Science.gov

Sample records for damage test specifications

  1. Large area damage testing of optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, L.; Kozlowski, M.; Stolz, C.

    1996-04-26

    The damage threshold specifications for the National Ignition Facility will include a mixture of standard small-area tests and new large-area tests. During our studies of laser damage and conditioning processes of various materials we have found that some damage morphologies are fairly small and this damage does not grow with further illumination. This type of damage might not be detrimental to the laser performance. We should therefore assume that some damage can be allowed on the optics, but decide on a maximum damage allowance of damage. A new specification of damage threshold termed {open_quotes}functional damage threshold{close_quotes} was derived. Further correlation of damage size and type to system performance must be determined in order to use this measurement, but it is clear that it will be a large factor in the optics performance specifications. Large-area tests have verified that small-area testing is not always sufficient when the optic in question has defect-initiated damage. This was evident for example on sputtered polarizer and mirror coatings where the defect density was low enough that the features could be missed by standard small- area testing. For some materials, the scale-length at which damage non-uniformities occur will effect the comparison of small-area and large-area tests. An example of this was the sub-aperture tests on KD*P crystals on the Beamlet test station. The tests verified the large-area damage threshold to be similar to that found when testing a small-area. Implying that for this KD*P material, the dominate damage mechanism is of sufficiently small scale-length that small-area testing is capable of determining the threshold. The Beamlet test station experiments also demonstrated the use of on-line laser conditioning to increase the crystals damage threshold.

  2. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  3. Experimental test of specific predictions of a model for the oscillatory response of p53 to DNA damage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Wagner, John; Rice, J. Jeremy; Ma, Lan; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui; Levine, Arnold

    2007-03-01

    We have proposed a model for radiation-induced oscillations of the p53-mdm2 system that makes specific predictions about the range of both p53 and mdm2 transcription rates that support oscillation. Our model predicts that in cells with a polymorphism in the mdm2 gene (SNP309) that enhances mdm2 transcription levels, oscillations disappear. The kinetics of the p53 and Mdm2 levels measured in cells with different genotype at the SNP309 locus show that oscillations of p53 and Mdm2 are observed in the cells wild type for mdm2 SNP309 but not in cells homozygous for mdm2 SNP309. By using H1299 cell line expressing wild-type p53 under a tetracycline-regulated promoter we found that only when p53 levels are in a certain range, oscillation can be observed after stress. This study provides evidence that proper range of the p53 and Mdm2 levels are required for the coordinated p53-Mdm2 oscillation upon stress.

  4. Specific construction tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcrae, W. V., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The technical feasibility of the Satellite Power System (SPS) is discussed. The development of feasible operational concepts and conceptualization of specific construction tasks are examined. The logic flow of functional analyses of both the rectenna and the satellite is illustrated. Constraints placed upon the construction processes and equipment by the satellite design are outlined. The construction tasks, when defined and combined into an integrated schedule establish, a time line for construction mass flow demands to be satisfied by the space transportation systems. An example of satellite constructive demands and HLLV delivery capabilities is given.

  5. Specific test and evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-03-20

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AX-B Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

  6. Specific test and evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.H.

    1997-12-09

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a ``lower tier`` document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP) This STEP encompasses all testing activities required to demonstrate compliance to the project design criteria as it relates to the modifications of the AN-A valve pit. The Project Design Specifications (PDS) identify the specific testing activities required for the Project. Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the modifications to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

  7. Versatile laser glass inspection and damage testing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, J.E.; Greiner, G.J.; Campbell, J.H.; Chaffee, P.H.; Hildum, J.S.; Grens, J.Z.; Weinzapfel, C.L.; Winfree, S.M.; Milam, D.

    1986-01-17

    A test facility is described which detects small opaque inclusions in large transparent components by using a commercial laser which delivers high energy pulses to the test sample at moderate frequency in a small diameter beam. The sample is automatically scanned such that each point in the volume is irradiated with ten pulses at twice the inclusion damage threshold - an amount sufficient to cause visible damage at inclusion sites. This approach permits detection of opaque inclusions in the parts per trillion and lower concentration range. The specifics of the device design and its performance are discussed in the context of automatic inclusion inspection and mapping in large laser optics.

  8. SPECIFIC MOLDS ASSOCIATED WITH ASTHMA IN WATER-DAMAGED HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: We sought to determine if specific molds were found in significantly higher concentrations in the water-damaged homes of asthmatic children compared to homes with no visible water damage. Methods: The mold concentrations in the dust in asthmatic children's bedrooms i...

  9. Testing the Effects of dl-Alpha-Tocopherol Supplementation on Oxidative Damage, Total Antioxidant Protection and the Sex-Specific Responses of Reproductive Effort and Lifespan to Dietary Manipulation in Australian Field Crickets (Teleogryllus commodus)

    PubMed Central

    Archer, C. Ruth; Hempenstall, Sarah; Royle, Nick J.; Selman, Colin; Willis, Sheridan; Rapkin, James; Blount, Jon D.; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress theory predicts that the accumulation of oxidative damage causes aging. More generally, oxidative damage could be a cost of reproduction that reduces survival. Both of these hypotheses have mixed empirical support. To better understand the life-history consequences of oxidative damage, we fed male and female Australian field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus) four diets differing in their protein and carbohydrate content, which have sex-specific effects on reproductive effort and lifespan. We supplemented half of these crickets with the vitamin E isoform dl-alpha-tocopherol and measured the effects of nutrient intake on lifespan, reproduction, oxidative damage and antioxidant protection. We found a clear trade-off between reproductive effort and lifespan in females but not in males. In direct contrast to the oxidative stress theory, crickets fed diets that improved their lifespan had high levels of oxidative damage to proteins. Supplementation with dl-alpha-tocopherol did not significantly improve lifespan or reproductive effort. However, males fed diets that increased their reproductive investment experienced high oxidative damage to proteins. While this suggests that male reproductive effort could elevate oxidative damage, this was not associated with reduced male survival. Overall, these results provide little evidence that oxidative damage plays a central role in mediating life-history trade-offs in T. commodus. PMID:26783958

  10. Use of behavioral avoidance testing in natural resource damage assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipton, J.; Little, E.E.; Marr, J.C.A.; DeLonay, A.J.; Bengston, David A.; Henshel, Diane S.

    1996-01-01

    Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) provisions established under federal and state statutes enable natural resource trustees to recover compensation from responsible parties to restore injured natural resources. Behavioral avoidance testing with fish has been used in NRDAs to determine injuries to natural resources and to establish restoration thresholds. In this manuscript we evaluate the use of avoidance testing to NRDA. Specifically, we discuss potential “acceptance criteria” to evaluate the applicability and relevance of avoidance testing. These acceptance criteria include: (1) regulatory relevance, (2) reproducibility of testing, (3) ecological significance, (4) quality assurance/quality control, and (5) relevance to restoration. We discuss each of these criteria with respect to avoidance testing. Overall, we conclude that avoidance testing can be an appropriate, defensible, and desirable aspect of an NRDA.

  11. Damage testing of sapphire and Ti: sapphire laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion bonded sapphire and Ti (Titanium). Sapphire laser materials that will be damage tested to determine if there is an increase in damage threshold. Photographed in building 1145, photographic studio.

  12. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  13. LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

  14. 21 CFR 660.26 - Specificity tests and avidity tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Specificity tests and avidity tests. 660.26 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.26 Specificity tests and avidity tests. Specificity and avidity tests shall be performed using...

  15. 21 CFR 660.26 - Specificity tests and avidity tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Specificity tests and avidity tests. 660.26... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.26 Specificity tests and avidity tests. Specificity and avidity tests shall be...

  16. Sources of specificity in plant damaged-self recognition.

    PubMed

    Duran-Flores, Dalia; Heil, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Plants perceive injury and herbivore attack via the recognition of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and herbivore-associated molecular patterns (HAMPs). Although HAMPs in particular are cues that can indicate the presence of a specific enemy, the application of pure DAMPs or HAMPs frequently activates general downstream responses: membrane depolarization, Ca(2+) influxes, oxidative stress, MAPKinase activation and octadecanoid signaling at the molecular level, and the expression of digestion inhibitors, cell wall modifications and other general defenses at the phenotypic level. We discuss the relative benefits of perceiving the non-self versus the damaged-self and of specific versus non-specific responses and suggest that the perception of a complex mixture of DAMPs and HAMPs triggers fine-tuned plant responses. DAMPs such as extracellular ATP (eATP), cell wall fragments, signaling peptides, herbivore-induced volatile organic compounds (HI-VOCs) and eDNA hold the key for a more complete understanding of how plants perceive that and by whom they are attacked.

  17. The neuropathology of alcohol-specific brain damage, or does alcohol damage the brain?

    PubMed

    Harper, C

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this review is to identify neuropathological changes that are directly related to the long-term use of excessive amounts of alcohol (ethanol). There is still debate as to whether alcohol per se causes brain damage. The main problem has been to identify those lesions caused by alcohol itself and those caused by other common alcohol-related factors, principally thiamin deficiency. Careful selection and classification of alcoholic cases into those with and without these complications, together with detailed quantitative neuropathological analyses, has provided us with useful data. There is brain shrinkage in uncomplicated alcoholics which can largely be accounted for by loss of white matter. Some of this damage appears to be reversible. However, alcohol-related neuronal loss has been documented in specific regions of the cerebral cortex (superior frontal association cortex), hypothalamus (supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei), and cerebellum. The data is conflicting for several regions: the hippocampus, amygdala and locus ceruleus. No change is found in the basal ganglia, nucleus basalis, or serotonergic raphe nuclei. Many of the regions that are normal in uncomplicated alcoholics are damaged in those with the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Dendritic and synaptic changes have been documented in uncomplicated alcoholics and these, together with receptor and transmitter changes, may explain functional changes and cognitive deficits that precede the more severe structural neuronal changes. The pattern of damage appears to be somewhat different and species-specific in animal models of alcohol toxicity. Pathological changes that have been found to correlate with alcohol intake include white matter loss and neuronal loss in the hypothalamus and cerebellum.

  18. Damage detection tests of five-story steel frame with simulated damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Koichi; Teshigawara, Masaomi; Isoda, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Takuji; Mita, Akira

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents damage detection tests of five-story steel frame with simulated damages. We discuss pre-analytical study and results of experiments. Fiber brag grating (FBG) sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges and laser displacement meters are installed in this test frame. We assume damages by removing studs from only one story, loosening bolts of beams, cutting part of beams and extracting braces from only one story. From the results of pre-analytical study, we can estimate which story is damaged from the change of natural period and mode shape to some extent. We applied flexibility method which is one of a damage identification methods using modal properties. We also apply flexibility method to results of experiments. In some cases we can estimate which story is damaged, and in other cases we cannot. We also applied a method using multiple natural frequency shifts. Making use of the change in five natural frequencies due to damage, the location of damaged stories can be pinpointed. In both methods, we cannot identify damaged story in some cases. Some methods other than methods using modal properties have to be tried to apply in such cases.

  19. Diagnostic methods for CW laser damage testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Alan F.; Shah, Rashmi S.

    2004-06-01

    High performance optical coatings are an enabling technology for many applications - navigation systems, telecom, fusion, advanced measurement systems of many types as well as directed energy weapons. The results of recent testing of superior optical coatings conducted at high flux levels will be presented. The diagnostics used in this type of nondestructive testing and the analysis of the data demonstrates the evolution of test methodology. Comparison of performance data under load to the predictions of thermal and optical models shows excellent agreement. These tests serve to anchor the models and validate the performance of the materials and coatings.

  20. STAGE 64: SIMULATOR PROGRAMMING SPECIFICATIONS MANUAL. VOLUME III. DAMAGE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Damage package of the STAGE Simulator is a group of six complexes which under normal running conditions assess damage to the following five types...preliminary control routine. Under nonoptimal running conditions, the damage assessment is made by the five complexes at the end of each time period during which ground zero has occurred.

  1. 34. Historic photo of Building 202 test cell with damage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Historic photo of Building 202 test cell with damage from fire or explosion during rocket engine testing, May 17, 1958. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-47965. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. 35. Historic photo of Building 202 test stand with damage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Historic photo of Building 202 test stand with damage to twenty-thousand-pound-thrust rocket engine related to failure during testing, September 16, 1958. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-48704. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Design, synthesis, and characterization of nucleosomes containing site-specific DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-12-01

    How DNA damaged is formed, recognized, and repaired in chromatin is an area of intense study. To better understand the structure activity relationships of damaged chromatin, mono and dinucleosomes containing site-specific damage have been prepared and studied. This review will focus on the design, synthesis, and characterization of model systems of damaged chromatin for structural, physical, and enzymatic studies.

  4. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  5. A continuous damage model based on stepwise-stress creep rupture tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    A creep damage accumulation model is presented that makes use of the Kachanov damage rate concept with a provision accounting for damage that results from a variable stress history. This is accomplished through the introduction of an additional term in the Kachanov rate equation that is linear in the stress rate. Specification of the material functions and parameters in the model requires two types of constituting a data base: (1) standard constant-stress creep rupture tests, and (2) a sequence of two-step creep rupture tests.

  6. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  7. High Voltage Testing. Volume 2. Specifications and Test Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    as tested to 4.7.12 shall exhibit no evidence of mechanical damage. 103 °o. . .. 3.16 Salt spray (corrosion) (metal surfaces only, see 3.1). When...of the surfaces shall be affected by flaking, peeling, or blistering of paint. There shall be no evidence of unwrapping of or mechanical damage to...Profile 48 A6 Typical Mechanical Release Fixture 50 A7 Suggested Method for Making Cable Ends Corona Free 56 BI Solder Contact (Pin and Socket

  8. Source of contamination in damage-test sample and vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitsuno, T.; Murakami, H.; Motokoshi, S.; Mikami, K.; Mikami, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kawanaka, J.; Miyanaga, N.

    2016-08-01

    Contamination of optics observed in LFEX compression chamber was a critical problem for maintaining high damage threshold and high optical performance for mirrors and gratings in the vacuum environments. We conducted a study for understanding this problem, and we found important knowledge on the nature of contamination, namely materials of contaminants, source of contamination, the invasion mechanism, and removal method of contamination. We also found the samples for the damage test is easily contaminated in the storage environment. This means the optical coating accumulate contaminations even in the air. So we tested in-situ damage test in a gas flowing chamber with controlled contaminants. The degradation was time-dependent phenomena, and proportional to the vapor pressure of contaminants. Several materials were tested, and even in water vapor, the damage threshold was decreased about 10%. We also found out two methods for removing contaminations from the coatings. According to these studies, our conclusion is special treatments should be used for knowing the intrinsic damage threshold of the coatings.

  9. Preliminary tests of a damaged ship for CFD validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungkyun; You, Ji-Myoung; Lee, Hyun-Ho; Lim, Taegu; Rhee, Shin Hyung; Rhee, Key-Pyo

    2012-06-01

    One of the most critical issues in naval architecture these days is the operational safety. Among many factors to be considered for higher safety level requirements, the hull stability in intact and damaged conditions is the first to ensure for both commercial and military vessels. Unlike the intact stability cases, the assessment of the damaged ship stability is very complicated physical phenomena. Therefore it is widely acknowledged that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are one of most feasible approaches. In order to develop better CFD methods for damaged ship stability assessment, it is essential to perform well-designed model tests and to build a database for CFD validation. In the present study, free roll decay tests in calm water with both intact and damaged ships were performed and six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) motion responses of intact ship in regular waves were measured. Through the free roll decay tests, the effects of the flooding water on the roll decay motion of a ship were investigated. Through the model tests in regular waves, the database that provides 6DOF motion responses of intact ship was established

  10. Unusual plastic deformation and damage features in titanium: Experimental tests and constitutive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil-Baudard, Benoit; Cazacu, Oana; Flater, Philip; Chandola, Nitin; Alves, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental study on plastic deformation and damage of polycrystalline pure HCP Ti, as well as modeling of the observed behavior. Mechanical characterization data were conducted, which indicate that the material is orthotropic and displays tension-compression asymmetry. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray tomography measurements conducted reveal that damage distribution and evolution in this HCP Ti material is markedly different than in a typical FCC material such as copper. Stewart and Cazacu (2011) anisotropic elastic/plastic damage model is used to describe the behavior. All the parameters involved in this model have a clear physical significance, being related to plastic properties, and are determined from very few simple mechanical tests. It is shown that this model predicts correctly the anisotropy in plastic deformation, and its strong influence on damage distribution and damage accumulation. Specifically, for a smooth axisymmetric specimen subject to uniaxial tension, damage initiates at the center of the specimen, and is diffuse; the level of damage close to failure being very low. On the other hand, for a notched specimen subject to the same loading the model predicts that damage initiates at the outer surface of the specimen, and further grows from the outer surface to the center of the specimen, which corroborates with the in-situ tomography data.

  11. Melcor Benchmarking Against Integral Severe Fuel Damage Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.

    1994-12-31

    MELCOR is a fully integrated computer code that models all phases of the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants, and is being developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a program with the NRC to provide independent assessment of MELCOR, and a very important part of this program is to benchmark MELCOR against experimental data from integral severe fuel damage tests and predictions of that data from more mechanistic codes such as SCDAP or SCDAP/RELAP5. Benchmarking analyses with MELCOR have been carried out at BNL for five integral severe fuel damage tests, namely, PBF SFD 1-1, SFD 1-4, and NRU FLHT-2, FLHT-4, and FLHT-5. This paper presents a summary of these analyses, and their role in identifying areas of modeling strengths and weaknesses in MELCOR.

  12. Melcor benchmarking against integral severe fuel damage tests

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.

    1995-09-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated computer code that models all phases of the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants, and is being developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a program with the NRC to provide independent assessment of MELCOR, and a very important part of this program is to benchmark MELCOR against experimental data from integral severe fuel damage tests and predictions of that data from more mechanistic codes such as SCDAP or SCDAP/RELAP5. Benchmarking analyses with MELCOR have been carried out at BNL for five integral severe fuel damage tests, namely, PBF SFD 1-1, SFD 14, and NRU FLHT-2, analyses, and their role in identifying areas of modeling strengths and weaknesses in MELCOR.

  13. Some effects of applied stress on early stages of cavitation damage. [test facilities for analyzing cavitation flow damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemppainen, D. J.; Hammitt, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation flow damage is discussed. The initial phases of damage and the effect of external stresses on the extent to which damage is incurred are analyzed. Three experimental facilities were used to procure the data required: (1) a water loop with venturi, (2) a mercury loop with venturi, and (3) a vibratory facility (stationary specimen, nonflow system). A description of each system is provided for the clarification of test conditions. Photographs of typical cavitation damage instances are included.

  14. Mechanism of site-specific DNA damage induced by ozone.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiko; Inoue, Sumiko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2005-08-01

    Ozone has been shown to induce lung tumors in mice. The reactivity of ozone with DNA in an aqueous solution was investigated by a DNA sequencing technique using 32P-labeled DNA fragments. Ozone induced cleavages in the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of double-stranded DNA, which were reduced by hydroxyl radical scavengers, suggesting the participation of hydroxyl radicals in the cleavages. The ozone-induced DNA cleavages were enhanced with piperidine treatment, which induces cleavages at sites of base modification, but the inhibitory effect of hydroxyl radical scavengers on the piperidine-induced cleavages was limited. Main piperidine-labile sites were guanine and thymine residues. Cleavages at some guanine and thymine residues after piperidine treatment became more predominant with denatured single-stranded DNA. Exposure of calf thymus DNA to ozone resulted in a dose-dependent increase of the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine formation, which was partially inhibited by hydroxyl radical scavengers. ESR studies using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) showed that aqueous ozone produced the hydroxyl radical adduct of DMPO. In addition, the fluorescein-dependent chemiluminescence was detected during the decomposition of ozone in a buffer solution and the enhancing effect of D2O was observed, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen. However, no or little enhancing effect of D2O on the ozone-induced DNA damage was observed. These results suggest that DNA backbone cleavages were caused by ozone via the production of hydroxyl radicals, while DNA base modifications were mainly caused by ozone itself and the participation of hydroxyl radicals and/or singlet oxygen in base modifications is small, if any. A possible link of ozone-induced DNA damage to inflammation-associated carcinogenesis as well as air pollution-related carcinogenesis is discussed.

  15. Tyndall AFB Bomb Damage Repair Field Test, Documentation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    was not tested, as bping Irrele- vant to these tests. Simulation of this event was not attempted because it would have provided little or no...Richardson, Texas, Report No. AFWL-TR-71-42, October 1971. 11. Bussone, P.S., B.J. Bottomley, and G.C. Hoff , Rapid Repair of Bomb- Damaged Runways...Airfield Runways, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Klrtland AFB, New Mexico, Report No. AFWL-TR-73-214, February 1974. 19. Hoff , George C, Investigation of

  16. Static testing and proposed standard specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, E P

    1920-01-01

    Static tests fall into two groups, the first of which is designed to load all members of the structure approximately in accordance with the worst loads which they carry in flight, while the second is directed to the testing of specific members which are suspected of weakness and which are difficult to analyze mathematically. The nature of the loading in the second type is different for every different test, but the purpose of the first is defined clearly enough to permit the adoption of some standard set of loading specifications, at least for airplanes of normal design. Here, an attempt is made to carry through an analysis leading to such a standard, the goal being the determination of a load which will simultaneously impose on every member of the airplane structure a stress equal to the worst it will carry in flight.

  17. Testing of concurrent programs and partial specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, D.

    1982-12-01

    The testing problems of concurrent systems include those of sequential programs, but there are two additional difficulties: the scheduling of tasks may alter the behavior, making tests misleading; testing may be conducted at an early stage of development, by users who are not software experts. Concurrent process systems can be modeled by a collection of finite-state transducers, in a way that displays their unique problems. The specification languages PAISLey and Gist approach the definition of concurrent systems differently, but both permit users to execute partially defined systems. The declarative language PROLOG, although not explicitly designed for concurrent programming, exhibits similar characteristics. Prototype execution has some unexpected implications for testing, and for final implementation.

  18. Tests in Print II: An Index to Tests, Test Reviews, and the Literature on Specific Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buros, Oscar K., Ed.

    Tests in Print II is a comprehensive, annotated bibliography of all in-print tests published as separates for use with English-speaking subjects. The 1,155 two-column pages list 2,467 tests in print as of early 1974; 16,574 references through 1971 on specific tests; a reprinting of the 1974 APA-AERA-NCME Standards for Educational andPsychological…

  19. Full-scale testing and progressive damage modeling of sandwich composite aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    A comprehensive experimental and computational investigation was conducted to characterize the fracture behavior and structural response of large sandwich composite aircraft fuselage panels containing artificial damage in the form of holes and notches. Full-scale tests were conducted where panels were subjected to quasi-static combined pressure, hoop, and axial loading up to failure. The panels were constructed using plain-weave carbon/epoxy prepreg face sheets and a Nomex honeycomb core. Panel deformation and notch tip damage development were monitored during the tests using several techniques, including optical observations, strain gages, digital image correlation (DIC), acoustic emission (AE), and frequency response (FR). Additional pretest and posttest inspections were performed via thermography, computer-aided tap tests, ultrasound, x-radiography, and scanning electron microscopy. The framework to simulate damage progression and to predict residual strength through use of the finite element (FE) method was developed. The DIC provided local and full-field strain fields corresponding to changes in the state-of-damage and identified the strain components driving damage progression. AE was monitored during loading of all panels and data analysis methodologies were developed to enable real-time determination of damage initiation, progression, and severity in large composite structures. The FR technique has been developed, evaluating its potential as a real-time nondestructive inspection technique applicable to large composite structures. Due to the large disparity in scale between the fuselage panels and the artificial damage, a global/local analysis was performed. The global FE models fully represented the specific geometries, composite lay-ups, and loading mechanisms of the full-scale tests. A progressive damage model was implemented in the local FE models, allowing the gradual failure of elements in the vicinity of the artificial damage. A set of modifications

  20. An advanced test technique to quantify thermomechanical fatigue damage accumulation in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanical test technique was developed to assist in quantifying the accumulation of damage in composite materials during thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) cycling. This was accomplished by incorporating definitive elastic mechanical property measurements into an ongoing load-controlled TMF test without disturbing the test specimen or significantly altering the test conditions. The technique allows two fundamental composite properties consisting of the isothermal elastic static moduli and the macroscopic coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to be measured and collected as functions of the TMF cycles. The specific implementation was incorporated into the commonly employed idealized in-phase and out-of-phase TMF cycles. However, the techniques discussed could be easily implemented into any form of load-controlled TMF mission cycle. By quantifying the degradations of these properties, tremendous insights are gained concerning the progression of macroscopic composite damage and often times the progression of damage within a given constituent. This information should also be useful for the characterization and essential for the verification of analytical damage modeling methodologies. Several examples utilizing this test technique are given for three different fiber lay-ups of titanium metal matrix composites.

  1. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  2. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  3. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  4. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  5. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  6. Filia is an ESC-specific regulator of DNA damage response and safeguards genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Wei-dao; Duan, Ying-liang; Lu, Yong-qing; Cun, Yi-xian; Li, Chao-hui; Guo, Kun; Nie, Wen-hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Rugang; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in cell-based therapy, but the genomic instability seen in culture hampers full application. Greater understanding of the factors that regulate genomic stability in PSCs could help address this issue. Here we describe the identification of Filia as a specific regulator of genomic stability in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Filia expression is induced by genotoxic stress. Filia promotes centrosome integrity and regulates DNA damage response (DDR) through multiple pathways, including DDR signaling, cell cycle checkpoints and damage repair, ESC differentiation and apoptosis. Filia depletion causes ESC genomic instability, induces resistance to apoptosis and promotes malignant transformation. As part of its role in the DDR, Filia interacts with PARP1 and stimulates its enzymatic activity. Filia also constitutively resides on centrosomes and translocates to DNA damage sites and mitochondria, consistent with its multifaceted roles in regulating centrosome integrity, damage repair and apoptosis. PMID:25936915

  7. Methamphetamine induces DNA damage in specific regions of the female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Zane; Venters, Jace; Guarraci, Fay A; Zewail-Foote, Maha

    2015-06-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that has been shown to produce neurotoxicity. Methamphetamine increases the release of dopamine by reversing the direction of monoamine transporter proteins, leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species in the brain. In this study, we examined the effect of METH on DNA damage in vivo using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) under two different conditions. Rats treated with multiple doses of METH (10 mg/kg × 4) showed significant levels of DNA damage in the nucleus accumbens and striatum, both dopamine-rich areas. In contrast, a single dose of METH did not lead to significant levels of DNA damage in any of the dopamine-rich brain regions that were tested. Overall, the results of our study demonstrate that METH produces greater oxidative DNA damage in brain areas that receive greater dopamine innervation.

  8. 7 CFR 51.3417 - Optional test for specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Optional test for specific gravity. 51.3417 Section 51... § 51.3417 Optional test for specific gravity. Tests to determine specific gravity shall be made in... lot with respect to size and quality. The specific gravity for any lot of potatoes shall be...

  9. 7 CFR 51.3417 - Optional test for specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Optional test for specific gravity. 51.3417 Section 51... § 51.3417 Optional test for specific gravity. Tests to determine specific gravity shall be made in... lot with respect to size and quality. The specific gravity for any lot of potatoes shall be...

  10. Damage Tolerance Testing of a NASA TransHab Derivative Woven Inflatable Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgecombe, John; delaFuente, Horacio; Valle, Gerald D.

    2008-01-01

    the structural support for the module when in a non-inflated state as well as resists a portion of the axial load when pressurized. The longitudinal members of the structural restraint layer are attached to the bulkheads using a series of clevises that are bolted to the bulkheads. Strain gages are placed on the clevises that can measure change in load when the structural restraint is inflated. The test module is 88 inches in diameter and 120 inches in height. The objectives of the DTT are to (1) verify the structural integrity of the assembled and pressurized structure when a section of the structural restraint layer is cut by a foreign object, and (2) verify the load distribution of the structural restraint layer during pressurization, before and after the structural restraint layer is severed. For this test, a longitudinal structural restraint strap will be severed using a linear shape charge. The linear shape charge was designed specifically for this application to cut only a single longitudinal strap, while not damaging the bladder. An array of strain gages were located at the bulkhead mounted clevises where the longitudinal restraint layer straps are attached. The DTT article was inflated to 45 psig, 25% of the ultimate design pressure, and one of the one-inch wide longitudinal structural members was severed. Strain gage measurements of loading in an array of longitudinal straps were taken throughout pressurization of the module to 45 psig, before firing of the linear shape charge, and after firing of the shape charge and separation of the strap. During testing not only were the original objectives met but better than expected results occurred. This paper will discuss space inflatable structures, damage tolerance analysis, test results, and applicability to the Lunar architecture.

  11. Acute Oxidative Effect and Muscle Damage after a Maximum 4 Min Test in High Performance Athletes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Heros Ribeiro; Ferreira, Pamela Gill; Loures, João Paulo; Fernandes Filho, José; Fernandes, Luiz Cláudio; Buck, Hudson Sousa; Montor, Wagner Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine lipid peroxidation markers, physiological stress and muscle damage in elite kayakers in response to a maximum 4-min kayak ergometer test (KE test), and possible correlations with individual 1000m kayaking performances. The sample consisted of twenty-three adult male and nine adult female elite kayakers, with more than three years' experience in international events, who voluntarily took part in this study. The subjects performed a 10-min warm-up, followed by a 2-min passive interval, before starting the test itself, which consisted of a maximum 4-min work paddling on an ergometer; right after the end of the test, an 8 ml blood sample was collected for analysis. 72 hours after the test, all athletes took part in an official race, when then it was possible to check their performance in the on site K1 1000m test (P1000m). The results showed that all lipoproteins and hematological parameters tested presented a significant difference (p≤0.05) after exercise for both genders. In addition, parameters related to muscle damage such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) presented significant differences after stress. Uric acid presented an inverse correlation with the performance (r = -0.76), while CK presented a positive correlation (r = 0.46) with it. Based on these results, it was possible to verify muscle damage and the level of oxidative stress caused by indoor training with specific ergometers for speed kayaking, highlighting the importance of analyzing and getting to know the physiological responses to this type of training, in order to provide information to coaches and optimize athletic performance.

  12. Acute Oxidative Effect and Muscle Damage after a Maximum 4 Min Test in High Performance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes Filho, José; Fernandes, Luiz Cláudio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine lipid peroxidation markers, physiological stress and muscle damage in elite kayakers in response to a maximum 4-min kayak ergometer test (KE test), and possible correlations with individual 1000m kayaking performances. The sample consisted of twenty-three adult male and nine adult female elite kayakers, with more than three years’ experience in international events, who voluntarily took part in this study. The subjects performed a 10-min warm-up, followed by a 2-min passive interval, before starting the test itself, which consisted of a maximum 4-min work paddling on an ergometer; right after the end of the test, an 8 ml blood sample was collected for analysis. 72 hours after the test, all athletes took part in an official race, when then it was possible to check their performance in the on site K1 1000m test (P1000m). The results showed that all lipoproteins and hematological parameters tested presented a significant difference (p≤0.05) after exercise for both genders. In addition, parameters related to muscle damage such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) presented significant differences after stress. Uric acid presented an inverse correlation with the performance (r = -0.76), while CK presented a positive correlation (r = 0.46) with it. Based on these results, it was possible to verify muscle damage and the level of oxidative stress caused by indoor training with specific ergometers for speed kayaking, highlighting the importance of analyzing and getting to know the physiological responses to this type of training, in order to provide information to coaches and optimize athletic performance. PMID:27111088

  13. Differential repair of DNA damage in specific nucleotide sequences in monkey cells.

    PubMed Central

    Leadon, S A

    1986-01-01

    An immunological method was developed that isolates DNA fragments containing bromouracil in repair patches from unrepaired DNA using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes bromouracil. Cultured monkey cells were exposed to either UV light or the activated carcinogen aflatoxin B1 and excision repair of damage in DNA fragments containing the integrated and transcribed E. coli gpt gene was compared to that in the genome overall. A more rapid repair, of both UV and AFB1 damage was observed in the DNA fragments containing the E. coli gpt genes. The more efficient repair of UV damage was not due to a difference in the initial level of pyrimidine dimers as determined with a specific UV endonuclease. Consistent with previous observations using different methodology, repair of UV damage in the alpha sequences was found to occur at the same rate as that in the genome overall, while repair of AFB1 damage was deficient in alpha DNA. The preferential repair of damage in the gpt gene may be related to the functional state of the sequence and/or to alterations produced in the chromatin conformation by the integration of plasmid sequences carrying the gene. Images PMID:3786142

  14. Layer-specific damage experiments and modeling of human thoracic and abdominal aortas with non-atherosclerotic intimal thickening.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Hannah; Pierce, David M; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2012-08-01

    Many treatments for cardiovascular diseases include an endovascular insertion of stents or stent grafts into arteries, a procedure which may cause high tissue stresses and even damage in the arterial wall. In order to study such problems by using finite element methods, both appropriate constitutive models and experimental data on human tissue samples are required. Layer-specific experimental data for human tissue tested up to the supra-physiological loading range are rare in the literature. In this study, intact and layer-separated experimental data from uniaxial extension tests are presented for human thoracic and abdominal aortas with non-atherosclerotic intimal thickening undergoing supra-physiological loading. A novel pseudo-elastic damage model, proposed to describe discontinuous softening in aortic arterial tissues, is fit to the obtained experimental data. Fitting of the model with and without consideration of damage accumulation in the non-collagenous matrix material reveals that tissue damage is primarily related to the collagen fiber fabric. By employing the fit model, the effect of aortic tissue pre-conditioning on the material parameters from the resulting data fits is evaluated. Histological examination of the collagen fibers under different applied stretches is used to gain more insights into the structural changes of the tissue under supra-physiological loading.

  15. Fuel containment and damage tolerance for large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 1: Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandifer, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Technical problems associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite material wings for transport aircraft were identified. The major tasks are the following: (1) the preliminary design of damage tolerant wing surface using composite materials; (2) the evaluation of fuel sealing and lightning protection methods for a composite material wing; and (3) an experimental investigation of the damage tolerant characteristics of toughened resin graphite/epoxy materials. The test results, the test techniques, and the test data are presented.

  16. Single Event Testing on Complex Devices: Test Like You Fly versus Test-Specific Design Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for evaluating complex digital systems targeted for harsh radiation environments such as space. Focus is limited to analyzing the single event upset (SEU) susceptibility of designs implemented inside Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. Tradeoffs are provided between application-specific versus test-specific test structures.

  17. CLAD/BCLAD Examinations. Test Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, Sacramento.

    This draft handbook provides descriptions and summaries of the six tests that California elementary and secondary teachers must pass to earn the Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development (CLAD) or Bilingual, Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development (BCLAD) certificates. The six tests include: (1) "Language Structure and…

  18. Draft Test Guideline: Site-Specific Aquatic Microcosm Test, Laboratory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  19. Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

    1989-04-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

  20. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate cancer recurrence. However, a single elevated PSA measurement in a patient who has a history of ... than with BPH . One recently approved test combines measurement of a form of pro-PSA called [-2] ...

  1. 7 CFR 51.3417 - Optional test for specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Optional test for specific gravity. 51.3417 Section 51... specific gravity. Tests to determine specific gravity shall be made in accordance with the procedures set.... The specific gravity for any lot of potatoes shall be the average of at least 3 corrected readings...

  2. 7 CFR 51.3417 - Optional test for specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Optional test for specific gravity. 51.3417 Section 51... specific gravity. Tests to determine specific gravity shall be made in accordance with the procedures set.... The specific gravity for any lot of potatoes shall be the average of at least 3 corrected readings...

  3. 7 CFR 51.3417 - Optional test for specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Optional test for specific gravity. 51.3417 Section 51... specific gravity. Tests to determine specific gravity shall be made in accordance with the procedures set.... The specific gravity for any lot of potatoes shall be the average of at least 3 corrected readings...

  4. Damage development in rod-on-rod impact test on 1100 pure aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannitti, G.; Bonora, N.; Bourne, N.; Ruggiero, A.; Testa, G.

    2017-01-01

    Stress triaxiality plays a major role in the nucleation and growth of ductile damage in metals and alloys. Although, the mechanisms responsible for ductile failure are the same at low and high strain rate, in impact dynamics, in addition to time resolved stress triaxiality and plastic strain accumulation, pressure also contributes to establish the condition for ductile failure to occur. In this work, ductile damage development in 1100 commercially pure aluminum was investigated by means of rod-on-rod (ROR) impact tests. Based on numerical simulations, using a continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model that accounts for the role of pressure on damage parameters and stochastic variability of such parameters, the impact velocity for no damage, incipient and fully developed damage were estimated. ROR tests at selected velocities were performed and damage distribution and extent were investigated by sectioning of soft recovered samples. Comparison between numerical simulations and experimental results is presented and discussed.

  5. Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site-Specific Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Rad51p proteins, the lat - end-joining. BRCA-2 complexed with machinery. ter a member of the RAD-52 epi- RAD-51 is active in strand exchange BRCA- 1 has...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0584 TITLE: Regulation of BRCAl Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site- Specific Phosphorylation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...ApprovedREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of Information Is estimated to average 1 hour per

  6. Design, testing, and damage tolerance study of bonded stiffened composite wing cover panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Ram C.; Sutton, Jason O.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of damage tolerance criteria for composite panels to multistringer composite wing cover panels developed under NASA's Composite Transport Wing Technology Development contract. This conceptual wing design integrated aeroelastic stiffness constraints with an enhanced damage tolerance material system, in order to yield optimized producibility and structural performance. Damage tolerance was demonstrated in a test program using full-sized cover panel subcomponents; panel skins were impacted at midbay between stiffeners, directly over a stiffener, and over the stiffener flange edge. None of the impacts produced visible damage. NASTRAN analyses were performed to simulate NDI-detected invisible damage.

  7. Gene-specific repair of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide DNA damage in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Denisenko, M.F.; Venkatachalam, S.; Wani, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    Gene-specific preferential repair of UV damage has been well documented in a variety of organisms. Less is known about many other types of critical DNA lesions, the data available being not numerous and contradictory. To date, the majority of observations with UV were obtained by using T4 endonuclease V system. Recent report questions the applicability of UvrABC nuclease incision method for detecting gene-specific repair. This has stimulated our search for simple and sensitive approach based on a different principle. We have employed the idea of detection by the Southern hybridization of restriction cleavage inhibition at rare sites and developed a method for the analysis of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (anti-BPDE) DNA damage in human H-ras proto-oncogene. Damage-dependent induction of individual facultative bands resulting from cleavage inhibition was observed in in vitro modified (4-50 adducts/10{sup 3}kb) p220-ras plasmid DNA digested with EcoRI/NotI, Xhol/Xbal/PstI, and SstI/XbaI/Pst/I. In vivo lesion formation and removal was monitored at several PstI sites distributed along the 6.4 kb single copy ras sequence. Rapid gene-specific repair was seen in primary culture of normal human fibroblasts and in SV40 transformed GM00637 cells. Surprisingly, SV40 transformed XP12BE (complementation group A) GM4429 fibroblasts also repaired anti-BPDE DNA damage at comparable levels. All investigated sites within ras sequence were repaired faster than the genome overall. The results show the utility of the above approach for fine mapping of anti-BPDE DNA lesions. Data suggests that the xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) fibroblasts have a capacity of removing these bulky adducts at least from the active genes.

  8. Low velocity instrumented impact testing of four new damage tolerant carbon/epoxy composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, D. G.; Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Low velocity drop weight instrumented impact testing was utilized to examine the damage resistance of four recently developed carbon fiber/epoxy resin systems. A fifth material, T300/934, for which a large data base exists, was also tested for comparison purposes. A 16-ply quasi-isotropic lay-up configuration was used for all the specimens. Force/absorbed energy-time plots were generated for each impact test. The specimens were cross-sectionally analyzed to record the damage corresponding to each impact energy level. Maximum force of impact versus impact energy plots were constructed to compare the various systems for impact damage resistance. Results show that the four new damage tolerant fiber/resin systems far outclassed the T300/934 material. The most damage tolerant material tested was the IM7/1962 fiber/resin system.

  9. Comparing simulations and test data of a radiation damaged CCD for the Euclid mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skottfelt, Jesper; Hall, David; Gow, Jason; Murray, Neil; Holland, Andrew; Prod'homme, Thibaut

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage effects from the harsh radiative environment outside the Earth's atmosphere can be a cause for concern for most space missions. With the science goals becoming ever more demanding, the requirements on the precision of the instruments on board these missions also increases, and it is therefore important to investigate how the radiation induced damage affects the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) that most of these instruments rely on. The primary goal of the Euclid mission is to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy using weak lensing and baryonic acoustic oscillation techniques. The weak lensing technique depends on very precise shape measurements of distant galaxies obtained by a large CCD array. It is anticipated that over the 6 year nominal lifetime of mission, the CCDs will be degraded to an extent that these measurements will not be possible unless the radiation damage effects are corrected. We have therefore created a Monte Carlo model that simulates the physical processes taking place when transferring signal through a radiation damaged CCD. The software is based on Shockley-Read-Hall theory, and is made to mimic the physical properties in the CCD as close as possible. The code runs on a single electrode level and takes charge cloud size and density, three dimensional trap position, and multi-level clocking into account. A key element of the model is that it takes device specific simulations of electron density as a direct input, thereby avoiding to make any analytical assumptions about the size and density of the charge cloud. This paper illustrates how test data and simulated data can be compared in order to further our understanding of the positions and properties of the individual radiation-induced traps.

  10. Precision short-pulse damage test station utilizing optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Wattellier, B; Nielsen, N; Molander, W; Stuart, B; Pennington, D; Barty, C J

    2004-03-22

    The next generation of high-energy petawatt (HEPW)-class lasers will utilize multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings for pulse compression, due to their high efficiency and high damage threshold for picosecond pulses. The peak power of HEPW lasers will be determined by the aperture and damage threshold of the final dielectric grating in the pulse compressor and final focusing optics. We have developed a short-pulse damage test station for accurate determination of the damage threshold of the optics used on future HEPW lasers. Our damage test station is based on a highly stable, high-beam-quality optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) operating at 1053 nm at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We present the design of our OPCPA system pumped by a commercial Q-switched pump laser and the results of the full system characterization. Initial short-pulse damage experiments in the far field using our system have been performed.

  11. UV damage-specific DNA-binding protein in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, H.; Fujiwara, Y. )

    1991-03-29

    The gel mobility shift assay method revealed a specifically ultraviolet (UV) damage recognizing, DNA-binding protein in nuclear extracts of normal human cells. The resulted DNA/protein complexes caused the two retarded mobility shifts. Four xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XPE) fibroblast strains derived from unrelated Japanese families were not deficient in such a DNA damage recognition/binding protein because of the normal complex formation and gel mobility shifts, although we confirmed the reported lack of the protein in the European XPE (XP2RO and XP3RO) cells. Thus, the absence of this binding protein is not always commonly observed in all the XPE strains, and the partially repair-deficient and intermediately UV-hypersensitive phenotype of XPE cells are much similar whether or not they lack the protein.

  12. Frontal lobe damage and tests of executive processing: a meta-analysis of the category test, stroop test, and trail-making test.

    PubMed

    Demakis, George J

    2004-05-01

    The Category Test, Trails B, and the interference task of the Stroop Test are among the most commonly administered measures of frontal lobe functioning and are thought to tap different cognitive functions mediated by these brain regions. Two meta-analyses were conducted on these tests to determine their sensitivity to frontal and lateralized frontal brain damage. Study 1 compared participants with frontal lobe damage to those with damage to posterior brain regions, whereas Study 2 compared participants with left and right frontal lobe damage. For each study, effect sizes based on performance differences between the above groups were calculated for the Category Test, Trail-Making Test Parts A and B, and the Stroop Test, including Word, Color, and Color-Word subtests. In Study 1 significant differences between groups were found for Trails A and all Stroop tasks, but in Study 2 the only difference between left and right frontal participants was on the Stroop Color-Word task. Potential reasons why Trails A and the Stroop Test are sensitive to frontal lobe damage are discussed, such as novelty and processing speed, as are clinical implications of these findings. The challenges of research on assessment of frontal lobe functioning are discussed and new developments in this area are highlighted.

  13. A ruggedness evaluation of procedures for damage threshold testing optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Matthew W.; Thomas, Milfred E.; Wise, Stephanie A.; Tappan, Nina D.

    1995-01-01

    A ruggedness evaluation of approaches to damage threshold testing was performed to determine the influence of three procedural variables on damage threshold data. The differences between the number of test sites evaluated at an applied fluence level (1 site versus 10 sites), the number of laser pulses at each test site (1 pulse versus 200 pulses), and the beam diameter (0.35 mm versus 0.70 mm) were all found to significantly influence the damage threshold data over a 99-percent confidence interval.

  14. Development of electrical test procedures for qualification of spacecraft against EID. Volume 2: Review and specification of test procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkenfeld, J. M.; Harlacher, B. L.; Mathews, D.

