of senescent cells. Consistently, comet assay failed to detect DNA damage. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTO R, which was shown to suppress cellular senescence, decreased gammaH2AX foci formation. Thus, cellular senescence leads to activation of atypical DDR without detectable DNA damage. Pseudo-DDR may be a marker of general over-activation of senescent cells.

  3. CHK2 kinase in the DNA damage response and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Laura; Delia, Domenico; Buscemi, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase CHK2 is a key component of the DNA damage response. In human cells, following genotoxic stress, CHK2 is activated and phosphorylates >20 proteins to induce the appropriate cellular response, which, depending on the extent of damage, the cell type, and other factors, could be cell cycle checkpoint activation, induction of apoptosis or senescence, DNA repair, or tolerance of the damage. Recently, CHK2 has also been found to have cellular functions independent of the presence of nuclear DNA lesions. In particular, CHK2 participates in several molecular processes involved in DNA structure modification and cell cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the activity of CHK2 in response to DNA damage and in the maintenance of the biological functions in unstressed cells. These activities are also considered in relation to a possible role of CHK2 in tumorigenesis and, as a consequence, as a target of cancer therapy. PMID:25404613

  4. DNA Damage Response and Autophagy: A Meaningful Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Eliopoulos, Aristides G.; Havaki, Sophia; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the DNA damage response (DDR) are biological processes essential for cellular and organismal homeostasis. Herein, we summarize and discuss emerging evidence linking DDR to autophagy. We highlight published data suggesting that autophagy is activated by DNA damage and is required for several functional outcomes of DDR signaling, including repair of DNA lesions, senescence, cell death, and cytokine secretion. Uncovering the mechanisms by which autophagy and DDR are intertwined provides novel insight into the pathobiology of conditions associated with accumulation of DNA damage, including cancer and aging, and novel concepts for the development of improved therapeutic strategies against these pathologies. PMID:27917193

  5. Parvovirus diversity and DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Parvoviruses have a linear single-stranded DNA genome, around 5 kb in length, with short imperfect terminal palindromes that fold back on themselves to form duplex hairpin telomeres. These contain most of the cis-acting information required for viral "rolling hairpin" DNA replication, an evolutionary adaptation of rolling-circle synthesis in which the hairpins create duplex replication origins, prime complementary strand synthesis, and act as hinges to reverse the direction of the unidirectional cellular fork. Genomes are packaged vectorially into small, rugged protein capsids ~260 Å in diameter, which mediate their delivery directly into the cell nucleus, where they await their host cell's entry into S phase under its own cell cycle control. Here we focus on genus-specific variations in genome structure and replication, and review host cell responses that modulate the nuclear environment.

  6. The intersection between DNA damage response and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Nowsheen, S; Yang, E S

    2012-10-01

    Apoptosis is a finely regulated process that serves to determine the fate of cells in response to various stresses. One such stress is DNA damage, which not only can signal repair processes but is also intimately involved in regulating cell fate. In this review we examine the relationship between the DNA damage/repair response in cell survival and apoptosis following insults to the DNA. Elucidating these pathways and the crosstalk between them is of great importance, as they eventually contribute to the etiology of human disease such as cancer and may play key roles in determining therapeutic response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Apoptosis: Four Decades Later".

  7. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response.

  8. DNA damage response to the Mdm2 inhibitor Nutlin-3

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev; Rigatti, Marc J.; Belinsky, Glenn S.; Godman, Cassandra A.; Giardina, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Mdm2 inhibitors represent a promising class of p53 activating compounds that may be useful in cancer treatment and prevention. However, the consequences of pharmacological p53 activation are not entirely clear. We observed that Nutlin-3 triggered a DNA damage response in azoxymethane-induced mouse AJ02-NM0 colon cancer cells, characterized by the phosphorylation of H2AX (at Ser-139) and p53 (at Ser-15). The DNA damage response was highest in cells showing robust p53 stabilization, it could be triggered by the active but not the inactive Nutlin-3 enantiomer, and it was also activated by another pharmacological Mdm2 inhibitor (Caylin). Quantification of γH2AX-positive cells following Nutlin-3 exposure showed that approximately 17% of cells in late S and G2/M were mounting a DNA damage response (compared to a ~50% response to 5-fluorouracil). Nutlin-3 treatment caused the formation of double strand DNA strand breaks, promoted the formation of micronuclei, accentuated strand breakage induced by doxorubicin and sensitized the mouse colon cancer cells to DNA break-inducing topoisomerase II inhibitors. Although the HCT116 colon cancer cells did not mount a significant DNA damage response following Nutlin-3 treatment, Nutlin-3 enhanced the DNA damage response to the nucleotide synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea in a p53-dependent manner. Finally, p21 deletion also sensitized HCT116 cells to the Nutlin-3-induced DNA damage response, suggesting that cell cycle checkpoint abnormalities may promote this response. We propose that p53 activation by Mdm2 inhibitors can result in the slowing of double stranded DNA repair. Although this effect may suppress illegitimate homologous recombination repair, it may also increase the risk of clastogenic events. PMID:19788889

  9. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Knight, James C; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart

    2017-06-01

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins.

  10. NBS1 and multiple regulations of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response is finely tuned, with several pathways including those for DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and cell cycle checkpoint, although most studies to date have focused on single pathways. Genetic diseases characterized by genome instability have provided novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of DNA damage response. NBS1, a protein responsible for the radiation-sensitive autosomal recessive disorder Nijmegen breakage syndrome, is one of the first factors to accumulate at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS1 binds to at least five key proteins, including ATM, RPA, MRE11, RAD18 and RNF20, in the conserved regions within a limited span of the C terminus, functioning in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair in response to DSBs. In this article, we reviewed the functions of these binding proteins and their comprehensive association with NBS1. PMID:27068998

  11. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA.

  12. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  13. Chromosome territories reposition during DNA damage-repair response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Local higher-order chromatin structure, dynamics and composition of the DNA are known to determine double-strand break frequencies and the efficiency of repair. However, how DNA damage response affects the spatial organization of chromosome territories is still unexplored. Results Our report investigates the effect of DNA damage on the spatial organization of chromosome territories within interphase nuclei of human cells. We show that DNA damage induces a large-scale spatial repositioning of chromosome territories that are relatively gene dense. This response is dose dependent, and involves territories moving from the nuclear interior to the periphery and vice versa. Furthermore, we have found that chromosome territory repositioning is contingent upon double-strand break recognition and damage sensing. Importantly, our results suggest that this is a reversible process where, following repair, chromosome territories re-occupy positions similar to those in undamaged control cells. Conclusions Thus, our report for the first time highlights DNA damage-dependent spatial reorganization of whole chromosomes, which might be an integral aspect of cellular damage response. PMID:24330859

  14. Systemic DNA damage responses in aging and diseases.

    PubMed

    Ribezzo, Flavia; Shiloh, Yosef; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-06-01

    The genome is constantly attacked by a variety of genotoxic insults. The causal role for DNA damage in aging and cancer is exemplified by genetic defects in DNA repair that underlie a broad spectrum of acute and chronic human disorders that are characterized by developmental abnormalities, premature aging, and cancer predisposition. The disease symptoms are typically tissue-specific with uncertain genotype-phenotype correlation. The cellular DNA damage response (DDR) has been extensively investigated ever since yeast geneticists discovered DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms, several decades ago. In recent years, it has become apparent that not only cell-autonomous but also systemic DNA damage responses determine the outcome of genome instability in organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of non-cell-autonomous DNA damage responses will provide important new insights into the role of genome instability in human aging and a host of diseases including cancer and might better explain the complex phenotypes caused by genome instability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by

  16. DICER, DROSHA and DNA damage response RNAs are necessary for the secondary recruitment of DNA damage response factors.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Cabrini, Matteo; Matti, Valentina; Oldani, Amanda; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) plays a central role in preserving genome integrity. Recently, we reported that the endoribonucleases DICER and DROSHA contribute to DDR activation by generating small non-coding RNAs, termed DNA damage response RNA (DDRNA), carrying the sequence of the damaged locus. It is presently unclear whether DDRNAs act by promoting the primary recognition of DNA lesions or the secondary recruitment of DDR factors into cytologically detectable foci and consequent signal amplification. Here, we demonstrate that DICER and DROSHA are dispensable for primary recruitment of the DDR sensor NBS1 to DNA damage sites. Instead, the accumulation of the DDR mediators MDC1 and 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1), markers of secondary recruitment, is reduced in DICER- or DROSHA-inactivated cells. In addition, NBS1 (also known as NBN) primary recruitment is resistant to RNA degradation, consistent with the notion that RNA is dispensable for primary recognition of DNA lesions. We propose that DICER, DROSHA and DDRNAs act in the response to DNA damage after primary recognition of DNA lesions and, together with γH2AX, are essential for enabling the secondary recruitment of DDR factors and fuel the amplification of DDR signaling.

  17. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Kai, Mihoko

    2016-02-27

    Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR)), and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, "sensor" proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)'s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent manner (unpublished data). DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP) ribose polymerase 1) makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR) network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as "liquid-demixing"). Among the

  18. Multiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Boeing, Stefan; Williamson, Laura; Encheva, Vesela; Gori, Ilaria; Saunders, Rebecca E; Instrell, Rachael; Aygün, Ozan; Rodriguez-Martinez, Marta; Weems, Juston C; Kelly, Gavin P; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Stewart, Aengus; Howell, Michael; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2016-05-11

    In order to facilitate the identification of factors and pathways in the cellular response to UV-induced DNA damage, several descriptive proteomic screens and a functional genomics screen were performed in parallel. Numerous factors could be identified with high confidence when the screen results were superimposed and interpreted together, incorporating biological knowledge. A searchable database, bioLOGIC, which provides access to relevant information about a protein or process of interest, was established to host the results and facilitate data mining. Besides uncovering roles in the DNA damage response for numerous proteins and complexes, including Integrator, Cohesin, PHF3, ASC-1, SCAF4, SCAF8, and SCAF11, we uncovered a role for the poorly studied, melanoma-associated serine/threonine kinase 19 (STK19). Besides effectively uncovering relevant factors, the multiomic approach also provides a systems-wide overview of the diverse cellular processes connected to the transcription-related DNA damage response.

  19. Curcumin-Mediated HDAC Inhibition Suppresses the DNA Damage Response and Contributes to Increased DNA Damage Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-Huei; Lin, Pei-Ya; Chiu, Ya-Chen; Huang, Ju-Sui; Kuo, Yi-Tsen; Wu, Jen-Chine; Chen, Chin-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Chemo- and radiotherapy cause multiple forms of DNA damage and lead to the death of cancer cells. Inhibitors of the DNA damage response are candidate drugs for use in combination therapies to increase the efficacy of such treatments. In this study, we show that curcumin, a plant polyphenol, sensitizes budding yeast to DNA damage by counteracting the DNA damage response. Following DNA damage, the Mec1-dependent DNA damage checkpoint is inactivated and Rad52 recombinase is degraded by curcumin, which results in deficiencies in double-stand break repair. Additive effects on damage-induced apoptosis and the inhibition of damage-induced autophagy by curcumin were observed. Moreover, rpd3 mutants were found to mimic the curcumin-induced suppression of the DNA damage response. In contrast, hat1 mutants were resistant to DNA damage, and Rad52 degradation was impaired following curcumin treatment. These results indicate that the histone deacetylase inhibitor activity of curcumin is critical to DSB repair and DNA damage sensitivity. PMID:26218133

  20. DNA damage-induced cell death: from specific DNA lesions to the DNA damage response and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Wynand P; Kaina, Bernd

    2013-05-28

    DNA damaging agents are potent inducers of cell death triggered by apoptosis. Since these agents induce a plethora of different DNA lesions, it is firstly important to identify the specific lesions responsible for initiating apoptosis before the apoptotic executing pathways can be elucidated. Here, we describe specific DNA lesions that have been identified as apoptosis triggers, their repair and the signaling provoked by them. We discuss methylating agents such as temozolomide, ionizing radiation and cisplatin, all of them are important in cancer therapy. We show that the potentially lethal events for the cell are O(6)-methylguanine adducts that are converted by mismatch repair into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), non-repaired N-methylpurines and abasic sites as well as bulky adducts that block DNA replication leading to DSBs that are also directly induced following ionizing radiation. Transcriptional inhibition may also contribute to apoptosis. Cells are equipped with sensors that detect DNA damage and relay the signal via kinases to executors, who on their turn evoke a process that inhibits cell cycle progression and provokes DNA repair or, if this fails, activate the receptor and/or mitochondrial apoptotic cascade. The main DNA damage recognition factors MRN and the PI3 kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which phosphorylate a multitude of proteins and thus induce the DNA damage response (DDR), will be discussed as well as the downstream players p53, NF-κB, Akt and survivin. We review data and models describing the signaling from DNA damage to the apoptosis executing machinery and discuss the complex interplay between cell survival and death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Ellis L; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J

    2016-01-06

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses.

  2. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  3. Regulation of DNA Repair Mechanisms: How the Chromatin Environment Regulates the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Jens; Richly, Holger

    2017-08-05

    Cellular DNA is constantly challenged by damage-inducing factors derived from exogenous or endogenous sources. In order to maintain genome stability and integrity, cells have evolved a wide variety of DNA repair pathways which counteract different types of DNA lesions, also referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR). However, DNA in eukaryotes is highly organized and compacted into chromatin representing major constraints for all cellular pathways, including DNA repair pathways, which require DNA as their substrate. Therefore, the chromatin configuration surrounding the lesion site undergoes dramatic remodeling to facilitate access of DNA repair factors and subsequent removal of the DNA lesion. In this review, we focus on the question of how the cellular DNA repair pathways overcome the chromatin barrier, how the chromatin environment is rearranged to facilitate efficient DNA repair, which proteins mediate this re-organization process and, consequently, how the altered chromatin landscape is involved in the regulation of DNA damage responses.

  4. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimir; Sakakibara, Yogo; Brzakova, Adela; Ferencova, Ivana; Motlik, Jan; Kitajima, Tomoya S.; Schultz, Richard M.; Solc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because low levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) appear not to activate the ATM-mediated prophase I checkpoint in full-grown oocytes, there may exist mechanisms to protect chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. Using live imaging we demonstrate that low levels of DSBs induced by the radiomimetic drug Neocarzinostatin (NCS) increase the incidence of chromosome fragments and lagging chromosomes but do not lead to APC/C activation and anaphase onset delay. The number of DSBs, represented by γH2AX foci, significantly decreases between prophase I and metaphase II in both control and NCS-treated oocytes. Transient treatment with NCS increases >2-fold the number of DSBs in prophase I oocytes, but less than 30% of these oocytes enter anaphase with segregation errors. MRE11, but not ATM, is essential to detect DSBs in prophase I and is involved in H2AX phosphorylation during metaphase I. Inhibiting MRE11 by mirin during meiotic maturation results in anaphase bridges and also increases the number of γH2AX foci in metaphase II.  Compromised DNA integrity in mirin-treated oocytes indicates a role for MRE11 in chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. PMID:26745237

  5. Involvement of DNA Damage Response Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wei, Ren-Jie; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Wang, Shen-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been known as one of the most lethal human malignancies, due to the difficulty of early detection, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, and is characterized by active angiogenesis and metastasis, which account for rapid recurrence and poor survival. Its development has been closely associated with multiple risk factors, including hepatitis B and C virus infection, alcohol consumption, obesity, and diet contamination. Genetic alterations and genomic instability, probably resulted from unrepaired DNA lesions, are increasingly recognized as a common feature of human HCC. Dysregulation of DNA damage repair and signaling to cell cycle checkpoints, known as the DNA damage response (DDR), is associated with a predisposition to cancer and affects responses to DNA-damaging anticancer therapy. It has been demonstrated that various HCC-associated risk factors are able to promote DNA damages, formation of DNA adducts, and chromosomal aberrations. Hence, alterations in the DDR pathways may accumulate these lesions to trigger hepatocarcinogenesis and also to facilitate advanced HCC progression. This review collects some of the most known information about the link between HCC-associated risk factors and DDR pathways in HCC. Hopefully, the review will remind the researchers and clinicians of further characterizing and validating the roles of these DDR pathways in HCC. PMID:24877058

  6. Detecting ATM-dependent chromatin modification in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lopa; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage.

  7. Detecting ATM-Dependent Chromatin Modification in DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lope; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia–telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage. PMID:25827888

  8. DNA damage response defect in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guenat, David; Merla, Giuseppe; Deconinck, Eric; Borg, Christophe; Rohrlich, Pierre-Simon

    2017-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, no. OMIM 194050) is a rare multisystem genetic disorder caused by a microdeletion on chromosome 7q11.23 and characterized by cardiovascular malformations, mental retardation, and a specific facial dysmorphism. Recently, we reported that a series of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma occurs in children with WBS and thus hypothesized that a predisposition to cancer may be associated with this genetic disorder. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the role played by three genes hemizygously deleted in WBS (RFC2, GTF2I and BAZ1B) in DNA damage response pathways. Cell proliferation, cell cycle analysis, γ-H2A.X induction, and expression of DNA damage response proteins were investigated upon exposure to genotoxic treatments in WBS patient-derived primary fibroblasts and in the 293T cell line treated with specific siRNAs targeting RFC2, GTF2I and BAZ1B. An impaired hydroxyurea-induced phosphorylation of CHK1 was observed in the WBS cells. However, this defective DNA damage response was not associated with an increased sensitivity to genotoxic agents. In addition, depletion of RFC2, GTF2I and BAZ1B using specific siRNAs did not have a significant impact on the DNA damage response in 293T cells. Our results highlight that the ATR-dependent DNA damage response is impaired in WBS patient cells but is also dispensable for viability when these cells undergo a genotoxic stress. The mechanism by which the ATR pathway is impaired in WBS warrants elucidation through further investigation. PMID:28098859

  9. Viruses and the DNA Damage Response: Activation and Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Luftig, Micah A

    2014-11-01

    Viruses must interact with their hosts in order to replicate; these interactions often provoke the evolutionarily conserved response to DNA damage, known as the DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR can be activated by incoming viral DNA, during the integration of retroviruses, or in response to the aberrant DNA structures generated upon replication of DNA viruses. Furthermore, DNA and RNA viral proteins can induce the DDR by promoting inappropriate S phase entry, by modifying cellular DDR factors directly, or by unintentionally targeting host DNA. The DDR may be antiviral, although viruses often require proximal DDR activation of repair and recombination factors to facilitate replication as well as downstream DDR signaling suppression to ensure cell survival. An unintended consequence of DDR attenuation during infection is the long-term survival and proliferation of precancerous cells. Therefore, the molecular basis for DDR activation and attenuation by viruses remains an important area of study that will likely provide key insights into how viruses have evolved with their hosts.

  10. MicroRNAs, DNA Damage Response, and Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    He, Mingyang; Zhou, Weiwei; Li, Chuang; Guo, Mingxiong

    2016-01-01

    As a result of various stresses, lesions caused by DNA-damaging agents occur constantly in each cell of the human body. Generally, DNA damage is recognized and repaired by the DNA damage response (DDR) machinery, and the cells survive. When repair fails, the genomic integrity of the cell is disrupted—a hallmark of cancer. In addition, the DDR plays a dual role in cancer development and therapy. Cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy are designed to eliminate cancer cells by inducing DNA damage, which in turn can promote tumorigenesis. Over the past two decades, an increasing number of microRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs, have been identified as participating in the processes regulating tumorigenesis and responses to cancer treatment with radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapies, by modulating the DDR. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent findings on how miRNAs regulate the DDR and discuss the therapeutic functions of miRNAs in cancer in the context of DDR regulation. PMID:27973455

  11. Diseases Associated with Defective Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, multiple novel congenital human disorders have been described with genetic defects in known and/or novel components of several well-known DNA repair and damage response pathways. Examples include disorders of impaired nucleotide excision repair, DNA double-strand and single-strand break repair, as well as compromised DNA damage-induced signal transduction including phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These conditions further reinforce the importance of multiple genome stability pathways for health and development in humans. Furthermore, these conditions inform our knowledge of the biology of the mechanics of genome stability and in some cases provide potential routes to help exploit these pathways therapeutically. Here, I will review a selection of these exciting findings from the perspective of the disorders themselves, describing how they were identified, how genotype informs phenotype, and how these defects contribute to our growing understanding of genome stability pathways. PMID:23209155

  12. DNA intercalator BMH-21 inhibits RNA polymerase I independent of DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Colis, Laureen; Peltonen, Karita; Sirajuddin, Paul; Liu, Hester; Sanders, Sara; Ernst, Glen; Barrow, James C; Laiho, Marikki

    2014-06-30

    DNA intercalation is a major therapeutic modality for cancer therapeutic drugs. The therapeutic activity comes at a cost of normal tissue toxicity and genotoxicity. We have recently described a planar heterocyclic small molecule DNA intercalator, BMH-21, that binds ribosomal DNA and inhibits RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription. Despite DNA intercalation, BMH-21 does not cause phosphorylation of H2AX, a key biomarker activated in DNA damage stress. Here we assessed whether BMH-21 activity towards expression and localization of Pol I marker proteins depends on DNA damage signaling and repair pathways. We show that BMH-21 effects on the nucleolar stress response were independent of major DNA damage associated PI3-kinase pathways, ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs. However, testing a series of BMH-21 derivatives with alterations in its N,N-dimethylaminocarboxamide arm showed that several derivatives had acquired the property to activate ATM- and DNA-PKcs -dependent damage sensing and repair pathways while their ability to cause nucleolar stress and affect cell viability was greatly reduced. The data show that BMH-21 is a chemically unique DNA intercalator that has high bioactivity towards Pol I inhibition without activation or dependence of DNA damage stress. The findings also show that interference with DNA and DNA metabolic processes can be exploited therapeutically without causing DNA damage.

  13. Taking a Bad Turn: Compromised DNA Damage Response in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nilles, Nadine; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2017-01-01

    Genomic integrity is of outmost importance for the survival at the cellular and the organismal level and key to human health. To ensure the integrity of their DNA, cells have evolved maintenance programs collectively known as the DNA damage response. Particularly challenging for genome integrity are DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and defects in their repair are often associated with human disease, including leukemia. Defective DSB repair may not only be disease-causing, but further contribute to poor treatment outcome and poor prognosis in leukemia. Here, we review current insight into altered DSB repair mechanisms identified in leukemia. While DSB repair is somewhat compromised in all leukemic subtypes, certain key players of DSB repair are particularly targeted: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and Ku70/80 in the non-homologous end-joining pathway, as well as Rad51 and breast cancer 1/2 (BRCA1/2), key players in homologous recombination. Defects in leukemia-related DSB repair may not only arise from dysfunctional repair components, but also indirectly from mutations in key regulators of gene expression and/or chromatin structure, such as p53, the Kirsten ras oncogene (K-RAS), and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2). A detailed understanding of the basis for defective DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms for each leukemia subtype may allow to further develop new treatment methods to improve treatment outcome and prognosis for patients. PMID:28471392

  14. Modeling the Study of DNA Damage Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Specks, Julia; Nieto-Soler, Maria; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Damaged DNA has a profound impact on mammalian health and overall survival. In addition to being the source of mutations that initiate cancer, the accumulation of toxic amounts of DNA damage can cause severe developmental diseases and accelerate ageing. Therefore, understanding how cells respond to DNA damage has become one of the most intense areas of biomedical research in the recent years. However, whereas most mechanistic studies derive from in vitro or in cellulo work, the impact of a given mutation on a living organism is largely unpredictable. For instance, why BRCA1 mutations preferentially lead to breast cancer whereas mutations compromising mismatch repair drive colon cancer is still not understood. In this context, evaluating the specific physiological impact of mutations that compromise genome integrity has become crucial for a better dimensioning of our knowledge. We here describe the various technologies that can be used for modeling mutations in mice, and provide a review of the genes and pathways that have been modeled so far in the context of DNA damage responses. PMID:25636482

  15. Targeting ATR in DNA damage response and cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Prevo, Remko; Hammond, Ester M; Brunner, Thomas B; McKenna, W Gillies; Muschel, Ruth J

    2014-02-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity during DNA replication through the phosphorylation and activation of Chk1 and regulation of the DNA damage response. Preclinical studies have shown that disruption of ATR pathway can exacerbate the levels of replication stress in oncogene-driven murine tumors to promote cell killing. Additionally, inhibition of ATR can sensitise tumor cells to radiation or chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that targeting ATR can selectively sensitize cancer cells but not normal cells to DNA damage. Furthermore, in hypoxic conditions, ATR blockade results in overloading replication stress and DNA damage response causing cell death. Despite the attractiveness of ATR inhibition in the treatment of cancer, specific ATR inhibitors have remained elusive. In the last two years however, selective ATR inhibitors suitable for in vitro and - most recently - in vivo studies have been identified. In this article, we will review the literature on ATR function, its role in DDR and the potential of ATR inhibition to enhance the efficacy of radiation and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rewiring of genetic networks in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Mehta, Monika; Kuo, Dwight; Sung, Min-Kyung; Chuang, Ryan; Jaehnig, Eric J; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Licon, Katherine; Copeland, Wilbert; Shales, Michael; Fiedler, Dorothea; Dutkowski, Janusz; Guénolé, Aude; van Attikum, Haico; Shokat, Kevan M; Kolodner, Richard D; Huh, Won-Ki; Aebersold, Ruedi; Keogh, Michael-Christopher; Krogan, Nevan J; Ideker, Trey

    2010-12-03

    Although cellular behaviors are dynamic, the networks that govern these behaviors have been mapped primarily as static snapshots. Using an approach called differential epistasis mapping, we have discovered widespread changes in genetic interaction among yeast kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors as the cell responds to DNA damage. Differential interactions uncover many gene functions that go undetected in static conditions. They are very effective at identifying DNA repair pathways, highlighting new damage-dependent roles for the Slt2 kinase, Pph3 phosphatase, and histone variant Htz1. The data also reveal that protein complexes are generally stable in response to perturbation, but the functional relations between these complexes are substantially reorganized. Differential networks chart a new type of genetic landscape that is invaluable for mapping cellular responses to stimuli.

  17. The Intra-S Checkpoint Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Divya Ramalingam; Rhind, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Faithful duplication of the genome is a challenge because DNA is susceptible to damage by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic genotoxins, such as free radicals and UV light. Cells activate the intra-S checkpoint in response to damage during S phase to protect genomic integrity and ensure replication fidelity. The checkpoint prevents genomic instability mainly by regulating origin firing, fork progression, and transcription of G1/S genes in response to DNA damage. Several studies hint that regulation of forks is perhaps the most critical function of the intra-S checkpoint. However, the exact role of the checkpoint at replication forks has remained elusive and controversial. Is the checkpoint required for fork stability, or fork restart, or to prevent fork reversal or fork collapse, or activate repair at replication forks? What are the factors that the checkpoint targets at stalled replication forks? In this review, we will discuss the various pathways activated by the intra-S checkpoint in response to damage to prevent genomic instability. PMID:28218681

  18. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer.

  19. The Yeast Copper Response Is Regulated by DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kangzhen; Addinall, Stephen G.; Lydall, David

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially toxic redox-active metal, so the levels and distribution of this metal are carefully regulated to ensure that it binds to the correct proteins. Previous studies of copper-dependent transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the response of genes to changes in the exogenous levels of copper. We now report that yeast copper genes are regulated in response to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea by a mechanism(s) that requires the copper-responsive transcription factors Mac1 and AceI, copper superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity, and the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. Furthermore, in copper-starved yeast, the response of the Rad53 pathway to MMS is compromised due to a loss of Sod1 activity, consistent with the model that yeast imports copper to ensure Sod1 activity and Rad53 signaling. Crucially, the Mac1 transcription factor undergoes changes in its redox state in response to changing levels of copper or MMS. This study has therefore identified a novel regulatory relationship between cellular redox, copper homeostasis, and the DNA damage response in yeast. PMID:23959798

  20. SUMO-mediated regulation of DNA damage repair and responses

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation plays important roles during DNA damage repair and responses. Recent broad-scope and substrate-based studies have shed light on the regulation and significance of sumoylation during these processes. An emerging paradigm is that sumoylation of many DNA metabolism proteins is controlled by DNA engagement. Such “on-site modification” can explain low substrate modification levels and has important implications in sumoylation mechanisms and effects. New studies also suggest that sumoylation can regulate a process through an ensemble effect or via major substrates. Additionally, we describe new trends in the functional effects of sumoylation, such as bi-directional changes in biomolecule binding and multi-level coordination with other modifications. These emerging themes and models will stimulate our thinking and research in sumoylation and genome maintenance. PMID:25778614

  1. HSV-I and the cellular DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samantha; Weller, Sandra K

    2015-04-01

    Peter Wildy first observed genetic recombination between strains of HSV in 1955. At the time, knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms was limited, and it has only been in the last decade that particular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways have been examined in the context of viral infections. One of the first reports addressing the interaction between a cellular DDR protein and HSV-1 was the observation by Lees-Miller et al. that DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit levels were depleted in an ICP0-dependent manner during Herpes simplex virus 1 infection. Since then, there have been numerous reports describing the interactions between HSV infection and cellular DDR pathways. Due to space limitations, this review will focus predominantly on the most recent observations regarding how HSV navigates a potentially hostile environment to replicate its genome.

  2. ATM kinase: Much more than a DNA damage responsive protein.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Ayushi; Chandna, Sudhir

    2016-03-01

    ATM, mutation of which causes Ataxia telangiectasia, has emerged as a cardinal multifunctional protein kinase during past two decades as evidenced by various studies from around the globe. Further to its well established and predominant role in DNA damage response, ATM has also been understood to help in maintaining overall functional integrity of cells; since its mutation, inactivation or deficiency results in a variety of pathological manifestations besides DNA damage. These include oxidative stress, metabolic syndrome, mitochondrial dysfunction as well as neurodegeneration. Recently, high throughput screening using proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomic studies revealed several proteins which might be acting as substrates of ATM. Studies that can help in identifying effective regulatory controls within the ATM-mediated pathways/mechanisms can help in developing better therapeutics. In fact, more in-depth understanding of ATM-dependent cellular signals could also help in the treatment of variety of other disease conditions since these pathways seem to control many critical cellular functions. In this review, we have attempted to put together a detailed yet lucid picture of the present-day understanding of ATM's role in various pathophysiological conditions involving DNA damage and beyond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyperactivation of DNA-PK by double-strand break mimicking molecules disorganizes DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Quanz, Maria; Chassoux, Danielle; Berthault, Nathalie; Agrario, Céline; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Dutreix, Marie

    2009-07-21

    Cellular response to DNA damage involves the coordinated activation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. The early steps of DNA damage recognition and signaling in mammalian cells are not yet fully understood. To investigate the regulation of the DNA damage response (DDR), we designed short and stabilized double stranded DNA molecules (Dbait) mimicking double-strand breaks. We compared the response induced by these molecules to the response induced by ionizing radiation. We show that stable 32-bp long Dbait, induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of DDR components such as H2AX, Rpa32, Chk1, Chk2, Nbs1 and p53 in various cell lines. However, individual cell analyses reveal that differences exist in the cellular responses to Dbait compared to irradiation. Responses to Dbait: (i) are dependent only on DNA-PK kinase activity and not on ATM, (ii) result in a phosphorylation signal lasting several days and (iii) are distributed in the treated population in an "all-or-none" pattern, in a Dbait-concentration threshold dependant manner. Moreover, despite extensive phosphorylation of the DNA-PK downstream targets, Dbait treated cells continue to proliferate without showing cell cycle delay or apoptosis. Dbait treatment prior to irradiation impaired foci formation of Nbs1, 53BP1 and Rad51 at DNA damage sites and inhibited non-homologous end joining as well as homologous recombination. Together, our results suggest that the hyperactivation of DNA-PK is insufficient for complete execution of the DDR but induces a "false" DNA damage signaling that disorganizes the DNA repair system.

  4. DNA damage response and sphingolipid signaling in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasunobu; Moro, Kazuki; Tsuchida, Junko; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cannot generally be cured by systemic chemotherapy or radiotherapy due to their poor response to conventional therapeutic agents. The development of novel and efficient targeted therapies to increase their treatment options depends on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of HCC. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a network of cell-signaling events that are triggered by DNA damage. Its dysregulation is thought to be one of the key mechanisms underlying the generation of HCC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator, has emerged as an important signaling molecule that has been found to be involved in many cellular functions. In the liver, the alteration of S1P signaling potentially affects the DDR pathways. In this review, we explore the role of the DDR in hepatocarcinogenesis of various etiologies, including hepatitis B and C infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolism and functions of S1P that may affect the hepatic DDR. The elucidation of the pathogenic role of S1P may create new avenues of research into therapeutic strategies for patients with HCC. PMID:26514817

  5. Chromatin plasticity in response to DNA damage: the shape of things to come

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Sophie E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage poses a major threat to cell function and viability by compromising both genome and epigenome integrity. The DNA damage response indeed operates in the context of chromatin and relies on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review the molecular bases of chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage, focusing on core histone mobilization in mammalian cells. Building on our current view of nucleosome dynamics in response to DNA damage, we highlight open challenges and avenues for future development. In particular, we discuss the different levels of regulation of chromatin plasticity during the DNA damage response and their potential impact on cell function and epigenome maintenance. PMID:25957486

  6. DNA strand breaks: the DNA template alterations that trigger p53-dependent DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W G; Kastan, M B

    1994-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 serves as a critical regulator of a G1 cell cycle checkpoint and of apoptosis following exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents. The mechanism by which DNA-damaging agents elevate p53 protein levels to trigger G1/S arrest or cell death remains to be elucidated. In fact, whether damage to the DNA template itself participates in transducing the signal leading to p53 induction has not yet been demonstrated. We exposed human cell lines containing wild-type p53 alleles to several different DNA-damaging agents and found that agents which rapidly induce DNA strand breaks, such as ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and DNA topoisomerase-targeted drugs, rapidly triggered p53 protein elevations. In addition, we determined that camptothecin-stimulated trapping of topoisomerase I-DNA complexes was not sufficient to elevate p53 protein levels; rather, replication-associated DNA strand breaks were required. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the antimetabolite N(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) did not cause rapid p53 protein increases but resulted in delayed increases in p53 protein levels temporally correlated with the appearance of DNA strand breaks. Finally, we concluded that DNA strand breaks were sufficient for initiating p53-dependent signal transduction after finding that introduction of nucleases into cells by electroporation stimulated rapid p53 protein elevations. While DNA strand breaks appeared to be capable of triggering p53 induction, DNA lesions other than strand breaks did not. Exposure of normal cells and excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells to low doses of UV light, under conditions in which thymine dimers appear but DNA replication-associated strand breaks were prevented, resulted in p53 induction attributable to DNA strand breaks associated with excision repair. Our data indicate that DNA strand breaks are sufficient and probably necessary for p53 induction in cells with wild-type p53 alleles exposed to DNA-damaging

  7. Identification of S-phase DNA damage-response targets in fission yeast reveals conservation of damage-response networks

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E. H.; Murray, Johanne M.; Carr, Antony M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Rhind, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA damage during S-phase regulates a complicated network of processes, including cell-cycle progression, gene expression, DNA replication kinetics, and DNA repair. In fission yeast, this S-phase DNA damage response (DDR) is coordinated by two protein kinases: Rad3, the ortholog of mammalian ATR, and Cds1, the ortholog of mammalian Chk2. Although several critical downstream targets of Rad3 and Cds1 have been identified, most of their presumed targets are unknown, including the targets responsible for regulating replication kinetics and coordinating replication and repair. To characterize targets of the S-phase DDR, we identified proteins phosphorylated in response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced S-phase DNA damage in wild-type, rad3∆, and cds1∆ cells by proteome-wide mass spectrometry. We found a broad range of S-phase–specific DDR targets involved in gene expression, stress response, regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis, and DNA replication and repair. These targets are highly enriched for proteins required for viability in response to MMS, indicating their biological significance. Furthermore, the regulation of these proteins is similar in fission and budding yeast, across 300 My of evolution, demonstrating a deep conservation of S-phase DDR targets and suggesting that these targets may be critical for maintaining genome stability in response to S-phase DNA damage across eukaryotes. PMID:27298342

  8. Circadian Clock Control of the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, Aziz; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A.; Kang, Tae-Hong; Reardon, Joyce T.; Lee, Jin Hyup; Ozturk, Nuri

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess a cell-autonomous molecular clock which controls the timing of many biochemical reactions and hence the cellular response to environmental stimuli including genotoxic stress. The clock consists of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop made up of four genes/proteins, BMal1, Clock, Cryptochrome, and Period. The circadian clock has an intrinsic period of about 24 hours, and it dictates the rates of many biochemical reactions as a function of the time of the day. Recently, it has become apparent that the circadian clock plays an important role in determining the strengths of cellular responses to DNA damage including repair, checkpoints, and apoptosis. These new insights are expected to guide development of novel mechanism-based chemotherapeutic regimens. PMID:20227409

  9. Spatiotemporal dynamics of early DNA damage response proteins on complex DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Frank; Löb, Daniel; Lengert, Nicor; Durante, Marco; Drossel, Barbara; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Jakob, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The response of cells to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is determined by the activation of multiple pathways aimed at repairing the injury and maintaining genomic integrity. Densely ionizing radiation induces complex damage consisting of different types of DNA lesions in close proximity that are difficult to repair and may promote carcinogenesis. Little is known about the dynamic behavior of repair proteins on complex lesions. In this study we use live-cell imaging for the spatio-temporal characterization of early protein interactions at damage sites of increasing complexity. Beamline microscopy was used to image living cells expressing fluorescently-tagged proteins during and immediately after charged particle irradiation to reveal protein accumulation at damaged sites in real time. Information on the mobility and binding rates of the recruited proteins was obtained from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Recruitment of the DNA damage sensor protein NBS1 accelerates with increasing lesion density and saturates at very high damage levels. FRAP measurements revealed two different binding modalities of NBS1 to damage sites and a direct impact of lesion complexity on the binding. Faster recruitment with increasing lesion complexity was also observed for the mediator MDC1, but mobility was limited at very high damage densities due to nuclear-wide binding. We constructed a minimal computer model of the initial response to DSB based on known protein interactions only. By fitting all measured data using the same set of parameters, we can reproduce the experimentally characterized steps of the DNA damage response over a wide range of damage densities. The model suggests that the influence of increasing lesion density accelerating NBS1 recruitment is only dependent on the different binding modes of NBS1, directly to DSB and to the surrounding chromatin via MDC1. This elucidates an impact of damage clustering on repair without the

  10. Host DNA damage response facilitates African swine fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Simões, Margarida; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2013-07-26

    Studies with different viral infection models on virus interactions with the host cell nucleus have opened new perspectives on our understanding of the molecular basis of these interactions in African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. The present study aims to characterize the host DNA damage response (DDR) occurring upon in vitro infection with the ASFV-Ba71V isolate. We evaluated protein levels during ASFV time-course infection, of several signalling cascade factors belonging to DDR pathways involved in double strand break repair - Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), ATM-Rad 3 related (ATR) and DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DDR inhibitory trials using caffeine and wortmannin and ATR inducible-expression cell lines were used to confirm specific pathway activation during viral infection. Our results show that ASFV specifically elicits ATR-mediated pathway activation from the early phase of infection with increased levels of H2AX, RPA32, p53, ATR and Chk1 phosphorylated forms. Viral p72 synthesis was abrogated by ATR kinase inhibitors and also in ATR-kd cells. Furthermore, a reduction of viral progeny was identified in these cells when compared to the outcome of infection in ATR-wt. Overall, our results strongly suggest that the ATR pathway plays an essential role for successful ASFV infection of host cells.

  11. DDRprot: a database of DNA damage response-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Cases, Ildefonso; Arcas, Aida; Rojas, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Damage Response (DDR) signalling network is an essential system that protects the genome’s integrity. The DDRprot database presented here is a resource that integrates manually curated information on the human DDR network and its sub-pathways. For each particular DDR protein, we present detailed information about its function. If involved in post-translational modifications (PTMs) with each other, we depict the position of the modified residue/s in the three-dimensional structures, when resolved structures are available for the proteins. All this information is linked to the original publication from where it was obtained. Phylogenetic information is also shown, including time of emergence and conservation across 47 selected species, family trees and sequence alignments of homologues. The DDRprot database can be queried by different criteria: pathways, species, evolutionary age or involvement in (PTM). Sequence searches using hidden Markov models can be also used. Database URL: http://ddr.cbbio.es. PMID:27577567

  12. Activation of DNA damage response pathways as a consequence of anthracycline-DNA adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Robert A; Swift, Lonnie P; Rephaeli, Ada; Nudelman, Abraham; Kimura, Ken-Ichi; Phillips, Don R; Cutts, Suzanne M

    2012-06-15

    The cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, a clinically used anti-neoplastic drug, can be enhanced by formaldehyde (either endogenous or exogenous) to promote the formation of doxorubicin-DNA adducts. Formaldehyde supplies the carbon required for the covalent linkage of doxorubicin to one strand of DNA, with hydrogen bonds stabilising the doxorubicin mono-adduct to the other strand of DNA, to act much like an interstrand crosslink. Interstrand crosslinks present a major challenge for cellular repair processes, requiring the activation of numerous DNA damage response proteins for resolution of the resulting DNA intermediates and damage. This work investigates DNA damage response proteins activated by doxorubicin-DNA adducts. Although p53 was phosphorylated at Serine 15 in response to adducts, long term growth inhibition of mammalian cells was not affected by p53 status. Using siRNA technology and kinase inhibitors we observed enhanced cellular sensitivity to doxorubicin-DNA adducts when the activity of the signalling protein kinases ATM and ATR were lost. Cells synchronised using a double thymidine block were sensitised to adduct-initiated cell death upon ATR knockdown, but relatively unaffected by ATM knockdown. Loss of ATR was associated with abrogation of a drug-induced G(2)/M block and induction of mitotic catastrophe, while loss of ATM was associated with drug-induced apoptosis in non-synchronised cells. These proteins may therefore be potential drug targets to achieve synergistic cytotoxic responses to doxorubicin-DNA adduct forming therapies. The analysis of these protein kinases with respect to cell cycle progression indicates that ATR is required for G(2)/M checkpoint responses while ATM appears to function in G(1) mediated responses to anthracycline adducts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RAD54 forms DNA repair foci in response to DNA damage in living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Junko; White, Charles I; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2017-02-02

    Plants have various defense mechanisms against environmental stresses that induce DNA damage. Genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed the sensing and signaling of DNA damage, but little is known about subnuclear dynamics in response to DNA damage in living plant cells. Here, we observed that the chromatin remodeling factor RAD54, which is involved in DNA repair via the homologous recombination pathway, formed subnuclear foci (termed RAD54 foci) in Arabidopsis thaliana after induction of DNA double-strand breaks. The appearance of RAD54 foci was dependent on the ATAXIA-TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED-SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 pathway, and RAD54 foci were co-localized with γH2AX signals. Laser irradiation of a subnuclear area demonstrated that in living cells RAD54 was specifically accumulated at the damaged site. In addition, the formation of RAD54 foci showed specificity for cell type and region. We conclude that RAD54 foci correspond to DNA repair foci in A. thaliana.

  14. The dynamic behavior of Ect2 in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Xiang, Jinnan; Li, Baojie; Liu, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    Ect2 is a BRCT-containing guanidine exchange factor for Rho GTPases. It is essential for cytokinesis and is also involved in tumorigenesis. Since most BRCT-containing proteins are involved in DNA damage response and/or DNA repair, we tested whether Ect2 plays similar roles. We report that in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), DNA damage quickly led to Ect2 relocalization to the chromatin and DNA damage foci-like structures. Ect2 knockdown did not affect foci localization of γH2AX, TopBP1, or Brca1, or activation of Atm, yet it impeded p53 Ser15 phosphorylation and activation, and resulted in defects in apoptosis and activation of S and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. These results suggest that Ect2 plays a role in DNA damage response. Interestingly, Ect2 is down-regulated at late stages of DNA damage response. Although p53 and E2F1 have been shown to regulate Ect2 transcription, DNA damage-induced Ect2 down-regulation occurred in p53−/− or Atm−/− MEFs and E2F1 knockdown cells. Instead, DNA damage-induced Ect2 down-regulation is mainly attributable to decreased protein stability. Like Ect2 knockdown, Ect2 destabilization may help the cell to recover from DNA damage response. These results suggest that Ect2 plays roles in multiple aspects of DNA damage response. PMID:27074761

  15. Regulation of the DNA Damage Response by DNA-PKcs Inhibitory Phosphorylation of ATM.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jiang, Wenxia; Crowe, Jennie L; Zha, Shan; Paull, Tanya T

    2017-01-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) regulates the DNA damage response as well as DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination. Here we show that ATM is hyperactive when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is chemically inhibited or when the DNA-PKcs gene is deleted in human cells. Pre-incubation of ATM protein with active DNA-PKcs also significantly reduces ATM activity in vitro. We characterize several phosphorylation sites in ATM that are targets of DNA-PKcs and show that phospho-mimetic mutations at these residues significantly inhibit ATM activity and impair ATM signaling upon DNA damage. In contrast, phospho-blocking mutations at one cluster of sites increase the frequency of apoptosis during normal cell growth. DNA-PKcs, which is integral to the non-homologous end joining pathway, thus negatively regulates ATM activity through phosphorylation of ATM. These observations illuminate an important regulatory mechanism for ATM that also controls DNA repair pathway choice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Marcos; Iglesias, Pablo; Gonzalez, Teresa; Dominguez, Fernando; Fraga, Maximo; Aliste, Carlos; Forteza, Jeronimo; Costoya, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR) activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb) inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12). Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  18. The DNA damage response in viral-induced cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, P A; Luftig, M A

    2012-01-31

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has emerged as a critical tumour suppressor pathway responding to cellular DNA replicative stress downstream of aberrant oncogene over-expression. Recent studies have now implicated the DDR as a sensor of oncogenic virus infection. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which tumour viruses activate and also suppress the host DDR. The mechanism of tumour virus induction of the DDR is intrinsically linked to the need for these viruses to promote an S-phase environment to replicate their nucleic acid during infection. However, inappropriate expression of viral oncoproteins can also activate the DDR through various mechanisms including replicative stress, direct interaction with DDR components and induction of reactive oxygen species. Given the growth-suppressive consequences of activating the DDR, tumour viruses have also evolved mechanisms to attenuate these pathways. Aberrant expression of viral oncoproteins may therefore promote tumourigenesis through increased somatic mutation and aneuploidy due to DDR inactivation. This review will focus on the interplay between oncogenic viruses and the DDR with respect to cellular checkpoint control and transformation.

  19. WWOX modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response.

    PubMed

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hereema, Nyla A; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2016-01-26

    For many decades genomic instability is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Role of the tumor suppressor WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) in DNA damage response upon double strand breaks has been recently revealed. Here we demonstrate unforeseen functions for WWOX upon DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) checkpoint activation. We found that WWOX levels are induced following SSBs and accumulate in the nucleus. WWOX deficiency is associated with reduced activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) checkpoint proteins and increased chromosomal breaks. At the molecular level, we show that upon SSBs WWOX is modified at lysine 274 by ubiquitination mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH and interacts with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Interestingly, ATM inhibition was associated with reduced activation of ATR checkpoint proteins suggesting that WWOX manipulation of ATR checkpoint proteins is ATM-dependent. Taken together, the present findings indicate that WWOX plays a key role in ATR checkpoint activation, while its absence might facilitate genomic instability.

  20. WWOX modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hereema, Nyla A.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2016-01-01

    For many decades genomic instability is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Role of the tumor suppressor WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) in DNA damage response upon double strand breaks has been recently revealed. Here we demonstrate unforeseen functions for WWOX upon DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) checkpoint activation. We found that WWOX levels are induced following SSBs and accumulate in the nucleus. WWOX deficiency is associated with reduced activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) checkpoint proteins and increased chromosomal breaks. At the molecular level, we show that upon SSBs WWOX is modified at lysine 274 by ubiquitination mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH and interacts with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Interestingly, ATM inhibition was associated with reduced activation of ATR checkpoint proteins suggesting that WWOX manipulation of ATR checkpoint proteins is ATM-dependent. Taken together, the present findings indicate that WWOX plays a key role in ATR checkpoint activation, while its absence might facilitate genomic instability. PMID:26675548

  1. Dynamics of DNA damage response proteins at DNA breaks: a focus on protein modifications

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Sophie E.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Genome integrity is constantly monitored by sophisticated cellular networks, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR). A common feature of DDR proteins is their mobilization in response to genotoxic stress. Here, we outline how the development of various complementary methodologies has provided valuable insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of DDR protein assembly/disassembly at sites of DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells. Considerable advances have also been made in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms for these events, with post-translational modifications of DDR factors being shown to play prominent roles in controlling the formation of foci in response to DNA-damaging agents. We review these regulatory mechanisms and discuss their biological significance to the DDR. PMID:21363960

  2. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  3. Recruitment of DNA polymerase eta by FANCD2 in the early response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dechen; Dudimah, Fred Duafalia; Zhang, Jun; Pickering, Anna; Paneerselvam, Jayabal; Palrasu, Manikandan; Wang, Hong; Fei, Peiwen

    2013-03-01

    How Fanconi anemia (FA) protein D2 (FANCD2) performs DNA damage repair remains largely elusive. We report here that translesion synthesis DNA polymerase (pol) eta is a novel mediator of FANCD2 function. We found that wild type (wt) FANCD2, not K561R (mt) FANCD2, can interact with pol eta. Upon DNA damage, the interaction of pol eta with FANCD2 occurs earlier than that with PCNA, which is in concert with our finding that FANCD2 monoubiquitination peaks at an earlier time point than that of PCNA monoubiquitination. FANCD2-null FA patient cells (PD20) carrying histone H2B-fused pol eta and wtFANCD2, respectively, show a similar tendency of low Mitomycin C (MMC) sensitivity, while cells transfected with empty vector control or pol eta alone demonstrate a similar high level of MMC sensitivity. It therefore appears that FANCD2 monoubiquitination plays a similar anchor role as histone to bind DNA in regulating pol eta. Collectively, our study indicates that, in the early phase of DNA damage response, FANCD2 plays crucial roles in recruiting pol eta to the sites of DNA damage for repair.