    1982-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program to develop system electrical test procedures for the qualification of spacecraft against damage produced by space-electron-induced discharges (EID) occurring on spacecraft dielectric outer surfaces is described. A review and critical evaluation of possible approaches to qualify spacecraft against space electron-induced discharges (EID) is presented. A variety of possible schemes to simulate EID electromagnetic effects produced in spacecraft was studied. These techniques form the principal element of a provisional, recommended set of test procedures for the EID qualification spacecraft. Significant gaps in our knowledge about EID which impact the final specification of an electrical test to qualify spacecraft against EID are also identified.

  15. Experimental tests of truncated diffusion in fault damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Anna; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Li, Kewen; Horne, Roland N.

    2016-11-01

    Fault zones affect the flow paths of fluids in groundwater aquifers and geological reservoirs. Fault-related fracture damage decreases to background levels with increasing distance from the fault core according to a power law. This study investigated mass transport in such a fault-related structure using nonlocal models. A column flow experiment is conducted to create a permeability distribution that varies with distance from a main conduit. The experimental tracer response curve is preasymptotic and implies subdiffusive transport, which is slower than the normal Fickian diffusion. If the surrounding area is a finite domain, an upper truncated behavior in tracer response (i.e., exponential decline at late times) is observed. The tempered anomalous diffusion (TAD) model captures the transition from subdiffusive to Fickian transport, which is characterized by a smooth transition from power-law to an exponential decline in the late-time breakthrough curves.

  16. Ductile Damage Prediction in Taylor Impact Cylinder Test Using CDM Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, A.; Bonora, N.

    2004-07-01

    Taylor cylinder impact test has been initially proposed as a potential testing technique to measure dynamic effect on material yield strength. Today, this technique represents an interesting benchmark case for constitutive and damage model performance verification. In this study, an extensive numerical investigation, using both finite element code and Lagrangian hydro-code, has been performed on standard Taylor impact cylinder configuration and Rod-on-Rod (ROR) test in OFHC and OFE copper. Here, material strength has been modeled using Johnson and Cook formulation which accounts both strain rate and temperature material sensibility. Ductile damage has been modeled using an advanced continuum damage mechanics model, as proposed by Bonora, which accounts for stress triaxiality effects on ductility, stress history at material point and where only a limited number of parameters is required. For both the test configuration investigated, both final calculated post test shape and damage pattern have been compared with experimental data available in literature.

  17. Interpretation of the Superpave IDT strength test using a viscoelastic-damage constitutive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onifade, Ibrahim; Balieu, Romain; Birgisson, Bjorn

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new interpretation for the Superpave IDT strength test based on a viscoelastic-damage framework. The framework is based on continuum damage mechanics and the thermodynamics of irreversible processes with an anisotropic damage representation. The new approach introduces considerations for the viscoelastic effects and the damage accumulation that accompanies the fracture process in the interpretation of the Superpave IDT strength test for the identification of the Dissipated Creep Strain Energy (DCSE) limit from the test result. The viscoelastic model is implemented in a Finite Element Method (FEM) program for the simulation of the Superpave IDT strength test. The DCSE values obtained using the new approach is compared with the values obtained using the conventional approach to evaluate the validity of the assumptions made in the conventional interpretation of the test results. The result shows that the conventional approach over-estimates the DCSE value with increasing estimation error at higher deformation rates.

  18. Genetic susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage in the rat. Evidence based on kidney-specific genome transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, P C; Churchill, M C; Bidani, A K; Griffin, K A; Picken, M; Pravenec, M; Kren, V; St Lezin, E; Wang, J M; Wang, N; Kurtz, T W

    1997-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that genetic factors can determine susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage, we derived an experimental animal model in which two genetically different yet histocompatible kidneys are chronically and simultaneously exposed to the same blood pressure profile and metabolic environment within the same host. Kidneys from normotensive Brown Norway rats were transplanted into unilaterally nephrectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-RT1.N strain) that harbor the major histocompatibility complex of the Brown Norway strain. 25 d after the induction of severe hypertension with deoxycorticosterone acetate and salt, proteinuria, impaired glomerular filtration rate, and extensive vascular and glomerular injury were observed in the Brown Norway donor kidneys, but not in the SHR-RT1.N kidneys. Control experiments demonstrated that the strain differences in kidney damage could not be attributed to effects of transplantation-induced renal injury, immunologic rejection phenomena, or preexisting strain differences in blood pressure. These studies (a) demonstrate that the kidney of the normotensive Brown Norway rat is inherently much more susceptible to hypertension-induced damage than is the kidney of the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and (b) establish the feasibility of using organ-specific genome transplants to map genes expressed in the kidney that determine susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal injury in the rat. PMID:9294102

  19. Collateral Damage: How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Sharon L.; Berliner, David C.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing on their extensive research, Nichols and Berliner document and categorize the ways that high-stakes testing threatens the purposes and ideals of the American education system. For more than a decade, the debate over high-stakes testing has dominated the field of education. This passionate and provocative book provides a fresh perspective…

  20. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rausch, W.N.; Hesson, G.M.; Pilger, J.P.; King, L.L.; Goodman, R.L.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the first full-length high-temperature test (FLHT-1) performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The test is part of a series of experiments being performed for the NRC as a part of their Severe Fuel Damage Program and is one of several planned for PNL`s Coolant Boilaway and Damage Progression Program. The report summarizes the test design and test plan. it also provides a summary and discussion of the data collected during the test and of the photos taken during the post-test examination. All objectives for the test were met. The key objective was to demonstrate that severe fuel damage tests on full-length fuel bundles can be safely conducted in the NRU reactor.

  1. Particle impact tests. [simulation of micrometeoroid damage to orbiter surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Particle impact tests were performed on three types of orbiter surface with a micrometeoroid facility. The test equipment electrostatically accelerated micron sized particles to high velocities simulating micrometeoroid impacts. Test particles were titanium diboride with typical velocities in the range 1 to 2.3 km x sec/1 and equivalent particle diameters in the range 4 to 16 microns. Impact angles to the material surface were 90, 60 and 30 degrees. The particle impact sites were located on the sample surfaces and craters were photographed with a magnification of 400X.

  2. Development of a Program Specific Locator Test. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Robert J.

    A project was undertaken to develop a series of program-specific vocational locator tests (PSVLTs) that would consist of subject-specific questions in three academic disciplines--writing, reading, and mathematics--for use in predicting vocational students' success in their vocational programs. As a prelude to constructing the tests, project staff…

  3. 46 CFR 189.20-20 - Specific tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specific tests and inspections. 189.20-20 Section 189.20-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Initial Inspection § 189.20-20 Specific tests and inspections. The...

  4. 46 CFR 189.20-20 - Specific tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specific tests and inspections. 189.20-20 Section 189.20-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Initial Inspection § 189.20-20 Specific tests and inspections. The...

  5. Vascular nanomedicine: Site specific delivery of elastin stabilizing therapeutics to damaged arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Aditi

    improved resistance to elastolytic digestion. We further show that the same polyphenols interact with monomeric tropoelastin released by the vascular cells and dramatically increasing their self-assembly in-vitro. In addition, we demonstrate the elastogenic ability of these polyphenols in aiding the crosslinking of tropoelastin released by aneurysmal cells converting it into mature elastin. Finally, we developed a nanoparticle system functionalized with elastin antibody on the surface that, upon systemic delivery, can recognize and bind to sites of damaged elastin in the aorta. We are able to show that this nanoparticle system works in representative animal models for MAC and AAA. These nanoparticles demonstrated spatial and functional specificity for degraded elastin. In conclusion, our work is focused on understanding the role of elastin degradation in vascular calcification and aortic aneurysms. We tested approaches to halt elastin degradation and to regenerate elastin in arteries so that homeostasis can be achieved.

  6. Zika virus infection damages the testes in mice.

    PubMed

    Govero, Jennifer; Esakky, Prabagaran; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Fernandez, Estefania; Drury, Andrea; Platt, Derek J; Gorman, Matthew J; Richner, Justin M; Caine, Elizabeth A; Salazar, Vanessa; Moley, Kelle H; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-12-15

    Infection of pregnant women with Zika virus (ZIKV) can cause congenital malformations including microcephaly, which has focused global attention on this emerging pathogen. In addition to transmission by mosquitoes, ZIKV can be detected in the seminal fluid of affected males for extended periods of time and transmitted sexually. Here, using a mouse-adapted African ZIKV strain (Dakar 41519), we evaluated the consequences of infection in the male reproductive tract of mice. We observed persistence of ZIKV, but not the closely related dengue virus (DENV), in the testis and epididymis of male mice, and this was associated with tissue injury that caused diminished testosterone and inhibin B levels and oligospermia. ZIKV preferentially infected spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes and Sertoli cells in the testis, resulting in cell death and destruction of the seminiferous tubules. Less damage was caused by a contemporary Asian ZIKV strain (H/PF/2013), in part because this virus replicates less efficiently in mice. The extent to which these observations in mice translate to humans remains unclear, but longitudinal studies of sperm function and viability in ZIKV-infected humans seem warranted.

  7. Test specification for decant pump and winch assembly. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Staehr, T.W.

    1995-02-22

    This specification provides the requirements for testing of the vertical turbine decant pump including the floating suction with load sensing winch control, instrumentation and the associated PLC/PC control system. All assembly necessary for testing including piping, temporary wiring, etc., shall be performed by the Seller. All referenced figures are at the back of this document. The testing consists of performance testing, winch testing and calibration, instrumentation verification testing and run-in testing of the pump. Testing shall be done in the presence and under the direction of the Buyer in accordance with this procedure.

  8. Ground vibration tests of a high fidelity truss for verification of on orbit damage location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a series of modal tests that were performed on a cantilevered truss structure. The goal of the tests was to assemble a large database of high quality modal test data for use in verification of proposed methods for on orbit model verification and damage detection in flexible truss structures. A description of the hardware is provided along with details of the experimental setup and procedures for 16 damage cases. Results from selected cases are presented and discussed. Differences between ground vibration testing and on orbit modal testing are also described.

  9. Roller Testing to Mimic Damage of the ISS SARJ Ring and Durability Test to Simulate Fifteen Years of SARJ Operation Using the Damaged Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Elchert, Justin P.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Dube, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) experienced a breakdown of the joint's race ring surface. The starboard SARJ mechanism was cleaned and lubricated with grease. To provide some guidance on the expected behavior of the damaged SARJ ring with continued operations, experiments were conducted using rollers and a vacuum roller test rig. The approach of the experimental work involved three main steps: (1) initiate damage using conditions representative of the SARJ with inadequate lubrication; (2) propagate the damage by operating the test rollers without lubrication; and (3) assess the durability of the roller by testing to simulate the equivalent of 15 years of SARJ operation on the damaged surface assuming adequate grease lubrication. During the rig testing, additional and/or replacement grease was introduced at regular intervals to maintain good lubrication in the rig. The damage to the nitride layer continued even after application of grease. The grease lubrication proved to be effective for limiting the value of the axial force that can be developed. Limiting the axial force on the SARJ mechanism is important since the larger the axial force the more concentrated the load pressure becomes on the blend-radius location on the SARJ roller. After the testing simulating 15 years of SARJ operations, the wear depths were the order of 0.2 mm for the nitrided 15-5 roller and the order of 0.06 mm for the mating 440C roller. Metallographic inspections were done to search for indications of impending fatigue or other fracture indications that might eventually propagate and cause structural failure. There were no indications or features found that could eventually compromise structural integrity.

  10. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

  11. Simple go/no-go test for subcritical damage in body armor panels

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jason; Chimenti, D. E.

    2011-06-23

    The development of a simple test for subcritical damage in body armor panels using pressure-sensitive dye-indicator film has been performed and demonstrated effective. Measurements have shown that static indicator levels are accurately reproduced in dynamic loading events. Impacts from hard blunt impactors instrumented with an accelerometer and embedded force transducer were studied. Reliable correlations between the indicator film and instrumented impact force are shown for a range of impact energies. Force and acceleration waveforms with corresponding indicator film results are presented for impact events onto damaged and undamaged panels. We find that panel damage can occur at impact levels far below the National Institute of Justice acceptance test standard.

  12. Simple No-Go Test for Subcritical Damage in Body Armor Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jason; Chimenti, D. E.

    2011-06-01

    The development of a simple test for subcritical damage in body armor panels using pressure-sensitive dye-indicator film has been performed and demonstrated effective. Measurements have shown that static indicator levels are accurately reproduced in dynamic loading events. Impacts from hard blunt impactors instrumented with an accelerometer and embedded force transducer were studied. Reliable correlations between the indicator film and instrumented impact force are shown for a range of impact energies. Force and acceleration waveforms with corresponding indicator film results are presented for impact events onto damaged and undamaged panels. We find that panel damage can occur at impact levels far below the National Institute of Justice acceptance test standard.

  13. Aging, Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA), and high potential testing of damaged cables

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, R.A.; Jacobus, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of high potential testing of cables and to assess the survivability of aged and damaged cables under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. High potential testing at 240 Vdc/mil on undamaged cables suggested that no damage was incurred on the selected virgin cables. During aging and LOCA testing, Okonite ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables with a bonded jacket experienced unexpected failures. The failures appear to be primarily related to the level of thermal aging and the presence of a bonded jacket that ages more rapidly than the insulation. For Brand Rex crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cables, the results suggest that 7 mils of insulation remaining should give the cables a high probability of surviving accident exposure following aging. The voltage necessary to detect when 7 mils of insulation remain on unaged Brand Rex cables is approximately 35 kVdc. This voltage level would almost certainly be unacceptable to a utility for use as a damage assessment tool. However, additional tests indicated that a 35 kvdc voltage application would not damage virgin Brand Rex cables when tested in water. Although two damaged Rockbestos silicone rubber cables also failed during the accident test, no correlation between failures and level of damage was apparent.

  14. A Ratio Test of Interrater Agreement with High Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousineau, Denis; Laurencelle, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Existing tests of interrater agreements have high statistical power; however, they lack specificity. If the ratings of the two raters do not show agreement but are not random, the current tests, some of which are based on Cohen's kappa, will often reject the null hypothesis, leading to the wrong conclusion that agreement is present. A new test of…

  15. The BITCH-100: A Culture-Specific Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    A description of the rationale and the development of the BITCH-100 (Black Intelligence Test of Cultural Homogeneity), a culture specific test for the American black population. Experimental evidence is reported on the norming and validation of this instrument and suggestions made as to potential advantages over the traditional testing approach as…

  16. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Specifications of Research Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrage, Jules H.; And Others

    The working guidelines for the development of research test items for the cumulative post-tests of the United States Naval Academy's leadership course developed by the Westinghouse Learning Corporation are presented in this report, including general specifications, content analysis and test construction, and classification of items. EM 010 418…

  17. Tests of Fire Suppression Effectiveness of Damaged Water Mist Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Alternatively the obstruction increases the radiation/heat flux to the fuel surface and increases the heat release rate and therefore temperature in the...beams covered with Promatect sheets that were lined with insulation boards. Figure 1 shows an overview of set up of the test compartment for the...thermocouples to monitor the surface temperature of the torpedo at positions P3, P4 and P5 The instrumentation is described in detail in the following two

  18. Evaluating damage potential of cryogenic concrete using acoustic emission sensors and permeability testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Parsaei, Boback; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluates the damage potential of concrete of different mix designs subjected to cryogenic temperatures, using acoustic emission (AE) and permeability testing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies that might be employed to produce concrete that resists damage when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Such concrete would be suitable for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and could replace currently used 9% Ni steel, thereby leading to huge cost savings. In the experiments described, concrete cubes, 150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm, were cast using four different mix designs. The four mixes employed siliceous river sand as fine aggregate. Moreover, limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate were individually used as coarse aggregates in the mixes. The concrete samples were then cooled from room temperature (20°C) to cryogenic temperature (-165°C) in a temperature chamber. AE sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during the cryogenic freezing process. The damage potential was evaluated in terms of the growth of damage as determined from AE, as a function of temperature and concrete mixture design. The damage potential observed was validated with water permeability testing. Initial results demonstrate the effects of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the aggregates on damage growth. Concrete damage (cracking) resistance generally decreased with increasing coarse aggregate CTE, and was in the order, limestone ≥ trap rock << lightweight aggregate ≥ sandstone. Work is in progress to fully understand thermal dilation and damage growth in concrete due to differential CTE of its components.

  19. Image dissector photocathode solar damage test program. [solar radiation shielding using a fast optical lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Image dissector sensors of the same type which will be used in the NASA shuttle star tracker were used in a series of tests directed towards obtaining solar radiation/time damage criteria. Data were evaluated to determine the predicted level of operability of the star tracker if tube damage became a reality. During the test series a technique for reducing the solar damage effect was conceived and verified. The damage concepts are outlined and the test methods and data obtained which were used for verification of the technique's feasibility are presented. The ability to operate an image dissector sensor with the solar image focussed on the photocathode by a fast optical lens under certain conditions is feasible and the elimination of a mechanical protection device is possible.

  20. Evaluation of Creep-Fatigue Damage Based on Simplified Model Test Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Tianlei; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2013-01-01

    Current methods used in the ASME Code, Subsection NH for the evaluation of creep-fatigue damage are based on the separation of elevated temperature cyclic damage into two parts, creep damage and fatigue damage. This presents difficulties in both evaluation of test data and determination of cyclic damage in design. To avoid these difficulties, an alternative approach was identified, called the Simplified Model Test or SMT approach based on the use of creep-fatigue hold time test data from test specimens with elastic follow-up conservatively designed to bound the response of general structural components of interest. A key feature of the methodology is the use of the results of elastic analysis directly in design evaluation similar to current methods in the ASME Code, Subsection NB. Although originally developed for current material included in Subsection NH, recent interest in the application of Alloy 617 for components operating at very high temperatures has caused renewed interest in the SMT approach because it provides an alternative to the proposed restriction on the use of current Subsection NH simplified methods at very high temperatures. A comprehensive review and assessment of five representative simplified methods for creep-fatigue damage evaluation is presented in Asayama [1]. In this review the SMT methodology was identified as the best long term approach but the need for test data precluded its near term implementation. Asayama and Jetter [2] is a summary of the more comprehensive report by Asayama [1] with a summary of the SMT approach presented by Jetter [3].

  1. Site-specific DICER and DROSHA RNA products control the DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Michelini, Flavia; Saxena, Alka; Tang, Dave; de Hoon, Michiel; Anelli, Viviana; Mione, Marina; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-08-09

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in an increasingly recognized number of cellular events. Some ncRNAs are processed by DICER and DROSHA RNases to give rise to small double-stranded RNAs involved in RNA interference (RNAi). The DNA-damage response (DDR) is a signalling pathway that originates from a DNA lesion and arrests cell proliferation3. So far, DICER and DROSHA RNA products have not been reported to control DDR activation. Here we show, in human, mouse and zebrafish, that DICER and DROSHA, but not downstream elements of the RNAi pathway, are necessary to activate the DDR upon exogenous DNA damage and oncogene-induced genotoxic stress, as studied by DDR foci formation and by checkpoint assays. DDR foci are sensitive to RNase A treatment, and DICER- and DROSHA-dependent RNA products are required to restore DDR foci in RNase-A-treated cells. Through RNA deep sequencing and the study of DDR activation at a single inducible DNA double-strand break, we demonstrate that DDR foci formation requires site-specific DICER- and DROSHA-dependent small RNAs, named DDRNAs, which act in a MRE11–RAD50–NBS1-complex-dependent manner (MRE11 also known as MRE11A; NBS1 also known as NBN). DDRNAs, either chemically synthesized or in vitro generated by DICER cleavage, are sufficient to restore the DDR in RNase-A-treated cells, also in the absence of other cellular RNAs. Our results describe an unanticipated direct role of a novel class of ncRNAs in the control of DDR activation at sites of DNA damage.

  2. A constitutive damage specific DNA-binding protein is synthesized at higher levels in UV-irradiated primate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschfeld, S.; Levine, A.S.; Ozato, K.; Protic, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Using a DNA band shift assay, we have identified a DNA-binding protein complex in primate cells which is present constitutively and has a high affinity for UV-irradiated, double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex, suggesting that the signal for induction can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. Physiochemical modifications of the DNA and competition analysis with defined substrates suggest that the most probable target site for the damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is a 6-4'-(pyrimidine-2'-one)-pyrimidine dimer: specific binding could not be detected with probes which contain -TT- cyclobutane dimers, and damage-specific DNA binding did not decrease after photoreactivation of UV-irradiated DNA. This damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is the first such inducible protein complex identified in primate cells. Cells from patients with the sun-sensitive cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (group E), are lacking both the constitutive and the induced damage-specific DNA-binding activities. These findings suggest a possible role for this DNA-binding protein complex in lesion recognition and DNA repair of UV-light-induced photoproducts.

  3. Developmental stage- and DNA damage-specific functions of C. elegans FANCD2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyong Yun; Yang, Insil; Park, Jung-Eun; Baek, Ok-Ryun; Chung, Kee Yang; Koo, Hyeon-Sook . E-mail: kooh@yonsei.ac.kr

    2007-01-12

    In this study, we set out to investigate the role of Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 protein (FANCD2) in developmental stage-specific DNA damage responses in Caenorhabditis elegans. A mutant C. elegans strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding the FANCD2 homolog, FCD-2, exhibited egg-laying defects, precocious oogenesis, and partial defects in fertilization. The mutant strain also had a lower hatching rate than the wild-type after {gamma}-irradiation of embryos, but not after the irradiation of pachytene stage germ cells. This mutation sensitized pachytene stage germ cells to the genotoxic effects of photoactivated psoralen, as seen by a greatly reduced hatching rate and increased chromosomal aberrations. This mutation also enhanced physiological M-phase arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, our data reveal that the C. elegans FANCD2 homolog participates in the repair of spontaneous DNA damage and DNA crosslinks, not only in proliferating cells but also in pachytene stage cells, and it may have an additional role in double-stranded DNA break repair during embryogenesis.

  4. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Sun, Xin; Zheng, Sixin; Liu, Xiao; Jin, Jinghua; Ren, Yi; Luo, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP). MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  5. ASCIZ regulates lesion-specific Rad51 focus formation and apoptosis after methylating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Rad51 focus formation is required for homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but its regulation in response to non-DSB lesions is poorly understood. Here we report a novel human SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein termed ASCIZ that forms Rad51-containing foci in response to base-modifying DNA methylating agents but not in response to DSB-inducing agents. ASCIZ foci seem to form prior to Rad51 recruitment, and an ASCIZ core domain can concentrate Rad51 in focus-like structures independently of DNA damage. ASCIZ depletion dramatically increases apoptosis after methylating DNA damage and impairs Rad51 focus formation in response to methylating agents but not after ionizing radiation. ASCIZ focus formation and increased apoptosis in ASCIZ-depleted cells depend on the mismatch repair protein MLH1. Interestingly, ASCIZ foci form efficiently during G1 phase, when sister chromatids are unavailable as recombination templates. We propose that ASCIZ acts as a lesion-specific focus scaffold in a Rad51-dependent pathway that resolves cytotoxic repair intermediates, most likely single-stranded DNA gaps, resulting from MLH1-dependent processing of base lesions. PMID:15933716

  6. Orthogonal cutting modeling of hybrid CFRP/Ti toward specific cutting energy and induced damage analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinyang; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    This paper studied the machinability of hybrid CFRP/Ti stack via the numerical approach. To this aim, an original FE model consisting of three fundamental physical constituents, i.e., CFRP phase, interface and Ti phase, was established in the Abaqus Explicit/code to construct the machining behavior of the composite-to-metal alliance. The CFRP phase was modeled as an equivalent homogeneous material (EHM) by considering its anisotropic behavior relative to the fiber orientation (θ) while the Ti alloy phase was assumed to exhibit isotropic and elastic-plastic behavior. The "interface" linking the "CFRP-to-Ti" contact boundary was physically modeled as an intermediate transition region through the concept of cohesive zone (CZ). Different constitutive laws and damage criteria were implemented to simulate the chip separation process of the bi-material system. The key cutting responses including specific cutting energy consumption, induced subsurface damage, and interface delamination were precisely addressed via the comprehensive FE analyses, and several key conclusions were drawn from this study.

  7. Next generation testing strategy for assessment of genomic damage: A conceptual framework and considerations.

    PubMed

    Dearfield, Kerry L; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Benz, R Daniel; Douglas, George R; Elespuru, Rosalie K; Johnson, George E; Kirkland, David J; LeBaron, Matthew J; Li, Albert P; Marchetti, Francesco; Pottenger, Lynn H; Rorije, Emiel; Tanir, Jennifer Y; Thybaud, Veronique; van Benthem, Jan; Yauk, Carole L; Zeiger, Errol; Luijten, Mirjam

    2016-09-21

    For several decades, regulatory testing schemes for genetic damage have been standardized where the tests being utilized examined mutations and structural and numerical chromosomal damage. This has served the genetic toxicity community well when most of the substances being tested were amenable to such assays. The outcome from this testing is usually a dichotomous (yes/no) evaluation of test results, and in many instances, the information is only used to determine whether a substance has carcinogenic potential or not. Over the same time period, mechanisms and modes of action (MOAs) that elucidate a wider range of genomic damage involved in many adverse health outcomes have been recognized. In addition, a paradigm shift in applied genetic toxicology is moving the field toward a more quantitative dose-response analysis and point-of-departure (PoD) determination with a focus on risks to exposed humans. This is directing emphasis on genomic damage that is likely to induce changes associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. This paradigm shift is moving the testing emphasis for genetic damage from a hazard identification only evaluation to a more comprehensive risk assessment approach that provides more insightful information for decision makers regarding the potential risk of genetic damage to exposed humans. To enable this broader context for examining genetic damage, a next generation testing strategy needs to take into account a broader, more flexible approach to testing, and ultimately modeling, of genomic damage as it relates to human exposure. This is consistent with the larger risk assessment context being used in regulatory decision making. As presented here, this flexible approach for examining genomic damage focuses on testing for relevant genomic effects that can be, as best as possible, associated with an adverse health effect. The most desired linkage for risk to humans would be changes in loci associated with human diseases, whether in somatic

  8. Test specification for decant pump and winch assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Staehr, T.W.

    1994-12-07

    This specification provides the requirements for testing of the vertical turbine decant pump including the floating suction arm with load sensing winch control, instrumentation and the associated PLC/PC control system.

  9. Locating Damaged Members in a Truss Structure Using Modal Test Data: a Demonstration Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Suzanne Weaver; Mcgowan, Paul E.

    1989-01-01

    On-orbit assessment of large flexible space truss structures can be accomplished, in principle, with dynamic response information, structural identification methods, and model correlation techniques which produce an adjusted mathematical model. In a previously developed approach for damage location, an optimal update of the structure model is formed using the response data, then examined to locate damaged members. An experiment designed to demonstrate and verify the performance of the on-orbit assessment approach uses a laboratory scale model truss structure which exhibits characteristics expected for large space truss structures. Vibration experiments were performed to generate response data for the damaged truss. The damage location approach, analytical work performed in support of the vibration tests, the measured response of the test article, and some preliminary results are described.

  10. Automated damage test facilities for materials development and production optic quality assurance at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Battersby, C; Dickson, R; Jennings, R; Kimmons, J; Kozlowski, M R; Maricle, S; Mouser, R; Runkel, M; Schwartz, S; Sheehan, L M; Weinzapfel, C

    1998-12-22

    The Laser Program at LLNL has developed automated facilities for damage testing optics up to 1 meter in diameter. The systems were developed to characterize the statistical distribution of localized damage performance across large-aperture National Ignition Facility optics. Full aperture testing is a key component of the quality assurance program for several of the optical components. The primary damage testing methods used are R:1 mapping and raster scanning. Automation of these test methods was required to meet the optics manufacturing schedule. The automated activities include control and diagnosis of the damage-test laser beam as well as detection and characterization of damage events.

  11. The BITCH-100: A Culture-Specific Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert L.

    The aim of this paper is to describe the rationale and evaluation of the Black Intelligence Scale of Cultural Homogeneity (BITCH). A "culture specific" test is used to determine the taker's ability to function symbolically or to think in terms of his own culture and environment. A combination of dialect specific and culture specific…

  12. Consistency test for simple specifications of automation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chebotarev, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    This article continues the topic of functional synthesis of automaton systems for discrete-information processing. A language of functional specification of automaton systems based on the logic of one-place predicates of an integer argument has been described. A specification in this language defines a nondeterministic superword X-Y-function, i.e., a function that maps superwords in the alphabet X into sets of superwords in the alphabet Y (the alphabets X and Y are specification-dependent), which corresponds to an initialized nondeterministic X-Y-automaton. The specification G is consistent if the function defined by the specification corresponds to an automaton A{sub G} with a nonempty state set. Consistency tests for the initial specification and for various intermediate specifications obtained in the process of functional synthesis of the automaton system are of fundamental importance for the verificational method of automaton system design developed in the framework of the proposed topic. We need sufficiently efficient algorithms to test consistency of specifications. An algorithm proposal constructs the coresponding automaton A{sub G} for any simple specifications G. The consistency of a specification is thus decided constructively. However, this solution is not always convenient, because it usually involves a highly time-consuming procedure to construct a nondeterministic automaton with a very large number of states. In this paper, we propose a convenient approach that combines automaton and logic methods and established consistency or inconsistency of a specification without constructing the corresponding autmaton.

  13. Direct Emissivity Measurements of Painted Metals for Improved Temperature Estimation During Laser Damage Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    DIRECT EMISSIVITY MEASUREMENTS OF PAINTED METALS FOR IMPROVED TEMPERATURE ESTIMATION DURING LASER DAMAGE TESTING THESIS Sean M. Baumann, Civilian...radiance measurement, and fitted spectral radiance results, of one pixel on the back surface of a painted metal sample, far from laser burn-through hole...parabolic mirror NET noise-equivalent temperature xv DIRECT EMISSIVITY MEASUREMENTS OF PAINTED METALS FOR IMPROVED TEMPERATURE ESTIMATION DURING LASER DAMAGE

  14. Prevention of damage to delicate connectors during mounting of heavy engines for testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Air-bearing-pad principle, combined with monitoring system of the air-bearing force, prevents damage between electrical and mechanical connectors joining a large engine system to the test stand during remote mating. Pad provides a cushion between engine and test stand.

  15. Reminiscences of a mouse specific-locus test addict.

    PubMed

    Russell, W L

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes some of the historical events surrounding the development of and achievements with the mouse specific-locus test in radiation and chemical mutagenesis. Some ongoing and future contributions of the test to research in molecular genetics are also mentioned.

  16. 9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. OC1-55-72-(Rev.); Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 43 of 148; file no. AF 1320/94, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 8. "TEST STAND, ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLANS AND SCHEDULES." Specifications No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. "TEST STAND, ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLANS AND SCHEDULES." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 22 of 148; file no. 1320/73. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 5. "TEST STAND 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. "TEST STAND 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/17, Rev. A. Stamped: AS BUILT; NO CHANGES. Date of Revision A: 11/1/50. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Experimental characterization of damage at countersunk bolted joints tested under quasi-static bearing loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Alexandru Paul

    The use of composite materials in aerospace vehicles has allowed for creation of lighter structures that provide excellent stiffness. Although they allow for easy disassembly and inspection of critical assemblies, bolted joints are common damage initiation sites in composite structures. In order for aging aircraft to be considered for life extension programs, the damage at these locations must be characterized and well-understood. Failure studies require that data be provided through experimental tests. The drawback of the present test standard for bolted composite joints is that it was initially designed for testing polymers. This thesis discusses deficiencies in the measurement of bearing strength as a result of this shortcoming, although the battery of bearing tests is modeled after this established test standard. The goal of the present work is to characterize the bearing load induced damage in laminates with pin bearing and countersunk fasteners through a series of bearing tests on laminated composites using a new modified ASTM D5961 fixture designed for testing countersunk bolted joints. This thesis examines variations in measurement of bearing strength that comes with using different test fixtures. The reliability of each test fixture to represent real conditions is evaluated using test fixtures that represent real joint configurations. Results for damage conditions and joint responses are compared. This thesis presents a study of the damage initiation and accumulation in composite specimens loaded in bearing using three different test fixtures: Procedure A, Procedure C, and Procedure A Modified. Procedure A, which is used to load the test specimen in double-shear via a straight pin, is a well known test fixture that comes from ASTM D5961. Procedure C has a countersunk fastener that loads the test specimen in single-shear. These types of fasteners are preferred in the aerospace industry over traditional bolts in order to maintain a smooth aerodynamic profile

  20. Item Specifications, Science Grade 6. Blue Prints for Testing Minimum Performance Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    These item specifications were developed as a part of the Arkansas "Minimum Performance Testing Program" (MPT). There is one item specification for each instructional objective included in the MPT. The purpose of an item specification is to provide an overview of the general content and format of test items used to measure an…

  1. Item Specifications, Science Grade 8. Blue Prints for Testing Minimum Performance Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    These item specifications were developed as a part of the Arkansas "Minimum Performance Testing Program" (MPT). There is one item specification for each instructional objective included in the MPT. The purpose of an item specification is to provide an overview of the general content and format of test items used to measure an…

  2. Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry: Online blade damage identification on a multi-blade test rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberholster, A. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometry enables the telemetry-free measurement of online turbomachinery blade vibration. Specifically, the Eulerian or fixed reference frame implementation of laser vibrometry provides a practical solution to the condition monitoring of rotating blades. The short data samples that are characteristic of this measurement approach do however negate the use of traditional frequency domain signal processing techniques. It is therefore necessary to employ techniques such as time domain analysis and non-harmonic Fourier analysis to obtain useful information from the blade vibration signatures. The latter analysis technique allows the calculation of phase angle trends which can be used as indicators of blade health deterioration, as has been shown in previous work for a single-blade rotor. This article presents the results from tests conducted on a five-blade axial-flow test rotor at different rotor speeds and measurement positions. With the aid of artificial neural networks, it is demonstrated that the parameters obtained from non-harmonic Fourier analysis and time domain signal processing on Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry signals can successfully be used to identify and quantify blade damage from among healthy blades. It is also shown that the natural frequencies of individual blades can be approximated from the Eulerian signatures recorded during rotor run-up and run-down.

  3. Assessing a Critical Aspect of Construct Continuity when Test Specifications Change or Test Forms Deviate from Specifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Dorans, Neil J.

    2013-01-01

    We make a distinction between two types of test changes: inevitable deviations from specifications versus planned modifications of specifications. We describe how score equity assessment (SEA) can be used as a tool to assess a critical aspect of construct continuity, the equivalence of scores, whenever planned changes are introduced to testing…

  4. A high accuracy femto-/picosecond laser damage test facility dedicated to the study of optical thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangote, B.; Gallais, L.; Zerrad, M.; Lemarchand, F.; Gao, L. H.; Commandré, M.; Lequime, M.

    2012-01-01

    A laser damage test facility delivering pulses from 100 fs to 3 ps and designed to operate at 1030 nm is presented. The different details of its implementation and performances are given. The originality of this system relies the online damage detection system based on Nomarski microscopy and the use of a non-conventional energy detection method based on the utilization of a cooled CCD that offers the possibility to obtain the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) with high accuracy. Applications of this instrument to study thin films under laser irradiation are presented. Particularly the deterministic behavior of the sub-picosecond damage is investigated in the case of fused silica and oxide films. It is demonstrated that the transition of 0-1 damage probability is very sharp and the LIDT is perfectly deterministic at few hundreds of femtoseconds. The damage process in dielectric materials being the results of electronic processes, specific information such as the material bandgap is needed for the interpretation of results and applications of scaling laws. A review of the different approaches for the estimation of the absorption gap of optical dielectric coatings is conducted and the results given by the different methods are compared and discussed. The LIDT and gap of several oxide materials are then measured with the presented instrument: Al2O3, Nb2O5, HfO2, SiO2, Ta2O5, and ZrO2. The obtained relation between the LIDT and gap at 1030 nm confirms the linear evolution of the threshold with the bandgap that exists at 800 nm, and our work expands the number of tested materials.

  5. 3. "TEST STAND NO. 13, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications No. ENG 04-353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-0906; no sheet number within title block; D.O. SERIES 1109/10. Stamped: AS BUILT. No revisions or revision dates. Last work date on this drawing "Checked by EAG, 1/31/49." Though this drawing is specific to Test Stand 1-3, it also illustrates the general methods used for excavation design and retaining wall construction at Test Stand 1-5. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Vibration testing of the I-40 bridge before and after the introduction of damage

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Cone, K.M.

    1994-11-01

    Because the bridges over the Rio Grande were to be razed, the investigators were able to introduce simulated cracks in four stages of increasing length into the structure. This paper summarizes the results of ambient and conventional, measured-input, modal analyses, performed on the undamaged structure. Also summarized are the results of conventional modal analyses performed after each stage of damage had been introduced. These tests were intended to quantify the amount of damage necessary to produce changes in the global dynamic properties of the bridge and to form a data base that can be used by other investigators to develop damage identification algorithms. Conventional modal analysis identified changes in the global dynamic properties of the structure only after the final stage of a damage.

  7. Higher certainty of the laser-induced damage threshold test with a redistributing data treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Lars; Mrohs, Marius; Gyamfi, Mark; Mädebach, Heinrich; Ristau, Detlev

    2015-10-15

    As a consequence of its statistical nature, the measurement of the laser-induced damage threshold holds always risks to over- or underestimate the real threshold value. As one of the established measurement procedures, the results of S-on-1 (and 1-on-1) tests outlined in the corresponding ISO standard 21 254 depend on the amount of data points and their distribution over the fluence scale. With the limited space on a test sample as well as the requirements on test site separation and beam sizes, the amount of data from one test is restricted. This paper reports on a way to treat damage test data in order to reduce the statistical error and therefore measurement uncertainty. Three simple assumptions allow for the assignment of one data point to multiple data bins and therefore virtually increase the available data base.

  8. Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Aglan, H.

    2005-08-04

    The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test

  9. An attempt to validate the ultra-accelerated microbar and the concrete performance test with the degree of AAR-induced damage observed in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas; Merz, Christine

    2013-07-15

    There is little knowledge about the relation between AAR-induced damage observed in structures and the expansion potential obtained with accelerated tests. In this study, aggregates used in structures damaged by AAR were tested with the microbar test (MBT/AFNOR XP 18-594) and the concrete performance test (CPT/AFNOR P18-454). After the tests, the samples were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Based on the results, the significance of the microbar test has to be examined very critically. The agreement of measured expansion, reacted rock types and the composition of the reaction products between the on-site concrete and the reproduced concrete subjected to the CPT clearly indicates that the reaction mechanisms in the structure and in the concrete performance test are comparable. As such, the concrete performance test seems to be an appropriate tool to test the potential reactivity of specific concrete mixtures.

  10. Static and damage tolerance tests of an advanced composite vertical fin for L-1011 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, F.; Ketola, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    This paper recounts the significant events which took place during the structural verification testing of two graphite/epoxy material, full-size vertical stabilizers. The ground test articles were tested to a high bending dynamic lateral gust condition. The first unit failed during static testing at 98 percent Design Ultimate Load. Failure began within the front spar cap. A detailed review of the failure was performed to identify all possible modes. This review resulted in a 'production line' type fix being designed for incorporation in the second ground test article prior to installation in the test fixture. The modified second unit sustained 106 percent of Design Ultimate Load without incident. One lifetime (36,000 flights) of damage tolerance testing was accomplished with the specimen purposely damaged at five locations. A fail-safe loading was performed successfully after simulating lightning strike damage to the fin box cover. A large area repair was substantiated by completing a second lifetime of spectrum loadings. The residual static strength was determined to be 119.7 percent of Design Ultimate Load.

  11. Rapid and specific immunoassay for cardiac troponin I in the diagnosis of myocardial damage.

    PubMed

    Panteghini, M; Bonora, R; Pagani, F

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated a new immunometric assay for the quantitation of cardiac troponin I with the Behring Opus analyzer. All assay steps are performed automatically by the analyzer, the complete procedure requiring 20 min for the first test result. Total precision (coefficient of variation) varied between 5.6% and 13.0%. Comparison with the Pasteur immunoenzymometric assay showed good correlation (r = 0.959), but the Opus assay gave approximately tenfold higher values. Cardiac troponin I was undetectable (< 0.5 microgram/l) in sera from healthy subjects (n = 46), patients with severe skeletal muscle damage (n = 8), and all but 1 patient with chronic renal failure (n = 39). In patients with myocardial infarction (n = 21), investigated for 4 days after onset by frequent sampling, cardiac troponin I peaked at 20.8 +/- 8.1 h after onset with a mean concentration of 164.8 +/- 361.3 micrograms/l, remaining elevated in 89% of patients on the 4th day. In patients with unstable angina (n = 15), cardiac troponin I measurement was valuable in predicting the type of lesion morphology on coronary angiography and the short-term outcome.

  12. Molecular Analysis of Base Damage Clustering Associated with a Site-Specific Radiation-Induced DNA Double-Strand Break

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Jaruga, Pawel; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Neumann, Ronald D.; Winters, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Base damage flanking a radiation-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) may contribute to DSB complexity and affect break repair. However, to date, an isolated radiation-induced DSB has not been assessed for such structures at the molecular level. In this study, an authentic site-specific radiation-induced DSB was produced in plasmid DNA by triplex forming oligonucleotide-targeted 125I decay. A restriction fragment terminated by the DSB was isolated and probed for base damage with the E. coli DNA repair enzymes, endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase. Our results demonstrate base damage clustering within 8 bases of the 125I-targeted base in the DNA duplex. An increased yield of base damage (purine>pyrimidine) was observed for DSBs formed by irradiation in the absence of DMSO. An internal control fragment 1354 bp upstream from the targeted base was insensitive to enzymatic probing, indicating the damage detected proximal to the DSB was produced by the 125I decay that formed the DSB. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified three types of damaged bases in the ~32 bp region proximal to the DSB. These base lesions were 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5-hydroxycytosine. Finally, evidence is presented for base damage >24 bp upstream from the 125I-decay site that may form via a charge migration mechanism. PMID:17067210

  13. A Test of Confusion Theory of Encoding Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Sandor; Tulving, Endel

    1975-01-01

    Subjects studied and were tested for recognition and recall of target words on lists of cue-target word pairs. List-cued recall was higher than non-cued recall, suggesting that recognition failure is independent of subjects' familiarity with task requirements. This contradicts attribution of encoding specificity phenomena to subjects' confusion.…

  14. Empirically Derived Test Specifications for the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Michael J.; Chan, Fong; Sung, Connie; Kim, Muwoong

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the major job functions and knowledge domains required for effective rehabilitation counseling practice in today's rapidly changing practice environment to revise and update the test specifications for the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification examination. This report describes the methodology used in this…

  15. Passive and active thermography for in situ damage monitoring in woven composites during mechanical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, J.-M.; Balageas, D.; Lamboul, B.; Bai, G.; Passilly, F.; Mavel, A.; Grail, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to highlight the contribution of both passive and active infrared thermography for in situ damage detection and monitoring in a 2D woven composite, during a mechanical testing constituted of multiple sequences of loadings and intermediate pauses. During the monotonic tensile loadings, damages such as matrix cracking and fiber-matrix debondings are monitored by passive thermography. Their thermal signatures are analyzed and the released heat, which is assumed to be a relevant index of their severity, is evaluated and correlated to the associated acoustic energies, simultaneously recorded. Finally, the contribution of the TSR (Thermographic Signal Reconstruction) advanced processing technique to provide a qualitative overview of the detected damages is underlined. As for the constant stress plateau levels, a nondestructive damage inspection of the tested specimen is carried out by pulsed thermography. The difficulties, due to the woven structure of the composite, in detecting any damage are put into relief. Once more, it is shown that the TSR technique can be useful.

  16. Displacement Damage Effects in Solar Cells: Mining Damage From the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Walters, R. J.; Morton, T. L.; Messenger, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop an improved space solar cell radiation response analysis capability and to produce a computer modeling tool which implements the analysis. This was accomplished through analysis of solar cell flight data taken on the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed experiment. This effort specifically addresses issues related to rapid technological change in the area of solar cells for space applications in order to enhance system performance, decrease risk, and reduce cost for future missions.

  17. Full-Scale Test and Analysis of a PRSEUS Fuselage Panel to Assess Damage-Containment Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew; Bakuckas, John G.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Linton, Kim A.; Korkosz, Gregory; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2011-01-01

    Stitched composite technology has the potential to substantially decrease structural weight through enhanced damage containment capabilities. The most recent generation of stitched composite technology, the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, has been shown to successfully arrest damage at the sub-component level through tension testing of a three stringer panel with damage in the form of a two-bay notch. In a joint effort undertaken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Boeing Company, further studies are being conducted to characterize the damage containment features of the PRSEUS concept. A full-scale residual strength test will be performed on a fuselage panel to determine if the load capacity will meet strength, deformation, and damage tolerance requirements. A curved panel was designed, fabricated, and prepared for residual strength testing. A pre-test Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed using design allowables from previous test programs to predict test panel deformation characteristics and margins of safety. Three phases of testing with increasing damage severity include: (1) as manufactured; (2) barely visible impact damage (BVID) and visible impact damage (VID); and (3) discrete source damage (DSD) where the panel will be loaded to catastrophic failure. This paper presents the background information, test plan, and experimental procedure. This paper is the first of several future articles reporting the test preparations, results, and analysis conducted in the test program.