  4. SUMO boosts the DNA damage response barrier against cancer.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Jiri; Hodny, Zdenek

    2010-01-19

    Cells exposed to genotoxic insults such as ionizing radiation activate a signaling cascade to repair the damaged DNA. Two recent articles published in Nature show that such genome maintenance requires modifications of tumor suppressor proteins BRCA1 and 53BP1 by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased Sensitivity of DNA Damage Response-Deficient Cells to Stimulated Microgravity-Induced DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; An, Lili; Hang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG). In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES) and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR) defects. PMID:25915950

  6. DNA damage response in peripheral nervous system: coping with cancer therapy-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    In the absence of blood brain barrier (BBB) the DNA of peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons is exposed to a broader spectrum of endogenous and exogenous threats compared to that of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence, while CNS and PNS neurons cope with many similar challenges inherent to their high oxygen consumption and vigorous metabolism, PNS neurons are also exposed to circulating toxins and inflammatory mediators due to relative permeability of PNS blood nerve barrier (BNB). Consequently, genomes of PNS neurons incur greater damage and the question awaiting investigation is whether specialized repair mechanisms for maintenance of DNA integrity have evolved to meet the additional needs of PNS neurons. Here, I review data showing how PNS neurons manage collateral DNA damage incurred in the course of different anti-cancer treatments designed to block DNA replication in proliferating tumor cells. Importantly, while PNS neurotoxicity and concomitant chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are among major dose limiting barriers in achieving therapy goals, CIPN is partially reversible during post-treatment nerve recovery. Clearly, cell recovery necessitates mobilization of the DNA damage response and underscores the need for systematic investigation of the scope of DNA repair capacities in the PNS to help predict post-treatment risks to recovering neurons.

  7. Histone ubiquitylation and its roles in transcription and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Meas, Rithy; Mao, Peng

    2015-12-01

    DNA in human cells is constantly assaulted by endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. It is vital for the cell to respond rapidly and precisely to DNA damage to maintain genome integrity and reduce the risk of mutagenesis. Sophisticated reactions occur in chromatin surrounding the damaged site leading to the activation of DNA damage response (DDR), including transcription reprogramming, cell cycle checkpoint, and DNA repair. Histone proteins around the DNA damage play essential roles in DDR, through extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs) by a variety of modifying enzymes. One PTM on histones, mono-ubiquitylation, has emerged as a key player in cellular response to DNA damage. In this review, we will (1) briefly summarize the history of histone H2A and H2B ubiquitylation (H2Aub and H2Bub, respectively), (2) discuss their roles in transcription, and (3) their functions in DDR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  9. Ku80-deletion suppresses spontaneous tumors and induces a p53-mediated DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Valerie B.; Rodier, Francis; Choi, Yong Jun; Busuttil, Rita A.; Vogel, Hannes; Vijg, Jan; Campisi, Judith; Hasty, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ku80 facilitates DNA repair and therefore should suppress cancer. However, ku80−/− mice exhibit reduced cancer, although they age prematurely and have a shortened life span. We tested the hypothesis that Ku80 deletion suppresses cancer by enhancing cellular tumor suppressive responses to inefficiently repaired DNA damage. In support of this hypothesis, Ku80 deletion ameliorated tumor burden in APCMIN mice, and increased a p53-mediated DNA damage response, DNA lesions, and chromosomal rearrangements. Thus, contrary to its assumed role as a caretaker tumor suppressor, Ku80 facilitates tumor growth most likely by dampening baseline cellular DNA damage responses. PMID:19010925

  10. BRCA1 in the DNA damage response and at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Eliot M

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) account for about 40-45% of hereditary breast cancer cases. Moreover, a significant fraction of sporadic (non-hereditary) breast and ovarian cancers exhibit reduced or absent expression of the BRCA1 protein, suggesting an additional role for BRCA1 in sporadic cancers. BRCA1 follows the classic pattern of a highly penetrant Knudsen-type tumor suppressor gene in which one allele is inactivated through a germ-line mutation and the other is mutated or deleted within the tumor. BRCA1 is a multi-functional protein but it is not fully understood which function(s) is (are) most important for tumor suppression, nor is it clear why BRCA1-mutations confer a high risk for breast and ovarian cancers and not a broad spectrum of tumor types. Here, we will review BRCA1 functions in the DNA damage response (DDR), which are likely to contribute to tumor suppression. In the process, we will highlight some of the controversies and unresolved issues in the field. We will also describe a recently identified and under-investigated role for BRCA1 in the regulation of telomeres and the implications of this role in the DDR and cancer suppression.

  11. BRCA1 in the DNA damage response and at telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Eliot M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) account for about 40–45% of hereditary breast cancer cases. Moreover, a significant fraction of sporadic (non-hereditary) breast and ovarian cancers exhibit reduced or absent expression of the BRCA1 protein, suggesting an additional role for BRCA1 in sporadic cancers. BRCA1 follows the classic pattern of a highly penetrant Knudsen-type tumor suppressor gene in which one allele is inactivated through a germ-line mutation and the other is mutated or deleted within the tumor. BRCA1 is a multi-functional protein but it is not fully understood which function(s) is (are) most important for tumor suppression, nor is it clear why BRCA1-mutations confer a high risk for breast and ovarian cancers and not a broad spectrum of tumor types. Here, we will review BRCA1 functions in the DNA damage response (DDR), which are likely to contribute to tumor suppression. In the process, we will highlight some of the controversies and unresolved issues in the field. We will also describe a recently identified and under-investigated role for BRCA1 in the regulation of telomeres and the implications of this role in the DDR and cancer suppression. PMID:23802008

  12. Noncatalytic, N-terminal Domains of DNA Polymerase Lambda Affect Its Cellular Localization and DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Anthony A; Taggart, David J; Suo, Zucai

    2017-04-13

    Specialized DNA polymerases, such as DNA polymerase lambda (Polλ), are important players in DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. Knowing how DNA polymerases are regulated and recruited to sites of DNA damage is imperative to understanding these pathways. Recent work has suggested that Polλ plays a role in several distinct DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. In this paper, we report previously unknown roles of the N-terminal domains of human Polλ for modulating its involvement in DNA damage tolerance and repair. By using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and cell survival assays, we found that the BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) and proline/serine-rich (PSR) domains of Polλ affect its cellular localization and DNA damage responses. The nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Polλ was necessary to overcome the impediment of its nuclear localization caused by its BRCT and PSR domains. Induction of DNA damage resulted in recruitment of Polλ to chromatin, which was controlled by its BRCT and PSR domains. In addition, the presence of both domains was required for Polλ-mediated tolerance of oxidative DNA damage but not DNA methylation damage. These findings suggest that the N-terminal domains of Polλ are important for regulating its responses to DNA damage.

  13. Alternative splicing of DNA damage response genes and gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Rahmutulla, Bahityar; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Nomura, Fumio

    2014-12-14

    Alternative splicing, which is a common phenomenon in mammalian genomes, is a fundamental process of gene regulation and contributes to great protein diversity. Alternative splicing events not only occur in the normal gene regulation process but are also closely related to certain diseases including cancer. In this review, we briefly demonstrate the concept of alternative splicing and DNA damage and describe the association of alternative splicing and cancer pathogenesis, focusing on the potential relationship of alternative splicing, DNA damage, and gastrointestinal cancers. We will also discuss whether alternative splicing leads to genetic instability, which is considered to be a driving force for tumorigenesis. Better understanding of the role and mechanism of alternative splicing in tumorigenesis may provide new directions for future cancer studies.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 protein impairs accumulation of host DNA damage proteins at damage sites in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Deng, Wen; Hau, Pok M; Liu, Jia; Lau, Victoria M Y; Cheung, Annie L M; Huen, Michael S Y; Tsao, Sai W

    2015-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is closely associated with several human malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The EBV immediate-early protein BZLF1 is the key mediator that switches EBV infection from latent to lytic forms. The lytic form of EBV infection has been implicated in human carcinogenesis but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. BZLF1 has been shown to be a binding partner of several DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. Its functions in host DDR remain unknown. Thus, we explore the effects of BZLF1 on cellular response to DNA damage in NPC cells. We found that expression of BZLF1 impaired the binding between RNF8 and MDC1 (mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1), which in turn interfered with the localization of RNF8 and 53BP1 to the DNA damage sites. The RNF8-53BP1 pathway is important for repair of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage-induced G2/M checkpoint activation. Our results showed that, by impairing DNA damage repair as well as abrogating G2/M checkpoint, BZLF1 induced genomic instability and rendered cells more sensitive to ionizing radiation. Moreover, the blockage of 53BP1 and RNF8 foci formation was recapitulated in EBV-infected cells. Taken together, our study raises the possibility that, by causing mis-localization of important DDR proteins, BZLF1 may function as a link between lytic EBV infection and impaired DNA damage repair, thus contributing to the carcinogenesis of EBV-associated human epithelial malignancies.

  15. Modeling amplified p53 responses under DNA-PK inhibition in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tingzhe; Li, Xinda; Shen, Pingping

    2017-01-01

    During DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) repair, coordinated activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-like kinases can activate p53 signaling pathway. Recent findings have identified novel interplays among these kinases demonstrating amplified first p53 pulses under DNA-PK inhibition. However, no theoretical model has been developed to characterize such dynamics. In current work, we modeled the prolonged p53 pulses with DNA-PK inhibitor. We could identify a dose-dependent increase in the first pulse amplitude and width. Meanwhile, weakened DNA-PK mediated ATM inhibition was insufficient to reproduce such dynamic behavior. Moreover, the information flow was shifted predominantly to the first pulse under DNA-PK inhibition. Furthermore, the amplified p53 responses were relatively robust. Taken together, our model can faithfully replicate amplified p53 responses under DNA-PK inhibition and provide insights into cell fate decision by manipulating p53 dynamics. PMID:28177883

  16. Blurring the line between the DNA damage response and transcription: the importance of chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E

    2014-11-15

    DNA damage interferes with the progression of transcription machineries. A tight coordination of transcription with signaling and repair of DNA damage is thus critical for safeguarding genome function. This coordination involves modulations of chromatin organization. Here, we focus on the central role of chromatin dynamics, in conjunction with DNA Damage Response (DDR) factors, in controlling transcription inhibition and restart at sites of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Recent work has identified chromatin modifiers and histone chaperones as key regulators of transcriptional activity in damaged chromatin regions. Conversely, the transcriptional state of chromatin before DNA damage influences both DNA damage signaling and repair. We discuss the importance of chromatin plasticity in coordinating the interplay between the DDR and transcription, with major implications for cell fate maintenance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The DNA damage response kinases DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) Are stimulated by bulky adduct-containing DNA.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael G; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Sancar, Aziz

    2011-06-03

    A variety of environmental, carcinogenic, and chemotherapeutic agents form bulky lesions on DNA that activate DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathways in human cells. To identify the mechanisms by which bulky DNA adducts induce damage signaling, we developed an in vitro assay using mammalian cell nuclear extract and plasmid DNA containing bulky adducts formed by N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene or benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide. Using this cell-free system together with a variety of pharmacological, genetic, and biochemical approaches, we identified the DNA damage response kinases DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) as bulky DNA damage-stimulated kinases that phosphorylate physiologically important residues on the checkpoint proteins p53, Chk1, and RPA. Consistent with these results, purified DNA-PK and ATM were directly stimulated by bulky adduct-containing DNA and preferentially associated with damaged DNA in vitro. Because the DNA damage response kinase ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) is also stimulated by bulky DNA adducts, we conclude that a common biochemical mechanism exists for activation of DNA-PK, ATM, and ATR by bulky adduct-containing DNA.

  18. Modulation of inflammation and disease tolerance by DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed

    Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Luis F

    2017-03-01

    The accurate replication and repair of DNA is central to organismal survival. This process is challenged by the many factors that can change genetic information such as replication errors and direct damage to the DNA molecule by chemical and physical agents. DNA damage can also result from microorganism invasion as an integral step of their life cycle or as collateral damage from host defense mechanisms against pathogens. Here we review the complex crosstalk of DNA damage response and immune response pathways that might be evolutionarily connected and argue that DNA damage response pathways can be explored therapeutically to induce disease tolerance through the activation of tissue damage control processes. Such approach may constitute the missing pillar in the treatment of critical illnesses caused by multiple organ failure, such as sepsis and septic shock. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. The Role of the DNA Damage Response throughout the Papillomavirus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Caleb C.; Hussmann, Katherine L.; McBride, Alison A.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) maintains genomic integrity through an elaborate network of signaling pathways that sense DNA damage and recruit effector factors to repair damaged DNA. DDR signaling pathways are usurped and manipulated by the replication programs of many viruses. Here, we review the papillomavirus (PV) life cycle, highlighting current knowledge of how PVs recruit and engage the DDR to facilitate productive infection. PMID:26008695

  20. Ciliogenesis and the DNA damage response: a stressful relationship.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Colin A; Collis, Spencer J

    2016-01-01

    Both inherited and sporadic mutations can give rise to a plethora of human diseases. Through myriad diverse cellular processes, sporadic mutations can arise through a failure to accurately replicate the genetic code or by inaccurate separation of duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. The human genome has therefore evolved to encode a large number of proteins that work together with regulators of the cell cycle to ensure that it remains error-free. This is collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR), and genome stability mechanisms involve a complex network of signalling and processing factors that ensure redundancy and adaptability of these systems. The importance of genome stability mechanisms is best illustrated by the dramatic increased risk of cancer in individuals with underlying disruption to genome maintenance mechanisms. Cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles present on most vertebrate cells, where they facilitate transduction of external signals into the cell. When not embedded within the specialised ciliary membrane, components of the primary cilium's basal body help form the microtubule organising centre that controls cellular trafficking and the mitotic segregation of chromosomes. Ciliopathies are a collection of diseases associated with functional disruption to cilia function through a variety of different mechanisms. Ciliopathy phenotypes can vary widely, and although some cellular overgrowth phenotypes are prevalent in a subset of ciliopathies, an increased risk of cancer is not noted as a clinical feature. However, recent studies have identified surprising genetic and functional links between cilia-associated proteins and genome maintenance factors. The purpose of this mini-review is to therefore highlight some of these discoveries and discuss their implications with regards to functional crosstalk between the DDR and ciliogenesis pathways, and how this may impact on the development of human disease.

  1. Functional interplay between ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response and DNA repair pathways in oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Melanie; Berman, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    To maintain genome stability, cells have evolved various DNA repair pathways to deal with oxidative DNA damage. DNA damage response (DDR) pathways, including ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 checkpoints, are also activated in oxidative stress to coordinate DNA repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, apoptosis, and senescence. Several studies demonstrate that DDR pathways can regulate DNA repair pathways. On the other hand, accumulating evidence suggests that DNA repair pathways may modulate DDR pathway activation as well. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how various DNA repair and DDR pathways are activated in response to oxidative DNA damage primarily from studies in eukaryotes. In particular, we analyze the functional interplay between DNA repair and DDR pathways in oxidative stress. A better understanding of cellular response to oxidative stress may provide novel avenues of treating human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24947324

  2. Hyperglycemia Differentially Affects Maternal and Fetal DNA Integrity and DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Moreli, Jusciele B.; Santos, Janine H.; Lorenzon-Ojea, Aline Rodrigues; Corrêa-Silva, Simone; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rudge, Marilza V.; Damasceno, Débora C.; Bevilacqua, Estela; Calderon, Iracema M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Investigate the DNA damage and its cellular response in blood samples from both mother and the umbilical cord of pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia. Methods: A total of 144 subjects were divided into 4 groups: normoglycemia (ND; 46 cases), mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH; 30 cases), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; 45 cases) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM2; 23 cases). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) isolation and/or leukocytes from whole maternal and umbilical cord blood were obtained from all groups at delivery. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage were measured by gene-specific quantitative PCR, and the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway were assessed by real-time qPCR and Western blot, respectively. Apoptosis was measured in vitro experiments by caspase 3/7 activity and ATP levels. Results: GDM and DM2 groups were characterized by an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers, an increase in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and decreased expression of mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1) involved in BER. The levels of hyperglycemia were associated with the in vitro apoptosis pathway. Blood levels of DNA damage in umbilical cord were similar among the groups. Newborns of diabetic mothers had increased expression of BER mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1, POLβ and FEN1). A diabetes-like environment was unable to induce apoptosis in the umbilical cord blood cells. Conclusions: Our data show relevant asymmetry between maternal and fetal blood cell susceptibility to DNA damage and apoptosis induction. Maternal cells seem to be more predisposed to changes in an adverse glucose environment. This may be due to differential ability in upregulating multiple genes involved in the activation of DNA repair response, especially the BER mechanism. However if this study shows a more effective adaptive response by the fetal organism, it also calls for

  3. Chromatin plasticity in response to DNA damage: The shape of things to come.

    PubMed

    Adam, Salomé; Dabin, Juliette; Polo, Sophie E

    2015-08-01

    DNA damage poses a major threat to cell function and viability by compromising both genome and epigenome integrity. The DNA damage response indeed operates in the context of chromatin and relies on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review the molecular bases of chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage, focusing on core histone mobilization in mammalian cells. Building on our current view of nucleosome dynamics in response to DNA damage, we highlight open challenges and avenues for future development. In particular, we discuss the different levels of regulation of chromatin plasticity during the DNA damage response and their potential impact on cell function and epigenome maintenance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidative DNA Damage Response in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Mongolian Gerbils.

    PubMed

    Bae, Minkyung; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2013-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induced DNA damage which may be related to gastric cancer development. The DNA damage response coordinates DNA repair, cell-cycle transition, and apoptosis through activation of DNA damage response molecules. The damaged DNA is repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). In the present study, we investigated the changes of HR DNA repair proteins (ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated; ATM, ATM and Rad3-related; ATR), NHEJ repair proteins (Ku70/80), cell cycle regulators (Chk1, Chk2), and apoptosis marker (p53/p-p53) were determined in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils. In addition, the effect of an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on H. pylori-induced DNA damage response was determined to assess the involvement of oxidative stress on DNA damage of the animals infected with H. pylori. One week after intragastric inoculation with H. pylori, Mongolian gerbils were fed with basal diet with or without 3% NAC for 6 weeks. After 6 week, the expression levels of DNA repair proteins (Ku70/80, ATM, ATR), cell cycle regulators (Chk1, Chk2) and apoptosis marker (p-p53/p53) were increased in gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils, which was suppressed by NAC treatment. In conclusion, oxidative stress mediates H. pylori-induced DNA damage response including NHEJ and HR repairing processes, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils.

  5. The ATM Kinase Induces MicroRNA Biogenesis in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinna; Wan, Guohui; Berger, Franklin G.; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA damage response involves a complex network of processes that detect and repair DNA damage. Here we show that miRNA biogenesis is globally induced upon DNA damage in an ATM-dependent manner. About one fourth of miRNAs are significantly up-regulated after DNA damage, while loss of ATM abolishes their induction. KSRP (KH-type splicing regulatory protein) is a key player that translates DNA damage signaling to miRNA biogenesis. The ATM kinase directly binds to and phosphorylates KSRP, leading to enhanced interaction between KSRP and pri-miRNAs and increased KSRP activity in miRNA processing. Mutations of the ATM phosphorylation sites of KSRP impaired its activity in regulating miRNAs. These findings reveal a mechanism by which DNA damage signaling is linked to miRNA biogenesis. PMID:21329876

  6. Oligomerization of MDC1 protein is important for proper DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kuntian; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2011-08-12

    Mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) plays an important role in the DNA damage response (DDR). MDC1 functions as a mediator protein and binds multiple proteins involved in different aspects of the DDR. However, little is know about the organization of MDC1 complexes. Here we show that ataxia telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) phosphorylates MDC1 at Thr-98 following DNA damage, which promotes its oligomerization. Oligomerization of MDC1 is important for the accumulation of MDC1 complex at the sites of DNA damage. Mutation of Thr-98 (T98A) would abolish its oligomerization and result in a defect in DNA damage checkpoint activation and increased sensitivity to irradiation. Taken together, these results suggest that the oligomerization of MDC1 plays an important role in DDR and help understand the formation of proteins complexes at the sites of DNA damage.

  7. Dissecting DNA damage response pathways by analyzing protein localization and abundance changes during DNA replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Tkach, Johnny M.; Yimit, Askar; Lee, Anna Y.; Riffle, Michael; Costanzo, Michael; Jaschob, Daniel; Hendry, Jason A.; Ou, Jiongwen; Moffat, Jason; Boone, Charles; Davis, Trisha N.; Nislow, Corey; Brown, Grant W.

    2012-01-01

    Re-localization of proteins is a hallmark of the DNA damage response. We use high-throughput microscopic screening of the yeast GFP fusion collection to develop a systems-level view of protein re-organization following drug-induced DNA replication stress. Changes in protein localization and abundance reveal drug-specific patterns of functional enrichments. Classification of proteins by sub-cellular destination allows the identification of pathways that respond to replication stress. We analyzed pairwise combinations of GFP fusions and gene deletion mutants to define and order two novel DNA damage responses. In the first, Cmr1 forms subnuclear foci that are regulated by the histone deacetylase Hos2 and are distinct from the typical Rad52 repair foci. In a second example, we find that the checkpoint kinases Mec1/Tel1 and the translation regulator Asc1 regulate P-body formation. This method identifies response pathways that were not detected in genetic and protein interaction screens, and can be readily applied to any form of chemical or genetic stress to reveal cellular response pathways. PMID:22842922

  8. Interplay between DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Karyn; Luftig, Micah A

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encounter many challenges within host cells in order to replicate their nucleic acid. In the case of DNA viruses, one challenge that must be overcome is recognition of viral DNA structures by the host DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. This is accomplished in elegant and unique ways by different viruses as each has specific needs and sensitivities dependent on its life cycle. In this review, we focus on three DNA tumor viruses and their interactions with the DDR. The viruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) account for nearly all of the virus-associated human cancers worldwide. These viruses have also been excellent models for the study of oncogenic virus-mediated cell transformation. In this review, we will discuss how each of these viruses engage and subvert aspects of the host DDR. The first level of DDR engagement is a result of the genetic linkage between the oncogenic potential of these viruses and their ability to replicate. Namely, the promotion of cells from quiescence into the cell cycle to facilitate virus replication can be sensed through aberrant cellular DNA replication structures which activate the DDR and hinder cell transformation. DNA tumor viruses subvert this growth-suppressive DDR through changes in viral oncoprotein expression which ultimately facilitate virus replication. An additional level of DDR engagement is through direct detection of replicating viral DNA. These interactions parallel those observed in other DNA virus systems in that the need to subvert these intrinsic sensors of aberrant DNA structure in order to replicate must be in place. DNA tumor viruses are no exception. This review will cover the molecular features of DNA tumor virus interactions with the host DDR and the consequences for virus replication.

  9. The DNA Damage Response: Making it safe to play with knives

    PubMed Central

    Ciccia, Alberto; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Damage to our genetic material is an ongoing threat to both our ability to faithfully transmit genetic information to our offspring as well as our own survival. To respond to these threats, eukaryotes have evolved the DNA Damage Response (DDR). The DDR is a complex signal transduction pathway that has the ability to sense DNA damage and transduce this information to the cell to influence cellular responses to DNA damage. Cells possess an arsenal of enzymatic tools capable of remodeling and repairing DNA, however, their activities must be tightly regulated in a temporal, spatial and DNA lesion-appropriate fashion to optimize repair and prevent unnecessary and potentially deleterious alterations in the structure of DNA during normal cellular processes. This review will focus on how the DDR controls DNA repair and the phenotypic consequences of defects in these critical regulatory functions in mammals. PMID:20965415

  10. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways. PMID:22289628

  11. RNA m(6)A methylation regulates the ultraviolet-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Laurent, Benoit; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Lu, Zhike; Sheng, Wanqiang; Xu, Chuanyun; Chen, Hao; Ouyang, Jian; Wang, Siqing; Ling, Dominic; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Zou, Lee; Jambhekar, Ashwini; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2017-03-23

    Cell proliferation and survival require the faithful maintenance and propagation of genetic information, which are threatened by the ubiquitous sources of DNA damage present intracellularly and in the external environment. A system of DNA repair, called the DNA damage response, detects and repairs damaged DNA and prevents cell division until the repair is complete. Here we report that methylation at the 6 position of adenosine (m(6)A) in RNA is rapidly (within 2 min) and transiently induced at DNA damage sites in response to ultraviolet irradiation. This modification occurs on numerous poly(A)(+) transcripts and is regulated by the methyltransferase METTL3 (methyltransferase-like 3) and the demethylase FTO (fat mass and obesity-associated protein). In the absence of METTL3 catalytic activity, cells showed delayed repair of ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine adducts and elevated sensitivity to ultraviolet, demonstrating the importance of m(6)A in the ultraviolet-responsive DNA damage response. Multiple DNA polymerases are involved in the ultraviolet response, some of which resynthesize DNA after the lesion has been excised by the nucleotide excision repair pathway, while others participate in trans-lesion synthesis to allow replication past damaged lesions in S phase. DNA polymerase κ (Pol κ), which has been implicated in both nucleotide excision repair and trans-lesion synthesis, required the catalytic activity of METTL3 for immediate localization to ultraviolet-induced DNA damage sites. Importantly, Pol κ overexpression qualitatively suppressed the cyclobutane pyrimidine removal defect associated with METTL3 loss. Thus, we have uncovered a novel function for RNA m(6)A modification in the ultraviolet-induced DNA damage response, and our findings collectively support a model in which m(6)A RNA serves as a beacon for the selective, rapid recruitment of Pol κ to damage sites to facilitate repair and cell survival.

  12. Viral DNA Replication-Dependent DNA Damage Response Activation during BK Polyomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verhalen, Brandy; Justice, Joshua L.; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation is associated with severe human disease in kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The interplay between viral and host factors that regulates the productive infection process remains poorly understood. We have previously reported that the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon lytic BKPyV infection and that its activation is required for optimal viral replication in primary kidney epithelial cells. In this report, we set out to determine what viral components are responsible for activating the two major phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinases (PI3KKs) involved in the DDR: ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase. Using a combination of UV treatment, lentivirus transduction, and mutant virus infection experiments, our results demonstrate that neither the input virus nor the expression of large T antigen (TAg) alone is sufficient to trigger the activation of ATM or ATR in our primary culture model. Instead, our data suggest that the activation of both the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways is linked to viral DNA replication. Intriguingly, a TAg mutant virus that is unable to activate the DDR causes substantial host DNA damage. Our study provides insight into how DDRs are activated by polyomaviruses in primary cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints and how the activation might be linked to the maintenance of host genome stability. IMPORTANCE Polyomaviruses are opportunistic pathogens that are associated with several human diseases under immunosuppressed conditions. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) affects mostly kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The detailed replication mechanism of these viruses remains to be determined. We have previously reported that BKPyV activates the host DNA damage response (DDR), a response normally used by the host cell to combat genotoxic stress, to aid its own replication. In this study, we identified that the trigger for DDR

  13. Choreography of recombination proteins during the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-09-02

    Genome integrity is frequently challenged by DNA lesions from both endogenous and exogenous sources. A single DNA double-strand break (DSB) is lethal if unrepaired and may lead to loss of heterozygosity, mutations, deletions, genomic rearrangements and chromosome loss if repaired improperly. Such genetic alterations are the main causes of cancer and other genetic diseases. Consequently, DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an important process in all living organisms. DSBR is also the driving mechanism in most strategies of gene targeting, which has applications in both genetic and clinical research. Here we review the cell biological response to DSBs in mitotically growing cells with an emphasis on homologous recombination pathways in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammalian cells.

  14. A potential role for protein palmitoylation and zDHHC16 in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Cao, Na; Li, Jia-Kai; Rao, Yu-Qing; Liu, Huijuan; Wu, Ji; Li, Baojie; Zhao, Peiquan; Zeng, Li; Li, Jing

    2016-05-10

    Cells respond to DNA damage by activating the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-related kinases, p53 and other pathways to promote cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and/or DNA repair. Here we report that protein palmitoylation, a modification carried out by protein acyltransferases with zinc-finger and Asp-His-His-Cys domains (zDHHC), is required for proper DNA damage responses. Inhibition of protein palmitoylation compromised DNA damage-induced activation of Atm, induction and activation of p53, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase, and DNA damage foci assembly/disassembly in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Furthermore, knockout of zDHHC16, a palmitoyltransferase gene identified as an interacting protein for c-Abl, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase involved in DNA damage response, reproduced most of the defects in DNA damage responses produced by the inhibition of protein palmitoylation. Our results revealed critical roles for protein palmitoylation and palmitoyltransferase zDHHC16 in early stages of DNA damage responses and in the regulation of Atm activation.

  15. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. PMID:25497287

  16. A Novel Role of Chromodomain Protein CBX8 in DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Oza, Jay; Ganguly, Bratati; Kulkarni, Atul; Ginjala, Vasudeva; Yao, Ming; Ganesan, Shridar

    2016-10-28

    Induction of DNA damage induces a dynamic repair process involving DNA repair factors and epigenetic regulators. Chromatin alterations must occur for DNA repair factors to gain access to DNA lesions and restore original chromatin configuration to preserve the gene expression profile. We characterize the novel role of CBX8, a chromodomain-containing protein with established roles in epigenetic regulation in DNA damage response. CBX8 protein rapidly accumulates at the sites of DNA damage within 30 s and progresses to accumulate until 4 min before gradually dispersing back to its predamage distribution by 15 min. CBX8 recruitment to the sites of DNA damage is dependent upon PARP1 activation and not dependent on ATM activation. CBX8 biochemically interacts with TRIM33, and its recruitment to DNA damage is also dependent on the presence of TRIM33. Knockdown of CBX8 using siRNA significantly reduces the efficiency of both homologous and the other non-homologous recombination, as well as increases sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation. These findings demonstrate that CBX8 functions in the PARP-dependent DNA damage response partly through interaction with TRIM33 and is required for efficient DNA repair. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Treacher Collins syndrome TCOF1 protein cooperates with NBS1 in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Ciccia, Alberto; Huang, Jen-Wei; Izhar, Lior; Sowa, Mathew E; Harper, J Wade; Elledge, Stephen J

    2014-12-30

    The signal transduction pathway of the DNA damage response (DDR) is activated to maintain genomic integrity following DNA damage. The DDR promotes genomic integrity by regulating a large network of cellular activities that range from DNA replication and repair to transcription, RNA splicing, and metabolism. In this study we define an interaction between the DDR factor NBS1 and TCOF1, a nucleolar protein that regulates ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription and is mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome. We show that NBS1 relocalizes to nucleoli after DNA damage in a manner dependent on TCOF1 and on casein kinase II and ATM, which are known to modify TCOF1 by phosphorylation. Moreover, we identify a putative ATM phosphorylation site that is required for NBS1 relocalization to nucleoli in response to DNA damage. Last, we report that TCOF1 promotes cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents. Collectively, our findings identify TCOF1 as a DDR factor that could cooperate with ATM and NBS1 to suppress inappropriate rDNA transcription and maintain genomic integrity after DNA damage.

  18. Treacher Collins syndrome TCOF1 protein cooperates with NBS1 in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Ciccia, Alberto; Huang, Jen-Wei; Izhar, Lior; Sowa, Mathew E.; Harper, J. Wade; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The signal transduction pathway of the DNA damage response (DDR) is activated to maintain genomic integrity following DNA damage. The DDR promotes genomic integrity by regulating a large network of cellular activities that range from DNA replication and repair to transcription, RNA splicing, and metabolism. In this study we define an interaction between the DDR factor NBS1 and TCOF1, a nucleolar protein that regulates ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription and is mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome. We show that NBS1 relocalizes to nucleoli after DNA damage in a manner dependent on TCOF1 and on casein kinase II and ATM, which are known to modify TCOF1 by phosphorylation. Moreover, we identify a putative ATM phosphorylation site that is required for NBS1 relocalization to nucleoli in response to DNA damage. Last, we report that TCOF1 promotes cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents. Collectively, our findings identify TCOF1 as a DDR factor that could cooperate with ATM and NBS1 to suppress inappropriate rDNA transcription and maintain genomic integrity after DNA damage. PMID:25512513

  19. USP51 deubiquitylates H2AK13,15ub and regulates DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiquan; Zhang, Honglian; Liu, Ji; Cheruiyot, Abigael; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Ordog, Tamas; Lou, Zhenkun; You, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-04-15

    Dynamic regulation of RNF168-mediated ubiquitylation of histone H2A Lys13,15 (H2AK13,15ub) at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is crucial for preventing aberrant DNA repair and maintaining genome stability. However, it remains unclear which deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) removes H2AK13,15ub. Here we show that USP51, a previously uncharacterized DUB, deubiquitylates H2AK13,15ub and regulates DNA damage response. USP51 depletion results in increased spontaneous DNA damage foci and elevated levels of H2AK15ub and impairs DNA damage response. USP51 overexpression suppresses the formation of ionizing radiation-induced 53BP1 and BRCA1 but not RNF168 foci, suggesting that USP51 functions downstream from RNF168 in DNA damage response. In vitro, USP51 binds to H2A-H2B directly and deubiquitylates H2AK13,15ub. In cells, USP51 is recruited to chromatin after DNA damage and regulates the dynamic assembly/disassembly of 53BP1 and BRCA1 foci. These results show that USP51 is the DUB for H2AK13,15ub and regulates DNA damage response. © 2016 Wang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. USP51 deubiquitylates H2AK13,15ub and regulates DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiquan; Zhang, Honglian; Liu, Ji; Cheruiyot, Abigael; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Ordog, Tamas; Lou, Zhenkun; You, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of RNF168-mediated ubiquitylation of histone H2A Lys13,15 (H2AK13,15ub) at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is crucial for preventing aberrant DNA repair and maintaining genome stability. However, it remains unclear which deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) removes H2AK13,15ub. Here we show that USP51, a previously uncharacterized DUB, deubiquitylates H2AK13,15ub and regulates DNA damage response. USP51 depletion results in increased spontaneous DNA damage foci and elevated levels of H2AK15ub and impairs DNA damage response. USP51 overexpression suppresses the formation of ionizing radiation-induced 53BP1 and BRCA1 but not RNF168 foci, suggesting that USP51 functions downstream from RNF168 in DNA damage response. In vitro, USP51 binds to H2A–H2B directly and deubiquitylates H2AK13,15ub. In cells, USP51 is recruited to chromatin after DNA damage and regulates the dynamic assembly/disassembly of 53BP1 and BRCA1 foci. These results show that USP51 is the DUB for H2AK13,15ub and regulates DNA damage response. PMID:27083998

  1. LOX-1, oxidant stress, mtDNA damage, autophagy, and immune response in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zufeng; Liu, Shijie; Wang, Xianwei; Dai, Yao; Khaidakov, Magomed; Romeo, Francesco; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2014-07-01

    As a major receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is upregulated in many pathophysiological events, including endothelial cell dysfunction and smooth muscle cell growth, as well as monocyte migration and transformation into foam cells, which are present in atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia. Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases LOX-1 expression, induces mitochondrial DNA damage, and activates autophagy. Damaged mitochondrial DNA that escapes from autophagy induces an inflammatory response. This paper reviews the potential link between LOX-1, mitochondrial DNA damage, autophagy, and immune response in atherosclerosis.

  2. Dynamic coordination of innate immune signaling and Insulin signaling regulates systemic responses to localized DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Karpac, Jason; Younger, Andrew; Jasper, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Metazoans adapt to changing environmental conditions and to harmful challenges by attenuating growth and metabolic activities systemically. Recent studies in mice and flies indicate that endocrine signaling interactions between Insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) and innate immune signaling pathways are critical for this adaptation, yet the temporal and spatial hierarchy of these signaling events remains elusive. Here we identify and characterize a program of signaling interactions that regulates the systemic response of the Drosophila larva to localized DNA damage. We provide evidence that epidermal DNA damage induces an innate immune response that is kept in check by systemic repression of IIS activity. IIS repression induces NFkB/Relish signaling in the fatbody, which is required for recovery of IIS activity in a second phase of the systemic response to DNA damage. This systemic response to localized DNA damage thus coordinates growth and metabolic activities across tissues, ensuring growth homeostasis and survival of the animal. PMID:21664581

  3. The mef/elf4 transcription factor fine tunes the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Sashida, Goro; Bae, Narae; Di Giandomenico, Silvana; Asai, Takashi; Gurvich, Nadia; Bazzoli, Elena; Liu, Yan; Huang, Gang; Zhao, Xinyang; Menendez, Silvia; Nimer, Stephen D

    2011-07-15

    The ATM kinase plays a critical role in initiating the DNA damage response that is triggered by genotoxic stresses capable of inducing DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we show that ELF4/MEF, a member of the ETS family of transcription factors, contributes to the persistence of γH2AX DNA damage foci and promotes the DNA damage response leading to the induction of apoptosis. Conversely, the absence of ELF4 promotes the faster repair of damaged DNA and more rapid disappearance of γH2AX foci in response to γ-irradiation, leading to a radio-resistant phenotype despite normal ATM phosphorylation. Following γ-irradiation, ATM phosphorylates ELF4, leading to its degradation; a mutant form of ELF4 that cannot be phosphorylated by ATM persists following γ-irradiation, delaying the resolution of γH2AX foci and triggering an excessive DNA damage response. Thus, although ELF4 promotes the phosphorylation of H2AX by ATM, its activity must be dampened by ATM-dependent phosphorylation and degradation to avoid an excessive DNA damage response.

  4. HIV-1 Vpr activates the DNA damage response in renal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenstiel, Paul E; Chan, Justin; Snyder, Alexander; Planelles, Vicente; D'Agati, Vivette D; Klotman, Paul E; Klotman, Mary E

    2009-09-24

    HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is a major cause of HIV-related morbidity and mortality. Pathogenesis involves direct infection of the glomerular and tubular epithelial cells leading to characteristic disorder. Recently, we have shown that HIV-1 Vpr causes hypertrophy, hyperploidy, and apoptosis. Here, we report that Vpr activates the DNA damage response resulting in the observed renal phenotype. Renal sections from the HIVAN transgenic mouse model and human biopsies both show an abundant DNA damage response.

  5. Regulation of the Mdm2-p53 signaling axis in the DNA damage response and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Carr, Michael I; Jones, Stephen N

    2016-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor acts as a guardian of the genome in mammalian cells undergoing DNA double strand breaks induced by a various forms of cell stress, including inappropriate growth signals or ionizing radiation. Following damage, p53 protein levels become greatly elevated in cells and p53 functions primarily as a transcription factor to regulate the expression a wide variety of genes that coordinate this DNA damage response. In cells undergoing high amounts of DNA damage, p53 can promote apoptosis, whereas in cells undergoing less damage, p53 promotes senescence or transient cell growth arrest and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair, depending upon the cell type and level of damage. Failure of the damaged cell to undergo growth arrest or apoptosis, or to respond to the DNA damage by other p53-coordinated mechanisms, can lead to inappropriate cell growth and tumorigenesis. In cells that have successfully responded to genetic damage, the amount of p53 present in the cell must return to basal levels in order for the cell to resume normal growth and function. Although regulation of p53 levels and function is coordinated by many proteins, it is now widely accepted that the master regulator of p53 is Mdm2. In this review, we discuss the role(s) of p53 in the DNA damage response and in tumor suppression, and how post-translational modification of Mdm2 regulates the Mdm2-p53 signaling axis to govern p53 activities in the cell.

  6. Tissue specific response to DNA damage: C. elegans as role model.

    PubMed

    Lans, Hannes; Vermeulen, Wim

    2015-08-01

    The various symptoms associated with hereditary defects in the DNA damage response (DDR), which range from developmental and neurological abnormalities and immunodeficiency to tissue-specific cancers and accelerated aging, suggest that DNA damage affects tissues differently. Mechanistic DDR studies are, however, mostly performed in vitro, in unicellular model systems or cultured cells, precluding a clear and comprehensive view of the DNA damage response of multicellular organisms. Studies performed in intact, multicellular animals models suggest that DDR can vary according to the type, proliferation and differentiation status of a cell. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become an important DDR model and appears to be especially well suited to understand in vivo tissue-specific responses to DNA damage as well as the impact of DNA damage on development, reproduction and health of an entire multicellular organism. C. elegans germ cells are highly sensitive to DNA damage induction and respond via classical, evolutionary conserved DDR pathways aimed at efficient and error-free maintenance of the entire genome. Somatic tissues, however, respond differently to DNA damage and prioritize DDR mechanisms that promote growth and function. In this mini-review, we describe tissue-specific differences in DDR mechanisms that have been uncovered utilizing C. elegans as role model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorescent sensors of PARP-1 structural dynamics and allosteric regulation in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; McCauley, Michael M.; Pascal, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a posttranslational modification predominantly synthesized by PAR polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in genome maintenance. PARP-1 detects DNA damage, and damage detection is coupled to a massive increase PAR production, primarily attached to PARP-1 (automodification). Automodified PARP-1 then recruits repair factors to DNA damage sites. PARP-1 automodification eventually leads to release from DNA damage thus turning off catalytic activity, although the effects of PAR on PARP-1 structure are poorly understood. The multiple domains of PARP-1 are organized upon detecting DNA damage, creating a network of domain contacts that imposes a major conformational transition in the catalytic domain that increases PAR production. Presented here are two novel fluorescent sensors that monitor the global and local structural transitions of PARP-1 that are associated with DNA damage detection and catalytic activation. These sensors display real-time monitoring of PARP-1 structural transitions upon DNA damage detection, and their reversal upon PARP-1 automodification. The fluorescent sensors are further used to investigate intramolecular and intermolecular PARP-1 activation, followed by the observation that intramolecular activation of PARP-1 is the predominant response to DNA strand breaks in cells. These results provide a unique perspective on the interplay between PARP-1 DNA damage recognition, allosteric regulation, and catalytic activity. PMID:27530425

  8. Fluorescent sensors of PARP-1 structural dynamics and allosteric regulation in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jamin D; McCauley, Michael M; Pascal, John M

    2016-11-16

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a posttranslational modification predominantly synthesized by PAR polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in genome maintenance. PARP-1 detects DNA damage, and damage detection is coupled to a massive increase PAR production, primarily attached to PARP-1 (automodification). Automodified PARP-1 then recruits repair factors to DNA damage sites. PARP-1 automodification eventually leads to release from DNA damage thus turning off catalytic activity, although the effects of PAR on PARP-1 structure are poorly understood. The multiple domains of PARP-1 are organized upon detecting DNA damage, creating a network of domain contacts that imposes a major conformational transition in the catalytic domain that increases PAR production. Presented here are two novel fluorescent sensors that monitor the global and local structural transitions of PARP-1 that are associated with DNA damage detection and catalytic activation. These sensors display real-time monitoring of PARP-1 structural transitions upon DNA damage detection, and their reversal upon PARP-1 automodification. The fluorescent sensors are further used to investigate intramolecular and intermolecular PARP-1 activation, followed by the observation that intramolecular activation of PARP-1 is the predominant response to DNA strand breaks in cells. These results provide a unique perspective on the interplay between PARP-1 DNA damage recognition, allosteric regulation, and catalytic activity. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    PubMed

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. An Integrated Approach for Analysis of the DNA Damage Response in Mammalian Cells: NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR, DNA DAMAGE CHECKPOINT, AND APOPTOSIS.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Kemp, Michael G; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-11-27

    DNA damage by UV and UV-mimetic agents elicits a set of inter-related responses in mammalian cells, including DNA repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis. Conventionally, these responses are analyzed separately using different methodologies. Here we describe a unified approach that is capable of quantifying all three responses in parallel using lysates from the same population of cells. We show that a highly sensitive in vivo excision repair assay is capable of detecting nucleotide excision repair of a wide spectrum of DNA lesions (UV damage, chemical carcinogens, and chemotherapeutic drugs) within minutes of damage induction. This method therefore allows for a real-time measure of nucleotide excision repair activity that can be monitored in conjunction with other components of the DNA damage response, including DNA damage checkpoint and apoptotic signaling. This approach therefore provides a convenient and reliable platform for simultaneously examining multiple aspects of the DNA damage response in a single population of cells that can be applied for a diverse array of carcinogenic and chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. The PIN domain of EXO1 recognizes poly(ADP-ribose) in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Shi, Jiazhong; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Following DNA double-strand breaks, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is quickly and heavily synthesized to mediate fast and early recruitment of a number of DNA damage response factors to the sites of DNA lesions and facilitates DNA damage repair. Here, we found that EXO1, an exonuclease for DNA damage repair, is quickly recruited to the sites of DNA damage via PAR-binding. With further dissection of the functional domains of EXO1, we report that the PIN domain of EXO1 recognizes PAR both in vitro and in vivo and the interaction between the PIN domain and PAR is sufficient for the recruitment. We also found that the R93G variant of EXO1, generated by a single nucleotide polymorphism, abolishes the interaction and the early recruitment. Moreover, our study suggests that the PAR-mediated fast recruitment of EXO1 facilities early DNA end resection, the first step of homologous recombination repair. We observed that other PIN domains could also recognize DNA damage-induced PAR. Taken together, our study demonstrates a novel class of PAR-binding module that plays an important role in DNA damage response. PMID:26400172

  12. Non-coding RNAs: an emerging player in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunzhi; Peng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability which is essential for cell survival and preventing tumorigenesis. Through an extensive crosstalk between non-coding RNAs and the canonical DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathway, DDR-induced expression of non-coding RNAs can provide a regulatory mechanism to accurately control the expression of DNA damage responsive genes in a spatio-temporal manner. Mechanistically, DNA damage alters expression of a variety of non-coding RNAs at multiple levels including transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation, and RNA degradation. In parallel, non-coding RNAs can directly regulate cellular processes involved in DDR by altering expression of their targeting genes, with a particular emphasis on miRNAs and lncRNAs. MiRNAs are required for almost every aspect of cellular responses to DNA damage, including sensing DNA damage, transducing damage signals, repairing damaged DNA, activating cell cycle checkpoints, and inducing apoptosis. As for lncRNAs, they control transcription of DDR relevant gene by four different regulatory models, including signal, decoy, guide, and scaffold. In addition, we also highlight potential clinical applications of non-coding RNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for anti-cancer treatments using DNA-damaging agents including radiation and chemotherapy. Although tremendous advances have been made to elucidate the role of non-coding RANs in genome maintenance, many key questions remain to be answered including mechanistically how non-coding RNA pathway and DNA damage response pathway is coordinated in response to genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  14. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation: making sense of apparently conflicting data.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lynn M; Marples, Brian; Coffey, Mary; Lawler, Mark; Lynch, Thomas H; Hollywood, Donal; Marignol, Laure

    2010-11-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway detects and repairs DNA replication errors. While DNA MMR-proficiency is known to play a key role in the sensitivity to a number of DNA damaging agents, its role in the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation (IR) is less well characterized. Available literature to date is conflicting regarding the influence of MMR status on radiosensitivity, and this has arisen as a subject of controversy in the field. The aim of this paper is to provide the first comprehensive overview of the experimental data linking MMR proteins and the DNA damage response to IR. A PubMed search was conducted using the key words "DNA mismatch repair" and "ionizing radiation". Relevant articles and their references were reviewed for their association between DNA MMR and IR. Recent data suggest that radiation dose and the type of DNA damage induced may dictate the involvement of the MMR system in the cellular response to IR. In particular, the literature supports a role for the MMR system in DNA damage recognition, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. In this review we discuss our current understanding of the impact of MMR status on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells gained from past and present studies and attempt to provide an explanation for how MMR may determine the response to radiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptomal profiling of the cellular response to DNA damage mediated by Slug (Snai2)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Caro, M; Bermejo-Rodríguez, C; González-Herrero, I; Sánchez-Beato, M; Piris, M A; Sánchez-García, I

    2008-01-01

    Snai2-deficient cells are radiosensitive to DNA damage. The function of Snai2 in response to DNA damage seems to be critical for its function in normal development and cancer. Here, we applied a functional genomics approach that combined gene-expression profiling and computational molecular network analysis to obtain global dissection of the Snai2-dependent transcriptional response to DNA damage in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), which undergo p53-dependent growth arrest in response to DNA damage. Although examination of the response showed that overall expression of p53 target gene expression patterns was similarly altered in both control and Snai2-deficient cells, we have identified and validated candidate Snai2 target genes linked to Snai2 gene function in response to DNA damage. This work defines for the first time the effect of Snai2 on p53 target genes in cells undergoing growth arrest, elucidates the Snai2-dependent molecular network induced by DNA damage, points to novel putative Snai2 targets, and suggest a mechanistic model, which has implications for cancer management. PMID:18182996

  16. ARRB1 enhances the chemosensitivity of lung cancer through the mediation of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongchang; Wang, Liguang; Zhang, Jiangang; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Tiehong; Ni, Yang; Cao, Hongxin; Wang, Kai; Li, Yun; Wang, Yibing; Du, Jiajun

    2017-01-01

    ARRB1 (also known as β-arrestin-1) serves as a multifunctional adaptor contributing to the regulation of signaling pathways. ARRB1 may be involved in DNA damage accumulation; however the underlying mechanism involved is unclear. In the present study, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (H520 and SK-MES-1) were transfected with ARRB1 plasmids or small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) and received treatment with DNA-damaging agents (cisplatin and etoposide). A mouse xenograft model was used to assess the impact of ARRB1 on the efficacy of cisplatin in vivo. A total of 30 surgically resected NSCLC patients were recruited for the present study and qRT-PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels in cancer tissues compared with para-carcinoma tissues. Our data showed that DNA damage was abrogated in the ARRB1-knockdown cells and enhanced in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells. ATR and Chk1 were more activated in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells compared to the ARRB1-knockdown cells, followed by increased H2AX phosphorylation. DNA damage and apoptosis were increased in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells treated with cisplatin. These data provided strong evidence that ARRB1 contributes to the response of NSCLC to DNA-damaging agents and is essential for DNA damage response (DDR). ARRB1 may enhance the efficacy of DNA-damaging agents in NSCLC. PMID:28035404

  17. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  18. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wier, Eric M.; Wen, Matthew G.; Kamenyeva, Olena; Xia, Xue; Koo, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (PAR) chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs). In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production. PMID:27635653

  19. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fayzullina, Saniya

    2016-01-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA. PMID:27452406

  1. Histone H3 Lysine 56 Acetylation and the Response to DNA Replication Fork Damage

    PubMed Central

    Wurtele, Hugo; Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Bacal, Julien; St-Hilaire, Edlie; Lee, Eun-Hye; Tsao, Sarah; Dorn, Jonas; Maddox, Paul; Lisby, Michael; Pasero, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) occurs in newly synthesized histones that are deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. Defects in H3K56ac sensitize cells to genotoxic agents, suggesting that this modification plays an important role in the DNA damage response. However, the links between histone acetylation, the nascent chromatin structure, and the DNA damage response are poorly understood. Here we report that cells devoid of H3K56ac are sensitive to DNA damage sustained during transient exposure to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or camptothecin but are only mildly affected by hydroxyurea. We demonstrate that, after exposure to MMS, H3K56ac-deficient cells cannot complete DNA replication and eventually segregate chromosomes with intranuclear foci containing the recombination protein Rad52. In addition, we provide evidence that these phenotypes are not due to defects in base excision repair, defects in DNA damage tolerance, or a lack of Rad51 loading at sites of DNA damage. Our results argue that the acute sensitivity of H3K56ac-deficient cells to MMS and camptothecin stems from a failure to complete the repair of specific types of DNA lesions by recombination and/or from defects in the completion of DNA replication. PMID:22025679

  2. Histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation and the response to DNA replication fork damage.

    PubMed

    Wurtele, Hugo; Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Bacal, Julien; St-Hilaire, Edlie; Lee, Eun-Hye; Tsao, Sarah; Dorn, Jonas; Maddox, Paul; Lisby, Michael; Pasero, Philippe; Verreault, Alain

    2012-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) occurs in newly synthesized histones that are deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. Defects in H3K56ac sensitize cells to genotoxic agents, suggesting that this modification plays an important role in the DNA damage response. However, the links between histone acetylation, the nascent chromatin structure, and the DNA damage response are poorly understood. Here we report that cells devoid of H3K56ac are sensitive to DNA damage sustained during transient exposure to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or camptothecin but are only mildly affected by hydroxyurea. We demonstrate that, after exposure to MMS, H3K56ac-deficient cells cannot complete DNA replication and eventually segregate chromosomes with intranuclear foci containing the recombination protein Rad52. In addition, we provide evidence that these phenotypes are not due to defects in base excision repair, defects in DNA damage tolerance, or a lack of Rad51 loading at sites of DNA damage. Our results argue that the acute sensitivity of H3K56ac-deficient cells to MMS and camptothecin stems from a failure to complete the repair of specific types of DNA lesions by recombination and/or from defects in the completion of DNA replication.