  18. Damage Tolerance Testing of a NASA TransHab Derivative Woven Inflatable Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgecombe, John; delaFuente, Horacio; Valle, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Current options for Lunar habitat architecture include inflatable habitats and airlocks. Inflatable structures can have mass and volume advantages over conventional structures. However, inflatable structures carry different inherent risks and are at a lower Technical Readiness Level (TRL) than more conventional metallic structures. One of the risks associated with inflatable structures is in understanding the tolerance to induced damage. The Damage Tolerance Test (DTT) is designed to study the structural integrity of an expandable structure. TransHab (Figure 1) was an experimental inflatable module developed at the NASA/Johnson Space Center in the 1990 s. The TransHab design was originally envisioned for use in Mars Transits but was also studied as a potential habitat for the International Space Station (ISS). The design of the TransHab module was based on a woven design using an Aramid fabric. Testing of this design demonstrated a high level of predictability and repeatability with analytical predictions of stresses and deflections. Based on JSC s experience with the design and analysis of woven inflatable structures, the Damage Tolerance Test article was designed and fabricated using a woven design. The DTT article was inflated to 45 psig, representing 25% of the ultimate burst pressure, and one of the one-inch wide longitudinal structural members was severed by initiating a Linear Shaped Charge (LSC). Strain gage measurements, at the interface between the expandable elements (straps) and the nonexpandable metallic elements for pre-selected longitudinal straps, were taken throughout pressurization of the module and strap separation. Strain gage measurements show no change in longitudinal strap loading at the bulkhead interface after strap separation indicating loads in the restraint layer were re-distributed local to the damaged area due to the effects of friction under high internal pressure loading. The test completed all primary objectives with better than

  19. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage.

  20. Releveling and behavior of strap-retrofitted damaged test foundations exposed to mine subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, G.G.

    1997-09-01

    Test foundation walls were constructed in an area of planned subsidence. These crawl space-sized block bearing walls were located in the tension zone of a longwall panel. The test walls were 1.2 m (40 ft) long and were vertically loaded on top with soil binds to simulate the weight of a house. As the longwall proceeded past these test foundations, subsidence movements damaged the test structures. These damaged foundations were then structurally and aesthetically repaired by using a steel strap retrofit and applying a cementitious surface coating. The repaired test foundations underwent significant subsequent subsidence as an adjacent longwall was mined beneath. The response of the repaired foundation is summarized in this paper. The steel straps were also used to relevel another set of the test foundations after they were tilted and damaged by subsidence. First, the straps were applied to the block bearing walls, and then wall jacks were used to lift the upper portion of the walls to a level position. This releveling procedure is outlined with the results.

  1. Novel speed test for evaluation of badminton-specific movements.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Christian M; Karlsen, Anders; Nybo, Lars

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we developed a novel badminton-specific speed test (BST). The test was designed to mimic match play. The test starts in the center of the court and consists of 5 maximal actions to sensors located in each of the 4 corners of the court. The 20 actions are performed in randomized order as dictated by computer screen shots displayed 1 second after completion of the previous action. We assessed day-to-day variation in elite players, and specificity of the test was evaluated by comparing 30-m sprint performance and time to complete the BST in 20 elite players, 21 skilled players, and 20 age-matched physical active subjects (non-badminton players). Sprint performance was similar across groups, whereas the elite players were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) faster in the BST (total test time: 32.3 ± 1.1 seconds; average: 1.6 seconds per action) than the skilled (34.1 ± 2.0 seconds) and non-badminton players (35.7 ± 1.7 seconds). Day-to-day coefficient of variation (CV) of the BST was 0.7% for the elite players, whereas CV for repeated tests on the same day was 1.7% for elite, 2.6% for skilled, and 2.5% for non-badminton players. On this basis, we suggest that the BST may be valuable for evaluation of short-term maximal movement speed in badminton players. Thus, the BST seems to be sport specific, as it may discriminate between groups (elite, less trained players, and non-badminton players) with similar sprinting performance, and the low test-retest variation may allow for using the BST to evaluate longitudinal changes, for example, training effects or seasonal variations.

  2. Design, analysis, and fabrication of a pressure box test fixture for tension damage tolerance testing of curved fuselage panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. J.; Bodine, J. B.; Preuss, C. H.; Koch, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    A pressure box test fixture was designed and fabricated to evaluate the effects of internal pressure, biaxial tension loads, curvature, and damage on the fracture response of composite fuselage structure. Previous work in composite fuselage tension damage tolerance, performed during NASA contract NAS1-17740, evaluated the above effects on unstiffened panels only. This work extends the tension damage tolerance testing to curved stiffened fuselage crown structure that contains longitudinal stringers and circumferential frame elements. The pressure box fixture was designed to apply internal pressure up to 20 psi, and axial tension loads up to 5000 lb/in, either separately or simultaneously. A NASTRAN finite element model of the pressure box fixture and composite stiffened panel was used to help design the test fixture, and was compared to a finite element model of a full composite stiffened fuselage shell. This was done to ensure that the test panel was loaded in a similar way to a panel in the full fuselage shell, and that the fixture and its attachment plates did not adversely affect the panel.

  3. Tests and specifications pertinent to coal ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.

    1994-12-31

    Fortunately, in the United States, most of the test methods and specifications for the use of coal ash in cement, concrete, lime, or soil-related products are found in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) books of standards. Many of the same or slightly different specifications are also found in the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) books of standards, as well as those of the various Departments of Transportation (DOTs). Other specifications for selected uses are found in publications of the American Petroleum Institute (API), the Sulfur Institute, the mineral wool industry, and West Virginia University. It is difficult to keep up with the most recent printed specifications, particularly in ASTM, since the committees meet twice yearly and have many time-consuming ballots. This paper summarizes the critical engineering properties required to assess the utilization applications of coal ash products. For most uses, both physical and chemical limits are specified. There are specifications for blended cement containing fly ash, for sulfate resistance, and for alkali aggregate reaction, also for fly ash for use in concrete, in oil well cement, and in grout. Coal ash is specified for use in ash-lime stabilization, as lightweight aggregate, and for mineral filler, as well as for structural fill and flowable fill. Other uses include sulfur concrete, high flexural strength ceramics, mineral wool, brick, cenospheres, and filler.

  4. Development of a Specific Anaerobic Field Test for Aerobic Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen’s d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  5. Development of a specific anaerobic field test for aerobic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Christiano Robles Rodrigues; Borelli, Marcello Tadeu Caetano; Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen's d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings.

  6. Benchmark specifications for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Sofu, T.; Briggs, L. L.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is hosting an IAEA-coordinated research project on benchmark analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor passive safety tests performed at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The benchmark project involves analysis of a protected and an unprotected loss of flow tests conducted during an extensive testing program within the framework of the U.S. Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate the inherently safety features of EBR-II as a pool-type, sodium-cooled fast reactor prototype. The project is intended to improve the participants' design and safety analysis capabilities for sodium-cooled fast reactors through validation and qualification of safety analysis codes and methods. This paper provides a description of the EBR-II tests included in the program, and outlines the benchmark specifications being prepared to support the IAEA-coordinated research project. (authors)

  7. Bender-Gestalt test and background interference procedure in discernment of organic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Pardue, A M

    1975-02-01

    Although the Bender-Gestalt test has proven adequate in differentiating groups of organic from groups of nonorganic Ss, attempts at individual diagnosis have frequently met with failure. Canter's Background Interference Procedure was designed to increase the sensitivity of the Bender test to the discernment of organic brain damage. The purpose of this paper was to check the validity of the Canter procedure, and to investigate its applicability to Hain's scoring system for the Bender test. 20 brain-damaged patients, 20 schizophrenics and 20 nonorganic, non-brain-damaged patients were matched for age and intelligence. Each of these groups was further divided into outpatients and inpatients. All patients were administered the Bender test on the standard white paper, the WAIS vocabulary subtest, and again the Bender test, on paper for the Background Interference Procedure. Significant results were obtained with the Background Interference administration for both Pascal-Suttell's and Hain's scoring systems where the standard administration had failed to yield significance. The tentative criteria proposed by Canter for individual diagnosis, however, were adequate for Pascal-Suttell's scoring system but not for Hain's method. Possible explanations for this disagreement, as well as suggestions for further research, are offered.

  8. Efficient Noninferiority Testing Procedures for Simultaneously Assessing Sensitivity and Specificity of Two Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Amei, Amei; Young, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity are often used to assess the performance of a diagnostic test with binary outcomes. Wald-type test statistics have been proposed for testing sensitivity and specificity individually. In the presence of a gold standard, simultaneous comparison between two diagnostic tests for noninferiority of sensitivity and specificity based on an asymptotic approach has been studied by Chen et al. (2003). However, the asymptotic approach may suffer from unsatisfactory type I error control as observed from many studies, especially in small to medium sample settings. In this paper, we compare three unconditional approaches for simultaneously testing sensitivity and specificity. They are approaches based on estimation, maximization, and a combination of estimation and maximization. Although the estimation approach does not guarantee type I error, it has satisfactory performance with regard to type I error control. The other two unconditional approaches are exact. The approach based on estimation and maximization is generally more powerful than the approach based on maximization.

  9. Displacement damage induced in iron by gammas and neutrons under irradiation in the IFMIF test cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Fischer, U.

    2011-10-01

    This work presents a complete comparative analysis of the radiation damage induced in iron-based materials in IFMIF by photons and neutrons. The gamma induced damage takes into account, for the first time, both photonuclear and photoatomic reaction mechanisms. The relevant cross sections were taken from available data evaluations. The gamma and neutron radiation fields were calculated by the McDeLicious Monte Carlo code using a 3-D geometry model. Finally the gamma and neutron induced damages in the iron have been assessed inside the IFMIF test cell and the surrounding concrete walls. It was found that the photoatomic mechanism dominates the photonuclear with at least one hundred times higher damage rates. The ratio of the gamma and the neutron induced displacement damage was found to be 10 -3 inside the concrete wall and 10 -5 in the components close to d-Li source. This fraction may increase a few times due to the uncertainty of the evaluated γ-dpa cross sections and the different surviving probabilities for defects produced by gammas and neutrons, nevertheless unlikely exceed 1%.

  10. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation-specific DNA damage and embryonic viability in sea urchins from Kasitsna Bay, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Theodorakis, C.; Anderson, S.; Shugart, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    Ripe ova and sperm were obtained from Green Sea Urchins (Strongvlocentrotus drochbachiensis) collected from Kasitsna Bay, Alaska, and ova were fertilized in vitro. Embryos were immediately placed in plastic bags secured to floating racks deployed in the bay. The bags were suspended just below the surface of the water and at 1 and 2 meter depths for up to 120 hours. Bags were either left uncovered, covered with Mylar plastic (which blocks out UV-B but not UV-A radiations), or covered with dark plastic. The number of damaged DNA sites was determined by digesting the DNA with enzymes isolated from the bacterium Micrococcus luteus which cleave the DNA at damaged sites. It was found that DNA damage was present in a dose-dependent fashion with the amount of damage in embryos from the uncovered bags > Mylar covered bags > dark covered bags. No dimers were detected from embryos at 1 or 2 m. depths. Also, the number of damaged sites varied from day to day. Finally, the number of damaged sites was positively correlated with percent abnormal embryos in each bag. The results are discussed with relation to monitoring UV-B effects and ecological consequences of enhanced UV-B radiation.

  12. Phased Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-02-28

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. These tests are described in separate planning documents. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: (1) Define the test scope for the FRS and IWTS; (2) Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; (3) Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and (4) Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  13. 14. "SITE WORK, CIVIL, SITE PLAN." Test Area 1120. Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. "SITE WORK, CIVIL, SITE PLAN." Test Area 1-120. Specifications No. OC2-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 7 of 148; file no. 1320/58, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338 Rev. C, Date: 16 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Force limit specifications vs. design limit loads in vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. Y.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the work presented herein is to discuss the results of force limit notching during vibration testing with respect to the traditional limit load design criteria. By using a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system approach, this work shows that with an appropriate force specification the notched response due to force limiting will result in loads comparable with the structural design limit criteria.

  15. Analysis of laser damage tests on coatings designed for broad bandwidth high reflection of femtosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bellum, John Curtis; Winstone, Trevor; Lamaignere, Laurent; Sozet, Martin; Kimmel, Mark W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Field, Ella Suzanne; Kletecka, Damon E.

    2016-08-25

    We designed an optical coating based on TiO2/SiO2 layer pairs for broad bandwidth high reflection (BBHR) at 45-deg angle of incidence (AOI), P polarization of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses of 900-nm center wavelength, and produced the coatings in Sandia’s large optics coater by reactive, ion-assisted e-beam evaporation. This paper reports on laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) tests of these coatings. The broad HR bands of BBHR coatings pose challenges to LIDT tests. An ideal test would be in a vacuum environment appropriate to a high energy, fs-pulse, petawatt-class laser, with pulses identical to its fs pulses. Short of this would be tests over portions of the HR band using nanosecond or sub-picosecond pulses produced by tunable lasers. Such tests could, e.g., sample 10-nm-wide wavelength intervals with center wavelengths tunable over the broad HR band. Alternatively, the coating’s HR band could be adjusted by means of wavelength shifts due to changing the AOI of the LIDT tests or due to the coating absorbing moisture under ambient conditions. In conclusion, we had LIDT tests performed on the BBHR coatings at selected AOIs to gain insight into their laser damage properties and analyze how the results of the different LIDT tests compare.

  16. Analysis of laser damage tests on coatings designed for broad bandwidth high reflection of femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellum, John; Winstone, Trevor; Lamaignere, Laurent; Sozet, Martin; Kimmel, Mark; Rambo, Patrick; Field, Ella; Kletecka, Damon

    2017-01-01

    We designed an optical coating based on TiO2/SiO2 layer pairs for broad bandwidth high reflection (BBHR) at 45-deg angle of incidence (AOI), P polarization of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses of 900-nm center wavelength, and produced the coatings in Sandia's large optics coater by reactive, ion-assisted e-beam evaporation. This paper reports on laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) tests of these coatings. The broad HR bands of BBHR coatings pose challenges to LIDT tests. An ideal test would be in a vacuum environment appropriate to a high energy, fs-pulse, petawatt-class laser, with pulses identical to its fs pulses. Short of this would be tests over portions of the HR band using nanosecond or sub-picosecond pulses produced by tunable lasers. Such tests could, e.g., sample 10-nm-wide wavelength intervals with center wavelengths tunable over the broad HR band. Alternatively, the coating's HR band could be adjusted by means of wavelength shifts due to changing the AOI of the LIDT tests or due to the coating absorbing moisture under ambient conditions. We had LIDT tests performed on the BBHR coatings at selected AOIs to gain insight into their laser damage properties and analyze how the results of the different LIDT tests compare.

  17. Analysis of laser damage tests on coatings designed for broad bandwidth high reflection of femtosecond pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Bellum, John Curtis; Winstone, Trevor; Lamaignere, Laurent; ...

    2016-08-25

    We designed an optical coating based on TiO2/SiO2 layer pairs for broad bandwidth high reflection (BBHR) at 45-deg angle of incidence (AOI), P polarization of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses of 900-nm center wavelength, and produced the coatings in Sandia’s large optics coater by reactive, ion-assisted e-beam evaporation. This paper reports on laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) tests of these coatings. The broad HR bands of BBHR coatings pose challenges to LIDT tests. An ideal test would be in a vacuum environment appropriate to a high energy, fs-pulse, petawatt-class laser, with pulses identical to its fs pulses. Short of this would bemore » tests over portions of the HR band using nanosecond or sub-picosecond pulses produced by tunable lasers. Such tests could, e.g., sample 10-nm-wide wavelength intervals with center wavelengths tunable over the broad HR band. Alternatively, the coating’s HR band could be adjusted by means of wavelength shifts due to changing the AOI of the LIDT tests or due to the coating absorbing moisture under ambient conditions. In conclusion, we had LIDT tests performed on the BBHR coatings at selected AOIs to gain insight into their laser damage properties and analyze how the results of the different LIDT tests compare.« less

  18. MELCOR modeling of the PBF (Power Burst Facility) Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-4

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a MELCOR Version 1.8 simulation of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--4. The input data for the analysis were obtained from the Test Results Report and from SCDAP/RELAP5 input. Results are presented for the transient liquid level in the test bundle, clad temperatures, shroud temperatures, clad oxidation and hydrogen generation, bundle geometry changes, fission product release, and heat transfer to the bypass flow. Comparisons are made with experimental data and with SCDAP/RELAP5 calculations. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST): MIST Facility Functional Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, T F; Koksal, C G; Moskal, T E; Rush, G C; Gloudemans, J R

    1991-04-01

    The Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST) is part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox designed plants. MIST is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST was specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the Once Through Integral System (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and OTIS are used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST Functional Specification documents as-built design features, dimensions, instrumentation, and test approach. It also presents the scaling basis for the facility and serves to define the scope of work for the facility design and construction. 13 refs., 112 figs., 38 tabs.

  20. Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification ( OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect

    PAJUNEN, A.L.; LANGEVIN, M.J.

    2000-08-07

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  1. Targeting of viral interleukin-10 with an antibody fragment specific to damaged arthritic cartilage improves its therapeutic potency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We previously demonstrated that a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) specific to collagen type II (CII) posttranslationally modified by reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to target anti-inflammatory therapeutics specifically to inflamed arthritic joints. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the superior efficacy of anti-inflammatory cytokines when targeted to inflamed arthritic joints by the anti-ROS modified CII (anti-ROS-CII) scFv in a mouse model of arthritis. Methods Viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10) was fused to anti-ROS-CII scFv (1-11E) with a matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) cleavable linker to create 1-11E/vIL-10 fusion. Binding of 1-11E/vIL-10 to ROS-CII was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, and immune-staining of arthritic cartilage, whereas vIL-10 bioactivity was evaluated in vitro by using an MC-9 cell-proliferation assay. Specific in vivo localization and therapeutic efficacy of 1-11E/vIL-10 was tested in the mouse model of antigen-induced arthritis. Results 1-11E/vIL-10 bound specifically to ROS-CII and to damaged arthritic cartilage. Interestingly, the in vitro vIL-10 activity in the fusion protein was observed only after cleavage with MMP-1. When systemically administered to arthritic mice, 1-11E/vIL-10 localized specifically to the arthritic knee, with peak accumulation observed after 3 days. Moreover, 1-11E/vIL-10 reduced inflammation significantly quicker than vIL-10 fused to the control anti-hen egg lysozyme scFv (C7/vIL10). Conclusions Targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cytokines potentiates their anti-arthritic action in a mouse model of arthritis. Our results further support the hypothesis that targeting biotherapeutics to arthritic joints may be extended to include anti-inflammatory cytokines that lack efficacy when administered systemically. PMID:25029910

  2. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation Via AC-29-2C Using Damage Progression Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the results of spiral bevel gear rig tests performed under a NASA Space Act Agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to support validation and demonstration of rotorcraft Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for maintenance credits via FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 29-2C, Section MG-15, Airworthiness Approval of Rotorcraft (HUMS) (Ref. 1). The overarching goal of this work was to determine a method to validate condition indicators in the lab that better represent their response to faults in the field. Using existing in-service helicopter HUMS flight data from faulted spiral bevel gears as a "Case Study," to better understand the differences between both systems, and the availability of the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig, a plan was put in place to design, fabricate and test comparable gear sets with comparable failure modes within the constraints of the test rig. The research objectives of the rig tests were to evaluate the capability of detecting gear surface pitting fatigue and other generated failure modes on spiral bevel gear teeth using gear condition indicators currently used in fielded HUMS. Nineteen final design gear sets were tested. Tables were generated for each test, summarizing the failure modes observed on the gear teeth for each test during each inspection interval and color coded based on damage mode per inspection photos. Gear condition indicators (CI) Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS), +/- 1 Sideband Index (SI1) and +/- 3 Sideband Index (SI3) were plotted along with rig operational parameters. Statistical tables of the means and standard deviations were calculated within inspection intervals for each CI. As testing progressed, it became clear that certain condition indicators were more sensitive to a specific component and failure mode. These tests were clustered together for further analysis. Maintenance actions during testing were also documented. Correlation coefficients were

  3. Evaluation of chlorite and chlorate genotoxicity using plant bioassays and in vitro DNA damage tests.

    PubMed

    Feretti, D; Zerbini, I; Ceretti, E; Villarini, M; Zani, C; Moretti, M; Fatigoni, C; Orizio, G; Donato, F; Monarca, S

    2008-09-01

    In the last few years chlorine dioxide has been increasingly used for disinfecting drinking water in many countries. Although it does not react with humic substances, chlorine dioxide added to water is reduced primarily to chlorite and chlorate ions, compounds that are under investigation for their potential adverse effects on human health. The aim of this research was to study the genotoxicity of chlorite and chlorate and their mixtures. The end-points included two plant tests (chromosomal aberration test in Allium cepa and micronucleus assay in Tradescantia, carried out at different times of exposure) and two genotoxicity tests in human HepG2 cells (comet assay and cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus test). Preliminary toxicity tests were carried out for both plant and HepG2 assays. The results showed that chlorite and chlorate are able to induce chromosomal damage to plant systems, particularly chromosomal aberrations in A. cepa root tip cells, even at concentrations lower than the limit established by Italian normative law and WHO guidelines. In HepG2 cells increased DNA damage was only observed for chlorate at the lowest concentration. No increase in micronuclei frequency was detected in any of the samples tested in human HepG2 cells.

  4. A test of the domain-specific acculturation strategy hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew J; Yang, Minji; Lim, Robert H; Hui, Kayi; Choi, Na-Yeun; Fan, Xiaoyan; Lin, Li-Ling; Grome, Rebekah E; Farrell, Jerome A; Blackmon, Sha'kema

    2013-01-01

    Acculturation literature has evolved over the past several decades and has highlighted the dynamic ways in which individuals negotiate experiences in multiple cultural contexts. The present study extends this literature by testing M. J. Miller and R. H. Lim's (2010) domain-specific acculturation strategy hypothesis-that individuals might use different acculturation strategies (i.e., assimilated, bicultural, separated, and marginalized strategies; J. W. Berry, 2003) across behavioral and values domains-in 3 independent cluster analyses with Asian American participants. Present findings supported the domain-specific acculturation strategy hypothesis as 67% to 72% of participants from 3 independent samples using different strategies across behavioral and values domains. Consistent with theory, a number of acculturation strategy cluster group differences emerged across generational status, acculturative stress, mental health symptoms, and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help. Study limitations and future directions for research are discussed.

  5. MELCOR simulation of the PBF (Power Burst Facility) severe fuel damage test 1-1

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a MELCOR version 1.7.1 simulation of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) 1-1 test. The input data for the simulation was obtained from the SFD 1-1 Test Results Report and from SCDAP input. Results are presented for the transient two-phase interface level in the core, fuel and clad temperatures at various elevations in the fuel bundle, clad oxidation, hydrogen generation, fission product release, and heat transfer to the surrounding structures. Comparisons are made with experimental data and predictions from STCP and the NRC's mechanistic code SCDAP (version 18). 6 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Verburg, Melissa; Renes, Ingrid B; Van Nispen, Danielle J P M; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jorritsma, Marieke; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C; Dekker, Jan

    2002-11-01

    The rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were localized on tissue sections and quantified at mRNA and protein levels relative to control levels. We analyzed correlations in temporal expression patterns between markers. mRNA expression of enterocyte and goblet cell markers decreased significantly during damage for a specific period. Of these, sucrase-isomaltase (-62%) and CPS (-82%) were correlated. Correlations were also found between lactase (-76%) and SGLT1 (-77%) and between I-FABP (-52%) and L-FABP (-45%). Decreases in GLUT5 (-53%), MUC2 (-43%), and TFF3 (-54%) mRNAs occurred independently of any of the other markers. In contrast, lysozyme mRNA present in Paneth cells increased (+76%). At the protein level, qualitative and quantitative changes were in agreement with mRNA expression, except for Muc2 (+115%) and TFF3 (+81%), which increased significantly during damage, following independent patterns. During regeneration, expression of each marker returned to control levels. The enhanced expression of cytoprotective molecules (Muc2, TFF3, lysozyme) during damage represents maintenance of goblet cell and Paneth cell functions, most likely to protect the epithelium. Decreased expression of enterocyte-specific markers represents decreased enterocyte function, of which fatty acid transporters were least affected.

  7. 29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ENG-OC-1-57-75, Drawing No. AF-6009-15, sheet 53 of 96, D.O. Series No. AF 1394/73, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 5296 Rev. C, Date: 19 NOV 59. Drawing includes plan, section, and details of track. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Arrested Spermatogenesis and Evidence for DNA Damage in PTIP Mutant Testes

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Kristopher R.; Smith, Gary D.; Dressler, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    The differentiation of mature sperm from male germ cells requires both chromatin remodeling and compaction as well as DNA double stranded break repair of sister chromatids. We examined the function of PTIP, a protein implicated in both DNA repair and histone methylation, during spermatogenesis by using a conditional, inducible mutation in adult male mice. Loss of PTIP led to the developmental arrest of spermatocytes, testicular atrophy, and infertility. By immunostaining with specific markers for different stages of spermatogenesis and for proteins involved in DNA damage and repair mechanisms, we conclude that the lack of PTIP results in genomic instability and DNA damage resulting in the cessation of spermatogenesis in meiosis I. These data underscore the importance of PTIP in the DNA repair process associated with the development of mature spermatozoa. PMID:23063797

  9. Finite Elements Analysis of a Composite Semi-Span Test Article With and Without Discrete Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    AS&M Inc. performed finite element analysis, with and without discrete damage, of a composite semi-span test article that represents the Boeing 220-passenger transport aircraft composite semi-span test article. A NASTRAN bulk data file and drawings of the test mount fixtures and semi-span components were utilized to generate the baseline finite element model. In this model, the stringer blades are represented by shell elements, and the stringer flanges are combined with the skin. Numerous modeling modifications and discrete source damage scenarios were applied to the test article model throughout the course of the study. This report details the analysis method and results obtained from the composite semi-span study. Analyses were carried out for three load cases: Braked Roll, LOG Down-Bending and 2.5G Up-Bending. These analyses included linear and nonlinear static response, as well as linear and nonlinear buckling response. Results are presented in the form of stress and strain plots. factors of safety for failed elements, buckling loads and modes, deflection prediction tables and plots, and strainage prediction tables and plots. The collected results are presented within this report for comparison to test results.

  10. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  11. Towards sensible toxicity testing for nanomaterials: proposal for the specification of test design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Annegret; Weil, Mirco; Meißner, Tobias; Kühnel, Dana

    2015-12-01

    During the last decade, nanomaterials (NM) were extensively tested for potential harmful effects towards humans and environmental organisms. However, a sound hazard assessment was so far hampered by uncertainties and a low comparability of test results. The reason for the low comparability is a high variation in the (1) type of NM tested with regard to raw material, size and shape and (2) procedures before and during the toxicity testing. This calls for tailored, nanomaterial-specific protocols. Here, a structured approach is proposed, intended to lead to test protocols not only tailored to specific types of nanomaterials, but also to respective test system for toxicity testing. There are existing standards on single procedures involving nanomaterials, however, not all relevant procedures are covered by standards. Hence, our approach offers a detailed way of weighting several plausible alternatives for e.g. sample preparation, in order to decide on the procedure most meaningful for a specific nanomaterial and toxicity test. A framework of several decision trees (DT) and flow charts to support testing of NM is proposed as a basis for further refinement and in-depth elaboration. DT and flow charts were drafted for (1) general procedure—physicochemical characterisation, (2) choice of test media, (3) decision on test scenario and application of NM to liquid media, (4) application of NM to the gas phase, (5) application of NM to soil and sediments, (6) dose metrics, (S1) definition of a nanomaterial, and (S2) dissolution. The applicability of the proposed approach was surveyed by using experimental data retrieved from studies on nanoscale CuO. This survey demonstrated the DT and flow charts to be a convenient tool to systematically decide upon test procedures and processes, and hence pose an important step towards harmonisation of NM testing.

  12. Towards sensible toxicity testing for nanomaterials: proposal for the specification of test design

    PubMed Central

    Potthoff, Annegret; Weil, Mirco; Meißner, Tobias; Kühnel, Dana

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, nanomaterials (NM) were extensively tested for potential harmful effects towards humans and environmental organisms. However, a sound hazard assessment was so far hampered by uncertainties and a low comparability of test results. The reason for the low comparability is a high variation in the (1) type of NM tested with regard to raw material, size and shape and (2) procedures before and during the toxicity testing. This calls for tailored, nanomaterial-specific protocols. Here, a structured approach is proposed, intended to lead to test protocols not only tailored to specific types of nanomaterials, but also to respective test system for toxicity testing. There are existing standards on single procedures involving nanomaterials, however, not all relevant procedures are covered by standards. Hence, our approach offers a detailed way of weighting several plausible alternatives for e.g. sample preparation, in order to decide on the procedure most meaningful for a specific nanomaterial and toxicity test. A framework of several decision trees (DT) and flow charts to support testing of NM is proposed as a basis for further refinement and in-depth elaboration. DT and flow charts were drafted for (1) general procedure—physicochemical characterisation, (2) choice of test media, (3) decision on test scenario and application of NM to liquid media, (4) application of NM to the gas phase, (5) application of NM to soil and sediments, (6) dose metrics, (S1) definition of a nanomaterial, and (S2) dissolution. The applicability of the proposed approach was surveyed by using experimental data retrieved from studies on nanoscale CuO. This survey demonstrated the DT and flow charts to be a convenient tool to systematically decide upon test procedures and processes, and hence pose an important step towards harmonisation of NM testing. PMID:27877848

  13. Fuel containment and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 2: Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandifer, J. P.; Denny, A.; Wood, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Technical issues associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite wing structures for transport aircraft were investigated. Material evaluation tests were conducted on two toughened resin composites: Celion/HX1504 and Celion/5245. These consisted of impact, tension, compression, edge delamination, and double cantilever beam tests. Another test series was conducted on graphite/epoxy box beams simulating a wing cover to spar cap joint configuration of a pressurized fuel tank. These tests evaluated the effectiveness of sealing methods with various fastener types and spacings under fatigue loading and with pressurized fuel. Another test series evaluated the ability of the selected coatings, film, and materials to prevent fuel leakage through 32-ply AS4/2220-1 laminates at various impact energy levels. To verify the structural integrity of the technology demonstration article structural details, tests were conducted on blade stiffened panels and sections. Compression tests were performed on undamaged and impacted stiffened AS4/2220-1 panels and smaller element tests to evaluate stiffener pull-off, side load and failsafe properties. Compression tests were also performed on panels subjected to Zone 2 lightning strikes. All of these data were integrated into a demonstration article representing a moderately loaded area of a transport wing. This test combined lightning strike, pressurized fuel, impact, impact repair, fatigue and residual strength.

  14. Does McNemar's test compare the sensitivities and specificities of two diagnostic tests?

    PubMed

    Kim, Soeun; Lee, Woojoo

    2017-02-01

    McNemar's test is often used in practice to compare the sensitivities and specificities for the evaluation of two diagnostic tests. For correct evaluation of accuracy, an intuitive recommendation is to test the diseased and the non-diseased groups separately so that the sensitivities can be compared among the diseased, and specificities can be compared among the healthy group of people. This paper provides a rigorous theoretical framework for this argument and study the validity of McNemar's test regardless of the conditional independence assumption. We derive McNemar's test statistic under the null hypothesis considering both assumptions of conditional independence and conditional dependence. We then perform power analyses to show how the result is affected by the amount of the conditional dependence under alternative hypothesis.

  15. Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site-Specific Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0584 TITLE: Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage...estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining...it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE 01-06-2007 2

  16. DNA-damaging agents stimulate gene expression at specific loci in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, C.J.; Walker, G.C.

    1988-05-01

    Operon fusions in Escherichia coli were obtained that showed increased beta-galactosidase expression in response to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C. These fusions were generated by using the Mud(ApR, lac) vector to insert the lactose structural genes randomly into the bacterial chromosome. Induction of beta-galactosidase in these strains, which carried fusions of lac to these din (damage-inducible) loci, was (i) triggered by UV light as well as by mitomycin C and (ii) abolished by either a recA- or a lexA- mutation. Similar characteristics of induction were observed when the lactose genes were fused to a prophage lambda promoter by using Mud(ApR, lac). These results indicate that E. coli contains a set of genes that, like prophage lambda genes, are expressed in response to DNA-damaging agents and regulated by the recA and lexA gene products. These din genes map at five bacterial loci. One din::Mud(ApR, lac) insertion results in a UV-sensitive phenotype and may be within the uvrA transcriptional unit.

  17. Domain-specific functional software testing: A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonnenmann, Uwe

    1992-01-01

    Software Engineering is a knowledge intensive activity that involves defining, designing, developing, and maintaining software systems. In order to build effective systems to support Software Engineering activities, Artificial Intelligence techniques are needed. The application of Artificial Intelligence technology to Software Engineering is called Knowledge-based Software Engineering (KBSE). The goal of KBSE is to change the software life cycle such that software maintenance and evolution occur by modifying the specifications and then rederiving the implementation rather than by directly modifying the implementation. The use of domain knowledge in developing KBSE systems is crucial. Our work is mainly related to one area of KBSE that is called automatic specification acquisition. One example is the WATSON prototype on which our current work is based. WATSON is an automatic programming system for formalizing specifications for telephone switching software mainly restricted to POTS, i.e., plain old telephone service. Our current approach differentiates itself from other approaches in two antagonistic ways. On the one hand, we address a large and complex real-world problem instead of a 'toy domain' as in many research prototypes. On the other hand, to allow such scaling, we had to relax the ambitious goal of complete automatic programming, to the easier task of automatic testing.

  18. Induction of a novel damage-specific DNA binding protein correlates with enhanced DNA repair in primate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.; Hirschfeld, S.; Tsang, A.P.; Wagner, M.; Dixon, K.; Levine, A.S. )

    1989-10-01

    Pretreatment of mammalian cell with DNA-damaging agents, such as UV light or mitomycin C, but not the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), results in the enhanced repair of subsequently transfected UV-damaged expression vectors. To determine the cellular factors that are responsible for this enhancement, the authors have used a modified gel retardation assay to detect the proteins that interact with damaged DNA. They have identified a constitutive DNA binding protein in extracts from primate cells that has a high affinity for UV-irradiated double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin, but not TPA or serum starvation, have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA binding (DDB) protein. These results suggest that the signal for induction of DDB protein can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. The induction of DDB protein varies among primate cells with different phenotypes: (1) virus-transformed repair-proficient cells have partially or fully lost the ability to induce DDB protein above constitutive levels; (2) primary cells from repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group C, and transformed XP groups A and D, show constitutive DDB protein, but do not show induced levels of this protein 48 h after UV; and (3) primary and transformed repair-deficient cells from one XP E patient are lacking both the constitutive and the induced DDB activity. The correlation between the induction of the DDB protein and the enhanced repair of UV-damaged expression vectors implies the involvement of the DDB protein in this inducible cellular response.

  19. An Experimental Test of Insect-Mediated Colonisation of Damaged Pinus radiata Trees by Sapstain Fungi

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James K.; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G.; Didham, Raphael K.

    2013-01-01

    Vector-pathogen dynamics play a central role in understanding tree health and forest dynamics. There is substantial evidence that bark beetles act as spore vectors for many species of fungi that cause ‘sapstain’ discolouration of damaged trees and timber. However, the direct quantitative link between vector-mediated spore dispersal and subsequent sapstain colonisation of wood is not fully understood. Here, we used caged versus uncaged experimental logs to test whether the exclusion of bark beetles quantitatively alters the distribution and intensity of sapstain fungal spread within damaged trees. Using generalised linear mixed models, we tested the effect of bark beetle exclusion on sapstain intensity within and among cut logs at two plantation forest sites. Overall, sapstain was found on all logs regardless of caging treatment, indicating that sapstain colonisation can occur (to some degree) without arthropod vectors, probably via wind, rain-splash and, potentially, latent endophytic development. This was supported by the dominance of Diplodia pinea in fungal isolations taken from trees felled at the site, as this fungal species is known to disperse independently of bark beetles. However, the intensity of sapstain within and among experimental logs was significantly greater in uncaged than in caged logs, where beetle colonisation was significantly greater. This appeared to be driven by a significant within-log association between the intensity of staining and the intensity of beetle, and other arthropod, tunnelling and feeding activities. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the dominant mechanism underlying the role of bark beetles in sapstain development in this study system is not vector-mediated spore dispersal, per se, but rather the facilitation of spore entry and hyphal development through tunnelling and feeding activities. We discuss the implications of these findings for forest management and the effective salvage-harvest of trees

  20. An experimental test of insect-mediated colonisation of damaged Pinus radiata trees by sapstain fungi.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James K; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G; Didham, Raphael K

    2013-01-01

    Vector-pathogen dynamics play a central role in understanding tree health and forest dynamics. There is substantial evidence that bark beetles act as spore vectors for many species of fungi that cause 'sapstain' discolouration of damaged trees and timber. However, the direct quantitative link between vector-mediated spore dispersal and subsequent sapstain colonisation of wood is not fully understood. Here, we used caged versus uncaged experimental logs to test whether the exclusion of bark beetles quantitatively alters the distribution and intensity of sapstain fungal spread within damaged trees. Using generalised linear mixed models, we tested the effect of bark beetle exclusion on sapstain intensity within and among cut logs at two plantation forest sites. Overall, sapstain was found on all logs regardless of caging treatment, indicating that sapstain colonisation can occur (to some degree) without arthropod vectors, probably via wind, rain-splash and, potentially, latent endophytic development. This was supported by the dominance of Diplodia pinea in fungal isolations taken from trees felled at the site, as this fungal species is known to disperse independently of bark beetles. However, the intensity of sapstain within and among experimental logs was significantly greater in uncaged than in caged logs, where beetle colonisation was significantly greater. This appeared to be driven by a significant within-log association between the intensity of staining and the intensity of beetle, and other arthropod, tunnelling and feeding activities. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the dominant mechanism underlying the role of bark beetles in sapstain development in this study system is not vector-mediated spore dispersal, per se, but rather the facilitation of spore entry and hyphal development through tunnelling and feeding activities. We discuss the implications of these findings for forest management and the effective salvage-harvest of trees damaged

  1. Laboratory and In Situ Simulation Tests of the Excavation Damaged Zone Around Galleries in Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labiouse, Vincent; Vietor, Tim

    2014-01-01

    In the context of nuclear waste disposal in clay formations, laboratory and in situ simulation experiments were performed to study at reduced scale the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) around tunnels in the indurated Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri, Switzerland. In the laboratory, thick-walled hollow cylindrical specimens were subjected to a mechanical unloading mimicking a gallery excavation. In samples cored parallel to bedding, cracks sub-parallel to the bedding planes open and lead to a buckling failure in two regions that extend from the borehole in the direction normal to bedding. The behaviour is clearly anisotropic. On the other hand, in experiments performed on specimens cored perpendicular to bedding, there is no indication of failure around the hole and the response of the hollow cylinder sample is mainly isotropic. The in situ experiment at Mont Terri which consisted in the overcoring of a resin-injected borehole that follows the bedding strike of the Opalinus Clay showed a striking similarity between the induced damaged zone and the fracture pattern observed in the hollow cylinder tests on samples cored parallel to bedding and such a bedding controlled "Excavation" Damaged Zone is as well consistent with the distinct fracture patterns observed at Mont Terri depending on the orientation of holes/galleries with respect to the bedding planes. Interestingly, the damaged zone observed in the hollow cylinder tests on samples cored parallel to bedding and in situ around URL galleries is found to develop in reverse directions in Boom Clay (Mol) and in Opalinus Clay (Mont Terri). This most probably results from different failure mechanisms, i.e. shear failure along conjugated planes in the plastic Boom Clay, but bedding plane splitting and buckling in the indurated Opalinus Clay.

  2. Criterion Related Validity of Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT)

    PubMed Central

    Chaabene, Helmi; Hachana, Younes; Franchini, Emerson; Tabben, Montassar; Mkaouer, Bessem; Negra, Yassine; Hammami, Mehrez; Chamari, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Karate is one the most popular combat sports in the world. Physical fitness assessment on a regular manner is important for monitoring the effectiveness of the training program and the readiness of karatekas to compete. Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the criterion related to validity of the karate specific aerobic test (KSAT) as an indicator of aerobic level of karate practitioners. Patients and Methods: Cardiorespiratory responses, aerobic performance level through both treadmill laboratory test and YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYoIRTL1) as well as time to exhaustion in the KSAT test (TE’KSAT) were determined in a total of fifteen healthy international karatekas (i.e. karate practitioners) (means ± SD: age: 22.2 ± 4.3 years; height: 176.4 ± 7.5 cm; body mass: 70.3 ± 9.7 kg and body fat: 13.2 ± 6%). Results: Peak heart rate obtained from KSAT represented ~99% of maximal heart rate registered during the treadmill test showing that KSAT imposes high physiological demands. There was no significant correlation between KSAT’s TE and relative (mL/min kg) treadmill maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.14; P = 0.69; [small]). On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between KSAT’s TE and the velocity associated with VO2max (vVO2max) (r = 0.67; P = 0.03; [large]) as well as the velocity at VO2 corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold (vVO2 VAT) (r = 0.64; P = 0.04; [large]). Moreover, significant relationship was found between TE’s KSAT and both the total distance covered and parameters of intermittent endurance measured through YoYoIRTL1. Conclusions: The KSAT has not proved to have indirect criterion related validity as no significant correlations have been found between TE’s KSAT and treadmill VO2max. Nevertheless, as correlated to other aerobic fitness variables, KSAT can be considered as an indicator of karate specific endurance. The establishment of the criterion related validity of the KSAT

  3. Laser-induced damage threshold tests of ultrafast multilayer dielectric coatings in various environmental conditions relevant for operation of ELI beamlines laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ďurák, Michal; Velpula, Praveen Kumar; Kramer, Daniel; Cupal, Josef; Medřík, Tomáš; Hřebíček, Jan; Golasowski, Jiří; Peceli, Davorin; Kozlová, Michaela; Rus, Bedřich

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the laser-induced damage resistance of optical components is one of the major challenges in the development of Peta-watt (PW) class laser systems. The extreme light infrastructure (ELI) beamlines project will provide ultrafast laser systems with peak powers up to 10 PW available every minute and PW class beams at 10 Hz complemented by a 5-TW, 1-kHz beamline. Sustainable performance of PW class laser systems relies on the durability of the employed optical components. As part of an effort to evaluate the damage resistance of components utilized in ELI beamlines systems, damage thresholds of several optical multilayer dielectric coatings were measured with different laser parameters and in different environments. Three coatings were tested with 10 Hz and 1 kHz pulse repetition rates, and the effect of a cleaning treatment on their damage resistance was examined. To explore the damage threshold behavior at different vacuum levels, one coating was subject to tests at various residual gas pressures. No change of damage threshold in a high vacuum with respect to ambient pressure was recorded. The effect of the cleaning treatment was found to be inconsistent, suggesting that development of the optimal cleaning treatment for a given coating requires consideration of its specific properties.

  4. Disorganized behavior on Link's cube test is sensitive to right hemispheric frontal lobe damage in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Bruno; Rösser, Nina; Tabeling, Sandra; Stürenburg, Hans Jörg; de Haan, Bianca; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Wessel, Karl

    2014-01-01

    One of Luria's favorite neuropsychological tasks for challenging frontal lobe functions was Link's cube test (LCT). The LCT is a cube construction task in which the subject must assemble 27 small cubes into one large cube in such a manner that only the painted surfaces of the small cubes are visible. We computed two new LCT composite scores, the constructive plan composite score, reflecting the capability to envisage a cubical-shaped volume, and the behavioral (dis-) organization composite score, reflecting the goal-directedness of cube construction. Voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping (VLBM) was used to test the relationship between performance on the LCT and brain injury in a sample of stroke patients with right hemisphere damage (N = 32), concentrated in the frontal lobe. We observed a relationship between the measure of behavioral (dis-) organization on the LCT and right frontal lesions. Further work in a larger sample, including left frontal lobe damage and with more power to detect effects of right posterior brain injury, is necessary to determine whether this observation is specific for right frontal lesions.

  5. Test-specific control conditions for functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Fahmie, Tara A; Iwata, Brian A; Querim, Angie C; Harper, Jill M

    2013-01-01

    Most functional analyses of problem behavior include a common condition (play or noncontingent reinforcement) as a control for both positive and negative reinforcement. However, test-specific conditions that control for each potential source of reinforcement may be beneficial occasionally. We compared responding during alone, ignore, play, and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) control conditions for individuals whose problem behavior was maintained by positive or negative reinforcement. Results showed that all of the conditions were effective controls for problem behavior maintained by positive reinforcement; however, the DRO condition was consistently ineffective as a control for problem behavior maintained by negative reinforcement. Implications for the design of functional analyses and future research are discussed.