  3. Loss of Caenorhabditis elegans UNG-1 uracil-DNA glycosylase affects apoptosis in response to DNA damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Skjeldam, Hanne K; Kassahun, Henok; Fensgård, Oyvind; SenGupta, Tanima; Babaie, Eshrat; Lindvall, Jessica M; Arczewska, Katarzyna; Nilsen, Hilde

    2010-08-05

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used extensively to study responses to DNA damage. In contrast, little is known about DNA repair in this organism. C. elegans is unusual in that it encodes few DNA glycosylases and the uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) encoded by the ung-1 gene is the only known UDG. C. elegans could therefore become a valuable model organism for studies of the genetic interaction networks involving base excision repair (BER). As a first step towards characterization of BER in C. elegans, we show that the UNG-1 protein is an active uracil-DNA glycosylase. We demonstrate that an ung-1 mutant has reduced ability to repair uracil-containing DNA but that an alternative Ugi-inhibited activity is present in ung-1 nuclear extracts. Finally, we demonstrate that ung-1 mutants show altered levels of apoptotic cell corpses formed in response to DNA damaging agents. Increased apoptosis in the ung-1 mutant in response to ionizing radiation (IR) suggests that UNG-1 contributes to repair of IR-induced DNA base damage in vivo. Following treatment with paraquat however, the apoptotic corpse-formation was reduced. Gene expression profiling suggests that this phenotype is a consequence of compensatory transcriptomic shifts that modulate oxidative stress responses in the mutant and not an effect of reduced DNA damage signaling. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ku70 Serine 155 mediates Aurora B inhibition and activation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Victoria L.; Walden, Elizabeth A.; Hoffer, Sarah M.; Rogers, Stephanie R.; Aitken, Amelia S.; Salemi, Louisa M.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The Ku heterodimer (Ku70/Ku80) is the central DNA binding component of the classical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway that repairs DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs), serving as the scaffold for the formation of the NHEJ complex. Here we show that Ku70 is phosphorylated on Serine 155 in response to DNA damage. Expression of Ku70 bearing a S155 phosphomimetic substitution (Ku70 S155D) in Ku70-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) triggered cell cycle arrest at multiple checkpoints and altered expression of several cell cycle regulators in absence of DNA damage. Cells expressing Ku70 S155D exhibited a constitutive DNA damage response, including ATM activation, H2AX phosphorylation and 53BP1 foci formation. Ku70 S155D was found to interact with Aurora B and to have an inhibitory effect on Aurora B kinase activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that Ku and Aurora B interact following ionizing radiation treatment and that Aurora B inhibition in response to DNA damage is dependent upon Ku70 S155 phosphorylation. This uncovers a new pathway where Ku may relay signaling to Aurora B to enforce cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. PMID:27849008

  5. CTCF participates in DNA damage response via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Deqiang; Chen, Qian; Shi, Jiazhong; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) plays an essential role in regulating the structure of chromatin by binding DNA strands for defining the boundary between active and heterochromatic DNA. However, the role of CTCF in DNA damage response remains elusive. Here, we show that CTCF is quickly recruited to the sites of DNA damage. The fast recruitment is mediated by the zinc finger domain and poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR). Further analyses show that only three zinc finger motifs are essential for PAR recognition. Moreover, CTCF-deficient cells are hypersensitive to genotoxic stress such as ionizing radiation (IR). Taken together, these results suggest that CTCF participate in DNA damage response via poly(ADP-ribosylation). PMID:28262757

  6. Centrosomes in the DNA damage response--the hub outside the centre.

    PubMed

    Mullee, Lisa I; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2016-01-01

    Here, we review how DNA damage affects the centrosome and how centrosomes communicate with the DNA damage response (DDR) apparatus. We discuss how several proteins of the DDR are found at centrosomes, including the ATM, ATR, CHK1 and CHK2 kinases, the BRCA1 ubiquitin ligase complex and several members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase family. Stereotypical centrosome organisation, in which two centriole barrels are orthogonally arranged in a roughly toroidal pericentriolar material (PCM), is strongly affected by exposure to DNA-damaging agents. We describe the genetic dependencies and mechanisms for how the centrioles lose their close association, and the PCM both expands and distorts after DNA damage. Another consequence of genotoxic stress is that centrosomes undergo duplication outside the normal cell cycle stage, meaning that centrosome amplification is commonly seen after DNA damage. We discuss several potential mechanisms for how centrosome numbers become dysregulated after DNA damage and explore the links between the DDR and the PLK1- and separase-dependent mechanisms that drive centriole separation and reduplication. We also describe how centrosome components, such as centrin2, are directly involved in responding to DNA damage. This review outlines current questions on the involvement of centrosomes in the DDR.

  7. DNA damage response induces structural alterations in histone H3–H4

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yudai; Fujii, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Matsuo, Koichi; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Yokoya, Akinari

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation circular-dichroism spectroscopy was used to reveal that the DNA damage response induces a decrement of α-helix and an increment of β-strand contents of histone H3–H4 extracted from X-ray–irradiated human HeLa cells. The trend of the structural alteration was qualitatively opposite to that of our previously reported results for histone H2A–H2B. These results strongly suggest that histones share roles in DNA damage responses, particularly in DNA repair processes and chromatin remodeling, via a specific structural alteration of each histone. PMID:27672100

  8. LKB1 is a DNA damage response protein that regulates cellular sensitivity to PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huibo; Wang, Shuai; Hang, Wei; Zeng, Qinghua; Quan, Cheng-Shi; Zhai, Ying-Xian; Wang, Jian-Wei; Shen, Xiang-Feng; Jian, Yong-Ping; Zhao, Rui-Xun; Werle, Kaitlin D.; Cui, Rutao; Liang, Jiyong; Li, Yu-Lin; Xu, Zhi-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) functions as a tumor suppressor encoded by STK11, a gene that mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and in sporadic cancers. Previous studies showed that LKB1 participates in IR- and ROS-induced DNA damage response (DDR). However, the impact of LKB1 mutations on targeted cancer therapy remains unknown. Herein, we demonstrated that LKB1 formed DNA damage-induced nuclear foci and co-localized with ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM), γ-H2AX, and breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1). ATM mediated LKB1 phosphorylation at Thr 363 following the exposure of cells to ionizing radiation (IR). LKB1 interacted with BRCA1, a downstream effector in DDR that is recruited to sites of DNA damage and functions directly in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair. LKB1 deficient cells exhibited delayed DNA repair due to insufficient HR. Notably, LKB1 deficiency sensitized cells to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Thus, we have demonstrated a novel function of LKB1 in DNA damage response. Cancer cells lacking LKB1 are more susceptible to DNA damage-based therapy and, in particular, to drugs that further impair DNA repair, such as PARP inhibitors. PMID:27705915

  9. Organic honey supplementation reverses pesticide-induced genotoxicity by modulating DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Renata; Manzella, Nicola; Gaetani, Simona; Ciarapica, Veronica; Bracci, Massimo; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Pasini, Federica; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Borghi, Battista; Tomasetti, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) and organophosphorus insecticides such as chlorpyrifos (CPF) may cause DNA damage and cancer in exposed individuals through mitochondrial dysfunction. Polyphenols ubiquitously present in fruits and vegetables, have been viewed as antioxidant molecules, but also influence mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, honey containing polyphenol compounds was evaluated for its potential protective effect on pesticide-induced genotoxicity. Honey extracts from four floral organic sources were evaluated for their polyphenol content, antioxidant activity, and potential protective effects on pesticide-related mitochondrial destabilization, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formation, and DNA damage response in human bronchial epithelial and neuronal cells. The protective effect of honey was, then evaluated in a residential population chronically exposed to pesticides. The four honey types showed a different polyphenol profile associated with a different antioxidant power. The pesticide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction parallels ROS formation from mitochondria (mtROS) and consequent DNA damage. Honey extracts efficiently inhibited pesticide-induced mtROS formation, and reduced DNA damage by upregulation of DNA repair through NFR2. Honey supplementation enhanced DNA repair activity in a residential population chronically exposed to pesticides, which resulted in a marked reduction of pesticide-induced DNA lesions. These results provide new insight regarding the effect of honey containing polyphenols on pesticide-induced DNA damage response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Huntingtin is a scaffolding protein in the ATM oxidative DNA damage response complex.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Tamara; Mocle, Andrew J; Hung, Claudia L; Xia, Jianrun; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C; Truant, Ray

    2017-01-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease. DNA repair pathways have recently been implicated as the most predominant modifiers of age of onset in HD patients. We report that endogenous huntingtin protein directly participates in oxidative DNA damage repair. Using novel chromobodies to detect endogenous human huntingtin in live cells, we show that localization of huntingtin to DNA damage sites is dependent on the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Super-resolution microscopy and biochemical assays revealed that huntingtin co-localizes with and scaffolds proteins of the DNA damage response pathway in response to oxidative stress. In HD patient fibroblasts bearing typical clinical HD allele lengths, we demonstrate that there is deficient oxidative DNA damage repair. We propose that DNA damage in HD is caused by dysfunction of the mutant huntingtin protein in DNA repair, and accumulation of DNA oxidative lesions due to elevated reactive oxygen species may contribute to the onset of HD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The DNA damage-induced cell death response: a roadmap to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Sonja; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    Upon massive DNA damage cells fail to undergo productive DNA repair and trigger the cell death response. Resistance to cell death is linked to cellular transformation and carcinogenesis as well as radio- and chemoresistance, making the underlying signaling pathways a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Diverse DNA damage-induced cell death pathways are operative in mammalian cells and finally culminate in the induction of programmed cell death via activation of apoptosis or necroptosis. These signaling routes affect nuclear, mitochondria- and plasma membrane-associated key molecules to activate the apoptotic or necroptotic response. In this review, we highlight the main signaling pathways, molecular players and mechanisms guiding the DNA damage-induced cell death response.

  12. Corrupting the DNA damage response: a critical role for Rad52 in tumor cell survival.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Rachel; You, Ming

    2017-07-15

    The DNA damage response enables cells to survive, maintain genome integrity, and to safeguard the transmission of high-fidelity genetic information. Upon sensing DNA damage, cells respond by activating this multi-faceted DNA damage response leading to restoration of the cell, senescence, programmed cell death, or genomic instability if the cell survives without proper repair. However, unlike normal cells, cancer cells maintain a marked level of genomic instability. Because of this enhanced propensity to accumulate DNA damage, tumor cells rely on homologous recombination repair as a means of protection from the lethal effect of both spontaneous and therapy-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA. Thus, modulation of DNA repair pathways have important consequences for genomic instability within tumor cell biology and viability maintenance under high genotoxic stress. Efforts are underway to manipulate specific components of the DNA damage response in order to selectively induce tumor cell death by augmenting genomic instability past a viable threshold. New evidence suggests that RAD52, a component of the homologous recombination pathway, is important for the maintenance of tumor genome integrity. This review highlights recent reports indicating that reducing homologous recombination through inhibition of RAD52 may represent an important focus for cancer therapy and the specific efforts that are already demonstrating potential.

  13. ATM modulates transcription in response to histone deacetylase inhibition as part of its DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Ryoung; Choi, Jae Duk; Park, Mi Ae; Jeong, Gajin; Cho, Hyeseong; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2010-03-31

    Chromatin structure has a crucial role in a diversity of physiological processes, including development, differentiation and stress responses, via regulation of transcription, DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors regulate chromatin structure and activate the DNA damage checkpoint pathway involving Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Herein, we investigated the impact of histone acetylation/deacetylation modification on the ATM-mediated transcriptional modulation to provide a better understanding of the transcriptional function of ATM. The prototype HDAC inhibitor trichostain A (TSA) reprograms expression of the myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL1) and Gadd45 genes via the ATM-mediated signal pathway. Transcription of MCL1 and Gadd45alpha is enhanced following TSA treatment in ATM(+) cells, but not in isogenic ATM(-) or kinase-dead ATM expressing cells, in the ATM-activated E2F1 or BRCA1- dependent manner, respectively. These findings suggest that ATM and its kinase activity are essential for the TSA-induced regulation of gene expression. In summary, ATM controls the transcriptional upregulation of MCL1 and Gadd45 through the activation of the ATM-mediated signal pathway in response to HDAC inhibition. These findings are important in helping to design combinatory treatment schedules for anticancer radio- or chemo-therapy with HDAC inhibitors.

  14. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, affects on the cellular response to DNA damage induced by exposures to radiation or other toxic chemicals will have an impact on the radiation risks for the astronauts, as well as on the mutation rate in microorganisms, is still an open question. Although the possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on the cellular response to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induces DNA damages including the double strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damage in the DNA was measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ti-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in -H2AX between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect the response of the DNA damage response genes to bleomycin treatment.

  15. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Outside the protection of the geomagnetic field, astronauts and other living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, have effects on cellular responses to DNA damage induced by exposure to radiation or cytotoxic chemicals is still unknown, as is their impact on the radiation risks for astronauts and on the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damages in the DNA were measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (g-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ki-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in g-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect initial transcriptional responses of the DNA damage response genes to

  16. A role for WRN in telomere-based DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Eller, Mark S; Liao, Xiaodong; Liu, SuiYang; Hanna, Kendra; Bäckvall, Helena; Opresko, Patricia L; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2006-10-10

    Telomeres cap the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes and prevent them from being recognized as DNA breaks. We have shown that certain DNA damage responses induced during senescence and, at times of telomere uncapping, also can be induced by treatment of cells with small DNA oligonucleotides homologous to the telomere 3' single-strand overhang (T-oligos), implicating this overhang in generation of these telomere-based damage responses. Here, we show that T-oligo-treated fibroblasts contain gammaH2AX foci and that these foci colocalize with telomeres. T-oligos with nuclease-resistant 3' ends are inactive, suggesting that a nuclease initiates T-oligo responses. We therefore examined WRN, a 3'-->5' exonuclease and helicase mutated in Werner syndrome, a disorder characterized by aberrant telomere maintenance, premature aging, chromosomal rearrangements, and predisposition to malignancy. Normal fibroblasts and U20S osteosarcoma cells rendered deficient in WRN showed reduced phosphorylation of p53 and histone H2AX in response to T-oligo treatment. Together, these data demonstrate a role for WRN in processing of telomeric DNA and subsequent activation of DNA damage responses. The T-oligo model helps define the role of WRN in telomere maintenance and initiation of DNA damage responses after telomere disruption.

  17. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression-adding another layer of complexity to the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Boucas, Jorge; Riabinska, Arina; Jokic, Mladen; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Chen, Shuhua; Höpker, Katja; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2012-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for DNA repair, or, if the extend of damage is beyond repair capacity, induce apoptosis. This signaling network, which is collectively referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR), is primarily thought to consist of two components-a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes and a delayed transcriptional response that promotes a prolonged cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves potent posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms that control the cellular response to DNA damage. Although much has been written on the relevance of the DDR in cancer and on the post-transcriptional role of microRNAs (miRs) in cancer, the post-transcriptional regulation of the DDR by non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) still remains elusive in large parts. Here, we review the recent developments in this exciting new area of research in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. We put specific emphasis on the role of RBPs and the control of their function through DNA damage-activated protein kinases.

  18. Chronic inflammation-related DNA damage response: a driving force of gastric cardia carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Runhua; Xiao, Dejun; Guo, Yi; Tian, Dongping; Yun, Hailong; Chen, Donglin; Su, Min

    2015-02-20

    Gastric cardia cancer (GCC) is a highly aggressive disease associated with chronic inflammation. To investigate the relationship between DNA damage response (DDR) and chronic inflammation, we collected 100 non-tumor gastric cardia specimens of Chaoshan littoral, a high-risk region for esophageal and gastric cardia cancer. A significantly higher proportion of severe chronic inflammation was found in dysplastic epithelia (80.9%) in comparison with that in non-dysplastic tissues (40.7%) (P<0.001). Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that DNA damage response was parallel with the chronic inflammation degrees from normal to severe inflammation (P<0.05). We found that DNA damage response was progressively increased with the progression of precancerous lesions (P<0.05). These findings provide pathological evidence that persistent chronic inflammation-related DNA damage response may be a driving force of gastric cardia carcinogenesis. Based on these findings, DNA damage response in non-malignant tissues may become a promising biomedical marker for predicting malignant transformation in the gastric cardia.

  19. Cross-talk between carbon metabolism and the DNA damage response in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J.; Bronstein, Alex; Kupiec, Martin; Johnston, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells with DNA damage avoid respiration, presumably because products of oxidative metabolism can be harmful to DNA. We show that DNA damage inhibits the activity of the Snf1 (AMP-activated) protein kinase (AMPK), which activates expression of genes required for respiration. Glucose and DNA damage upregulate SUMOylation of Snf1, catalyzed by the SUMO E3-ligase Mms21, which inhibits SNF1 activity. The DNA damage checkpoint kinases Mec1/ATR and Tel1/ATM, as well as the nutrient sensing protein kinase A (PKA), regulate Mms21 activity towards Snf1. Mec1 and Tel1 are required for two SNF1-regulated processes—glucose sensing and ADH2 gene expression—even without exogenous genotoxic stress. Our results imply that inhibition of Snf1 by SUMOylation is a mechanism by which cells lower their respiration in response to DNA damage. This raises the possibility that activation of DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms could contribute to aerobic fermentation (Warburg effect), a hallmark of cancer cells. PMID:26344768

  20. Oleandrin induces DNA damage responses in cancer cells by suppressing the expression of Rad51

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhengqiang; Tian, Baoping; Wang, Xiaohui; Feng, Hanrong; Liang, Ye; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-01-01

    Oleandrin is a monomeric compound extracted from leaves and seeds of Nerium oleander. It had been reported that oleandrin could effectively inhibit the growth of human cancer cells. However, the specific mechanisms of the oleandrin-induced anti-tumor effects remain largely unclear. Genomic instability is one of the main features of cancer cells, it can be the combined effect of DNA damage and tumour-specific DNA repair defects. DNA damage plays important roles during tumorigenesis. In fact, most of the current chemotherapy agents were designed to kill cancer cells by inducing DNA damage. In this study, we found that oleandrin was effective to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, and cause rapid DNA damage response, represented by nuclear RPA (Replication Protein A, a single strand DNA binding protein) and γH2AX(a marker for DNA double strand breaks) foci formation. Interestingly, expression of RAD51, a key protein involved in homologous recombination (HR), was suppressed while XRCC1 was up-regulated in oleandrin treated cancer cells. These results suggested that XRCC1 may play a predominant role in repairing oleandrin-induced DNA damage. Collectively, oleandrin may be a potential anti-tumor agent by suppressing the expression of Rad51. PMID:27449097

  1. Arsenic Disruption of DNA Damage Responses-Potential Role in Carcinogenesis and Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Muenyi, Clarisse S; Ljungman, Mats; States, J Christopher

    2015-09-24

    Arsenic is a Class I human carcinogen and is widespread in the environment. Chronic arsenic exposure causes cancer in skin, lung and bladder, as well as in other organs. Paradoxically, arsenic also is a potent chemotherapeutic against acute promyelocytic leukemia and can potentiate the cytotoxic effects of DNA damaging chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin, in vitro. Arsenic has long been implicated in DNA repair inhibition, cell cycle disruption, and ubiquitination dysregulation, all negatively impacting the DNA damage response and potentially contributing to both the carcinogenic and chemotherapeutic potential of arsenic. Recent studies have provided mechanistic insights into how arsenic interferes with these processes including disruption of zinc fingers and suppression of gene expression. This review discusses these effects of arsenic with a view toward understanding the impact on the DNA damage response.

  2. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and DNA damage response with analysis of intracellular ATM signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Sriram; Viswanathan, Preeti; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity by preventing and overcoming DNA damage is critical for cell survival. Deficiency or aberrancy in the DNA damage response, for example, through ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling, lead to pathophysiological perturbations in organs throughout the body. Therefore, control of DNA damage is of major interest for development of therapeutic agents. Such efforts will greatly benefit from convenient and simple diagnostic and/or drug development tools to demonstrate whether ATM and related genes have been activated and to then determine whether these have been returned to normal levels of activity because pathway members sense and also repair DNA damage. To overcome difficulties in analyzing differences in multitudinous ATM pathway members following DNA damage, we measured ATM promoter activity with a fluorescent td-Tomato reporter gene to interrogate the global effects of ATM signaling pathways. In cultured HuH-7 cell line derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma, cis-platinum, acetaminophen, or hydrogen peroxide caused DNA strand breaks and ATM pathway activation as shown by γH2AX expression, which in turn, led to rapid and sustained increases in ATM promoter activity. This assay of ATM promoter activity identified biological agents capable of controlling cellular DNA damage in toxin-treated HuH-7 cells and in mice after onset of drug-induced acute liver failure. Therefore, the proposed assay of ATM promoter activity in HuH-7 cells was appropriately informative for treating DNA damage. High-throughput screens using ATM promoter activation will be helpful for therapeutic development in DNA damage-associated abnormal ATM signaling in various cell types and organs.

  3. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6μM) for 24 or 48h. Cell viability was reduced (P<0.05) after 48h of exposure to 3 or 6μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24h of 6μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Smoking-promoted oxidative DNA damage response is highly correlated to lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chao; Lai, Tianwen; Li, Miao; Zhou, Hongbin; Lv, Dan; Deng, Zaichun; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao

    2016-04-05

    Oxidative stress induced by tobacco smoking is one of the main causes of DNA damage and is known to be involved in various cancers. Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, while the role of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative DNA damage response during lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated oxidative DNA damage response levels in smoking and nonsmoking patients with lung cancer, and evaluated the potential diagnostic value of 8-OHdG for lung cancer. We observed a higher level of 8-OHdG expression and secretion in airways of lung cancer patients than that of noncancer controls. 8-OHdG expression was associated with the TNM stages. Additionally, cigarette smoke-induced oxidative DNA damage response was observed in bronchial epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. A statistical significance correlation was found between the levels of 8-OHdG and smoking index. With a cut-off value of 2.86 ng/ml, 8-OHdG showed a sensitivity and specificity of 70.0% and 73.7%, respectively, to identify a patient with lung cancer. These findings not only underscore the importance of smoking in oxidative DNA damage response of lung cancer patients, but also suggest 8-OHdG as a potential diagnostic biomarker for lung cancer.

  5. Death and more: DNA damage response pathways in the nematode C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, L; Hengartner, M O

    2004-01-01

    Genotoxic stress is a threat to our cells' genome integrity. Failure to repair DNA lesions properly after the induction of cell proliferation arrest can lead to mutations or large-scale genomic instability. Because such changes may have tumorigenic potential, damaged cells are often eliminated via apoptosis. Loss of this apoptotic response is actually one of the hallmarks of cancer. Towards the effort to elucidate the DNA damage-induced signaling steps leading to these biological events, an easily accessible model system is required, where the acquired knowledge can reveal the mechanisms underlying more complex organisms. Accumulating evidence coming from studies in Caenorhabditis elegans point to its usefulness as such. In the worm's germline, DNA damage can induce both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, two responses that are spatially separated. The latter is a tightly controlled process that is genetically indistinguishable from developmental programmed cell death. Upstream of the central death machinery, components of the DNA damage signaling cascade lie and act either as sensors of the lesion or as transducers of the initial signal detected. This review summarizes the findings of several studies that specify the elements of the DNA damage-induced responses, as components of the cell cycle control machinery, the repairing process or the apoptotic outcome. The validity of C. elegans as a tool to further dissect the complex signaling network of these responses and the high potential for it to reveal important links to cancer and other genetic abnormalities are addressed.

  6. Effects of microgravity on DNA damage response in Caenorhabditis elegans during Shenzhou-8 spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Xu, Dan; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Min; Sun, Yeqing

    2015-07-01

    Space radiations and microgravity both could cause DNA damage in cells, but the effects of microgravity on DNA damage response to space radiations are still controversial. A mRNA microarray and microRNA micro- array in dauer larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) that endured spaceflight environment and space radiations environment during 16.5-day Shenzhou-8 space mission was performed. Twice as many transcripts significantly altered in the spaceflight environment than space radiations alone. The majority of alterations were related to protein amino acid dephosphorylation and histidine metabolic and catabolic processes. From about 900 genes related to DNA damage response, 38 differentially expressed genes were extracted; most of them differentially expressed under spaceflight environment but not space radiations, although the identical directions of alteration were observed in both cases. cel-miR-81, cel- miR-82, cel-miR-124 and cel-miR-795 were predicted to regulate DNA damage response through four different anti-correlated genes. Evidence was provided that, in the presence of space radiations, microgravity probably enhanced the DNA damage response in C. elegans by integrating the transcriptome and microRNome.

  7. The FHA and BRCT domains recognize ADP-ribosylation during DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo; Lu, Lin-Yu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Wang, Shaomeng; Yu, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribosylation is a unique post-translational modification participating in many biological processes, such as DNA damage response. Here, we demonstrate that a set of Forkhead-associated (FHA) and BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains recognizes poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) both in vitro and in vivo. Among these FHA and BRCT domains, the FHA domains of APTX and PNKP interact with iso-ADP-ribose, the linkage of PAR, whereas the BRCT domains of Ligase4, XRCC1, and NBS1 recognize ADP-ribose, the basic unit of PAR. The interactions between PAR and the FHA or BRCT domains mediate the relocation of these domain-containing proteins to DNA damage sites and facilitate the DNA damage response. Moreover, the interaction between PAR and the NBS1 BRCT domain is important for the early activation of ATM during DNA damage response and ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoint activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate two novel PAR-binding modules that play important roles in DNA damage response. PMID:23964092

  8. p53 and RAD9, the DNA Damage Response, and Regulation of Transcription Networks.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Howard B; Panigrahi, Sunil K; Hopkins, Kevin M; Wang, Li; Broustas, Constantinos G

    2017-04-01

    The way cells respond to DNA damage is important since inefficient repair or misrepair of lesions can have deleterious consequences, including mutation, genomic instability, neurodegenerative disorders, premature aging, cancer or death. Whether damage occurs spontaneously as a byproduct of normal metabolic processes, or after exposure to exogenous agents, cells muster a coordinated, complex DNA damage response (DDR) to mitigate potential harmful effects. A variety of activities are involved to promote cell survival, and include DNA repair, DNA damage tolerance, as well as transient cell cycle arrest to provide time for repair before entry into critical cell cycle phases, an event that could be lethal if traversal occurs while damage is present. When such damage is prolonged or not repairable, senescence, apoptosis or autophagy is induced. One major level of DDR regulation occurs via the orchestrated transcriptional control of select sets of genes encoding proteins that mediate the response. p53 is a transcription factor that transactivates specific DDR downstream genes through binding DNA consensus sequences usually in or near target gene promoter regions. The profile of p53-regulated genes activated at any given time varies, and is dependent upon type of DNA damage or stress experienced, exact composition of the consensus DNA binding sequence, presence of other DNA binding proteins, as well as cell context. RAD9 is another protein critical for the response of cells to DNA damage, and can also selectively regulate gene transcription. The limited studies addressing the role of RAD9 in transcription regulation indicate that the protein transactivates at least one of its target genes, p21/waf1/cip1, by binding to DNA sequences demonstrated to be a p53 response element. NEIL1 is also regulated by RAD9 through a similar DNA sequence, though not yet directly verified as a bonafide p53 response element. These findings suggest a novel pathway whereby p53 and RAD9 control

  9. Potential Relationship between Inadequate Response to DNA Damage and Development of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Chen, Peishuai; Gu, Jian; Bishop, Alexander J. R.; Scott, Linda M.; Hasty, Paul; Rebel, Vivienne I.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the continuous regeneration of all types of blood cells, including themselves. To ensure the functional and genomic integrity of blood tissue, a network of regulatory pathways tightly controls the proliferative status of HSCs. Nevertheless, normal HSC aging is associated with a noticeable decline in regenerative potential and possible changes in other functions. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is an age-associated hematopoietic malignancy, characterized by abnormal blood cell maturation and a high propensity for leukemic transformation. It is furthermore thought to originate in a HSC and to be associated with the accrual of multiple genetic and epigenetic aberrations. This raises the question whether MDS is, in part, related to an inability to adequately cope with DNA damage. Here we discuss the various components of the cellular response to DNA damage. For each component, we evaluate related studies that may shed light on a potential relationship between MDS development and aberrant DNA damage response/repair. PMID:25569081

  10. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Harley, Margaret E; Murina, Olga; Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R; Bicknell, Louise S; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A M; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P; Hurles, Matthew E; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage, where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions.

  11. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R.; Bicknell, Louise S.; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N.; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J.; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A. M.; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H.; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B.; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S.; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism/Seckel syndrome. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to UV irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a novel component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions. PMID:26595769

  12. Interaction of FUS and HDAC1 Regulates DNA Damage Response and Repair in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Yuan; Pan, Ling; Su, Susan C.; Quinn, Emma J.; Sasaki, Megumi; Jimenez, Jessica C.; Mackenzie, Ian R.A.; Huang, Eric J.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Defects in DNA repair have been extensively linked to neurodegenerative diseases, but the exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we report that FUS, a RNA/DNA binding protein linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), plays a pivotal role in DNA damage response (DDR). We show that the function of FUS in DDR involves a direct interaction with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), and that the recruitment of FUS to double stranded break (DSB) sites is important for proper DDR signaling. Remarkably, FUS proteins carrying familial ALS (fALS) mutations are defective in DDR and DNA repair, and show a diminished interaction with HDAC1. Moreover, increased DNA damage was also observed in human ALS patients harboring FUS mutations. Our findings suggest that an impaired DDR and DNA repair may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases linked to FUS mutations. PMID:24036913

  13. Caspase-2 deficiency promotes aberrant DNA-damage response and genetic instability.

    PubMed

    Dorstyn, L; Puccini, J; Wilson, C H; Shalini, S; Nicola, M; Moore, S; Kumar, S

    2012-08-01

    Caspase-2 is an initiator caspase, which has been implicated to function in apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling pathways, including cell-cycle regulation, DNA-damage signalling and tumour suppression. We previously demonstrated that caspase-2 deficiency enhances E1A/Ras oncogene-induced cell transformation and augments lymphomagenesis in the EμMyc mouse model. Caspase-2(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (casp2(-/-) MEFs) show aberrant cell-cycle checkpoint regulation and a defective apoptotic response following DNA damage. Disruption of cell-cycle checkpoints often leads to genomic instability (GIN), which is a common phenotype of cancer cells and can contribute to cellular transformation. Here we show that caspase-2 deficiency results in increased DNA damage and GIN in proliferating cells. Casp2(-/-) MEFs readily escape senescence in culture and exhibit increased micronuclei formation and sustained DNA damage during cell culture and following γ-irradiation. Metaphase analyses demonstrated that a lack of caspase-2 is associated with increased aneuploidy in both MEFs and in EμMyc lymphoma cells. In addition, casp2(-/-) MEFs and lymphoma cells exhibit significantly decreased telomere length. We also noted that loss of caspase-2 leads to defective p53-mediated signalling and decreased trans-activation of p53 target genes upon DNA damage. Our findings suggest that loss of caspase-2 serves as a key function in maintaining genomic integrity, during cell proliferation and following DNA damage.

  14. Regulation of DNA damage responses and cell cycle progression by hMOB2

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Valenti; Gundogdu, Ramazan; Gomez, Marta; Hoa, Lily; Panchal, Neelam; O’Driscoll, Mark; Hergovich, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Mps one binder proteins (MOBs) are conserved regulators of essential signalling pathways. Biochemically, human MOB2 (hMOB2) can inhibit NDR kinases by competing with hMOB1 for binding to NDRs. However, biological roles of hMOB2 have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe novel functions of hMOB2 in the DNA damage response (DDR) and cell cycle regulation. hMOB2 promotes DDR signalling, cell survival and cell cycle arrest after exogenously induced DNA damage. Under normal growth conditions in the absence of exogenously induced DNA damage hMOB2 plays a role in preventing the accumulation of endogenous DNA damage and a subsequent p53/p21-dependent G1/S cell cycle arrest. Unexpectedly, these molecular and cellular phenotypes are not observed upon NDR manipulations, indicating that hMOB2 performs these functions independent of NDR signalling. Thus, to gain mechanistic insight, we screened for novel binding partners of hMOB2, revealing that hMOB2 interacts with RAD50, facilitating the recruitment of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) DNA damage sensor complex and activated ATM to DNA damaged chromatin. Taken together, we conclude that hMOB2 supports the DDR and cell cycle progression. PMID:25460043

  15. Regulation of DNA damage responses and cell cycle progression by hMOB2.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Valenti; Gundogdu, Ramazan; Gomez, Marta; Hoa, Lily; Panchal, Neelam; O'Driscoll, Mark; Hergovich, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Mps one binder proteins (MOBs) are conserved regulators of essential signalling pathways. Biochemically, human MOB2 (hMOB2) can inhibit NDR kinases by competing with hMOB1 for binding to NDRs. However, biological roles of hMOB2 have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe novel functions of hMOB2 in the DNA damage response (DDR) and cell cycle regulation. hMOB2 promotes DDR signalling, cell survival and cell cycle arrest after exogenously induced DNA damage. Under normal growth conditions in the absence of exogenously induced DNA damage hMOB2 plays a role in preventing the accumulation of endogenous DNA damage and a subsequent p53/p21-dependent G1/S cell cycle arrest. Unexpectedly, these molecular and cellular phenotypes are not observed upon NDR manipulations, indicating that hMOB2 performs these functions independent of NDR signalling. Thus, to gain mechanistic insight, we screened for novel binding partners of hMOB2, revealing that hMOB2 interacts with RAD50, facilitating the recruitment of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) DNA damage sensor complex and activated ATM to DNA damaged chromatin. Taken together, we conclude that hMOB2 supports the DDR and cell cycle progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA Damage Response Factors from Diverse Pathways, Including DNA Crosslink Repair, Mediate Alternative End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Sean M.; Yanez, Diana A.; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative end joining (Alt-EJ) chromosomal break repair involves bypassing classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ), and such repair causes mutations often with microhomology at the repair junction. Since the mediators of Alt-EJ are not well understood, we have sought to identify DNA damage response (DDR) factors important for this repair event. Using chromosomal break reporter assays, we surveyed an RNAi library targeting known DDR factors for siRNAs that cause a specific decrease in Alt-EJ, relative to an EJ event that is a composite of Alt-EJ and c-NHEJ (Distal-EJ between two tandem breaks). From this analysis, we identified several DDR factors that are specifically important for Alt-EJ relative to Distal-EJ. While these factors are from diverse pathways, we also found that most of them also promote homologous recombination (HR), including factors important for DNA crosslink repair, such as the Fanconi Anemia factor, FANCA. Since bypass of c-NHEJ is likely important for both Alt-EJ and HR, we disrupted the c-NHEJ factor Ku70 in Fanca-deficient mouse cells and found that Ku70 loss significantly diminishes the influence of Fanca on Alt-EJ. In contrast, an inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) causes a decrease in Alt-EJ that is enhanced by Ku70 loss. Additionally, the helicase/nuclease DNA2 appears to have distinct effects from FANCA and PARP on both Alt-EJ, as well as end resection. Finally, we found that the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a cancer therapeutic that has been shown to disrupt FANC signaling, causes a significant reduction in both Alt-EJ and HR, relative to Distal-EJ, as well as a substantial loss of end resection. We suggest that several distinct DDR functions are important for Alt-EJ, which include promoting bypass of c-NHEJ and end resection. PMID:25629353

  17. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1.

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, J; Sancar, G B

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. We report here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 upstream repression sequence, that together regulate induction of PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. A prominent feature of the foot-printed region is a 22-base-pair palindrome. Deletion of the PHR1 upstream repression sequence increased the basal level expression of PHR1 in vivo and decreased induction after exposure of cells to UV radiation or methyl methanesulfonate, whereas insertion of the PRP binding site between the CYC1 upstream activation sequence and "TATA" sequence reduced basal level expression and conferred damage responsiveness upon a reporter gene. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription. Images PMID:1763039

  18. Differential regulation of DNA damage response activation between somatic and germline cells in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vermezovic, J; Stergiou, L; Hengartner, M O; d'Adda di Fagagna, F

    2012-01-01

    The germline of Caenorhabditis elegans is a well-established model for DNA damage response (DDR) studies. However, the molecular basis of the observed cell death resistance in the soma of these animals remains unknown. We established a set of techniques to study ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage generation and DDR activation in a whole intact worm. Our single-cell analyses reveal that, although germline and somatic cells show similar levels of inflicted DNA damage, somatic cells, differently from germline cells, do not activate the crucial apical DDR kinase ataxia-telengiectasia mutated (ATM). We also show that DDR signaling proteins are undetectable in all somatic cells and this is due to transcriptional repression. However, DNA repair genes are expressed and somatic cells retain the ability to efficiently repair DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that germline cells, when induced to transdifferentiate into somatic cells within the gonad, lose the ability to activate ATM. Overall, these observations provide a molecular mechanism for the known, but hitherto unexplained, resistance to DNA damage-induced cell death in C. elegans somatic cells. We propose that the observed lack of signaling and cell death but retention of DNA repair functions in the soma is a Caenorhabditis-specific evolutionary-selected strategy to cope with its lack of adult somatic stem cell pools and regenerative capacity. PMID:22705849

  19. Involvement of Matrin 3 and SFPQ/NONO in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Salton, Maayan; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Wang, Shih-Ya; Chen, David J; Shiloh, Yosef

    2010-04-15

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex signaling network that is induced by DNA lesions and vigorously activated by double strand breaks (DSBs). The DSB response is mobilized by the nuclear protein kinase ATM, which phosphorylates key players in its various branches. SFPQ (PSF) and NONO (p54) are nuclear proteins that interact with each other and have diverse roles in nucleic acids metabolism. The SFPQ/NONO heterodimer was previously found to enhance DNA strand break rejoining in vitro. Our attention was drawn to these two proteins as they interact with the nuclear matrix protein Matrin 3 (MATR3), which we found to be a novel ATM target. We asked whether SFPQ and NONO too are involved in the DSB response. Proteins that function at the early phase of this response are often recruited to the damaged sites. We observed rapid recruitment of SFPQ/NONO to sites of DNA damage induced by laser microbeam. In MATR3 knockdown cells SFPQ/NONO retention at DNA damage sites was prolonged. SFPQ and MATR3 depletion led to abnormal accumulation of cells at the S-phase of the cell cycle following treatment with the radiomimetic chemical neocarzinostatin. Notably, proteins involved in DSB repair via nonhomologous end-joining co-immunoprecipitated with NONO; SFPQ depletion delayed DSB repair. Collectively the data suggest that SFPQ, NONO and MATR3 are involved in the early stage of the DSB response, setting the scene for DSB repair.

  20. Interplay between Np95 and Eme1 in the DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, Helena; Gibson, Lianne; Yun, J.W.; Sarras, Haya; Tamblyn, Laura; McPherson, John Peter

    2008-10-24

    Mus81 (methyl methansulfonate UV sensitive clone 81) and Eme1 (essential meiotic endonuclease 1, also known as MMS4) form a heterodimeric endonuclease that is critical for genomic stability and the response to DNA crosslink damage and replication blockade. However, relatively little is known as to how this endonuclease is regulated following DNA damage. Here, we report mammalian Eme1 interacts with Np95, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in chromatin modification, replication-linked epigenetic maintenance and the DNA damage response. Np95 and Eme1 co-localize on nuclear chromatin following exposure of cells to camptothecin, an agent that promotes the collapse of replication forks. The observed co localization following DNA damage was found to be dependent on an intact RING finger, the structural motif that encodes the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Np95. Taken together, these findings link Mus81-Eme1 with the replication-associated chromatin modifier functions of Np95 in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  1. Epigenetic and genetic factors in the cellular response to radiations and DNA-damaging chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.R.; D'Arpa, P.

    1981-07-01

    DNA-damaging agents are widely used as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease states. Many such agents are considered to produce detrimental side effects. Thus, it is important to evaluate both therapeutic efficacy and potential risk. DNA-damaging agents can be so evaluated by comparison to agents whose therapeutic benefit and potential hazards are better known. We propose a framework for such comparison, demonstrating that a simple transformation of cytotoxicity-dose response patterns permits a facile comparison of variation between cells exposed to a single DNA-damaging agent or to different cytotoxic agents. Further, by transforming data from experiments which compare responses of 2 cell populations to an effects ratio, different patterns for the changes in cytotoxicity produced by epigenetic and genetic factors were compared. Using these transformations, we found that there is a wide variation (a factor of 4) between laboratories for a single agent (UVC) and only a slightly larger variation (factor of 6) between normal cell response for different types of DNA-damaging agents (x-ray, UVC, alkylating agents, crosslinking agents). Epigenetic factors such as repair and recovery appear to be a factor only at higher dose levels. Comparison in the cytotoxic effect of a spectrum of DNA-damaging agents in xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia cells indicates significantly different patterns, implying that the effect, and perhaps the nature, of these genetic conditions are quite different.

  2. Dose-response relationship for rat liver DNA damage caused by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Kitchin, K T; Brown, J L

    1996-12-02

    An experimental approach was taken to the question of dose-response curves for chemical carcinogenesis, using DNA damage as a biomarker. Female rats were give 13 different doses of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (from 1.4 to 135,000 micrograms/kg) and the subsequent hepatic DNA damage was determined by the alkaline elution technique. DMH doses below 450 micrograms/kg did not significantly damage DNA; all DMH doses of 1000 micrograms/kg or higher damaged rat hepatic DNA (P < 0.05). In this study the x values (dose) ranged over five orders of magnitude and the y values (DNA damage) ranged 30-fold. Ten different regression models (linear, quadratic, cubic, power, and six nonlinear transition models) were compared in their ability to fit the experimental data. With respect to log transformed dose, the six nonlinear transition equations fit the data considerably better than the four power type of equations. A sigmoid model fit to the log transformed dose of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine had an r2 of 0.9979, a degree of freedom adjusted r2 of 0.9969, a F-statistic of 1,457, and a fit standard error of 0.50. With respect to untransformed dose, only three equations (sigmoid, cascade and gaussian cumulative) could creditably fit the DMH data. The experimental results are interpreted with respect to hormesis, use of log transformed dose, sigmoid dose-response models, thresholds of biological response and cancer risk assessment.

  3. Highlighting the DNA damage response with ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared and kinetic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Tomas, Martin; Blumhardt, Philipp; Stöckl, Martin; Fuchs, Matthias; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms governing the response to DNA damage in higher eucaryotes crucially depends on our ability to dissect the temporal and spatial organization of the cellular machinery responsible for maintaining genomic integrity. To achieve this goal, we need experimental tools to inflict DNA lesions with high spatial precision at pre-defined locations, and to visualize the ensuing reactions with adequate temporal resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses focused through high-aperture objective lenses of advanced scanning microscopes offer the advantage of inducing DNA damage in a 3D-confined volume of subnuclear dimensions. This high spatial resolution results from the highly non-linear nature of the excitation process. Here we review recent progress based on the increasing availability of widely tunable and user-friendly technology of ultrafast lasers in the near infrared. We present a critical evaluation of this approach for DNA microdamage as compared to the currently prevalent use of UV or VIS laser irradiation, the latter in combination with photosensitizers. Current and future applications in the field of DNA repair and DNA-damage dependent chromatin dynamics are outlined. Finally, we discuss the requirement for proper simulation and quantitative modeling. We focus in particular on approaches to measure the effect of DNA damage on the mobility of nuclear proteins and consider the pros and cons of frequently used analysis models for FRAP and photoactivation and their applicability to non-linear photoperturbation experiments. PMID:23882280

  4. DNA damage signaling in response to double-strand breaks during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Simona

    2010-01-01

    The signaling cascade initiated in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) has been extensively investigated in interphase cells. Here, we show that mitotic cells treated with DSB-inducing agents activate a “primary” DNA damage response (DDR) comprised of early signaling events, including activation of the protein kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), histone H2AX phosphorylation together with recruitment of mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), and the Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN) complex to damage sites. However, mitotic cells display no detectable recruitment of the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, or accumulation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, at DSB sites. Accordingly, we found that DNA-damage signaling is attenuated in mitotic cells, with full DDR activation only ensuing when a DSB-containing mitotic cell enters G1. Finally, we present data suggesting that induction of a primary DDR in mitosis is important because transient inactivation of ATM and DNA-PK renders mitotic cells hypersensitive to DSB-inducing agents. PMID:20660628

  5. Potentiated DNA Damage Response in Circulating Breast Tumor Cells Confers Resistance to Chemotherapy*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chang; Liu, Bodu; Yao, Yandan; Qu, Shaohua; Luo, Wei; Tan, Weige; Liu, Qiang; Yao, Herui; Zou, Lee; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are seeds for cancer metastasis and are predictive of poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Whether CTCs and primary tumor cells (PTCs) respond to chemotherapy differently is not known. Here, we show that CTCs of breast cancer are more resistant to chemotherapy than PTCs because of potentiated DNA repair. Surprisingly, the chemoresistance of CTCs was recapitulated in PTCs when they were detached from the extracellular matrix. Detachment of PTCs increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and partially activated the DNA damage checkpoint, converting PTCs to a CTC-like state. Inhibition of checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2 in CTCs reduces the basal checkpoint response and sensitizes CTCs to DNA damage in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Our results suggest that DNA damage checkpoint inhibitors may benefit the chemotherapy of breast cancer patients by suppressing the chemoresistance of CTCs and reducing the risk of cancer metastasis. PMID:25897074

  6. Potentiated DNA Damage Response in Circulating Breast Tumor Cells Confers Resistance to Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chang; Liu, Bodu; Yao, Yandan; Qu, Shaohua; Luo, Wei; Tan, Weige; Liu, Qiang; Yao, Herui; Zou, Lee; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei

    2015-06-12

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are seeds for cancer metastasis and are predictive of poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Whether CTCs and primary tumor cells (PTCs) respond to chemotherapy differently is not known. Here, we show that CTCs of breast cancer are more resistant to chemotherapy than PTCs because of potentiated DNA repair. Surprisingly, the chemoresistance of CTCs was recapitulated in PTCs when they were detached from the extracellular matrix. Detachment of PTCs increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and partially activated the DNA damage checkpoint, converting PTCs to a CTC-like state. Inhibition of checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2 in CTCs reduces the basal checkpoint response and sensitizes CTCs to DNA damage in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Our results suggest that DNA damage checkpoint inhibitors may benefit the chemotherapy of breast cancer patients by suppressing the chemoresistance of CTCs and reducing the risk of cancer metastasis.