  6. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  7. Timelapse ultrasonic tomography for measuring damage localization in geomechanics laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, Erika; Roux, Philippe; Hall, Stephen A; Viggiani, Giulia M B; Viggiani, Gioacchino

    2015-03-01

    Variation of mechanical properties in materials can be detected non-destructively using ultrasonic measurements. In particular, changes in elastic wave velocity can occur due to damage, i.e., micro-cracking and particles debonding. Here the challenge of characterizing damage in geomaterials, i.e., rocks and soils, is addressed. Geomaterials are naturally heterogeneous media in which the deformation can localize, so that few measurements of acoustic velocity across the sample are not sufficient to capture the heterogeneities. Therefore, an ultrasonic tomography procedure has been implemented to map the spatial and temporal variations in propagation velocity, which provides information on the damage process. Moreover, double beamforming has been successfully applied to identify and isolate multiple arrivals that are caused by strong heterogeneities (natural or induced by the deformation process). The applicability of the developed experimental technique to laboratory geomechanics testing is illustrated using data acquired on a sample of natural rock before and after being deformed under triaxial compression. The approach is then validated and extended to time-lapse monitoring using data acquired during plane strain compression of a sample including a well defined layer with different mechanical properties than the matrix.

  8. Damage Characterization of EBC-SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Imposed Thermal Gradient Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high temperature capabilities, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components are being developed for use in hot-section aerospace engine applications. Harsh engine environments have led to the development of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for silicon-based CMCs to further increase thermal and environmental capabilities. This study aims at understanding the damage mechanisms associated with these materials under simulated operating conditions. A high heat-flux laser testing rig capable of imposing large through-thickness thermal gradients by means of controlled laser beam heating and back-side air cooling is used. Tests are performed on uncoated composites, as well as CMC substrates that have been coated with state-of-the-art ceramic EBC systems. Results show that the use of the EBCs may help increase temperature capability and creep resistance by reducing the effects of stressed oxidation and environmental degradation. Also, the ability of electrical resistance (ER) and acoustic emission (AE) measurements to monitor material condition and damage state during high temperature testing is shown; suggesting their usefulness as a valuable health monitoring technique. Micromechanics models are used to describe the localized stress state of the composite system, which is utilized along with ER modeling concepts to develop an electromechanical model capable of characterizing material behavior.

  9. Test simulation of neutron damage to electronic components using accelerator facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. B.; Fleming, R. M.; Bielejec, E. S.; McDonald, J. K.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate equivalent bipolar transistor damage response to neutrons and silicon ions. We report on irradiation tests performed at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor, the SNL SPHINX accelerator, and the SNL Ion Beam Laboratory using commercial silicon npn bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and III-V Npn heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Late time and early time gain metrics as well as defect spectra measurements are reported.

  10. Testing the specificity between social anxiety disorder and drinking motives.

    PubMed

    Windle, Michael; Windle, Rebecca C

    2012-09-01

    This study tested the specificity of the relationship between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and coping drinking motives (versus enhancement drinking motives and social drinking motives) within the context of a range of potentially confounding variables measured during adolescence (e.g., quantity and frequency of alcohol use, coping drinking motives) and substantively important variables assessed during young adulthood (e.g., other anxiety disorders and major depressive disorder). A sample of high school sophomores and juniors (n=717) completed measures of substance use and risk factors during adolescence and were then prospectively followed-up in early- and middle-young adulthood, and psychiatric diagnoses and drinking motives (i.e., coping, enhancement, and social) were assessed each time. Findings indicated that SAD was specifically related to coping motives (measured during early-to-middle young adulthood) after controlling for the effects of a range of alcohol and mental health variables. In addition, adolescent variables predicted young adult drinking motives as did major depressive disorder and other anxiety disorders. These findings are discussed within a conceptual framework of the functional role (e.g., self-medication) that drinking motives, and especially coping drinking motives, may play in the etiology of alcohol problems and disorders. Implications for prevention and treatment interventions are discussed.

  11. Local strain and damage mapping in single trabeculae during three-point bending tests.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, R; Szabo, M E; Schitter, G; Tang, Raymond Yue-Sing; Vashishth, D; Hansma, P K; Thurner, P J

    2011-05-01

    The use of bone mineral density as a surrogate to diagnose bone fracture risk in individuals is of limited value. However, there is growing evidence that information on trabecular microarchitecture can improve the assessment of fracture risk. One current strategy is to exploit finite element analysis (FEA) applied to 3D image data of several mm-sized trabecular bone structures obtained from non-invasive imaging modalities for the prediction of apparent mechanical properties. However, there is a lack of FE damage models, based on solid experimental facts, which are needed to validate such approaches and to provide criteria marking elastic-plastic deformation transitions as well as microdamage initiation and accumulation. In this communication, we present a strategy that could elegantly lead to future damage models for FEA: direct measurements of local strains involved in microdamage initiation and plastic deformation in single trabeculae. We use digital image correlation to link stress whitening in bone, reported to be correlated to microdamage, to quantitative local strain values. Our results show that the whitening zones, i.e. damage formation, in the presented loading case of a three-point bending test correlate best with areas of elevated tensile strains oriented parallel to the long axis of the samples. The average local strains along this axis were determined to be (1.6±0.9)% at whitening onset and (12±4)% just prior to failure. Overall, our data suggest that damage initiation in trabecular bone is asymmetric in tension and compression, with failure originating and propagating over a large range of tensile strains.

  12. Local strain and damage mapping in single trabeculae during three-point bending tests

    PubMed Central

    Jungmann, R.; Szabo, M.E.; Schitter, G.; Tang, Raymond Yue-Sing; Vashishth, D.; Hansma, P.K.; Thurner, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of bone mineral density as a surrogate to diagnose bone fracture risk in individuals is of limited value. However, there is growing evidence that information on trabecular microarchitecture can improve the assessment of fracture risk. One current strategy is to exploit finite element analysis (FEA) applied to 3D image data of several mm-sized trabecular bone structures obtained from non-invasive imaging modalities for the prediction of apparent mechanical properties. However, there is a lack of FE damage models, based on solid experimental facts, which are needed to validate such approaches and to provide criteria marking elastic–plastic deformation transitions as well as microdamage initiation and accumulation. In this communication, we present a strategy that could elegantly lead to future damage models for FEA: direct measurements of local strains involved in microdamage initiation and plastic deformation in single trabeculae. We use digital image correlation to link stress whitening in bone, reported to be correlated to microdamage, to quantitative local strain values. Our results show that the whitening zones, i.e. damage formation, in the presented loading case of a three-point bending test correlate best with areas of elevated tensile strains oriented parallel to the long axis of the samples. The average local strains along this axis were determined to be (1.6 ± 0.9)% at whitening onset and (12 ± 4)% just prior to failure. Overall, our data suggest that damage initiation in trabecular bone is asymmetric in tension and compression, with failure originating and propagating over a large range of tensile strains. PMID:21396601

  13. Repeat Prostate-Specific Antigen Tests Before Prostate Biopsy Decisions.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Tobias; Adolfsson, Jan; Grönberg, Henrik; Eklund, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Despite limited scientific support, a repeat prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test before prostate biopsy decisions is common. We analyzed biopsy outcomes in 1686 men from the STHLM3 study with PSA 3-10 ng/mL and two PSA tests taken within eight weeks and before prostate biopsy using percentages and multinomial logistic regression. We found that omitting prostate biopsy for men with PSA values decreasing to PSAs of 3 ng/mL or less would save 16.8% of biopsy procedures, while missing 5.4% of the cancers with Gleason scores (GSs) of 7 or higher. The proportion of cancers with GSs of 6 or lower was independent of the first PSA value, as well as of PSA change. Also, the risk of tumors with GSs of 7 or higher decreased with both decreasing and increasing PSA levels: It was 18.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 16.3% to 20.9%) for men with PSA changes of less than 20%, 12.1% (95% CI = 8.0% to 16.2%) for men with PSA levels increasing at least 20%, and 6.6% (95% CI = 3.8% to 9.3%) for men with PSA levels decreasing at least 20%.

  14. Cell cycle stage-specific roles of Rad18 in tolerance and repair of oxidative DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Durando, Michael; Smith-Roe, Stephanie L.; Sproul, Chris; Greenwalt, Alicia M.; Kaufmann, William; Oh, Sehyun; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2013-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 mediates tolerance of replication fork-stalling bulky DNA lesions, but whether Rad18 mediates tolerance of bulky DNA lesions acquired outside S-phase is unclear. Using synchronized cultures of primary human cells, we defined cell cycle stage-specific contributions of Rad18 to genome maintenance in response to ultraviolet C (UVC) and H2O2-induced DNA damage. UVC and H2O2 treatments both induced Rad18-mediated proliferating cell nuclear antigen mono-ubiquitination during G0, G1 and S-phase. Rad18 was important for repressing H2O2-induced (but not ultraviolet-induced) double strand break (DSB) accumulation and ATM S1981 phosphorylation only during G1, indicating a specific role for Rad18 in processing of oxidative DNA lesions outside S-phase. However, H2O2-induced DSB formation in Rad18-depleted G1 cells was not associated with increased genotoxin sensitivity, indicating that back-up DSB repair mechanisms compensate for Rad18 deficiency. Indeed, in DNA LigIV-deficient cells Rad18-depletion conferred H2O2-sensitivity, demonstrating functional redundancy between Rad18 and non-homologous end joining for tolerance of oxidative DNA damage acquired during G1. In contrast with G1-synchronized cultures, S-phase cells were H2O2-sensitive following Rad18-depletion. We conclude that although Rad18 pathway activation by oxidative lesions is not restricted to S-phase, Rad18-mediated trans-lesion synthesis by Polη is dispensable for damage-tolerance in G1 (because of back-up non-homologous end joining-mediated DSB repair), yet Rad18 is necessary for damage tolerance during S-phase. PMID:23295675

  15. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wady, P. T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S. M.; Smith, A. D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S. M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5-6 cm2, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  16. Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Marbury, Justin Luke

    2006-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).

  17. Site-specific DNA damage induced by sulfite in the presence of cobalt(II) ion. Role of sulfate radical.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, S; Yamamoto, K; Inoue, S

    1989-10-15

    The reactivities of sulfite (SO23-) with DNA in the presence of metal ions were investigated by a DNA sequencing technique using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from human c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene. Sulfite caused DNA damage in the presence of Co2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+, although sulfite alone or metal ion alone did not. The order of inducing effect on sulfite-dependent DNA damage (Co2+ much greater than Cu2+ greater than Mn2+ Fe3+) was consistent with that of accelerating effect on the initial oxygen consumption rate of sulfite autoxidation. The DNA damage induced by sulfite plus Co2+ was inhibited by 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrobenzenesulfonate, primary and secondary alchols, whereas it was not inhibited by SOD, catalase and tert-butyl alcohol. Incubation of DNA with sulfite plus Co2+ followed by the piperidine treatment led to the predominant cleavage at the positions of guanine especially located 5' to guanine. Sulfite plus Cu2+ gave a DNA cleavage pattern different from that induced by sulfite plus Co2+. The photolysis of peroxydisulfate (S2O28-), which is known to produce SO-4 radicals, gave a DNA cleavage pattern similar to that induced by sulfite plus Co2+. ESR studies using spin-trapping reagent revealed the production of spin adduct possibly of SO-3 radical in a solution of sulfite plus Cu2+, whereas much less spin adduct was produced by sulfite plus Co2+. The results suggest that sulfite is rapidly autoxidized in the presence of Co2+ to produce SO4- radical causing site-specific DNA damage.

  18. Damaged-self recognition in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) shows taxonomic specificity and triggers signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS)

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Flores, Dalia; Heil, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Plants require reliable mechanisms to detect injury. Danger signals or “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs) are released from stressed host cells and allow injury detection independently of enemy-derived molecules. We studied the response of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to the application of leaf homogenate as a source of DAMPs and measured the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an early response and the secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN) as a jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent late response. We observed a strong taxonomic signal in the response to different leaf homogenates. ROS formation and EFN secretion were highly correlated and responded most strongly to leaf homogenates produced using the same cultivar or closely related accessions, less to a distantly related cultivar of common bean or each of the two congeneric species, P. lunatus and P. coccineus, and not at all to homogenates prepared from species in different genera, not even when using other Fabaceae. Interestingly, leaf homogenates also reduced the infection by the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, when they were applied directly before challenging, although the same homogenates exhibited no direct in vitro inhibitory effect in the bacterium. We conclude that ROS signaling is associated to the induction of EFN secretion and that the specific blend of DAMPs that are released from damaged cells allows the plant to distinguish the “damaged-self” from the damaged “non-self.” The very early responses of plants to DAMPs can trigger resistance to both, herbivores and pathogens, which should be adaptive because injury facilitates infection, independently of its causal reason. PMID:25400650

  19. Process compensated resonance testing modeling for damage evolution and uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Eric; Heffernan, Julieanne; Mayes, Alexander; Gatewood, Garrett; Jauriqui, Leanne; Goodlet, Brent; Pollock, Tresa; Torbet, Chris; Aldrin, John C.; Mazdiyasni, Siamack

    2017-02-01

    Process Compensated Resonance Testing (PCRT) is a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method based on the fundamentals of Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). PCRT is used for material characterization, defect detection, process control and life monitoring of critical gas turbine engine and aircraft components. Forward modeling and model inversion for PCRT have the potential to greatly increase the method's material characterization capability while reducing its dependence on compiling a large population of physical resonance measurements. This paper presents progress on forward modeling studies for damage mechanisms and defects in common to structural materials for gas turbine engines. Finite element method (FEM) models of single crystal (SX) Ni-based superalloy Mar-M247 dog bones and Ti-6Al-4V cylindrical bars were created, and FEM modal analyses calculated the resonance frequencies for the samples in their baseline condition. Then the frequency effects of superalloy creep (high-temperature plastic deformation) and macroscopic texture (preferred crystallographic orientation of grains detrimental to fatigue properties) were evaluated. A PCRT sorting module for creep damage in Mar-M247 was trained with a virtual database made entirely of modeled design points. The sorting module demonstrated successful discrimination of design points with as little as 1% creep strain in the gauge section from a population of acceptable design points with a range of material and geometric variation. The resonance frequency effects of macro-scale texture in Ti-6Al-4V were quantified with forward models of cylinder samples. FEM-based model inversion was demonstrated for Mar-M247 bulk material properties and variations in crystallographic orientation. PCRT uncertainty quantification (UQ) was performed using Monte Carlo studies for Mar-M247 that quantified the overall uncertainty in resonance frequencies resulting from coupled variation in geometry, material properties, crystallographic

  20. Dose-rate plays a significant role in synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced damage of rodent testes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Ban; Wang, Caixia; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yingxin; Hong, Yunyi; Fu, Shen; Wu, Fan; Ying, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray has significant potential for applications in medical imaging and cancer treatment. However, the mechanisms underlying SR X-ray-induced tissue damage remain unclear. Previous studies on regular X-ray-induced tissue damage have suggested that dose-rate could affect radiation damage. Because SR X-ray has exceedingly high dose-rate compared to regular X-ray, it remains to be determined if dose-rate may affect SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. We used rodent testes as a model to investigate the role of dose-rate in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. One day after SR X-ray irradiation, we determined the effects of the irradiation of the same dosage at two different dose-rates, 0.11 Gy/s and 1.1 Gy/s, on TUNEL signals, caspase-3 activation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of the testes. Compared to those produced by the irradiation at 0.11 Gy/s, irradiation at 1.1 Gy/s produced higher levels of DSBs, TUNEL signals, and caspase-3 activation in the testes. Our study has provided the first evidence suggesting that dose-rate could be a significant factor in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage, which may establish a valuable base for utilizing this factor to manipulate the tissue damage in SR X-ray-based medical applications. PMID:28078052

  1. Dose-rate plays a significant role in synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced damage of rodent testes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Ban; Wang, Caixia; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yingxin; Hong, Yunyi; Fu, Shen; Wu, Fan; Ying, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray has significant potential for applications in medical imaging and cancer treatment. However, the mechanisms underlying SR X-ray-induced tissue damage remain unclear. Previous studies on regular X-ray-induced tissue damage have suggested that dose-rate could affect radiation damage. Because SR X-ray has exceedingly high dose-rate compared to regular X-ray, it remains to be determined if dose-rate may affect SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. We used rodent testes as a model to investigate the role of dose-rate in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. One day after SR X-ray irradiation, we determined the effects of the irradiation of the same dosage at two different dose-rates, 0.11 Gy/s and 1.1 Gy/s, on TUNEL signals, caspase-3 activation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of the testes. Compared to those produced by the irradiation at 0.11 Gy/s, irradiation at 1.1 Gy/s produced higher levels of DSBs, TUNEL signals, and caspase-3 activation in the testes. Our study has provided the first evidence suggesting that dose-rate could be a significant factor in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage, which may establish a valuable base for utilizing this factor to manipulate the tissue damage in SR X-ray-based medical applications.

  2. The use of experimental bending tests to more accurate numerical description of TBC damage process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, T.; Golewski, P.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been extensively used in aircraft engines to protect critical engine parts such as blades and combustion chambers, which are exposed to high temperatures and corrosive environment. The blades of turbine engines are additionally exposed to high mechanical loads. These loads are created by the high rotational speed of the rotor (30 000 rot/min), causing the tensile and bending stresses. Therefore, experimental testing of coated samples is necessary in order to determine strength properties of TBCs. Beam samples with dimensions 50×10×2 mm were used in those studies. The TBC system consisted of 150 μm thick bond coat (NiCoCrAlY) and 300 μm thick top coat (YSZ) made by APS (air plasma spray) process. Samples were tested by three-point bending test with various loads. After bending tests, the samples were subjected to microscopic observation to determine the quantity of cracks and their depth. The above mentioned results were used to build numerical model and calibrate material data in Abaqus program. Brittle cracking damage model was applied for the TBC layer, which allows to remove elements after reaching criterion. Surface based cohesive behavior was used to model the delamination which may occur at the boundary between bond coat and top coat.

  3. Comparison of two anaerobic water polo-specific tests with the Wingate test.

    PubMed

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Marrin, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to compare 2 water polo-specific tests-the 14 x 25-m swims (SWIM) and the 30-second crossbar jumps (30CJ)-with a laboratory-based test of anaerobic power, the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT). Thirteen elite women's water polo players (mean +/- SD: age 22.0 +/- 4.4 years, height 168.7 +/- 7.9 cm, body mass 65.9 +/- 6.1 kg, body fat 23.6 +/- 3.5 %, maximum oxygen uptake 51.4 +/- 4.5 mlxkgxmin) participated in the study. The SWIM involved 14 repeated "all-out" sprints every 30 seconds. Swimming time was recorded, and sprint velocity, mean velocity (Vmean), and the gradient of the linear regression equation (GRADIENT) were calculated. The 30CJ involved repeated in-water water polo jumps and touching the goal crossbar with both hands. The number of touches in 30 seconds was recorded. Additionally, the subjects completed a 30-second WAnT, and mean power (Mp) and fatigue index (FI) were calculated. Kendall tau (tau) rank correlation was used to examine for correlation between ranks. Significance level was set at p specific tests. It was suggested that the WAnT may not be an appropriate evaluation tool for anaerobic power assessment of water polo players, stressing the importance of sport-specific tests.

  4. Site-specifically modified oligodeoxynucleotides as probes for the structural and biological effect of DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, A.K.; Essigmann, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This review critically analyzes the state of knowledge on the preparation, characterization, and uses of site-specifically modified DNA segments. Although these substrates have begun to have an impact upon several fields, the review focuses upon their applications in site-directed mutagenesis studies and for defining the effect of chemical damage upon DNA structure. Oligonucleotides have been synthesized containing alkylated DNA bases, aromatic amine adducts, base oxidation products, cyclic nucleic acid adducts, model apurinic/apyrimidinic sites, UV and psoralen photoadducts, and several antitumor drug-DNA covalent complexes. Below, the authors shall describe the progress to date on synthesis of site-specifically modified DNA segments and how these oligonucleotides have been used to further their understanding of the roles of individual DNA adducts in toxicology. The structures of the DNA adducts and adduct-derived products discussed in this review are presented. 168 references.

  5. Sequence-specific photoinduced c-fos gene damage mediated by triple stranded-forming oligonucleotide conjugated to psoralen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, En-Hua; Wang, Ju-jun; Ma, Wenjian; Qin, Jingfen

    1999-09-01

    A psoralen-oligonucleotide conjugate was designed to photoinduce a cross-link at a specific sequence of c-fos oncogene. Psoralen was attached to its C-3 position of a 20-base mer oligonucleotide, which binds to a synthetic 49 bp duplex containing the c-fos gene polypurine site, where it forms a triple stranded DNA. Upon near-UV-irradiation, the two strand of DNA are crosslinked at the TpA step present at the triple-duplex junction. Results show that the yield of the photoinduce cross- linking reaction is quite high. We treated HeLa cells with above 2-mer oligonucleotide conjugated to psoralen. The expression of c-fos oncogene was significant reduced, no significant effect on the level of c-myc mRNA. These data indicate that such psoralen- oligonucleotide conjugates could be used to selectively control gene expression or to induce sequence-specific damages.

  6. Initial stages of cavitation damage and erosion on copper and brass tested in a rotating disk device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, B. C. S.; Rao, N. S. L.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the differences in flow and experimental conditions, there has been a continuing debate as to whether or not the ultrasonic method of producing cavitation damage is similar to the damage occurring in cavitating flow systems, namely, venturi and rotating disk devices. In this paper, the progress of cavitation damage during incubation periods on polycrystalline copper and brass tested in a rotating disk device is presented. The results indicate several similarities and differences in the damage mechanism encountered in a rotating disk device (which simulates field rotary devices) and a magnetostriction apparatus. The macroscopic erosion appears similar to that in the vibratory device except for nonuniform erosion and apparent plastic flow during the initial damage phase.

  7. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenMoussa, A.; Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Saito, T.; Averin, S.; Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B.; Berger, G.; Kroth, U.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Gottwald, A.

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal-semiconductor-metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3-6 pA/cm2). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 1011 protons/cm2.

  8. Reliability and Factorial Validity of Non-Specific and Tennis-Specific Pre-Planned Agility Tests; Preliminary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sekulic, Damir; Uljevic, Ognjen; Peric, Mia; Spasic, Miodrag; Kondric, Miran

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Agility is an important quality in tennis, yet there is an evident lack of studies focussing on the applicability of tennis-specific agility performances and comparing them to equivalent non-specific agility performances. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and factorial validity of three tests of pre-planned agility, performed in specific (with a tennis racquet) and non-specific (without a tennis racquet) conditions. The sample consisted of 33 tennis players (13 males and 20 females; age: 18.3 ± 1.1 years and 18.6 ± 1.3 years; body height: 185.4 ± 51 cm and 169.3 ± 4.2 cm, 74.0 ± 4.4 kg and 61.2 ± 3.1 kg, respectively). The variables comprised three agility tests: a 20-yard test, a T-test and the Illinois test, all performed in both specific and non-specific conditions. Between-subject and within-subject reliability were found to be high (Cronbach Alpha: 0.93 to 0.98; Coefficient of Variation: 3 to 8%), with better within-subject reliability and stability of the measurement for specific tests. Pearson’s product moment correlations between the non-specific and specific agility performances were high (r ≥0.84), while factor analysis extracted only one significant latent dimension on the basis of the Guttman-Kaiser criterion. The results of the 20-yard test were better when the test was conducted in the specific conditions (t-test = 2.66; p < 0.05). For the Illinois test, superior results were recorded in the non-specific conditions (t-test = 2.96; p < 0.05), which can be explained by the test duration (about 20 s) and non-specific locomotion forms such as rotational movements. Considering the findings of the present study, when testing tennis-specific pre-planned agility, we suggest using tests of short duration (less than 10 s) and sport-specific types of locomotion. PMID:28210343

  9. End User Acceptance - Requirements or Specifications, Certification, Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2013-01-01

    NASA follows top level safety requirement of two-failure tolerance (t hree levels of controls or design for minimum risk) to all catastroph ic hazards in the design of safe li-ion batteries for space use. ? R igorous development testing at appropriate levels to credible offnominal conditions and review of test data. ? Implement robust design con trols based on test results and test again to confirm safety at the a ppropriate levels. ? Stringent testing of all (100%) flight batteries (from button cells to large batteries).

  10. Repair of oxidatively induced DNA damage by DNA glycosylases: Mechanisms of action, substrate specificities and excision kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Coskun, Erdem; Jaruga, Pawel

    Endogenous and exogenous reactive species cause oxidatively induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. As a result, a plethora of mutagenic and/or cytotoxic products are formed in cellular DNA. This type of DNA damage is repaired by base excision repair, although nucleotide excision repair also plays a limited role. DNA glycosylases remove modified DNA bases from DNA by hydrolyzing the glycosidic bond leaving behind an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. Some of them also possess an accompanying AP-lyase activity that cleaves the sugar-phosphate chain of DNA. Since the first discovery of a DNA glycosylase, many studies have elucidated the mechanisms of action, substrate specificities and excision kinetics of these enzymes present in all living organisms. For this purpose, most studies used single- or double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides with a single DNA lesion embedded at a defined position. High-molecular weight DNA with multiple base lesions has been used in other studies with the advantage of the simultaneous investigation of many DNA base lesions as substrates. Differences between the substrate specificities and excision kinetics of DNA glycosylases have been found when these two different substrates were used. Some DNA glycosylases possess varying substrate specificities for either purine-derived lesions or pyrimidine-derived lesions, whereas others exhibit cross-activity for both types of lesions. Laboratory animals with knockouts of the genes of DNA glycosylases have also been used to provide unequivocal evidence for the substrates, which had previously been found in in vitro studies, to be the actual substrates in vivo as well. On the basis of the knowledge gained from the past studies, efforts are being made to discover small molecule inhibitors of DNA glycosylases that may be used as potential drugs in cancer therapy.

  11. Flight Test of an Adaptive Controller and Simulated Failure/Damage on the NASA NF-15B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschbacher, Mark; Maliska, Heather

    2006-01-01

    The method of flight-testing the Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Second Generation (Gen-2) project on the NASA NF-15B is herein described. The Gen-2 project objective includes flight-testing a dynamic inversion controller augmented by a direct adaptive neural network to demonstrate performance improvements in the presence of simulated failure/damage. The Gen-2 objectives as implemented on the NASA NF-15B created challenges for software design, structural loading limitations, and flight test operations. Simulated failure/damage is introduced by modifying control surface commands, therefore requiring structural loads measurements. Flight-testing began with the validation of a structural loads model. Flight-testing of the Gen-2 controller continued, using test maneuvers designed in a sequenced approach. Success would clear the new controller with respect to dynamic response, simulated failure/damage, and with adaptation on and off. A handling qualities evaluation was conducted on the capability of the Gen-2 controller to restore aircraft response in the presence of a simulated failure/damage. Control room monitoring of loads sensors, flight dynamics, and controller adaptation, in addition to postflight data comparison to the simulation, ensured a safe methodology of buildup testing. Flight-testing continued without major incident to accomplish the project objectives, successfully uncovering strengths and weaknesses of the Gen-2 control approach in flight.

  12. Comparison of the Bender Gestalt Test for Both Black and White Brain-Damaged Patients Using Two Scoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Oliver T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study tested for cultural bias in the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test. Subjects were 72 black and white patients diagnosed as either brain damaged or psychiatric. Bender protocols were scored by Pascal-Suttell and Hain systems. No race effect appeared except for the Pascal-Suttell system for which blacks scored significantly better. (Author)

  13. Content Specifications of a Test and Generalizability Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Tamayo, Eulogio

    The concepts of universe of admissible observation and universe of generalization from the generalizability theory were applied to calculate the intraclass correlation coefficient of a licensure test. The internal consistency coefficient of a dichotomously scored test is identical to the intraclass correlation coefficient of a two-facet design.…

  14. 30 CFR 7.86 - Test equipment and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 7.86 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING...-3.2 (3) The test fuel temperature at the inlet to the diesel engine's fuel injection pump shall be... and V12; (x) Heated Flow Control Valves—V14 and V18; (xi) Pump—Sample Transfer Pump; (xii)...

  15. Intrahepatic virus-specific IL-10-producing CD8 T cells prevent liver damage during chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Abel, Michal; Sène, Damien; Pol, Stanislas; Bourlière, Marc; Poynard, Thierry; Charlotte, Frédéric; Cacoub, Patrice; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2006-12-01

    CD8 T cell killing of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected hepatocytes is thought to contribute to liver damage during chronic HCV infection, whereas the participation of HCV-nonspecific immune cells is unclear. To visualize the spatial relationship of HCV-specific CD8 T cells with parenchymal target cells, and to examine their local functional activity in relation to hepatocellular necrosis and fibrosis, we used HLA tetramers and confocal microscopy in biopsies from 23 HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 patients with chronic HCV infection. Intrahepatic tetramer+ (HCV-specific) CD8 T cells protected from hepatic necroinflammatory disease activity, independently of age, gender, viral load, and viral genotype. Indeed, tetramer+ cells were scattered in the liver within regions of weak fibrosis (low laminin expression) and low hepatocellular apoptosis (TUNEL method), and expressed IL-10 but not IFNgamma. By contrast, tetramer-negative CD8 T cells were associated with active necroinflammatory liver disease, colocalized with strong laminin expression and hepatocellular apoptosis, and expressed more frequently IFNgamma than IL-10. Overall, liver regions harboring HCV-specific CD8 T cells tended to be healthier than areas containing only inflammatory cells of undefined specificity. In conclusion, HCV-specific IL-10-producing CD8 T cells, although not cytotoxic and unable to control viral replication, can attenuate hepatocellular necrosis, liver fibrosis, and inflammation mediated by bystander T cells, and may thus represent antigen-induced regulatory CD8 T cells. Therapeutic modulation of the intrahepatic balance between specific and bystander CD8 T cells might be beneficial in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  16. Sensory-specific satiation with a pinched nose and eyes closed: testing the sensory modality specificity of satiation.

    PubMed

    Havermans, Remco C; Mallach, Anna-Theresa

    2014-02-01

    Sensory-specific satiation refers to the decrease in pleasantness derived from a consumed food relative to other unconsumed foods. In the current study, it was investigated to what extent sensory-specific satiation is modality specific. To this end, 80 female participants ate a preferred snack until full while wearing (or not wearing) a blindfold and/or a nose clip. Impaired vision should impede satiation for the appearance of the consumed test snack. Obstructing olfaction should undermine satiation for the smell of the test snack. Indeed, when vision was obstructed, hedonic ratings of specifically snack appearance did not decrease as much. When olfaction was blocked, the hedonic ratings for the flavor of the test snack did not show as much of a reduction. It is concluded that, to a degree, sensory-specific satiation is indeed modality specific.

  17. Damage Assessment of Creep Tested and Thermally Aged Metallic Alloys Using Acousto-Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years emphasis has been placed on the early detection of material changes experienced in turbine powerplant components. During the scheduled overhaul of a turbine, the current techniques of examination of various hot section components aim to find flaws such as cracks, wear, and erosion, as well as excessive deformations. Thus far, these localized damage modes have been detected with satisfactory results. However, the techniques used to find these flaws provide no information on life until the flaws are actually detected. Major improvements in damage assessment, safety, as well as more accurate life prediction could be achieved if nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques could be utilized to sense material changes that occur prior to the localized defects mentioned. Because of elevated temperatures and excessive stresses, turbine components may experience creep behavior. As a result, it is desirable to monitor and access the current condition of such components. Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center involves developing and utilizing an NDE technique that discloses distributed material changes that occur prior to the localized damage detected by the current methods of inspection. In a recent study, creep processes in a nickel-base alloy were the life-limiting condition of interest, and the NDE technique was acousto-ultrasonics (AU). AU is an NDE technique that utilizes two ultrasonic transducers to interrogate the condition of a test specimen. The sending transducer introduces an ultrasonic pulse at a point on the surface of the specimen while a receiving transducer detects the signal after it has passed through the material. The goal of the method is to correlate certain parameters of the detected waveform to characteristics of the material between the two transducers. Here, the waveform parameter of interest is the attenuation due to internal damping for which information is being garnered from the frequency domain. The parameters utilized to

  18. Damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1): a protein with a wide range of functions.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2011-12-01

    Damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) is a multifunctional protein that was first isolated as a subunit of a heterodimeric complex that recognises the UV-induced DNA lesions in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. DDB1 and DDB2 form a complex that promotes the global genome repair (GG-NER), whereas DDB1 and Cockayne syndrome group A protein (CSA) form a complex that contributes to the transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) pathway. DDB1 is also a component of an ubiquitin-E3 ligase complex and functions as substrate or adapter protein between Cullin 4A (Cul4A) and CUL4-associated factors (DCAFs) to target substrates for ubiquitination. CUL4-DDB1 E3-ligase complex regulates the selective proteolysis of key proteins in DNA repair, replication and transcription. In addition, DDB1 plays a role in transcriptional regulation of UV-induced genes. It is conceivable that DDB1 acts as a sensor of damage to maintain the balance between genome integrity and cell cycle progression. However, the temporal order between these two events remains to be established.

  19. Swim training does not protect mice from skeletal muscle oxidative damage following a maximum exercise test.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Tatiane Oliveira; Cleto, Lorena Sabino; Gioda, Carolina Rosa; Silva, Renata Sabino; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; de Sousa-Franco, Junia; de Magalhães, José Carlos; Penaforte, Claudia Lopes; Pinto, Kelerson Mauro de Castro; Cruz, Jader dos Santos; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2012-07-01

    We investigated whether swim training protects skeletal muscle from oxidative damage in response to a maximum progressive exercise. First, we investigated the effect of swim training on the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), in the gastrocnemius muscle of C57Bl/6 mice, 48 h after the last training session. Mice swam for 90 min, twice a day, for 5 weeks at 31°C (± 1°C). The activities of SOD and CAT were increased in trained mice (P < 0.05) compared to untrained group. However, no effect of training was observed in the activity of GPx. In a second experiment, trained and untrained mice were submitted to a maximum progressive swim test. Compared to control mice (untrained, not acutely exercised), malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were increased in the skeletal muscle of both trained and untrained mice after maximum swim. The activity of GPx was increased in the skeletal muscle of both trained and untrained mice, while SOD activity was increased only in trained mice after maximum swimming. CAT activity was increased only in the untrained compared to the control group. Although the trained mice showed increased activity of citrate synthase in skeletal muscle, swim performance was not different compared to untrained mice. Our results show an imbalance in the activities of SOD, CAT and GPx in response to swim training, which could account for the oxidative damage observed in the skeletal muscle of trained mice in response to maximum swim, resulting in the absence of improved exercise performance.

  20. Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Masanobu; Lee, Sungchil; Kim, Sehwan; Chou, Pai H.

    2011-04-01

    Early detection of pipeline damages has been highlighted in water supply industry. Water pressure change in pipeline due to a sudden rupture causes pipe to vibrate and the pressure change propagates through the pipeline. From the measurement of pipe vibration the rupture can be detected. In this paper, the field test results and observations are provided for implementing next generation of SCADA system for pipeline rupture detection. Two field tests were performed on real buried plastic and metal pipelines for rupture detection. The rupture was simulated by introducing sudden water pressure drop caused by water blow-off and valve control. The measured acceleration data at the pipe surfaces were analyzed in both time and frequency domain. In time domain, the sudden narrow increase of acceleration amplitude was used as an indication of rupture event. For the frequency domain analysis, correlation function and the short time Fourier Transform technique were adopted to trace the dominant frequency shift. The success of rupture detection was found to be dependent on several factors. From the frequency analysis, the dominant frequency of metal water pipe was shifted by the water pressure drop, however, it was hard to identify from the plastic pipeline. Also the influence of existing facility such as airvac on pipe vibrations was observed. Finally, several critical lessons learned in the viewpoint of field measurement are discussed in this paper.

  1. Full-Scale Test and Analysis Results of a PRSEUS Fuselage Panel to Assess Damage Containment Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Lovejoy, Andrew; Jegley, Dawn; Linton, Kim; Neal, Bert; Korkosz, Gregory; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2012-01-01

    Integrally stitched composite technology is an area that shows promise in enhancing the structural integrity of aircraft and aerospace structures. The most recent generation of this technology is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. The goal of the PRSEUS concept relevant to this test is to provide damage containment capability for composite structures while reducing overall structural weight. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and The Boeing Company have partnered in an effort to assess the damage containment features of a full-scale curved PRSEUS panel using the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. A single PRSEUS test panel was subjected to axial tension, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loads. The test results showed excellent performance of the PRSEUS concept. No growth of Barely Visible Impact Damage (BVID) was observed after ultimate loads were applied. With a two-bay notch severing the central stringer, damage was contained within the two-bay region well above the required limit load conditions. Catastrophic failure was well above the ultimate load level. Information describing the test panel and procedure has been previously presented, so this paper focuses on the experimental procedure, test results, nondestructive inspection results, and preliminary test and analysis correlation.

  2. Hemispheric specificity for proprioception: Postural control of standing following right or left hemisphere damage during ankle tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Noémie C; Maynard, Luc; Abbas, Djawad; Mesure, Serge

    2015-11-02

    Right brain damage (RBD) following stroke often causes significant postural instability. In standing (without vision), patients with RBD are more unstable than those with left brain damage (LBD). We hypothesised that this postural instability would relate to the cortical integration of proprioceptive afferents. The aim of this study was to use tendon vibration to investigate whether these changes were specific to the paretic or non-paretic limbs. 14 LBD, 12 RBD patients and 20 healthy subjects were included. Displacement of the Centre of Pressure (CoP) was recorded during quiet standing, then during 3 vibration conditions (80 Hz - 20s): paretic limb, non-paretic limb (left and right limbs for control subjects) and bilateral. Vibration was applied separately to the peroneal and Achilles tendons. Mean antero-posterior position of the CoP, variability and velocity were calculated before (4s), during and after (24s) vibration. For all parameters, the strongest perturbation was during Achilles vibrations. The Achilles non-paretic condition induced a larger backward displacement than the Achilles paretic condition. This condition caused specific behaviour on the velocity: the LBD group was perturbed at the onset of the vibrations, but gradually recovered their stability; the RBD group was significantly perturbed thereafter. After bilateral Achilles vibration, RBD patients required the most time to restore initial posture. The reduction in use of information from the paretic limb may be a central strategy to deal with risk-of-fall situations such as during Achilles vibration. The postural behaviour is profoundly altered by lesions of the right hemisphere when proprioception is perturbed.

  3. Cell fixation in zinc salt solution is compatible with DNA damage response detection by phospho-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Li, Jiangwei; Traganos, Frank; Halicka, H Dorota; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jurek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2011-06-01

    By virtue of superior preservation of proteins and nucleic acids the zinc salt-based fixatives (ZBF) has been proposed as an alternative to precipitants and cross-linking fixatives in histopathology. It was recently reported that ZBF is compatible with analysis of cell surface immunophenotype and detection of intracellular epitopes by flow cytometry. The aim of this study was to explore whether ZBF is also compatible with the detection of DNA damage response assessed by phospho-specific antibodies (Abs) detecting phosphorylation of the key proteins of that pathway. DNA damage in human pulmonary adenocarcinoma A549 cells was induced by treatment with the DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin and phosphorylation of histone H2AX on Ser139 (γH2AX) and of ATM on Ser1981 was detected with phospho-specific Abs; cellular fluorescence was measured by laser scanning cytometry (LSC). The sensitivity and accuracy of detection of H2AX and ATM phosphorylation concurrent with the detection of DNA replication by EdU incorporation and "click chemistry" was found in ZBF fixed cells to be comparable to that of cell fixed in formaldehyde. The accuracy of DNA content measurement as evident from the resolution of DNA content frequency histograms of cells stained with DAPI was somewhat better in ZBF- than in formaldehyde-fixed cells. The pattern of chromatin condensation revealed by the intensity of maximal pixel of DAPI that allows one to identify mitotic and immediately post-mitotic cells by LSC was preserved after ZBF fixation. ZBF fixation was also compatible with the detection of γH2AX foci considered to be the hallmarks of induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Analysis of cells by flow cytometry revealed that ZBF fixation of lymphoblastoid TK6 cells led to about 60 and 33% higher intensity of the side and forward light scatter, respectively, compared to formaldehyde fixed cells.

  4. Assessment of impact damage in Kevlar{reg_sign}-epoxy, filament-wound spherical test specimens by acoustic emission techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, J.W.; Brosey, W.D.; Hamstad, M.A.

    1996-09-26

    The results of a study of the acoustic emission (AE) behavior of impact-damaged, spherical, composite test specimens subjected to thermal cycling and biaxial mechanical loading are presented. Seven Kevlar{reg_sign}-epoxy, filament-wound, spherical composite test specimens were subjected to different levels of impact damage. The seven specimens were a subset of a group of 77 specimens made with simulated fabrication-induced flaws. The specimens were subjected to two or three cycles of elevated temperature and then hydraulically pressurized to failure. The pressurization regime consisted of two cycles to different intermediate levels with a hold at each peak pressure level; a final pressurization to failure followed. The thermal and pressurization cycles were carefully designed to stimulate AE production under defined conditions. Both impacted and nonimpacted specimens produced thermo-AE (the term given to emission stimulated by thermal loading), but impacted specimens produced significantly more. Thermo-AE was produced primarily by damaged composite material. Damaged material produced emission as a function of both rising and falling temperature, but the effect was not repeatable. More seriously damaged specimens produced very large quantities of emission. Emission recorded during the static portion of the hydraulic loading cycles varied with load, time, and degree of damage. Static load AE behavior was quantified using a newly developed concept, the event-rate moment, and various correlations with residual strength were attempted. Correlations between residual strength, long-duration events, and even-rate moments were developed with varying degrees of success.

  5. Defending the leaf surface: intra- and inter-specific differences in silicon deposition in grasses in response to damage and silicon supply.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Sue E; Fitt, Rob N; McLarnon, Emma L; Wade, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding interactions between grasses and their herbivores is central to the conservation of species-rich grasslands and the protection of our most important crops against pests. Grasses employ a range of defenses against their natural enemies; silicon-based defenses have been shown to be one of the most effective. Silicon (Si) is laid down on the leaf surface as spines and other sharp bodies, known as phytoliths, making grasses abrasive and their foliage indigestible to herbivores. Previous studies on Si defenses found that closely related species may have similar levels of Si in the leaves but differ markedly in abrasiveness. Here we show how the number, shape and distribution of Si-rich phytoliths and spines differ within and between different grass species and demonstrate that species also differ in their ability to change the deposition and distribution of these defenses in response to damage or increases in Si supply. Specifically, we tested the response of two genotypes of Festuca arundinacea known to differ in their surface texture and three different grass species (F. ovina, F. rubra, and Deschampsia cespitosa) differing in their abrasiveness to combined manipulation of leaf damage and Si supply. F. arundinacea plants with a harsh leaf surface had higher Si content and more spines on their leaf surface than soft varieties. F. ovina and D. cespitosa plants increased their leaf Si concentration and produced an increase in the number of leaf spines and phytoliths on the leaf surface in response to Si addition. F rubra also increased leaf Si content in response to treatments, particularly in damaged leaves, but did not deposit this in the form of spines or increased densities of phytoliths. We discuss how the form in which grasses deposit Si may affect their anti-herbivore characteristics and consider the ecological and agricultural implications of the differences in allocation to Si-based defenses between grass species.

  6. Defending the leaf surface: intra- and inter-specific differences in silicon deposition in grasses in response to damage and silicon supply

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Sue E.; Fitt, Rob N.; McLarnon, Emma L.; Wade, Ruth N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding interactions between grasses and their herbivores is central to the conservation of species-rich grasslands and the protection of our most important crops against pests. Grasses employ a range of defenses against their natural enemies; silicon-based defenses have been shown to be one of the most effective. Silicon (Si) is laid down on the leaf surface as spines and other sharp bodies, known as phytoliths, making grasses abrasive and their foliage indigestible to herbivores. Previous studies on Si defenses found that closely related species may have similar levels of Si in the leaves but differ markedly in abrasiveness. Here we show how the number, shape and distribution of Si-rich phytoliths and spines differ within and between different grass species and demonstrate that species also differ in their ability to change the deposition and distribution of these defenses in response to damage or increases in Si supply. Specifically, we tested the response of two genotypes of Festuca arundinacea known to differ in their surface texture and three different grass species (F. ovina, F. rubra, and Deschampsia cespitosa) differing in their abrasiveness to combined manipulation of leaf damage and Si supply. F. arundinacea plants with a harsh leaf surface had higher Si content and more spines on their leaf surface than soft varieties. F. ovina and D. cespitosa plants increased their leaf Si concentration and produced an increase in the number of leaf spines and phytoliths on the leaf surface in response to Si addition. F rubra also increased leaf Si content in response to treatments, particularly in damaged leaves, but did not deposit this in the form of spines or increased densities of phytoliths. We discuss how the form in which grasses deposit Si may affect their anti-herbivore characteristics and consider the ecological and agricultural implications of the differences in allocation to Si-based defenses between grass species. PMID:25717331

  7. 46 CFR 71.20-20 - Specific tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) For inspection procedures of marine engineering equipment and systems, see subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. (d) For inspection procedures of electrical engineering equipment and systems, see subchapter J (Electrical Engineering) of this chapter. (e) For inspection and testing standards...

  8. 46 CFR 126.350 - Specific tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Installation of piping for gaseous fixed fire-extinguishing (see § 95.15-15 of this chapter). (2) Hydraulic steering-systems. If fitted with manual operation, these systems must be tested in the manual mode, with the hydraulic pumps secured, for smooth, efficient operation by one person....

  9. 46 CFR 71.20-20 - Specific tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) For inspection procedures of marine engineering equipment and systems, see subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. (d) For inspection procedures of electrical engineering equipment and systems, see subchapter J (Electrical Engineering) of this chapter. (e) For inspection and testing standards...