  7. Lamin A/C-dependent interaction with 53BP1 promotes cellular responses to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Markiewicz, Ewa; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Lamins A/C have been implicated in DNA damage response pathways. We show that the DNA repair protein 53BP1 is a lamin A/C binding protein. In undamaged human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), 53BP1 is a nucleoskeleton protein. 53BP1 binds to lamins A/C via its Tudor domain, and this is abrogated by DNA damage. Lamins A/C regulate 53BP1 levels and consequently lamin A/C-null HDF display a 53BP1 null-like phenotype. Our data favour a model in which lamins A/C maintain a nucleoplasmic pool of 53BP1 in order to facilitate its rapid recruitment to sites of DNA damage and could explain why an absence of lamin A/C accelerates aging. PMID:25645366

  8. Modulation of the yeast protein interactome in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Samuel; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Diss, Guillaume; Landry, Christian R

    2014-04-04

    Cells deploy diverse mechanisms to physiologically adapt to potentially detrimental perturbations. These mechanisms include changes in the organization of protein-protein interaction networks (PINs). Most PINs characterized to date are portrayed in a single environmental condition and are thus likely to miss important connections among biological processes. In this report, we show that the yeast DHFR-PCA on high-density arrays allows to detects modulations of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in different conditions by testing more than 1000 PPIs in standard and in a drug-inducing DNA damage conditions. We identify 156 PPIs that show significant modulation in response to DNA damage. We provide evidence that modulated PPIs involve essential genes (NOP7, EXO84 and LAS17) playing critical roles in response to DNA damage. Additionally, we show that a significant proportion of PPI changes are likely explained by changes in protein localization and, to a lesser extent, protein abundance. The protein interaction modules affected by changing PPIs support the role of mRNA stability and translation, protein degradation and ubiquitylation and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in response to DNA damage. Overall, we provide a valuable tool and dataset for the study of the rewiring of PINs in response to environmental perturbations. We show that the DHFR-PCA is a high-throughput method that allows the detection of changes in PPIs associated with different environmental conditions using DNA damage response as a testbed. We provide a valuable resource for the study of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells. This article is part of a Special Issue: Can Proteomics Fill the Gap Between Genomics and Phenotypes? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Function of ZFAND3 in the DNA Damage Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    treatment with various genotoxic agents was examined. Signaling from the apical DDR kinase ATR (ataxia telangiectasia- mutated ( ATM ) and Rad3...to ATR- dependent checkpoint signaling after IR. It remains possible that the knock-down Figure 2. ZFAND3 silencing does not hypersensitize...resolution achieved with iPOND depends on EdU incubation time, the rate of DNA synthesis and chromatin fragment size. Experimentally, EdU incubation

  10. The Role of Mms22p in DNA Damage Response in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lan; Xiong, Juan; Lu, Hui; Lv, Quan-zhen; Ma, Qian-yao; Côte, Pierre; Whiteway, Malcolm; Jiang, Yuan-ying

    2015-01-01

    To ensure correct DNA replication, eukaryotes have signaling pathways that respond to replication-associated DNA damage and trigger repair. In both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a complex of proteins, including the cullin protein Rtt101p and two adapter proteins Mms22p and Mms1p, is important for proper response to replication stress. We have investigated this system in Candida albicans. In this pathogen, Mms22p is important for recovery from DNA replication damage induced by agents including methylmethane sulfonate, camptothecin, and ionizing radiation. Although no clear ortholog of Mms1p has been identified in C. albicans, loss of either Mms22p or Rtt101p generates similar damage sensitivity, consistent with a common function. In S. cerevisiae, the Mrc1p−Csm3p−Tof1p complex stabilizes stalled replication forks and activates a replication checkpoint and interacts with Mms22p. A similar complex in S. pombe, consisting of the Tof1p and Csm3p orthologs Swi1p and Swi3p, along with the fission yeast Mrc1p, genetically also interacts with Mms22p. Intriguingly in C. albicans only Mrc1p and Csm3p appear involved in damage repair, and Mms22p is required for responding to DNA damage agents in MRC1 or CSM3 conditional mutants. In C. albicans, although the loss of RAD57 greatly impairs response in the pathogen to many DNA-damaging agents, lethality due to camptothecin damage requires concomitant loss of Rad57p and Mms22p, suggesting that Mms22p is only essential for homologous recombination induced by camptothecin. These results establish that although C. albicans uses conserved cellular modules to respond to DNA damage and replication blocks, the specific details of these modules differ significantly from the S. cerevisiae model. PMID:26438292

  11. Induction of a Cellular DNA Damage Response by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Facilitates Viral Replication and Mediates Apoptotic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; Yan, Xu; Li, Zixue; Hou, Lei; Wang, Naidong; Yang, Yi; Jiang, Haijun; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Cellular DNA damage response (DDR) triggered by infection of DNA viruses mediate cell cycle checkpoint activation, DNA repair, or apoptosis induction. In the present study, infection of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which serves as a major etiological agent of PCV2-associated diseases (PCVAD), was found to elicit a DNA damage response (DDR) as observed by the phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA32 following infection. The response requires active viral replication, and all the ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase), ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related kinase), and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) are the transducers of the DDR signaling events in the PCV2-infected cells as demonstrated by the phosphorylation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK signalings as well as reductions in their activations after treatment with specific kinase inhibitors. Inhibitions of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK activations block viral replication and prevent apoptotic responses as observed by decreases in cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 as well as fragmented DNA following PCV2 infection. These results reveal that PCV2 is able to exploit the cellular DNA damage response machinery for its own efficient replication and for apoptosis induction, further extending our understanding for the molecular mechanism of PCV2 infection. PMID:27982097

  12. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-24

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  13. Clofarabine Acts as Radiosensitizer In Vitro and In Vivo by Interfering With DNA Damage Response

    SciTech Connect

    Cariveau, Mickael J.; Stackhouse, Murray; Cui Xiaoli; Tiwari, Kamal; Waud, William; Secrist, John A.; Xu Bo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Combination treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy has emerged as the dominant form of cancer adjuvant regimens in recent years. Clofarabine, a newly approved drug for pediatric leukemia, is a second-generation purine nucleoside analogue that can block DNA synthesis and inhibit DNA repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that clofarabine could work synergistically with radiotherapy to increase the tumor cell response. Methods and Materials: The effects of clofarabine on radiosensitivity have been established in several tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo using colony-forming assays and tumor xenografts. The effect of clofarabine on the DNA damage response was also studied in vitro by measuring {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. Results: Clonogenic survival was significantly reduced in irradiated cells treated with clofarabine, demonstrating the strong radiosensitizing effect of clofarabine. Furthermore, clofarabine displayed a radiosensitizing effect that was greater than gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil. We also found that low doses of clofarabine can prolong the presence of radiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX nuclear focus formation, and high doses of clofarabine can induce DNA double-strand breaks, suggesting that clofarabine can interfere with DNA damage response pathways. In addition, clofarabine-induced radiosensitization was also established in vivo using a colorectal cancer model, DLD-1, in athymic nude mice. When combined with fractionated radiotherapy, a moderate dose of clofarabine led to a significant increase in tumor growth inhibition. Conclusion: Clofarabine acts as a powerful radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo by interfering with the DNA damage response.

  14. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles activate the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response in human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Raju Y.; Chastain, Paul D.; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Smeester, Lisa M.; Kaufmann, William K.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in consumer products increases their prevalence in the environment and the potential risk to human health. Although recent studies have shown in vivo and in vitro toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), a more detailed view of the underlying mechanisms of this response needs to be established. Here the effects of nano-TiO2 on the DNA damage response and DNA replication dynamics were investigated in human dermal fibroblasts. Specifically, the relationship between nano-TiO2 and the DNA damage response pathways regulated by ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 were examined. The results show increased phosphorylation of H2AX, ATM, and Chk2 after exposure. In addition, nano-TiO2 inhibited the overall rate of DNA synthesis and frequency of replicon initiation events in DNA combed fibers. Taken together, these results demonstrate that exposure to nano-TiO2 activates the ATM/Chk2 DNA damage response pathway. PMID:22770119

  15. Bacterial Genotoxins: Merging the DNA Damage Response into Infection Biology

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Francesca; Frisan, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genotoxins are unique among bacterial toxins as their molecular target is DNA. The consequence of intoxication or infection is induction of DNA breaks that, if not properly repaired, results in irreversible cell cycle arrest (senescence) or death of the target cells. At present, only three bacterial genotoxins have been identified. Two are protein toxins: the cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) family produced by a number of Gram-negative bacteria and the typhoid toxin produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The third member, colibactin, is a peptide-polyketide genotoxin, produced by strains belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 of Escherichia coli. This review will present the cellular effects of acute and chronic intoxication or infection with the genotoxins-producing bacteria. The carcinogenic properties and the role of these effectors in the context of the host-microbe interaction will be discussed. We will further highlight the open questions that remain to be solved regarding the biology of this unusual family of bacterial toxins. PMID:26270677

  16. The DNA-damage response: new molecular insights and new approaches to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    The DNA of all cells is continually under assault from a wide range of DNA-damaging agents. To counter this threat to their genetic integrity, cells possess systems, collectively known as the DNA-damage response (DDR), to detect DNA damage, signal its presence and mediate its repair. Here, I provide an overview of the DDR and then describe how work in my laboratory and elsewhere has identified some of the key protein players that mediate cellular responses to the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage: the DNA double-strand break (DSB). Next, I discuss some of my laboratory’s recent work, which has revealed that the way cells respond to DSBs is modulated in a cell-cycle dependent manner to ensure that the cell uses the DSB repair system that is most suited to its cell-cycle stage. Finally, I explain how our increasing knowledge of the DDR is suggesting new avenues for treating cancer and provide an example of a DDR inhibitory drug that is showing promise in clinical trials. PMID:19442242

  17. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) interacts with p400 ATPase for an efficient DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca J; Savoian, Matthew S; Weber, Lauren E; Park, Jeong Hyeon

    2016-11-04

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and TRRAP proteins belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase family and are involved in DNA damage repair and chromatin remodeling. ATM is a checkpoint kinase that is recruited to sites of DNA double-strand breaks where it phosphorylates a diverse range of proteins that are part of the chromatin and DNA repair machinery. As an integral subunit of the TRRAP-TIP60 complexes, p400 ATPase is a chromatin remodeler that is also targeted to DNA double-strand break sites. While it is understood that DNA binding transcriptional activators recruit p400 ATPase into a regulatory region of the promoter, how p400 recognises and moves to DNA double-strand break sites is far less clear. Here we investigate a possibility whether ATM serves as a shuttle to deliver p400 to break sites. Our data indicate that p400 co-immunoprecipitates with ATM independently of DNA damage state and that the N-terminal domain of p400 is vital for this interaction. Heterologous expression studies using Sf9 cells revealed that the ATM-p400 complex can be reconstituted without other mammalian bridging proteins. Overexpression of ATM-interacting p400 regions in U2OS cells induced dominant negative effects including the inhibition of both DNA damage repair and cell proliferation. Consistent with the dominant negative effect, the stable expression of an N-terminal p400 fragment showed a decrease in the association of p400 with ATM, but did not alter the association of p400 with TRRAP. Taken together, our findings suggest that a protein-protein interaction between ATM and p400 ATPase occurs independently of DNA damage and contributes to efficient DNA damage response and repair.

  18. A role for the spindle assembly checkpoint in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Palou, Roger; Palou, Gloria; Quintana, David G

    2017-05-01

    Spontaneous DNA damage poses a continuous threat to genomic integrity. If unchecked, genotoxic insults result in genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer cells. In eukaryotic cells a DNA Damage Response (DDR) detects and responds to genotoxic stress, acting as an anti-cancer barrier in humans. Among other actions, the DDR blocks the segregation of incompletely replicated or damaged chromosomes, thus preventing aneuploidy. In a work aimed at better understanding such S-M control, we recently showed that cells block anaphase through different control pathways. The S phase checkpoint kinase Mec1/ATR inhibits mitotic Cyclin Dependent Kinase activity through effector kinases Swe1/Wee1 and Rad53/Chk2. Cells also stabilize the levels of Pds1/securin to block sister chromatid segregation in response to DNA damage. We show here that Pds1/securin abundance is still secured when the S phase checkpoint response is fully abrogated in mec1/ATR tel1/ATM double null mutants. When such cells are exposed to genotoxic stress, Pds1/securin is stabilized in a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) dependent manner. Disruption of the SAC and the S phase checkpoint together, allows chromosome segregation in the presence of DNA damage or replication stress. Our results place the SAC as a part of the DDR, which appears to count on different, independent control layers to preserve genomic integrity when chromosome replication is challenged.

  19. DNA damage response as an anti-cancer barrier: damage threshold and the concept of 'conditional haploinsufficiency'.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri; Bartkova, Jirina

    2007-10-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) emerges as a biological tumorigenesis barrier in early stages of cancer development, and a selective pressure that favors outgrowth of malignant clones with defects in the genome maintenance machinery, such as mutations of p53 and other DDR components. Recent studies indicate that the DDR barrier is not alarmed universally among early noninvasive lesions, but rather responds to high-risk tumorigenic threats that occur in high-grade, pre-malignant lesions that are generally more likely to develop into bona fide malignancies. In addition, while the DDR barrier appears to operate in major types of cancer, such as carcinomas of the lung, breast and colon, DDR activation is rare at any stage of progression among testicular germ-cell tumors. Together with observations that several, but not all oncogenic insults are capable of activating the DDR machinery, these new results point to existence of a critical threshold of such oncogene-induced DNA damage. It seems that only cells and lesions that experience DNA replication stress and DNA damage above such threshold activate the cellular senescence or cell death pathways within the DDR machinery. The higher load of DNA damage may also contribute to cancer predisposition in families with inherited heterozygous defects in the DDR barrier, such as in ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, p53 and other genes. We propose that carriers of such DDR defects may be more prone to malignancy due to 'conditional haploinsufficiency': such partial defects may be asymptomatic in normal tissues, yet they may become manifest under conditions of supra-threshold endogenous DNA damage in oncogene-driven pre-malignant lesions.

  20. Hyperactivation of ATM upon DNA-PKcs inhibition modulates p53 dynamics and cell fate in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Finzel, Ana; Grybowski, Andrea; Strasen, Jette; Cristiano, Elena; Loewer, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A functional DNA damage response is essential for maintaining genome integrity in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks. It is mainly coordinated by the kinases ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs, which control the repair of broken DNA strands and relay the damage signal to the tumor suppressor p53 to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or senescence. Although many functions of the individual kinases have been identified, it remains unclear how they act in concert to ensure faithful processing of the damage signal. Using specific inhibitors and quantitative analysis at the single-cell level, we systematically characterize the contribution of each kinase for regulating p53 activity. Our results reveal a new regulatory interplay in which loss of DNA-PKcs function leads to hyperactivation of ATM and amplification of the p53 response, sensitizing cells for damage-induced senescence. This interplay determines the outcome of treatment regimens combining irradiation with DNA-PKcs inhibitors in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27280387

  1. Hyperactivation of ATM upon DNA-PKcs inhibition modulates p53 dynamics and cell fate in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Finzel, Ana; Grybowski, Andrea; Strasen, Jette; Cristiano, Elena; Loewer, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    A functional DNA damage response is essential for maintaining genome integrity in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks. It is mainly coordinated by the kinases ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs, which control the repair of broken DNA strands and relay the damage signal to the tumor suppressor p53 to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or senescence. Although many functions of the individual kinases have been identified, it remains unclear how they act in concert to ensure faithful processing of the damage signal. Using specific inhibitors and quantitative analysis at the single-cell level, we systematically characterize the contribution of each kinase for regulating p53 activity. Our results reveal a new regulatory interplay in which loss of DNA-PKcs function leads to hyperactivation of ATM and amplification of the p53 response, sensitizing cells for damage-induced senescence. This interplay determines the outcome of treatment regimens combining irradiation with DNA-PKcs inhibitors in a p53-dependent manner. © 2016 Finzel et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  3. The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane induces DNA breaks, ATF3 and the DNA damage response in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shiwei; Yan, Tiandong; Nikolova, Teodora; Fuhrmann, Dominik; Nemecek, Andrea; Gödtel-Armbrust, Ute; Kaina, Bernd; Wojnowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane has been associated not only with improved cancer patient survival but also with secondary malignancies and reduced tumour response. Experimental Approach We investigated the DNA damage response and the role of the activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) accumulation in tumour cells exposed to dexrazoxane. Key Results Dexrazoxane exposure induced topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A)-dependent cell death, γ-H2AX accumulation and increased tail moment in neutral comet assays. Dexrazoxane induced DNA damage responses, shown by enhanced levels of γ-H2AX/53BP1 foci, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ATM and Rad3-related), Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylation, and by p53 accumulation. Dexrazoxane-induced γ-H2AX accumulation was dependent on ATM. ATF3 protein was induced by dexrazoxane in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which was abolished in TOP2A-depleted cells and in cells pre-incubated with ATM inhibitor. Knockdown of ATF3 gene expression by siRNA triggered apoptosis in control cells and diminished the p53 protein level in both control and dexrazoxane -treated cells. This was accompanied by increased γ-H2AX accumulation. ATF3 knockdown also delayed the repair of dexrazoxane -induced DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions and Implications As with other TOP2A poisons, dexrazoxane induced DNA double-strand breaks followed by activation of the DNA damage response. The DNA damage-triggered ATF3 controlled p53 accumulation and generation of double-strand breaks and is proposed to serve as a switch between DNA damage and cell death following dexrazoxane treatment. These findings suggest a mechanistic explanation for the diverse clinical observations associated with dexrazoxane. PMID:25521189

  4. DNA breakage and induction of DNA damage response proteins precede the appearance of visible mutant huntingtin aggregates.

    PubMed

    Illuzzi, Jennifer; Yerkes, Sarah; Parekh-Olmedo, Hetal; Kmiec, Eric B

    2009-02-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that follows an autosomal-dominant inheritance pattern. The pathogenesis of the disease depends on the degree of expansion of triplet (CAG) repeats located in the first exon on the gene. An expanded polyglutamine tract within the protein huntingtin (Htt) enables a gain-of-function phenotype that is often exhibited by a dysfunctional oligomerization process and the formation of protein aggregates. How this process leads to neurodegeneration remains undefined. We report that expression of a Htt-fragment containing an expanded glutamine tract induces DNA damage and activates the DNA damage response pathway. Both single-strand and double-strand breaks are observed as the mutant protein accumulates in the cell; these breaks precede the appearance of detectable protein aggregates containing mutant Htt. We also observe activation of H2AX, ATM, and p53 in cells expressing mutant Htt, a predictable response in cells containing chromosomal breakage. Expression of wild-type Htt does not affect the integrity of DNA, nor does it activate the same pathway. Furthermore, DNA damage and activated H2AX are present in HD transgenic mice before the formation of mutant Htt aggregates and HD pathogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the expression of mutant Htt causes an accumulation of DNA breaks that activates the DNA damage response pathway, a process that can disable cell function. Because these events can lead to apoptosis, it is possible that the DNA damage response pathway activated by single- and double-strand breaks that we found contributes to neurodegeneration.

  5. Human cytomegalovirus inhibits a DNA damage response by mislocalizing checkpoint proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, Miguel; Shenk, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint pathway responds to DNA damage and induces a cell cycle arrest to allow time for DNA repair. Several viruses are known to activate or modulate this cellular response. Here we show that the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated checkpoint pathway, which responds to double-strand breaks in DNA, is activated in response to human cytomegalovirus DNA replication. However, this activation does not propagate through the pathway; it is blocked at the level of the effector kinase, checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2). Late after infection, several checkpoint proteins, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Chk2, are mislocalized to a cytoplasmic virus assembly zone, where they are colocalized with virion structural proteins. This colocalization was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of virion proteins with an antibody that recognizes Chk2. Virus replication was resistant to ionizing radiation, which causes double-strand breaks in DNA. We propose that human CMV DNA replication activates the checkpoint response to DNA double-strand breaks, and the virus responds by altering the localization of checkpoint proteins to the cytoplasm and thereby inhibiting the signaling pathway. ionizing radiation | ataxia-telangiectasia mutated pathway

  6. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity.

  7. Interplay between histone H3 lysine 56 deacetylation and chromatin modifiers in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Antoine; Delgoshaie, Neda; Celic, Ivana; Dai, Junbiao; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Costantino, Santiago; Thibault, Pierre; Boeke, Jef D; Verreault, Alain; Wurtele, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is present in newly synthesized histones deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. The sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 deacetylate H3K56 after S phase, and virtually all histone H3 molecules are K56 acetylated throughout the cell cycle in hst3∆ hst4∆ mutants. Failure to deacetylate H3K56 causes thermosensitivity, spontaneous DNA damage, and sensitivity to replicative stress via molecular mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that unlike wild-type cells, hst3∆ hst4∆ cells are unable to complete genome duplication and accumulate persistent foci containing the homologous recombination protein Rad52 after exposure to genotoxic drugs during S phase. In response to replicative stress, cells lacking Hst3 and Hst4 also displayed intense foci containing the Rfa1 subunit of the single-stranded DNA binding protein complex RPA, as well as persistent activation of DNA damage-induced kinases. To investigate the basis of these phenotypes, we identified histone point mutations that modulate the temperature and genotoxic drug sensitivity of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. We found that reducing the levels of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation or H3 lysine 79 methylation partially suppresses these sensitivities and reduces spontaneous and genotoxin-induced activation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Our data further suggest that elevated DNA damage-induced signaling significantly contributes to the phenotypes of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Overall, these results outline a novel interplay between H3K56Ac, H3K79 methylation, and H4K16 acetylation in the cellular response to DNA damage. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Comparative analysis of different laser systems to study cellular responses to DNA damage in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangduo; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Stephens, Jared; Heale, Jason T.; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Shi, Linda Z.; Kim, Jong-Soo; Yokomori, Kyoko; Berns, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Proper recognition and repair of DNA damage is critical for the cell to protect its genomic integrity. Laser microirradiation ranging in wavelength from ultraviolet A (UVA) to near-infrared (NIR) can be used to induce damage in a defined region in the cell nucleus, representing an innovative technology to effectively analyze the in vivo DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage recognition process in mammalian cells. However, the damage-inducing characteristics of the different laser systems have not been fully investigated. Here we compare the nanosecond nitrogen 337 nm UVA laser with and without bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), the nanosecond and picosecond 532 nm green second-harmonic Nd:YAG, and the femtosecond NIR 800 nm Ti:sapphire laser with regard to the type(s) of damage and corresponding cellular responses. Crosslinking damage (without significant nucleotide excision repair factor recruitment) and single-strand breaks (with corresponding repair factor recruitment) were common among all three wavelengths. Interestingly, UVA without BrdU uniquely produced base damage and aberrant DSB responses. Furthermore, the total energy required for the threshold H2AX phosphorylation induction was found to vary between the individual laser systems. The results indicate the involvement of different damage mechanisms dictated by wavelength and pulse duration. The advantages and disadvantages of each system are discussed. PMID:19357094

  9. Haploinsufficiency of DNA Damage Response Genes and their Potential Influence in Human Genomic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Genomic disorders are a clinically diverse group of conditions caused by gain, loss or re-orientation of a genomic region containing dosage-sensitive genes. One class of genomic disorder is caused by hemizygous deletions resulting in haploinsufficiency of a single or, more usually, several genes. For example, the heterozygous contiguous gene deletion on chromosome 22q11.2 causing DiGeorge syndrome involves at least 20-30 genes. Determining how the copy number variation (CNV) affects human variation and contributes to the aetiology and progression of various genomic disorders represents important questions for the future. Here, I will discuss the functional significance of one form of CNV, haploinsufficiency (i.e. loss of a gene copy), of DNA damage response components and its association with certain genomic disorders. There is increasing evidence that haploinsufficiency for certain genes encoding key players in the cells response to DNA damage, particularly those of the Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR)-pathway, has a functional impact. I will review this evidence and present examples of some well known clinically similar genomic disorders that have recently been shown to be defective in the ATR-dependent DNA damage response. Finally, I will discuss the potential implications of a haploinsufficiency-induced defective DNA damage response for the clinical management of certain human genomic disorders. PMID:19440510

  10. Polycomb protein EZH2 regulates cancer cell fate decision in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z; Lee, S T; Qiao, Y; Li, Z; Lee, P L; Lee, Y J; Jiang, X; Tan, J; Aau, M; Lim, C Z H; Yu, Q

    2011-11-01

    Polycomb protein histone methyltransferase enhancer of Zeste homologe 2 (EZH2) is frequently overexpressed in human malignancy and is implicated in cancer cell proliferation and invasion. However, it is largely unknown whether EZH2 has a role in modulating DNA damage response. Here, we show that EZH2 is an important determinant of cell fate decision in response to genotoxic stress. EZH2 depletion results in abrogation of both cell cycle G1 and G2/M checkpoints, directing DNA damage response toward predominant apoptosis in both p53-proficient and p53-deficient cancer cells, but not in normal cells. Mechanistically, EZH2 regulates DNA damage response in p53 wild-type cells mainly through transcriptional repression of FBXO32, which binds to and directs p21 for proteasome-mediated degradation, whereas it affects p53-deficient cells through regulating Chk1 activation by a distinct mechanism. Furthermore, pharmacological depletion of EZH2 phenocopies the effects of EZH2 knockdown on cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis. These data unravel a crucial role of EZH2 in determining the cancer cell outcome following DNA damage and suggest that therapeutic targeting oncogenic EZH2 might serve as a strategy for improving conventional chemotherapy in a given malignancy.

  11. Bidirectional coupling of splicing and ATM signaling in response to transcription-blocking DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Tresini, Maria; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In response to DNA damage cells activate intricate protein networks to ensure genomic fidelity and tissue homeostasis. DNA damage response signaling pathways coordinate these networks and determine cellular fates, in part, by modulating RNA metabolism. Here we discuss a replication-independent pathway activated by transcription-blocking DNA lesions, which utilizes the ATM signaling kinase to regulate spliceosome function in a reciprocal manner. We present a model according to which, displacement of co-transcriptional spliceosomes from lesion-arrested RNA polymerases, culminates in R-loop formation and non-canonical ATM activation. ATM signals in a feed-forward fashion to further impede spliceosome organization and regulates UV-induced gene expression and alternative splicing genome-wide. This reciprocal coupling between ATM and the spliceosome highlights the importance of ATM signaling in the cellular response to transcription-blocking lesions and supports a key role of the splicing machinery in this process. PMID:26913497

  12. The Actin Depolymerizing Factor (ADF)/Cofilin Signaling Pathway and DNA Damage Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family is essential for actin dynamics, cell division, chemotaxis and tumor metastasis. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is a primary non-muscle isoform of the ADF/cofilin protein family accelerating the actin filamental turnover in vitro and in vivo. In response to environmental stimulation, CFL-1 enters the nucleus to regulate the actin dynamics. Although the purpose of this cytoplasm-nucleus transition remains unclear, it is speculated that the interaction between CFL-1 and DNA may influence various biological responses, including DNA damage repair. In this review, we will discuss the possible involvement of CFL-1 in DNA damage responses (DDR) induced by ionizing radiation (IR), and the implications for cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25689427

  13. The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin signaling pathway and DNA damage responses in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-02-13

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family is essential for actin dynamics, cell division, chemotaxis and tumor metastasis. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is a primary non-muscle isoform of the ADF/cofilin protein family accelerating the actin filamental turnover in vitro and in vivo. In response to environmental stimulation, CFL-1 enters the nucleus to regulate the actin dynamics. Although the purpose of this cytoplasm-nucleus transition remains unclear, it is speculated that the interaction between CFL-1 and DNA may influence various biological responses, including DNA damage repair. In this review, we will discuss the possible involvement of CFL-1 in DNA damage responses (DDR) induced by ionizing radiation (IR), and the implications for cancer radiotherapy.

  14. Emerging roles of Jab1/CSN5 in DNA damage response, DNA repair, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunbao; Yang, Huiling; Claret, Francois X

    2014-03-01

    Jab1/CSN5 is a multifunctional protein that plays an important role in integrin signaling, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the regulation of genomic instability and DNA repair. Dysregulation of Jab1/CSN5 activity has been shown to contribute to oncogenesis by functionally inactivating several key negative regulatory proteins and tumor suppressors. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the relationship between Jab1/CSN5 and DNA damage and summarize recent findings regarding opportunities for and challenges to therapeutic intervention.

  15. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H; Engelward, Bevin P; Heinen, Christopher D; Johnson, George E; Clewell, Rebecca A; Carmichael, Paul L; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance of a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Johnson, George E.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  17. Inhibiting the DNA damage response as a therapeutic manoeuvre in cancer.

    PubMed

    Curtin, N J

    2013-08-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR), consisting of an orchestrated network of proteins effecting repair and signalling to cell cycle arrest, to allow time to repair, is essential for cell viability and to prevent DNA damage being passed on to daughter cells. The DDR is dysregulated in cancer with some pathways up-regulated and others down-regulated or lost. Up-regulated pathways can confer resistance to anti-cancer DNA damaging agents. Therefore, inhibitors of key components of these pathways have the potential to prevent this therapeutic resistance. Conversely, defects in a particular DDR pathway may lead to dependence on a complementary pathway. Inhibition of this complementary pathway may result in tumour-specific cell killing. Thus, inhibitors of the DDR have the potential to increase the efficacy of DNA damaging chemotherapy and radiotherapy and have single-agent activity against tumours with a specific DDR defect. This review describes the compounds that have been designed to inhibit specific DDR targets and summarizes the pre-clinical and clinical evaluation of these inhibitors of DNA damage signalling and repair. This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Alcohol metabolism in human cells causes DNA damage and activates the Fanconi anemia – breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Jessy; Balbo, Silvia; Crabb, David; Brooks, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently reported that exposure of human cells in vitro to acetaldehyde resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia-breast cancer associated (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network. Methods To determine whether intracellular generation of acetaldehyde from ethanol metabolism can cause DNA damage and activate the FA-BRCA network, we engineered HeLa cells to metabolize alcohol by expression of human alcohol dehydrogenase 1B. Results Incubation of HeLa-ADH1B cells with ethanol (20 mM) resulted in acetaldehyde accumulation in the media which was prevented by co-incubation with 4-methyl pyrazole (4-MP), a specific inhibitor of ADH. Ethanol treatment of HeLa-ADH1B cells produced a 4-fold increase in the acetaldehyde-DNA adduct, N2-ethylidene-dGuo, and also resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia -breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network, as indicated by a monoubiquitination of FANCD2, and phosphorylation of BRCA1. Ser 1524 was identified as one site of BRCA1 phosphorylation. The increased levels of DNA adducts, FANCD2 monoubiquitination, and BRCA1 phosphorylation were all blocked by 4-MP, indicating that acetaldehyde, rather than ethanol itself, was responsible for all three responses. Importantly, the ethanol concentration we used is within the range that can be attained in the human body during social drinking. Conclusions Our results indicate that intracellular metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde results in DNA damage which activates the FA-BRCA DNA damage response network. PMID:21919919

  19. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Inês G.; Giess, Adam; Paschalaki, Koralia; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lidington, Elaine C.; Mason, Justin C.; Jones, Michael D.; Game, Laurence; Ali, Simak; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous reports from patients able to report vascular sequelae in real time, and recognition that serum non transferrin bound iron may reach or exceed 10μmol/L in the blood stream after iron tablets or infusions, led us to hypothesize that conventional iron treatments may provoke acute vascular injury. This prompted us to examine whether a phenotype could be observed in normal human endothelial cells treated with low dose iron. Methodology Confluent primary human endothelial cells (EC) were treated with filter-sterilized iron (II) citrate or fresh media for RNA sequencing and validation studies. RNA transcript profiles were evaluated using directional RNA sequencing with no pre-specification of target sequences. Alignments were counted for exons and junctions of the gene strand only, blinded to treatment types. Principal Findings Rapid changes in RNA transcript profiles were observed in endothelial cells treated with 10μmol/L iron (II) citrate, compared to media-treated cells. Clustering for Gene Ontology (GO) performed on all differentially expressed genes revealed significant differences in biological process terms between iron and media-treated EC, whereas 10 sets of an equivalent number of randomly selected genes from the respective EC gene datasets showed no significant differences in any GO terms. After 1 hour, differentially expressed genes clustered to vesicle mediated transport, protein catabolism, and cell cycle (Benjamini p = 0.0016, 0.0024 and 0.0032 respectively), and by 6 hours, to cellular response to DNA damage stimulus most significantly through DNA repair genes FANCG, BLM, and H2AFX. Comet assays demonstrated that 10μM iron treatment elicited DNA damage within 1 hour. This was accompanied by a brisk DNA damage response pulse, as ascertained by the development of DNA damage response (DDR) foci, and p53 stabilization. Significance These data suggest that low dose iron treatments are sufficient to modify the vascular endothelium

  20. SGO1 is involved in the DNA damage response in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Ikeda, Haruna; Yamagishi, Ryota; Inayoshi, Mao; Inagaki, Shiho; Kishida, Satoshi; Komata, Yosuke; Jan Koster, J K; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Kondo, Yutaka; Maeda, Tohru; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Shugoshin 1 (SGO1) is required for accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis; however, its other functions, especially at interphase, are not clearly understood. Here, we found that downregulation of SGO1 caused a synergistic phenotype in cells overexpressing MYCN. Downregulation of SGO1 impaired proliferation and induced DNA damage followed by a senescence-like phenotype only in MYCN-overexpressing neuroblastoma cells. In these cells, SGO1 knockdown induced DNA damage, even during interphase, and this effect was independent of cohesin. Furthermore, MYCN-promoted SGO1 transcription and SGO1 expression tended to be higher in MYCN- or MYC-overexpressing cancers. Together, these findings indicate that SGO1 plays a role in the DNA damage response in interphase. Therefore, we propose that SGO1 represents a potential molecular target for treatment of MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma. PMID:27539729

  1. DNA damage and the bystander response in tumor and normal cells exposed to X-rays.

    PubMed

    Subhashree, M; Venkateswarlu, R; Karthik, K; Shangamithra, V; Venkatachalam, P

    2017-09-01

    Monolayer and suspension cultures of tumor (BMG-1, CCRF-CEM), normal (AG1522, HADF, lymphocytes) and ATM-mutant (GM4405) human cells were exposed to X-rays at doses used in radiotherapy (high dose and high dose-rate) or radiological imaging (low dose and low dose-rate). Radiation-induced DNA damage, its persistence, and possible bystander effects were evaluated, based on DNA damage markers (γ-H2AX, p53(ser15)) and cell-cycle-specific cyclins (cyclin B1 and cyclin D1). Dose-dependent DNA damage and a dose-independent bystander response were seen after exposure to high dose and high dose-rate radiation. The level of induced damage (expression of p53(ser15), γ-H2AX) depended on ATM status. However, low dose and dose-rate exposures neither increased expression of marker proteins nor induced a bystander response, except in the CCRF-CEM cells. Bystander effects after high-dose irradiation may contribute to stochastic and deterministic effects. Precautions to protect unexposed regions or to inhibit transmission of DNA damage signaling might reduce radiation risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. What Combined Measurements From Structures and Imaging Tell Us About DNA Damage Responses

    PubMed Central

    Brosey, Chris A.; Ahmed, Zamal; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Tainer, John A.

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage outcomes depend upon the efficiency and fidelity of DNA damage responses (DDRs) for different cells and damage. As such, DDRs represent tightly regulated prototypical systems for linking nanoscale biomolecular structure and assembly to the biology of genomic regulation and cell signaling. However, the dynamic and multifunctional nature of DDR assemblies can render elusive the correlation between the structures of DDR factors and specific biological disruptions to the DDR when these structures are altered. In this chapter, we discuss concepts and strategies for combining structural, biophysical, and imaging techniques to investigate DDR recognition and regulation, and thus bridge sequence-level structural biochemistry to quantitative biological outcomes visualized in cells. We focus on representative DDR responses from PARP/PARG/AIF damage signaling in DNA single-strand break repair and nonhomologous end joining complexes in double-strand break repair. Methods with exemplary experimental results are considered with a focus on strategies for probing flexibility, conformational changes, and assembly processes that shape a predictive understanding of DDR mechanisms in a cellular context. Integration of structural and imaging measurements promises to provide foundational knowledge to rationally control and optimize DNA damage outcomes for synthetic lethality and for immune activation with resulting insights for biology and cancer interventions. PMID:28668129

  3. Initiation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response through the base excision repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Cheng; Hu, Ling-Yueh; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2015-08-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated by various genotoxic stresses. Base lesions, which are structurally simple and predominantly fixed by base excision repair (BER), can trigger the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) pathway, a DDR component. How these lesions trigger DDR remains unclear. Here we show that, for alkylation damage, methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, both of which function early in BER, are required for ATM-Chk2-dependent DDR. In addition, other DNA glycosylases, including uracil-DNA glycosylase and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, which are involved in repairing deaminated bases and oxidative damage, also induced DDR. The early steps of BER therefore play a vital role in modulating the ATM-Chk2 DDR in response to base lesions, facilitating downstream BER processing for repair, in which the formation of a single-strand break was shown to play a critical role. Moreover, MPG knockdown rescued cell lethality, its overexpression led to cell death triggered by DNA damage and, more interestingly, higher MPG expression in breast and ovarian cancers corresponded with a greater probability of relapse-free survival after chemotherapy, underscoring the importance of glycosylase-dependent DDR. This study highlights the crosstalk between BER and DDR that contributes to maintaining genomic integrity and may have clinical applications in cancer therapy.

  4. Controlling the response to DNA damage by the APC/C-Cdh1.

    PubMed

    de Boer, H Rudolf; Guerrero Llobet, S; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-03-01

    Proper cell cycle progression is safeguarded by the oscillating activities of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. An important player in the regulation of mitotic cyclins is the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase. Prior to entry into mitosis, the APC/C remains inactive, which allows the accumulation of mitotic regulators. APC/C activation requires binding to either the Cdc20 or Cdh1 adaptor protein, which sequentially bind the APC/C and facilitate targeting of multiple mitotic regulators for proteasomal destruction, including Securin and Cyclin B, to ensure proper chromosome segregation and mitotic exit. Emerging data have indicated that the APC/C, particularly in association with Cdh1, also functions prior to mitotic entry. Specifically, the APC/C-Cdh1 is activated in response to DNA damage in G2 phase cells. These observations are in line with in vitro and in vivo genetic studies, in which cells lacking Cdh1 expression display various defects, including impaired DNA repair and aberrant cell cycle checkpoints. In this review, we summarize the current literature on APC/C regulation in response to DNA damage, the functions of APC/C-Cdh1 activation upon DNA damage, and speculate how APC/C-Cdh1 can control cell fate in the context of persistent DNA damage.

  5. Filia is an ESC-specific regulator of DNA damage response and safeguards genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Wei-dao; Duan, Ying-liang; Lu, Yong-qing; Cun, Yi-xian; Li, Chao-hui; Guo, Kun; Nie, Wen-hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Rugang; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in cell-based therapy, but the genomic instability seen in culture hampers full application. Greater understanding of the factors that regulate genomic stability in PSCs could help address this issue. Here we describe the identification of Filia as a specific regulator of genomic stability in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Filia expression is induced by genotoxic stress. Filia promotes centrosome integrity and regulates DNA damage response (DDR) through multiple pathways, including DDR signaling, cell cycle checkpoints and damage repair, ESC differentiation and apoptosis. Filia depletion causes ESC genomic instability, induces resistance to apoptosis and promotes malignant transformation. As part of its role in the DDR, Filia interacts with PARP1 and stimulates its enzymatic activity. Filia also constitutively resides on centrosomes and translocates to DNA damage sites and mitochondria, consistent with its multifaceted roles in regulating centrosome integrity, damage repair and apoptosis. PMID:25936915

  6. S1219 residue of 53BP1 is phosphorylated by ATM kinase upon DNA damage and required for proper execution of DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haemi; Kwak, Hee-Jin; Cho, Il-taeg; Park, Seok Hee; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2009-01-02

    53BP1 is phosphorylated by the protein kinase ATM upon DNA damage. Even though several ATM phosphorylation sites in 53BP1 have been reported, those sites have little functional implications in the DNA damage response. Here, we show that ATM phosphorylates the S1219 residue of 53BP1 in vitro and that the residue is phosphorylated in cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Transfection with siRNA targeting ATM abolished IR-induced phosphorylation at this residue, supporting the theory that this process is mediated by the kinase. To determine the functional relevance of this phosphorylation event, a U2OS cell line expressing S1219A mutant 53BP1 was established. IR-induced foci formation of MDC1 and {gamma}H2AX, DNA damage signaling molecules, was reduced in this cell line, implying that S1219 phosphorylation is required for recruitment of these molecules to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, overexpression of the mutant protein impeded IR-induced G2 arrest. In conclusion, we have shown that S1219 phosphorylation by ATM is required for proper execution of DNA damage response.

  7. S1219 residue of 53BP1 is phosphorylated by ATM kinase upon DNA damage and required for proper execution of DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haemi; Kwak, Hee-Jin; Cho, Il-taeg; Park, Seok Hee; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2009-01-02

    53BP1 is phosphorylated by the protein kinase ATM upon DNA damage. Even though several ATM phosphorylation sites in 53BP1 have been reported, those sites have little functional implications in the DNA damage response. Here, we show that ATM phosphorylates the S1219 residue of 53BP1 in vitro and that the residue is phosphorylated in cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Transfection with siRNA targeting ATM abolished IR-induced phosphorylation at this residue, supporting the theory that this process is mediated by the kinase. To determine the functional relevance of this phosphorylation event, a U2OS cell line expressing S1219A mutant 53BP1 was established. IR-induced foci formation of MDC1 and gammaH2AX, DNA damage signaling molecules, was reduced in this cell line, implying that S1219 phosphorylation is required for recruitment of these molecules to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, overexpression of the mutant protein impeded IR-induced G2 arrest. In conclusion, we have shown that S1219 phosphorylation by ATM is required for proper execution of DNA damage response.

  8. Elements that Regulate the DNA Damage Response of Proteins Defective in Cockayne Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a premature aging disorder characterized by developmental defects, multisystem progressive degeneration, and sensitivity to ultraviolet light. CS is divided into two primary complementation groups, A and B, with the CSA and CSB proteins presumably functioning in DNA repair and transcription. Using laser microirradiation and confocal microscopy, we characterized the nature and regulation of the CS protein response to oxidative DNA damage, double-strand breaks (DSBs), angelicin monoadducts, and trioxsalen interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Our data indicate that CSB recruitment is influenced by the type of DNA damage, and is most rapid and robust as follows: ICLs > DSBs > monoadducts > oxidative lesions. Transcription inhibition reduced accumulation of CSB at sites of monoadducts and ICLs, but did not affect recruitment to (although slightly affected retention at) oxidative damage. Inhibition of histone deacetylation altered the dynamics of CSB assembly, suggesting a role for chromatin status in the response to DNA damage, whereas the proteasome inhibitor MG132 had no effect. The C-terminus of CSB, and in particular its ubiquitin-binding domain, were critical to recruitment, while the N-terminus and a functional ATPase domain played a minor role at best in facilitating protein accumulation. Although the absence of CSA had no effect on CSB recruitment, CSA itself localized at sites of ICLs, DSBs and monoadducts, but not oxidative lesions. Our results reveal molecular components of the CS protein response and point to a major involvement of complex lesions in the pathology of CS. PMID:26616585

  9. Elements That Regulate the DNA Damage Response of Proteins Defective in Cockayne Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M

    2016-01-16

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a premature aging disorder characterized by developmental defects, multisystem progressive degeneration and sensitivity to ultraviolet light. CS is divided into two primary complementation groups, A and B, with the CSA and CSB proteins presumably functioning in DNA repair and transcription. Using laser microirradiation and confocal microscopy, we characterized the nature and regulation of the CS protein response to oxidative DNA damage, double-strand breaks (DSBs), angelicin monoadducts and trioxsalen interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Our data indicate that CSB recruitment is influenced by the type of DNA damage and is most rapid and robust as follows: ICLs>DSBs>monoadducts>oxidative lesions. Transcription inhibition reduced accumulation of CSB at sites of monoadducts and ICLs, but it did not affect recruitment to (although slightly affected retention at) oxidative damage. Inhibition of histone deacetylation altered the dynamics of CSB assembly, suggesting a role for chromatin status in the response to DNA damage, whereas the proteasome inhibitor MG132 had no effect. The C-terminus of CSB and, in particular, its ubiquitin-binding domain were critical to recruitment, while the N-terminus and a functional ATPase domain played a minor role at best in facilitating protein accumulation. Although the absence of CSA had no effect on CSB recruitment, CSA itself localized at sites of ICLs, DSBs and monoadducts but not at oxidative lesions. Our results reveal molecular components of the CS protein response and point to a major involvement of complex lesions in the pathology of CS. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. At the Bench: Helicobacter pylori, dysregulated host responses, DNA damage, and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardbower, Dana M.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Given that ∼50% of the global population is infected with this pathogen, there is great impetus to elucidate underlying causes that mediate progression from infection to cancer. Recent evidence suggests that H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation and oxidative stress create an environment conducive to DNA damage and tissue injury. DNA damage leads to genetic instability and eventually, neoplastic transformation. Pathogen-encoded virulence factors induce a robust but futile immune response and alter host pathways that lower the threshold for carcinogenesis, including DNA damage repair, polyamine synthesis and catabolism, antioxidant responses, and cytokine production. Collectively, such dysregulation creates a protumorigenic microenvironment within the stomach. This review seeks to address each of these aspects of H. pylori infection and to call attention to areas of particular interest within this field of research. This review also seeks to prioritize areas of translational research related to H. pylori-induced gastric cancer based on insights garnered from basic research in this field. See related review by Dalal and Moss, At the Bedside: H. pylori, dysregulated host responses, DNA damage, and gastric cancer. PMID:24868089

  11. Genomic instability and DNA damage responses in progeria arising from defective maturation of prelamin A.

    PubMed

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    Progeria syndromes have in common a premature aging phenotype and increased genome instability. The susceptibility to DNA damage arises from a compromised repair system, either in the repair proteins themselves or in the DNA damage response pathways. The most severe progerias stem from mutations affecting lamin A production, a filamentous protein of the nuclear lamina. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) patients are heterozygous for aLMNA gene mutation while Restrictive Dermopathy (RD) individuals have a homozygous deficiency in the processing protease Zmpste24. These mutations generate the mutant lamin A proteins progerin and FC-lamina A, respectively, which cause nuclear deformations and chromatin perturbations. Genome instability is observed even though genome maintenance and repair genes appear normal. The unresolved question is what features of the DNA damage response pathways are deficient in HGPS and RD cells. Here we review and discuss recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how the accumulation of progerin/FC-lamin A proteins may disrupt DNA damage response pathways in HGPS and RD cells. As the mutant lamin proteins accumulate they sequester replication and repair factors, leading to stalled replication forks which collapse into DNA double-strand beaks (DSBs). In a reaction unique to HGPS and RD cells these accessible DSB termini bind Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein which excludes normal binding by DNA DSB repair proteins. The bound XPA also signals activation of ATM and ATR, arresting cell cycle progression, leading to arrested growth. In addition, the effective sequestration of XPA at these DSB damage sites makes HGPS and RD cells more sensitive to ultraviolet light and other mutagens normally repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway of which XPA is a necessary and specific component.

  12. Immune and inflammatory responses to DNA damage in cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Soria-Valles, Clara; López-Soto, Alejandro; Osorio, Fernando G; López-Otín, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Genome instability is a hallmark of both cancer and aging processes. Beyond cell-autonomous responses, it is known that DNA damage also elicits systemic mechanisms aimed at favoring survival and damaged cells clearance. Among these mechanisms, immune activation and NF-κB-mediated inflammation play central roles in organismal control of DNA damage. We focus herein on the different experimental evidences that have allowed gaining mechanistic insight about this relationship. We also describe the functional consequences of defective immune function in cancer development and age-related alterations. Finally, we discuss different intervention strategies based on enhancing immunity or on the modulation of the inflammatory response to improve organism homeostasis in cancer and aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways in response to nitrogen mustard-induced DNA damage and toxicity in skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Swetha; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a structural analog of chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM), forms adducts and crosslinks with DNA, RNA and proteins. Here we studied the mechanism of NM-induced skin toxicity in response to double strand breaks (DSBs) resulting in cell cycle arrest to facilitate DNA repair, as a model for developing countermeasures against vesicant-induced skin injuries. NM exposure of mouse epidermal JB6 cells decreased cell growth and caused S-phase arrest. Consistent with these biological outcomes, NM exposure also increased comet tail extent moment and the levels of DNA DSB repair molecules phospho H2A.X Ser139 and p53 Ser15 indicating NM-induced DNA DSBs. Since DNA DSB repair occurs via non homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) or homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways, next we studied these two pathways and noted their activation as defined by an increase in phospho- and total DNA-PK levels, and the formation of Rad51 foci, respectively. To further analyze the role of these pathways in the cellular response to NM-induced cytotoxicity, NHEJ and HRR were inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 and Rad51 inhibitor BO2, respectively. Inhibition of NHEJ did not sensitize cells to NM-induced decrease in cell growth and cell cycle arrest. However, inhibition of the HRR pathway caused a significant increase in cell death, and prolonged G2M arrest following NM exposure. Together, our findings, indicating that HRR is the key pathway involved in the repair of NM-induced DNA DSBs, could be useful in developing new therapeutic strategies against vesicant-induced skin injury.

  14. FAAP100 is essential for activation of the Fanconi anemia-associated DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Ishiai, Masamichi; Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Medhurst, Annette L; Neveling, Kornelia; Kalb, Reinhard; Yan, Zhijiang; Xue, Yutong; Oostra, Anneke B; Auerbach, Arleen D; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Schindler, Detlev; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Takata, Minoru; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Wang, Weidong

    2007-04-18

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex plays a central role in the DNA damage response network involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2. The complex consists of eight FA proteins, including a ubiquitin ligase (FANCL) and a DNA translocase (FANCM), and is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage. Here, we report a novel component of this complex, termed FAAP100, which is essential for the stability of the core complex and directly interacts with FANCB and FANCL to form a stable subcomplex. Formation of this subcomplex protects each component from proteolytic degradation and also allows their coregulation by FANCA and FANCM during nuclear localization. Using siRNA depletion and gene knockout techniques, we show that FAAP100-deficient cells display hallmark features of FA cells, including defective FANCD2 monoubiquitination, hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, and genomic instability. Our study identifies FAAP100 as a new critical component of the FA-BRCA DNA damage response network.