  10. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... distilled water or isotonic saline buffered appropriately, if needed, for stability. Water-insoluble..., inhalation, admixture with food or water, and IP or IV injections. (e) Test performance—(1) Treatment and... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be...

  11. Testing a Model of Caffeinated Alcohol-specific Expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Linden-Carmichael, Ashley N.; Lau-Barraco, Cathy; Stamates, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The present study sought to further understand the association between caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) use and alcohol-related risks. In particular, we focused on the role of two identified expectancies specific to CAB use: intoxication enhancement and avoidance of negative consequences. Although outcome expectancies are consistent predictors of substance use, limited research has examined expectancies related to CAB use and their association with alcohol-related behaviors, such as protecting themselves from alcohol-related harms. Consequently, the present study examined CAB-specific expectancies and protective behavioral strategies (PBS) as mediators of CAB use and negative consequences. Methods Participants were 322 (219 women) college drinkers who completed self-report measures of typical CAB and alcohol use, CAB-specific expectancies, PBS use, and alcohol-related harms. Results Structural equation modeling revealed, after controlling for typical non-CAB heavy alcohol use, a significant indirect effect of CAB use to alcohol-related problems through avoidance of negative consequences CAB expectancies and PBS use. However, intoxication enhancement expectancies did not mediate this association. Conclusions Thus, our findings indicate that heavier CAB use was associated with stronger expectations that drinking CABs can help avoid negative consequences. These beliefs were related to using fewer PBS when drinking and a greater likelihood of experiencing problems. Given that these expectancies may be underlying mechanisms of CAB use, their inclusion in existing alcohol interventions may be beneficial. PMID:25864133

  12. Specification of Surface Roughness for Hydraulic Flow Test Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Timothy S. Yoder

    2006-05-01

    A study was performed to determine the surface roughness of the corrosion layer on aluminum clad booster fuel plates for the proposed Gas Test Loop (GTL) system to be incorporated into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. A layer of boehmite (a crystalline, non-porous gamma-alumina hydrate) is typically pre-formed on the surface of the fuel cladding prior to exposure to reactor operation to prevent the uncontrolled buildup of corrosion product on the surface. A representative sample coupon autoclaved with the ATR driver fuel to produce the boehmite layer was analyzed using optical profilometry to determine the mean surface roughness, a parameter that can have significant impact on the coolant flow past the fuel plates. This information was used to specify the surface finish of mockup fuel plates for a hydraulic flow test model. The purpose of the flow test is to obtain loss coefficients describing the resistance of the coolant flow paths, which are necessary for accurate thermal hydraulic analyses of the water-cooled booster fuel assembly. It is recommended that the surface roughness of the boehmite layer on the fuel cladding be replicated for the flow test. While it is very important to know the order of magnitude of the surface roughness, this value does not need to be matched exactly. Maintaining a reasonable dimensional tolerance for the surface finish on each side of the 12 mockup fuel plates would ensure relative uniformity in the flow among the four coolant channels. Results obtained from thermal hydraulic analyses indicate that ±15% deviation from a surface finish (i.e., Ra) of 0.53 ìm would have a minimal effect on coolant temperature, coolant flow rate, and fuel temperature.

  13. ORNL testing of DOT specification 17H drums (55-gallon) for compliance with DOT specifications for Type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.S.; Lasher, L.C.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.; Van Hoesen, S.D.

    1986-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) proposes using Department of Transportation (DOT) specification 17H drums (55-gal) for transporting low-level waste (LLW) to Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) for interim storage. This container type was tested and found to be in compliance with DOT specifications for Type A packaging.

  14. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing conducted with engines installed in vehicles, including field testing conducted to measure emissions under...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing conducted with engines installed in vehicles, including field testing conducted to measure emissions under...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing conducted with engines installed in vehicles, including field testing conducted to measure emissions under...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing conducted with engines installed in vehicles, including field testing conducted to measure emissions under...

  18. Test validation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) durability and damage tolerance modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Najafi, Ali; Abdi, Frank; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2014-03-01

    Protection of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) is rather an important element for the engine manufacturers and aerospace companies to help improve the durability of their hot engine components. The CMC's are typically porous materials which permits some desirable infiltration that lead to strength enhancements. However, they experience various durability issues such as degradation due to coating oxidation. These concerns are being addressed by introducing a high temperature protective system, Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) that can operate at temperature applications1, 3 In this paper, linear elastic progressive failure analyses are performed to evaluate conditions that would cause crack initiation in the EBC. The analysis is to determine the overall failure sequence under tensile loading conditions on different layers of material including the EBC and CMC in an attempt to develop a life/failure model. A 3D finite element model of a dogbone specimen is constructed for the analyses. Damage initiation, propagation and final failure is captured using a progressive failure model considering tensile loading conditions at room temperature. It is expected that this study will establish a process for using a computational approach, validated at a specimen level, to predict reliably in the future component level performance without resorting to extensive testing.

  19. A test of the oxidative damage hypothesis for discontinuous gas exchange in the locust Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; Snelling, Edward P; Seymour, Roger S; White, Craig R

    2012-08-23

    The discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) is a breathing pattern displayed by many insects, characterized by periodic breath-holding and intermittently low tracheal O(2) levels. It has been hypothesized that the adaptive value of DGCs is to reduce oxidative damage, with low tracheal O(2) partial pressures (PO(2) ≈ 2-5 kPa) occurring to reduce the production of oxygen free radicals. If this is so, insects displaying DGCs should continue to actively defend a low tracheal PO(2) even when breathing higher than atmospheric levels of oxygen (hyperoxia). This behaviour has been observed in moth pupae exposed to ambient PO(2) up to 50 kPa. To test this observation in adult insects, we implanted fibre-optic oxygen optodes within the tracheal systems of adult migratory locusts Locusta migratoria exposed to normoxia, hypoxia and hyperoxia. In normoxic and hypoxic atmospheres, the minimum tracheal PO(2) that occurred during DGCs varied between 3.4 and 1.2 kPa. In hyperoxia up to 40.5 kPa, the minimum tracheal PO(2) achieved during a DGC exceeded 30 kPa, increasing with ambient levels. These results are consistent with a respiratory control mechanism that functions to satisfy O(2) requirements by maintaining PO(2) above a critical level, not defend against high levels of O(2).

  20. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  1. Differential cell cycle-specificity for chromosomal damage induced by merbarone and etoposide in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Roy, Shambhu K; Eastmond, David A

    2007-03-01

    Merbarone, a topoisomerase II (topo II) inhibitor which, in contrast to etoposide, does not stabilize topo II-DNA cleavable complexes, was previously shown to be a potent clastogen in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the possible mechanisms, we compared the cell cycle-specificity of the clastogenic effects of merbarone and etoposide in V79 cells. Using flow cytometry and BrdU labeling techniques, etoposide was shown to cause a rapid and persistent G2 delay while merbarone was shown to cause a prolonged S-phase followed by a G2 delay. To identify the stages which are susceptible to DNA damage, we performed the micronucleus (MN) assay with synchronized cells or utilized a combination of BrdU pulse labeling and the cytokinesis-blocked MN assay with non-synchronized cells. Treatment of M phase cells with either agent did not result in increased MN formation. Etoposide but not merbarone caused a significant increase in MN when cells were treated during G2 phase. When treated during S-phase, both chemicals induced highly significant increases in MN. However, the relative proportion of MN induced by merbarone was substantially higher than that induced by etoposide. Both chemicals also caused significant increases in MN in cells that were treated during G1 phase. To confirm the observations in the MN assay, first division metaphases were evaluated in the chromosome aberration assay. The chromosomes of cells treated with merbarone and etoposide showed increased frequencies of both chromatid- and chromosome-type of aberrations. Our findings indicate that while etoposide causes DNA damage more evenly throughout the G1, S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, an outcome which may be closely associated with topo II-mediated DNA strand cleavage, merbarone induces DNA breakage primarily during S-phase, an effect which is likely due to the stalling of replication forks by inhibition of topo II activity.

  2. Errors on the Trail Making Test Are Associated with Right Hemispheric Frontal Lobe Damage in Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Bruno; Rösser, Nina; Tabeling, Sandra; Stürenburg, Hans Jörg; de Haan, Bianca; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Wessel, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Measures of performance on the Trail Making Test (TMT) are among the most popular neuropsychological assessment techniques. Completion time on TMT-A is considered to provide a measure of processing speed, whereas completion time on TMT-B is considered to constitute a behavioral measure of the ability to shift between cognitive sets (cognitive flexibility), commonly attributed to the frontal lobes. However, empirical evidence linking performance on the TMT-B to localized frontal lesions is mostly lacking. Here, we examined the association of frontal lesions following stroke with TMT-B performance measures (i.e., completion time and completion accuracy measures) using voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping, with a focus on right hemispheric frontal lobe lesions. Our results suggest that the number of errors, but not completion time on the TMT-B, is associated with right hemispheric frontal lesions. This finding contradicts common clinical practice-the use of completion time on the TMT-B to measure cognitive flexibility, and it underscores the need for additional research on the association between cognitive flexibility and the frontal lobes. Further work in a larger sample, including left frontal lobe damage and with more power to detect effects of right posterior brain injury, is necessary to determine whether our observation is specific for right frontal lesions.

  3. Increasing the specificity of the forensic luminol test for blood.

    PubMed

    Quickenden, T I; Cooper, P D

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the presumptive luminol chemiluminescence test for the presence of traces of blood can be made more determinative by measuring the peak emission wavelength of the luminol chemiluminescence. When sprayed onto a surface containing traces of human haemoglobin, a 1 g/L solution of aqueous luminol containing 7 g/L sodium perborate gives an emission peak at 455 +/- 2 nm, whereas the same mixture gives an emission peak at 430 +/- 3 nm when sprayed onto a surface containing traces of sodium hypochlorite (household bleach). This spectral difference can readily be determined using spectroscopic equipment that either scans the spectrum before significant luminescence decay occurs or corrects the spectrum for the effects of any decay. It was found that bovine haemoglobin and human haemoglobin showed no significant spectral differences.

  4. Specification and testing for power by wire aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Irving G.; Kenney, Barbara H.

    1993-08-01

    A power by wire aircraft is one in which all active functions other than propulsion are implemented electrically. Other nomenclature are 'all electric airplane,' or 'more electric airplane.' What is involved is the task of developing and certifying electrical equipment to replace existing hydraulics and pneumatics. When such functions, however, are primary flight controls which are implemented electrically, new requirements are imposed that were not anticipated by existing power system designs. Standards of particular impact are the requirements of ultra-high reliability, high peak transient bi-directional power flow, and immunity to electromagnetic interference and lightning. Not only must the electromagnetic immunity of the total system be verifiable, but box level tests and meaningful system models must be established to allow system evaluation. This paper discusses some of the problems, the system modifications involved, and early results in establishing wiring harness and interface susceptibility requirements.

  5. Thermography Inspection for Detection and Tracking of Composite Cylinder Damage During Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Seebo, J. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations in a cylinder under different loads. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to nonimmersion ultrasonic results.

  6. Thermography inspection for detection and tracking of composite cylinder damage during load testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.; Seebo, J. P.

    2011-06-23

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to non-immersion ultrasonic results.

  7. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  9. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  10. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  11. Cells with UV-specific DNA damage are present in murine lymph nodes after in vivo UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sontag, Y; Guikers, C L; Vink, A A; de Gruijl, F R; van Loveren, H; Garssen, J; Roza, L; Kripke, M L; van der Leun, J C; van Vloten, W A

    1995-05-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is absorbed in the skin, especially in the epidermis. After ultraviolet irradiation the number of major histocompatibility complex class II+, adenosine triphosphatase+ Langerhans cells and Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal cells in the epidermis decreases. Whether this decrease is due to migration of these cells or to loss of membrane markers is not clear. To address this question we have used the monoclonal antibody H3 directed against cyclobutyl thymine dimers-a form of DNA damage that is specifically induced by ultraviolet radiation-to investigate whether H3+ cells are present in the draining lymph nodes of the skin after ultraviolet irradiation of hairless, inbred mice (HRA/Skh). After a single dose of ultraviolet radiation (Westinghouse FS40, 1.5 kJ/m2), H3+ cells were present in the paracortex of the draining lymph nodes. No positive cells were found in the blood of irradiated mice. These results suggest that the H3+ cells in the lymph nodes originate from the skin. The number of H3+ cells in the draining lymph nodes increased the first 24 h after irradiation and then stabilized. Immunohistochemical double staining revealed that all H3+ cells were major histocompatibility complex II+, and that only a fraction of the cells were NLDC-145 positive. No V gamma 3 T-cell receptor bearing cells could be found in the lymph nodes after UV irradiation of the skin.

  12. Testing the dose-response specification in epidemiology: public health and policy consequences for lead.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Stephen J; Rothenberg, Jesse C

    2005-09-01

    Statistical evaluation of the dose-response function in lead epidemiology is rarely attempted. Economic evaluation of health benefits of lead reduction usually assumes a linear dose-response function, regardless of the outcome measure used. We reanalyzed a previously published study, an international pooled data set combining data from seven prospective lead studies examining contemporaneous blood lead effect on IQ (intelligence quotient) of 7-year-old children (n = 1,333). We constructed alternative linear multiple regression models with linear blood lead terms (linear-linear dose response) and natural-log-transformed blood lead terms (log-linear dose response). We tested the two lead specifications for nonlinearity in the models, compared the two lead specifications for significantly better fit to the data, and examined the effects of possible residual confounding on the functional form of the dose-response relationship. We found that a log-linear lead-IQ relationship was a significantly better fit than was a linear-linear relationship for IQ (p = 0.009), with little evidence of residual confounding of included model variables. We substituted the log-linear lead-IQ effect in a previously published health benefits model and found that the economic savings due to U.S. population lead decrease between 1976 and 1999 (from 17.1 microg/dL to 2.0 microg/dL) was 2.2 times (319 billion dollars) that calculated using a linear-linear dose-response function (149 billion dollars). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention action limit of 10 microg/dL for children fails to protect against most damage and economic cost attributable to lead exposure.

  13. The lack of target specificity of small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors is correlated with their ability to damage myocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B. Patel, Daywin

    2010-12-01

    Many new targeted small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors are actively being developed. However, the clinical use of some kinase inhibitors has been shown to result in cardiotoxicity. In most cases the mechanisms by which they exert their cardiotoxicity are not well understood. We have used large scale profiling data on 8 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors and 10 other kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases in order to correlate binding constants and kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with kinase inhibitor-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The 18 kinase inhibitors that were the subject of this study were: canertinib, dasatinib, dovitinib, erlotinib, flavopiridol, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, midostaurin, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, staurosporine, sunitinib, tandutinib, tozasertib, vandetanib and vatalanib. The combined tyrosine kinase and serine-threonine kinase selectivity scores were highly correlated with the myocyte-damaging effects of the kinase inhibitors. This result suggests that myocyte damage was due to a lack of target selectivity to binding of both tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases, and was not due to binding to either group specifically. Finally, the strength of kinase inhibitor binding for 290 kinases was examined for correlations with myocyte damage. Kinase inhibitor binding was significantly correlated with myocyte damage for 12 kinases. Thus, myocyte damage may be multifactorial in nature with the inhibition of a number of kinases involved in producing kinase inhibitor-induced myocyte damage.

  14. Physics-based damage predictions for simulating testing and evaluation (T and E) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, F.L.; Schraad, M.W.; Lewis, M.W.

    1999-03-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report addresses the need to develop computational techniques and physics-based material models for simulating damage to weapons systems resulting from ballistic threats. Modern weapons systems, such as fighter aircraft, are becoming more dependent upon composite materials to reduce weight, to increase strength and stiffness, and to resist adverse conditions resulting from high temperatures and corrosion. Unfortunately, damaged components can have severe and detrimental effects, as evidenced by statistics from Desert Storm indicating that 75% of aircraft losses were attributable to fuel system vulnerability with hydrodynamic ram being the primary kill mechanism. Therefore, this project addresses damage predictions for composite systems that are subjected to ballistic threats involving hydrodynamic ram. A computational technique for simulating fluid-solid interaction phenomena and physics-based material models have been developed for this purpose.

  15. Laser shock waves: A way to test and damage composite materials for aeronautic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Berthe, L.; Touchard, F.

    2012-07-01

    A laser shock technique has been used as a laboratory tool to produce different levels of damage inside T800/M21 CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) samples. The resulting defects for a given sample have been controlled by varying laser source parameters. A VISAR (Velocity Interferometer for System and Any Reflector) has been used to measure the sample back face velocity, which enables a time-resolved detection of inside damage thanks to the laser shock wave theory. Moreover, a preliminary numerical modeling of the composite sample under laser shock has been developed using LS-DYNA software in order to improve the knowledge of composite behaviour under high impact energy level. These numerical tools have been compared to the experimental VISAR signals in order to validate the constitutive law computed. The damage resulting from this local tensile loading has also been simulated and compared to observations performed on composite samples with different post-mortem analysis.

  16. Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Standardization of Carbon-Phenolic Test Methods and Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.B.

    1990-04-01

    Topics addressed include: Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) activity; low fired PAN fiber program review; carbon fabric oxidation mass loss; gel permeation chromatography (GPC) test methodology; carbon assay testing; and NAR rayon yarn specifications.

  17. Evaluating Specification Tests in the Context of Value-Added Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Stacy, Brian W.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the properties of two specification tests that have been applied to a variety of estimators in the context of value-added measures (VAMs) of teacher and school quality: the Hausman test for choosing between student-level random and fixed effects, and a test for feedback (sometimes called a "falsification test"). We discuss…

  18. Evaluating Specification Tests in the Context of Value-Added Estimation. Working Paper #38

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Stacy, Brian W.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    We study the properties of two specification tests that have been applied to a variety of estimators in the context of value-added measures (VAMs) of teacher and school quality: the Hausman test for choosing between random and fixed effects and a test for feedback (sometimes called a "falsification test"). We discuss theoretical…

  19. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase1 Is an Organ-Specific Mediator of End Organ Damage in a Murine Model of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sydow, Karsten; Schmitz, Christine; von Leitner, Eike-Christin; von Leitner, Robin; Klinke, Anna; Atzler, Dorothee; Krebs, Christian; Wieboldt, Hartwig; Ehmke, Heimo; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Meinertz, Thomas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Böger, Rainer H.; Magnus, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Background The endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular and overall mortality. Moreover, elevated ADMA plasma concentrations are associated with the extent of hypertension. However, data from small-sized clinical trials and experimental approaches using murine transgenic models have revealed conflicting results regarding the impact of ADMA and its metabolizing enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Methodology/Principal Findings Therefore, we investigated the role of ADMA and DDAH1 in hypertension-induced end organ damage using the uninephrectomized, deoxycorticosterone actetate salt, and angiotensin II-induced hypertension model in human DDAH1 (hDDAH1) overexpressing and wild-type (WT) mice. ADMA plasma concentrations differed significantly between hDDAH1 and WT mice at baseline, but did not significantly change during the induction of hypertension. hDDAH1 overexpression did not protect against hypertension-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy. In addition, the hypertension-induced impairment of the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of aortic segments ex vivo was not significantly attenuated by hDDAH1 overexpression. However, hDDAH1 mice displayed an attenuated hypertensive inflammatory response in renal tissue, resulting in less hypertensive renal injury. Conclusion/Significance Our data reveal that hDDAH1 organ-specifically modulates the inflammatory response in this murine model of hypertension. The lack of protection in cardiac and aortic tissues may be due to DDAH1 tissue selectivity and/or the extent of hypertension by the used combined model. However, our study underlines the potency of hDDAH1 overexpression in modulating inflammatory processes as a crucial step in the pathogenesis of hypertension, which needs further experimental and clinical investigation. PMID:23110194

  20. Oxidative DNA damage drives carcinogenesis in MUTYH-associated-polyposis by specific mutations of mitochondrial and MAPK genes.

    PubMed

    Venesio, Tiziana; Balsamo, Antonella; Errichiello, Edoardo; Ranzani, Guglielmina N; Risio, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    MUTYH is a DNA-base-excision-repair gene implicated in the activation of nuclear and mitochondrial cell-death pathways. MUTYH germline mutations cause an inherited polyposis, MUTYH-associated-polyposis, characterized by multiple adenomas and increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Since this carcinogenesis remains partially unknown, we searched for nuclear and mitochondrial gene alterations that may drive the tumorigenic process. Ninety-six adenomas and 7 carcinomas from 12 MUTYH-associated-polyposis and 13 classical/attenuated adenomatous polyposis patients were investigated by sequencing and pyrosequencing for the presence of mutations in KRAS, BRAF, MT-CO1/MT-CO2 and MT-TD genes. KRAS mutations were identified in 24% MUTYH-associated-polyposis vs 15% classical/attenuated familial polyposis adenomas; mutated MUTYH-associated-polyposis adenomas exhibited only c.34G>T transversions in codon 12, an alteration typically associated with oxidative DNA damage, or mutations in codon 13; neither of these mutations was found in classical/attenuated familial polyposis adenomas (P<0.001). Mutated MUTYH-associated-polyposis carcinomas showed KRAS c.34G>T transversions, prevalently occurring with BRAFV600E; none of the classical/attenuated familial polyposis carcinomas displayed these alterations. Comparing mitochondrial DNA from lymphocytes and adenomas of the same individuals, we detected variants in 82% MUTYH-associated-polyposis vs 38% classical/attenuated familial polyposis patients (P=0.040). MT-CO1/MT-CO2 missense mutations, which cause aminoacid changes, were only found in MUTYH-associated-polyposis lesions and were significantly associated with KRAS mutations (P=0.0085). We provide evidence that MUTYH-associated-polyposis carcinogenesis is characterized by the occurrence of specific mutations in both KRAS and phylogenetically conserved genes of mitochondrial DNA which are involved in controlling oxidative phosphorylation; this implies the existence of a

  1. Acoustic Emission and Damage Accumulation for Various Woven C/SiC Composites Tested in Tension at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory; Petko, Jeanne; Kiser, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Modal acoustic emission (AE) has proven to be an excellent technique to monitor damage accumulation in ceramic matrix composites. In this study, AE was used to monitor tensile load-unload-reload hysteresis tests for a variety of C fiber reinforced, Sic matrix composites. C/SiC composites were reinforced with T-300 and IM7 fibers, had C, multilayer, or pseudo-porous C interphases, and had chemical vapor infiltrated Sic or melt-infiltrated SiC matrices. All of the composites exhibited considerable AE during testing. The extent and nature of the AE activity will be analyzed and discussed in light of matrix cracking and the variety of composite constituents. It is hoped that understanding the nature of stress-dependent damage accumulation in these materials can be of use in life-modeling for these types of composites.

  2. Acoustic Emission and Damage Accumulation for Various Woven C/SiC Composites Tested in Tension at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Petko, Jeanne; Kiser, James D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Modal acoustic emission (AE) has proven to be an excellent technique to monitor damage accumulation in ceramic matrix composites. In this study, AE was used to monitor tensile load-unload-reload hysteresis tests for a variety of C fiber reinforced, SiC matrix composites. C/SiC composites were reinforced with T300 and IM7 fibers, had C, multilayer, or pseudo-porous C interphases, and had chemical vapor infiltrated SiC or melt-infiltrated SiC matrices. All of the composites exhibited considerable AE during testing. The extent and nature of the AE activity will be analyzed and discussed in light of matrix cracking and the variety of composite constituents. It is hoped that understanding the nature of stress dependent damage accumulation in these materials can be of use in life modeling for these types of composites.

  3. A Neuropsychological Test of Belief and Doubt: Damage to Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Increases Credulity for Misleading Advertising

    PubMed Central

    Asp, Erik; Manzel, Kenneth; Koestner, Bryan; Cole, Catherine A.; Denburg, Natalie L.; Tranel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have proposed the False Tagging Theory (FTT) as a neurobiological model of belief and doubt processes. The theory posits that the prefrontal cortex is critical for normative doubt toward properly comprehended ideas or cognitions. Such doubt is important for advantageous decisions, for example in the financial and consumer purchasing realms. Here, using a neuropsychological approach, we put the FTT to an empirical test, hypothesizing that focal damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) would cause a “doubt deficit” that would result in higher credulity and purchase intention for consumer products featured in misleading advertisements. We presented 8 consumer ads to 18 patients with focal brain damage to the vmPFC, 21 patients with focal brain damage outside the prefrontal cortex, and 10 demographically similar healthy comparison participants. Patients with vmPFC damage were (1) more credulous to misleading ads; and (2) showed the highest intention to purchase the products in the misleading advertisements, relative to patients with brain damage outside the prefrontal cortex and healthy comparison participants. The pattern of findings was obtained even for ads in which the misleading bent was “corrected” by a disclaimer. The evidence is consistent with our proposal that damage to the vmPFC disrupts a “false tagging mechanism” which normally produces doubt and skepticism for cognitive representations. We suggest that the disruption increases credulity for misleading information, even when the misleading information is corrected for by a disclaimer. This mechanism could help explain poor financial decision-making when persons with ventromedial prefrontal dysfunction (e.g., caused by neurological injury or aging) are exposed to persuasive information. PMID:22787439

  4. A neuropsychological test of belief and doubt: damage to ventromedial prefrontal cortex increases credulity for misleading advertising.

    PubMed

    Asp, Erik; Manzel, Kenneth; Koestner, Bryan; Cole, Catherine A; Denburg, Natalie L; Tranel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have proposed the False Tagging Theory (FTT) as a neurobiological model of belief and doubt processes. The theory posits that the prefrontal cortex is critical for normative doubt toward properly comprehended ideas or cognitions. Such doubt is important for advantageous decisions, for example in the financial and consumer purchasing realms. Here, using a neuropsychological approach, we put the FTT to an empirical test, hypothesizing that focal damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) would cause a "doubt deficit" that would result in higher credulity and purchase intention for consumer products featured in misleading advertisements. We presented 8 consumer ads to 18 patients with focal brain damage to the vmPFC, 21 patients with focal brain damage outside the prefrontal cortex, and 10 demographically similar healthy comparison participants. Patients with vmPFC damage were (1) more credulous to misleading ads; and (2) showed the highest intention to purchase the products in the misleading advertisements, relative to patients with brain damage outside the prefrontal cortex and healthy comparison participants. The pattern of findings was obtained even for ads in which the misleading bent was "corrected" by a disclaimer. The evidence is consistent with our proposal that damage to the vmPFC disrupts a "false tagging mechanism" which normally produces doubt and skepticism for cognitive representations. We suggest that the disruption increases credulity for misleading information, even when the misleading information is corrected for by a disclaimer. This mechanism could help explain poor financial decision-making when persons with ventromedial prefrontal dysfunction (e.g., caused by neurological injury or aging) are exposed to persuasive information.

  5. Effect of mechanical damage on emission of volatile organic compounds from plant leaves and implications for evaluation of host plant specificity of prospective biological control agents of weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of host plant specificity is a critical step in the evaluation of classical biological control agents of weeds, which is necessary for avoiding possible damage to nontarget plants. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by plants likely play an important role in determining which plant...

  6. The cardiotoxicity and myocyte damage caused by small molecule anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors is correlated with lack of target specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B.

    2010-04-15

    The use of the new anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) has revolutionized the treatment of certain cancers. However, the use of some of these results in cardiotoxicity. Large-scale profiling data recently made available for the binding of 7 of the 9 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases has allowed us to correlate kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with TKI-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The tyrosine kinase selectivity scores, but not the serine-threonine kinase scores, were highly correlated with the myocyte damaging effects of the TKIs. Additionally, we showed that damage to myocytes gave a good rank order correlation with clinical cardiotoxicity. Finally, strength of TKI binding to colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) was highly correlated with myocyte damage, thus possibly implicating this kinase in contributing to TKI-induced cardiotoxicity.

  7. Structural changes and damage of single-crystal turbine blades during life tests of an aviation gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospennikova, O. G.; Orlov, M. R.; Kolodochkina, V. G.; Nazarkin, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    The irreversible structural changes of the single-crystal ZhS32-VI nickel superalloy blades of a high-pressure turbine that occur during life tests of a gas turbine engine are studied. The main operation damages in the hottest section of the blade airfoil are found to be the fracture of the heat-resistant coating in the leading edge and the formation of thermomechanical fatigue cracks. The possibility of reconditioning repair of the blades is considered.

  8. Validity of a squash-specific test of multiple-sprint ability.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Michael; McCord, Andrew; Winter, Edward M

    2010-12-01

    We examined the validity and reproducibility of a squash-specific multiple-sprint test. Eight male squash and 8 male soccer players performed Baker's 8 × 40-m sprints and a squash-specific-multiple-sprint test on separate days. The sum of individual sprint times in each test was recorded. Six squash and 6 soccer players repeated the tests 7 days later to assess reproducibility using intraclass correlation. In addition, 2 England Squash coaches independently ranked the squash players using knowledge of the player and recent performances in local leagues. Performance on the squash-specific (r = 0.97 and 0.90) and Baker's test (r = 0.95 and 0.83) was reproducible in squash and soccer players, respectively, and did not differ on Baker's test (mean ± SD 72.9 ± 3.9 and 72.9 ± 2.8 seconds for squash and soccer players, p = 0.969, effect size = 0.03). Squash players (232 ± 32 seconds) outperformed soccer players (264 ± 14 seconds) on the squash-specific test (p = 0.02, effect size = 1.39). Performance on Baker's and the squash-specific test were related in squash players (r = 0.98, p < 0.001) but not in soccer players (r = -0.08, p = 0.87). Squash-player rank correlated with performance on the squash-specific (ρ = 0.79, p = 0.02) but not the Baker's test (ρ = 0.55, p = 0.16). The squash-specific test discriminated between groups with similar non-sport-specific multiple-sprint ability and in squash players. In conjunction with the relationship between test performances, the results suggest that the squash-specific test is a valid and reproducible measure of multiple-sprint ability in squash players and could be used for assessing and tracking training-induced changes in multiple-sprint ability.

  9. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case 1 loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case 1 loading history, and alumina for the Case 3 loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test materials.

  10. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth arid/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a Function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test material&

  11. Assessment of Damage Containment Features of a Full-Scale PRSEUS Fuselage Panel Through Test and Teardown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2012-01-01

    An area that shows promise in enhancing structural integrity of aircraft and aerospace structures is the integrally stitched composite technology. The most recent generation of this technology is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept developed by Boeing Research and Technology and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A joint test program on the assessment of damage containment capabilities of the PRSEUS concept for curved fuselage structures was conducted recently at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. The panel was subjected to axial tension, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure load conditions up to fracture, with a through-the-thickness, two-bay notch severing the central stiffener. For the purpose of future progressive failure analysis development and verification, extensive post failure nondestructive and teardown inspections were conducted. Detailed inspections were performed directly ahead of the notch tip where stable damage progression was observed. These examinations showed: 1) extensive delaminations developed ahead of the notch tip, 2) the extent and location of damage, 3) the typical damage mechanisms observed in composites, and 4) the role of stitching and warp-knitting in the failure mechanisms. The objective of this paper is to provide a summary of results from these posttest inspections.

  12. Recent development in the design, testing and impact-damage tolerance of stiffened composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Anderson, M. S.; Rhodes, M. D.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.; Stroud, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Structural technology of laminated filamentary-composite stiffened-panel structures under combined inplane and lateral loadings is discussed. Attention is focused on: (1) methods for analyzing the behavior of these structures under load and for determining appropriate structural proportions for weight-efficient configurations; and (2) effects of impact damage and geometric imperfections on structural performance. Recent improvements in buckling analysis involving combined inplane compression and shear loadings and transverse shear deformations are presented. A computer code is described for proportioning or sizing laminate layers and cross-sectional dimensions, and the code is used to develop structural efficiency data for a variety of configurations, loading conditions, and constraint conditions. Experimental data on buckling of panels under inplane compression is presented. Mechanisms of impact damage initiation and propagation are described.

  13. Simplification of Fatigue Test Requirements for Damage Tolerance of Composite Interstage Launch Vehicle Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hodge, A. J.; Jackson, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The issue of fatigue loading of structures composed of composite materials is considered in a requirements document that is currently in place for manned launch vehicles. By taking into account the short life of these parts, coupled with design considerations, it is demonstrated that the necessary coupon level fatigue data collapse to a static case. Data from a literature review of past studies that examined compressive fatigue loading after impact and data generated from this experimental study are presented to support this finding. Damage growth, in the form of infrared thermography, was difficult to detect due to rapid degradation of compressive properties once damage growth initiated. Unrealistically high fatigue amplitudes were needed to fail 5 of 15 specimens before 10,000 cycles were reached. Since a typical vehicle structure, such as the Ares I interstage, only experiences a few cycles near limit load, it is concluded that static compression after impact (CAI) strength data will suffice for most launch vehicle structures.

  14. Toxicity evaluation of e-juice and its soluble aerosols generated by electronic cigarettes using recombinant bioluminescent bacteria responsive to specific cellular damages.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shiv; Mitchell, Robert J; Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H

    2017-04-15

    Electronic-cigarettes (e-cigarette) are widely used as an alternative to traditional cigarettes but their safety is not well established. Herein, we demonstrate and validate an analytical method to discriminate the deleterious effects of e-cigarette refills (e-juice) and soluble e-juice aerosol (SEA) by employing stress-specific bioluminescent recombinant bacterial cells (RBCs) as whole-cell biosensors. These RBCs carry luxCDABE-operon tightly controlled by promoters that specifically induced to DNA damage (recA), superoxide radicals (sodA), heavy metals (copA) and membrane damage (oprF). The responses of the RBCs following exposure to various concentrations of e-juice/SEA was recorded in real-time that showed dose-dependent stress specific-responses against both the e-juice and vaporized e-juice aerosols produced by the e-cigarette. We also established that high doses of e-juice (4-folds diluted) lead to cell death by repressing the cellular machinery responsible for repairing DNA-damage, superoxide toxicity, ion homeostasis and membrane damage. SEA also caused the cellular damages but the cells showed enhanced bioluminescence expression without significant growth inhibition, indicating that the cells activated their global defense system to repair these damages. DNA fragmentation assay also revealed the disintegration of total cellular DNA at sub-toxic doses of e-juice. Despite their state of matter, the e-juice and its aerosols induce cytotoxicity and alter normal cellular functions, respectively that raises concerns on use of e-cigarettes as alternative to traditional cigarette. The ability of RBCs in detecting both harmful effects and toxicity mechanisms provided a fundamental understanding of biological response to e-juice and aerosols.

  15. Rat MYH, a glycosylase for repair of oxidatively damaged DNA, has brain-specific isoforms that localize to neuronal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W; Hu, Zhaoyong; Sharma, Abha; Lee, Heung-Man; Wu, Zhao-Hui; Greeley, George H

    2002-12-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are exposed to a heavy load of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage DNA. Since in neurons, mitochondrial DNA integrity must be maintained over the entire mammalian life span, neuronal mitochondria most likely repair oxidatively damaged DNA. We show that the Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase homolog (MYH) in rat (rMYH) involved in repair of oxidative damage is abundantly expressed in the rat brain, with isoforms that are exclusive to brain tissue. Confocal microscopy and western analyses reveal localization of rMYH in neuronal mitochondria. To assess involvement of MYH in the neuronal response to oxidative DNA damage, we used a rat model of respiratory hypoxia, in which acutely reduced blood oxygenation leads to generation of superoxide, and formation and subsequent removal of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Removal of 8OHdG is accompanied by a spatial increase in rMYH immunoreactivity in the brain and an increase in levels of one of the three mitochondrial MYH isoforms, suggesting that inducible and non-inducible MYH isoforms exist in the brain. The mitochondrial localization of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in neurons may represent a specialized neuronal mechanism that safeguards mitochondrial genomes in the face of routine and accidental exposures to heavy loads of injurious ROS.

  16. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for inspection and test of... Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars. (a) General. Each tank car owner must ensure that a tank car facility: (1) Inspects and tests each item according to the requirements specified...

  17. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for inspection and test of... Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars. (a) General. Each tank car owner must ensure that a tank car facility: (1) Inspects and tests each item according to the requirements specified...

  18. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for inspection and test of... Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars. (a) General. Each tank car owner must ensure that a tank car facility: (1) Inspects and tests each item according to the requirements specified...

  19. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... metal jacket or with a thermal protection system shall have an inspection and test conforming to this... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for inspection and test of... Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars. (a) General. (1) Each tank car facility...

  20. Standard Setting in Specific-Purpose Language Testing: What Can a Qualitative Study Add?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manias, Elizabeth; McNamara, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the views of nursing and medical domain experts in considering the standards for a specific-purpose English language screening test, the Occupational English Test (OET), for professional registration for immigrant health professionals. Since individuals who score performances in the test setting are often language experts…

  1. Negative and Positive Testing Effects in Terms of Item-Specific and Relational Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Though retrieving information typically results in improved memory on a subsequent test (the testing effect), Peterson and Mulligan (2013) outlined the conditions under which retrieval practice results in poorer recall relative to restudy, a phenomenon dubbed the "negative testing effect." The item-specific-relational account proposes…

  2. 21 CFR 866.5520 - Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) immunological test system. 866.5520 Section 866.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5520 Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system....

  3. 21 CFR 866.5520 - Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) immunological test system. 866.5520 Section 866.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5520 Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system....

  4. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress- rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the rest materials.

  5. Quasi-Static 3-Point Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Bend Test and Analysis for Shuttle Orbiter Wing Leading Edge Impact Damage Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Sotiris, Kellas

    2006-01-01

    Static 3-point bend tests of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) were conducted to failure to provide data for additional validation of an LS-DYNA RCC model suitable for predicting the threshold of impact damage to shuttle orbiter wing leading edges. LS-DYNA predictions correlated well with the average RCC failure load, and were good in matching the load vs. deflection. However, correlating the detectable damage using NDE methods with the cumulative damage parameter in LS-DYNA material model 58 was not readily achievable. The difficulty of finding internal RCC damage with NDE and the high sensitivity of the mat58 damage parameter to the load near failure made the task very challenging. In addition, damage mechanisms for RCC due to dynamic impact of debris such as foam and ice and damage mechanisms due to a static loading were, as expected, not equivalent.

  6. Development of a force specification for a force-limited random vibration test

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.R.

    1996-02-01

    Vibration testing, techniques have been developed and employed that reduce the overtesting caused by the essentially infinite mechanical impedance of the shaker in conventional vibration tests. With these ``force-limiting`` techniques, two vibration test specifications are used: the conventional acceleration specification, and an interface force specification. The vibration level of the shake table is controlled such that neither the table acceleration nor the force transmitted to the test item exceeds its specification, hence the name ``dual control`` vibration test. The effect of limiting the shake table vibration to the force specification is to reduce (``notch``) the shaker acceleration near some of the test item`s resonance frequencies. Several methods of deriving the force specification have been described in the literature. A new method is proposed in this paper that is based on a modal method of coupling two dynamic systems, in this case the ``source`` or launch vehicle, and the ``load`` or payload. The only information that is required is an experimentally-measurable frequency-response function (FRF) called the dynamic mass for both the source and the load. The method, referred to as the coupled system, modal approach (CSMA) method, is summarized and compared to an existing method of determining the force specification for force-limited vibration testing.

  7. Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for AZ tank farm upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-08-12

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-631 transfer line from the AZ-O1A pit to the AZ-02A pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation P1 an (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities, etc), Factory Tests and Inspections (FTIs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Tests and Inspections (CTIs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

  8. NDE Evidence for the Damage Arrestment Performance of PRSEUS Composite Cube During High-Pressure Load Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2013-01-01

    As an approach to light-weight, cost-effective and manufacturable structures required to enable the hybrid wing body aircraft, The Boeing Company, Inc. and NASA have developed the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. A PRSEUS pressure cube was developed as a risk reduction test article to examine a new integral cap joint concept as part of a building block approach for technology development of the PRSEUS concept. The overall specimen strength exceeded the 18.4 psi load requirement as testing resulted in the cube reaching a final pressure load of around 48 psi prior to catastrophic failure. The cube pressure test verified that the joints and structure were capable of sustaining the required loads, and represented the first testing of joined PRSEUS structure. This paper will address the damage arrestment performance of the stitched PRSEUS structure. Following catastrophic failure of the cube, ultrasonic pulse-echo inspection found that the localized damage, surrounding a barely-visible impact damage site, did not change noticeably between just after impact and catastrophic failure of the cube, and did not play a role in the catastrophic failure event. Ultrasonic inspection of the remaining intact cube panels presented three basic types of indications: delaminations between laminae parallel to the face sheets, lying between face sheet and tear strap layers, or between tear strap and flange layers; delaminations above the noodles of stringers, frames or integral caps, lying within face sheet or tear strap layers; and delaminations between the laminae in the inner fillets of the integral caps, where pulloff stresses were expected to be highest. Delaminations of all three types were predominantly contained by the first row of stitches encountered. For the small fraction of delaminations extending beyond the first row of stitches, all were contained by the second stitch row.

  9. NDE evidence for the damage arrestment performance of PRSEUS composite cube during high-pressure load test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-02-01

    As an approach to light-weight, cost-effective and manufacturable structures required to enable the hybrid wing body aircraft, The Boeing Company, Inc. and NASA have developed the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. A PRSEUS pressure cube was developed as a risk reduction test article to examine a new integral cap joint concept as part of a building block approach for technology development of the PRSEUS concept. The overall specimen strength exceeded the 18.4 psi load requirement as testing resulted in the cube reaching a final pressure load of around 48 psi prior to catastrophic failure. The cube pressure test verified that the joints and structure were capable of sustaining the required loads, and represented the first testing of joined PRSEUS structure. This paper will address the damage arrestment performance of the stitched PRSEUS structure. Following catastrophic failure of the cube, ultrasonic pulse-echo inspection found that the localized damage, surrounding a barely-visible impact damage site, did not change noticeably between just after impact and catastrophic failure of the cube, and did not play a role in the catastrophic failure event. Ultrasonic inspection of the remaining intact cube panels presented three basic types of indications: delaminations between laminae parallel to the face sheets, lying between face sheet and tear strap layers, or between tear strap and flange layers; delaminations above the noodles of stringers, frames or integral caps, lying within face sheet or tear strap layers; and delaminations between the laminae in the inner fillets of the integral caps, where pulloff stresses were expected to be highest. Delaminations of all three types were predominantly contained by the first row of stitches encountered. For the small fraction of delaminations extending beyond the first row of stitches, all were contained by the second stitch row.

  10. In situ analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine oxidation reveals sequence- and agent-specific damage spectra.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kok Seong; Cui, Liang; Taghizadeh, Koli; Wishnok, John S; Chan, Wan; DeMott, Michael S; Babu, I Ramesh; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Dedon, Peter C

    2012-10-31

    Guanine is a major target for oxidation in DNA, with 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) as a major product. 8-oxodG is itself significantly more susceptible to oxidation than guanine, with the resulting damage consisting of more than 10 different products. This complexity has hampered efforts to understand the determinants of biologically relevant DNA oxidation chemistry. To address this problem, we have developed a high mass accuracy mass spectrometric method to quantify oxidation products arising site specifically in DNA. We applied this method to quantify the role of sequence context in defining the spectrum of damage products arising from oxidation of 8-oxodG by two oxidants: nitrosoperoxycarbonate (ONOOCO(2)(-)), a macrophage-derived chemical mediator of inflammation, and the classical one-electron oxidant, riboflavin-mediated photooxidation. The results reveal the predominance of dehydroguanidinohydantoin (DGh) in 8-oxodG oxidation by both oxidants. While the relative quantities of 8-oxodG oxidation products arising from ONOOCO(2)(-) did not vary as a function of sequence context, products of riboflavin-mediated photooxidation of 8-oxodG were highly sequence dependent. Several of the 8-oxodG oxidation products underwent hydrolytic conversion to new products with half-lives of 2-7 h. The results have implications for understanding the chemistry of DNA oxidation and the biological response to the damage, with DNA damage recognition and repair systems faced with a complex and dynamic set of damage targets.

  11. Testing Requirements to Manage Data Exchange Specifications in Enterprise Integration - A Schema Design Quality Focus.

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Ivezic, Nenad; Buhwan, Jeong

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the requirements to test W3C XML Schema usage when defining message schemas for data exchange in any large and evolving enterprise integration project. We then decompose the XML Schema testing into four (4) aspects including the message schema conformance to the XML Schema specification grammar, the message schema conformance to the XML Schema specification semantics, the message schema conformance to design quality testing, and canonical semantics testing of the message schema. We describe these four testing aspects in some detail and point to other related efforts. We further focus to provide some technical details for the message schema design quality testing. As a future work, we describe the requirements for canonical semantics testing and potential solution approaches. Finally, we describe an implementation architecture for the message schema design quality testing.

  12. Communicative Language Testing: Implications for Computer Based Language Testing in French for Specific Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García Laborda, Jesús; López Santiago, Mercedes; Otero de Juan, Nuria; Álvarez Álvarez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Current evolutions of language testing have led to integrating computers in FSP assessments both in oral and written communicative tasks. This paper deals with two main issues: learners' expectations about the types of questions in FSP computer based assessments and the relation with their own experience. This paper describes the experience of 23…

  13. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, M. J.; Huckins-Gang, H. E.; Prothro, L. B.; Reed, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE-N-1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 100 kg of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE-N-3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE-N-2, and at the same depth as SPE-N-2, within the damage zone created by the SPE-N-2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE-N-2 shot and prior to the SPE-N-3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The objective was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE-N-2 core hole included

  14. Statistical analysis and ground-based testing of the on-orbit Space Shuttle damage detection sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Brian H.; Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Carter, John P.; Kamerman, Gary W.; Schwartz, Robert

    2005-05-01

    The loss of Space Shuttle Columbia and her crew led to the creation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB), which concluded that a piece of external fuel tank insulating foam impacted the Shuttle"s wing leading edge. The foam created a hole in the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) insulating material which gravely compromised the Shuttle"s thermal protection system (TPS). In response to the CAIB recommendation, the upcoming Return to Flight Shuttle Mission (STS-114) NASA will include a Shuttle deployed sensor suite which, among other sensors, will include two laser sensing systems, Sandia National Lab"s Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) and Neptec"s Laser Camera System (LCS) to collect 3-D imagery of the Shuttle"s exterior. Herein is described a ground-based statistical testing procedure that will be used by NASA as part of a damage detection performance assessment studying the performance of each of the two laser radar systems in detecting and identifying impact damage to the Shuttle. A statistical framework based on binomial and Bayesian statistics is used to describe the probability of detection and associated statistical confidence. A mock-up of a section of Shuttle wing RCC with interchangeable panels includes a random pattern of 1/4" and 1" diameter holes on the simulated RCC panels and is cataloged prior to double-blind testing. A team of ladar sensor operators will acquire laser radar imagery of the wing mock-up using a robotic platform in a laboratory at Johnson Space Center to execute linear image scans of the wing mock-up. The test matrix will vary robotic platform motion to simulate boom wobble and alter lighting and background conditions at the 6.5 foot and 10 foot sensor-wing stand-off distances to be used on orbit. A separate team of image analysts will process and review the data and characterize and record the damage that is found. A suite of software programs has been developed to support hole location definition, damage disposition

  15. Hydrogen test of a small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage with a 2 inch tip diameter, .030 inch tip width shrouded impeller and volute collector was tested with liquid hydrogen as the pumped fluid. The hydrodynamic design of the pump stage is summarized and the noncavitating and cavitating performance results are presented. Test speeds were 60 and 80 percent of the 77,000 rpm design speed. Liquid hydrogen test results are compared with data from previous tests of the stage in water.

  16. Inter-rater agreement, sensitivity, and specificity of the prone hip extension test and active straight leg raise test

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Two clinical tests used to assess for neuromuscular control deficits in low back pain (LBP) patients are the prone hip extension (PHE) test and active straight leg raise (ASLR) test. For these tests, it has been suggested examiners classify patients as “positive” or “negative” based on the presence or absence (respectively) of specific “abnormal” lumbopelvic motion patterns. The inter-rater agreement of such a classification scheme has been reported for the PHE test, but not for the ASLR test. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of such classification schemes have not been reported for either test. The primary objectives of the current study were to investigate: 1) the inter-rater agreement of the examiner-reported classification schemes for these two tests, and 2) the sensitivity and specificity of the classification schemes. Methods Thirty participants with LBP and 40 asymptomatic controls took part in this cross-sectional observational study. Participants performed 3–4 repetitions of each test whilst two examiners classified them as “positive” or “negative” based on the presence or absence (respectively) of specific “abnormal” lumbopelvic motion patterns. The inter-rater agreement (Kappa statistic), sensitivity (LBP patients), and specificity (controls) were calculated for each test. Results Both tests demonstrated substantial inter-rater agreement (PHE test: Kappa = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.57-0.95, p < 0.001; ASLR test: Kappa = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.57-0.96, p < 0.001). For the PHE test, the sensitivity was 0.18-0.27 and the specificity was 0.63-0.78; the odds ratio (OR) of “positive” classifications in the LBP group was 1.25 (95% CI = 0.58-2.72; Examiner 1) and 1.27 (95% CI = 0.52-3.12; Examiner 2). For the ASLR test, the sensitivity was 0.20-0.25 and the specificity was 0.84-0.86; the OR of “positive” classifications in the LBP group was 1.72 (95% CI = 0.75-3.95; Examiner 1) and 1

  17. Siddhartha: Domain-specific unit test generation for "low-testibility" programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Arthur Alexander

    This Dissertation validates the hypothesis that domain-specific language (DSL) methodology can provide essential automation support for specification-based testing (SBT) of computer program units expressed in difficult-to-test (i.e., "low-testability"), domain-specific design styles. This Dissertation presents Siddhartha, an extension to DSL methodology for development of program synthesizers to support SBT methods in novel application domains. Synthesizers map formal test data specifications (TestSpecs) into unit test driver procedures (Drivers). Both TestSpecs and Driver reference designs are represented via DSLs. Synthesizer development is iterative and example-driven. A Domain Designer applying the Siddhartha methodology in a novel application domain first selects a collection of general, example TestSpecs, then manually codes a collection of corresponding Drivers. Each Driver is expressed in a different reference design that specifically accommodates difficult-to-test, domain-specific program unit under test (UUT) design styles. After selecting the most promising Driver reference design, the set of (TestSpec, Driver) pairs become test cases for the synthesizer under development. The Domain Designer then designs a TestSpec→Driver translation function. The translation function maps TestSpecs to Driver kernels in the selected reference design. The translation function design simplifies DSL development by modularizing both TestSpec and Driver reference design DSLs into syntactic productions. This effectively optimizes DSL representations to support efficient TestSpec→Driver synthesis. This Dissertation validates the hypothesis by answering the question "What are the relative costs and benefits of applying DSL methods to generate requirements-based and regression Drivers for a flight control system expressed in Ada?" Costs and benefits are measured with respect to manually coded Drivers, which are arguably equivalent to Drivers generated by a general

  18. Specificity of the comparative skin test for bovine tuberculosis in Great Britain

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, A. V.; Downs, S. H.; Upton, P.; Wood, J. L. N.; de la Rua-Domenech, R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for estimating specificity of the Single Intradermal Comparative Cervical Tuberculin (SICCT) test for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) using surveillance tests results is reported. The specificity of the SICCT test at three cut-offs was estimated from the dates, locations and skinfold measurements of all routine tests carried out in Officially TB Free (OTF) cattle herds in Great Britain (GB) between 2002 and 2008, according to their separation (by distance and time) from known infected (OTF-withdrawn) herds. The proportion of animals that tested positive was constant (P>0.20) when the distance between tested herds and nearest infected herd exceeded 8 km. For standard cut-off, calculated specificity was 99.98 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval ±0.004 per cent), equating to one false positive result per 5000 uninfected animals tested. For severe cut-off it was 99.91 per cent (±0.013 per cent) and for ultrasevere cut-off (selecting all reactors and inconclusive reactors) it was 99.87 per cent (±0.017 per cent). The estimated positive predictive value of the test averaged 91 per cent and varied by regional prevalence. This study provides further evidence of the high specificity of the SICCT test under GB conditions, suggests that over 90 per cent of cattle currently culled using this test in GB were infected, and endorses slaughter of at least these cattle for bTB control. PMID:26338518

  19. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-09-18

    The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSS (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a “calibration” shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey

  20. Two-dimensional damage mapping of a glass-epoxy composite test sample by optical transmission analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davin, Tanguy; Serio, Bruno; Hunsinger, Jean-Jacques; Lebuffe, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Under mechanical stress, the optical transmission coefficient of a translucent composite material changes. In this study, the optical response, defined as transmitted luminous flux function of the stress, is used to characterize the optomechanical behavior. Tensile tests were carried out on composite specimens made of glass fibers and epoxy resin. A visible imaging instrument has been developed to characterize this opto-mechanical response. The used camera has permitted to map the two-dimensional behavior, resulting from the heterogeneous stress field. Monotonic tests have been conducted as well as fatigue tests, to analyze de damage state along the material cycle life. In this study, both the principle and the experimental setup of this contactless method are described.

  1. Claims, Evidence and Achievement Level Descriptors as a Foundation for Item Design and Test Specifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Amy; Huff, Kristen; Luecht, Ric

    2009-01-01

    [Slides] presented at the Annual Meeting of National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) in San Diego, CA in April 2009. This presentation describes how the vehicles for gathering student evidence--task models and test specifications--are developed.

  2. A closure test for time-specific capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, T.R.; Burnham, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    The assumption of demographic closure in the analysis of capture-recapture data under closed-population models is of fundamental importance. Yet, little progress has been made in the development of omnibus tests of the closure assumption. We present a closure test for time-specific data that, in principle, tests the null hypothesis of closed-population model M(t) against the open-population Jolly-Seber model as a specific alternative. This test is chi-square, and can be decomposed into informative components that can be interpreted to determine the nature of closure violations. The test is most sensitive to permanent emigration and least sensitive to temporary emigration, and is of intermediate sensitivity to permanent or temporary immigration. This test is a versatile tool for testing the assumption of demographic closure in the analysis of capture-recapture data.

  3. Fatigue damage observed non-destructively in fibre composite coupon test specimens by X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jespersen, K. M.; Mikkelsen, L. P.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a method for monitoring the 3D fatigue damage progression on a micro-structural level in a glass fibre/polymer coupon test specimen by means of laboratory X-ray Computed Tomography (CT). A modified mount and holder made for the standard test samples to fit into the X-ray CT scanner along with a tension clamp solution is presented. Initially, the same location of the test specimen is inspected by ex-situ X-ray CT during the fatigue loading history, which shows the damage progression on a micro-structural level. The openings of individual uni-directional (UD) fibre fractures are seen to generally increase with the number of cycles, and new regions of UD fibre fractures also appear. There are some UD fibre fractures that are difficult to detect since their opening is small. Therefore, the effect of tension on the crack visibility is examined afterwards using a tension clamp solution. With applied tension some additional cracks become visible and the openings of fibre fractures increases, which shows the importance of applied tension during the scan.

  4. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  5. Damaging Confusions in England's KS2 Reading Tests: A Response to Anne Kispal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This article is written in response to the article published in issue 39.3 of this journal, in November 2005, on the nature of the Key Stage 2 National Curriculum reading tests: "Examining England's National Curriculum assessments: an analysis of the KS2 reading test questions" by Anne Kispal of the National Foundation for Educational…

  6. On the Use of a Test to Exhaustion Specific to Tennis (TEST) with Ball Hitting by Elite Players

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to a) introduce a new Test to Exhaustion Specific to Tennis (TEST) and compare performance (test duration) and physiological responses to those obtained during the 20-m multistage shuttle test (MSST), and b) determine to which extent those variables correlate with performance level (tennis competitive ranking) for both test procedures. Methods Twenty-seven junior players (8 males, 19 females) members of the national teams of the French Tennis Federation completed MSST and TEST, including elements of the game (ball hitting, intermittent activity, lateral displacement), in a randomized order. Cardiorespiratory responses were compared at submaximal (respiratory compensation point) and maximal loads between the two tests. Results At the respiratory compensation point oxygen uptake (50.1 ± 4.7 vs. 47.5 ± 4.3 mL.min-1.kg-1, p = 0.02), but not minute ventilation and heart rate, was higher for TEST compared to MSST. However, load increment and physiological responses at exhaustion did not differ between the two tests. Players’ ranking correlated negatively with oxygen uptake measured at submaximal and maximal loads for both TEST (r = -0.41; p = 0.01 and -0.55; p = 0.004) and MSST (r = -0.38; P = 0.05 and -0.51; p = 0.1). Conclusion Using TEST provides a tennis-specific assessment of aerobic fitness and may be used to prescribe aerobic exercise in a context more appropriate to the game than MSST. Results also indicate that VO2 values both at submaximal and maximal load reached during TEST and MSST are moderate predictors of players competitive ranking. PMID:27035342

  7. Estimating, Testing, and Comparing Specific Effects in Structural Equation Models: The Phantom Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macho, Siegfried; Ledermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The phantom model approach for estimating, testing, and comparing specific effects within structural equation models (SEMs) is presented. The rationale underlying this novel method consists in representing the specific effect to be assessed as a total effect within a separate latent variable model, the phantom model that is added to the main…

  8. Low specificities of HIV diagnostic tests caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Lejon, V; Ngoyi, D Mumba; Ilunga, M; Beelaert, G; Maes, I; Büscher, P; Fransen, K

    2010-08-01

    The accuracy of diagnostic tests for HIV in patients with tropical infections is poorly documented. Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is characterized by a polyclonal B-cell activation, constituting a risk for false-positive reactions to diagnostic tests, including HIV tests. A retrospective study of the accuracy of HIV diagnostic tests was performed with 360 human African HAT patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense before treatment and 163 T. b. gambiense-infected patients 2 years after successful treatment in Mbuji Mayi, East Kasai, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The sensitivities, specificities, and positive predictive values (PPVs) of individual tests and algorithms consisting of 3 rapid tests were determined. The sensitivity of all tests was 100% (11/11). The low specificity (96.3%, 335/348) and PPV (45.8%, 11/24) of a classical seroconfirmation strategy (Vironostika enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] followed by line immunoassay) complicated the determination of HIV status, which had to be determined by PCR. The specificities of the rapid diagnostic tests were 39.1% for Determine (136/348); 85.3 to 92.8% (297/348 to 323/348) for Vikia, ImmunoFlow, DoubleCheck, and Bioline; and 96.6 to 98.3% (336/348 to 342/348) for Uni-Gold, OraQuick, and Stat-Pak. The specificity of Vironostika was 67.5% (235/348). PPVs ranged between 4.9 and 64.7%. Combining 3 different rapid tests resulted in specificities of 98.3 to 100% (342/348 to 348/348) and PPVs of 64.7 to 100% (11/17 to 11/11). For cured HAT patients, specificities were significantly higher for Vironostika, Determine, Uni-Gold, and ImmunoFlow. T. b. gambiense infection decreases the specificities of antibody detection tests for HIV diagnosis. Unless tests have been validated for interference with HAT, HIV diagnosis using classical algorithms in untreated HAT patients should be avoided. Specific, validated combinations of 3 HIV rapid tests can increase specificity.

  9. Vertical jumping tests in volleyball: reliability, validity, and playing-position specifics.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Tine; Sekulic, Damir; Hadzic, Vedran; Uljevic, Ognjen; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2012-06-01

    Vertical jumping is known to be important in volleyball, and jumping performance tests are frequently studied for their reliability and validity. However, most studies concerning jumping in volleyball have dealt with standard rather than sport-specific jumping procedures and tests. The aims of this study, therefore, were (a) to determine the reliability and factorial validity of 2 volleyball-specific jumping tests, the block jump (BJ) test and the attack jump (AJ) test, relative to 2 frequently used and systematically validated jumping tests, the countermovement jump test and the squat jump test and (b) to establish volleyball position-specific differences in the jumping tests and simple anthropometric indices (body height [BH], body weight, and body mass index [BMI]). The BJ was performed from a defensive volleyball position, with the hands positioned in front of the chest. During an AJ, the players used a 2- to 3-step approach and performed a drop jump with an arm swing followed by a quick vertical jump. A total of 95 high-level volleyball players (all men) participated in this study. The reliability of the jumping tests ranged from 0.97 to 0.99 for Cronbach's alpha coefficients, from 0.93 to 0.97 for interitem correlation coefficients and from 2.1 to 2.8 for coefficients of variation. The highest reliability was found for the specific jumping tests. The factor analysis extracted one significant component, and all of the tests were highly intercorrelated. The analysis of variance with post hoc analysis showed significant differences between 5 playing positions in some of the jumping tests. In general, receivers had a greater jumping capacity, followed by libero players. The differences in jumping capacities should be emphasized vis-a-vis differences in the anthropometric measures of players, where middle hitters had higher BH and body weight, followed by opposite hitters and receivers, with no differences in the BMI between positions.

  10. Testing Job-Specific Literacy of Industrial Workers: Cooperation between Educators and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William W.; Stewart, Oran J.

    A test of job-specific literacy, called the McCoy Assessment of Worksite Literacy Abilities (MAWSLA), could not predict the job success of the 100 employees who took it. The 108-item test was based on literary tasks encountered by employees in the course of a routine day at McCoy Electronics Company, a 560-employee firm in Pennsylvania. The…

  11. Specific Resistance. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, John F.

    A commonly used test for determining filterability of conditioned sludge is the specific resistance (Buchner funnel) test. The sludge is filtered through filter paper using a Buchner funnel, and the time needed to obtain a given volume of filtrate (or for cake residue to begin to crack) is measured. The shorter the time, the better the…

  12. Proceedings: Nozzle Initiative Industry Advisory Committee on Standardization of Carbon-Phenolic Test Methods and Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the meeting is presented in conversational form. Some areas of discussion are as follow: resin advancement at NASA Marshall new technologies studies; NMR studies; SPIP/PAN development summary; computer modeling support; composite testing; carbon assay testing; activity and aerospace computer database; alternate rayon yarn sizing; fiber morphology; and carbon microballoons specifications.

  13. Investigations into the Appropriate Use of Various Item Types for Testing Specific Levels of Reading Proficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Sandra

    A study investigated the appropriate use of item types for testing reading at various levels of proficiency. It was specifically concerned with item types found in the standardized group-administered Defense Language Proficiency Tests. The item formats investigated were signs in the target language, identification of underlined information,…

  14. Development of a Culture Specific Critical Thinking Ability Test and Using It as a Supportive Diagnostic Test for Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köksal, Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a culture specific critical thinking ability test for 6, 7, and 8. grade students in Turkey and to use it as an assessment instrument for giftedness. For these purposes, item pool involving 22 items was formed by writing items focusing on the current and common events presented in (Turkish) media from…

  15. Domain-General and Domain-Specific Creative-Thinking Tests: Effects of Gender and Item Content on Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.; Wu, Junbin

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the effects of gender and item content of domain-general and domain-specific creative-thinking tests on four subscale scores of creative-thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration). Chinese tenth-grade students (234 males and 244 females) participated in the study. Domain-general creative thinking was measured…

  16. Damage parameter comparison for candidate intense neutron test facilities for fusion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, D.G.; Greenwood, L.R. ); Mann, F.M. )

    1990-07-31

    It is recognized worldwide that an intense source of fusion energy neutrons is needed to evaluate candidate fusion materials. At an International Energy Agency (IEA) workshop held in San Diego in February 1989, an Evaluation Panel recommended that three neutron source concepts be developed further. The panel also recommended that further comparisons were needed of their irradiation environments. In this paper, a comparison is made of damage parameters for beryllium, carbon, silicon, vanadium, iron, copper, molybdenum, and tungsten irradiated in spectra characteristic of di-Li, spallation, and beam-plasma (d-t) neutron sources and in a reference DEMO first wall spectrum. The treatment of neutron-induced displacement reactions is confined to the region below 20 MeV and transmutation reactions to below 50 MeV by the limited availability of calculational tools. The spallation spectrum is relatively soft; less than 2% of the neutrons are above 50 MeV. The transmutation results emphasize the need to define the neutron spectra at low, as well as high, energies; only the DEMO spectrum is adequate in this respect. Recommendations are given for further work to be performed under an international working group. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Damage Assessment of Creep Tested and Thermally Aged Udimet 520 Using Acousto-Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.; Cao, Wei

    2001-01-01

    Due to elevated temperatures and excessive stresses, turbine components may experience creep behavior. As a result, it is desirable to monitor and assess the current condition of such components. This study employed the Acousto-Ultrasonics (AU) method in an effort to monitor the state of the material at various percentages of used up creep life in the nickel base alloy, Udimet 520. A stepped specimen (i.e., varying cross sectional area) was employed which allowed for a postmortem nondestructive evaluation (NDE) analysis of the various levels of used up life. The overall objectives here were two fold: First, a user friendly, graphical interface AU system was developed, and second the new AU system was applied as an NDE tool to assess distributed damage resulting from creep. The experimental results demonstrated that the AU method shows promise as an NDE tool capable of detecting material changes as a function of used up creep life. Furthermore, the changes in the AU parameters were mainly attributed to the case of combined load and elevated temperature (i.e., creep) and not simply because of a timed exposure at elevated temperature (i.e., heat treatment or thermal aging).

  18. 26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG043535572; Drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 25 of 148; file no. 1320/76. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on standardization of carbon-phenolic test methods and specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Standardization of carbon-phenolic test methods and specifications are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: ashing procedures and alkali metal content of carbon fiber and fabrics; SPIP product identification code; SPIP initiative to adopt a water-soluble rayon yarn lubricant/size for weaving; fabric oxidation mass loss test; shelf life limit for prepregs, industry standard; silicon contamination update; resin, filler, and fabric content in prepreg; carbon assay testing calibration; thiokol rayon specifications; and SPIP low conductivity PAN program.

  20. Gene set analysis for self-contained tests: complex null and specific alternative hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Rahmatallah, Y.; Glazko, G.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The analysis of differentially expressed gene sets became a routine in the analyses of gene expression data. There is a multitude of tests available, ranging from aggregation tests that summarize gene-level statistics for a gene set to true multivariate tests, accounting for intergene correlations. Most of them detect complex departures from the null hypothesis but when the null hypothesis is rejected, the specific alternative leading to the rejection is not easily identifiable. Results: In this article we compare the power and Type I error rates of minimum-spanning tree (MST)-based non-parametric multivariate tests with several multivariate and aggregation tests, which are frequently used for pathway analyses. In our simulation study, we demonstrate that MST-based tests have power that is for many settings comparable with the power of conventional approaches, but outperform them in specific regions of the parameter space corresponding to biologically relevant configurations. Further, we find for simulated and for gene expression data that MST-based tests discriminate well against shift and scale alternatives. As a general result, we suggest a two-step practical analysis strategy that may increase the interpretability of experimental data: first, apply the most powerful multivariate test to find the subset of pathways for which the null hypothesis is rejected and second, apply MST-based tests to these pathways to select those that support specific alternative hypotheses. Contact: gvglazko@uams.edu or yrahmatallah@uams.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23044539

  1. Nozzle Initiative Industry Advisory Committee on Standardization of Carbon-Phenolic Test Methods and Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, William B. (Compiler); Pinoli, Pat C. (Compiler); Upton, Cindy G. (Compiler); Day, Tony (Compiler); Hill, Keith (Compiler); Stone, Frank (Compiler); Hall, William B.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a compendium of the presentations of the 12th biannual meeting of the Industry Advisory Committee under the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program. A complete transcript of the welcoming talks is provided. Presentation outlines and overheads are included for the other sessions: SPIP Overview, Past, Current and Future Activity; Test Methods Manual and Video Tape Library; Air Force Developed Computer Aided Cure Program and SPC/TQM Experience; Magneto-Optical mapper (MOM), Joint Army/NASA program to assess composite integrity; Permeability Testing; Moisture Effusion Testing by Karl Fischer Analysis; Statistical Analysis of Acceptance Test Data; NMR Phenolic Resin Advancement; Constituent Testing Highlights on the LDC Optimization Program; Carbon Sulfur Study, Performance Related Testing; Current Rayon Specifications and Future Availability; RSRM/SPC Implementation; SRM Test Methods, Delta/Titan/FBM/RSRM; and Open Forum on Performance Based Acceptance Testing -- Industry Experience.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF BURN TEST SPECIFICATIONS FOR FIRE PROTECTION MATERIALS IN RAM PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.

    2010-03-03

    The regulations in 10 CFR 71 require that the radioactive material (RAM) packages must be able to withstand specific fire conditions given in 10 CFR 71.73 during Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). This requirement is normally satisfied by extensive testing of full scale test specimens under required test conditions. Since fire test planning and execution is expensive and only provides a single snapshot into a package performance, every effort is made to minimize testing and supplement tests with results from computational thermal models. However, the accuracy of such thermal models depends heavily on the thermal properties of the fire insulating materials that are rarely available at the regulatory fire temperatures. To the best of authors knowledge no test standards exist that could be used to test the insulating materials and derive their thermal properties for the RAM package design. This paper presents a review of the existing industry fire testing standards and proposes testing methods that could serve as a standardized specification for testing fire insulating materials for use in RAM packages.

  3. Protective effects of melatonin and Glycyrrhiza glabra extract on ochratoxin A--induced damages on testes in mature rats.

    PubMed

    Malekinejad, Hassan; Mirzakhani, Navideh; Razi, Mazdak; Cheraghi, Hadi; Alizadeh, Arash; Dardmeh, Fereshteh

    2011-02-01

    The effect of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract (GgE) as a natural antioxidant and melatonin (MEL) on ochratoxin A (OTA)-induced histopathological damages on the testes and oxidative stress was evaluated in male rats. The animals were assigned into four groups (n = 8) including control and test groups. The rats in control group received saline and the animals in the test groups received (200 µg/kg) of OTA, (15 mg/kg) of MEL + (200 µg/kg) OTA and (100 mg/kg) of GgE + (200 µg/kg) OTA, respectively, during 28 consecutive days. The serum total antioxidant power (TAOP) and total thiol molecules (TTM) production were assessed. Moreover, histopathological and histochemical studies were also performed. The results showed that the TAOP and TTM were decreased in OTA-exposed rats, while the animals that received MEL + OTA or GgE + OTA showed an enhancement in the serum TAOP and TTM levels. Histopathological analyses demonstrated that in OTA-exposed rats, the testicular degeneration, seminiferous tubule atrophy, dissociation of germinative epithelium, vasodilatation with vascular thrombosis, perivascular immune cell infiltration, hypertrophied leydic cells, giant cell formation, and negative tubular differentiation index (TDI) were observed. Surprisingly, both the biochemical and histopathological examinations showed that MEL and GgE, albeit with some differences, exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced damages. In conclusion, this data suggest that OTA contamination in animal feeds and human foods could cause reproductive abnormalities. Our data also indicate that OTA, at least partly by interfering in oxidative stress system, exerts its toxic effects on testes whereas MEL and GgE with antioxidant properties could fairly protect rats against OTA toxic effects.

  4. Assessment of NDE methods for detecting cracks and damage in environmental barrier coated CMC tested under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Gorican, Daniel; Rauser, Richard W.

    2015-03-01

    For validating physics based analytical models predicting spallation life of environmental barrier coating (EBC) on fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, the fracture strength of EBC and kinetics of crack growth in EBC layers need to be experimentally determined under engine operating conditions. In this study, a multi layered barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS) based EBC-coated, melt infiltrated silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC) specimen was tensile tested at room temperature. Multiple tests were performed on a single specimen with increasing predetermined stress levels until final failure. During loading, the damage occurring in the EBC was monitored by digital image correlation (DIC). After unloading from the predetermined stress levels, the specimen was examined by optical microscopy and computed tomography (CT). Results indicate both optical microscopy and CT could not resolve the primary or secondary cracks developed during tensile loading until failure. On the other hand, DIC did show formation of a primary crack at ~ 50% of the ultimate tensile strength and this crack grew with increasing stress and eventually led to final failure of the specimen. Although some secondary cracks were seen in the DIC strain plots prior to final failure, the existence of these cracks were not confirmed by other methods. By using a higher resolution camera, it is possible to improve the capability of DIC in resolving secondary cracks and damage in coated specimen tested at room temperature, but use of DIC at high temperature requires significant development. Based on the current data, it appears that both optical microscopy and CT do not offer any hope for detecting crack initiation or determining crack growth in EBC coated CMC tested at room or high temperatures after the specimen has been unloaded. Other methods such as, thermography and optical/SEM of the polished cross section of EBC coated CMC specimens stressed to

  5. Honey and metformin ameliorated diabetes-induced damages in testes of rat; correlation with hormonal changes

    PubMed Central

    Nasrolahi, Ozra; Khaneshi, Fereshteh; Rahmani, Fatemeh; Razi, Mazdak

    2013-01-01

    Background: The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is on rise. Diabetes-induced oxidative stress has been known to affect liver, pancreas, kidney and reproductive organs pathologically. Honey is a natural product of bee with antioxidant properties. Objective: Current study aimed to analyze the protective effects of Metformin (MF) alone and MF+ natural honey co-administration on diabetes-induced histological derangements in testis of rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty six, mature male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups including; control, honey-dosed non-diabetic, diabetes-induced (65 mg/kg, single dose), honey-administrated diabetic (1.0 g/kg/day), Metformin-received diabetic (100 mg/kg/day), Metformin and honey-co-treated diabetic which were followed 40 days. The animals were anesthetized by diethyl ether and the blood samples were collected. The serum levels of testosterone, Insulin, LH and FSH analyzed using antibody enzyme immunoassay method. The testicular tissues were dissected out and underwent to histological analyses. Results: The biochemical analyses revealed that the diabetes resulted in significantly reduced testosterone (p<0.01), LH and FSH (P<0.01, 0.001) levels in serum. Light microscopic analyses showed remarkable (p<0.01) reduction in seminiferous tubules diameter (STD), spermiogenesis index (SPI) and thickness of the epithelium in the diabetic group versus control and co-treated groups. Simultaneous administration of the honey with MF could fairly up-regulate testosterone, LH and FSH levels. The animals in metformin and honey-treated group exhibited with improved tubules atrophy, elevated spermiogenesis index and germinal epithelium thickness. Conclusion: Our data indicated that co-administration of Metformin and honey could inhibit the diabetes-induced damages in testicular tissue. Moreover, the simultaneous administration of metformin and honey up-regulated the diabetes-reduced insulin, LH, FSH and testosterone levels. This

  6. Frontal Lobe Damage Impairs Process and Content in Semantic Memory: Evidence from Category Specific Effects in Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Jamie; Rodriguez, Amy D.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Grossman, Murray

    2010-01-01

    Portions of left inferior frontal cortex have been linked to semantic memory both in terms of the content of conceptual representation (e.g., motor aspects in an embodied semantics framework) and the cognitive processes used to access these representations (e.g., response selection). Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia (PNFA) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive atrophy of left inferior frontal cortex. PNFA can, therefore, provide a lesion model for examining the impact of frontal lobe damage on semantic processing and content. In the current study we examined picture naming in a cohort of PNFA patients across a variety of semantic categories. An embodied approach to semantic memory holds that sensorimotor features such as self-initiated action may assume differential importance for the representation of manufactured artifacts (e.g., naming hand tools). Embodiment theories might therefore predict that patients with frontal damage would be differentially impaired on manufactured artifacts relative to natural kinds, and this prediction was borne out. We also examined patterns of naming errors across a wide range of semantic categories and found that naming error distributions were heterogeneous. Although PNFA patients performed worse overall on naming manufactured artifacts, there was no reliable relationship between anomia and manipulability across semantic categories. These results add to a growing body of research arguing against a purely sensorimotor account of semantic memory, suggesting instead a more nuanced balance of process and content in how the brain represents conceptual knowledge. PMID:20576258

  7. The Trail Making Test elucidates neural substrates of specific post-stroke executive dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan T.; Lam, Benjamin; Honjo, Kie; Harry, Robin D.; McNeely, Alicia A.; Gao, Fu-Qiang; Ramirez, Joel; Scott, Christopher J.M; Ganda, Anoop; Zhao, Jiali; Zhou, X. Joe; Graham, Simon J.; Rangwala, Novena; Gibson, Erin; Lobaugh, Nancy J.; Kiss, Alex; Stuss, Donald T.; Nyenhuis, David L.; Lee, Byung-Chul; Kang, Yeonwook; Black, Sandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) is typified by prominent deficits in processing speed and executive function. However, the underlying neuroanatomical substrates of executive deficits are not well understood and further elucidation is needed. There may be utility in fractionating executive functions to delineate neural substrates. Methods One test amenable to fine delineation is the Trail Making Test (TMT), which emphasizes processing speed (TMT-A) and set-shifting (TMT-B-A difference, proportion, quotient scores and TMT-B set-shifting errors). The TMT was administered to two overt ischemic stroke cohorts from a multinational study: (i) a chronic stroke cohort (N=61) and (ii) an acute-sub-acute stroke cohort (N=45). Volumetric quantification of ischemic stroke and White Matter HyperIntensities (WMH) was done on MRI, along with ratings of involvement of cholinergic projections, using the previously published Cholinergic Hyperintensities Projections Scale (CHIPS). Damage to the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), which co-localizes with some cholinergic projections, was also documented. Results Multiple linear regression analyses were completed. While larger infarcts (β=0.37, p<0.0001) were associated with slower processing speed, CHIPS severity (β=0.39, p<0.0001) was associated with all metrics of set shifting. Left SLF damage, however, was only associated with the difference score (β=0.17, p=0.03). These findings were replicated in both cohorts. Patients with ≥2 TMT-B set shifting errors also had greater CHIPS severity. Conclusions In this multinational stroke cohort study, damage to lateral cholinergic pathways and the SLF emerged as significant neuroanatomical correlates for executive deficits in set shifting. PMID:26382176

  8. Assessment of DNA damage in coal open-cast mining workers using the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus test and the comet assay.

    PubMed

    León-Mejía, Grethel; Espitia-Pérez, Lyda; Hoyos-Giraldo, Luz Stella; Da Silva, Juliana; Hartmann, Andreas; Henriques, João Antônio Pêgas; Quintana, Milton

    2011-01-15

    Coal mining is one of the most important causes of environmental pollution, as large quantities of coal dust particles are emitted. Colombia-South America has large natural coal reserves and "El Cerrejón" is the world's largest open-cast mine located in the northern department of Guajira. The aim of the present study was to evaluate genotoxic effects in a population exposed to coal residues from the open-cast mine "El Cerrejón". 100 exposed workers and 100 non-exposed control individuals were included in this study. The exposed group was divided according to different mining area activities: (i). Transport of extracted coal, (ii). Equipment field maintenance, (iii). Coal stripping and, (iv). Coal embarking. Blood samples were taken to investigate biomarkers of genotoxicity, specifically, primary DNA damage as damage index (DI), tail length and% of tail DNA using the Comet assay (alkaline version) and chromosome damage as micronucleus (MN) frequency in lymphocytes. Both biomarkers showed statistically significantly higher values in the exposed group compared to the non-exposed control group. No difference was observed between the exposed groups executing different mining activities. These results indicate that exposure to coal mining residues may result in an increased genotoxic exposure in coal mining workers. We did not find a correlation between age, alcohol consumption and service time with the biomarkers of genotoxicity. Our results are the first data of genotoxic effects induced by coal mining exposure in Colombia, and thus, contribute to the exploration of test batteries use for monitoring of exposed populations and may stimulate designing control, hygiene and prevention strategies for occupational health risk assessment in developing countries.

  9. Treponema pallidum specific IgM haemagglutination test for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Kubo, E; Yokota, M; Kayashima, T; Tomizawa, T

    1984-01-01

    The Treponema pallidum specific IgM haemagglutination (TP-IgM-HA) test uses erythrocytes sensitised with antiserum to human IgM to separate IgM from IgG in serum. Specific antitreponemal IgM captured in this way is detected by adding a second reagent comprising erythrocytes sensitised with T pallidum antigen. Eighty two serum samples from 82 patients with untreated syphilis, 521 samples from 73 patients with treated syphilis, and 1872 samples from people who did not have syphilis were examined by the 19S(IgM)-TPHA (T pallidum haemagglutination), IgM-FTA-ABS (fluorescent treponemal antibody absorbed), TP-IgM-ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), and TP-IgM-HA tests for the presence of 19S(IgM) antibodies specific to treponemes. The sensitivity of the TP-IgM-HA test was 97.6% and the specificity was 99.7%. We also traced IgM specific to treponemes in untreated patients with primary syphilis by four different tests. The TP-IgM-HA test results clearly reflected the effect of the treatment. PMID:6394097

  10. Prostate-specific antigen testing in inner London general practices: are those at higher risk most likely to get tested?

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Ashworth, Mark; Mathur, Rohini; Hull, Sally; Dudek, Alexandra; Chowdhury, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between factors influencing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing prevalence including prostate cancer risk factors (age, ethnicity, obesity) and non-risk factors (social deprivation and comorbidity). Setting A cross-sectional database of 136 inner London general practices from 1 August 2009 to 31 July 2014. Participants Men aged ≥40 years without prostate cancer were included (n=150 481). Primary outcome Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the association between PSA testing and age, ethnicity, social deprivation, body mass index (BMI) and comorbidity while adjusting for age, benign prostatic hypertrophy, prostatitis and tamsulosin or finasteride use. Results PSA testing prevalence was 8.2% (2013–2014), and the mean age was 54 years (SD 11). PSA testing was positively associated with age (OR 70–74 years compared to 40–44 years: 7.34 (95% CI 6.82 to 7.90)), ethnicity (black) (OR compared to white: 1.78 (95% CI 1.71 to 1.85)), increasing BMI and cardiovascular comorbidity. Testing was negatively associated with Chinese ethnicity and with increasing social deprivation. Conclusions PSA testing among black patients was higher compared to that among white patients, which differs from lower testing rates seen in previous studies. PSA testing was positively associated with prostate cancer risk factors and non-risk factors. Association with non-risk factors may increase the risk of unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:27406644

  11. Brain-Specific Cytoskeletal Damage Markers in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Is There a Common Pattern between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhak, Ahmed; Junker, Andreas; Brettschneider, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C.; Otto, Markus; Tumani, Hayrettin

    2015-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders share a common pathophysiological pathway involving axonal degeneration despite different etiological triggers. Analysis of cytoskeletal markers such as neurofilaments, protein tau and tubulin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may be a useful approach to detect the process of axonal damage and its severity during disease course. In this article, we review the published literature regarding brain-specific CSF markers for cytoskeletal damage in primary progressive multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in order to evaluate their utility as a biomarker for disease progression in conjunction with imaging and histological markers which might also be useful in other neurodegenerative diseases associated with affection of the upper motor neurons. A long-term benefit of such an approach could be facilitating early diagnostic and prognostic tools and assessment of treatment efficacy of disease modifying drugs. PMID:26263977

  12. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact. UDRI Light Gas Gun Test Data Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The HEX bumper was originally developed for use with the Defensive Shields Demonstration (DSD) Program. The University of Dayton Research Institute was a subcontractor to the Martin Marietta Astronautics Group in Denver Colorado at the time the HEX bumper was designed for use on the DSD Program. The design originated at the University and was essentially made available to interested parties. All HEX bumpers used in the DSD Program were fabricated at the University by rolling sheet stock through a special set of rollers. Two pieces of 3003-H14 aluminum sheet were rolled to produce the bumpers evaluated in Shots 4-1302 and 4-1304. A brief summary of the results of these tests is given in below. Contact prints of the multiple-exposure, orthogonal view radiographs of the debris clouds produced by the tests are attached. A sketch of the HEX bumper design is also attached.

  13. [Usefulness of color vision test for early detection of neurological damages by neurotoxic substances].

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Choi, Kyungho; Chae, Hong Jae; Paek, Domyung

    2008-11-01

    This paper reviews the published literature that is concerned with color vision impairment from industrial and environmental exposure to neurotoxic substances, and we evaluated whether testing for color vision impairment could be an affordable procedure for assessing these neurotoxic effects. In general, most cases of congenital color vision impairment are red-green, and blue-yellow impairment is extremely rare. However, most of the acquired color vision impairment that is related to age, alcohol or environmental factors is blue-yellow impairment. Therefore, many studies have been performed to identify this relationship between exposure to neurotoxic substances, such as organic solvents and heavy metals, and the prevalence of blue-yellow color vision impairment. The test for color vision impairment is known to be very sensitive to the early signs of nervous system dysfunction and this can be useful for making the early diagnosis of neurotoxic effects from exposure to very low concentrations of toxic substances.

  14. The role of ketotifen in the prevention of testicular damage in rats with experimental unilateral undescended testes

    PubMed Central

    Acikgoz, Abdullah; Asci, Ramazan; Aydin, Oguz; Çavuş, Hikmet; Donmez, Gamze; Buyukalpelli, Recep

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study conducted on rats were to determine mast cell (MC) proliferation on undescended testes (UDTs); whether there is a correlation between MC proliferation and testicular damage; and whether testicular damage can be prevented with administration of an MC blocker. Sixty-five newborn male rats were divided into three groups. During the neonatal period, unilateral UDTs were experimentally induced in Group 2 and Group 3. The rats in Group 3 were given 1 mg/kg/day ketotifen orally until the end of the study. Groups 2 (n=30) and 3 (n=15) were divided into groups of ten and five rats, respectively, each of which underwent bilateral orchiectomy in either the prepubertal, pubertal, or adult period. Group 1 (n=15) underwent a sham operation followed by bilateral orchiectomy, with five rats in each of the prepubertal, pubertal, and adult periods. Testicular MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas, biopsy scores, interstitial connective tissue, seminiferous tubule (ST) diameters, and the basement membrane thickness of STs were evaluated. In Group 2 the ST diameters in the UDTs decreased, the number of MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas increased, ST basement membranes thickened, and spermatogenesis decreased. The number of MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas of the descended testes increased and spermatogenesis decreased. In Group 3, the number of MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas decreased. In unilateral UDTs, the number of MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas increased in both testes. Fibrosis developed in the ST basement membranes and interstitial areas, and spermatogenesis deteriorated. Testicular fibrosis may be prevented with administration of an MC blocker. PMID:25364234

  15. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  16. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination.

  17. Estimating, testing, and comparing specific effects in structural equation models: the phantom model approach.

    PubMed

    Macho, Siegfried; Ledermann, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    The phantom model approach for estimating, testing, and comparing specific effects within structural equation models (SEMs) is presented. The rationale underlying this novel method consists in representing the specific effect to be assessed as a total effect within a separate latent variable model, the phantom model that is added to the main model. The following favorable features characterize the method: (a) It enables the estimation, testing, and comparison of arbitrary specific effects for recursive and nonrecursive models with latent and manifest variables; (b) it enables the bootstrapping of confidence intervals; and (c) it can be applied with all standard SEM programs permitting latent variables, the specification of equality constraints, and the bootstrapping of total effects. These features along with the fact that no manipulation of matrices and formulas is required make the approach particularly suitable for applied researchers. The method is illustrated by means of 3 examples with real data sets.

  18. Simulation of brain damage on the Bender-Gestalt test by college subjects.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, A R; Reed, M R

    1975-06-01

    The study found that nonbraindamaged college subjects could not simulate organicity on the Bender-Gestalt test when instructed to do so. Although Pascal-Suttell and Canter scoring methods failed to differentiate malingerers from an organic criterion group, an ABPP clinician sorted 89% of the records correctly in a pilot study. Differentiating criteria were then spelled out from the pilot study protocols. In the main study the expert clinician correctly identified all 20 malingerers. Subsequent studies of intra- and inter-rater reliability produced satisfactory results.

  19. Thermal Impact on Damaged Boom Clay and Opalinus Clay: Permeameter and Isostatic Tests with μCT Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. J.; Maes, T.; Vandervoort, F.; Sillen, X.; Van Marcke, P.; Honty, M.; Dierick, M.; Vanderniepen, P.

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of the TIMODAZ project, permeameter tests and isostatic tests were performed on Boom Clay and Opalinus Clay in order to assess the impact of temperature, pore water composition, and confining stress on the sealing of damaged samples of Boom Clay and Opalinus Clay. A microfocus X-ray computed tomography technique was used to visualize the evolution of the sealing process. Compared to the fast sealing of Boom Clay, the sealing of Opalinus Clay was much slower. The heating showed a significant, favorable impact on the sealing behavior of Opalinus Clay under permeameter test conditions, while the sealing behavior of Boom Clay appeared to be unaffected. Tests performed under isostatic conditions did not reveal a significant influence of a heating-cooling cycle on the sealing behavior of these clays. The reappearance of the fractures or holes in the samples after dismantling confirms earlier observations which showed that after sealing, the original mechanical properties are not recovered. In other words, a heating cycle does not seem to induce healing.

  20. Beam test evaluation of electromagnetic calorimeter modules made from proton-damaged PbWO4 crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, T.; Adzic, P.; Ahuja, S.; ...

    2016-04-11

    The performance of electromagnetic calorimeter modules made of proton-irradiated PbWO4 crystals has been studied in beam tests. The modules, similar to those used in the Endcaps of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), were formed from 5×5 matrices of PbWO4 crystals, which had previously been exposed to 24 GeV protons up to integrated fluences between 2.1 × 1013 and 1.3 × 1014 cm–2. These correspond to the predicted charged-hadron fluences in the ECAL Endcaps at pseudorapidity η = 2.6 after about 500 fb–1 and 3000 fb–1 respectively, corresponding to the end of the LHC and High Luminosity LHC operation periods. Themore » irradiated crystals have a lower light transmission for wavelengths corresponding to the scintillation light, and a correspondingly reduced light output. A comparison with four crystals irradiated in situ in CMS showed no significant rate dependence of hadron-induced damage. A degradation of the energy resolution and a non-linear response to electron showers are observed in damaged crystals. Direct measurements of the light output from the crystals show the amplitude decreasing and pulse becoming faster as the fluence increases. The latter is interpreted, through comparison with simulation, as a side-effect of the degradation in light transmission. In conclusion, the experimental results obtained can be used to estimate the long term performance of the CMS ECAL.« less

  1. Aphasic and non-brain-damaged adults' descriptions of aphasia test pictures and gender-biased pictures.

    PubMed

    Correia, L; Brookshire, R H; Nicholas, L E

    1990-11-01

    Twelve aphasic and 12 non-brain-damaged adult males described the speech elicitation pictures from the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE), the Minnesota Test for Differential Diagnosis of Aphasia (MTDDA), the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB), and six pictures representing male-biased or female-biased daily-life situations. For each speech sample we calculated number of words, words per minute, number of correct information units, percentage of words that were correct information units, and percentage of correct information units that were nouns or adjectives (amount of enumeration or naming). The WAB picture elicited more enumeration than the BDAE or MTDDA pictures, and information was produced at a slower rate in response to the WAB picture than the other two pictures. These differences were statistically significant and appear to be clinically important. Gender bias had statistically significant effects on two measures. Male-biased pictures elicited significantly more words and significantly more correct information units than female-biased pictures. However, these differences were small and do not appear to be clinically important. Two of the five measures (words per minute and percentage of words that were correct information units) differentiated non-brain-damaged speakers from aphasic speakers. The magnitude of these differences suggests that these measures provide clinically important information about the problems aphasic adults may have when they produce narrative discourse.