  15. Targeting the epigenetics of the DNA damage response in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, M F; González-Guerrero, R; Sánchez-del-Campo, L; Piñero-Madrona, A; Cabezas-Herrera, J; Rodríguez-López, J N

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is as much an epigenetic disease as it is a genetic disease, and epigenetic alterations in cancer often serve as potent surrogates for genetic mutations. Because the epigenetic factors involved in the DNA damage response are regulated by multiple elements, therapies to target specific components of the epigenetic machinery can be inefficient. In contrast, therapies aimed at inhibiting the methionine cycle can indirectly inhibit both DNA and protein methylation, and the wide variety of genes and pathways that are affected by these methylations make this global strategy very attractive. In the present study, we propose an adjuvant therapy that targets the epigenetics of the DNA damage response in breast cancer cells and that results in efficient apoptosis and a reduction in distant metastases in vivo. We observed that a combined therapy designed to uncouple adenosine metabolism using dipyridamole in the presence of a new synthetic antifolate, 3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)-(−)-catechin, simultaneously and efficiently blocked both the folic cycle and the methionine cycle in breast cancer cells and sensitized these cells to radiotherapy. The treatment impeded the recruitment of 53BP1 and BRCA1 to the chromatin regions flanking DNA double-strand breaks and thereby avoided the DNA damage responses in breast cancer cells that were exposed to ionizing radiation. In addition, this hypomethylating therapy was also efficient in reducing the self-renewal capability of breast cancer-initiating cells and induced reversion of mesenchymal phenotypes in breast cancer cells. PMID:27054335

  16. A stress response pathway regulates DNA damage through β2-adrenoreceptors and β-arrestin-1.

    PubMed

    Hara, Makoto R; Kovacs, Jeffrey J; Whalen, Erin J; Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Strachan, Ryan T; Grant, Wayne; Towers, Aaron J; Williams, Barbara; Lam, Christopher M; Xiao, Kunhong; Shenoy, Sudha K; Gregory, Simon G; Ahn, Seungkirl; Duckett, Derek R; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2011-08-21

    The human mind and body respond to stress, a state of perceived threat to homeostasis, by activating the sympathetic nervous system and secreting the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline in the 'fight-or-flight' response. The stress response is generally transient because its accompanying effects (for example, immunosuppression, growth inhibition and enhanced catabolism) can be harmful in the long term. When chronic, the stress response can be associated with disease symptoms such as peptic ulcers or cardiovascular disorders, and epidemiological studies strongly indicate that chronic stress leads to DNA damage. This stress-induced DNA damage may promote ageing, tumorigenesis, neuropsychiatric conditions and miscarriages. However, the mechanisms by which these DNA-damage events occur in response to stress are unknown. The stress hormone adrenaline stimulates β(2)-adrenoreceptors that are expressed throughout the body, including in germline cells and zygotic embryos. Activated β(2)-adrenoreceptors promote Gs-protein-dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA), followed by the recruitment of β-arrestins, which desensitize G-protein signalling and function as signal transducers in their own right. Here we elucidate a molecular mechanism by which β-adrenergic catecholamines, acting through both Gs-PKA and β-arrestin-mediated signalling pathways, trigger DNA damage and suppress p53 levels respectively, thus synergistically leading to the accumulation of DNA damage. In mice and in human cell lines, β-arrestin-1 (ARRB1), activated via β(2)-adrenoreceptors, facilitates AKT-mediated activation of MDM2 and also promotes MDM2 binding to, and degradation of, p53, by acting as a molecular scaffold. Catecholamine-induced DNA damage is abrogated in Arrb1-knockout (Arrb1(-/-)) mice, which show preserved p53 levels in both the thymus, an organ that responds prominently to acute or chronic stress, and in the testes, in which paternal stress may affect the offspring

  17. A stress response pathway regulates DNA damage through β2-adrenoreceptors and β-arrestin-1

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Makoto R.; Kovacs, Jeffrey J.; Whalen, Erin J.; Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Strachan, Ryan T.; Grant, Wayne; Towers, Aaron J.; Williams, Barbara; Lam, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kunhong; Shenoy, Sudha K.; Gregory, Simon G.; Ahn, Seungkirl; Duckett, Derek R.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The human mind and body respond to stress1, a state of perceived threat to homeostasis, by activating the sympathetic nervous system and secreting the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline in the ‘fight-or-flight’ response. The stress response is generally transient because its accompanying effects (for example, immunosuppression, growth inhibition and enhanced catabolism) can be harmful in the long term2. When chronic, the stress response can be associated with disease symptoms such as peptic ulcers or cardiovascular disorders3, and epidemiological studies strongly indicate that chronic stress leads to DNA damage4,5. This stress-induced DNA damage may promote ageing6, tumorigenesis4,7, neuropsychiatric conditions8,9 and miscarriages10. However, the mechanisms by which these DNA-damage events occur in response to stress are unknown. The stress hormone adrenaline stimulates β2-adrenoreceptors that are expressed throughout the body, including in germline cells and zygotic embryos11. Activated β2-adrenoreceptors promote Gs-protein-dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA), followed by the recruitment of β-arrestins, which desensitize G-protein signalling and function as signal transducers in their own right12. Here we elucidate a molecular mechanism by which β-adrenergic catecholamines, acting through both Gs-PKA and β-arrestin-mediated signalling pathways, trigger DNA damage and suppress p53 levels respectively, thus synergistically leading to the accumulation of DNA damage. In mice and in human cell lines, β-arrestin-1 (ARRB1), activated via β2-adrenoreceptors, facilitates AKT-mediated activation of MDM2 and also promotes MDM2 binding to, and degradation of, p53, by acting as a molecular scaffold. Catecholamine-induced DNA damage is abrogated in Arrb1-knockout (Arrb1−/−) mice, which show pre served p53 levels in both the thymus, an organ that responds prominently to acute or chronic stress1, and in the testes, in which paternal stress may

  18. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRA per se (KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  19. SOG1: a master regulator of the DNA damage response in plants.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama, Kaoru Okamoto

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a critical mechanism to maintain the genome stability of an organism upon exposure to endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors. The DDR system is particularly important for plants as these organisms, owing to their intrinsic immobility, are inevitably exposed to environmental stress factors, some of which induce DNA damage. Arabidopsis thaliana has orthologs of several DDR factors that are present in animals; however, some of the important animal regulators, such as the tumor suppressor p53 and the DDR kinases CHK1 and CHK2, have not been found in plants. These observations imply a unique DDR system in plants. The present review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the DDR in A. thaliana and, in particular, on the function and role of SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 (SOG1), a plant-specific transcription factor that regulates the DDR. The most obvious response to DNA damage in A. thaliana is a rapid and robust change in the transcriptional regulation of numerous genes, in which SOG1 is an essential regulatory factor. Mutation of SOG1 causes various defects in the activation of cell cycle arrest, programmed cell death, and endoreduplication in response to DNA damage. These observations indicate that SOG1 is a master regulator of the DDR. Phylogenetic analyses of SOG1 reveal that orthologs of this crucial transcription factor are present not only in angiosperms but also in gymnosperms, suggesting that the SOG1 system is conserved across spermatophytes. Finally, future prospects for SOG1 research are also discussed.

  20. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  1. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  2. Structure analysis of FAAP24 reveals single-stranded DNA-binding activity and domain functions in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yucai; Han, Xiao; Wu, Fangming; Leung, Justin W; Lowery, Megan G; Do, Huong; Chen, Junjie; Shi, Chaowei; Tian, Changlin; Li, Lei; Gong, Weimin

    2013-01-01

    The FANCM/FAAP24 heterodimer has distinct functions in protecting cells from complex DNA lesions such as interstrand crosslinks. These functions rely on the biochemical activity of FANCM/FAAP24 to recognize and bind to damaged DNA or stalled replication forks. However, the DNA-binding activity of this complex was not clearly defined. We investigated how FAAP24 contributes to the DNA-interacting functions of the FANCM/FAAP24 complex by acquiring the N-terminal and C-terminal solution structures of human FAAP24. Modeling of the FAAP24 structure indicates that FAAP24 may possess a high affinity toward single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Testing of various FAAP24 mutations in vitro and in vivo validated this prediction derived from structural analyses. We found that the DNA-binding and FANCM-interacting functions of FAAP24, although both require the C-terminal (HhH)2 domain, can be distinguished by segregation-of-function mutations. These results demonstrate dual roles of FAAP24 in DNA damage response against crosslinking lesions, one through the formation of FANCM/FAAP24 heterodimer and the other via its ssDNA-binding activity required in optimized checkpoint activation. PMID:23999858

  3. Predicted Role of NAD Utilization in the Control of Circadian Rhythms during DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Augustin; McFadden, Geoffrey B.; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Kohn, Kurt W.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a set of regulatory steps that oscillate with a period of approximately 24 hours influencing many biological processes. These oscillations are robust to external stresses, and in the case of genotoxic stress (i.e. DNA damage), the circadian clock responds through phase shifting with primarily phase advancements. The effect of DNA damage on the circadian clock and the mechanism through which this effect operates remains to be thoroughly investigated. Here we build an in silico model to examine damage-induced circadian phase shifts by investigating a possible mechanism linking circadian rhythms to metabolism. The proposed model involves two DNA damage response proteins, SIRT1 and PARP1, that are each consumers of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a metabolite involved in oxidation-reduction reactions and in ATP synthesis. This model builds on two key findings: 1) that SIRT1 (a protein deacetylase) is involved in both the positive (i.e. transcriptional activation) and negative (i.e. transcriptional repression) arms of the circadian regulation and 2) that PARP1 is a major consumer of NAD during the DNA damage response. In our simulations, we observe that increased PARP1 activity may be able to trigger SIRT1-induced circadian phase advancements by decreasing SIRT1 activity through competition for NAD supplies. We show how this competitive inhibition may operate through protein acetylation in conjunction with phosphorylation, consistent with reported observations. These findings suggest a possible mechanism through which multiple perturbations, each dominant during different points of the circadian cycle, may result in the phase advancement of the circadian clock seen during DNA damage. PMID:26020938

  4. ATM-dependent Phosphorylation of the Fanconi Anemia Protein PALB2 Promotes the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yingying; Feng, Wanjuan; Sy, Shirley M H; Huen, Michael S Y

    2015-11-13

    The Fanconi anemia protein PALB2, also known as FANCN, protects genome integrity by regulating DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints. Exactly how PALB2 functions may be temporally coupled with detection and signaling of DNA damage is not known. Intriguingly, we found that PALB2 is transformed into a hyperphosphorylated state in response to ionizing radiation (IR). IR treatment specifically triggered PALB2 phosphorylation at Ser-157 and Ser-376 in manners that required the master DNA damage response kinase Ataxia telangiectasia mutated, revealing potential mechanistic links between PALB2 and the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent DNA damage responses. Consistently, dysregulated PALB2 phosphorylation resulted in sustained activation of DDRs. Full-blown PALB2 phosphorylation also required the breast and ovarian susceptible gene product BRCA1, highlighting important roles of the BRCA1-PALB2 interaction in orchestrating cellular responses to genotoxic stress. In summary, our phosphorylation analysis of tumor suppressor protein PALB2 uncovers new layers of regulatory mechanisms in the maintenance of genome stability and tumor suppression. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Differential chromatin proteomics of the MMS-induced DNA damage response in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein enrichment by sub-cellular fractionation was combined with differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (DIGE) to address the detection of the low abundance chromatin proteins in the budding yeast proteome. Comparisons of whole-cell extracts and chromatin fractions were used to provide a measure of the degree of chromatin association for individual proteins, which could be compared across sample treatments. The method was applied to analyze the effect of the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) on levels of chromatin-associated proteins. Results Up-regulation of several previously characterized DNA damage checkpoint-regulated proteins, such as Rnr4, Rpa1 and Rpa2, was observed. In addition, several novel DNA damage responsive proteins were identified and assessed for genotoxic sensitivity using either DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) or knockout strains, including Acf2, Arp3, Bmh1, Hsp31, Lsp1, Pst2, Rnr4, Rpa1, Rpa2, Ste4, Ycp4 and Yrb1. A strain in which the expression of the Ran-GTPase binding protein Yrb1 was reduced was found to be hypersensitive to genotoxic stress. Conclusion The described method was effective at unveiling chromatin-associated proteins that are less likely to be detected in the absence of fractionation. Several novel proteins with altered chromatin abundance were identified including Yrb1, pointing to a role for this nuclear import associated protein in DNA damage response. PMID:21967861

  6. A novel role of the chromokinesin Kif4A in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guikai; Zhou, Longen; Khidr, Lily; Guo, Xuning Emily; Kim, Wankee; Lee, Young Mi; Krasieva, Tatiana; Chen, Phang-Lang

    2011-01-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule-motor molecules that possess chromatin binding activity and are important for mitotic and meiotic regulation. The chromokinesin-member Kif4A is unique in that it localizes to nucleus during interphase of the cell cycle. Kif4 deletion by gene targeting in mouse embryonic cells was known to associate with DNA damage response. However, its precise role in DNA damage or repair pathway is not clear. Here we report that Kif4A associates with BRCA2 in a biochemical identification and that the interaction is mediated by the Kif4A C-terminal cargo-binding domain and BRCA2 C-terminal conserved region. Upon nucleus-specific laser micro-irradiation, Kif4A was rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage. Significantly, the depletion of Kif4A from cells by shRNA impaired the ionizing-radiation induced foci (IRIF) formation of Rad51, both quantitatively and qualitatively. In contrast, the IRIF of γ-H2AX or NBS1 was largely intact. Moreover, Kif4A knockdown rendered cells hypersensitive to ionizing radiation in a colonogenic survival assay. We further demonstrated that Kif4A deficiency led to significantly decreased homologous recombination in an I-SceI endonuclease induced in vivo recombination assay. Together, our results suggest a novel role for a chromokinesin family member in the DNA damage response by modulating the BRCA2/Rad51 pathway. PMID:18604178

  7. A novel role of the chromokinesin Kif4A in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guikai; Zhou, Longen; Khidr, Lily; Guo, Xuning Emily; Kim, Wankee; Lee, Young Mi; Krasieva, Tatiana; Chen, Phang-Lang

    2008-07-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule-motor molecules that possess chromatin binding activity and are important for mitotic and meiotic regulation. The chromokinesin-member Kif4A is unique in that it localizes to nucleus during interphase of the cell cycle. Kif4 deletion by gene targeting in mouse embryonic cells was known to associate with DNA damage response. However, its precise role in DNA damage or repair pathway is not clear. Here we report that Kif4A associates with BRCA2 in a biochemical identification and that the interaction is mediated by the Kif4A C-terminal cargo-binding domain and BRCA2 C-terminal conserved region. Upon nucleus-specific laser micro-irradiation, Kif4A was rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage. Significantly, the depletion of Kif4A from cells by shRNA impaired the ionizing-radiation induced foci (IRIF) formation of Rad51, both quantitatively and qualitatively. In contrast, the IRIF of gamma-H2AX or NBS1 was largely intact. Moreover, Kif4A knockdown rendered cells hypersensitive to ionizing radiation in a colonogenic survival assay. We further demonstrated that Kif4A deficiency led to significantly decreased homologous recombination in an I-SceI endonuclease induced in vivo recombination assay. Together, our results suggest a novel role for a chromokinesin family member in the DNA damage response by modulating the BRCA2/Rad51 pathway.

  8. Mechanisms of DNA Damage Response to Targeted Irradiation in Organotypic 3D Skin Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  9. Cell-free Xenopus egg extracts for studying DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed

    Cupello, Steven; Richardson, Christine; Yan, Shan

    2016-01-01

    In response to a variety of DNA replication stress or DNA damaging agents, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are triggered for cells to coordinate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis, and senescence. Cell-free Xenopus egg extracts, derived from the eggs of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), have been widely used for studies concerning DDR pathways. In this review, we focus on how different experimental systems have been established using Xenopus egg extracts to investigate the DDR pathways that are activated in response to DNA replication stress, double-strand breaks (DSBs), inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs), and oxidative stress. We summarize how molecular details of DDR pathways are dissected by the mechanistic studies with Xenopus egg extracts. We also provide an update on the regulation of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases (Pol ĸ and REV1) in the DDR pathways. A better understanding of DDR pathways using Xenopus egg extracts has opened new avenues for future cancer therapeutics. Finally, we offer our perspectives of future directions for studies of DDR pathways with Xenopus egg extracts.

  10. Nucleolar exit of RNF8 and BRCA1 in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Mateo, Francesca; Franke, Kristin; Huen, Michael S.Y.; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S.; Plans, Vanessa; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-11-01

    The induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicits a plethora of responses that redirect many cellular functions to the vital task of repairing the injury, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR). We have found that, in the absence of DNA damage, the DSB repair factors RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus. Shortly after exposure of cells to {gamma}-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci, a traffic that was reverted several hours after the damage. RNF8 interacted through its FHA domain with the ribosomal protein RPSA, and knockdown of RPSA caused a depletion of nucleolar RNF8 and BRCA1, suggesting that the interaction of RNF8 with RPSA is critical for the nucleolar localization of these DDR factors. Knockdown of RPSA or RNF8 impaired bulk protein translation, as did {gamma}-irradiation, the latter being partially countered by overexpression of exogenous RNF8. Our results suggest that RNF8 and BRCA1 are anchored to the nucleolus through reversible interactions with RPSA and that, in addition to its known functions in DDR, RNF8 may play a role in protein synthesis, possibly linking the nucleolar exit of this factor to the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to DNA damage. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus of undamaged cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon {gamma}-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 are translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ribosomal protein RPSA anchors RNF8 to the nucleolus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNF8 may play previously unsuspected roles in protein synthesis.

  11. The Adaptive Significance of Natural Genetic Variation in the DNA Damage Response of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Svetec, Nicolas; Cridland, Julie M.; Zhao, Li; Begun, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of work, our understanding of the distribution of fitness effects of segregating genetic variants in natural populations remains largely incomplete. One form of selection that can maintain genetic variation is spatially varying selection, such as that leading to latitudinal clines. While the introduction of population genomic approaches to understanding spatially varying selection has generated much excitement, little successful effort has been devoted to moving beyond genome scans for selection to experimental analysis of the relevant biology and the development of experimentally motivated hypotheses regarding the agents of selection; it remains an interesting question as to whether the vast majority of population genomic work will lead to satisfying biological insights. Here, motivated by population genomic results, we investigate how spatially varying selection in the genetic model system, Drosophila melanogaster, has led to genetic differences between populations in several components of the DNA damage response. UVB incidence, which is negatively correlated with latitude, is an important agent of DNA damage. We show that sensitivity of early embryos to UVB exposure is strongly correlated with latitude such that low latitude populations show much lower sensitivity to UVB. We then show that lines with lower embryo UVB sensitivity also exhibit increased capacity for repair of damaged sperm DNA by the oocyte. A comparison of the early embryo transcriptome in high and low latitude embryos provides evidence that one mechanism of adaptive DNA repair differences between populations is the greater abundance of DNA repair transcripts in the eggs of low latitude females. Finally, we use population genomic comparisons of high and low latitude samples to reveal evidence that multiple components of the DNA damage response and both coding and non-coding variation likely contribute to adaptive differences in DNA repair between populations. PMID:26950216

  12. Complex interactions between the DNA-damage response and mammalian telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Arnoult, Nausica; Karlseder, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Natural chromosome ends resemble double-stranded DNA breaks, but they do not activate a damage response in healthy cells. Telomeres therefore have evolved to solve the ‘end-protection problem’ by inhibiting multiple DNA damage–response pathways. During the past decade, the view of telomeres has progressed from simple caps that hide chromosome ends to complex machineries that have an active role in organizing the genome. Here we focus on mammalian telomeres and summarize and interpret recent discoveries in detail, focusing on how repair pathways are inhibited, how resection and replication are controlled and how these mechanisms govern cell fate during senescence, crisis and transformation. PMID:26581520

  13. DNA damage response and Ku80 function in the vertebrate embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bladen, Catherine L.; Lam, Wai K.; Dynan, William S.; Kozlowski, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA damage reflect the dynamic integration of cell cycle control, cell–cell interactions and tissue-specific patterns of gene regulation that occurs in vivo but is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Here we describe use of the zebrafish embryo as a model system to identify determinants of the in vivo response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. To demonstrate the utility of the model we cloned and characterized the embryonic function of the XRCC5 gene, which encodes Ku80, an essential component of the nonhomologous end joining pathway of DNA repair. After the onset of zygotic transcription, Ku80 mRNA accumulates in a tissue-specific pattern, which includes proliferative zones of the retina and central nervous system. In the absence of genotoxic stress, zebrafish embryos with reduced Ku80 function develop normally. However, low dose irradiation of these embryos during gastrulation leads to marked apoptosis throughout the developing central nervous system. Apoptosis is p53 dependent, indicating that it is a downstream consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Results suggest that nonhomologous end joining components mediate DNA repair to promote survival of irradiated cells during embryogenesis. PMID:15914672

  14. Combined loss of three DNA damage response pathways renders C. elegans intolerant to light.

    PubMed

    van Bostelen, Ivo; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2017-06-01

    Infliction of DNA damage initiates a complex cellular reaction - the DNA damage response - that involves both signaling and DNA repair networks with many redundancies and parallel pathways. Here, we reveal the three strategies that the simple multicellular eukaryote, C. elegans, uses to deal with DNA damage induced by light. Separately inactivating repair or replicative bypass of photo-lesions results in cellular hypersensitivity towards UV-light, but impeding repair of replication associated DNA breaks does not. Yet, we observe an unprecedented synergistic relationship when these pathways are inactivated in combination. C. elegans mutants that lack nucleotide excision repair (NER), translesion synthesis (TLS) and alternative end joining (altEJ) grow undisturbed in the dark, but become sterile when grown in light. Even exposure to very low levels of normal daylight impedes animal growth. We show that NER and TLS operate to suppress the formation of lethal DNA breaks that require polymerase theta-mediated end joining (TMEJ) for their repair. Our data testifies to the enormous genotoxicity of light and to the demand of multiple layers of protection against an environmental threat that is so common. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA damage responses by human ELG1 in S phase are important to maintain genomic integrity.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Nilabja; Banerjee, Soma; Lee, Kyoo-young; Wincovitch, Stephen; Pak, Evgenia; Nakanishi, Koji; Jasin, Maria; Dutra, Amalia; Myung, Kyungjae

    2009-10-01

    Genomic integrity depends on DNA replication, recombination and repair, particularly in S phase. We demonstrate that a human homologue of yeast Elg1 plays an important role in S phase to preserve genomic stability. The level of ELG1 is induced during recovery from a variety of DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, ELG1 forms distinct foci at stalled DNA replication forks that are different from DNA double strand break foci. Targeted gene knockdown of ELG1 resulted in spontaneous foci formation of gamma-H2AX, 53BP1 and phosphorylated-ATM that mark chromosomal breaks. Abnormal chromosomes including fusions, inversions and hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents were also observed in cells expressing low level of ELG1 by targeted gene knockdown. Knockdown of ELG1 by siRNA reduced homologous recombination frequency in the I-SceI induced double strand break-dependent assay. In contrast, spontaneous homologous recombination frequency and sister chromatin exchange rate were upregulated when ELG1 was silenced by shRNA. Taken together, we propose that ELG1 would be a new member of proteins involved in maintenance of genomic integrity.

  16. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  17. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Dantuma, Nico P.; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process. PMID:27148355

  18. DAF-16/FoxO and EGL-27/GATA promote developmental growth in response to persistent somatic DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Vipin; Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Frommolt, Peter; Williams, Ashley B.; Greiss, Sebastian; Schneider, Jennifer I.; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Genome maintenance defects cause complex disease phenotypes characterized by developmental failure, cancer susceptibility, and premature aging. It remains poorly understood how DNA damage responses function during organismal development and maintain tissue functionality when DNA damage accumulates with aging. Here we show that the FoxO transcription factor DAF-16 is activated in response to DNA damage during development while the DNA damage responsiveness of DAF-16 declines with aging. We find that in contrast to its established role in mediating starvation arrest, DAF-16 alleviates DNA damage-induced developmental arrest and even in the absence of DNA repair promotes developmental growth and enhances somatic tissue functionality. We demonstrate that the GATA transcription factor EGL-27 co-regulates DAF-16 target genes in response to DNA damage and together with DAF-16 promotes developmental growth. We propose that EGL-27/GATA activity specifies DAF-16 mediated DNA damage responses to enable developmental progression and to prolong tissue functioning when DNA damage persists. PMID:25419847

  19. A selective USP1-UAF1 inhibitor links deubiquitination to DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qin; Dexheimer, Thomas S; Zhang, Ping; Rosenthal, Andrew S; Villamil, Mark A; You, Changjun; Zhang, Qiuting; Chen, Junjun; Ott, Christine A; Sun, Hongmao; Luci, Diane K; Yuan, Bifeng; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Xiao, Hui; Wang, Yinsheng; Maloney, David J; Zhuang, Zhihao

    2014-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are central to the control of a large number of cellular pathways and signaling networks in eukaryotes. Although the essential roles of ubiquitination have been established in the eukaryotic DNA damage response, the deubiquitination process remains poorly defined. Chemical probes that perturb the activity of deubiquitinases (DUBs) are needed to characterize the cellular function of deubiquitination. Here we report ML323 (2), a highly potent inhibitor of the USP1-UAF1 deubiquitinase complex with excellent selectivity against human DUBs, deSUMOylase, deneddylase and unrelated proteases. Using ML323, we interrogated deubiquitination in the cellular response to UV- and cisplatin-induced DNA damage and revealed new insights into the requirement of deubiquitination in the DNA translesion synthesis and Fanconi anemia pathways. Moreover, ML323 potentiates cisplatin cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer and osteosarcoma cells. Our findings point to USP1-UAF1 as a key regulator of the DNA damage response and a target for overcoming resistance to the platinum-based anticancer drugs. PMID:24531842

  20. DNA damage in germ cells induces an innate immune response that triggers systemic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Ermolaeva, Maria A; Segref, Alexandra; Dakhovnik, Alexander; Ou, Hui-Ling; Schneider, Jennifer I; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Hoppe, Thorsten; Schumacher, Björn

    2013-09-19

    DNA damage responses have been well characterized with regard to their cell-autonomous checkpoint functions leading to cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. In contrast, systemic responses to tissue-specific genome instability remain poorly understood. In adult Caenorhabditis elegans worms germ cells undergo mitotic and meiotic cell divisions, whereas somatic tissues are entirely post-mitotic. Consequently, DNA damage checkpoints function specifically in the germ line, whereas somatic tissues in adult C. elegans are highly radio-resistant. Some DNA repair systems such as global-genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) remove lesions specifically in germ cells. Here we investigated how genome instability in germ cells affects somatic tissues in C. elegans. We show that exogenous and endogenous DNA damage in germ cells evokes elevated resistance to heat and oxidative stress. The somatic stress resistance is mediated by the ERK MAP kinase MPK-1 in germ cells that triggers the induction of putative secreted peptides associated with innate immunity. The innate immune response leads to activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in somatic tissues, which confers enhanced proteostasis and systemic stress resistance. We propose that elevated systemic stress resistance promotes endurance of somatic tissues to allow delay of progeny production when germ cells are genomically compromised.

  1. Functional Role of NBS1 in Radiation Damage Response and Translesion DNA Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuichiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2015-08-20

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a recessive genetic disorder characterized by increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR) and a high frequency of malignancies. NBS1, a product of the mutated gene in NBS, contains several protein interaction domains in the N-terminus and C-terminus. The C-terminus of NBS1 is essential for interactions with MRE11, a homologous recombination repair nuclease, and ATM, a key player in signal transduction after the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which is induced by IR. Moreover, NBS1 regulates chromatin remodeling during DSB repair by histone H2B ubiquitination through binding to RNF20 at the C-terminus. Thus, NBS1 is considered as the first protein to be recruited to DSB sites, wherein it acts as a sensor or mediator of DSB damage responses. In addition to DSB response, we showed that NBS1 initiates Polη-dependent translesion DNA synthesis by recruiting RAD18 through its binding at the NBS1 C-terminus after UV exposure, and it also functions after the generation of interstrand crosslink DNA damage. Thus, NBS1 has multifunctional roles in response to DNA damage from a variety of genotoxic agents, including IR.

  2. Tof1p regulates DNA damage responses during S phase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Foss, E J

    2001-01-01

    A tof1 mutant was recovered in a screen aimed at identifying genes involved specifically in the S phase branch of the MEC1-dependent DNA damage response pathway. The screen was based on the observation that mutants missing this branch are particularly dependent on the cell cycle-wide branch and, therefore, on RAD9, for surviving DNA damage. tof1 and rad9 conferred synergistic sensitivity to MMS, UV, and HU, and the double mutant was incapable of slowing S phase in response to MMS, inducing RNR3 transcription in response to UV, and phosphorylating Rad53p in response to HU. TOF1's contribution to DNA damage response appeared to be restricted to S phase, since TOF1 did not contribute to UV-induced transcription during G1 or to the cdc13-1-induced block to anaphase in G2/M. I suggest a model in which Tof1p functions to link Mec1p with Rad53p. PMID:11156979

  3. Constant rate of p53 tetramerization in response to DNA damage controls the p53 response

    PubMed Central

    Gaglia, Giorgio; Lahav, Galit

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the tumor suppressor protein p53 have been previously investigated in single cells using fluorescently tagged p53. Such approach reports on the total abundance of p53 but does not provide a measure for functional p53. We used fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) to quantify in single cells the dynamics of p53 tetramers, the functional units of p53. We found that while total p53 increases proportionally to the input strength, p53 tetramers are formed in cells at a constant rate. This breaks the linear input–output relation and dampens the p53 response. Disruption of the p53-binding protein ARC led to a dose-dependent rate of tetramers formation, resulting in enhanced tetramerization and induction of p53 target genes. Our work suggests that constraining the p53 response in face of variable inputs may protect cells from committing to terminal outcomes and highlights the importance of quantifying the active form of signaling molecules in single cells. Quantification of the dynamics of p53 tetramers in single cells using a fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay reveals that, while total p53 increases proportionally to the DNA damage strength, p53 tetramers are formed at a constant rate. PMID:25344068

  4. Alcohol induces DNA damage and the Fanconi anemia D2 protein implicating FANCD2 in the DNA damage response pathways in brain.

    PubMed

    Rulten, S L; Hodder, E; Ripley, T L; Stephens, D N; Mayne, L V

    2008-07-01

    The largest cause of neurological damage to children is prenatal exposure to alcohol and chronic alcohol use in adults is associated with neurodegeneration, dementia and long-term behavioral changes. Microarray analysis identified the DNA damage response (DDR) gene, Fanconi anemia (Fanc) D2, to be robustly upregulated in mouse midbrain following 24-hour in vivo exposure to ethanol. In this study, we investigate the ability of ethanol to generate DNA strand breaks, predicted substrates for the Fanc pathway and the potential role of FANCD2 in the DDR to ethanol in brain. The effect of ethanol on FANCD2 mRNA levels was measured by quantitative real time PCR using mouse brain and human neuronal cells. FANCD2 protein levels and ubiquitination were measured by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. DNA damage induction by ethanol/acetaldehyde was measured using the Comet assay and gamma H2AX immunocytochemistry. Levels of DNA and RNA synthesis were measured in cell strains using (3)H-thymidine or (3)H-uridine up-take. Chronic exposure to ethanol induced FANCD2 in mouse midbrain in vivo and in the nucleus of human neuronal cells in culture. However, there was no concomitant increase in the amount of ubiquitinated FANCD2. Acetaldehyde also induced nonubiquitinated FANCD2 protein, and we were able to demonstrate the ability of acetaldehyde to generate DNA double strand breaks, lesions which normally induce ubiquitination of FANCD2. Ethanol also inhibited both RNA and DNA synthesis in proliferating cells consistent with effects on transcription and replication. In contrast to other DNA damaging agents, ethanol/acetaldehyde generated DNA strand breaks without inducing ubiquitination of FANCD2, despite increasing protein levels in the nucleus. These data are consistent with recent reports that suggest the Fanconi anemia pathway plays an important role in the adult brain in response to DNA damage. Further work is required to establish what this role is, in particular the

  5. DNA damage and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer D; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is intimately related to the accumulation of DNA damage, and repair failures (including mutation prone repair and hyperactive repair systems). This article relates current clinical categories for breast cancer and their common DNA damage repair defects. Information is included on the potential for accumulation of DNA damage in the breast tissue of a woman during her lifetime and the role of DNA damage in breast cancer development. We then cover endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage, types of DNA damage repair and basic signal transduction pathways for three gene products involved in the DNA damage response system; namely BRCA1, BRIT1 and PARP-1. These genes are often considered tumor suppressors because of their roles in DNA damage response and some are under clinical investigation as likely sources for effective new drugs to treat breast cancers. Finally we discuss some of the problems of DNA damage repair systems in cancer and the conundrum of hyper-active repair systems which can introduce mutations and confer a survival advantage to certain types of cancer cells. PMID:21909479

  6. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo. PMID:26114388

  7. Interplay Between Histone H3 Lysine 56 Deacetylation and Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Antoine; Delgoshaie, Neda; Celic, Ivana; Dai, Junbiao; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Costantino, Santiago; Thibault, Pierre; Boeke, Jef D.; Verreault, Alain; Wurtele, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is present in newly synthesized histones deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. The sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 deacetylate H3K56 after S phase, and virtually all histone H3 molecules are K56 acetylated throughout the cell cycle in hst3∆ hst4∆ mutants. Failure to deacetylate H3K56 causes thermosensitivity, spontaneous DNA damage, and sensitivity to replicative stress via molecular mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that unlike wild-type cells, hst3∆ hst4∆ cells are unable to complete genome duplication and accumulate persistent foci containing the homologous recombination protein Rad52 after exposure to genotoxic drugs during S phase. In response to replicative stress, cells lacking Hst3 and Hst4 also displayed intense foci containing the Rfa1 subunit of the single-stranded DNA binding protein complex RPA, as well as persistent activation of DNA damage–induced kinases. To investigate the basis of these phenotypes, we identified histone point mutations that modulate the temperature and genotoxic drug sensitivity of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. We found that reducing the levels of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation or H3 lysine 79 methylation partially suppresses these sensitivities and reduces spontaneous and genotoxin-induced activation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Our data further suggest that elevated DNA damage–induced signaling significantly contributes to the phenotypes of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Overall, these results outline a novel interplay between H3K56Ac, H3K79 methylation, and H4K16 acetylation in the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:25786853

  8. Sex chromosome inactivation in germ cells: emerging roles of DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Sin, Ho-Su; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2012-08-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation in male germ cells is a paradigm of epigenetic programming during sexual reproduction. Recent progress has revealed the underlying mechanisms of sex chromosome inactivation in male meiosis. The trigger of chromosome-wide silencing is activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, which is centered on the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), a binding partner of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). This DDR pathway shares features with the somatic DDR pathway recognizing DNA replication stress in the S phase. Additionally, it is likely to be distinct from the DDR pathway that recognizes meiosis-specific double-strand breaks. This review article extensively discusses the underlying mechanism of sex chromosome inactivation.

  9. Ubiquitin-SUMO circuitry controls activated fanconi anemia ID complex dosage in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Rajendra, Eeson; Weinert, Brian T; Passmore, Lori A; Patel, Ketan J; Olsen, Jesper V; Choudhary, Chunaram; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2015-01-08

    We show that central components of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, the tumor suppressor proteins FANCI and FANCD2 (the ID complex), are SUMOylated in response to replication fork stalling. The ID complex is SUMOylated in a manner that depends on the ATR kinase, the FA ubiquitin ligase core complex, and the SUMO E3 ligases PIAS1/PIAS4 and is antagonized by the SUMO protease SENP6. SUMOylation of the ID complex drives substrate selectivity by triggering its polyubiquitylation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 to promote its removal from sites of DNA damage via the DVC1-p97 ubiquitin segregase complex. Deregulation of ID complex SUMOylation compromises cell survival following replication stress. Our results uncover a regulatory role for SUMOylation in the FA pathway, and we propose that ubiquitin-SUMO signaling circuitry is a mechanism that contributes to the balance of activated ID complex dosage at sites of DNA damage.

  10. Phospho-Ser/Thr-binding domains: navigating the cell cycle and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, H Christian; Yaffe, Michael B

    2013-09-01

    Coordinated progression through the cell cycle is a complex challenge for eukaryotic cells. Following genotoxic stress, diverse molecular signals must be integrated to establish checkpoints specific for each cell cycle stage, allowing time for various types of DNA repair. Phospho-Ser/Thr-binding domains have emerged as crucial regulators of cell cycle progression and DNA damage signalling. Such domains include 14-3-3 proteins, WW domains, Polo-box domains (in PLK1), WD40 repeats (including those in the E3 ligase SCF(βTrCP)), BRCT domains (including those in BRCA1) and FHA domains (such as in CHK2 and MDC1). Progress has been made in our understanding of the motif (or motifs) that these phospho-Ser/Thr-binding domains connect with on their targets and how these interactions influence the cell cycle and DNA damage response.

  11. A Role for the Host DNA Damage Response in Hepatitis B Virus cccDNA Formation-and Beyond?

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Nassal, Michael

    2017-05-22

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection puts more than 250 million people at a greatly increased risk to develop end-stage liver disease. Like all hepadnaviruses, HBV replicates via protein-primed reverse transcription of a pregenomic (pg) RNA, yielding an unusually structured, viral polymerase-linked relaxed-circular (RC) DNA as genome in infectious particles. Upon infection, RC-DNA is converted into nuclear covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA. Associating with cellular proteins into an episomal minichromosome, cccDNA acts as template for new viral RNAs, ensuring formation of progeny virions. Hence, cccDNA represents the viral persistence reservoir that is not directly targeted by current anti-HBV therapeutics. Eliminating cccDNA will thus be at the heart of a cure for chronic hepatitis B. The low production of HBV cccDNA in most experimental models and the associated problems in reliable cccDNA quantitation have long hampered a deeper understanding of cccDNA molecular biology. Recent advancements including cccDNA-dependent cell culture systems have begun to identify select host DNA repair enzymes that HBV usurps for RC-DNA to cccDNA conversion. While this list is bound to grow, it may represent just one facet of a broader interaction with the cellular DNA damage response (DDR), a network of pathways that sense and repair aberrant DNA structures and in the process profoundly affect the cell cycle, up to inducing cell death if repair fails. Given the divergent interactions between other viruses and the DDR it will be intriguing to see how HBV copes with this multipronged host system.

  12. A Role for the Host DNA Damage Response in Hepatitis B Virus cccDNA Formation—and Beyond?

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Nassal, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection puts more than 250 million people at a greatly increased risk to develop end-stage liver disease. Like all hepadnaviruses, HBV replicates via protein-primed reverse transcription of a pregenomic (pg) RNA, yielding an unusually structured, viral polymerase-linked relaxed-circular (RC) DNA as genome in infectious particles. Upon infection, RC-DNA is converted into nuclear covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA. Associating with cellular proteins into an episomal minichromosome, cccDNA acts as template for new viral RNAs, ensuring formation of progeny virions. Hence, cccDNA represents the viral persistence reservoir that is not directly targeted by current anti-HBV therapeutics. Eliminating cccDNA will thus be at the heart of a cure for chronic hepatitis B. The low production of HBV cccDNA in most experimental models and the associated problems in reliable cccDNA quantitation have long hampered a deeper understanding of cccDNA molecular biology. Recent advancements including cccDNA-dependent cell culture systems have begun to identify select host DNA repair enzymes that HBV usurps for RC-DNA to cccDNA conversion. While this list is bound to grow, it may represent just one facet of a broader interaction with the cellular DNA damage response (DDR), a network of pathways that sense and repair aberrant DNA structures and in the process profoundly affect the cell cycle, up to inducing cell death if repair fails. Given the divergent interactions between other viruses and the DDR it will be intriguing to see how HBV copes with this multipronged host system. PMID:28531167

  13. DNA damage response pathway and replication fork stress during oligonucleotide directed gene editing.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Melissa; Strouse, Bryan; Applegate, Mindy; Livingston, Paula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2012-04-03

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) can be used to direct the exchange of nucleotides in the genome of mammalian cells in a process known as gene editing. Once refined, gene editing should become a viable option for gene therapy and molecular medicine. Gene editing is regulated by a number of DNA recombination and repair pathways whose natural activities often lead to single- and double-stranded DNA breaks. It has been previously shown that introduction of a phosphorotioated ODN, designed to direct a gene-editing event, into cells results in the activation of γH2AX, a well-recognized protein biomarker for double-stranded DNA breakage. Using a single copy, integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene as our target, we now demonstrate that several types of ODNs, capable of directing gene editing, also activate the DNA damage response and the post-translational modification of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a signature modification of replication stress. We find that the gene editing reaction itself leads to transient DNA breakage, perhaps through replication fork collapse. Unmodified specific ODNs elicit a lesser degree of replication stress than their chemically modified counterparts, but are also less active in gene editing. Modified phosphothioate oligonucleotides (PTOs) are detrimental irrespective of the DNA sequence. Such collateral damage may prove problematic for proliferation of human cells genetically modified by gene editing.

  14. Microgravity increases DNA damage response in Caenorhabditis elegans during Shenzhou-8 spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ying; Sun, Yeqing; Xu, Dan; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Jiamin

    DNA damage response (DDR) plays an important role in genome maintenance through cell cycle arrest followed by DNA repair and/or apoptosis. Perturbing DDR may elicit genomic instability, carcinogenesis, even cell death. Space radiation and microgravity both have been reported to cause DDR in mammal cells,while, in the space environment, the interaction of space radiation and microgravity on DDR is still controversial. To clarify the interaction, dauer larva of Caenorhabditis elegans were employed in Shenzhou-8 space mission and suffered space synthetic environment (RM) and space radiation (R) during 16.5-day spaceflight. mRNA microarray, qPCR and miRNA microarray were performed individually to detect the differences of transcriptome and microRNome affected by two environments. The results showed that, two fold genes were regulated more significantly by RM than by R. These regulated genes were involved in different physiological activities from each environment, which mainly involve in protein metabolic and modification processes in RM, and energy metabolic process in R. 21 of 500 DDR genes were extracted as significantly different expression in two space environments. DNA repair and apoptosis were enhanced by microgravity, since 18 of 21 genes were altered by RM specifically, including six “Response to DNA damage stimulus” genes, four “DNA repair” genes and eight “apoptosis process” genes. miRNAome also showed changes in response to microgravity. miRNA-81, 82, 124 and 795 were predicted to respond to RM and regulate DDR in C.elegans for the first time. These results suggest that microgravity increases the physiological activities to the space environment, especially enhance DNA damage response on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in metazoan. We expect the finding provides new informations on synergetic effects between microgravity and radiation, and may be helpful for space risk assessment.

  15. Potentiation of tumor responses to DNA damaging therapy by the selective ATR inhibitor VX-970

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Diane M.; Eustace, Brenda; Gu, Yong; Hare, Brian; Johnson, Mac A.; Milton, Sean; Murphy, Cheryl E.; Takemoto, Darin; Tolman, Crystal; Wood, Mark; Charlton, Peter; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Furey, Brinley; Golec, Julian; Reaper, Philip M.; Pollard, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based DNA-damaging chemotherapy is standard-of-care for most patients with lung cancer but outcomes remain poor. This has been attributed, in part, to the highly effective repair network known as the DNA-damage response (DDR). ATR kinase is a critical regulator of this pathway, and its inhibition has been shown to sensitize some cancer, but not normal, cells in vitro to DNA damaging agents. However, there are limited in vivo proof-of-concept data for ATR inhibition. To address this we profiled VX-970, the first clinical ATR inhibitor, in a series of in vitro and in vivo lung cancer models and compared it with an inhibitor of the downstream kinase Chk1. VX-970 markedly sensitized a large proportion of a lung cancer cell line and primary tumor panel in vitro to multiple DNA damaging drugs with clear differences to Chk1 inhibition observed. In vivo VX-970 blocked ATR activity in tumors and dramatically enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin across a panel of patient derived primary lung xenografts. The combination led to complete tumor growth inhibition in three cisplatin-insensitive models and durable tumor regression in a cisplatin-sensitive model. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of VX-970 in lung cancer patients. PMID:25010037

  16. Potentiation of tumor responses to DNA damaging therapy by the selective ATR inhibitor VX-970.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amy B; Newsome, Dave; Wang, Yuxin; Boucher, Diane M; Eustace, Brenda; Gu, Yong; Hare, Brian; Johnson, Mac A; Milton, Sean; Murphy, Cheryl E; Takemoto, Darin; Tolman, Crystal; Wood, Mark; Charlton, Peter; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Furey, Brinley; Golec, Julian; Reaper, Philip M; Pollard, John R

    2014-07-30

    Platinum-based DNA-damaging chemotherapy is standard-of-care for most patients with lung cancer but outcomes remain poor. This has been attributed, in part, to the highly effective repair network known as the DNA-damage response (DDR). ATR kinase is a critical regulator of this pathway, and its inhibition has been shown to sensitize some cancer, but not normal, cells in vitro to DNA damaging agents. However, there are limited in vivo proof-of-concept data for ATR inhibition. To address this we profiled VX-970, the first clinical ATR inhibitor, in a series of in vitro and in vivo lung cancer models and compared it with an inhibitor of the downstream kinase Chk1. VX-970 markedly sensitized a large proportion of a lung cancer cell line and primary tumor panel in vitro to multiple DNA damaging drugs with clear differences to Chk1 inhibition observed. In vivo VX-970 blocked ATR activity in tumors and dramatically enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin across a panel of patient derived primary lung xenografts. The combination led to complete tumor growth inhibition in three cisplatin-insensitive models and durable tumor regression in a cisplatin-sensitive model. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of VX-970 in lung cancer patients.

  17. Arabidopsis RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED directly regulates DNA damage responses through functions beyond cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Beatrix M; Kourova, Hana; Nagy, Szilvia; Nemeth, Edit; Magyar, Zoltan; Papdi, Csaba; Ahmad, Zaki; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino F; Perilli, Serena; Blilou, Ikram; Pettkó-Szandtner, Aladár; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Meszaros, Tamas; Binarova, Pavla; Bogre, Laszlo; Scheres, Ben

    2017-05-02

    The rapidly proliferating cells in plant meristems must be protected from genome damage. Here, we show that the regulatory role of the Arabidopsis RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED (RBR) in cell proliferation can be separated from a novel function in safeguarding genome integrity. Upon DNA damage, RBR and its binding partner E2FA are recruited to heterochromatic γH2AX-labelled DNA damage foci in an ATM- and ATR-dependent manner. These γH2AX-labelled DNA lesions are more dispersedly occupied by the conserved repair protein, AtBRCA1, which can also co-localise with RBR foci. RBR and AtBRCA1 physically interact in vitro and in planta Genetic interaction between the RBR-silenced amiRBR and Atbrca1 mutants suggests that RBR and AtBRCA1 may function together in maintaining genome integrity. Together with E2FA, RBR is directly involved in the transcriptional DNA damage response as well as in the cell death pathway that is independent of SOG1, the plant functional analogue of p53. Thus, plant homologs and analogues of major mammalian tumour suppressor proteins form a regulatory network that coordinates cell proliferation with cell and genome integrity. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  18. Promyelocytic leukaemia protein links DNA damage response and repair to hepatitis B virus-related hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Wu, Mei-Ling

    2013-08-01

    DNA damage response and repair pathways are important barriers to carcinogenesis. Here, we show that promyelocytic leukaemia (PML, also known as TRIM19), involved in sensing DNA damage and executing homologous recombination repair, is down-regulated in non-tumour liver cells surrounding hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). No PML mutation or deletion was found in HBV-infected liver or HCC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of liver biopsies from patients with breast or liver cancer and HBV reactivation after chemotherapy revealed PML up-regulation and HBV exacerbation in normal liver tissue in response to DNA damage (functional PML), PML down-regulation in HCC peritumour cells associated with high HBsAg accumulation and low HBV replication activity (suppressive PML), and heterogeneous nuclear PML expression in HCC cells that lost HBV DNA and HBsAg and were non-reactive to DNA damage (dysregulated PML). Loss of PML in HBsAg-transgenic mice promoted chromosome breaks in liver cells and accelerated the accumulation of body and liver fat and the development of a liver steatosis-dysplasia-adenoma-carcinoma sequence in an inflammation-independent and male-predominant manner, compared to PML knock-out or HBsAg-transgenic mice during the same time period. These results indicate that PML deficiency facilitates genomic instability and promotes HBsAg-related hepatocarcinogenesis, which also involves androgen and lipid metabolism. These findings uncover a novel PML link between HBV-related tumourigenesis, DNA repair, and metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Proteomics insights into DNA damage response and translating this knowledge to clinical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Jesper V.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability is a critical driver in the process of cancer formation. At the same time, inducing DNA damage by irradiation or genotoxic compounds constitutes a key therapeutic strategy to kill fast‐dividing cancer cells. Sensing of DNA lesions initiates a complex set of signalling pathways, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR). Deciphering DDR signalling pathways with high‐throughput technologies could provide insights into oncogenic transformation, metastasis formation and therapy responses, and could build a basis for better therapeutic interventions in cancer treatment. Mass spectrometry (MS)‐based proteomics emerged as a method of choice for global studies of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). MS‐based studies of the DDR have aided in delineating DNA damage‐induced signalling responses. Those studies identified changes in abundance, interactions and modification of proteins in the context of genotoxic stress. Here we review ground‐breaking MS‐based proteomics studies, which analysed changes in protein abundance, protein‐protein and protein‐DNA interactions, phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation and Poly(ADP‐ribose)ylation (PARylation) in the DDR. Finally, we provide an outlook on how proteomics studies of the DDR could aid clinical developments on multiple levels. PMID:27682984

  20. Phosphorylation of PTEN at STT motif is associated with DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sandip; Mukherjee, Ananda; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-12-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten (PTEN), a tumor suppressor protein participates in multiple cellular activities including DNA repair. In this work we found a relationship between phosphorylation of carboxy (C)-terminal STT motif of PTEN and DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of C-terminal phospho-mutants of PTEN, in PTEN deficient human glioblastoma cells, U87MG, resulted in reduced viability and DNA repair after etoposide induced DNA damage compared to cells expressing wild type PTEN. Also, after etoposide treatment phosphorylation of PTEN increased at C-terminal serine 380 and threonine 382/383 residues in PTEN positive HEK293T cells and wild type PTEN transfected U87MG cells. One-step further, DNA damage induced phosphorylation of PTEN was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of total PTEN from cellular extract followed by immunobloting with phospho-specific PTEN antibodies. Additionally, phospho-PTEN translocated to nucleus after etoposide treatment as revealed by indirect immunolabeling. Further, phosphorylation dependent nuclear foci formation of PTEN was observed after ionizing radiation or etoposide treatment which colocalized with γH2AX. Additionally, etoposide induced γH2AX, Mre11 and Ku70 foci persisted for a longer period of times in U87MG cells after ectopic expression of PTEN C-terminal phospho-mutant constructs compared to wild type PTEN expressing cells. Thus, our findings strongly suggest that DNA damage induced phosphorylation of C-terminal STT motif of PTEN is necessary for DNA repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcription profile of DNA damage response genes at G₀ lymphocytes exposed to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Divyalakshmi; Shelke, Shridevi; Mani Vannan, A; Toprani, Sneh; Jain, Vinay; Das, Birajalaxmi; Seshadri, M

    2012-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a plethora of DNA damages in human cells which may alter the level of mRNA expression. We have analyzed mRNA expression profile of DNA damage response genes involved in G(0)/G(1) check point pathway in whole blood to assess their radio-adaptive response, if any, to gamma radiation. Blood samples were collected from twenty-five random, normal, and healthy male donors with written informed consent and irradiated at doses between 0.1 and 2.0 Gy (0.7 Gy/min). DNA strand breaks were studied using comet assay, whereas DNA double-strand breaks were visualized using γH2AX as a biomarker. Dose response if any, at transcriptional level was studied for all these dose groups at 1 and 5-h post-irradiation. Adaptive response at transcriptional level was studied at three different priming doses (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 Gy) separately followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4 h. For both the experiments, total RNA was isolated from PBMCs obtained from irradiated whole blood and reverse transcribed to cDNA. The level of mRNA expression of ATM, ATR, GADD45A, CDKN1A, P53, CDK2, MDM2, and Cyclin E was studied using real-time quantitative PCR. A significant dose-dependant increase in the percentage of DNA damage in tail was observed using comet assay. Similarly, increased number of foci was observed at γH2AX with increasing dose. At transcriptional level, a significant dose-dependent up-regulation at GADD45A, CDKN1A, and P53 genes up to 1.0 Gy was observed at 5-h post-irradiation (P ≤ 0.05). Radio-adaptive response at mRNA expression level was observed at CDK2, Cyclin E, and P53, whereas ATM, ATR, GADD45A, MDM2, ATM, and ATR have not shown any radio-adaptive changes in the expression profile. DNA damage response genes involved in G(0)/G(1) checkpoint pathway has important implications in terms of radiosensitivity in vivo and changes in the transcriptional profile might throw some new insights to understand the mechanism of adaptive response.

  2. DNA damage response in male gametes of Cyrtanthus mackenii during pollen tube growth

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Tomonari; Takagi, Keiichi; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Abe, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Male gametophytes of plants are exposed to environmental stress and mutagenic agents during the double fertilization process and therefore need to repair the DNA damage in order to transmit the genomic information to the next generation. However, the DNA damage response in male gametes is still unclear. In the present study, we analysed the response to DNA damage in the generative cells of Cyrtanthus mackenii during pollen tube growth. A carbon ion beam, which can induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), was used to irradiate the bicellular pollen, and then the irradiated pollen grains were cultured in a liquid culture medium. The male gametes were isolated from the cultured pollen tubes and used for immunofluorescence analysis. Although inhibitory effects on pollen tube growth were not observed after irradiation, sperm cell formation decreased significantly after high-dose irradiation. After high-dose irradiation, the cell cycle progression of generative cells was arrested at metaphase in pollen mitosis II, and phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci, an indicator of DSBs, were detected in the majority of the arrested cells. However, these foci were not detected in cells that were past metaphase. Cell cycle progression in irradiated generative cells is regulated by the spindle assembly checkpoint, and modification of the histones surrounding the DSBs was confirmed. These results indicate that during pollen tube growth generative cells can recognize and manage genomic lesions using DNA damage response pathways. In addition, the number of generative cells with γH2AX foci decreased with culture prolongation, suggesting that the DSBs in the generative cells are repaired. PMID:23550213

  3. DNA damage response to different surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Karns, Michael; Goodson, Michael; Rowe, John; Hussain, Saber M.; Schlager, John J.

    2008-12-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have recently received much attention for their possible applications in biotechnology and life sciences. Ag NPs are of interest to defense and engineering programs for new material applications as well as for commercial purposes as an antimicrobial. However, little is known about the genotoxicity of Ag NPs following exposure to mammalian cells. This study was undertaken to examine the DNA damage response to polysaccharide surface functionalized (coated) and non-functionalized (uncoated) Ag NPs in two types of mammalian cells; mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). Both types of Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51 and phosphorylated-H2AX expression. Furthermore both of them induced cell death as measured by the annexin V protein expression and MTT assay. Our observations also suggested that the different surface chemistry of Ag NPs induce different DNA damage response: coated Ag NPs exhibited more severe damage than uncoated Ag NPs. The results suggest that polysaccharide coated particles are more individually distributed while agglomeration of the uncoated particles limits the surface area availability and access to membrane bound organelles.

  4. 14-3-3 proteins, FHA domains and BRCT domains in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Duaa H; Yaffe, Michael B

    2009-09-02

    The DNA damage response depends on the concerted activity of protein serine/threonine kinases and modular phosphoserine/threonine-binding domains to relay the damage signal and recruit repair proteins. The PIKK family of protein kinases, which includes ATM/ATR/DNA-PK, preferentially phosphorylate Ser-Gln sites, while their basophilic downstream effecter kinases, Chk1/Chk2/MK2 preferentially phosphorylate hydrophobic-X-Arg-X-X-Ser/Thr-hydrophobic sites. A subset of tandem BRCT domains act as phosphopeptide binding modules that bind to ATM/ATR/DNA-PK substrates after DNA damage. Conversely, 14-3-3 proteins interact with substrates of Chk1/Chk2/MK2. FHA domains have been shown to interact with substrates of ATM/ATR/DNA-PK and CK2. In this review we consider how substrate phosphorylation together with BRCT domains, FHA domains and 14-3-3 proteins function to regulate ionizing radiation-induced nuclear foci and help to establish the G(2)/M checkpoint. We discuss the role of MDC1 a molecular scaffold that recruits early proteins to foci, such as NBS1 and RNF8, through distinct phosphodependent interactions. In addition, we consider the role of 14-3-3 proteins and the Chk2 FHA domain in initiating and maintaining cell cycle arrest.

  5. Modulation of the DNA damage response during the life cycle of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Anacker, Daniel C; Moody, Cary A

    2017-03-02

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted viral infection. Infection with certain types of HPV pose a major public health risk as these types are associated with multiple human cancers, including cervical cancer, other anogenital malignancies and an increasing number of head and neck cancers. The HPV life cycle is closely tied to host cell differentiation with late viral events such as structural gene expression and viral genome amplification taking place in the upper layers of the stratified epithelium. The DNA damage response (DDR) is an elaborate signaling network of proteins that regulate the fidelity of replication by detecting, signaling and repairing DNA lesions. ATM and ATR are two kinases that are major regulators of DNA damage detection and repair. A multitude of studies indicate that activation of the ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related) pathways are critical for HPV to productively replicate. This review outlines how HPV interfaces with the ATM- and ATR-dependent DNA damage responses throughout the viral life cycle to create an environment supportive of viral replication and how activation of these pathways could impact genomic stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A; Gwerder, Myriam; Gutsche, Katrin; Altmeyer, Matthias; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Toledo, Luis I; Fink, Daniel; Rask, Maj-Britt; Grøfte, Merete; Lukas, Claudia; Nielsen, Michael L; Smerdon, Stephen J; Lukas, Jiri; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in-trans signaling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identified TCOF1-Treacle, a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1, and demonstrate that NBS1 translocation and accumulation in the nucleoli is Treacle-dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that Treacle-mediated NBS1 recruitment into the nucleoli regulates rRNA silencing in-trans in the presence of distant chromosome breaks. PMID:25064736

  7. Monitoring the Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    PubMed

    Mondesert, Odile; Frongia, Céline; Clayton, Olivia; Boizeau, Marie-Laure; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) activated pathway in multicellular tumor spheroid models is an important challenge as these 3D models have demonstrated their major relevance in pharmacological evaluation. Herein we present DDR-Act-FP, a fluorescent biosensor that allows detection of DDR activation through monitoring of the p21 promoter p53-dependent activation. We show that cells expressing the DDR-Act-FP biosensor efficiently report activation of the DDR pathway after DNA damage and its pharmacological manipulation using ATM kinase inhibitors. We also report the successful use of this assay to screen a small compound library in order to identify activators of the DDR response. Finally, using multicellular spheroids expressing the DDR-Act-FP we demonstrate that DDR activation and its pharmacological manipulation with inhibitory and activatory compounds can be efficiently monitored in live 3D spheroid model. This study paves the way for the development of innovative screening and preclinical evaluation assays.

  8. TGF-β1 accelerates the DNA damage response in epithelial cells via Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeeyong; Kim, Mi-Ra; Kim, Hyun-Ji; An, You Sun; Yi, Jae Youn

    2016-08-05

    The evidence suggests that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) regulates the DNA-damage response (DDR) upon irradiation, and we previously reported that TGF-β1 induced DNA ligase IV (Lig4) expression and enhanced the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway in irradiated cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on the irradiation-induced DDRs of A431 and HaCaT cells. Cells were pretreated with or without TGF-β1 and irradiated. At 30 min post-irradiation, DDRs were detected by immunoblotting of phospho-ATM, phospho-Chk2, and the presence of histone foci (γH2AX). The levels of all three factors were similar right after irradiation regardless of TGF-β1 pretreatment. However, they soon thereafter exhibited downregulation in TGF-β1-pretreated cells, indicating the acceleration of the DDR. Treatment with a TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor (SB431542) or transfections with siRNAs against Smad2/3 or DNA ligase IV (Lig4) reversed this acceleration of the DDR. Furthermore, the frequency of irradiation-induced apoptosis was decreased by TGF-β1 pretreatment in vivo, but this effect was abrogated by SB431542. These results collectively suggest that TGF-β1 could enhance cell survival by accelerating the DDR via Smad signaling and Lig4 expression. -- Highlights: •TGF-β1 pretreatment accelerates γ-radiation-induced DNA damage response. •TGF-β1-accelerated DNA damage response is dependent on Smad signaling and DNA Ligase IV. •TGF-β1 pretreatment protects epithelial cells from γ-radiation in vivo.

  9. UVB and caffeine: inhibiting the DNA damage response to protect against the adverse effects of UVB.

    PubMed

    Kerzendorfer, Claudia; O'Driscoll, Mark

    2009-07-01

    The incidence of sunlight-induced skin cancer is increasing. Mouse studies indicate that caffeine, administered orally or topically, promotes apoptosis of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes. In this issue, Heffernan and colleagues identify the pathway targeted by caffeine and suggest that inhibition of this DNA damage response may offer a viable therapeutic option for nonmelanoma skin cancer. This potentially represents an important protective or therapeutic option from the most unlikely of sources: your daily coffee.

  10. A cellular defense pathway regulating transcription through poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Vispé, Stéphane; Yung, Tetsu M. C.; Ritchot, Janelle; Serizawa, Hiroaki; Satoh, Masahiko S.

    2000-01-01

    DNA damage is known to trigger key cellular defense pathways such as those involved in DNA repair. Here we provide evidence for a previously unrecognized pathway regulating transcription in response to DNA damage and show that this regulation is mediated by the abundant nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reduced the rate of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase negatively regulates transcription, possibly through the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase–RNA complexes. In damaged cells, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase binds to DNA breaks and automodifies itself in the presence of NAD+, resulting in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inactivation. We found that automodification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in response to DNA damage resulted in the up-regulation of transcription, presumably because automodified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase molecules were released from transcripts, thereby relieving the block on transcription. Because agents that damage DNA damage RNA as well, up-regulation of RNA synthesis in response to DNA damage may provide cells with a mechanism to compensate for the loss of damaged transcripts and may be critical for cell survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:10944198

  11. A cellular defense pathway regulating transcription through poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Vispe, S; Yung, T M; Ritchot, J; Serizawa, H; Satoh, M S

    2000-08-29

    DNA damage is known to trigger key cellular defense pathways such as those involved in DNA repair. Here we provide evidence for a previously unrecognized pathway regulating transcription in response to DNA damage and show that this regulation is mediated by the abundant nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reduced the rate of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase negatively regulates transcription, possibly through the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-RNA complexes. In damaged cells, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase binds to DNA breaks and automodifies itself in the presence of NAD(+), resulting in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inactivation. We found that automodification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in response to DNA damage resulted in the up-regulation of transcription, presumably because automodified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase molecules were released from transcripts, thereby relieving the block on transcription. Because agents that damage DNA damage RNA as well, up-regulation of RNA synthesis in response to DNA damage may provide cells with a mechanism to compensate for the loss of damaged transcripts and may be critical for cell survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents.

  12. The DNA damage response induced by infection with human cytomegalovirus and other viruses.

    PubMed

    Xiaofei, E; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2014-05-23

    Viruses use different strategies to overcome the host defense system. Recent studies have shown that viruses can induce DNA damage response (DDR). Many of these viruses use DDR signaling to benefit their replication, while other viruses block or inactivate DDR signaling. This review focuses on the effects of DDR and DNA repair on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Here, we review the DDR induced by HCMV infection and its similarities and differences to DDR induced by other viruses. As DDR signaling pathways are critical for the replication of many viruses, blocking these pathways may represent novel therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of certain infectious diseases. Lastly, future perspectives in the field are discussed.

  13. Topoisomerase IIalpha-dependent induction of a persistent DNA damage response in response to transient etoposide exposure.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Pope, Louise; Haché, Robert J G

    2010-02-01

    Cytotoxicity of the topoisomerase II (topoII) poison etoposide has been ascribed to the persistent covalent trapping of topoII in DNA cleavage complexes that become lethal as cells replicate their DNA. However, short term etoposide treatment also leads to subsequent cell death, suggesting that the lesions that lead to cytotoxicity arise rapidly and prior to the onset DNA replication. In the present study 1h treatment with 25muM etoposide was highly toxic and initiated a double-stranded DNA damage response as reflected by the recruitment of ATM, MDC1 and DNA-PKcs to gammaH2AX foci. While most DNA breaks were rapidly repaired upon withdrawal of the etoposide treatment, the repair machinery remained engaged in foci for at least 24h following withdrawal. TopoII siRNA ablation showed the etoposide toxicity and gammaH2AX response to correlate with the inability of the cell to correct topoIIalpha-initiated DNA damage. gammaH2AX induction was resistant to the inhibition of DNA replication and transcription, but was increased by pre-treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. These results link the lethality of etoposide to the generation of persistent topoIIalpha-dependent DNA defects within topologically open chromatin domains.

  14. Cadmium and copper toxicity in three marine macroalgae: evaluation of the biochemical responses and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Babu, M Yokesh; Palanikumar, L; Nagarani, N; Devi, V Janaki; Kumar, S Ramesh; Ramakritinan, C M; Kumaraguru, A K

    2014-01-01

    Marine macroalgae have evolved a different mechanism to maintain physiological concentrations of essential metal ions and non-essential metals. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the antioxidant response and DNA damage of copper and cadmium ions in three halophytes, namely, Acanthophora spicifera, Chaetomorpha antennina, and Ulva reticulata. Accumulation of copper was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of cadmium. Biochemical responses showed that copper was considerably more toxic than cadmium (P < 0.05). Decreases in glutathione content and fluctuations of super oxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were observed corresponding to time and concentration of exposure. Interestingly, it was also observed that antioxidant levels decreased as a result of metal accumulation, which may be due to free radicals generated by copper and cadmium in seaweeds. The present study also showed that copper and cadmium increased oxidative stress and induced antioxidant defense systems against reactive oxygen species. The order of toxicity for metals in the studied seaweeds was U. reticulata > A. spicifera > C. antennina. DNA damage index analysis supported that copper was significantly (P < 0.05) more toxic than cadmium. Bioaccumulation, biochemical responses, and DNA damage observed in the here analyzed marine macroalgae after exposure to selected metals indicate that these marine organisms represent useful bioindicators of marine pollution.

  15. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Becherel, Olivier J; Yeo, Abrey J; Stellati, Alissa; Heng, Evelyn Y H; Luff, John; Suraweera, Amila M; Woods, Rick; Fleming, Jean; Carrie, Dianne; McKinney, Kristine; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chuxia; Lavin, Martin F

    2013-04-01

    Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops), and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  16. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Shen, Huahao; Helleday, Thomas; Hickson, Ian D.; Ying, Songmin

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81 is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity. PMID:26415217

  17. Mismatch Repair Proteins Are Activators of Toxic Responses to Chromium-DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Mindy; Quievryn, George; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal that causes the formation of DNA phosphate-based adducts. Cr-DNA adducts are genotoxic in human cells, although they do not block replication in vitro. Here, we report that induction of cytotoxicity in Cr(VI)-treated human colon cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts requires the presence of all major mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Cr-DNA adducts lost their ability to block replication of Cr-modified plasmids in human colon cells lacking MLH1 protein. The presence of functional mismatch repair caused induction of p53-independent apoptosis associated with activation of caspases 2 and 7. Processing of Cr-DNA damage by mismatch repair resulted in the extensive formation of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase, indicating generation of double-stranded breaks as secondary toxic lesions. Induction of γ-H2AX foci was observed at 6 to 12 h postexposure, which was followed by activation of apoptosis in the absence of significant G2 arrest. Our results demonstrate that mismatch repair system triggers toxic responses to Cr-DNA backbone modifications through stress mechanisms that are significantly different from those for other forms of DNA damage. Selection for Cr(VI) resistant, MMR-deficient cells may explain the very high frequency of lung cancers with microsatellite instability among chromate workers. PMID:15831465

  18. Aberrant DNA Damage Response Pathways May Predict the Outcome of Platinum Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefanou, Dimitra T.; Bamias, Aristotelis; Episkopou, Hara; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Likka, Maria; Kalampokas, Theodore; Photiou, Stylianos; Gavalas, Nikos; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Souliotis, Vassilis L.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Despite the advances in the treatment of OC with combinatorial regimens, including surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, patients generally exhibit poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are involved in resistance of OC patients to platinum chemotherapy. Selected DDR signals were evaluated in two human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, one sensitive (A2780) and one resistant (A2780/C30) to platinum treatment as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from OC patients, sensitive (n = 7) or resistant (n = 4) to subsequent chemotherapy. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 9) were studied in parallel. DNA damage was evaluated by immunofluorescence γH2AX staining and comet assay. Higher levels of intrinsic DNA damage were found in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. Moreover, the intrinsic DNA damage levels were significantly higher in OC patients relative to healthy volunteers, as well as in platinum-sensitive patients relative to platinum-resistant ones (all P<0.05). Following carboplatin treatment, A2780 cells showed lower DNA repair efficiency than A2780/C30 cells. Also, following carboplatin treatment of PBMCs ex vivo, the DNA repair efficiency was significantly higher in healthy volunteers than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in platinum-sensitive ones (t1/2 for loss of γH2AX foci: 2.7±0.5h, 8.8±1.9h and 15.4±3.2h, respectively; using comet assay, t1/2 of platinum-induced damage repair: 4.8±1.4h, 12.9±1.9h and 21.4±2.6h, respectively; all P<0.03). Additionally, the carboplatin-induced apoptosis rate was higher in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. In PBMCs, apoptosis rates were inversely correlated with DNA repair efficiencies of these cells, being significantly higher in platinum-sensitive than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in healthy volunteers (all P<0.05). We conclude that

  19. Aberrant DNA damage response pathways may predict the outcome of platinum chemotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Stefanou, Dimitra T; Bamias, Aristotelis; Episkopou, Hara; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Likka, Maria; Kalampokas, Theodore; Photiou, Stylianos; Gavalas, Nikos; Sfikakis, Petros P; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Souliotis, Vassilis L

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Despite the advances in the treatment of OC with combinatorial regimens, including surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, patients generally exhibit poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are involved in resistance of OC patients to platinum chemotherapy. Selected DDR signals were evaluated in two human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, one sensitive (A2780) and one resistant (A2780/C30) to platinum treatment as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from OC patients, sensitive (n = 7) or resistant (n = 4) to subsequent chemotherapy. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 9) were studied in parallel. DNA damage was evaluated by immunofluorescence γH2AX staining and comet assay. Higher levels of intrinsic DNA damage were found in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. Moreover, the intrinsic DNA damage levels were significantly higher in OC patients relative to healthy volunteers, as well as in platinum-sensitive patients relative to platinum-resistant ones (all P<0.05). Following carboplatin treatment, A2780 cells showed lower DNA repair efficiency than A2780/C30 cells. Also, following carboplatin treatment of PBMCs ex vivo, the DNA repair efficiency was significantly higher in healthy volunteers than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in platinum-sensitive ones (t1/2 for loss of γH2AX foci: 2.7±0.5h, 8.8±1.9h and 15.4±3.2h, respectively; using comet assay, t1/2 of platinum-induced damage repair: 4.8±1.4h, 12.9±1.9h and 21.4±2.6h, respectively; all P<0.03). Additionally, the carboplatin-induced apoptosis rate was higher in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. In PBMCs, apoptosis rates were inversely correlated with DNA repair efficiencies of these cells, being significantly higher in platinum-sensitive than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in healthy volunteers (all P<0.05). We conclude that

  20. Baculoviruses modulate a proapoptotic DNA damage response to promote virus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan K; Friesen, Paul D

    2012-12-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) initiates apoptosis in diverse insects through events triggered by virus DNA (vDNA) replication. To define the proapoptotic pathway and its role in antivirus defense, we investigated the link between the host's DNA damage response (DDR) and apoptosis. We report here that AcMNPV elicits a DDR in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Replication of vDNA activated DDR kinases, as evidenced by ATM-driven phosphorylation of the Drosophila histone H2AX homolog (H2Av), a critical regulator of the DDR. Ablation or inhibition of ATM repressed H2Av phosphorylation and blocked virus-induced apoptosis. The DDR kinase inhibitors caffeine and KU55933 also prevented virus-induced apoptosis in cells derived from the permissive AcMNPV host, Spodoptera frugiperda. This block occurred at a step upstream of virus-mediated depletion of the cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein, an event that initiates apoptosis in Spodoptera and Drosophila. Thus, the DDR is a conserved, proapoptotic response to baculovirus infection. DDR inhibition also repressed vDNA replication and reduced virus yields 100,000-fold, demonstrating that the DDR contributes to virus production, despite its recognized antivirus role. In contrast to virus-induced phosphorylation of Drosophila H2Av, AcMNPV blocked phosphorylation of the Spodoptera H2AX homolog (SfH2AX). Remarkably, AcMNPV also suppressed SfH2AX phosphorylation following pharmacologically induced DNA damage. These findings indicate that AcMNPV alters canonical DDR signaling in permissive cells. We conclude that AcMNPV triggers a proapoptotic DDR that is subsequently modified, presumably to stimulate vDNA replication. Thus, manipulation of the DDR to facilitate multiplication is an evolutionarily conserved strategy among DNA viruses of insects and mammals.

  1. DNA-Damage Response RNA-Binding Proteins (DDRBPs): Perspectives from a New Class of Proteins and Their RNA Targets.

    PubMed

    Dutertre, Martin; Vagner, Stéphan

    2016-09-29

    Upon DNA damage, cells trigger an early DNA-damage response (DDR) involving DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, and late responses involving gene expression regulation that determine cell fate. Screens for genes involved in the DDR have found many RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), while screens for novel RBPs have identified DDR proteins. An increasing number of RBPs are involved in early and/or late DDR. We propose to call this new class of actors of the DDR, which contain an RNA-binding activity, DNA-damage response RNA-binding proteins (DDRBPs). We then discuss how DDRBPs contribute not only to gene expression regulation in the late DDR but also to early DDR signaling, DNA repair, and chromatin modifications at DNA-damage sites through interactions with both long and short noncoding RNAs.

  2. Ubiquitin-binding domains and their role in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kay

    2009-04-05

    The modification of eukaryotic proteins by covalent attachment of ubiquitin is a versatile signaling event with a wide range of possible consequences. Canonical poly-ubiquitination by Lys-48 linked chains usually destines a protein for degradation by the proteasome. By contrast, attachment of a single ubiquitin or ubiquitin chains linked through Lys-63 or Lys-6 serves a non-proteolytic role. Over the last years, evidence has accumulated that several nuclear proteins become ubiquitinated in response to DNA damage. Typically, these proteins carry mono-ubiquitin or non-classical ubiquitin chains and are localized close to the site of DNA damage. Of particular interest are PCNA and the variant histone H2AX, two key proteins whose ubiquitination serves to recruit factors needed by the cell to cope with the damage. A prerequisite for docking effector proteins to the site of the lesion is the detection of a specific ubiquitin modification, a process that can be mediated by a range of dedicated ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs). As the same types of ubiquitin modification are involved in entirely different processes, the recognition of the ubiquitin mark has to go along with the recognition of the modified protein. Thus, ubiquitin-binding domains gain their specificity through combination with other recognition domains and motifs. This review discusses ubiquitin-binding domains relevant to the DNA damage response, including their binding mode, their specificity, and their interdependence with other factors. For several repair pathways, current knowledge of the events downstream of the ubiquitin mark is sketchy. A closer look at orphan UBD proteins might lead to the identification of missing pieces in the DNA response puzzle.

  3. Adenovirus core protein VII down-regulates the DNA damage response on the host genome.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Della Fera, Ashley N; Otter, Clayton J; Herrmann, Christin; Pancholi, Neha J; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-08-09

    Viral manipulation of cellular proteins allows viruses to suppress host defenses and generate infectious progeny. Due to the linear double-stranded DNA nature of the adenovirus genome, the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is considered a barrier for successful infection. The adenovirus genome is packaged with protein VII, a viral-encoded histone-like core protein that is suggested to protect incoming viral genomes from detection by cellular DNA damage machinery. We showed that protein VII localizes to host chromatin during infection, leading us to hypothesize that protein VII may affect DNA damage responses on the cellular genome. Here, we show that protein VII at cellular chromatin results in a significant decrease in accumulation of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) following irradiation, indicating that protein VII inhibits DDR signaling. The oncoprotein SET was recently suggested to modulate the DDR by affecting access of repair proteins to chromatin. Since protein VII binds SET, we investigated a role for SET in DDR inhibition by protein VII. We show that knockdown of SET partially rescues the protein VII-induced decrease in γH2AX accumulation on the host genome, suggesting that SET is required for inhibition. Finally, we show that knockdown of SET also allows ATM to localize to incoming viral genomes bound by protein VII during infection with a mutant lacking early region E4. Together, our data suggest that the protein VII-SET interaction contributes to DDR evasion by adenovirus. Our results provide an additional example of a strategy used by adenovirus to manipulate the host DDR and show how viruses can modify cellular processes through manipulation of host chromatin.IMPORTANCE The DNA damage response (DDR) is a cellular network crucial for maintaining genome integrity. DNA viruses replicating in the nucleus challenge the resident genome and must overcome cellular responses, including the DDR. Adenoviruses are prevalent human pathogens that can cause a

  4. Analysis of Individual Molecular Events of DNA Damage Response by Flow and Image Assisted Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Traganos, Frank; Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H. Dorota; Skommer, Joanna; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes molecular mechanisms of DNA damage response (DDR) and presents flow- and image-assisted cytometric approaches to assess these mechanisms and measure the extent of DDR in individual cells. DNA damage was induced by cell treatment with oxidizing agents, UV light, DNA topoisomerase I or II inhibitors, cisplatin, tobacco smoke, and by exogenous and endogenous oxidants. Chromatin relaxation (decondensation) is an early event of DDR chromatin that involves modification of high mobility group proteins (HMGs) and histone H1 and was detected by cytometry by analysis of the susceptibility of DNA in situ to denaturation using the metachromatic fluorochrome acridine orange. Translocation of the MRN complex consisting of Meiotic Recombination 11 Homolog A (Mre11), Rad50 homolog and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome 1 (NMR1) into DNA damage sites was assessed by laser scanning cytometry as the increase in the intensity of maximal pixel as well as integral value of Mre11 immunofluorescence. Examples of cytometric detection of activation of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), and Check 2 (Chk2) protein kinases using phospho-specific Abs targeting Ser1981 and Thr68 of these proteins, respectively are also presented. We also discuss approaches to correlate activation of ATM and Chk2 with phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15 and histone H2AX on Ser139 as well as with cell cycle position and DNA replication. The capability of laser scanning cytometry to quantify individual foci of phosphorylated H2AX and/or ATM that provides more dependable assessment of the presence of DNA double-strand breaks is outlined. The new microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip platforms for interrogation of individual cells offer a novel approach for DDR cytometric analysis. PMID:21722802

  5. Protective effect of extract of Crataegus pinnatifida pollen on DNA damage response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ni; Wang, Yuan; Gao, Hui; Yuan, Jialing; Feng, Fan; Cao, Wei; Zheng, Jianbin

    2013-09-01

    The protective effect of extract of Crataegus pinnatifida (Rosaceae) pollen (ECPP) on the DNA damage response to oxidative stress was investigated and assessed with an alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay and pBR322 plasmid DNA breaks in site-specific and non-site-specific systems. Total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, individual phenolic compounds, antioxidant activities (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), radical scavenging activity, FRAP, and chelating activity) were also determined. The results showed that ECPP possessed a strong ability to protect DNA from being damaged by hydroxyl radicals in both the site-specific system and the non-site-specific system. It also exhibited a cytoprotection effect in mouse lymphocytes against H₂O₂-induced DNA damage. These protective effects may be related to its high total phenolic content (17.65±0.97 mg GAE/g), total flavonoid content (8.04±0.97 mg rutin/g), strong free radical scavenging activity and considerable ferrous ion chelating ability (14.48±0.21 mg Na₂EDTA/g). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multifunctional Ebselen drug functions through the activation of DNA damage response and alterations in nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gajendra K; Balkrishna, Shah Jaimin; Sathish, Narayanan; Kumar, Sangit; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2012-01-15

    Several studies have demonstrated that Ebselen is an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agent. Contrary to this, studies have also shown a high degree of cellular toxicity associated with Ebselen usage, the underlying mechanism of which remains less understood. In this study we have attempted to identify a possible molecular mechanism behind the above by investigating the effects of Ebselen on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Significant growth arrest was documented in yeast cells exposed to Ebselen similar to that seen in presence of DNA damaging agents (including methyl methane sulfonate [MMS] and hydroxy urea [HU]). Furthermore, mutations in specific lysine residues in the histone H3 tail (H3 K56R) resulted in increased sensitivity of yeast cells to Ebselen presumably due to alterations in post-translational modifications of histone proteins towards regulating replication and DNA damage repair. Our findings suggest that Ebselen functions through activation of DNA damage response, alterations in histone modifications, activation of checkpoint kinase pathway and derepression of ribonucleotide reductases (DNA repair genes) which to the best of our knowledge is being reported for the first time. Interestingly subsequent to Ebselen exposure there were changes in global yeast protein expression and specific histone modifications, identification of which is expected to reveal a fundamental cellular mechanism underlying the action of Ebselen. Taken together these observations will help to redesign Ebselen-based therapy in clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. New insights into cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suvorova, Irina I; Katolikova, Natalia V; Pospelov, Valery A

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have unlimited proliferative potential, while retaining the ability to differentiate into descendants of all three embryonic layers. High proliferation rate of ESCs is accompanied by a shortening of the G(1) phase and the lack of G(1) checkpoint following DNA damage. The absence of G(1) arrest in ESCs after DNA damage is likely caused by a dysfunction of the p53-dependent p21Waf1 pathway that is a key event for the maintenance of pluripotency. There are controversial data on the functional status of p53, but it is well established that one of the key p53 target-p21Waf1-is expressed in ESCs at a very low level. Despite the lack of G(1) checkpoint, ESCs are capable to repair DNA defects; moreover the DNA damage response (DDR) signaling operates very effectively throughout the cell cycle. This review covers also the results obtained with the reprogramming of somatic cells into the induced pluripotent stem cells, for which have been shown that a partial dysfunction of the p53Waf1 pathway increases the frequency of generation of pluripotent cells. In summary, these results indicate that the G(1) checkpoint control and DDR are distinct from somatic cells and their status is tightly connected with maintaining of pluripotency and self-renewal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxidative Stress Induces Persistent Telomeric DNA Damage Responsible for Nuclear Morphology Change in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Elisa; Colamartino, Monica; Cozzi, Renata; Leone, Stefano; Meneghini, Carlo; O’Callaghan, Nathan; Sgura, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    One main function of telomeres is to maintain chromosome and genome stability. The rate of telomere shortening can be accelerated significantly by chemical and physical environmental agents. Reactive oxygen species are a source of oxidative stress and can produce modified bases (mainly 8-oxoG) and single strand breaks anywhere in the genome. The high incidence of guanine residues in telomeric DNA sequences makes the telomere a preferred target for oxidative damage. Our aim in this work is to evaluate whether chromosome instability induced by oxidative stress is related specifically to telomeric damage. We treated human primary fibroblasts (MRC-5) in vitro with hydrogen peroxide (100 and 200 µM) for 1 hr and collected data at several time points. To evaluate the persistence of oxidative stress-induced DNA damage up to 24 hrs after treatment, we analysed telomeric and genomic oxidative damage by qPCR and a modified comet assay, respectively. The results demonstrate that the genomic damage is completely repaired, while the telomeric oxidative damage persists. The analysis of telomere length reveals a significant telomere shortening 48 hrs after treatment, leading us to hypothesise that residual telomere damage could be responsible for the telomere shortening observed. Considering the influence of telomere length modulation on genomic stability, we quantified abnormal nuclear morphologies (Nucleoplasmic Bridges, Nuclear Buds and Micronuclei) and observed an increase of chromosome instability in the same time frame as telomere shortening. At subsequent times (72 and 96 hrs), we observed a restoration of telomere length and a reduction of chromosome instability, leaving us to conjecture a correlation between telomere shortening/dysfunction and chromosome instability. We can conclude that oxidative base damage leads to abnormal nuclear morphologies and that telomere dysfunction is an important contributor to this effect. PMID:25354277

  9. Lysophospholipids secreted by splenic macrophages induce chemotherapy resistance via interference with the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Houthuijzen, Julia M; Daenen, Laura G M; Roodhart, Jeanine M L; Oosterom, Ilse; van Jaarsveld, Marijn T M; Govaert, Klaas M; Smith, Michelle E; Sadatmand, Sahar J; Rosing, Hilde; Kruse, Fabian; Helms, Bernd J; van Rooijen, Nico; Beijnen, Jos H; Haribabu, Bodduluri; van de Lest, Chris H A; Voest, Emile E

    2014-11-12

    Host responses to systemic anti-cancer treatment play important roles in the development of anti-cancer drug resistance. Here we show that F4/80(+)/CD11b(low) splenocytes mediate the resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics induced by two platinum-induced fatty acids (PIFAs), 12-S-keto-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid and 4,7,10,13-hexadecatetraenoic acid (16:4(n-3)) in xenograft mouse models. Splenectomy or depletion of splenic macrophages by liposomal clodronate protects against PIFA-induced chemoresistance. In addition, we find that 12-S-HHT, but not 16:4(n-3), functions via leukotriene B4 receptor 2 (BLT2). Genetic loss or chemical inhibition of BLT2 prevents 12-S-HHT-mediated resistance. Mass spectrometry analysis of conditioned medium derived from PIFA-stimulated splenic macrophages identifies several lysophosphatidylcholines as the resistance-inducing molecules. When comparing cisplatin and PIFA-treated tumours with cisplatin alone treated tumours we found overall less γH2AX, a measure for DNA damage. Taken together, we have identified an intricate network of lysophospholipid signalling by splenic macrophages that induces systemic chemoresistance in vivo via an altered DNA damage response.

  10. G2E3 IS A NUCLEO-CYTOPLASMIC SHUTTLING PROTEIN WITH DNA DAMAGE RESPONSIVE LOCALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, William S.; Banerjee, Sami; Crawford, David F.

    2007-01-01

    G2E3 was originally described as a G2/M-specific gene with DNA damage responsive expression. The presence of a conserved HECT domain within the carboxy-terminus of the protein indicated that it likely functions as an ubiquitin ligase or E3. Although HECT domains are known to function in this capacity for many proteins, we demonstrate that a portion of the HECT domain from G2E3 plays an important role in the dynamic subcellular localization of the protein. We have shown that G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with nuclear export mediated by a novel nuclear export domain that functions independently of CRM1. In full-length G2E3, a separate region of the HECT domain suppresses the function of the NES. Additionally, G2E3 contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in its amino terminus. Localization of G2E3 to the nucleolus is a dynamic process, and the protein delocalizes from the nucleolus rapidly after DNA damage. Cell cycle phase-specific expression and highly regulated subcellular localization of G2E3 suggest a possible role in cell cycle regulation and the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:17239372

  11. G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with DNA damage responsive localization

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, William S.; Banerjee, Sami; Crawford, David F. . E-mail: dfc@uab.edu

    2007-02-15

    G2E3 was originally described as a G2/M-specific gene with DNA damage responsive expression. The presence of a conserved HECT domain within the carboxy-terminus of the protein indicated that it likely functions as a ubiquitin ligase or E3. Although HECT domains are known to function in this capacity for many proteins, we demonstrate that a portion of the HECT domain from G2E3 plays an important role in the dynamic subcellular localization of the protein. We have shown that G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with nuclear export mediated by a novel nuclear export domain that functions independently of CRM1. In full-length G2E3, a separate region of the HECT domain suppresses the function of the NES. Additionally, G2E3 contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in its amino terminus. Localization of G2E3 to the nucleolus is a dynamic process, and the protein delocalizes from the nucleolus rapidly after DNA damage. Cell cycle phase-specific expression and highly regulated subcellular localization of G2E3 suggest a possible role in cell cycle regulation and the cellular response to DNA damage.

  12. The tumour suppressor CYLD regulates the p53 DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Majada, Vanesa; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Schell, Michael; Adam, Alexander; Dietlein, Felix; Komander, David; Büttner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K.; Schumacher, Björn; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    The tumour suppressor CYLD is a deubiquitinase previously shown to inhibit NF-κB, MAP kinase and Wnt signalling. However, the tumour suppressing mechanisms of CYLD remain poorly understood. Here we show that loss of CYLD catalytic activity causes impaired DNA damage-induced p53 stabilization and activation in epithelial cells and sensitizes mice to chemical carcinogen-induced intestinal and skin tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, CYLD interacts with and deubiquitinates p53 facilitating its stabilization in response to genotoxic stress. Ubiquitin chain-restriction analysis provides evidence that CYLD removes K48 ubiquitin chains from p53 indirectly by cleaving K63 linkages, suggesting that p53 is decorated with complex K48/K63 chains. Moreover, CYLD deficiency also diminishes CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Collectively, our results identify CYLD as a deubiquitinase facilitating DNA damage-induced p53 activation and suggest that regulation of p53 responses to genotoxic stress contributes to the tumour suppressor function of CYLD. PMID:27561390

  13. 14-3-3 proteins integrate E2F activity with the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Milton, Alasdair H; Khaire, Nandkumar; Ingram, Laura; O'donnell, Amanda J; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2006-01-01

    The E2F family is composed of at least eight E2F and two DP subunits, which in cells exist as E2F/DP heterodimers that bind to and regulate E2F target genes. While DP-1 is an essential and widespread component of E2F, much less is known about the DP-3 subunit, which exists as a number of distinct protein isoforms that differ in several respects including the presence of a nuclear localisation signal (NLS). We show here that the NLS region of DP-3 harbours a binding site for 14-3-3ɛ, and that binding of 14-3-3ɛ alters the cell cycle and apoptotic properties of E2F. DP-3 responds to DNA damage, and the interaction between DP-3 and 14-3-3ɛ is under DNA damage-responsive control. Further, 14-3-3ɛ is present in the promoter region of certain E2F target genes, and reducing 14-3-3ɛ levels induces apoptosis. These results identify a new level of control on E2F activity and, at a more general level, suggest that 14-3-3 proteins integrate E2F activity with the DNA damage response. PMID:16482218

  14. 14-3-3 proteins integrate E2F activity with the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Milton, Alasdair H; Khaire, Nandkumar; Ingram, Laura; O'Donnell, Amanda J; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2006-03-08

    The E2F family is composed of at least eight E2F and two DP subunits, which in cells exist as E2F/DP heterodimers that bind to and regulate E2F target genes. While DP-1 is an essential and widespread component of E2F, much less is known about the DP-3 subunit, which exists as a number of distinct protein isoforms that differ in several respects including the presence of a nuclear localisation signal (NLS). We show here that the NLS region of DP-3 harbours a binding site for 14-3-3epsilon, and that binding of 14-3-3epsilon alters the cell cycle and apoptotic properties of E2F. DP-3 responds to DNA damage, and the interaction between DP-3 and 14-3-3epsilon is under DNA damage-responsive control. Further, 14-3-3epsilon is present in the promoter region of certain E2F target genes, and reducing 14-3-3epsilon levels induces apoptosis. These results identify a new level of control on E2F activity and, at a more general level, suggest that 14-3-3 proteins integrate E2F activity with the DNA damage response.

  15. The role of the DNA damage response in zebrafish and cellular models of Diamond Blackfan anemia

    PubMed Central

    Danilova, Nadia; Bibikova, Elena; Covey, Todd M.; Nathanson, David; Dimitrova, Elizabeth; Konto, Yoan; Lindgren, Anne; Glader, Bertil; Radu, Caius G.; Sakamoto, Kathleen M.; Lin, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal biogenesis involves the processing of pre-ribosomal RNA. A deficiency of some ribosomal proteins (RPs) impairs processing and causes Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA), which is associated with anemia, congenital malformations and cancer. p53 mediates many features of DBA, but the mechanism of p53 activation remains unclear. Another hallmark of DBA is the upregulation of adenosine deaminase (ADA), indicating changes in nucleotide metabolism. In RP-deficient zebrafish, we found activation of both nucleotide catabolism and biosynthesis, which is consistent with the need to break and replace the faulty ribosomal RNA. We also found upregulation of deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) synthesis – a typical response to replication stress and DNA damage. Both RP-deficient zebrafish and human hematopoietic cells showed activation of the ATR/ATM-CHK1/CHK2/p53 pathway. Other features of RP deficiency included an imbalanced dNTP pool, ATP depletion and AMPK activation. Replication stress and DNA damage in cultured cells in non-DBA models can be decreased by exogenous nucleosides. Therefore, we treated RP-deficient zebrafish embryos with exogenous nucleosides and observed decreased activation of p53 and AMPK, reduced apoptosis, and rescue of hematopoiesis. Our data suggest that the DNA damage response contributes to p53 activation in cellular and zebrafish models of DBA. Furthermore, the rescue of RP-deficient zebrafish with exogenous nucleosides suggests that nucleoside supplements could be beneficial in the treatment of DBA. PMID:24812435

  16. Development of DNA Damage Response Signaling Biomarkers using Automated, Quantitative Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaishvilli-Feinberg, Nana; Cohen, Stephanie M.; Midkiff, Bentley; Zhou, Yingchun; Olorvida, Mark; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Omolo, Bernard; Shields, Janiel M.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Groben, Pamela A.; Kaufmann, William K.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates DNA repair with cell cycle checkpoints to ameliorate or mitigate the pathological effects of DNA damage. Automated quantitative analysis (AQUA) and Tissue Studio are commercial technologies that use digitized immunofluorescence microscopy images to quantify antigen expression in defined tissue compartments. Because DDR is commonly activated in cancer and may reflect genetic instability within the lesion, a method to quantify DDR in cancer offers potential diagnostic and/or prognostic value. In this study, both AQUA and Tissue Studio algorithms were used to quantify the DDR in radiation-damaged skin fibroblasts, melanoma cell lines, moles, and primary and metastatic melanomas. Digital image analysis results for three markers of DDR (γH2AX, P-ATM, P-Chk2) correlated with immunoblot data for irradiated fibroblasts, whereas only γH2AX and P-Chk2 correlated with immunoblot data in melanoma cell lines. Melanoma cell lines displayed substantial variation in γH2AX and P-Chk2 expression, and P-Chk2 expression was significantly correlated with radioresistance. Moles, primary melanomas, and melanoma metastases in brain, lung and liver displayed substantial variation in γH2AX expression, similar to that observed in melanoma cell lines. Automated digital analysis of immunofluorescent images stained for DDR biomarkers may be useful for predicting tumor response to radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:24309508

  17. The Oxygen Rich Postnatal Environment Induces Cardiomyocyte Cell Cycle Arrest Through DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Bao N.; Kimura, Wataru; Muralidhar, Shalini A.; Moon, Jesung; Amatruda, James F.; Phelps, Kate L.; Grinsfelder, David; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Chen, Rui; Garcia, Joseph A.; Santos, Celio X.; Thet, SuWannee; Mori, Eiichiro; Kinter, Michael T.; Rindler, Paul M.; Zacchigna, Serena; Mukherjee, Shibani; Chen, David J.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Giacca, Mauro; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Aroumougame, Asaithamby; Shah, Ajay M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Sadek, Hesham A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mammalian heart has a remarkable regenerative capacity for a short period of time after birth, after which the majority of cardiomyocytes permanently exit cell cycle. We sought to determine the primary post-natal event that results in cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We hypothesized that transition to the oxygen rich postnatal environment is the upstream signal that results in cell cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative DNA damage, and DNA damage response (DDR) markers significantly increase in the heart during the first postnatal week. Intriguingly, postnatal hypoxemia, ROS scavenging, or inhibition of DDR all prolong the postnatal proliferative window of cardiomyocytes, while hyperoxemia and ROS generators shorten it. These findings uncover a previously unrecognized protective mechanism that mediates cardiomyocyte cell cycle arrest in exchange for utilization of oxygen dependent aerobic metabolism. Reduction of mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress should be important component of cardiomyocyte proliferation-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:24766806

  18. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  19. Carbon nanotubes elicit DNA damage and inflammatory response relative to their size and shape.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Morishita, Yuki; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Fujimura, Maho; Kayamuro, Hiroyuki; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yamashita, Takuya; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Kawai, Yuichi; Mayumi, Tadanori; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Itoh, Norio; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been one of the most extensively researched and developed nanomaterials. However, little concern has been placed on their safety. The biological effects of CNTs are believed to differ relative to size and shape. Thus, the relationship between the characteristics of CNTs and their safety needs to be evaluated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of different-sized multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) and single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Long and thick MWCNTs induced the strongest DNA damage while similar SWCNTs caused little effect. Comparison of inflammatory responses of various types of CNTs found that peritoneal CNT administration of long and thick MWCNTs increased the total cell number in abdominal lavage fluid in mice. These results indicate that long and thick MWCNT, but not short and thin MWCNT, cause DNA damage and severe inflammatory effects. These findings might provide useful information for constructing novel CNTs with safety.

  20. The oxygen-rich postnatal environment induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Puente, Bao N; Kimura, Wataru; Muralidhar, Shalini A; Moon, Jesung; Amatruda, James F; Phelps, Kate L; Grinsfelder, David; Rothermel, Beverly A; Chen, Rui; Garcia, Joseph A; Santos, Celio X; Thet, SuWannee; Mori, Eiichiro; Kinter, Michael T; Rindler, Paul M; Zacchigna, Serena; Mukherjee, Shibani; Chen, David J; Mahmoud, Ahmed I; Giacca, Mauro; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Aroumougame, Asaithamby; Shah, Ajay M; Szweda, Luke I; Sadek, Hesham A

    2014-04-24

    The mammalian heart has a remarkable regenerative capacity for a short period of time after birth, after which the majority of cardiomyocytes permanently exit cell cycle. We sought to determine the primary postnatal event that results in cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We hypothesized that transition to the oxygen-rich postnatal environment is the upstream signal that results in cell-cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes. Here, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative DNA damage, and DNA damage response (DDR) markers significantly increase in the heart during the first postnatal week. Intriguingly, postnatal hypoxemia, ROS scavenging, or inhibition of DDR all prolong the postnatal proliferative window of cardiomyocytes, whereas hyperoxemia and ROS generators shorten it. These findings uncover a protective mechanism that mediates cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest in exchange for utilization of oxygen-dependent aerobic metabolism. Reduction of mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress should be an important component of cardiomyocyte proliferation-based therapeutic approaches.

  1. Two-phase dynamics of p53 in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 mainly induces cell cycle arrest/DNA repair or apoptosis in the DNA damage response. How to choose between these two outcomes is not fully understood. We proposed a four-module model of the p53 signaling network and associated the network dynamics with cellular outcomes after ionizing radiation. We found that the cellular response is mediated by both the level and posttranslational modifications of p53 and that p53 is activated in a progressive manner. First, p53 is partially activated by primary modifications such as phosphorylation at Ser-15/20 to induce cell cycle arrest, with its level varying in a series of pulses. If the damage cannot be fixed after a critical number of p53 pulses, then p53 is fully activated by further modifications such as phosphorylation at Ser-46 to trigger apoptosis, with its concentration switching to rather high levels. Thus, p53 undergoes a two-phase response in irreparably damaged cells. Such combinations of pulsatile and switch-like behaviors of p53 may represent a flexible and efficient control mode, avoiding the premature apoptosis and promoting the execution of apoptosis. In our model, p53 pulses are recurrently driven by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) pulses triggered by DNA damage. The p53-Mdm2 and ATM-p53-Wip1 negative feedback loops are responsible for p53 pulses, whereas the switching behavior occurs when the p53-PTEN-Akt-Mdm2 positive feedback loop becomes dominant. Our results suggest that a sequential predominance of distinct feedback loops may elicit multiple-phase dynamical behaviors. This work provides a new mechanism for p53 dynamics and cell fate decision. PMID:21576488

  2. Mitochondrial DNA damage and a hypoxic response are induced by CoCl2 in rat neuronal PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guichun; Hazra, Tapas K.; Mitra, Sankar; Lee, Heung-Man; Englander, Ella W.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of a transcriptional program that mimics the hypoxic response have been documented in cultured cells in the presence of cobalt chloride. We found that in the presence of hypoxia-mimicking concentrations of CoCl2, mitochondrial but not nuclear DNA damage is induced in rat neuronal, PC12 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of induction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage under these conditions. Likewise, we provide the first evidence for elevation of MYH, the mammalian homolog of the Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase, in mammalian cells. Recently, the human MYH was implicated in repair of oxidative DNA damage and shown to carry a mitochondrial localization sequence. Here, an induction of mtDNA damage and a time-dependent increase in the MYH level were detected with exposure of cells to 100 µM CoCl2. In addition, the levels of proteins involved in cellular responses to hypoxia, ROS and nuclear DNA damage; hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), p53, p21 and PCNA were also modulated temporally. Earlier studies suggested that the mtDNA is a primary target for oxidative damage. Our findings extend these observations and suggest that activation of DNA repair processes is associated with the presence of mtDNA damage. PMID:10773083

  3. Mitochondrial DNA damage and a hypoxic response are induced by CoCl(2) in rat neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Hazra, T K; Mitra, S; Lee, H M; Englander, E W

    2000-05-15

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of a transcriptional program that mimics the hypoxic response have been documented in cultured cells in the presence of cobalt chloride. We found that in the presence of hypoxia-mimicking concentrations of CoCl(2), mitochondrial but not nuclear DNA damage is induced in rat neuronal, PC12 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of induction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage under these conditions. Likewise, we provide the first evidence for elevation of MYH, the mammalian homolog of the Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase, in mammalian cells. Recently, the human MYH was implicated in repair of oxidative DNA damage and shown to carry a mitochondrial localization sequence. Here, an induction of mtDNA damage and a time-dependent increase in the MYH level were detected with exposure of cells to 100 microM CoCl(2). In addition, the levels of proteins involved in cellular responses to hypoxia, ROS and nuclear DNA damage; hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha(HIF-1alpha), p53, p21 and PCNA were also modulated temporally. Earlier studies suggested that the mtDNA is a primary target for oxidative damage. Our findings extend these observations and suggest that activation of DNA repair processes is associated with the presence of mtDNA damage.