  2. Beam test evaluation of electromagnetic calorimeter modules made from proton-damaged PbWO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Adzic, P.; Ahuja, S.; Anderson, D.; Andrews, M. B.; Antropov, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Arcidiacono, R.; Arenton, M. W.; Argirò, S.; Askew, A.; Attikis, A.; Auffray, E.; Baccaro, S.; Baffioni, S.; Bailleux, D.; Baillon, P.; Barney, D.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Bartosik, N.; Becheva, E.; Bein, S.; Silva, C. Beirāo Da Cruz E.; Bell, K. W.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Berry, D.; Besancon, M.; Betev, B.; Bialas, W.; Bianchini, L.; Biino, C.; Bitioukov, S.; Bornheim, A.; Brianza, L.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Brown, R. M.; Brummitt, A.; Busson, P.; Candelise, V.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cartiglia, N.; Cavallari, F.; Chang, Y. W.; Chen, K. F.; Chevenier, G.; Chipaux, R.; Clement, E.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Corpe, L.; Couderc, F.; Courbon, B.; Cox, B.; Cucciati, G.; Cussans, D.; D'imperio, G.; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D. R.; Dafinei, I.; Daguin, J.; Daskalakis, G.; Tinoco Mendes, A. D.; De Guio, F.; Degano, A.; Dejardin, M.; Del Re, D.; Della Ricca, G.; Denegri, D.; Depasse, P.; Dev, N.; Deyrail, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diamond, B.; Diemoz, M.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Doan, T. H.; Dobrzynski, L.; Dolgopolov, A.; Donegà, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dröge, M.; Durkin, T.; Dutta, D.; El Mamouni, H.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Elmalis, E.; Fabbro, B.; Fasanella, G.; Faure, J.; Fay, J.; Fedorov, A.; Ferri, F.; Francis, B.; Frank, N.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Ganjour, S.; Gascon, S.; Gastal, M.; Geerebaert, Y.; Gelli, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Givernaud, A.; Gninenko, S.; Godinovic, N.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Golubev, N.; Govoni, P.; Gras, P.; Guilloux, F.; Haller, C.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hansen, M.; Hansen, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Heath, H. F.; Hill, J.; Hirosky, R.; Hobson, P. R.; Holme, O.; Honma, A.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Iiyama, Y.; Ille, B.; Ingram, Q.; Jain, S.; Jarry, P.; Jessop, C.; Jovanovic, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, K. Y.; Kellams, N.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khatiwada, A.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Korzhik, M.; Kovac, M.; Kubota, Y.; Kucher, I.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Kuo, C.; Kyberd, P.; Kyriakis, A.; Latyshev, G.; Lecoq, P.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lei, Y. J.; Lelas, D.; Lethuillier, M.; Li, H.; Lin, W.; Liu, Y. F.; Locci, E.; Longo, E.; Loukas, D.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchini, M. T.; Lustermann, W.; Mackay, C. K.; Magniette, F.; Malcles, J.; Malhotra, S.; Mandjavidze, I.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marinelli, N.; Marini, A. C.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Massironi, A.; Matveev, V.; Mechinsky, V.; Meng, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Milosevic, J.; Mousa, J.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Neu, C.; Newman, H.; Nicolaou, C.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Obertino, M. M.; Organtini, G.; Orimoto, T.; Paganini, P.; Paganis, E.; Paganoni, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Panov, V.; Paramatti, R.; Parracho, P.; Pastrone, N.; Paulini, M.; Pauss, F.; Pauwels, K.; Pellegrino, F.; Pena, C.; Perniè, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrakou, E.; Petyt, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Piroué, P.; Planer, M.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Prosper, H.; Ptochos, F.; Puljak, I.; Quittnat, M.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahatlou, S.; Rander, J.; Ranjan, K.; Rasteiro Da Silva, J.; Razis, P. A.; Romanteau, T.; Rosowsky, A.; Rovelli, C.; Rusack, R.; Salerno, R.; Santanastasio, F.; Santra, A.; Schönenberger, M.; Seez, C.; Sharma, V.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Shiu, J. G.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Singovsky, A.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sirois, Y.; Smiljkovic, N.; Soffi, L.; Sun, M.; Symonds, P.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tambe, N.; Tarasov, I.; Taroni, S.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Thiant, F.; Titov, M.; Torbet, M.; Trapani, P. P.; Tropea, P.; Tsai, J. f.; Tsirou, A.; Turkewitz, J.; Tyurin, N.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Uzunian, A.; Valls, N.; Varela, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Verdini, P. G.; Vichoudis, P.; Vlassov, E.; Wang, J.; Wang, T.; Weinberg, M.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Zabi, A.; Zahid, S.; Zelepoukine, S.; Zghiche, A.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, R.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of electromagnetic calorimeter modules made of proton-irradiated PbWO4 crystals has been studied in beam tests. The modules, similar to those used in the Endcaps of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), were formed from 5×5 matrices of PbWO4 crystals, which had previously been exposed to 24 GeV protons up to integrated fluences between 2.1× 1013 and 1.3× 1014 cm-2. These correspond to the predicted charged-hadron fluences in the ECAL Endcaps at pseudorapidity η = 2.6 after about 500 fb-1 and 3000 fb-1 respectively, corresponding to the end of the LHC and High Luminosity LHC operation periods. The irradiated crystals have a lower light transmission for wavelengths corresponding to the scintillation light, and a correspondingly reduced light output. A comparison with four crystals irradiated in situ in CMS showed no significant rate dependence of hadron-induced damage. A degradation of the energy resolution and a non-linear response to electron showers are observed in damaged crystals. Direct measurements of the light output from the crystals show the amplitude decreasing and pulse becoming faster as the fluence increases. The latter is interpreted, through comparison with simulation, as a side-effect of the degradation in light transmission. The experimental results obtained can be used to estimate the long term performance of the CMS ECAL.

  3. Effects of Tributyltin Antifouling Paint Leachates on Pearl Harbor Organisms. Site-Specific Flowthrough Bioassay Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Organotin paint leachate. antifoulitip coa~tings. marine n~ii r, isms.A.benthicFIEL GRUP SB GOUP organisms. harbor pollutani fributt Iti omplx cmmuitie...of organotins should be closely monitored for ossible shifts in dominance of specific organisms- ~ 20 DISTRIBUJTION, AVAILABIUITY OF ABSTRACT 21...d* J 77. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Site-specific bioassay tests were performed to determine the effects of organotin paint leachate on complex communities of

  4. Development of a sports specific aerobic capacity test for karate - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nunan, David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop an aerobic fitness assessment test for competitive Karate practitioners and describe the preliminary findings. Five well-trained, competitive Karate practitioners participated in this study. A protocol simulating common attack strikes used in competition Karate sparring was developed from video analysis. In addition, pilot testing established a specific sequence of strikes and timings to be used in the test. The time to perform the strike sequence remained the same, whilst the time between strike sequence performances was progressively reduced. The aim of the test was to increase intensity of exercise through a decrease in recovery. On two separate occasions, absolute and relative peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), peak ventilation (VEpeak), maximum heart rate (HRM), and time to exhaustion (TE) obtained during the test were recorded. Subjective feedback provided by the participants was positive in that participants felt the test accurately simulated actions of a competitive sparring situation, and as a result athletes felt more motivated to perform well on this test. There was no significant between test difference in absolute VO2peak, relative VO2peak, HRM and TE (p > 0.05), indicating a potentially high reproducibility with the new test for these variables (test 1-test 2 difference of 0.04 L·min(-1), 1 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), -3 beats·min(-1), and 28 s; respectively). However, VEpeak displayed potentially less reproducibility due to a significant difference observed between tests (test 1- test 2 difference of -2.8 L·min(-1), p < 0.05). There was a significant relationship between TE and relative VO2peak (R(2) = 0.77, p < 0.001). Further developments to the test will need to address issues with work rate/force output assessment/monitoring. The new test accurately simulates the actions of competitive Karate sparring. Key PointsThis is the first attempt at an aerobic fitness test specific to competitive Karate practitioners

  5. Development of a Sports Specific Aerobic Capacity Test for Karate - A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nunan, David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop an aerobic fitness assessment test for competitive Karate practitioners and describe the preliminary findings. Five well-trained, competitive Karate practitioners participated in this study. A protocol simulating common attack strikes used in competition Karate sparring was developed from video analysis. In addition, pilot testing established a specific sequence of strikes and timings to be used in the test. The time to perform the strike sequence remained the same, whilst the time between strike sequence performances was progressively reduced. The aim of the test was to increase intensity of exercise through a decrease in recovery. On two separate occasions, absolute and relative peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), peak ventilation (VEpeak), maximum heart rate (HRM), and time to exhaustion (TE) obtained during the test were recorded. Subjective feedback provided by the participants was positive in that participants felt the test accurately simulated actions of a competitive sparring situation, and as a result athletes felt more motivated to perform well on this test. There was no significant between test difference in absolute VO2peak, relative VO2peak, HRM and TE (p > 0.05), indicating a potentially high reproducibility with the new test for these variables (test 1-test 2 difference of 0.04 L·min-1, 1 ml·kg-1·min-1, -3 beats·min-1, and 28 s; respectively). However, VEpeak displayed potentially less reproducibility due to a significant difference observed between tests (test 1- test 2 difference of -2.8 L·min-1, p < 0.05). There was a significant relationship between TE and relative VO2peak (R2 = 0.77, p < 0.001). Further developments to the test will need to address issues with work rate/force output assessment/monitoring. The new test accurately simulates the actions of competitive Karate sparring. Key Points This is the first attempt at an aerobic fitness test specific to competitive Karate practitioners Anecdotal reports

  6. Sensitivity and specificity of parallel or serial serological testing for detection of canine Leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mauro Maciel de; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges; Marcelino, Andreza Pain; Barbosa, José Ronaldo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2016-03-01

    In Brazil, human and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) caused by Leishmania infantum has undergone urbanisation since 1980, constituting a public health problem, and serological tests are tools of choice for identifying infected dogs. Until recently, the Brazilian zoonoses control program recommended enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) as the screening and confirmatory methods, respectively, for the detection of canine infection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the accuracy of ELISA and IFA in parallel or serial combinations. The reference standard comprised the results of direct visualisation of parasites in histological sections, immunohistochemical test, or isolation of the parasite in culture. Samples from 98 cases and 1,327 noncases were included. Individually, both tests presented sensitivity of 91.8% and 90.8%, and specificity of 83.4 and 53.4%, for the ELISA and IFA, respectively. When tests were used in parallel combination, sensitivity attained 99.2%, while specificity dropped to 44.8%. When used in serial combination (ELISA followed by IFA), decreased sensitivity (83.3%) and increased specificity (92.5%) were observed. Serial testing approach improved specificity with moderate loss in sensitivity. This strategy could partially fulfill the needs of public health and dog owners for a more accurate diagnosis of CVL.

  7. Specific PCR detection of tiger, leopard, and lion ingredients from test samples.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jijuan; Xu, Junyi; Liu, Ran; Yu, Ke; Wang, Changwen

    2011-01-01

    A PCR method was developed for specific detection of tiger, leopard, and lion DNA from test specimens for inspection and quarantine or for law-enforced animal protection. Three pairs of specific primers were designed based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of tiger, leopard, and lion and used in the PCR testing. To mimic the effect of food processing on the sensitivity of the test, the tiger muscle and bovine bonemeal powder samples were treated at 133 degrees C for 30 min. At this processing condition, the method was sensitive enough to detect as low as 0.05% of tiger-derived ingredients from the mixed bonemeal powders. The data demonstrate that our PCR method is convenient and economic, with high sensitivity and repeatability, and can be used to detect and identify tiger, leopard, and lion ingredients from various test samples.

  8. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TESTING THE PRESENCE OF SPECIFIC ATOMIC ELEMENTS IN A SUBSTANCE

    DOEpatents

    Putman, J.L.

    1960-01-26

    Detection of specific atomic elements in a substance and particularly the applicability to well logging are discussed. The principal novelty resides in the determination of several of the auxiliary energy peaks in addition to the main energy peak of the gamma-ray energy spectrum of a substance and comparison of such peaks to the spectrum of the specific atomic element being tested for. thus resulting in identification of same. The invention facilitates the identification of specific elements even when in the presence of other elements having similar gamma energy spectra as to the main energy peaks.

  9. Immediate hypersensitivity to penicillins with negative skin tests--the value of specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Silva, R; Cruz, L; Botelho, C; Castro, E; Cadinha, S; Castel-Branco, M G; Rodrigues, J

    2009-08-01

    The determination of specific IgE in patients with history of penicillins hypersensitivity is simple, safe and widely available. The positive and negative predictive values of this determination, however, are not yet established. In order to evaluate them, we performed specific IgE determination and diagnostic drug challenges in a group of 22 patients with a clear history of immediate penicillins hypersensitivity but negative skin tests. In this sample, the positive and negative predictive values were 29% and 87%, respectively. This seems to indicate that a positive specific IgE is not enough to confirm the diagnosis, and further study is necessary.

  10. Modeling Spatial Structure of Rock Fracture Surfaces Before and After Shear Test: A Method for Estimating Morphology of Damaged Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanouri, Nima; Karimi Nasab, Saeed

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with the structural analysis of rock fracture roughness, and accordingly, a method is developed for estimating/predicting the post-shearing 3D geometry of the fracture surface. For this purpose, surfaces of three natural rock fractures were digitized and studied before and after the direct shear test. The variogram analysis of the surfaces indicated a strong non-linear trend in the topography data. Hence, the spatial variability of the rock fracture surfaces was decomposed to: one deterministic component, characterized by a high-order polynomial representing the large-scale undulations, and one stochastic component, described by the variogram of residuals representing the small-scale roughness. Using an image-processing technique, a total of 343 damage zones with different sizes, shapes, initial roughness characteristics, local stress fields, and/or asperity strength values were spatially located and clustered. In order to characterize the overall spatial structure of the degraded zones, the concept of the `pseudo-zonal variogram' was introduced. The results showed that the spatial continuity at the damage zones increases due to the asperity degradation. The increase in the variogram range is anisotropic and tends to be higher along the shearing. Consequently, the direction of maximum continuity rotates towards the shear direction. After modeling the evolution of the spatial structure with shearing and detecting boundaries of the degraded areas, a methodology was presented to provide a regression-kriging estimate of the morphology of sheared surfaces. The proposed method can be considered as a cost-free and reasonably accurate alternative to expensive techniques of scanning the rock fracture surface after the shear test.

  11. Determination of specific yield for the Biscayne Aquifer with a canal-drawdown test.

    PubMed

    Bolster, C H; Genereux, D P; Saiers, J E

    2001-01-01

    Data from a large-scale canal-drawdown test were used to estimate the specific yield (sy) of the Biscayne Aquifer, an unconfined limestone aquifer in southeast Florida. The drawdown test involved dropping the water level in a canal by about 30 cm and monitoring the response of hydraulic head in the surrounding aquifer. Specific yield was determined by analyzing data from the unsteady portion of the drawdown test using an analytical stream-aquifer interaction model (Zlotnik and Huang 1999). Specific yield values computed from drawdown at individual piezometers ranged from 0.050 to 0.57, most likely indicating heterogeneity of specific yield within the aquifer (small-scale variation in hydraulic conductivity may also have contributed to the differences in sy among piezometers). A value of 0.15 (our best estimate) was computed based on all drawdown data from all piezometers. We incorporated our best estimate of specific yield into a large-scale two-dimensional numerical MODFLOW-based ground water flow model and made predictions of head during a 183-day period at four wells located 337 to 2546 m from the canal. We found good agreement between observed and predicted heads, indicating our estimate of specific yield is representative of the large portion of the Biscayne Aquifer studied here. This work represents a practical and novel approach to the determination of a key hydrogeological parameter (the storage parameter needed for simulation and calculation of transient unconfined ground water flow), at a large spatial scale (a common scale for water resource modeling), for a highly transmissive limestone aquifer (in which execution of a traditional pump test would be impractical and would likely yield ambiguous results). Accurate estimates of specific yield and other hydrogeological parameters are critical for management of water supply, Everglades environmental restoration, flood control, and other issues related to the ground water hydrology of the Biscayne Aquifer.

  12. Sport-Specific Motor Fitness Tests in Water Polo: Reliability, Validity and Playing Position Differences

    PubMed Central

    Uljevic, Ognjen; Spasic, Miodrag; Sekulic, Damir

    2013-01-01

    Sport-specific motor fitness tests are not often examined in water polo. In this study we examined the reliability, factorial and discriminative validity of 10 water-polo-specific motor-fitness tests, namely: three tests of in-water jumps (thrusts), two characteristic swimming sprints (10 and 20 metres from the water start), three ball-throws (shoots), one test of passing precision (accuracy), and a test of the dynamometric force produced while using the eggbeater kick. The sample of subjects consisted of 54 young male water polo players (15 to 17 years of age; 1.86 ± 0.07 m, and 83.1 ± 9.9 kg). All tests were applied over three testing trials. Reliability analyses included Cronbach Alpha coefficients (CA), inter-item- correlations (IIR) and coefficients of the variation (CV), while an analysis of variance was used to define any systematic bias between the testing trials. All tests except the test of accuracy (precision) were found to be reliable (CA ranged from 0.83 to 0.97; IIR from 0.62 to 0.91; CV from 2% to 21%); with small and irregular biases between the testing trials. Factor analysis revealed that jumping capacities as well as throwing and sprinting capacities should be observed as a relatively independent latent dimensions among young water polo players. Discriminative validity of the applied tests is partially proven since the playing positions significantly (p < 0.05) differed in some of the applied tests, with the points being superior in their fitness capacities in comparison to their teammates. This study included players from one of the world’s best junior National leagues, and reported values could be used as fitness standards for such an age. Further studies are needed to examine the applicability of the proposed test procedures to older subjects and females. Key Points Here presented and validated sport specific water polo motor fitness tests are found to be reliable in the sample of young male water polo players. Factor analysis revealed

  13. Sport-specific motor fitness tests in water polo: reliability, validity and playing position differences.

    PubMed

    Uljevic, Ognjen; Spasic, Miodrag; Sekulic, Damir

    2013-01-01

    Sport-specific motor fitness tests are not often examined in water polo. In this study we examined the reliability, factorial and discriminative validity of 10 water-polo-specific motor-fitness tests, namely: three tests of in-water jumps (thrusts), two characteristic swimming sprints (10 and 20 metres from the water start), three ball-throws (shoots), one test of passing precision (accuracy), and a test of the dynamometric force produced while using the eggbeater kick. The sample of subjects consisted of 54 young male water polo players (15 to 17 years of age; 1.86 ± 0.07 m, and 83.1 ± 9.9 kg). All tests were applied over three testing trials. Reliability analyses included Cronbach Alpha coefficients (CA), inter-item- correlations (IIR) and coefficients of the variation (CV), while an analysis of variance was used to define any systematic bias between the testing trials. All tests except the test of accuracy (precision) were found to be reliable (CA ranged from 0.83 to 0.97; IIR from 0.62 to 0.91; CV from 2% to 21%); with small and irregular biases between the testing trials. Factor analysis revealed that jumping capacities as well as throwing and sprinting capacities should be observed as a relatively independent latent dimensions among young water polo players. Discriminative validity of the applied tests is partially proven since the playing positions significantly (p < 0.05) differed in some of the applied tests, with the points being superior in their fitness capacities in comparison to their teammates. This study included players from one of the world's best junior National leagues, and reported values could be used as fitness standards for such an age. Further studies are needed to examine the applicability of the proposed test procedures to older subjects and females. Key PointsHere presented and validated sport specific water polo motor fitness tests are found to be reliable in the sample of young male water polo players.Factor analysis revealed

  14. Effects of a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink on specific soccer tests and performance.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M; Mazic, Sanja

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink on specific soccer tests and performance. Twenty-two professional male soccer players volunteered to participate in the study. The players were allocated to two assigned trials ingesting carbohydrate-electrolyte drink (7% carbohydrates, sodium 24 mmol.l-1, chloride 12 mmol.l-1, potassium 3 mmol.l-1) or placebo during a 90 min on-field soccer match. The trials were matched for subjects' age, weight, height and maximal oxygen uptake. Immediately after the match, players completed four soccer-specific skill tests. Blood glucose concentration [mean (SD)] was higher at the end of the match-play in the carbohydrate-electrolyte trial than in the placebo trial (4.4 (0.3) vs. 4.0 (0.3) mmol.l-1, P < 0.05). Subjects in the carbohydrate-electrolyte trial finished the specific dribble test faster in comparison with subjects in the placebo trial (12.9 (0.4) vs. 13.6 (0.5) s, P < 0.05). Ratings of the precision test were higher in the carbohydrate-electrolyte trial as compared to the placebo trial (17.2 (4.8) vs. 15.1 (5.2), P < 0.05) but there were no differences in coordination test and power test results between trials. The main finding of the present study indicates that supplementation with carbohydrate-electrolyte solution improved soccer-specific skill performance and recovery after an on-field soccer match compared with ingestion of placebo. This suggests that soccer players should consume carbohydrate-electrolyte fluid throughout a game to help prevent deterioration in specific skill performance.

  15. Validity of critical frequency test for measuring table tennis aerobic endurance through specific protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zagatto, Alessandro M.; Papoti, Marcelo; Gobatto, Claudio A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate critical frequency specific test (critf) for the estimation of the aerobic endurance in table tennis players. Methods: Eight male international-level table tennis players participated of this study. Specific tests were applied by using a mechanical ball thrower to control the intensity of the exercise. The critf was determined by applying three or four series of exercises to exhaustion (Tlim). The critf was evaluated by using lactate steady state test (90, 100, and 106 % of critf intensity). The other specific test was an incremental protocol used to determine the anaerobic threshold (AnTBI) and the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) using a ball thrower. Results: The critf (39.87 ± 3.31 balls·min-1) was not significantly different among AnTBI (48.11 ± 7.36 balls·min- 1) and OBLA3.5 (49.36 ± 12.04 balls·min-1) frequencies and it was correlated with AnTBI parameter (r = 0.78). At frequencies of the 90 and 100% of critf a dynamic equilibrium was verified in lactate concentration between the eighth and twentieth minutes. However, this dynamic equilibrium was not found at 106% intensity. Conclusion: The data indicate that in table tennis the critf model can be used for measuring the aerobic endurance. Key pointsIn table tennis is need the use of a specific protocol for evaluation of the aerobic endurance.The critical frequency test in table tennis seems to represent the intensity of maximal equilibrium of lactatemia.The critical frequency test can be used for measuring table tennis aerobic endurance through specific protocol. PMID:24149951

  16. DNA damage in fish (Anguilla anguilla) exposed to a glyphosate-based herbicide -- elucidation of organ-specificity and the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Gaivão, I; Santos, M A; Pacheco, M

    2012-03-18

    Organophosphate herbicides are among the most dangerous agrochemicals for the aquatic environment. In this context, Roundup(®), a glyphosate-based herbicide, has been widely detected in natural water bodies, representing a potential threat to non-target organisms, namely fish. Thus, the main goal of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of Roundup(®) in the teleost fish Anguilla anguilla, addressing the possible causative involvement of oxidative stress. Fish were exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of this herbicide (58 and 116 μgL(-1)) during one or three days. The standard procedure of the comet assay was applied to gill and liver cells in order to determine organ-specific genetic damage. Since liver is a central organ in xenobiotic metabolism, nucleoids of hepatic cells were also incubated with a lesion-specific repair enzyme (formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase - FPG), in order to recognise oxidised purines. Antioxidants were determined in both organs as indicators of pro-oxidant state. In general, both organs displayed an increase in DNA damage for the two Roundup(®) concentrations and exposure times, although liver showed to be less susceptible to the lower concentration. The enzyme-modified comet assay showed the occurrence of FPG-sensitive sites in liver only after a 3-day exposure to the higher Roundup(®) concentration. The antioxidant defences were in general unresponsive, despite a single increment of catalase activity in gills (116 μgL(-1), 3-day) and a decrease of superoxide dismutase activity in liver (58 μgL(-1), 3-day). Overall, the mechanisms involved in Roundup(®)-induced DNA strand-breaks showed to be similar in both organs. Nevertheless, it was demonstrated that the type of DNA damage varies with the concentration and exposure duration. Hence, after 1-day exposure, an increase on pro-oxidant state is not a necessary condition for the induction of DNA-damaging effects of Roundup(®). By increasing the

  17. California Verbal Learning Test Indicators of Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction: Sensitivity and Specificity in Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Kelly L.; Greve, Kevin W.; Bianchini, Kevin J.; Brennan, Adrianne

    2006-01-01

    The present study used well-defined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mixed neurological (other than TBI) and psychiatric samples to examine the specificity and sensitivity to Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction (MND) of four individual California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) variables and eight composite CVLT malingering indicators. Participants…

  18. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5540 Section 866.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5530 - Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5530 Section 866.5530 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... abnormalities, e.g., gamma heavy chain disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5540 Section 866.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5540 Section 866.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5530 - Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5530 Section 866.5530 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... abnormalities, e.g., gamma heavy chain disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5540 Section 866.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5530 - Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5530 Section 866.5530 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... abnormalities, e.g., gamma heavy chain disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  5. 75 FR 20832 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada Test Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada Test Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal...

  6. Relationship between anaerobic parameters provided from MAOD and critical power model in specific table tennis test.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, A M; Gobatto, C A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the validity of the curvature constant parameter (W'), calculated from 2-parameter mathematical equations of critical power model, in estimating the anaerobic capacity and anaerobic work capacity from a table tennis-specific test. Specifically, we aimed to i) compare constants estimated from three critical intensity models in a table tennis-specific test (Cf); ii) correlate each estimated W' with the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD); iii) correlate each W' with the total amount of anaerobic work (W ANAER) performed in each exercise bout performed during the Cf test. Nine national-standard male table tennis players participated in the study. MAOD was 63.0(10.8) mL · kg - 1 and W' values were 32.8(6.6) balls for the linear-frequency model, 38.3(6.9) balls for linear-total balls model, 48.7(8.9) balls for Nonlinear-2 parameter model. Estimated W' from the Nonlinear 2-parameter model was significantly different from W' from the other 2 models (P<0.05). Also, none W' values were significantly correlated with MAOD or W ANAER (r ranged from - 0.58 to 0.51; P>0.13). Thus, W' estimated from the 2-parameter mathematical equations did not correlate with MAOD or W ANAER in table tennis-specific tests, indicating that W' may not provide a strong and valid estimation of anaerobic capacity and anaerobic capacity work.

  7. Interactions among Domain-Specific Expectancies, Values, and Gender: Predictors of Test Anxiety during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selkirk, Laura C.; Bouchey, Heather A.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses on the interaction between students' domain-specific expectancies and values as a predictor of test anxiety. A subsample of adolescents from the MSALT dataset are used in the current study; students complete measures during the spring of sixth grade and again during the spring of seventh grade. Overall, findings provide…

  8. Testing a Bilinear Domain-Specific Model of Acculturation and Enculturation across Generational Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    This study attempted to replicate Miller's (2007) finding that a bilinear domain-specific model of Asian American acculturation demonstrated superior model fit when compared to unilinear and bilinear domain-generic models. Current confirmatory factor analytic tests of competing acculturation models in a cross-validation sample of 306 participants…

  9. 12. "SITE PLAN." Test Area 1100. Specifications No. OC35973; Drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "SITE PLAN." Test Area 1-100. Specifications No. OC359-73; Drawing No. 5841-C-1; D.O. SERIES AW1525/7 Rev. A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Using a Table of Specifications to Improve Teacher-Constructed Traditional Tests: An Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiDonato-Barnes, Nicole; Fives, Helenrose; Krause, Emily S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated if instruction on a Table of Specifications (TOS) would influence the quality of classroom test construction. Results should prove informative for educational researchers, teacher educators, and practising teachers interested in evidenced-based strategies that may improve assessment-related practices. Fifty-three college…

  11. Development of USES Specific Aptitude Test Battery for Ticket Agent (any ind.) 238.367-026.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Dept. of Employment Security, Salt Lake City. Western Test Development Field Center.

    The United States Employment Service (USES) Specific Aptitude Test Battery (SATB) for Ticket Agent is evaluated from three points of view: (1) technical adequacy of the research; (2) fairness to minorities; and (3) usefulness of the battery to Employment Service staff and employers in selecting individuals for ticket agent positions. Research…

  12. A specific polymerase chain reaction test for the identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Prère, Marie-Françoise; Fayet, Olivier A

    2011-05-01

    Using an approach based on the comparison of arbitrary primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genomic profiles from oral streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae strains, we identified a 434-bp genomic fragment apparently specific for S. pneumoniae. From the nucleotidic sequence of this common fragment, a pair of primers was designed and tested on a set of strains comprising the major Streptococcus species. One species, S. anginosus, gave an amplification product of the same length as S. pneumoniae. Sequence comparison of the S. anginosus and S. pneumoniae amplicons revealed several variations which were used to define a new set of primers giving a 181-bp S. pneumoniae-specific fragment. The amplified fragment contains the 5' terminal part of a gene encoding a putative sugar-specific permease and an intergenic sequence. The PCR test was evaluated on 257 strains of invasive S. pneumoniae corresponding to clinical isolates and on 153 non-pneumoniae oral streptococci strains; in addition, 3 S. pseudopneumoniae strains were tested. With these primers, an amplification product was only obtained with the S. pneumoniae strains. Moreover, the test was successfully evaluated on 10 atypical S. pneumoniae strains related to pneumococcal diseases. In this study, we therefore established the capacity of a simple PCR test to discriminate S. pneumoniae from other Streptococci (including S. pseudopneumoniae), thus allowing rapid and accurate diagnosis.

  13. McNemar chi2 test revisited: comparing sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic examinations.

    PubMed

    Trajman, A; Luiz, R R

    2008-01-01

    When evaluating a novel diagnostic examination for clinical use, it should be compared with a reference standard, defined as the best available examination, which may include clinical and laboratory criteria. The novel examination and reference standard's results are usually presented in the form of a 2 x 2 table, which allows calculation of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. It has been recommended that the measures of statistical uncertainty should be reported, such as the 95% confidence interval, when evaluating the accuracy of diagnostic examinations. Comparing the difference in sensitivity or specificity of a novel examination with the reference standard is important when evaluating its usefulness. The McNemar chi(2) test, used to compare discordance of two dichotomous responses, can be applied for this purpose. However, applying the McNemar test to a 2 x 2 table for comparing the accuracy of examinations is not recommended, since this test is sensitive to the proportion of positive versus negative subjects. Moreover, if the novel examination has higher sensitivity than the one considered as the reference standard, constructing a classic 2 x 2 table would result in low specificity of the novel examination. Thus, in order to compare sensitivities and specificities between examinations, this table is inappropriate and an independent reference standard is necessary. In this article, we propose the use of the McNemar chi(2) test to compare sensitivities between examinations using a 2 x 2 table exclusively among diseased patients, defined by a set of criteria and follow-up of patients. Likewise, specificities can be compared applying the McNemar test among healthy individuals.

  14. Shake table tests of suspended ceilings to simulate the observed damage in the M s7.0 Lushan earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duozhi; Dai, Junwu; Qu, Zhe; Ning, Xiaoqing

    2016-06-01

    Severe damage to suspended ceilings of metal grids and lay-in panels was observed in public buildings during the 2013 M s7.0 Lushan earthquake in China. Over the past several years, suspended ceilings have been widely used practice in public buildings throughout China, including government offices, schools and hospitals. To investigate the damage mechanism of suspended ceilings, a series of three-dimensional shake table tests was conducted to reproduce the observed damage. A full-scale reinforced concrete frame was constructed as the testing frame for the ceiling, which was single-story and infilled with brick masonry walls to represent the local construction of low-rise buildings. In general, the ceiling in the tests exhibited similar damage phenomena as the field observations, such as higher vulnerability of perimeter elements and extensive damage to the cross runners. However, it exhibited lower fragility in terms of peak ground/roof accelerations at the initiation of damage. Further investigations are needed to clarify the reasons for this behavior.

  15. The wrist hyperflexion and abduction of the thumb (WHAT) test: a more specific and sensitive test to diagnose de Quervain tenosynovitis than the Eichhoff's Test.

    PubMed

    Goubau, J F; Goubau, L; Van Tongel, A; Van Hoonacker, P; Kerckhove, D; Berghs, B

    2014-03-01

    De Quervain's disease has different clinical features. Different tests have been described in the past, the most popular test being the Eichhoff's test, often wrongly named as the Finkelstein's test. Over the years, a misinterpretation has occurred between these two tests, the latter being confused with the first. To compare the Eichhoff's test with a new test, the wrist hyperflexion and abduction of the thumb test, we set up a prospective study over a period of three years for a cohort of 100 patients (88 women, 12 men) presenting spontaneous pain over the radial side of the styloid of the radius (de Quervain tendinopathy). The purpose of the study was to compare the accuracy of the Eichhoff's test and wrist hyperflexion and abduction of the thumb test to diagnose correctly de Quervain's disease by comparing clinical findings using those tests with the results on ultrasound. The wrist hyperflexion and abduction of the thumb test revealed greater sensitivity (0.99) and an improved specificity (0.29) together with a slightly better positive predictive value (0.95) and an improved negative predictive value (0.67). Moreover, the study showed us that the wrist hyperflexion and abduction of the thumb test is very valuable in diagnosing dynamic instability after successful decompression of the first extensor compartment. Our results support that the wrist hyperflexion and abduction of the thumb test is a more precise tool for the diagnosis of de Quervain's disease than the Eichhoff's test and thus could be adopted to guide clinical diagnosis in the early stages of de Quervain's tendinopathy.

  16. Practice Effect and Normative Data of an HIV-specific Neuropsychological Testing Battery among Healthy Thais

    PubMed Central

    Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Hutchings, Nicholas; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Wendelken, Lauren; Saengtawan, Putthachard; Paul, Robert; Chomchey, Nitiya; Fletcher, James LK; Chalermchai, Thep; Valcour, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Objective A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in Bangkok, Thailand between 2008 and 2013 in order to determine the practice effect of serial neuropsychological testing and establish normative data among normal (HIV-uninfected) Thai volunteers. Material and Method The authors enrolled 511 cognitively healthy individuals (HIV-uninfected, no drug abuse or other previous/current neurological or psychological conditions) to assess baseline performance on a HIV-specific neuropsychological testing battery. Ninety-nine subjects were re-assessed at 6 and 12 months to evaluate practice effects. Results The mean age of the 99 subjects completing longitudinal visits was 49.2 years and 53 were male. The authors identified improved mean raw scores on most neuropsychological tests with repeated measurements; however, only change in WHO Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT) scores (learning, attention, immediate and delayed recall tasks) met statistical significance, with larger differences seen between baseline and 6-month compared to 6 and 12 months follow-up. Older age correlated with poorer baseline raw score, and was a predictor of worse performance at 6 months and 12 months on several tasks. Level of education was associated with practice effects on several tests. No similar effects were observed with gender. Conclusion The authors identified improved performance after repeated measurements revealing a significant practice effect on an HIV-specific neuropsychological testing battery employed in Bangkok, Thailand. Main predictors were age and educational attainment. PMID:25518198

  17. Relationship between herpes simplex virus-1-specific antibody titers and cortical brain damage in Alzheimer’s disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Baglio, Francesca; Agostini, Simone; Agostini, Monia Cabinio; Laganà, Maria M.; Hernis, Ambra; Margaritella, Nicolò; Guerini, Franca R.; Zanzottera, Milena; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a multifactorial disease with a still barely understood etiology. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has long been suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD because of its neurotropism, high rate of infection in the general population, and life-long persistence in neuronal cells, particularly in the same brain regions that are usually altered in AD. The goal of this study was to evaluate HSV-1-specific humoral immune responses in patients with a diagnosis of either AD or amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and to verify the possible relation between HSV-1-specific antibody (Ab) titers and cortical damage; results were compared to those obtained in a group of healthy controls (HC). HSV-1 serum IgG titers were measured in 225 subjects (83 AD, 68 aMCI, and 74 HC). HSV-specific Ab avidity and cortical gray matter volumes analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were evaluated as well in a subgroup of these individuals (44 AD, 23 aMCI, and 26 HC). Results showed that, whereas HSV-1 seroprevalence and IgG avidity were comparable in the three groups, increased Ab titers (p < 0.001) were detected in AD and aMCI compared to HC. Positive significant correlations were detected in AD patients alone between HSV-1 IgG titers and cortical volumes in orbitofrontal (region of interest, ROI1 RSp0.56; p = 0.0001) and bilateral temporal cortices (ROI2 RSp0.57; p < 0.0001; ROI3 RSp0.48; p = 0.001); no correlations could be detected between IgG avidity and MRI parameters. Results herein suggest that a strong HSV-1-specific humoral response could be protective toward AD-associated cortical damage. PMID:25360113

  18. Determination of Aerobic Power Through a Specific Test for Taekwondo - A Predictive Equation Model

    PubMed Central

    Louro, Hugo; Matias, Ricardo; Brito, João; Costa, Aldo M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our aim was to verify the concurrent validity of a maximal taekwondo specific test (TST) to predict VO2max through an explanatory model. Seventeen elite male taekwondo athletes (age: 17.59 ± 4.34 years; body height: 1.72 ± 6.5 m; body mass: 61.3 ± 8.7 kg) performed two graded maximal exercise tests on different days: a 20 m multistage shuttle run test (SRT) and an incremental TST. We recorded test time, VO2max, ventilation, a heart rate and time to exhaustion. Significant differences were found between observed and estimated VO2max values [F (2, 16) = 5.77, p < 0.01]; post-hoc subgroup analysis revealed the existence of significant differences (p = 0.04) between the estimated VO2max value in the SRT and the observed value recorded in the TST (58.4 ± 6.4 ml/kg/min and 52.6 ± 5.2 ml/kg/min, respectively). Our analysis also revealed a moderate correlation between both testing protocols regarding VO2max (r = 0.70; p = 0.005), test time (r = 0.77; p = 0.02) and ventilation (r = 0.69; p = 0.03). There was no proportional bias in the mean difference (t = -1.04; p = 0.313), and there was a level of agreement between both tests. An equation/model was used to estimate VO2max during the TST based on the mean heart rate, test time, body height and mass, which explained 74.3% of the observed VO2max variability. A moderate correlation was found between the observed and predicted VO2max values in the taekwondo TST (r = 0.74, p = 0.001). Our results suggest that an incremental specific test estimates VO2max of elite taekwondo athletes with acceptable concurrent validity. PMID:28149417

  19. Determination of Aerobic Power Through a Specific Test for Taekwondo - A Predictive Equation Model.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Fernando P S; Louro, Hugo; Matias, Ricardo; Brito, João; Costa, Aldo M

    2016-12-01

    Our aim was to verify the concurrent validity of a maximal taekwondo specific test (TST) to predict VO2max through an explanatory model. Seventeen elite male taekwondo athletes (age: 17.59 ± 4.34 years; body height: 1.72 ± 6.5 m; body mass: 61.3 ± 8.7 kg) performed two graded maximal exercise tests on different days: a 20 m multistage shuttle run test (SRT) and an incremental TST. We recorded test time, VO2max, ventilation, a heart rate and time to exhaustion. Significant differences were found between observed and estimated VO2max values [F (2, 16) = 5.77, p < 0.01]; post-hoc subgroup analysis revealed the existence of significant differences (p = 0.04) between the estimated VO2max value in the SRT and the observed value recorded in the TST (58.4 ± 6.4 ml/kg/min and 52.6 ± 5.2 ml/kg/min, respectively). Our analysis also revealed a moderate correlation between both testing protocols regarding VO2max (r = 0.70; p = 0.005), test time (r = 0.77; p = 0.02) and ventilation (r = 0.69; p = 0.03). There was no proportional bias in the mean difference (t = -1.04; p = 0.313), and there was a level of agreement between both tests. An equation/model was used to estimate VO2max during the TST based on the mean heart rate, test time, body height and mass, which explained 74.3% of the observed VO2max variability. A moderate correlation was found between the observed and predicted VO2max values in the taekwondo TST (r = 0.74, p = 0.001). Our results suggest that an incremental specific test estimates VO2max of elite taekwondo athletes with acceptable concurrent validity.

  20. Beam test evaluation of electromagnetic calorimeter modules made from proton-damaged PbWO4 crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Adzic, P.; Ahuja, S.; Anderson, D.; Andrews, M. B.; Antropov, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Arcidiacono, R.; Arenton, M. W.; Argirò, S.; Askew, A.; Attikis, A.; Auffray, E.; Baccaro, S.; Baffioni, S.; Bailleux, D.; Baillon, P.; Barney, D.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Bartosik, N.; Becheva, E.; Bein, S.; Beirāo Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Bell, K. W.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Berry, D.; Besancon, M.; Betev, B.; Bialas, W.; Bianchini, L.; Biino, C.; Bitioukov, S.; Bornheim, A.; Brianza, L.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Brown, R. M.; Brummitt, A.; Busson, P.; Candelise, V.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Cartiglia, N.; Cavallari, F.; Chang, Y. W.; Chen, K. F.; Chevenier, G.; Chipaux, R.; Clement, E.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Corpe, L.; Couderc, F.; Courbon, B.; Cox, B.; Cucciati, G.; Cussans, D.; D'imperio, G.; Calafiori, D. R. Da Silva Di; Dafinei, I.; Daguin, J.; Daskalakis, G.; Mendes, A. D. Tinoco; Guio, F. De; Degano, A.; Dejardin, M.; Re, D. Del; Ricca, G. Della; Denegri, D.; Depasse, P.; Dev, N.; Deyrail, D.; Marco, E. Di; Diamond, B.; Diemoz, M.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Doan, T. H.; Dobrzynski, L.; Dolgopolov, A.; Donegà, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dröge, M.; Durkin, T.; Dutta, D.; Mamouni, H. El; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Elmalis, E.; Fabbro, B.; Fasanella, G.; Faure, J.; Fay, J.; Fedorov, A.; Ferri, F.; Francis, B.; Frank, N.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Ganjour, S.; Gascon, S.; Gastal, M.; Geerebaert, Y.; Gelli, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Givernaud, A.; Gninenko, S.; Godinovic, N.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Golubev, N.; Govoni, P.; Gras, P.; Guilloux, F.; Haller, C.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Hansen, M.; Hansen, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Heath, H. F.; Hill, J.; Hirosky, R.; Hobson, P. R.; Holme, O.; Honma, A.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.; Iiyama, Y.; Ille, B.; Ingram, Q.; Jain, S.; Jarry, P.; Jessop, C.; Jovanovic, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, K. Y.; Kellams, N.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khatiwada, A.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Korzhik, M.; Kovac, M.; Kubota, Y.; Kucher, I.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Kuo, C.; Kyberd, P.; Kyriakis, A.; Latyshev, G.; Lecoq, P.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lei, Y. J.; Lelas, D.; Lethuillier, M.; Li, H.; Lin, W.; Liu, Y. F.; Locci, E.; Longo, E.; Loukas, D.; Lu, R. -S.; Lucchini, M. T.; Lustermann, W.; Mackay, C. K.; Magniette, F.; Malcles, J.; Malhotra, S.; Mandjavidze, I.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marinelli, N.; Marini, A. C.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Massironi, A.; Matveev, V.; Mechinsky, V.; Meng, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Milosevic, J.; Mousa, J.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Neu, C.; Newman, H.; Nicolaou, C.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Obertino, M. M.; Organtini, G.; Orimoto, T.; Paganini, P.; Paganis, E.; Paganoni, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Panov, V.; Paramatti, R.; Parracho, P.; Pastrone, N.; Paulini, M.; Pauss, F.; Pauwels, K.; Pellegrino, F.; Pena, C.; Perniè, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrakou, E.; Petyt, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Piroué, P.; Planer, M.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Prosper, H.; Ptochos, F.; Puljak, I.; Quittnat, M.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahatlou, S.; Rander, J.; Ranjan, K.; Silva, J. Rasteiro Da; Razis, P. A.; Romanteau, T.; Rosowsky, A.; Rovelli, C.; Rusack, R.; Salerno, R.; Santanastasio, F.; Santra, A.; Schönenberger, M.; Seez, C.; Sharma, V.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Shiu, J. G.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Singovsky, A.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sirois, Y.; Smiljkovic, N.; Soffi, L.; Sun, M.; Symonds, P.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Tambe, N.; Tarasov, I.; Taroni, S.; Lima, R. Teixeira De; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Thiant, F.; Titov, M.; Torbet, M.; Trapani, P. P.; Tropea, P.; Tsai, J. f.; Tsirou, A.; Turkewitz, J.; Tyurin, N.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Uzunian, A.; Valls, N.; Varela, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Verdini, P. G.; Vichoudis, P.; Vlassov, E.; Wang, J.; Wang, T.; Weinberg, M.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Zabi, A.; Zahid, S.; Zelepoukine, S.; Zghiche, A.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, R.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2016-04-11

    The performance of electromagnetic calorimeter modules made of proton-irradiated PbWO4 crystals has been studied in beam tests. The modules, similar to those used in the Endcaps of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), were formed from 5×5 matrices of PbWO4 crystals, which had previously been exposed to 24 GeV protons up to integrated fluences between 2.1 × 1013 and 1.3 × 1014 cm–2. These correspond to the predicted charged-hadron fluences in the ECAL Endcaps at pseudorapidity η = 2.6 after about 500 fb–1 and 3000 fb–1 respectively, corresponding to the end of the LHC and High Luminosity LHC operation periods. The irradiated crystals have a lower light transmission for wavelengths corresponding to the scintillation light, and a correspondingly reduced light output. A comparison with four crystals irradiated in situ in CMS showed no significant rate dependence of hadron-induced damage. A degradation of the energy resolution and a non-linear response to electron showers are observed in damaged crystals. Direct measurements of the light output from the crystals show the amplitude decreasing and pulse becoming faster as the fluence increases. The latter is interpreted, through comparison with simulation, as a side-effect of the degradation in light transmission. In conclusion, the experimental results obtained can be used to estimate the long term performance of the CMS ECAL.