  4. Aberrant expression of DNA damage response proteins is associated with breast cancer subtype and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Gulnur; Himmetoglu, Cigdem; Jimenez, Rafael E.; Geyer, Susan M.; Wang, Wenle P.; Costinean, Stefan; Pilarski, Robert T.; Morrison, Carl; Suren, Dinc; Liu, Jianhua; Chen, Jingchun; Kamal, Jyoti; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Landmark studies of the status of DNA damage checkpoints and associated repair functions in preneoplastic and neoplastic cells has focused attention on importance of these pathways in cancer development, and inhibitors of repair pathways are in clinical trials for treatment of triple negative breast cancer. Cancer heterogeneity suggests that specific cancer subtypes will have distinct mechanisms of DNA damage survival, dependent on biological context. In this study, status of DNA damage response (DDR)-associated proteins was examined in breast cancer subtypes in association with clinical features; 479 breast cancers were examined for expression of DDR proteins γH2AX, BRCA1, pChk2, and p53, DNA damage-sensitive tumor suppressors Fhit and Wwox, and Wwox-interacting proteins Ap2α, Ap2γ, ErbB4, and correlations among proteins, tumor subtypes, and clinical features were assessed. In a multivariable model, triple negative cancers showed significantly reduced Fhit and Wwox, increased p53 and Ap2γ protein expression, and were significantly more likely than other subtype tumors to exhibit aberrant expression of two or more DDR-associated proteins. Disease-free survival was associated with subtype, Fhit and membrane ErbB4 expression level and aberrant expression of multiple DDR-associated proteins. These results suggest that definition of specific DNA repair and checkpoint defects in subgroups of triple negative cancer might identify new treatment targets. Expression of Wwox and its interactor, ErbB4, was highly significantly reduced in metastatic tissues vs. matched primary tissues, suggesting that Wwox signal pathway loss contributes to lymph node metastasis, perhaps by allowing survival of tumor cells that have detached from basement membranes, as proposed for the role of Wwox in ovarian cancer spread. PMID:21069451

  5. Rac1 protein signaling is required for DNA damage response stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons.

    PubMed

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-11-09

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons.

  6. Rac1 Protein Signaling Is Required for DNA Damage Response Stimulated by Topoisomerase II Poisons*

    PubMed Central

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C.; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons. PMID:23012366

  7. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase RNF4 is required for the response of human cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yili; Seifert, Anne; Chua, Joy Shijia; Maure, Jean-François; Golebiowski, Filip; Hay, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that RNF4, a highly conserved small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase, plays a critical role in the response of mammalian cells to DNA damage. Human cells in which RNF4 expression was ablated by siRNA or chicken DT40 cells with a homozygous deletion of the RNF4 gene displayed increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Recruitment of RNF4 to double-strand breaks required its RING and SUMO interaction motif (SIM) domains and DNA damage factors such as NBS1, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), RNF8, 53BP1, and BRCA1. In the absence of RNF4, these factors were still recruited to sites of DNA damage, but 53BP1, RNF8, and RNF168 displayed delayed clearance from such foci. SILAC-based proteomics of SUMO substrates revealed that MDC1 was SUMO-modified in response to ionizing radiation. As a consequence of SUMO modification, MDC1 recruited RNF4, which mediated ubiquitylation at the DNA damage site. Failure to recruit RNF4 resulted in defective loading of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 onto ssDNA. This appeared to be a consequence of reduced recruitment of the CtIP nuclease, resulting in inefficient end resection. Thus, RNF4 is a novel DNA damage-responsive protein that plays a role in homologous recombination and integrates SUMO modification and ubiquitin signaling in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. PMID:22661230

  8. DNA damage response and prostate cancer: defects, regulation and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Karanika, S; Karantanos, T; Li, L; Corn, P G; Thompson, T C

    2015-05-28

    DNA damage response (DDR) includes the activation of numerous cellular activities that prevent duplication of DNA lesions and maintain genomic integrity, which is critical for the survival of normal and cancer cells. Specific genes involved in the DDR such as BRCA1/2 and P53 are mutated during prostate cancer progression, while various oncogenic signaling such as Akt and c-Myc are activated, enhancing the replication stress and increasing the genomic instability of cancer cells. These events may render prostate cancer cells particularly sensitive to inhibition of specific DDR pathways, such as PARP in homologous recombination DNA repair and Chk1 in cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair, creating opportunities for synthetic lethality or synergistic cytotoxicity. Recent reports highlight the critical role of androgen receptor (AR) as a regulator of DDR genes, providing a rationale for combining DNA-damaging agents or targeted DDR inhibitors with hormonal manipulation or AR inhibition as treatment for aggressive disease. The aims of this review are to discuss specific DDR defects in prostate cancer that occur during disease progression, to summarize recent advances in understanding the regulation of DDR in prostate cancer, and to present potential therapeutic opportunities through combinational targeting of the intact components of DDR signaling pathways.

  9. DNA damage response regulation by microRNAs as a therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Majidinia, Maryam; Yousefi, Bahman

    2016-11-01

    The inability of cancer cells in taking care of DNA damages can lead to cancer development and/or progression. Due to the essential role of DNA repair in maintaining genomic stability, tightly controlled regulatory mechanism are required for these processes. Recent studies have shown a myriad of interactions among DNA damage response (DDR) components and miRNAs. While DDR modulates miRNA expression in transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels and affects miRNA degradation, miRNAs in turn, directly modulate the expression of multiple proteins in the DDR pathways, or indirectly fine-tune the expression of such proteins. A better understanding of DDR-miRNA interactions can facilitate the development of new anticancer agents targeting miRNAs involved in the DNA repair process. In this review, we provide a brief introduction about miRNA biogenesis and functions, DDR pathways, and recent findings about DDR-microRNA interactions. Finally, the therapeutic importance of miRNAs in modulation of DDR/DNA repair mechanisms will be discussed.

  10. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    PubMed

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Two- and three-dimensional live cell imaging of DNA damage response proteins.

    PubMed

    Beckta, Jason M; Henderson, Scott C; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2012-09-28

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious DNA lesions a cell can encounter. If left unrepaired, DSBs harbor great potential to generate mutations and chromosomal aberrations. To prevent this trauma from catalyzing genomic instability, it is crucial for cells to detect DSBs, activate the DNA damage response (DDR), and repair the DNA. When stimulated, the DDR works to preserve genomic integrity by triggering cell cycle arrest to allow for repair to take place or force the cell to undergo apoptosis. The predominant mechanisms of DSB repair occur through nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) (reviewed in). There are many proteins whose activities must be precisely orchestrated for the DDR to function properly. Herein, we describe a method for 2- and 3-dimensional (D) visualization of one of these proteins, 53BP1. The p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) localizes to areas of DSBs by binding to modified histones, forming foci within 5-15 minutes. The histone modifications and recruitment of 53BP1 and other DDR proteins to DSB sites are believed to facilitate the structural rearrangement of chromatin around areas of damage and contribute to DNA repair. Beyond direct participation in repair, additional roles have been described for 53BP1 in the DDR, such as regulating an intra-S checkpoint, a G2/M checkpoint, and activating downstream DDR proteins. Recently, it was discovered that 53BP1 does not form foci in response to DNA damage induced during mitosis, instead waiting for cells to enter G1 before localizing to the vicinity of DSBs. DDR proteins such as 53BP1 have been found to associate with mitotic structures (such as kinetochores) during the progression through mitosis. In this protocol we describe the use of 2- and 3-D live cell imaging to visualize the formation of 53BP1 foci in response to the DNA damaging agent camptothecin (CPT), as well as 53BP1's behavior during mitosis. Camptothecin is a topoisomerase I inhibitor that

  12. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRAper se(KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  13. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibits DNA damage response during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Benada, Jan; Burdová, Kamila; Lidak, Tomáš; von Morgen, Patrick; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    In response to genotoxic stress, cells protect their genome integrity by activation of a conserved DNA damage response (DDR) pathway that coordinates DNA repair and progression through the cell cycle. Extensive modification of the chromatin flanking the DNA lesion by ATM kinase and RNF8/RNF168 ubiquitin ligases enables recruitment of various repair factors. Among them BRCA1 and 53BP1 are required for homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, respectively. Whereas mechanisms of DDR are relatively well understood in interphase cells, comparatively less is known about organization of DDR during mitosis. Although ATM can be activated in mitotic cells, 53BP1 is not recruited to the chromatin until cells exit mitosis. Here we report mitotic phosphorylation of 53BP1 by Plk1 and Cdk1 that impairs the ability of 53BP1 to bind the ubiquitinated H2A and to properly localize to the sites of DNA damage. Phosphorylation of 53BP1 at S1618 occurs at kinetochores and in cytosol and is restricted to mitotic cells. Interaction between 53BP1 and Plk1 depends on the activity of Cdk1. We propose that activity of Cdk1 and Plk1 allows spatiotemporally controlled suppression of 53BP1 function during mitosis. PMID:25607646

  14. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibits DNA damage response during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Benada, Jan; Burdová, Kamila; Lidak, Tomáš; von Morgen, Patrick; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    In response to genotoxic stress, cells protect their genome integrity by activation of a conserved DNA damage response (DDR) pathway that coordinates DNA repair and progression through the cell cycle. Extensive modification of the chromatin flanking the DNA lesion by ATM kinase and RNF8/RNF168 ubiquitin ligases enables recruitment of various repair factors. Among them BRCA1 and 53BP1 are required for homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, respectively. Whereas mechanisms of DDR are relatively well understood in interphase cells, comparatively less is known about organization of DDR during mitosis. Although ATM can be activated in mitotic cells, 53BP1 is not recruited to the chromatin until cells exit mitosis. Here we report mitotic phosphorylation of 53BP1 by Plk1 and Cdk1 that impairs the ability of 53BP1 to bind the ubiquitinated H2A and to properly localize to the sites of DNA damage. Phosphorylation of 53BP1 at S1618 occurs at kinetochores and in cytosol and is restricted to mitotic cells. Interaction between 53BP1 and Plk1 depends on the activity of Cdk1. We propose that activity of Cdk1 and Plk1 allows spatiotemporally controlled suppression of 53BP1 function during mitosis.

  15. Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) confers resistance to DNA-damaging agents in human breast cancer by affecting DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Salzano, Marcella; Vázquez-Cedeira, Marta; Sanz-García, Marta; Valbuena, Alberto; Blanco, Sandra; Fernández, Isabel F.; Lazo, Pedro A.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) belongs to a group of sixteen kinases associated to a poorer prognosis in human breast carcinomas, particularly in estrogen receptor positive cases based on gene expression arrays. In this work we have studied the potential molecular mechanism by which the VRK1 protein can contribute to a poorer prognosis in this disease. For this aim it was first analyzed by immunohistochemistry the VRK1 protein level in normal breast and in one hundred and thirty six cases of human breast cancer. The effect of VRK1 to protect against DNA damage was determined by studying the effect of its knockdown on the formation of DNA repair foci assembled on 53BP1 in response to treatment with ionizing radiation or doxorubicin in two breast cancer cell lines. VRK1 protein was detected in normal breast and in breast carcinomas at high levels in ER and PR positive tumors. VRK1 protein level was significantly lower in ERBB2 positive cases. Next, to identify a mechanism that can link VRK1 to poorer prognosis, VRK1 was knocked-down in two breast cancer cell lines that were treated with ionizing radiation or doxorubicin, both inducing DNA damage. Loss of VRK1 resulted in reduced formation of DNA-damage repair foci complexes assembled on the 53BP1 scaffold protein, and this effect was independent of damaging agent or cell type. This observation is consistent with detection of high VRK1 protein levels in ER and PR positive breast cancers. We conclude that VRK1 can contribute to make these tumors more resistant to DNA damage-based therapies, such as ionizing radiation or doxorubicin, which is consistent with its association to a poor prognosis in ER positive breast cancer. VRK1 is potential target kinase for development of new specific inhibitors which can facilitate sensitization to other treatments in combination therapies; or alternatively be used as a new cancer drugs. PMID:24731990

  16. NAD homeostasis in the bacterial response to DNA/RNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Leonardo; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    In mammals, NAD represents a nodal point for metabolic regulation, and its availability is critical to genome stability. Several NAD-consuming enzymes are induced in various stress conditions and the consequent NAD decline is generally accompanied by the activation of NAD biosynthetic pathways to guarantee NAD homeostasis. In the bacterial world a similar scenario has only recently begun to surface. Here we review the current knowledge on the involvement of NAD homeostasis in bacterial stress response mechanisms. In particular, we focus on the participation of both NAD-consuming enzymes (DNA ligase, mono(ADP-ribosyl) transferase, sirtuins, and RNA 2'-phosphotransferase) and NAD biosynthetic enzymes (both de novo, and recycling enzymes) in the response to DNA/RNA damage. As further supporting evidence for such a link, a genomic context analysis is presented showing several conserved associations between NAD homeostasis and stress responsive genes.

  17. Expression of DNA damage response proteins in cervical cancer patients treated with radical chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ho, C K; Kornaga, E N; Klimowicz, A C; Enwere, E K; Dean, M; Bebb, G D; Phan, T; Ghatage, P; Magliocco, A M; Lees-Miller, S P; Doll, C M

    2017-04-01

    The management of locally advanced cervical cancer has improved significantly with the advent of cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) as the primary treatment regimen. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of patients fail to respond or relapse on this treatment and have a very poor prognosis. Our goal was to determine the prognostic value of a panel of proteins involved in detection and repair of DNA damage. We performed fluorescence immunohistochemistry, and used software analysis to assess expression of DNA damage response proteins ATM, DNA-PKcs, PARP-1, Ku70 and Ku86 in 117 pre-treatment specimens from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. We compared expression to clinicopathologic correlates to determine prognostic significance. Five-year progression-free survival was significantly lower in the low expressors than in high expressors of ATM (35% vs. 58%, p=0.044) and PARP-1 (24% vs. 61%, p=0.003), and showed a trend to significance for DNA-PKcs (30% vs. 60%, p=0.050). Low expression of the same proteins also correlated significantly with lower overall survival. In multivariable analysis, adjusted for FIGO stage and tumor size, low ATM and PARP-1 expression was significantly associated with both poorer progression-free and overall survival. Pairwise analyses indicated that expression levels of these proteins were correlated. Expression of DNA damage response proteins in cervical cancer is associated with outcome in patients treated with CRT. Immunohistochemical analysis of these proteins may be useful in guiding treatment decisions in such patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Interaction Landscape Reveals Critical Requirements for Schizosaccharomyces pombe Brc1 in DNA Damage Response Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Arancha; Roguev, Assen; Krogan, Nevan J.; Russell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Brc1, which was first identified as a high-copy, allele-specific suppressor of a mutation impairing the Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, protects genome integrity during normal DNA replication and when cells are exposed to toxic compounds that stall or collapse replication forks. The C-terminal tandem BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminus) domain of fission yeast Brc1 docks with phosphorylated histone H2A (γH2A)-marked chromatin formed by ATR/Rad3 checkpoint kinase at arrested and damaged replication forks; however, how Brc1 functions in relation to other genome protection modules remains unclear. Here, an epistatic mini-array profile reveals critical requirements for Brc1 in mutants that are defective in multiple DNA damage response pathways, including checkpoint signaling by Rad3-Rad26/ATR-ATRIP kinase, DNA repair by Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex, replication fork stabilization by Mrc1/claspin and Swi1-Swi3/Timeless-Tipin, and control of ubiquitin-regulated proteolysis by the COP9 signalosome (CSN). Exogenous genotoxins enhance these negative genetic interactions. Rad52 and RPA foci are increased in CSN-defective cells, and loss of γH2A increases genotoxin sensitivity, indicating a critical role for the γH2A-Brc1 module in stabilizing replication forks in CSN-defective cells. A negative genetic interaction with the Nse6 subunit of Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex indicates that the DNA repair functions of Brc1 and Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex are at least partially independent. Rtt107, the Brc1 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has a very different pattern of genetic interactions, indicating evolutionary divergence of functions and DNA damage responses. PMID:25795664

  19. A novel transcription factor gene FHS1 is involved in the DNA damage response in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hokyoung; Fu, Minmin; Lee, Yoonji; Lim, Jae Yun; Min, Kyunghun; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation and the maintenance of genome integrity are crucial for the development and virulence of the pathogenic plant fungus Fusarium graminearum. To identify transcription factors (TFs) related to these processes, four DNA-damaging agents were applied to screen a F. graminearum TF mutant library. Sixteen TFs were identified to be likely involved in DNA damage responses. Fhs1 is a fungal specific Zn(II)2Cys6 TF that localises exclusively to nuclei. fhs1 deletion mutants were hypersensitive to hydroxyurea and defective in mitotic cell division. Moreover, deletion of FHS1 resulted in defects in perithecia production and virulence and led to the accumulation of DNA damage. Our genetic evidence demonstrated that the FHS1-associated signalling pathway for DNA damage response is independent of the ATM or ATR pathways. This study identified sixteen genes involved in the DNA damage response and is the first to characterise the novel transcription factor gene FHS1, which is involved in the DNA damage response. The results provide new insights into mechanisms underlying DNA damage responses in fungi, including F. graminearum. PMID:26888604

  20. DNA damage response (DDR) via NKX3.1 expression in prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Erbaykent-Tepedelen, Burcu; Karamil, Selda; Gonen-Korkmaz, Ceren; Korkmaz, Kemal S

    2014-05-01

    It has been reported that NKX3.1 an androgen-regulated homeobox gene restricted to prostate and testicular tissues, encodes a homeobox protein, which transcriptionally regulates oxidative damage responses and enhances topoisomerase I re-ligation by a direct interaction with the ATM protein in prostate cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of NKX3.1 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We demonstrate that the DNA damage induced by CPT-11 (irinotecan, a topo I inhibitor), doxorubicin (a topo II inhibitor), and H2O2 (a mediator of oxidative damage), but not by etoposide (another topo II inhibitor), is negatively influenced by NKX3.1 expression. We also examined γH2AX((S139)) foci formation and observed that the overexpression of NKX3.1 resulted a remarkable decrease in the formation of γH2AX((S139)) foci. Intriguingly, we observed in NKX3.1 silencing studies that the depletion of NKX3.1 correlated with a significant decrease in the levels of p-ATM((S1981)) and γH2AX((S139)). The data imply that the DNA damage response (DDR) can be altered, perhaps via a decrease in the topoisomerase I re-ligation function; this is consistent with the physical association of NKX3.1 with DDR mediators upon treatment of both PC-3 and LNCaP cells with CPT-11. Furthermore, the depletion of NKX3.1 resulted in a G1/S progression via the facilitation of an increase in E2F stabilization concurrent with the suppressed DDR. Thus, the topoisomerase I inhibitor-mediated DNA damage enhanced the physical association of NKX3.1 with γH2AX((S139)) on the chromatin in LNCaP cells, whereas NKX3.1 in the soluble fraction was associated with p-ATM((S1981)) and RAD50 in these cells. Overall, the data suggest that androgens and NKX3.1 expression regulate the progression of the cell cycle and concurrently activate the DDR. Therefore, androgen withdrawal may augment the development of an error-prone phenotype and, subsequently, the loss of DNA damage control during prostate cancer

  1. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  2. The interplay among chromatin dynamics, cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms modulates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Federico; Giannattasio, Michele; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Plevani, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    Cells are continuously under the assault of endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress that challenges the integrity of DNA. To cope with such a formidable task cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms, known as checkpoints, and a variety of DNA repair systems responding to different types of DNA lesions. These lesions occur in the context of the chromatin structure and, as expected for all DNA transactions, the cellular response to DNA damage is going to be influenced by the chromatin enviroment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies implicating chromatin remodelling factors and histone modifications in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and in checkpoint activation in response to UV lesions.

  3. SIRT4 has tumor suppressive activity and regulates the cellular metabolic response to DNA damage by inhibiting mitochondrial glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Min; Xiao, Cuiying; Finley, Lydia W.S; Lahusen, Tyler; Souza, Amanda L.; Pierce, Kerry; Li, Ying-Hua; Wang, Xiaoxu; Laurent, Gaëlle; German, Natalie J.; Xu, Xiaoling; Li, Cuiling; Wang, Rui-Hong; Lee, Jaewon; Csibi, Alfredo; Cerione, Richard; Blenis, John; Clish, Clary B.; Kimmelman, Alec; Deng, Chu-Xia; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage elicits a cellular signaling response that initiates cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. Here we find that DNA damage triggers a critical block in glutamine metabolism, which is required for proper DNA damage responses. This block requires the mitochondrial SIRT4, which is induced by numerous genotoxic agents and represses the metabolism of glutamine into TCA cycle. SIRT4 loss leads to both increased glutamine-dependent proliferation and stress-induced genomic instability, resulting in tumorigenic phenotypes. Moreover, SIRT4 knockout mice spontaneously develop lung tumors. Our data uncover SIRT4 as an important component of the DNA damage response pathway that orchestrates a metabolic block in glutamine metabolism, cell cycle arrest and tumor suppression. PMID:23562301

  4. Stop pulling my strings — what telomeres taught us about the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lazzerini-Denchi, Eros; Sfeir, Agnel

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cells have evolved specialized mechanisms to sense and repair double-strand breaks (DSBs) to maintain genomic stability. However, in certain cases, the activity of these pathways can lead to aberrant DNA repair, genomic instability and tumorigenesis. One such case is DNA repair at the natural ends of linear chromosomes, known as telomeres, which can lead to chromosome-end fusions. Here, we review data obtained over the past decade and discuss the mechanisms that protect mammalian chromosome ends from the DNA damage response. We also discuss how telomere research has helped to uncover key steps in DSB repair. Last, we summarize how dysfunctional telomeres and the ensuing genomic instability drive the progression of cancer. PMID:27165790

  5. RNF8- and Ube2S-Dependent Ubiquitin Lysine 11-Linkage Modification in Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Paul, Atanu; Wang, Bin

    2017-05-18

    Ubiquitin modification of proteins plays pivotal roles in the cellular response to DNA damage. Given the complexity of ubiquitin conjugation due to the formation of poly-conjugates of different linkages, functional roles of linkage-specific ubiquitin modification at DNA damage sites are largely unclear. We identify that Lys11-linkage ubiquitin modification occurs at DNA damage sites in an ATM-dependent manner, and ubiquitin-modifying enzymes, including Ube2S E2-conjugating enzyme and RNF8 E3 ligase, are responsible for the assembly of Lys11-linkage conjugates on damaged chromatin, including histone H2A/H2AX. We show that RNF8- and Ube2S-dependent Lys11-linkage ubiquitin conjugation plays an important role in regulating DNA damage-induced transcriptional silencing, distinct from the role of Lys63-linkage ubiquitin in the recruitment of DNA damage repair proteins 53BP1 and BRCA1. Thus, our study highlights the importance of linkage-specific ubiquitination at DNA damage sites, and it reveals that Lys11-linkage ubiquitin modification plays a crucial role in the DNA damage response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel role for non-ubiquitinated FANCD2 in response to hydroxyurea induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyong; Bosques, Linette; Sung, Patrick; Kupfer, Gary M

    2017-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease of bone marrow failure, cancer susceptibility, and sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. FANCD2, the central protein of the FA pathway, is monoubiquitinated upon DNA damage, such as crosslinkers and replication blockers such as hydroxyurea (HU). Even though FA cells demonstrate unequivocal sensitivity to crosslinkers, such as mitomycin C (MMC), we find that they are largely resistant to hydroxyurea (HU), except for cells absent for expression of FANCD2. FANCD2, RAD51, and RAD18 form a complex, which is enhanced upon HU exposure. Surprisingly, while FANCD2 is required for this enhanced interaction, its monoubiquitination is not. Similarly, non-ubiquitinated FANCD2 can still support PCNA monoubiquitination. RAD51, but not BRCA2, is also required for PCNA monoubiquitination in response to HU, suggesting that this function is independent of homologous recombination (HR). We further show that TLS polymerase PolH chromatin localization is decreased in FANCD2 deficient cells, FANCD2 siRNA knock down cells, and RAD51 siRNA knock down cells, and PolH knockdown results in HU sensitivity only. Our data suggest that FANCD2 and RAD51 play an important role in PCNA monoubiquitination and TLS in a FANCD2 monoubiquitination and HR-independent manner in response to HU. This effect is not observed with MMC treatment, suggesting a non-canonical function for the FA pathway in response to different types of DNA damage. PMID:25893307

  7. DNA Damage Response Assessments in Human Tumor Samples Provide Functional Biomarkers of Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Willers, Henning; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Liu, Qi; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Wirth, Lori J.; Krause, Mechthild; von Neubeck, Cläre

    2015-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers are urgently needed for individualization of radiation therapy and treatment with radiosensitizing anti-cancer agents. Genomic profiling of human cancers will provide us with unprecedented insight into the mutational landscape of genes directly or indirectly involved in the response to radiation-induced DNA damage. However, to what extent this wealth of structural information about the cancer genome will produce biomarkers of sensitivity to radiation remains to be seen. Investigators are increasingly studying the subnuclear accumulation (i.e., foci) of proteins in the DNA damage response (DDR), such as γ-H2AX, 53BP1, or RAD51, as a surrogate of treatment sensitivity. Recent findings from preclinical studies have demonstrated the predictive potential of DDR foci by correlating foci with clinically relevant endpoints such as tumor control probability. Therefore, pre-clinical investigations of DDR foci responses are increasingly moving into cells and tissues from patients, which is the major focus of this review. The advantage of using DDR foci as functional biomarkers is that they can detect alterations in DNA repair due to various mechanisms. Moreover, they provide a global measurement of DDR network function without needing to know the identities of all the components, many of which remain unknown. Foci assays are thus expected to yield functional insight that may complement or supersede genomic information, thereby giving radiation oncologists unique opportunities to individualize cancer treatments in the near future. PMID:26384272

  8. DNA damage and DNA damage response in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells following exposure to 2-nitrobenzanthrone and 3-nitrobenzanthrone: role in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Oya, Elisabeth; Ovrevik, Johan; Arlt, Volker M; Nagy, Eszter; Phillips, David H; Holme, Jørn A

    2011-11-01

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) are mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental pollutants found in diesel exhaust and on urban air pollution particles. In the present study, human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 2-nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA) and 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA). DNA damage responses were compared to those observed after exposure to 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Examination by microscopy revealed that 3-NBA was the most potent toxic compound while weaker responses were observed with 1-NP and B[a]P. Most interestingly, 2-NBA did not induce cell death or any other stress-related responses. 3-NBA induced a typical apoptotic cell death judged by nuclear condensation and little plasma membrane damage as well as cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Exposure to 3-NBA resulted in an accumulation of cells in S-phase, and further analysis by Western blotting, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry revealed that 3-NBA induced a DNA damage response characterized by phosphorylation of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated), checkpoint kinase (Chk) 2/Chk1, H2AX and p53. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α inhibited 3-NBA-induced apoptosis while small effects were seen using pifithrin-μ, suggesting that 3-NBA-induced cell death is a result of transcriptional activation of p53. In conclusion, 3-NBA is a potent inducer of apoptosis, which seemed to be triggered by the DNA damage response. Furthermore, a change of the nitro-group to the second position (i.e. 2-NBA) dramatically changed the cellular reactivity of the compound.

  9. Host DNA Damage Response Factors Localize to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus DNA Replication Sites To Support Efficient Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Sabrina H.; Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Buck, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating evidence indicates a role for Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in the development of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), making MCPyV the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. With the high prevalence of MCPyV infection and the increasing amount of MCC diagnosis, there is a need to better understand the virus and its oncogenic potential. In this study, we examined the relationship between the host DNA damage response (DDR) and MCPyV replication. We found that components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways accumulate in MCPyV large T antigen (LT)-positive nuclear foci in cells infected with native MCPyV virions. To further study MCPyV replication, we employed our previously established system, in which recombinant MCPyV episomal DNA is autonomously replicated in cultured cells. Similar to native MCPyV infection, where both MCPyV origin and LT are present, the host DDR machinery colocalized with LT in distinct nuclear foci. Immunofluorescence in situ hybridization and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation analysis showed that these DDR proteins and MCPyV LT in fact colocalized at the actively replicating MCPyV replication complexes, which were absent when a replication-defective LT mutant or an MCPyV-origin mutant was introduced in place of wild-type LT or wild-type viral origin. Inhibition of DDR kinases using chemical inhibitors and ATR/ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown reduced MCPyV DNA replication without significantly affecting LT expression or the host cell cycle. This study demonstrates that these host DDR factors are important for MCPyV DNA replication, providing new insight into the host machinery involved in the MCPyV life cycle. IMPORTANCE MCPyV is the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. However, the MCPyV life cycle and its oncogenic mechanism remain poorly understood. In this report, we show that, in cells infected with native MCPyV virions, components of the ATM- and ATR

  10. Recurrent Initiation: A Mechanism for Triggering p53 Pulses in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Eric; Mock, Caroline; Bhan, Irun; Loewer, Alexander; Lahav, Galit

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage initiates a series of p53 pulses. Although much is known about the interactions surrounding p53, little is known about which interactions contribute to p53’s dynamical behavior. The simplest explanation is that these pulses are oscillations intrinsic to the p53/Mdm2 negative feedback loop. Here we present evidence that this simple mechanism is insufficient to explain p53 pulses; we show that p53 pulses are externally driven by pulses in the upstream signaling kinases, ATM and Chk2, and that the negative feedback between p53 and ATM, via Wip1, is essential for maintaining the uniform shape of p53 pulses. We propose that p53 pulses result from repeated initiation by ATM which is re-activated by persistent DNA damage. Our study emphasizes the importance of collecting quantitative dynamic information at high temporal resolution for understanding the regulation of signaling pathways and opens new ways to manipulate p53 pulses to ask questions about their function in response to DNA damage. PMID:18471974

  11. Exposure to copper induces oxidative and stress responses and DNA damage in the coral Montastraea franksi.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, J A; Mitchelmore, C L; Jones, R; O'Dea, A; Seymour, S

    2013-04-01

    Copper is a common chemical contaminant in coastal environments, including coral reefs. Ecotoxicological studies have demonstrated that exposure to copper can cause stress and detrimental effects in both host cnidarian and algal symbionts. The objective of this study was to investigate the sublethal effects of copper on the reef-building coral Montastraea franksi, by identifying genes with altered expression in corals exposed to dissolved copper, and by measuring the extent of damage to DNA in response to copper exposure. Corals exposed to 30 μg L(-1) copper for 48 h experienced significant DNA damage and displayed changes in expression patterns of genes that are known to play role cellular and oxidative stress responses. Corals also experienced changes in gene expression of genes that are not already known to play roles in oxidative stress in corals. Our data suggest that these genes may either play roles directly in mediating a stress response, or may be genes acting downstream of the stress response. These include an ETS domain-containing transcription factor related to the ETS1 family of transcription factors, known in mammals to mediate development, disease, and stress response, and two genes that are associated with biomineralization: galaxin, a protein from the organic matrix of the coral skeleton, and a coral-specific gene SCRIP2.

  12. Ccr4-Not Complex mRNA Deadenylase Activity Contributes to DNA Damage Responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Traven, Ana; Hammet, Andrew; Tenis, Nora; Denis, Clyde L.; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    DNA damage checkpoints regulate gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Some components of the yeast Ccr4-Not complex, which regulates transcription as well as transcript turnover, have previously been linked to DNA damage responses, but it is unclear if this involves transcriptional or post-transcriptional functions. Here we show that CCR4 and CAF1, which together encode the major cytoplasmic mRNA deadenylase complex, have complex genetic interactions with the checkpoint genes DUN1, MRC1, RAD9, and RAD17 in response to DNA-damaging agents hydroxyurea (HU) and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). The exonuclease-inactivating ccr4-1 point mutation mimics ccr4Δ phenotypes, including synthetic HU hypersensitivity with dun1Δ, demonstrating that Ccr4-Not mRNA deadenylase activity is required for DNA damage responses. However, ccr4Δ and caf1Δ DNA damage phenotypes and genetic interactions with checkpoint genes are not identical, and deletions of some Not components that are believed to predominantly function at the transcriptional level rather than mRNA turnover, e.g., not5Δ, also lead to increased DNA damage sensitivity and synthetic HU hypersensitivity with dun1Δ. Taken together, our data thus suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional functions of the Ccr4-Not complex contribute to the DNA damage response affecting gene expression in a complex manner. PMID:15466434

  13. Ccr4-not complex mRNA deadenylase activity contributes to DNA damage responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Traven, Ana; Hammet, Andrew; Tenis, Nora; Denis, Clyde L; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    DNA damage checkpoints regulate gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Some components of the yeast Ccr4-Not complex, which regulates transcription as well as transcript turnover, have previously been linked to DNA damage responses, but it is unclear if this involves transcriptional or post-transcriptional functions. Here we show that CCR4 and CAF1, which together encode the major cytoplasmic mRNA deadenylase complex, have complex genetic interactions with the checkpoint genes DUN1, MRC1, RAD9, and RAD17 in response to DNA-damaging agents hydroxyurea (HU) and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). The exonuclease-inactivating ccr4-1 point mutation mimics ccr4Delta phenotypes, including synthetic HU hypersensitivity with dun1Delta, demonstrating that Ccr4-Not mRNA deadenylase activity is required for DNA damage responses. However, ccr4Delta and caf1Delta DNA damage phenotypes and genetic interactions with checkpoint genes are not identical, and deletions of some Not components that are believed to predominantly function at the transcriptional level rather than mRNA turnover, e.g., not5Delta, also lead to increased DNA damage sensitivity and synthetic HU hypersensitivity with dun1Delta. Taken together, our data thus suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional functions of the Ccr4-Not complex contribute to the DNA damage response affecting gene expression in a complex manner.

  14. Adaptive Response in Mice Exposed to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Fields: Primary DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Zhang, Jie; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of adaptive response (AR) in animal and human cells exposed to ionizing radiation is well documented in scientific literature. We have examined whether such AR could be induced in mice exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields (RF) used for wireless communications. Mice were pre-exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 µW/cm2 power density for 4 hours/day for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days and then subjected to an acute dose of 3 Gy γ-radiation. The primary DNA damage in the form of alkali labile base damage and single strand breaks in the DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The results indicated that the extent of damage in mice which were pre-exposed to RF for 1 day and then subjected to γ-radiation was similar and not significantly different from those exposed to γ-radiation alone. However, mice which were pre-exposed to RF for 3, 5, 7 and 14 days showed progressively decreased damage and was significantly different from those exposed to γ-radiation alone. Thus, the data indicated that RF pre-exposure is capable of inducing AR and suggested that the pre-exposure for more than 4 hours for 1 day is necessary to elicit such AR. PMID:22389679

  15. EdU induces DNA damage response and cell death in mESC in culture.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, Fanni; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Jackson, Dean A

    2013-03-01

    Recently, a novel DNA replication precursor analogue called 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) has been widely used to monitor DNA synthesis as an alternative to bromodeoxyuridine. Use of EdU benefits from simplicity and reproducibility and the simple chemical detection systems allows excellent preservation of nuclear structure. However, the alkyne moiety is highly reactive, raising the possibility that incorporation might compromise genome stability. To assess the extent of possible DNA damage, we have analysed the effect of EdU incorporation into DNA during short- and long-term cell culture using a variety of cell lines. We show that EdU incorporation has no measurable impact on the rate of elongation of replication forks during synthesis. However, using different cell lines we find that during long-term cell culture variable responses to EdU incorporation are seen, which range from delayed cell cycle progression to complete cell cycle arrest. The most profound phenotypes were seen in mouse embryonic stem cells, which following incorporation of EdU accumulated in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle before undergoing apoptosis. In long-term cell culture, EdU incorporation also triggered a DNA damage response in all cell types analysed. Our study shows that while EdU is extremely useful to tag sites of on-going replication, for long-term studies (i.e. beyond the cell cycle in which labelling is performed), a careful analysis of cell cycle perturbations must be performed in order to ensure that any conclusions made after EdU treatment are not a direct consequence of EdU-dependent activation of cell stress responses.

  16. FBXL5-mediated degradation of single-stranded DNA-binding protein hSSB1 controls DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Bin; Tang, Nai-Wang; Xu, Yun-Hua; Ye, Xiang-Yun; Li, Zi-Ming; Niu, Xiao-Min; Shen, Sheng-Ping; Lu, Shun; Xu, Ling

    2014-10-01

    Human single-strand (ss) DNA binding proteins 1 (hSSB1) has been shown to participate in DNA damage response and maintenance of genome stability by regulating the initiation of ATM-dependent signaling. ATM phosphorylates hSSB1 and prevents hSSB1 from ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. However, the E3 ligase that targets hSSB1 for destruction is still unknown. Here, we report that hSSB1 is the bona fide substrate for an Fbxl5-containing SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F box) E3 ligase. Fbxl5 interacts with and targets hSSB1 for ubiquitination and degradation, which could be prevented by ATM-mediated hSSB1 T117 phosphorylation. Furthermore, cells overexpression of Fbxl5 abrogated the cellular response to DSBs, including activation of ATM and phosphorylation of ATM targets and exhibited increased radiosensitivity, chemosensitivity and defective checkpoint activation after genotoxic stress stimuli. Moreover, the protein levels of hSSB1 and Fbxl5 showed an inverse correlation in lung cancer cells lines and clinical lung cancer samples. Therefore, Fbxl5 may negatively modulate hSSB1 to regulate DNA damage response, implicating Fbxl5 as a novel, promising therapeutic target for lung cancers. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Is post-transcriptional stabilization, splicing and translation of selective mRNAs a key to the DNA damage response?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network that consists of two components—a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes to arrest the cell cycle along with recruitment of repair machinery to damaged DNA, followed by a delayed transcriptional response that promotes cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves post-transcriptional control of mRNA stability, splicing and translation as a critical part of the DNA damage response. Here, we describe recent work implicating DNA damage-dependent modification of RNA-binding proteins that are responsible for some of these mRNA effects, highlighting recent work on post-transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle checkpoint protein/apoptosis inducer Gadd45α by the checkpoint kinase MAPKAP Kinase-2. PMID:21173571

  18. RAD50 targeting impairs DNA damage response and sensitizes human breast cancer cells to cisplatin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Pérez, Ali; Rafaelli, Lourdes E; Ramírez-Torres, Nayeli; Aréchaga-Ocampo, Elena; Frías, Sara; Sánchez, Silvia; Marchat, Laurence A; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Bautista-Piña, Verónica; Carlos-Reyes, Ángeles; López-Camarillo, César

    2014-01-01

    In tumor cells the effectiveness of anti-neoplastic agents that cause cell death by induction of DNA damage is influenced by DNA repair activity. RAD50 protein plays key roles in DNA double strand breaks repair (DSBs), which is crucial to safeguard genome integrity and sustain tumor suppression. However, its role as a potential therapeutic target has not been addressed in breast cancer. Our aim in the present study was to analyze the expression of RAD50 protein in breast tumors, and evaluate the effects of RAD50-targeted inhibition on the cytotoxicity exerted by cisplatin and anthracycline and taxane-based therapies in breast cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry assays on tissue microarrays indicate that the strong staining intensity of RAD50 was reduced in 14% of breast carcinomas in comparison with normal tissues. Remarkably, RAD50 silencing by RNA interference significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Combinations of cisplatin with doxorubicin and paclitaxel drugs induced synergistic effects in early cell death of RAD50-deficient MCF-7, SKBR3, and T47D breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we found an increase in the number of DSBs, and delayed phosphorylation of histone H2AX after cisplatin treatment in RAD50-silenced cells. These cellular events were associated to a dramatical increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease of cell number in metaphase. In conclusion, our data showed that RAD50 abrogation impairs DNA damage response and sensitizes breast cancer cells to cisplatin-combined therapies. We propose that the development and use of inhibitors to manipulate RAD50 levels might represent a promising strategy to sensitize breast cancer cells to DNA damaging agents. PMID:24642965

  19. Site-specific DICER and DROSHA RNA products control the DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Michelini, Flavia; Saxena, Alka; Tang, Dave; de Hoon, Michiel; Anelli, Viviana; Mione, Marina; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-08-09

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in an increasingly recognized number of cellular events. Some ncRNAs are processed by DICER and DROSHA RNases to give rise to small double-stranded RNAs involved in RNA interference (RNAi). The DNA-damage response (DDR) is a signalling pathway that originates from a DNA lesion and arrests cell proliferation3. So far, DICER and DROSHA RNA products have not been reported to control DDR activation. Here we show, in human, mouse and zebrafish, that DICER and DROSHA, but not downstream elements of the RNAi pathway, are necessary to activate the DDR upon exogenous DNA damage and oncogene-induced genotoxic stress, as studied by DDR foci formation and by checkpoint assays. DDR foci are sensitive to RNase A treatment, and DICER- and DROSHA-dependent RNA products are required to restore DDR foci in RNase-A-treated cells. Through RNA deep sequencing and the study of DDR activation at a single inducible DNA double-strand break, we demonstrate that DDR foci formation requires site-specific DICER- and DROSHA-dependent small RNAs, named DDRNAs, which act in a MRE11–RAD50–NBS1-complex-dependent manner (MRE11 also known as MRE11A; NBS1 also known as NBN). DDRNAs, either chemically synthesized or in vitro generated by DICER cleavage, are sufficient to restore the DDR in RNase-A-treated cells, also in the absence of other cellular RNAs. Our results describe an unanticipated direct role of a novel class of ncRNAs in the control of DDR activation at sites of DNA damage.

  20. DNA damage and DNA damage responses in THP-1 monocytes after exposure to spores of either Stachybotrys chartarum or Aspergillus versicolor or to T-2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Rakkestad, Kirsten E; Skaar, Ida; Ansteinsson, Vibeke E; Solhaug, Anita; Holme, Jørn A; Pestka, James J; Samuelsen, Jan T; Dahlman, Hans J; Hongslo, Jan K; Becher, Rune

    2010-05-01

    We have characterized cell death in THP-1 cells after exposure to heat-treated spores from satratoxin G-producing Stachybotrys chartarum isolate IBT 9631, atranone-producing S. chartarum isolate IBT 9634, and sterigmatocystin-producing Aspergillus versicolor isolate IBT 3781, as well as the trichothecenes T-2 and satratoxin G. Spores induced cell death within 3-6 h, with Stachybotrys appearing most potent. IBT 9631 induced both apoptosis and necrosis, while IBT 9634 and IBT 3781 induced mostly necrosis. T-2 toxin and satratoxin G caused mainly apoptosis. Comet assay +/- formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase showed that only the spore exposures induced early (3h) oxidative DNA damage. Likewise, only the spores increased the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that spores as particles may induce ROS formation and oxidative DNA damage. Increased Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) phosphorylation, indicating DNA damage, was observed after all exposures. The DNA damage response induced by IBT 9631 as well as satratoxin G was characterized by rapid (15 min) activation of p38 and H2AX. The p38 inhibitor SB 202190 reduced IBT 9631-induced H2AX activation. Both IBT 9631 and T-2 induced activation of Chk2 and H2AX after 3 h. The ATM inhibitor KU 55933, as well as transfection of cells with ATM siRNA, reduced this activation, suggesting a partial role for ATM as upstream activator for Chk2 and H2AX. In conclusion, activation of Chk2 and H2AX correlated with spore- and toxin-induced apoptosis. For IBT 9631 and satratoxin G, additional factors may be involved in triggering apoptosis, most notably p38 activation.

  1. DNA Damage and DNA Damage Responses in THP-1 Monocytes after Exposure to Spores of either Stachybotrys chartarum or Aspergillus versicolor or to T-2 toxin

    PubMed Central

    Rakkestad, Kirsten E.; Skaar, Ida; Ansteinsson, Vibeke E.; Solhaug, Anita; Holme, Jørn A.; Pestka, James J.; Samuelsen, Jan T.; Dahlman, Hans J.; Hongslo, Jan K.; Becher, Rune

    2010-01-01

    We have characterized cell death in THP-1 cells after exposure to heat-treated spores from satratoxin G–producing Stachybotrys chartarum isolate IBT 9631, atranone-producing S. chartarum isolate IBT 9634, and sterigmatocystin-producing Aspergillus versicolor isolate IBT 3781, as well as the trichothecenes T-2 and satratoxin G. Spores induced cell death within 3–6 h, with Stachybotrys appearing most potent. IBT 9631 induced both apoptosis and necrosis, while IBT 9634 and IBT 3781 induced mostly necrosis. T-2 toxin and satratoxin G caused mainly apoptosis. Comet assay ± formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase showed that only the spore exposures induced early (3h) oxidative DNA damage. Likewise, only the spores increased the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that spores as particles may induce ROS formation and oxidative DNA damage. Increased Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) phosphorylation, indicating DNA damage, was observed after all exposures. The DNA damage response induced by IBT 9631 as well as satratoxin G was characterized by rapid (15 min) activation of p38 and H2AX. The p38 inhibitor SB 202190 reduced IBT 9631–induced H2AX activation. Both IBT 9631 and T-2 induced activation of Chk2 and H2AX after 3 h. The ATM inhibitor KU 55933, as well as transfection of cells with ATM siRNA, reduced this activation, suggesting a partial role for ATM as upstream activator for Chk2 and H2AX. In conclusion, activation of Chk2 and H2AX correlated with spore- and toxin-induced apoptosis. For IBT 9631 and satratoxin G, additional factors may be involved in triggering apoptosis, most notably p38 activation. PMID:20150440

  2. Probing the Dynamic Interaction between Damaged DNA and a Cellular Responsive Protein Using a Piezoelectric Mass Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yulong; Xie, Yunfeng; Wu, Kui; Huang, Yanyan; Wang, Fuyi; Zhao, Rui

    2017-03-15

    The binding events between damaged DNA and recognition biomolecules are of great interest for understanding the activity of DNA-damaging drugs and the related DNA repair networks. Herein, a simple and sensitive sensor system was tailored for real-time probing of the dynamic molecular recognition between cisplatin-damaged-DNA (cisPt-DNA) and a cellular responsive protein, high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1). By integration of flow injection analysis (FIA) with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the interaction time-course of cisPt-DNA and HMGB1 domain A (HMGB1a) was investigated. The highly specific sensing interface was carefully designed and fabricated using cisPt-DNA as recognition element. A hybrid self-assembled monolayer consisting of cysteamine and mercaptohexanol was introduced to resist nonspecific adsorption. The calculated kinetic parameters (kass and kdiss) and the dissociation constant (KD) demonstrated the rapid recognition and tight binding of HMGB1a toward cisPt-DNA. Molecular docking was employed to simulate the complex formed by cisPt-DNA and HMGB1a. The tight binding of such a DNA-damage responsive complex is appealing for the downstream molecular recognition event related to the resistance to DNA repair. This continuous-flow QCM biosensor is an ideal tool for studying specific interactions between drug-damaged-DNAs and their recognition proteins in a physiological-relevant environment, and will provide a potential sensor platform for rapid screening and evaluating metal anticancer drugs.

  3. Giardia duodenalis Rad52 protein: biochemical characterization and response upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Miguel, Rosa María; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Bazán-Tejeda, María Luisa; Torres-Huerta, Ana Laura; Martínez-Reyes, Diego A; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María

    2017-08-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a flagellated binucleated protozoan that colonizes the small intestine in mammals, causing giardiasis, acute or chronic diarrhea. DNA double strand break either endogenously or exogenously generated is a major insult to DNA and its repair by homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genomic stability. During HR, Rad52 plays key roles in the loading of the Rad51 recombinase, and the annealing of the second double-strand break end to the displaced strand of the D-loop structure. Among the functions found in vitro in yeast and human Rad52 protein are: ssDNA or dsDNA binding activity, ability to anneal bare or RPA coated-ssDNA, as well as multimeric ring formation. In this work, we searched for conserved domains in a putative Rad52 protein from G. duodenalis (GdRad52). Its coding sequence was cloned, expressed and purified to study its biochemical properties. rGdRad52 binds to dsDNA and ssDNA, with greater affinity for the latter. Likewise, rGdRad52 promotes annealing of DNA uncoated and coated with GdRPA1. rGdRad52 interacts with GdDMC1B and with GdRPA1 protein as shown in far western blotting assay. Additionally, rGdRad52 formed multimeric rings as observed by electronic microscopy. Finally, GdRad52 is over expressed in response upon DNA damage inflicted on trophozoites. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe.

  5. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Yume; Tada, Shusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  6. Investigation of DNA Damage Dose-Response Kinetics after Ionizing Radiation Schemes Similar to CT Protocols.

    PubMed

    Elgart, S Robin; Bostani, Maryam; Mok, Karen C; Adibi, Ali; Ruehm, Stefan; Enzmann, Dieter; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Iwamoto, Keisuke S

    2015-06-01

    Although there has been extensive research done on the biological response to doses of ionizing radiation relevant to radiodiagnostic procedures, very few studies have examined radiation schemes similar to those frequently utilized in CT exams. Instead of a single exposure, CT exams are often made up of a series of scans separated on the order of minutes. DNA damage dose-response kinetics after radiation doses and schemes similar to CT protocols were established in both cultured (ESW-WT3) and whole blood lymphocytes and compared to higher dose exposures. Both the kinetics and extent of H2AX phosphorylation were found to be dose dependent. Damage induction and detection showed a clear dose response, albeit different, at all time points and differences in the DNA repair kinetics of ESW-WT3 and whole blood lymphocytes were characterized. Moreover, using a modified split-dose in vitro experiment, we show that phosphorylation of H2AX is significantly reduced after exposure to CT doses fractionated over a few minutes compared to the same total dose delivered as a single exposure. Because the split-dose exposures investigated here are more similar to those experienced during a CT examination, it is essential to understand why and how these differences occur. This work provides compelling evidence supporting differential biological responses not only between high and low doses, but also between single and multiple exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation.

  7. PTEN Activation by DNA Damage Induces Protective Autophagy in Response to Cucurbitacin B in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yanan; Sun, Wen; Lu, Jin-Jian; Pei, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Cucurbitacin B (Cuc B), a natural product, induced both protective autophagy and DNA damage mediated by ROS while the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This study explored the mechanism of Cuc B-induced DNA damage and autophagy. Cuc B decreased cell viability in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Cuc B caused long comet tails and increased expression of γ-H2AX, phosphorylation of ATM/ATR, and Chk1/Chk2. Cuc B induced autophagy as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, increased expression of LC3II, phosphorylated ULK1, and decreased expression of phosphorylated AKT, mTOR. Cuc B induced apoptosis mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins and caspase activation. Furthermore, Cuc B induced ROS formation, which was inhibited by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). NAC pretreatment dramatically reversed Cuc B-induced DNA damage, autophagy, and apoptosis. Cuc B-induced apoptosis was reversed by NAC but enhanced by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), chloroquine (CQ), and silencing phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). 3-MA and CQ showed no effect on Cuc B-induced DNA damage. In addition, Cuc B increased PTEN phosphorylation and silence PTEN restored Cuc B-induced autophagic protein expressions without affecting DNA damage. In summary, Cuc B induced DNA damage, apoptosis, and protective autophagy mediated by ROS. PTEN activation in response to DNA damage bridged DNA damage and prosurvival autophagy. PMID:28042385

  8. Cidofovir selectivity is based on the different response of normal and cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cidofovir (CDV) proved efficacious in treatment of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) hyperplasias. Antiproliferative effects of CDV have been associated with apoptosis induction, S-phase accumulation, and increased levels of tumor suppressor proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms for the selectivity and antitumor activity of CDV against HPV-transformed cells remain unexplained. Methods We evaluated CDV drug metabolism and incorporation into cellular DNA, in addition to whole genome gene expression profiling by means of microarrays in two HPV+ cervical carcinoma cells, HPV- immortalized keratinocytes, and normal keratinocytes. Results Determination of the metabolism and drug incorporation of CDV into genomic DNA demonstrated a higher rate of drug incorporation in HPV+ tumor cells and immortalized keratinocytes compared to normal keratinocytes. Gene expression profiling clearly showed distinct and specific drug effects in the cell types investigated. Although an effect on inflammatory response was seen in all cell types, different pathways were identified in normal keratinocytes compared to immortalized keratinocytes and HPV+ tumor cells. Notably, Rho GTPase pathways, LXR/RXR pathways, and acute phase response signaling were exclusively activated in immortalized cells. CDV exposed normal keratinocytes displayed activated cell cycle regulation upon DNA damage signaling to allow DNA repair via homologous recombination, resulting in genomic stability and survival. Although CDV induced cell cycle arrest in HPV- immortalized cells, DNA repair was not activated in these cells. In contrast, HPV+ cells lacked cell cycle regulation, leading to genomic instability and eventually apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our data provide novel insights into the mechanism of action of CDV and its selectivity for HPV-transformed cells. The proposed mechanism suggests that this selectivity is based on the inability of HPV+ cells to respond to DNA damage, rather than on a

  9. Activation of WIP1 Phosphatase by HTLV-1 Tax Mitigates the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dayaram, Tajhal; Lemoine, Francene J.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Marriott, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic instability stemming from dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA damage response (DDR) is a common feature of many cancers. The cancer adult T cell leukemia (ATL) can occur in individuals infected with human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), and ATL cells contain extensive chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that they have defects in the recognition or repair of DNA damage. Since Tax is the transforming protein encoded by HTLV-1, we asked whether Tax can affect cell cycle checkpoints and the DDR. Using a combination of flow cytometry and DNA repair assays we showed that Tax-expressing cells exit G1 phase and initiate DNA replication prematurely following damage. Reduced phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX) and RPA2, phosphoproteins that are essential to properly initiate the DDR, was also observed in Tax-expressing cells. To determine the cause of decreased DDR protein phosphorylation in Tax-expressing cells, we examined the cellular phosphatase, WIP1, which is known to dephosphorylate γH2AX. We found that Tax can interact with Wip1 in vivo and in vitro, and that Tax-expressing cells display elevated levels of Wip1 mRNA. In vitro phosphatase assays showed that Tax can enhance Wip1 activity on a γH2AX peptide target by 2-fold. Thus, loss of γH2AX in vivo could be due, in part, to increased expression and activity of WIP1 in the presence of Tax. siRNA knockdown of WIP1 in Tax-expressing cells rescued γH2AX in response to damage, confirming the role of WIP1 in the DDR. These studies demonstrate that Tax can disengage the G1/S checkpoint by enhancing WIP1 activity, resulting in reduced DDR. Premature G1 exit of Tax-expressing cells in the presence of DNA lesions creates an environment that tolerates incorporation of random mutations into the host genome. PMID:23405243

  10. Idelalisib and bendamustine combination is synergistic and increases DNA damage response in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Modi, Prexy; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Yang, Qingshan; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Gandhi, Varsha

    2017-02-07

    Idelalisib is a targeted agent that potently inhibits PI3Kδ which is exclusively expressed in hematological cells. Bendamustine is a well-tolerated cytotoxic alkylating agent which has been extensively used for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Both these agents are FDA-approved for CLL. To increase the potency of idelalisib and bendamustine, we tested their combination in primary CLL lymphocytes. While each compound alone produced a moderate response, combination at several concentrations resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity. Idelalisib enhanced the bendamustine-mediated DNA damage/repair response, indicated by the phosphorylation of ATM, Chk2, and p53. Each drug alone activated γH2AX but combination treatment further increased the expression of this DNA damage marker. Compared with the control, idelalisib treatment decreased global RNA synthesis, resulting in a decline of early-response and short-lived MCL1 transcripts. In concert, there was a decline in total Mcl-1 protein in CLL lymphocytes. Isogenic mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking MCL1 had higher sensitivity to bendamustine alone or in combination compared to MCL1 proficient cells. Collectively, these data indicate that bendamustine and idelalisib combination therapy should be investigated for treating patients with CLL.

  11. Protein kinase Cη activates NF-κB in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-κB in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-κB regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKCη) regulates NF-κB upstream signaling by activating the IκB kinase (IKK) and the degradation of IκB. Furthermore, PKCη enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-κB under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKCη confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKCη is involved in NF-κB signaling leading to drug resistance.

  12. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Dinant, Christoffel; Watanabe, Sugiko; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri; Andersen, Jens S

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. Apart from cataloging acetylation sites through SILAC proteomic analyses before IR and at 5 and 60 min after IR exposure of U2OS cells, we report that: (1) key components of the transcriptional machinery, such as EP300 and CREBBP, are dynamically acetylated; (2) that nuclear acetyltransferases themselves are regulated, not on the protein abundance level, but by (de)acetylation; and (3) that the recently reported p53 co-activator and methyltransferase MLL3 is acetylated on five lysines during the DDR. For selected examples, protein immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting were used to assess lysine acetylation status and thereby validate the mass spectrometry data. We thus present evidence that nuclear proteins, including those known to regulate cellular functions via epigenetic modifications of histones, are regulated by (de)acetylation in a timely manner upon cell's exposure to genotoxic insults. Overall, these results present a resource of temporal profiles of a spectrum of protein acetylation sites during DDR and provide further insights into the highly dynamic nature of regulatory PTMs that help orchestrate the maintenance of genome integrity.

  13. Fanconi anemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI exhibit different DNA damage responses during S-phase

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Archana; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Adams, Nicole; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway members, FANCD2 and FANCI, contribute to the repair of replication-stalling DNA lesions. FA pathway activation relies on phosphorylation of FANCI by the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase, followed by monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI by the FA core complex. FANCD2 and FANCI are thought to form a functional heterodimer during DNA repair, but it is unclear how dimer formation is regulated or what the functions of the FANCD2–FANCI complex versus the monomeric proteins are. We show that the FANCD2–FANCI complex forms independently of ATR and FA core complex, and represents the inactive form of both proteins. DNA damage-induced FA pathway activation triggers dissociation of FANCD2 from FANCI. Dissociation coincides with FANCD2 monoubiquitination, which significantly precedes monoubiquitination of FANCI; moreover, monoubiquitination responses of FANCD2 and FANCI exhibit distinct DNA substrate specificities. A phosphodead FANCI mutant fails to dissociate from FANCD2, whereas phosphomimetic FANCI cannot interact with FANCD2, indicating that FANCI phosphorylation is the molecular trigger for FANCD2–FANCI dissociation. Following dissociation, FANCD2 binds replicating chromatin prior to—and independently of—FANCI. Moreover, the concentration of chromatin-bound FANCD2 exceeds that of FANCI throughout replication. Our results suggest that FANCD2 and FANCI function separately at consecutive steps during DNA repair in S-phase. PMID:22753026

  14. The Role of PALB2 in the DNA Damage Response and Cancer Predisposition.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno, Thales C; De Gregoriis, Giuliana; de Oliveira, Francisco M Bastos; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Carvalho, Marcelo A

    2017-08-31

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage response (DDR) is a major feature in the maintenance of genome integrity and in the suppression of tumorigenesis. PALB2 (Partner and Localizer of Breast Cancer 2 (BRCA2)) plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity through its role in the Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathways. Since its identification as a BRCA2 interacting partner, PALB2 has emerged as a pivotal tumor suppressor protein associated to hereditary cancer susceptibility to breast and pancreatic cancers. In this review, we discuss how other DDR proteins (such as the kinases Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-Related (ATR), mediators BRCA1 (Breast Cancer 1)/BRCA2 and effectors RAD51/DNA Polymerase η (Polη) interact with PALB2 to orchestrate DNA repair. We also examine the involvement of PALB2 mutations in the predisposition to cancer and the role of PALB2 in stimulating error-free DNA repair through the FA/HR pathway.

  15. Fanconi anemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI exhibit different DNA damage responses during S-phase.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Archana; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Adams, Nicole; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2012-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway members, FANCD2 and FANCI, contribute to the repair of replication-stalling DNA lesions. FA pathway activation relies on phosphorylation of FANCI by the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase, followed by monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI by the FA core complex. FANCD2 and FANCI are thought to form a functional heterodimer during DNA repair, but it is unclear how dimer formation is regulated or what the functions of the FANCD2-FANCI complex versus the monomeric proteins are. We show that the FANCD2-FANCI complex forms independently of ATR and FA core complex, and represents the inactive form of both proteins. DNA damage-induced FA pathway activation triggers dissociation of FANCD2 from FANCI. Dissociation coincides with FANCD2 monoubiquitination, which significantly precedes monoubiquitination of FANCI; moreover, monoubiquitination responses of FANCD2 and FANCI exhibit distinct DNA substrate specificities. A phosphodead FANCI mutant fails to dissociate from FANCD2, whereas phosphomimetic FANCI cannot interact with FANCD2, indicating that FANCI phosphorylation is the molecular trigger for FANCD2-FANCI dissociation. Following dissociation, FANCD2 binds replicating chromatin prior to-and independently of-FANCI. Moreover, the concentration of chromatin-bound FANCD2 exceeds that of FANCI throughout replication. Our results suggest that FANCD2 and FANCI function separately at consecutive steps during DNA repair in S-phase.

  16. Fhit loss in lung preneoplasia: relation to DNA damage response checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Cirombella, Roberto; Montrone, Giuseppe; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Giglio, Simona; Volinia, Stefano; Graziano, Paolo; Huebner, Kay; Vecchione, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity at the FHIT locus is coincident with activation of DNA damage response checkpoint proteins; thus damage at fragile loci may trigger checkpoint activation. We examined preneoplastic lesions adjacent to non-small cell lung carcinomas for alterations to expression of Fhit and activated checkpoint proteins. Expression scores were analyzed for pair-wise associations and correlations among proteins and type of lesion. Hyperplastic and dysplastic lesions were positive for nuclear H2AX expression; 12/20 dysplastic lesions were negative for Fhit expression. Fhit positive lesions showed expression of most checkpoint proteins examined, while Fhit negative lesions showed absence of expression of Chk1 and phosphoChk1. The results show that loss of expression of Fhit is significantly directly correlated with absence of activated Chk1 in dysplasia, and suggest a connection between loss of Fhit and modulation of checkpoint activity. PMID:19931269

  17. Dual Functions of ASCIZ in the DNA Base Damage Response and Pulmonary Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tenis, Nora; Hammet, Andrew; Hewitt, Kimberly; Ng, Jane-Lee; McNees, Carolyn J.; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Oka, Hayato; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Conlan, Lindus A.; Cole, Timothy J.; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Takeda, Shunichi; Lavin, Martin F.; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Zn2+-finger proteins comprise one of the largest protein superfamilies with diverse biological functions. The ATM substrate Chk2-interacting Zn2+-finger protein (ASCIZ; also known as ATMIN and ZNF822) was originally linked to functions in the DNA base damage response and has also been proposed to be an essential cofactor of the ATM kinase. Here we show that absence of ASCIZ leads to p53-independent late-embryonic lethality in mice. Asciz-deficient primary fibroblasts exhibit increased sensitivity to DNA base damaging agents MMS and H2O2, but Asciz deletion or knock-down does not affect ATM levels and activation in mouse, chicken, or human cells. Unexpectedly, Asciz-deficient embryos also exhibit severe respiratory tract defects with complete pulmonary agenesis and severe tracheal atresia. Nkx2.1-expressing respiratory precursors are still specified in the absence of ASCIZ, but fail to segregate properly within the ventral foregut, and as a consequence lung buds never form and separation of the trachea from the oesophagus stalls early. Comparison of phenotypes suggests that ASCIZ functions between Wnt2-2b/ß-catenin and FGF10/FGF-receptor 2b signaling pathways in the mesodermal/endodermal crosstalk regulating early respiratory development. We also find that ASCIZ can activate expression of reporter genes via its SQ/TQ-cluster domain in vitro, suggesting that it may exert its developmental functions as a transcription factor. Altogether, the data indicate that, in addition to its role in the DNA base damage response, ASCIZ has separate developmental functions as an essential regulator of respiratory organogenesis. PMID:20975950

  18. Dual functions of ASCIZ in the DNA base damage response and pulmonary organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Sabine; Smyth, Ian; van Denderen, Bryce; Tenis, Nora; Hammet, Andrew; Hewitt, Kimberly; Ng, Jane-Lee; McNees, Carolyn J; Kozlov, Sergei V; Oka, Hayato; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Conlan, Lindus A; Cole, Timothy J; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Takeda, Shunichi; Lavin, Martin F; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2010-10-21

    Zn²(+)-finger proteins comprise one of the largest protein superfamilies with diverse biological functions. The ATM substrate Chk2-interacting Zn²(+)-finger protein (ASCIZ; also known as ATMIN and ZNF822) was originally linked to functions in the DNA base damage response and has also been proposed to be an essential cofactor of the ATM kinase. Here we show that absence of ASCIZ leads to p53-independent late-embryonic lethality in mice. Asciz-deficient primary fibroblasts exhibit increased sensitivity to DNA base damaging agents MMS and H2O2, but Asciz deletion knock-down does not affect ATM levels and activation in mouse, chicken, or human cells. Unexpectedly, Asciz-deficient embryos also exhibit severe respiratory tract defects with complete pulmonary agenesis and severe tracheal atresia. Nkx2.1-expressing respiratory precursors are still specified in the absence of ASCIZ, but fail to segregate properly within the ventral foregut, and as a consequence lung buds never form and separation of the trachea from the oesophagus stalls early. Comparison of phenotypes suggests that ASCIZ functions between Wnt2-2b/ß-catenin and FGF10/FGF-receptor 2b signaling pathways in the mesodermal/endodermal crosstalk regulating early respiratory development. We also find that ASCIZ can activate expression of reporter genes via its SQ/TQ-cluster domain in vitro, suggesting that it may exert its developmental functions as a transcription factor. Altogether, the data indicate that, in addition to its role in the DNA base damage response, ASCIZ has separate developmental functions as an essential regulator of respiratory organogenesis.

  19. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  20. Dual-utility NLS drives RNF169-dependent DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    An, Liwei; Jiang, Yiyang; Ng, Howin H. W.; Man, Ellen P. S.; Chen, Jie; Khoo, Ui-Soon; Gong, Qingguo; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Loading of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and receptor-associated protein 80 (RAP80) at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) drives cell cycle checkpoint activation but is counterproductive to high-fidelity DNA repair. ring finger protein 169 (RNF169) maintains the balance by limiting the deposition of DNA damage mediator proteins at the damaged chromatin. We report here that this attribute is accomplished, in part, by a predicted nuclear localization signal (NLS) that not only shuttles RNF169 into the nucleus but also promotes its stability by mediating a direct interaction with the ubiquitin-specific protease USP7. Guided by the crystal structure of USP7 in complex with the RNF169 NLS, we uncoupled USP7 binding from its nuclear import function and showed that perturbing the USP7–RNF169 complex destabilized RNF169, compromised high-fidelity DSB repair, and hypersensitized cells to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition. Finally, expression of USP7 and RNF169 positively correlated in breast cancer specimens. Collectively, our findings uncover an NLS-mediated bipartite mechanism that supports the nuclear function of a DSB response protein. PMID:28325877

  1. Suppression of CHK1 by ETS Family Members Promotes DNA Damage Response Bypass and Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Andrea; Varmeh, Shohreh; Chen, Ming; Taulli, Riccardo; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Ala, Ugo; Seitzer, Nina; Ishikawa, Tomoki; Carver, Brett S; Hobbs, Robin M; Quarantotti, Valentina; Ng, Christopher; Berger, Alice H; Nardella, Caterina; Poliseno, Laura; Montironi, Rodolfo; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Signoretti, Sabina; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2015-05-01

    The ETS family of transcription factors has been repeatedly implicated in tumorigenesis. In prostate cancer, ETS family members, such as ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5, are frequently overexpressed due to chromosomal translocations, but the molecular mechanisms by which they promote prostate tumorigenesis remain largely undefined. Here, we show that ETS family members, such as ERG and ETV1, directly repress the expression of the checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), a key DNA damage response cell-cycle regulator essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. Critically, we find that ERG expression correlates with CHK1 downregulation in human patients and demonstrate that Chk1 heterozygosity promotes the progression of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia into prostatic invasive carcinoma in Pten(+) (/-) mice. Importantly, CHK1 downregulation sensitizes prostate tumor cells to etoposide but not to docetaxel treatment. Thus, we identify CHK1 as a key functional target of the ETS proto-oncogenic family with important therapeutic implications. Genetic translocation and aberrant expression of ETS family members is a common event in different types of human tumors. Here, we show that through the transcriptional repression of CHK1, ETS factors may favor DNA damage accumulation and consequent genetic instability in proliferating cells. Importantly, our findings provide a rationale for testing DNA replication inhibitor agents in ETS-positive TP53-proficient tumors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. A novel endonuclease that may be responsible for damaged DNA base repair in Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Miyako; Ishino, Sonoko; Yamagami, Takeshi; Egashira, Yuriko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2015-01-01

    DNA is constantly damaged by endogenous and environmental influences. Deaminated adenine (hypoxanthine) tends to pair with cytosine and leads to the A:T→G:C transition mutation during DNA replication. Endonuclease V (EndoV) hydrolyzes the second phosphodiester bond 3′ from deoxyinosine in the DNA strand, and was considered to be responsible for hypoxanthine excision repair. However, the downstream pathway after EndoV cleavage remained unclear. The activity to cleave the phosphodiester bond 5′ from deoxyinosine was detected in a Pyrococcus furiosus cell extract. The protein encoded by PF1551, obtained from the mass spectrometry analysis of the purified fraction, exhibited the corresponding cleavage activity. A putative homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TK0887) showed the same activity. Further biochemical analyses revealed that the purified PF1551 and TK0887 proteins recognize uracil, xanthine and the AP site, in addition to hypoxanthine. We named this endonuclease Endonuclease Q (EndoQ), as it may be involved in damaged base repair in the Thermococcals of Archaea. PMID:25694513

  3. Increased oxidative stress in AOA3 cells disturbs ATM-dependent DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junya; Saito, Yuichiro; Okui, Michiyo; Miwa, Noriko; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2015-04-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is caused by a mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) gene; the condition is associated with hyper-radiosensitivity, abnormal cell-cycle checkpoints, and genomic instability. AT patients also show cerebellar ataxia, possibly due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensitivity in neural cells. The ATM protein is a key regulator of the DNA damage response. Recently, several AT-like disorders have been reported. The genes responsible for them are predicted to encode proteins that interact with ATM in the DNA-damage response. Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia types 1-3 (AOA1, 2, and 3) result in a neurodegenerative and cellular phenotype similar to AT; however, the basis of this phenotypic similarity is unclear. Here, we show that the cells of AOA3 patients display aberrant ATM-dependent phosphorylation and apoptosis following γ-irradiation. The ATM-dependent response to H2O2 treatment was abrogated in AOA3 cells. Furthermore, AOA3 cells had reduced ATM activity. Our results suggest that the attenuated ATM-related response is caused by an increase in endogenous ROS in AOA3 cells. Pretreatment of cells with pyocyanin, which induces endogenous ROS production, abolished the ATM-dependent response. Moreover, AOA3 cells had decreased homologous recombination (HR) activity, and pyocyanin pretreatment reduced HR activity in HeLa cells. These results indicate that excess endogenous ROS represses the ATM-dependent cellular response and HR repair in AOA3 cells. Since the ATM-dependent cell-cycle checkpoint is an important block to carcinogenesis, such inactivation of ATM may lead to tumorigenesis as well as neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting telomere-containing chromosome ends with a near-infrared femtosecond laser to study the activation of the DNA damage response and DNA damage repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bárbara Alcaraz; Stambaugh, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Telomeres are at the ends of chromosomes. Previous evidence suggests that laser-induced deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) breaks at chromosome ends during anaphase results in delayed cytokinesis. A possible explanation for this delay is that the DNA damage response (DDR) mechanism has been activated. We describe a live imaging method to study the effects of DDR activation following focal point near-infrared femtosecond laser microirradiation either at a single chromosome end or at a chromosome arm in mitotic anaphase cells. Laser microirradiation is used in combination with dual fluorescent labeling to monitor the co-localization of double-strand break marker γH2AX along with the DDR factors in PtK2 (Potorous tridactylus) cells. Laser-induced DNA breaks in chromosome ends as well as in chromosome arms results in recruitment of the following: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1, checkpoint sensors (p-Chk1, p-Chk2), DNA repair protein Ku70/Ku80, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. However, phosphorylated p53 at serine 15 is detected only at chromosome ends and not at chromosome arms. Full activation of DDR on damaged chromosome ends may explain previously published results that showed the delay of cytokinesis. PMID:24064949

  5. The DNA Damage Response Induced by Infection with Human Cytomegalovirus and Other Viruses

    PubMed Central

    E, Xiaofei; Kowalik, Timothy F.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses use different strategies to overcome the host defense system. Recent studies have shown that viruses can induce DNA damage response (DDR). Many of these viruses use DDR signaling to benefit their replication, while other viruses block or inactivate DDR signaling. This review focuses on the effects of DDR and DNA repair on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Here, we review the DDR induced by HCMV infection and its similarities and differences to DDR induced by other viruses. As DDR signaling pathways are critical for the replication of many viruses, blocking these pathways may represent novel therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of certain infectious diseases. Lastly, future perspectives in the field are discussed. PMID:24859341

  6. Thrombopoietin-increased DNA-PK-dependent DNA repair limits hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mutagenesis in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    de Laval, Bérengère; Pawlikowska, Patrycja; Petit-Cocault, Laurence; Bilhou-Nabera, Chrystèle; Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Souyri, Michèle; Pouzoulet, Frédéric; Gaudry, Murielle; Porteu, Françoise

    2013-01-03

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent a serious threat for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). How cytokines and environmental signals integrate the DNA damage response and contribute to HSC-intrinsic DNA repair processes remains unknown. Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor, Mpl, are critical factors supporting HSC self-renewal and expansion. Here, we uncover an unknown function for TPO-Mpl in the regulation of DNA damage response. We show that DNA repair following γ-irradiation (γ-IR) or the action of topoisomerase-II inhibitors is defective in Mpl(-/-) and in wild-type mouse or human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells treated in the absence of TPO. TPO stimulates DNA repair in vitro and in vivo by increasing DNA-PK-dependent nonhomologous end-joining efficiency. This ensures HSC chromosomal integrity and limits their long-term injury in response to IR. This shows that niche factors can modulate the HSC DSB repair machinery and opens new avenues for administration of TPO agonists for minimizing radiotherapy-induced HSC injury and mutagenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential Activation of Cellular DNA Damage Responses by Replication-Defective and Replication-Competent Adenovirus Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Anand; Jayaram, Sumithra

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) mutants that lack early region 4 (E4) activate the phosphorylation of cellular DNA damage response proteins. In wild-type Ad type 5 (Ad5) infections, E1b and E4 proteins target the cellular DNA repair protein Mre11 for redistribution and degradation, thereby interfering with its ability to activate phosphorylation cascades important during DNA repair. The characteristics of Ad infection that activate cellular DNA repair processes are not yet well understood. We investigated the activation of DNA damage responses by a replication-defective Ad vector (AdRSVβgal) that lacks E1 and fails to produce the immediate-early E1a protein. E1a is important for activating early gene expression from the other viral early transcription units, including E4. AdRSVβgal can deliver its genome to the cell, but it is subsequently deficient for viral early gene expression and DNA replication. We studied the ability of AdRSVβgal-infected cells to induce cellular DNA damage responses. AdRSVβgal infection does activate formation of foci containing the Mdc1 protein. However, AdRSVβgal fails to activate phosphorylation of the damage response proteins Nbs1 and Chk1. We found that viral DNA replication is important for Nbs1 phosphorylation, suggesting that this step in the viral life cycle may provide an important trigger for activating at least some DNA repair proteins. PMID:23015708

  8. Cell synchronization by inhibitors of DNA replication induces replication stress and DNA damage response: analysis by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Halicka, H. Dorota; Zhao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cell synchronization is often achieved by inhibition of DNA replication. The cells cultured in the presence of such inhibitors as hydroxyurea, aphidicolin or thymidine become arrested at the entrance to S-phase and upon release from the block they synchronously progress through S, G2 and M. We recently reported that exposure of cells to these inhibitors at concentrations commonly used to synchronize cell populations led to phosphorylation of histone H2AX on Ser139 (induction of γH2AX) through activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related protein kinase (ATR). These findings imply that the induction of DNA replication stress by these inhibitors activates the DNA damage response cell signaling pathways and caution about interpreting data obtained with the use of cells synchronized such way as representing unperturbed cells. The protocol presented in this chapter describes the methodology of assessment of phosphorylation of histone H2AX-Ser139, ATM/ATR substrate on Ser/Thr at SQ/TQ cluster domains as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase in cells treated with inhibitors of DNA replication. Phosphorylation of these proteins is detected in individual cell immunocytochemically with phospho-specific Ab and measured by flow cytometry. Concurrent measurement of cellular DNA content and phosphorylated proteins followed by multiparameter cytometric analysis allows one to correlate extent of their phosphorylation with cell cycle phase. PMID:21755443

  9. PARP activation regulates the RNA-binding protein NONO in the DNA damage response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Krietsch, Jana; Caron, Marie-Christine; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Vignard, Julien; Vincent, Michel; Rouleau, Michèle; Hendzel, Michael J; Poirier, Guy G; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    After the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is one of the first proteins to be recruited and activated through its binding to the free DNA ends. Upon activation, PARP-1 uses NAD+ to generate large amounts of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair factors. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein NONO, a partner protein of SFPQ, as a novel PAR-binding protein. The protein motif being primarily responsible for PAR-binding is the RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1), which is also crucial for RNA-binding, highlighting a competition between RNA and PAR as they share the same binding site. Strikingly, the in vivo recruitment of NONO to DNA damage sites completely depends on PAR, generated by activated PARP-1. Furthermore, we show that upon PAR-dependent recruitment, NONO stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and represses homologous recombination (HR) in vivo. Our results therefore place NONO after PARP activation in the context of DNA DSB repair pathway decision. Understanding the mechanism of action of proteins that act in the same pathway as PARP-1 is crucial to shed more light onto the effect of interference on PAR-mediated pathways with PARP inhibitors, which have already reached phase III clinical trials but are until date poorly understood.

  10. PARP activation regulates the RNA-binding protein NONO in the DNA damage response to DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Krietsch, Jana; Caron, Marie-Christine; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Vignard, Julien; Vincent, Michel; Rouleau, Michèle; Hendzel, Michael J.; Poirier, Guy G.; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    After the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is one of the first proteins to be recruited and activated through its binding to the free DNA ends. Upon activation, PARP-1 uses NAD+ to generate large amounts of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair factors. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein NONO, a partner protein of SFPQ, as a novel PAR-binding protein. The protein motif being primarily responsible for PAR-binding is the RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1), which is also crucial for RNA-binding, highlighting a competition between RNA and PAR as they share the same binding site. Strikingly, the in vivo recruitment of NONO to DNA damage sites completely depends on PAR, generated by activated PARP-1. Furthermore, we show that upon PAR-dependent recruitment, NONO stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and represses homologous recombination (HR) in vivo. Our results therefore place NONO after PARP activation in the context of DNA DSB repair pathway decision. Understanding the mechanism of action of proteins that act in the same pathway as PARP-1 is crucial to shed more light onto the effect of interference on PAR-mediated pathways with PARP inhibitors, which have already reached phase III clinical trials but are until date poorly understood. PMID:22941645

  11. Contribution of ATM and ATR kinase pathways to p53-mediated response in etoposide and methyl methanesulfonate induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Ross, Susan M; Rowley, Sean; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Clewell, Rebecca A

    2017-03-01

    p53 is a key integrator of cellular response to DNA damage, supporting post-translational repair and driving transcription-mediated responses including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and repair. DNA damage sensing kinases recognize different types of DNA damage and initiate specific responses through various post-translational modifications of p53. This study evaluated chemical specificity of the p53 pathway response by manipulating p53 or its upstream kinases and assessing the effect on DNA damage and cellular responses to prototype chemicals: etoposide (ETP, topoisomerase II inhibitor) and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, alkylating agent). p53-deficient cells demonstrated reduced accumulation of the p53 target proteins MDM2, p21, and Wip1; reduced apoptotic response; and increased DNA damage (p-H2AX and micronuclei) with both chemicals. However, p53 was not essential for cell cycle arrest in HT1080 or HCT116 cells. The two chemicals induced different patterns of kinase activation, particularly in terms of Chk 1, Chk 2, p38, and ERK 1/2. However, inhibition of the ATM pathway showed a greater effect on p53 activtation, apoptosis, and accumulation of DNA damage than ATR-Chk 1 or the MAP kinases regardless of the chemical used. These results indicate that ATM is the predominant upstream kinase responsible for activation of the p53-mediated DNA damage response for both MMS and ETP, though the downstream kinase response is markedly different. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:72-83, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Forkhead transcription factor FoxF1 interacts with Fanconi anemia protein complexes to promote DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Arun; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Zhang, Yufang; Kalin, Tanya V.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box F1 (Foxf1) transcription factor is an important regulator of embryonic development but its role in tumor cells remains incompletely understood. While 16 proteins were characterized in Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, its interactions with cellular transcriptional machinery remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified FoxF1 protein as a novel interacting partner of the FA complex proteins. Using multiple human and mouse tumor cell lines and Foxf1+/− mice we demonstrated that FoxF1 physically binds to and increases stability of FA proteins. FoxF1 co-localizes with FANCD2 in DNA repair foci in cultured cells and tumor tissues obtained from cisplatin-treated mice. In response to DNA damage, FoxF1-deficient tumor cells showed significantly reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCM phosphorylation, resulting in impaired formation of DNA repair foci. FoxF1 knockdown caused chromosomal instability, nuclear abnormalities, and increased tumor cell death in response to DNA-damaging agents. Overexpression of FoxF1 in DNA-damaged cells improved stability of FA proteins, decreased chromosomal and nuclear aberrations, restored formation of DNA repair foci and prevented cell death after DNA damage. These findings demonstrate that FoxF1 is a key component of FA complexes and a critical mediator of DNA damage response in tumor cells. PMID:26625197

  13. Forkhead transcription factor FoxF1 interacts with Fanconi anemia protein complexes to promote DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arun; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Zhang, Yufang; Kalin, Tanya V; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V

    2016-01-12

    Forkhead box F1 (Foxf1) transcription factor is an important regulator of embryonic development but its role in tumor cells remains incompletely understood. While 16 proteins were characterized in Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, its interactions with cellular transcriptional machinery remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified FoxF1 protein as a novel interacting partner of the FA complex proteins. Using multiple human and mouse tumor cell lines and Foxf1+/- mice we demonstrated that FoxF1 physically binds to and increases stability of FA proteins. FoxF1 co-localizes with FANCD2 in DNA repair foci in cultured cells and tumor tissues obtained from cisplatin-treated mice. In response to DNA damage, FoxF1-deficient tumor cells showed significantly reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCM phosphorylation, resulting in impaired formation of DNA repair foci. FoxF1 knockdown caused chromosomal instability, nuclear abnormalities, and increased tumor cell death in response to DNA-damaging agents. Overexpression of FoxF1 in DNA-damaged cells improved stability of FA proteins, decreased chromosomal and nuclear aberrations, restored formation of DNA repair foci and prevented cell death after DNA damage. These findings demonstrate that FoxF1 is a key component of FA complexes and a critical mediator of DNA damage response in tumor cells.

  14. Post-translational modifications of proliferating cell nuclear antigen: A key signal integrator for DNA damage response (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiong; Chang, Yuxiao; Yang, Jin; Wei, Quanfang

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that the post-translational modifications of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) may be crucial in influencing the cellular choice between different pathways, such as the cell cycle checkpoint, DNA repair or apoptosis pathways, in order to maintain genomic stability. DNA damage leads to replication stress and the subsequent induction of PCNA modification by small ubiquitin (Ub)-related modifiers and Ub, which has been identified to affect multiple biological processes of genomic DNA. Thus far, much has been learned concerning the behavior of modified PCNA as a key signal integrator in response to DNA damage. In humans and yeast, modified PCNA activates DNA damage bypass via an error-prone or error-free pathway to prevent the breakage of DNA replication forks, which may potentially induce double-strand breaks and subsequent chromosomal rearrangements. However, the exact mechanisms by which these pathways work and by what means the modified PCNA is involved in these processes remain elusive. Thus, the improved understanding of PCNA modification and its implications for DNA damage response may provide us with more insight into the mechanisms by which human cells regulate aberrant recombination events, and cancer initiation and development. The present review focuses on the post-translational modifications of PCNA and its important functions in mediating mammalian cellular response to different types of DNA damage.

  15. Platelet-activating factor induces cell cycle arrest and disrupts the DNA damage response in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Puebla-Osorio, N; Damiani, E; Bover, L; Ullrich, S E

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid modulator of inflammation that has diverse physiological and pathological functions. Previously, we demonstrated that PAF has an essential role in ultraviolet (UV)-induced immunosuppression and reduces the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that UV-induced PAF is contributing to skin cancer initiation by inducing immune suppression and also affecting a proper DNA damage response. The exact role of PAF in modulating cell proliferation, differentiation or transformation is unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) by which PAF affects the cell cycle and impairs early DNA damage response. PAF arrests proliferation in transformed and nontransformed human mast cells by reducing the expression of cyclin-B1 and promoting the expression of p21. PAF-treated cells show a dose-dependent cell cycle arrest mainly at G2–M, and a decrease in the DNA damage response elements MCPH1/BRIT-1 and ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (ATR). In addition, PAF disrupts the localization of p-ataxia telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), and phosphorylated-ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (p-ATR) at the site of DNA damage. Whereas the potent effect on cell cycle arrest may imply a tumor suppressor activity for PAF, the impairment of proper DNA damage response might implicate PAF as a tumor promoter. The outcome of these diverse effects may be dependent on specific cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25950475

  16. Bmi1 regulates mitochondrial function and the DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Cao, Liu; Chen, Jichun; Song, Shiwei; Lee, In Hye; Quijano, Celia; Liu, Hongjun; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Chen, Haoqian; Cao, Long-Yue; Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Kumar, Neil G; Rovira, Ilsa I; Xu, Xiao-Ling; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Motoyama, Noboru; Deng, Chu-Xia; Finkel, Toren

    2009-05-21

    Mice deficient in the Polycomb repressor Bmi1 develop numerous abnormalities including a severe defect in stem cell self-renewal, alterations in thymocyte maturation and a shortened lifespan. Previous work has implicated de-repression of the Ink4a/Arf (also known as Cdkn2a) locus as mediating many of the aspects of the Bmi1(-/-) phenotype. Here we demonstrate that cells derived from Bmi1(-/-) mice also have impaired mitochondrial function, a marked increase in the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and subsequent engagement of the DNA damage response pathway. Furthermore, many of the deficiencies normally observed in Bmi1(-/-) mice improve after either pharmacological treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or genetic disruption of the DNA damage response pathway by Chk2 (also known as Chek2) deletion. These results demonstrate that Bmi1 has an unexpected role in maintaining mitochondrial function and redox homeostasis and indicate that the Polycomb family of proteins can coordinately regulate cellular metabolism with stem and progenitor cell function.

  17. Viability and DNA damage responses of TPPII-deficient Myc- and Ras-transformed fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurumi, Chizuko; Firat, Elke; Gaedicke, Simone; Huai, Jisen; Mandal, Pankaj Kumar; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2009-09-04

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPPII) is a giant cytosolic protease. Previous protease inhibitor, overexpression and siRNA studies suggested that TPPII is important for viability and proliferation of tumor cells, and for their ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response. The possibility that TPPII could be targeted for tumor therapy prompted us to study its role in transformed cells following genetic TPPII deletion. We generated cell lines from primary fibroblasts having conditional (floxed) TPPII alleles, transformed them with both the c-myc and H-ras oncogenes, and deleted TPPII using retroviral self-deleting Cre recombinase. Clonally derived TPPIIflox/flox and TPPII-/- transformed fibroblasts showed no influences of TPPII expression on basal cell survival and proliferation, nor on radiation-induced p53 activation, p21 induction, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or clonogenic cell death. Thus, our results do not support a generally important role of TPPII for viability and proliferation of transformed cells or their p53-mediated DNA damage response.

  18. Renal-Retinal Ciliopathy Gene Sdccag8 Regulates DNA Damage Response Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Airik, Rannar; Slaats, Gisela G.; Guo, Zhi; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Khan, Naheed; Ghosh, Amiya; Hurd, Toby W.; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Schrøder, Jacob M.; Elledge, Steve J.; Andersen, Jens S.; Kispert, Andreas; Castelli, Maddalena; Boletta, Alessandra; Giles, Rachel H.

    2014-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RCs) are developmental and degenerative kidney diseases that are frequently associated with extrarenal pathologies such as retinal degeneration, obesity, and intellectual disability. We recently identified mutations in a gene encoding the centrosomal protein SDCCAG8 as causing NPHP type 10 in humans. To study the role of Sdccag8 in disease pathogenesis, we generated a Sdccag8 gene-trap mouse line. Homozygous Sdccag8gt/gt mice lacked the wild-type Sdccag8 transcript and protein, and recapitulated the human phenotypes of NPHP and retinal degeneration. These mice exhibited early onset retinal degeneration that was associated with rhodopsin mislocalization in the photoreceptors and reduced cone cell numbers, and led to progressive loss of vision. By contrast, renal histologic changes occurred later, and no global ciliary defects were observed in the kidneys. Instead, renal pathology was associated with elevated levels of DNA damage response signaling activity. Cell culture studies confirmed the aberrant activation of DNA damage response in Sdccag8gt/gt-derived cells, characterized by elevated levels of γH2AX and phosphorylated ATM and cell cycle profile abnormalities. Our analysis of Sdccag8gt/gt mice indicates that the pleiotropic phenotypes in these mice may arise through multiple tissue-specific disease mechanisms. PMID:24722439

  19. DNA Damage Response Is Involved in the Developmental Toxicity of Mebendazole in Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Shota; Nishimura, Yuhei; Kon, Tetsuo; Yamanaka, Yukiko; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Yuge, Mizuki; Okabe, Shiko; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal helminths cause iron-deficiency anemia in pregnant women, associated with premature delivery, low birth weight, maternal ill health, and maternal death. Although benzimidazole compounds such as mebendazole (MBZ) are highly efficacious against helminths, there are limited data on its use during pregnancy. In this study, we performed in vivo imaging of the retinas of zebrafish larvae exposed to MBZ, and found that exposure to MBZ during 2 and 3 days post-fertilization caused malformation of the retinal layers. To identify the molecular mechanism underlying the developmental toxicity of MBZ, we performed transcriptome analysis of zebrafish eyes. The analysis revealed that the DNA damage response was involved in the developmental toxicity of MBZ. We were also able to demonstrate that inhibition of ATM significantly attenuated the apoptosis induced by MBZ in the zebrafish retina. These results suggest that MBZ causes developmental toxicity in the zebrafish retina at least partly by activating the DNA damage response, including ATM signaling, providing a potential adverse outcome pathway in the developmental toxicity of MBZ in mammals. PMID:27014071

  20. Prion-induced neurotoxicity: Possible role for cell cycle activity and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Bujdoso, Raymond; Landgraf, Matthias; Jackson, Walker S; Thackray, Alana M

    2015-08-12

    Protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases arise through neurotoxicity induced by aggregation of host proteins. These conditions include Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease, tauopathies and prion diseases. Collectively, these conditions are a challenge to society because of the increasing aged population and through the real threat to human food security by animal prion diseases. It is therefore important to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie protein misfolding-induced neurotoxicity as this will form the basis for designing strategies to alleviate their burden. Prion diseases are an important paradigm for neurodegenerative conditions in general since several of these maladies have now been shown to display prion-like phenomena. Increasingly, cell cycle activity and the DNA damage response are recognised as cellular events that participate in the neurotoxic process of various neurodegenerative diseases, and their associated animal models, which suggests they are truly involved in the pathogenic process and are not merely epiphenomena. Here we review the role of cell cycle activity and the DNA damage response in neurodegeneration associated with protein misfolding diseases, and suggest that these events contribute towards prion-induced neurotoxicity. In doing so, we highlight PrP transgenic Drosophila as a tractable model for the genetic analysis of transmissible mammalian prion disease.

  1. Genetic Interactions of the Aspergillus nidulans atmAATM Homolog With Different Components of the DNA Damage Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Malavazi, Iran; Lima, Joel Fernandes; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Savoldi, Marcela; de Souza Goldman, Maria Helena; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2008-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a phosphatidyl-3-kinase-related protein kinase that functions as a central regulator of the DNA damage response in eukaryotic cells. In humans, mutations in ATM cause the devastating neurodegenerative disease ataxia telangiectasia. Previously, we characterized the homolog of ATM (AtmA) in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. In addition to its expected role in the DNA damage response, we found that AtmA is also required for polarized hyphal growth. Here, we extended these studies by investigating which components of the DNA damage response pathway are interacting with AtmA. The AtmAATM loss of function caused synthetic lethality when combined with mutation in UvsBATR. Our results suggest that AtmA and UvsB are interacting and they are probably partially redundant in terms of DNA damage sensing and/or repairing and polar growth. We identified and inactivated A. nidulans chkACHK1 and chkBCHK2 genes. These genes are also redundantly involved in A. nidulans DNA damage response. We constructed several combinations of double mutants for ΔatmA, ΔuvsB, ΔchkA, and ΔchkB. We observed a complex genetic relationship with these mutations during the DNA replication checkpoint and DNA damage response. Finally, we observed epistatic and synergistic interactions between AtmA, and bimEAPC1, ankAWEE1 and the cdc2-related kinase npkA, at S-phase checkpoint and in response to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:18245360

  2. Identification of the Dimer Exchange Interface of the Bacterial DNA Damage Response Protein UmuD.

    PubMed

    Murison, David A; Timson, Rebecca C; Koleva, Bilyana N; Ordazzo, Michael; Beuning, Penny J

    2017-08-29

    The Escherichia coli SOS response, an induced DNA damage response pathway, confers survival on bacterial cells by providing accurate repair mechanisms as well as the potentially mutagenic pathway translesion synthesis (TLS). The umuD gene products are upregulated after DNA damage and play roles in both nonmutagenic and mutagenic aspects of the SOS response. Full-length UmuD is expressed as a homodimer of 139-amino-acid subunits, which eventually cleaves its N-terminal 24 amino acids to form UmuD'. The cleavage product UmuD' and UmuC form the Y-family polymerase DNA Pol V (UmuD'2C) capable of performing TLS. UmuD and UmuD' exist as homodimers, but their subunits can readily exchange to form UmuDD' heterodimers preferentially. Heterodimer formation is an essential step in the degradation pathway of UmuD'. The recognition sequence for ClpXP protease is located within the first 24 amino acids of full-length UmuD, and the partner of full-length UmuD, whether UmuD or UmuD', is degraded by ClpXP. To better understand the mechanism by which UmuD subunits exchange, we measured the kinetics of exchange of a number of fluorescently labeled single-cysteine UmuD variants as detected by Förster resonance energy transfer. Labeling sites near the dimer interface correlate with increased rates of exchange, indicating that weakening the dimer interface facilitates exchange, whereas labeling sites on the exterior decrease the rate of exchange. In most but not all cases, homodimer and heterodimer exchange exhibit similar rates, indicating that somewhat different molecular surfaces mediate homodimer exchange and heterodimer formation.

  3. The 3′–5′ DNA Exonuclease TREX1 Directly Interacts with Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP1) during the DNA Damage Response*

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Takuya; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yoon, Jeongheon; Wang, Hongsheng; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Morse, Herbert C.

    2014-01-01

    The main function of the 3′–5′ DNA exonuclease TREX1 is to digest cytosolic single-stranded DNA to prevent activation of cell-intrinsic responses to immunostimulatory DNA. TREX1 translocates to the nucleus following DNA damage with its nuclear activities being less well defined. Although mutations in human TREX1 have been linked to autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, the mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of these diseases remain incompletely understood. Here, using mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation assays and in vivo overexpression models, we show that TREX1 interacts with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), a nuclear enzyme involved in the DNA damage response. Two zinc finger domains at the amino terminus of PARP1 were required for the interaction with TREX1 that occurs after nuclear translocation of TREX1 in response to DNA damage. Functional studies suggested that TREX1 may contribute to stabilization of PARP1 levels in the DNA damage response and its activity. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of single-stranded DNA repair following DNA damage and alterations induced by gene mutations. PMID:25278026

  4. Maximiscin Induces DNA Damage, Activates DNA Damage Response Pathways, and Has Selective Cytotoxic Activity against a Subtype of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Robles, Andrew J; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Mooberry, Susan L

    2016-07-22

    Triple-negative breast cancers are highly aggressive, and patients with these types of tumors have poor long-term survival. These breast cancers do not express estrogen or progesterone receptors and do not have gene amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2; therefore, they do not respond to available targeted therapies. The lack of targeted therapies for triple-negative breast cancers stems from their heterogeneous nature and lack of a clear definition of driver defects. Studies have recently identified triple-negative breast cancer molecular subtypes based on gene expression profiling and representative cell lines, allowing for the identification of subtype-specific drug leads and molecular targets. We previously reported the identification of a new fungal metabolite named maximiscin (1) identified through a crowdsourcing program. New results show that 1 has selective cytotoxic efficacy against basal-like 1 MDA-MB-468 cells compared to cell lines modeling other triple-negative breast cancer molecular subtypes. This compound also exhibited antitumor efficacy in a xenograft mouse model. The mechanisms of action of 1 in MDA-MB-468 cells were investigated to identify potential molecular targets and affected pathways. Compound 1 caused accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting induction of DNA damage. Indeed, treatment with 1 caused DNA double-strand breaks with concomitant activation of the DNA damage response pathways, indicated by phosphorylation of p53, Chk1, and Chk2. Collectively, these results suggest basal-like triple-negative breast cancer may be inherently sensitive to DNA-damaging agents relative to other triple-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results also demonstrate the potential of our citizen crowdsourcing program to identify new lead molecules for treating the subtypes of triple-negative breast cancer.

  5. Chromatin-associated proteins HMGB1/2 and PDIA3 trigger cellular response to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Krynetskaia, Natalia F.; Phadke, Manali S.; Jadhav, Sachin H.; Krynetskiy, Evgeny Y

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the new molecular components of the DNA damage signaling cascade opens novel avenues to enhance efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a DNA damage sensor responsive to incorporation of non-natural nucleosides into DNA; several nuclear and cytosolic proteins are functionally integrated with HMGB1 in the context of DNA damage response. The functional role of HMGB1 and HMGB1-associated proteins (high mobility group protein B2, HMGB2; glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GAPDH; protein disulfide isomerase family A member 3, PDIA3; heat shock 70kDa protein 8, HSPA8) in DNA damage response was assessed in human carcinoma cells A549 and UO31 by transient knockdown with short interfering RNAs. Using the cell proliferation assay, we found that knockdown of HMGB1-associated proteins resulted in 8-50-fold decreased chemosensitivity of A549 cells to cytarabine. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescent microscopy were used to evaluate genotoxic stress markers in knocked down cancer cells after 24-72 hr incubation with 1 μM cytarabine. Our results dissect the roles of HMGB1-associated proteins in DNA damage response: HMGB1 and HMGB2 facilitate p53 phosphorylation after exposure to genotoxic stress; and PDIA3 has been found essential for H2AX phosphorylation (no γ-H2AX was accumulated after 24-72 hr incubation with 1 μM cytarabine in PDIA3 knockdown cells). We conclude that phosphorylation of p53, and phosphorylation of H2AX, occur in two distinct branches of the DNA damage response. These findings identify new molecular components of the DNA damage signaling cascade and provide novel promising targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:19372559

  6. Archaeal Genome Guardians Give Insights into Eukaryotic DNA Replication and Damage Response Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shin, David S.; Pratt, Ashley J.; Tainer, John A.