  1. BIOMEX Experiment: Ultrastructural Alterations, Molecular Damage and Survival of the Fungus Cryomyces antarcticus after the Experiment Verification Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacelli, Claudia; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; De Vera, Jean-Pierre; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; de la Torre, Rosa; Onofri, Silvano

    2016-04-01

    The search for traces of extinct or extant life in extraterrestrial environments is one of the main goals for astrobiologists; due to their ability to withstand stress producing conditions, extremophiles are perfect candidates for astrobiological studies. The BIOMEX project aims to test the ability of biomolecules and cell components to preserve their stability under space and Mars-like conditions, while at the same time investigating the survival capability of microorganisms. The experiment has been launched into space and is being exposed on the EXPOSE-R2 payload, outside of the International Space Station (ISS) over a time-span of 1.5 years. Along with a number of other extremophilic microorganisms, the Antarctic cryptoendolithic black fungus Cryomyces antarcticus CCFEE 515 has been included in the experiment. Before launch, dried colonies grown on Lunar and Martian regolith analogues were exposed to vacuum, irradiation and temperature cycles in ground based experiments (EVT1 and EVT2). Cultural and molecular tests revealed that the fungus survived on rock analogues under space and simulated Martian conditions, showing only slight ultra-structural and molecular damage.

  2. Correlation between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral "Lesions" and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain?

    PubMed

    Balestra, Costantino; Germonpré, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SCUBA diving exposes divers to decompression sickness (DCS). There has been considerable debate whether divers with a Patent Foramen Ovale of the heart have a higher risk of DCS because of the possible right-to-left shunt of venous decompression bubbles into the arterial circulation. Symptomatic neurological DCS has been shown to cause permanent damage to brain and spinal cord tissue; it has been suggested that divers with PFO may be at higher risk of developing subclinical brain lesions because of repeated asymptomatic embolization of decompression-induced nitrogen bubbles. These studies however suffer from several methodological flaws, including self-selection bias. We recruited 200 volunteer divers from a recreational diving population who had never suffered from DCS; we then randomly selected 50 of those for further investigation. The selected divers underwent brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging to detect asymptomatic brain lesions, contrast trans-oesophageal echocardiography for PFO, and extensive neuro-psychometric testing. Neuro-psychometry results were compared with a control group of normal subjects and a separate control group for subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents. Forty two divers underwent all the tests and are included in this report. Grade 2 Patent Foramen Ovale was found in 16 (38%) of the divers; brain Unidentified Bright Objects (UBO's) were found in 5 (11.9%). There was no association between PFO and the presence of UBO's (P = 0.693) or their size (p = 0.5) in divers. Neuropsychometric testing in divers was significantly worse from controls in two tests, Digit Span Backwards (DSB; p < 0.05) and Symbol-Digit-Substitution (SDS; p < 0.01). Compared to subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents, divers scored similar on DSB and SDS tests, but significantly better on the Simple Reaction Time (REA) and Hand-Eye Coordination (EYE) tests. There was no correlation between PFO, number of UBO's and any of the neuro-psychometric tests. We conclude that for

  3. Protective effects of hepatocyte-specific glycyrrhetic derivatives against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifei; Yang, Lingyun; Han, Yaodan; Wu, Zhenwei; Chen, Pan; Zhang, Huibin; Zhou, Jinpei

    2017-03-20

    Glycyrrhetic acid (GA), the main hydrolysate of glycyrrhizic acid extracted from the roots of the Chinese herb Glycyrrhiza glabra, was reported to be accumulated in hepatocytes due to the extensive distribution of GA receptors in liver. A series of hepatocyte-specific derivatives on the basis of anetholtrithione and glycyrrhizic were designed and synthesized. The potential beneficial effect was evaluated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury model. In addition, the hepatoprotective activity of these derivatives was assessed by measuring levels of serum marker enzymes, including serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the ratio of GSH to GSSG. Gratifyingly, compounds 5a-c (100mg/kg, p.o.) markedly prevented CCl4-induced elevation of levels of serum GPT, GOT. A comparative histopathological study of liver exhibited almost a normal liver lobular architecture and cell structure of the livers, as compared to CCl4-treated group. These findings were confirmed with the histopathological observations, where hepatocyte-specific glycyrrhetic acid derivatives 5a-c were capable of reversing the toxic effects of CCl4 on hepatocytes.

  4. Sensitivity and specificity of Ankara University Cerebral Dominance Inventory in comparison with the Wada test.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Nesrin Helvacı; Bingol, Ayse Petek

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the Ankara University Cerebral Dominance Inventory (AUCDI) in determining left cerebral dominance compared with the Wada test. The AUCDI and Wada test were applied to 49 patients referred to Ankara University for epilepsy surgery. Hand, foot and 'total' preference scores were specified according to the results of the inventory. Thirty-eight of the patients had left cerebral dominance and 11 had atypical cerebral dominance for language. 86 % of the patients were right-handed and 43 % were right-footed. When compared with the results of the Wada test, the sensitivity of the AUCDI for each 'total preference', and hand and foot preference was 90, 95 and 50 % and specificity was 46, 46 and 82 %, respectively. The percentage of right-footed patients was low when compared with the other studies. This difference might result from the method used for assessing foot preference by the actual demonstration of the task rather than just asking about the performance. The AUCDI was found to be sensitive in terms of 'total preference' and hand preference, and specific in terms of foot preference for determining the left hemisphere dominance in patients preferring the right side. It was a cheap and noninvasive alternative to the Wada test, appropriate for clinical bedside evaluation.

  5. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides: Protective effects against heat-induced damage of rat testes and H2O2-induced DNA damage in mouse testicular cells and beneficial effect on sexual behavior and reproductive function of hemicastrated rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiong; Li, Zhuoneng; Huang, Xiaolan; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Shenghua; Cai, Yi-Zhong

    2006-07-10

    Lycium barbarum, a famous Chinese medicinal herb, has a long history of use as a traditional remedy for male infertility. Polysaccharides are the most important functional constituent in L. barbarum fruits. We systematically investigated the effect of L. barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on rat testis damage induced by a physical factor (43 degrees C heat exposure), on DNA damage of mouse testicular cells induced by a chemical factor (H2O2), and on sexual behavior and reproductive function of hemicastrated male rats. The results showed that LBP provided a protective effect against the testicular tissue damage induced by heat exposure. When compared with negative control, a suitable concentration of LBP significantly increased testis and epididymis weights, improved superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and raised sexual hormone levels in the damaged rat testes. LBP had a dose-dependent protective effect against DNA oxidative damage of mouse testicular cells induced by H2O2. LBP improved the copulatory performance and reproductive function of hemicastrated male rats, such as shortened penis erection latency and mount latency, regulated secretion of sexual hormones and increased hormone levels, raised accessory sexual organ weights, and improved sperm quantity and quality. The present findings support the folk reputation of L. barbarum fruits as an aphrodisiac and fertility-facilitating agent, and provide scientific evidence for a basis for the extensive use of L. barbarum fruits as a traditional remedy for male infertility in China.

  6. The sensitivity and specificity of clinical measures of sport concussion: three tests are better than one

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Jacob E; Brown, Cathleen N; Schmidt, Julianne; Macciocchi, Stephen N; Blueitt, Damond; Cullum, C Munro; Ferrara, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Context A battery of clinical measures of neurocognition, balance and symptoms has been recommended for the management of sport concussion (SC) but is based on variable evidence. Objective To examine the sensitivity and specificity of a battery of tests to assess SC in college athletes. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or other participants Division 1 athletes diagnosed with a SC (n=40) who were 20.2±1.60 years of age and 180.5±11.12 cm tall and healthy athletes (n=40) who were 19.0±0.93 years of age and 179.1±11.39 cm tall were enrolled. Intervention(s) Participants were administered Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT), the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and the Revised Head Injury Scale (HIS-r) prior to and up to 24 h following injury between the 2004 and 2014 sport seasons. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using predictive discriminant analyses (PDA) and clinical interpretation guidelines. Main outcome measures Outcome measures included baseline and postinjury ImPACT, SOT and HIS-r composite scores. Results Using PDA, each clinical measure's sensitivity ranged from 55.0% to 77.5% and specificity ranged from 52.5% to 100%. The test battery possessed a sensitivity and specificity of 80.0% and 100%, respectively. Using clinical interpretation guidelines, sensitivity ranged from 55% to 97.5% individually, and 100% when combined. Conclusions Our results support a multidimensional approach to assess SC in college athletes which correctly identified 80–100% of concussed participants as injured. When each test was evaluated separately, up to 47.5% of our sample was misclassified. Caution is warranted when using singular measures to manage SC. PMID:27900145

  7. Involvement of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants-specific IgE in pollen allergy testing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Yuma; Kawada, Michitsugu; Takato, Yoshiki; Shinagawa, Kiyomi; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Saito, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Specific IgE antibodies against the low-molecular-weight carbohydrate antigen that does not bridge IgE molecules on mast cells are not associated with clinical symptoms. Cross reactivity can be determined in allergen-specific IgE detection assays when the carbohydrate structures between pollen allergens and plant derived food allergens are similar; in such cases, false positive results for grain or legume allergens can be reported for pollen allergic patients who are not sensitized to those allergens. This phenomenon arises owing to the presence of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs). Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of CCD interference on the results for pollen allergen-specific IgE antibodies in the general adult population and to perform CCD inhibition tests evaluating the involvement of CCD on samples positive to pollen allergens. Methods Serum samples from 322 subjects were tested for IgE antibodies to pollens and CCD. The research subjects were given questionnaires about pollen allergic symptoms to help assess the presence of allergies. Allergen IgE antibodies for Japanese cedar, Japanese cypress, orchard grass, ragweed, MUXF, bromelain, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and ascorbate oxidase (ASOD) were analyzed. Results It was observed that among individuals who tested positive to any of the pollen allergens, the positive ratio of CCD-specific IgE antibody was the highest for HRP (13.5%–50.0%). The results from the inhibition tests revealed that CCD was marginally present. Although IgE antibodies for cedar pollen did not react with CCD, IgE antibodies for Japanese cypress, orchard grass, and ragweed might be detected by the presence of CCD. Conclusion The results of the inhibition tests revealed the obvious presence of CCD suggesting its involvement. Considering these findings, careful evaluation of patient IgE results should be performed for Japanese cypress, orchard grass, and ragweed. PMID:28154803

  8. Specificity data for the b Test, Dot Counting Test, Rey-15 Item Plus Recognition, and Rey Word Recognition Test in monolingual Spanish-speakers.

    PubMed

    Robles, Luz; López, Enrique; Salazar, Xavier; Boone, Kyle B; Glaser, Debra F

    2015-01-01

    The current study provides specificity data on a large sample (n = 115) of young to middle-aged, male, monolingual Spanish speakers of lower educational level and low acculturation to mainstream US culture for four neurocognitive performance validity tests (PVTs): the Dot Counting, the b Test, Rey Word Recognition, and Rey 15-Item Plus Recognition. Individuals with 0 to 6 years of education performed more poorly than did participants with 7 to 10 years of education on several Rey 15-Item scores (combination equation, recall intrusion errors, and recognition false positives), Rey Word Recognition total correct, and E-score and omission errors on the b Test, but no effect of educational level was observed for Dot Counting Test scores. Cutoff scores are provided that maintain approximately 90% specificity for the education subgroups separately. Some of these cutoffs match, or are even more stringent than, those recommended for use in US test takers who are primarily Caucasian, are tested in English, and have a higher educational level (i.e., Rey Word Recognition correct false-positive errors; Rey 15-Item recall intrusions and recognition false-positive errors; b Test total time; and Dot Counting E-score and grouped dot counting time). Thus, performance on these PVT variables in particular appears relatively robust to cultural/language/educational factors.

  9. Test and verification of a reactor protection system application-specific integrated circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Battle, R.E.; Turner, G.W.; Vandermolen, R.I.; Vitalbo, C.; Naser, J.

    1997-03-01

    Application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) were utilized in the design of nuclear plant safety systems because they have certain advantages over software-based systems and analog-based systems. An advantage they have over software-based systems is that an ASIC design can be simple enough to not include branch statements and also can be thoroughly tested. A circuit card on which an ASIC is mounted can be configured to replace various versions of older analog equipment with fewer design types required. The approach to design and testing of ASICs for safety system applications is discussed in this paper. Included are discussions of the ASIC architecture, how it is structured to assist testing, and of the functional and enhanced circuit testing.

  10. Specific wavelength colorimeter. [for measuring given solute concentration in test sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, C. C.; Mcdavid, L. S.; Walsh, J. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A self contained, specific wavelength, single beam colorimeter is described for direct spectrophotometric measurement of the concentration of a given solute in a test sample. An electrical circuit employing a photoconductive cell converts the optical output into a linear, directly readable meter output. The colorimeter is simple to operate and is adapted for use in zero gravity conditions. In a specific application, the colorimeter is designed to analyze the concentration of iodine in potable water carried aboard a space vehicle such as the 4B stage of Skylab.

  11. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  12. Microinjection of partially purified protein factor restores DNA damage specifically in group A of xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaizumi, M.; Sugano, T.; Asahina, H.; Okada, Y.; Uchida, T.

    1986-03-01

    Microinjection of cell extracts prepared from both human placenta and HeLa cells into xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells of complementation group A restores unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in these cells after UV irradiation. These cells also showed normal resistance to UV irradiation. The half-life of the factors in the cell extracts corresponding to the UDS activity (factor A) was 14 hr in XP cells of group A, and the maximal level of UDS was exerted 2 hr after microinjection. The factors were sensitive to protease treatment but not to RNase treatment and were found to be approx. = 160 and approx. = 90 kDa by gel filtration. These two fractions of the factor(s) acted specifically in XP cells of complementation group A among complementation groups A, B, C, D, F, G, and probably E and H.

  13. Genome-wide association filtering using a highly locus-specific transmission/disequilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Abad-Grau, María M; Medina-Medina, Nuria; Montes-Soldado, Rosana; Moreno-Ortega, José; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2010-09-01

    Multimarker transmission/disequilibrium tests (TDTs) are powerful association and linkage tests used to perform genome-wide filtering in the search for disease susceptibility loci. In contrast to case/control studies, they have a low rate of false positives for population stratification and admixture. However, the length of a region found in association with a disease is usually very large because of linkage disequilibrium (LD). Here, we define a multimarker proportional TDT (mTDT ( P )) designed to improve locus specificity in complex diseases that has good power compared to the most powerful multimarker TDTs. The test is a simple generalization of a multimarker TDT in which haplotype frequencies are used to weight the effect that each haplotype has on the whole measure. Two concepts underlie the features of the metric: the 'common disease, common variant' hypothesis and the decrease in LD with chromosomal distance. Because of this decrease, the frequency of haplotypes in strong LD with common disease variants decreases with increasing distance from the disease susceptibility locus. Thus, our haplotype proportional test has higher locus specificity than common multimarker TDTs that assume a uniform distribution of haplotype probabilities. Because of the common variant hypothesis, risk haplotypes at a given locus are relatively frequent and a metric that weights partial results for each haplotype by its frequency will be as powerful as the most powerful multimarker TDTs. Simulations and real data sets demonstrate that the test has good power compared with the best tests but has remarkably higher locus specificity, so that the association rate decreases at a higher rate with distance from a disease susceptibility or disease protective locus.

  14. Genome-wide association filtering using a highly locus-specific transmission/disequilibrium test

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Medina, Nuria; Montes-Soldado, Rosana; Moreno-Ortega, José; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2010-01-01

    Multimarker transmission/disequilibrium tests (TDTs) are powerful association and linkage tests used to perform genome-wide filtering in the search for disease susceptibility loci. In contrast to case/control studies, they have a low rate of false positives for population stratification and admixture. However, the length of a region found in association with a disease is usually very large because of linkage disequilibrium (LD). Here, we define a multimarker proportional TDT (mTDTP) designed to improve locus specificity in complex diseases that has good power compared to the most powerful multimarker TDTs. The test is a simple generalization of a multimarker TDT in which haplotype frequencies are used to weight the effect that each haplotype has on the whole measure. Two concepts underlie the features of the metric: the ‘common disease, common variant’ hypothesis and the decrease in LD with chromosomal distance. Because of this decrease, the frequency of haplotypes in strong LD with common disease variants decreases with increasing distance from the disease susceptibility locus. Thus, our haplotype proportional test has higher locus specificity than common multimarker TDTs that assume a uniform distribution of haplotype probabilities. Because of the common variant hypothesis, risk haplotypes at a given locus are relatively frequent and a metric that weights partial results for each haplotype by its frequency will be as powerful as the most powerful multimarker TDTs. Simulations and real data sets demonstrate that the test has good power compared with the best tests but has remarkably higher locus specificity, so that the association rate decreases at a higher rate with distance from a disease susceptibility or disease protective locus. PMID:20603721

  15. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A Type A Packaging. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-30

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 49, Part 178 (49 CFR 178). The program is currently administered by the DOE, Office of Facility Safety Analysis, DOE/EH-32, at DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the evaluation and testing performed for all of the packagings successfully qualified in this program.

  16. DNA Damage Potential of Engine Emissions Measured In Vitro by Micronucleus Test in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cervena, Tereza; Rossnerova, Andrea; Sikorova, Jitka; Beranek, Vit; Vojtisek-Lom, Michal; Ciganek, Miroslav; Topinka, Jan; Rossner, Pavel

    2016-10-26

    Internal combustion engine emissions belong among the major anthropogenic sources of air pollution in urban areas. According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, there is sufficient evidence of the carcinogenicity of diesel exhaust in human beings. Although alternative fuels, mainly biodiesel, have recently become popular, little is still known about the genotoxicity of emissions from these fuels. We analysed DNA damage expressed as the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B), induced by extractable organic matter (EOM; tested concentrations: 1, 10 and 25 μg/ml) obtained from particle emissions from various blends of biodiesel with diesel fuels (including neat diesel fuel (B0), a blend of 70% B0 and 30% biodiesel (B30) and neat biodiesel (B100)). We also tested the effect of selected diesel exhaust organic/genotoxic components [benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) concentrations: 25, 100 and 200 μM; 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) concentrations: 1, 5 and 10 μM; 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) concentrations: 1, 5 and 50 μM]. The cells were treated with the compounds for 28 and 48 hr. Our results showed that most of the tested compounds (except for the 25 μM B[a]P, 28-hr treatment) significantly increased MN frequency. The genotoxicity of EOMs from the engine emissions of diesel and biodiesel engines was comparable. Both nitro-PAH compounds demonstrated higher genotoxic potential in comparison with B[a]P. Considering our results and due to increasing popularity of alternative fuels, it is prudent that the potential genotoxic effects of various fuels are investigated across engine technologies and operating conditions in a relevant model system.

  17. The sensitivity and specificity of postbreeding plasma progesterone levels as a pregnancy test for dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, M E; Leslie, K E; Martin, S W

    1985-01-01

    Plasma progesterone levels on day 4 and day 8 postbreeding were measured for one hundred and eighty-four dairy cows. These two parameters (PPD4, PPD8), their absolute difference (PPDIFF) and their ratio (PPRATIO) were assessed for their ability to identify cows not conceiving, using the principles of sensitivity and specificity. PPD4 was significantly higher (p less than 0.10) and PPD8, PPDIFF and PPRATIO were significantly lower (p less than 0.01) in cows remaining open than in pregnant cows. Evaluating each parameter separately, PPDIFF greater than 3.00 units had the highest specificity, 85.7%, but a low sensitivity (27.0%). Combining two parameters using series interpretation to increase specificity resulted in the best combination of specificity (87%) and sensitivity (27%). Maximum specificity was 97% for PPD4 less than or equal to 1.00 units and PPD8 greater than 4.00 units, and also for PPD4 less than or equal to 1.00 units and PPDIFF greater than 3.00 units, but sensitivity was very low (7% and 10% respectively). Predictive values of the test results with the best specificity were evaluated; given the population pregnancy rate of 54%, none exceeded 50%, indicating that the plasma progesterone parameters were not very useful for identifying open dairy cows. PMID:4041979

  18. A novel small-molecule enantiomeric analogue of traditional (-)-morphinans has specific TLR9 antagonist properties and reduces sterile inflammation-induced organ damage.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Rafaz; Farooq, Ahmad; Malik, Ahsan; Trawick, Bobby N; Berberich, David W; McClurg, Joseph P; Galen, Karen P; Mehal, Wajahat

    2013-04-15

    TLR9 is a key determinant of the innate immune responses in both infectious and sterile injury. Specific antagonism of TLR9 is of great clinical interest to reduce tissue damage in a wide range of pathologies, and has been approached by modification of nucleic acids, the recognized ligand for TLR9. Such oligonucleotide-derived pharmacotherapeutics have limitations in specificity for nucleic acid receptors, significant potential for immunologic recognition with generation of innate and adaptive immune responses, and limited bioavailability. We have identified enantiomeric analogues of traditional (-)-morphinans as having TLR9 antagonist properties on reporter cell lines. One of these analogues (COV08-0064) is demonstrated to be a novel small-molecule antagonist of TLR9 with greater specificity for TLR9 than oligo-based antagonists. COV08-0064 has wide bioavailability, including the s.c. and oral routes. It specifically inhibits the action of TLR9 antagonists on reporter cells lines and the production of cytokines by TLR9 agonists from primary cells. It also has efficacy in limiting TLR9-mediated sterile inflammation in in vivo models of acute liver injury and acute pancreatitis. The identification of a morphinan-based novel small-molecule structure with TLR9 antagonism is a significant step in expanding therapeutic strategies in the field of sterile inflammatory injury.

  19. A Novel Small Molecule Enantiomeric Analogue of Traditional (−)-morphinans has Specific TLR9 Antagonist Properties and Reduces Sterile Inflammation Induced Organ Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Rafaz; Farooq, Ahmad; Malik, Ahsan; Trawick, Bobby N.; Berberich, David W.; McClurg, Joseph P.; Galen, Karen P.; Mehal, Wajahat

    2013-01-01

    TLR9 is a key determinant of the innate immune responses in both infectious and sterile injury. Specific antagonism of TLR9 is of great clinical interest to reduce tissue damage in a wide range of pathologies, and has been approached by modification of nucleic acids, the recognized ligand for TLR9. Such oligonucleotide-derived pharmacotherapeutics have limitations in specificity for nucleic acid receptors, significant potential for immunologic recognition with generation of innate and adaptive immune responses, and limited bioavailability. We have identified enantiomeric analogues of traditional (−)-morphinans as having TLR9 antagonist properties on reporter cell lines. One of these analogues (COV08-0064) is demonstrated to be a novel small molecule antagonist of TLR9 with greater specificity for TLR9 than oligo based antagonists. COV08-0064 has wide bioavailability, including the subcutaneous and per oral route. It specifically inhibits the action of TLR9 antagonists on reporter cells lines and the production of cytokines by TLR9 agonists from primary cells. It also has efficacy in limiting TLR9 mediated sterile inflammation in in vivo models of acute liver injury and acute pancreatitis. The identification of a morphinan based novel small molecule structure with TLR9 antagonism is a significant step in expanding therapeutic strategies in the field of sterile inflammatory injury. PMID:23509352

  20. Use of recombinant purified protein derivative (PPD) antigens as specific skin test for tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Stavri, Henriette; Bucurenci, Nadia; Ulea, Irina; Costache, Adriana; Popa, Loredana; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Purified protein derivative (PPD) is currently the only available skin test reagent used worldwide for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was to develop a Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific skin test reagent, without false positive results due to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination using recombinant antigens. Methods: Proteins in PPD IC-65 were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and compared to proteins in M. tuberculosis culture filtrate; 54 proteins were found in common. Top candidates MPT64, ESAT 6, and CFP 10 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli expression strains and purified as recombinant proteins. To formulate optimal immunodiagnostic PPD cocktails, the antigens were evaluated by skin testing guinea pigs sensitized with M. tuberculosis H37Rv and BCG. Results: For single antigens and a cocktail mixture of these antigens, best results were obtained using 3 μg/0.1 ml, equivalent to 105 TU (tuberculin units). Each animal was simultaneously tested with PPD IC-65, 2 TU/0.1 ml, as reference. Reactivity of the multi-antigen cocktail was greater than that of any single antigen. The skin test results were between 34.3 and 76.6 per cent the level of reactivity compared to that of the reference when single antigens were tested and 124 per cent the level of reactivity compared to the reference for the multi-antigen cocktail. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that this specific cocktail could represent a potential candidate for a new skin diagnostic test for TB. PMID:23287127

  1. Retesting The Validity Of A Specific Field Test For Judo Training

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Luis; González, Vicente; Iscar, Marta; Brime, Juan I.; Fernández-Río, Javier; Rodríguez, Blanca; Montoliu, Mª Ángeles

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this research project was to retest the validity of a specifically designed judo field test (Santos Test) in a different group of judokas. Eight (n=8) national-level male judokas underwent laboratory and field testing. The mean data (mean +/− SD) obtained in the laboratory tests was: HRmax: 200 ± 4.0 beats × min−1, VO2 max: 52.8 ± 7.9 ± ml × kg−1 × min−1, lactate max: 12 ± 2.5 mmol × l−1, HR at the anaerobic threshold: 174.2 ± 9.4 beats × min−1, percentage of maximum heart rate at which the anaerobic threshold appears: 87 ± 3.6 %, lactate threshold: 4.0 ± 0.2 mmol × l−1, and RPE: 17.2 ± 1.0. The mean data obtained in the field test (Santos) was: HRmax: 201.3 ± 4.1 beats × min−1, VO2 max: 55.6 ± 5.8 ml × kg−1 × min−1, lactate max: 15.6 ± 2.8 mmol × l−1, HR at the anaerobic threshold: 173.2 ± 4.3 beats × min−1, percentage of maximum heart rate at which the anaerobic threshold appears: 86 ± 2.5 %, lactate threshold: 4.0 ± 0.2 mmol × l−1, and RPE: 16.7 ± 1.0. There were no significant differences between the data obtained on both tests in any of the parameters, except for maximum lactate concentration. Therefore, the Santos test can be considered a valid tool specific for judo training. PMID:23486994

  2. The role of specific emotions in children's responses to interparental conflict: a test of the model.

    PubMed

    Crockenberg, S; Langrock, A

    2001-06-01

    Mothers, fathers, and their 6-year-old children (N = 164) participated in a study testing key tenets of the specific emotions model of marital conflict. Parents reported their marital conflict strategies, were observed interacting with their children, and rated children's behavioral adjustment. Children reported their emotional reactions to specific interparental conflicts. Results support the specific emotions model. Children's behaviors mirrored the marital or parental behaviors of same-gender parents. Indirect effects of marital aggression through parental behavior were detected, and marital and parental behaviors interacted to predict girls' externalizing. Girls' anger, sadness, and fear increased with fathers' marital aggression. Fear and the anger by fear interaction predicted girls' internalizing. Fathers' marital aggression interacted with anger to predict externalizing and interacted with fear to predict internalizing behavior in boys.

  3. A test of the cognitive content specificity hypothesis in depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lamberton, Anna; Oei, Tian P S

    2008-03-01

    The present study tested the cognitive content specificity hypothesis (CCSH) to assess whether anxiety and depression can be differentiated on the basis of cognitive disturbance. One hundred and thirty five depressed participants were administered the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), the automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ) and the anxious self-statements questionnaire (ASSQ). It was hypothesised that depressive cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, depressive (but not anxiety) symptoms in a depressed sample. Conversely, it was predicted that anxiety cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, anxiety (but not depressive) symptoms in a depressed sample. Results revealed that the ATQ was the sole predictor of the BDI and similarly, the ASSQ was the sole predictor of the BAI. These findings support the CCSH in depression and provide an integrative framework for a greater understanding of the relationship between anxiety and depression.

  4. Copper-induced intra-specific oxidative damage and antioxidant responses in strains of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus with different pollution histories.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Claudio A; Roncarati, Francesca; Moenne, Alejandra; Moody, A John; Brown, Murray T

    2015-02-01

    Inter- and intra-specific variation in metal resistance has been observed in the ecologically and economically important marine brown macroalgae (Phaeophyceae), but the mechanisms of cellular tolerance are not well elucidated. To investigate inter-population responses of brown seaweeds to copper (Cu) pollution, the extent of oxidative damage and antioxidant responses were compared in three strains of the filamentous brown seaweed Ectocarpus siliculosus, the model organism for the algal class Phaeophyceae that diverged from other major eukaryotic groups over a billion year ago. Strains isolated from locations with different pollution histories (i.e. LIA, from a pristine site in Scotland; REP and Es524 from Cu-contaminated sites in England and Chile, respectively) were exposed to total dissolved Cu concentrations (CuT) of up to 2.4 μM (equivalent to 128 nM Cu(2+)) for 10 d. LIA exhibited oxidative stress, with increases in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS levels), and decreased concentrations of photosynthetic pigments. Es524 presented no apparent oxidative damage whereas in REP, TBARS increased, revealing some level of oxidative damage. Adjustments to activities of enzymes and antioxidant compounds concentrations in Es524 and REP were strain and treatment dependent. Mitigation of oxidative stress in Es524 was by increased activities of superoxide dismutases (SOD) at low CuT, and catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) at all CuT, accompanied by higher levels of antioxidants (ascorbate, glutathione, phenolics) at higher CuT. In REP, only APX activity increased, as did the antioxidants. For the first time evidence is presented for distinctive oxidative stress defences under excess Cu in two populations of a species of brown seaweed from environments contaminated by Cu.

  5. Identification of β Clamp-DNA Interaction Regions That Impair the Ability of E. coli to Tolerate Specific Classes of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Nanfara, Michael T.; Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    The E. coli dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein plays a pivotal role in managing the actions on DNA of the 5 bacterial DNA polymerases, proteins involved in mismatch repair, as well as several additional proteins involved in DNA replication. Results of in vitro experiments indicate that the loading of β clamp onto DNA relies on both the DnaX clamp loader complex as well as several discrete sliding clamp-DNA interactions. However, the importance of these DNA interactions to E. coli viability, as well as the ability of the β clamp to support the actions of its numerous partner proteins, have not yet been examined. To determine the contribution of β clamp-DNA interactions to the ability of E. coli to cope with different classes of DNA damage, we used alanine scanning to mutate 22 separate residues mapping to 3 distinct β clamp surfaces known or nearby those known to contact the DNA template, including residues P20-L27 (referred to here as loop I), H148-Y154 (loop II) and 7 different residues lining the central pore of the β clamp through which the DNA template threads. Twenty of these 22 dnaN mutants supported bacterial growth. While none of these 20 conferred sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide or ultra violet light, 12 were sensitized to NFZ, 5 were sensitized to MMS, 8 displayed modestly altered frequencies of DNA damage-induced mutagenesis, and 2 may be impaired for supporting hda function. Taken together, these results demonstrate that discrete β clamp-DNA interaction regions contribute to the ability of E. coli to tolerate specific classes of DNA damage. PMID:27685804

  6. Acoustic specifications for the design of jet engine test facilities on an airbase

    SciTech Connect

    Strumpf, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The use of engine run up test arrangements was common in Israeli air-bases since the forties, when engines for the Mustang, Mosquito, Harward and other propellor powered planes were used. The era of jet engine propulsion boosted the noise levels, and the use of fighters with afterburners in the new engines of the 80's brought it up to unbearable levels. Thus, the growth of the Israeli Air Force demanded the use of efficient noise suppression devices. These were divided into engine run-up noise suppressors, and aircraft noise suppessors (Hush Houses). For both of the bove ground arrangements, acoustic specifications had to be given. They were, as well as design goals for the manufacturers, also needed to restrict noise levels on the air-base as well as its surroundings. The acoustic specifications discussed are based on measured data, and permitted noise levels in the homes on the base being as far as 2500 meters from the engine exhaust silencer. For the special air-base discussed, various criteria were tested, including US Military Specifications, none of which were acceptable, and a special specification was therefore prepared.

  7. 90/10 JP5/Synthesized ISO-Paraffin Specification and Fit-for-Purpose Test Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-11

    90/10 JP5/SYNTHESIZED ISO -PARAFFIN SPECIFICATION AND FIT-FOR-PURPOSE TEST RESULTS NAVAIR SYSCOM REPORT 441/14-010 11 June 2014 Prepared By...3 3.1 Synthesized Iso -Paraffins (SIP) Procurement Specification Test Results...26 Appendix A: Procurement Specification for Synthesized Iso -Paraffins (SIP) ........................... A-1

  8. Developing a Non-Language Related Span Test for the Use in Language-Specific and Cross-Language Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahnazari-Dorcheh, Mohammadtaghi; Roshan, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of span test for the use in language-specific and cross-language studies, this study provides L1 and L2 researchers with a reliable language-independent span test (math span test) for the measurement of working memory capacity. It also describes the development, validation, and scoring method of this test. This test included 70…

  9. B7x in the periphery abrogates pancreas specific damage mediated by self-reactive CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Sik; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Ray, Anjana; Wei, Joyce; Hofmeyer, Kimberly A.; Abadi, Yael M.; Loke, P’ng; Lin, Juan; Yuan, Jianda; Serreze, David V.; Allison, James P.; Zang, Xingxing

    2012-01-01

    B7x (B7-H4 or B7S1) is the seventh member of the B7 family and the in vivo function remains largely unknown. Despite new genetic data linking the B7x gene with autoimmune diseases, how exactly it contributes to peripheral tolerance and autoimmunity is unclear. Here we showed that B7x protein was not detected on antigen-presenting cells or T cells in both human and mice, which is unique in the B7 family. As B7x protein is expressed in some peripheral cells such as pancreatic β cells, we utilized a CD8 T cell-mediated diabetes model (AI4αβ) in which CD8 T cells recognize an endogenous self-antigen, and found that mice lacking B7x developed more severe diabetes than control AI4αβ mice. Conversely, mice overexpressing B7x in the β cells (Rip-B7xAI4αβ) were diabetes free. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of effector AI4αβ CD8 T cells induced diabetes in control mice, but not in Rip-B7xAI4αβ mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that pathogenic effector CD8 T cells were capable of migrating to the pancreas but failed to robustly destroy tissue when encountering local B7x in Rip-B7xAI4αβ mice. Although AI4αβ CD8 T cells in Rip-B7xAI4αβ mice and AI4αβ mice showed similar cytotoxic function, cell death, and global gene expression profiles, these cells had greater proliferation in AI4αβ mice than in RIP-B7xAI4αβ mice. These results suggest that B7x in nonlymphoid organs prevents peripheral autoimmunity partially through inhibiting proliferation of tissue-specific CD8 T cells and that local overexpression of B7x on pancreatic β cells is sufficient to abolish CD8 T cell-induced diabetes. PMID:22972920

  10. Dissipated energy as a method to characterize the cartilage damage in large animal joints: an in vitro testing model.

    PubMed

    Walter, Christian; Leichtle, Ulf; Lorenz, Andrea; Mittag, Falk; Wülker, Nikolaus; Müller, Otto; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Rothstock, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Several quantitative methods for the in vitro characterization of cartilage quality are available. However, only a few of these methods allow surgical cartilage manipulations and the subsequent analysis of the friction properties of complete joints. This study introduces an alternative approach to the characterization of the friction properties of entire joint surfaces using the dissipated energy during motion of the joint surfaces. Seven sheep wrist joints obtained post mortem were proximally and distally fixed to a material testing machine. With the exception of the carpometacarpal articulation surface, all joint articulations were fixed with 'Kirschner' wires. Three cartilage defects were simulated with a surgically introduced groove (16 mm(2), 32 mm(2), 300 mm(2)) and compared to intact cartilage without an artificial defect. The mean dissipated energy per cycle was calculated from the hysteresis curve during ten torsional motion cycles (±10°) under constant axial preload (100-900 N). A significant increase in dissipated energy was observed with increasing cartilage defect size and axial load (p<0.001). At lower load levels, the intact and 16 mm(2) defect showed a similar dissipated energy (p>0.073), while all other defect conditions were significantly different (p=0.015). All defect sizes were significantly different (p=0.049) at 900 N axial load. We conclude that the method introduced here could be an alternative for the study of cartilage damage, and further applications based on the principles of this method could be developed for the evaluation of different cartilage treatments.

  11. Status and specifications of a Project X front-end accelerator test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Steimel, J.; Webber, R.; Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Evans-Peoples, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the construction and operational status of an accelerator test facility for Project X. The purpose of this facility is for Project X component development activities that benefit from beam tests and any development activities that require 325 MHz or 650 MHz RF power. It presently includes an H- beam line, a 325 MHz superconducting cavity test facility, a 325 MHz (pulsed) RF power source, and a 650 MHz (CW) RF power source. The paper also discusses some specific Project X components that will be tested in the facility. Fermilab's future involves new facilities to advance the intensity frontier. In the early 2000's, the vision was a pulsed, superconducting, 8 GeV linac capable of injecting directly into the Fermilab Main Injector. Prototyping the front-end of such a machine started in 2005 under a program named the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS). While the HINS test facility was being constructed, the concept of a new, more versatile accelerator for the intensity frontier, now called Project X, was forming. This accelerator comprises a 3 GeV CW superconducting linac with an associated experimental program, followed by a pulsed 8 GeV superconducting linac to feed the Main Injector synchrotron. The CW Project X design is now the model for Fermilab's future intensity frontier program. Although CW operation is incompatible with the original HINS front-end design, the installation remains useful for development and testing many Project X components.

  12. Proposal of a New Specific Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test for Taekwondo Athletes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Marcus P; Nóbrega, Antônio C L; Espinosa, Gabriel; Hausen, Matheus; Castro, Renata R T; Soares, Pedro P; Gurgel, Jonas L

    2015-12-18

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the cardiorespiratory variables of Taekwondo athletes while performing incremental exercise test on ergometer using a ramp protocol and to propose a specific protocol for assessing these physiological variables during Taekwondo practice. Fourteen athletes participated in two incremental exercise tests: a treadmill exercise test (TREADtest) and a Taekwondo-specific exercise test (TKDtest). The TKDtest consists in one-minute stages of kicks with an incremental load between then. The subjects perform kicks each time a sound signal was heard. Heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), and their reserve correspondents (V[Combining Dot Above]O2R and HRR) were divided into quartiles to verify their kinetics along the tests. Significant difference between two tests was found only for V[Combining Dot Above]O2R (p = 0.03). Regarding the quartiles, significant differences were found for HR in the 1 (p = 0.030) and 2 (p = 0.003). Analyzing the regression curves, significant differences were found for HR for intercept (p = 0.01) and slope (p = 0.05) and HRR for slope (p = 0.02). Analysis showed significant reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), was found for the V[Combining Dot Above]O2PEAK (ICC = 0.855, p = 0.003), V[Combining Dot Above]O2 in ventilatory thresholds 1 (ICC = 0.709, p = 0.03) and 2 (ICC = 0.848, p = 0.003). Bland-Altman analyses reported a mean difference ± the 95% limits of agreement of 2.2 ± 8.4 ml.kg.min to V[Combining Dot Above]O2PEAK. TKDtest is reliable for measurement of cardiorespiratory variables, and the behavior of these variables differs mainly from TREADtest, probably due to the motor task performed.

  13. Damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) is involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of p27Kip1 in response to UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2011-05-01

    Damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) is a conserved protein component of the damaged DNA binding protein complex (DDB) that recognizes UV-induced DNA lesions and initiates the nucleotide excision repair process. DDB1 is also part of an E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex that targets a variety of substrates for proteolysis including the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). The mechanism regulating the trafficking of DDB1 and its relationship with UV irradiation is not known, although cell cycle progression is implicated in the molecular machinery driving DDB1 into the nucleus. We evaluated the involvement of DDB1 in ubiquitination of the cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1) in response to UV irradiation. First, we observed that low and high doses of UV irradiation exert different effects on p27(Kip1) protein levels. Indeed, low but not high UV doses induced p27(Kip1) protein proteolysis in several human cell lines and UV-dependent degradation is dominant over other genotoxic agents such as cisplatin. We also demonstrate that p27(Kip1) reduction is not due to transcriptional regulation and that the proteasome inhibitor MG132 affects p27(Kip1) degradation. We observed that at low UV doses the decrease in p27(Kip1) nuclear protein related with DDB1 translocation into the nucleus; conversely, high doses of UV-induced p27(Kip1) accumulation and unchanged level of DDB1. The knockdown of DDB1 or Skp2 prevents UV-induced degradation of p27(Kip1) suggesting that DDB1 is essential to regulation of p27(kip1) turnover after a mild DNA damage. Our findings support the concept that DDB1 contributes to the activation of DNA repair mechanisms and could be a key factor in regulating the cell cycle in response to UV-induced DNA damage. Although the temporal order with which DDB1 contributes to ubiquitination of p27(Kip1) or initiates the nucleotide excision repair process remains to be established, our results represent a major step towards clarifying these issues.

  14. Specificity of leucocyte migration inhibition test in coeliac disease. A reassessment using different gluten subfractions.

    PubMed Central

    Corazza, G R; Rawcliffe, P M; Frisoni, M; Sarchielli, P; Londei, M; Campieri, M; Lazzari, R; Gasbarrini, G

    1985-01-01

    Production of leucocyte migration inhibition factor by peripheral blood leucocytes in response to challenge with gluten fractions has been proposed as a reliable in vitro test for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. We have performed the leucocyte migration inhibition test with two different gluten fractions, GFIII and B2, in untreated and treated coeliac patients, patients with other intestinal diseases (abnormal controls) and healthy controls, and evaluated the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictability of the test for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Using GFIII as antigen leucocyte migration was significantly inhibited, compared to healthy controls, not only in treated and untreated coeliacs but also in abnormal controls. Using B2 gluten subfraction as antigen only treated coeliacs and abnormal controls differed significantly from healthy controls. The elevated number of abnormal controls showing migration inhibition consistently affected the diagnostic value of the test, which did not vary using B2 subfraction instead of GFIII as antigen. Our study confirms previous observations of gluten sensitization, as detected by leucocyte migration inhibition, in coeliac patients but strongly questions the claim that coeliac disease can be diagnosed on the basis of a positive leucocyte migration inhibition test without the need for intestinal biopsy. PMID:4006297

  15. Predictive value of specific ultrasound findings when used as a screening test for abnormalities on VCUG

    PubMed Central

    Logvinenko, Tanya; Chow, Jeanne S.; Nelson, Caleb P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Renal and bladder ultrasound (RBUS) is often used as an initial screening test for children after urinary tract infection (UTI). The 2011 AAP guidelines specifically recommend that RBUS be performed first, with voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) to be performed only if the ultrasound is abnormal. While prior research has suggested that RBUS is neither sensitive nor specific for VCUG findings, such as vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), it is uncertain as to whether specific RBUS findings, alone or in combination, might make RBUS more useful as a predictor of VCUG abnormalities. Aims To evaluate the association of specific RBUS with VCUG findings, and determine whether predictive models that accurately predict patients at high risk of VCUG abnormalities, based on RBUS findings, can be constructed. Methods and study sample A total of 3995 patients were identified with VCUG and RBUS performed on the same day. The RBUS and VCUG reports were reviewed and the findings were classified. Analysis was limited to patients aged 0–60 months with no prior postnatal genitourinary imaging and no history of prenatal hydronephrosis. Analysis The associations between large numbers of specific RBUS findings with abnormalities seen on VCUG were investigated. Both multivariate logistic models and a neural network machine learning algorithms were constructed to evaluate the predictive power of RBUS for VCUG abnormalities (including VUR or bladder/urethral findings). Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and area under receiving operating curves (AUROC) of RBUS for VCUG abnormalities were determined. Results A total of 2259 patients with UTI as the indication for imaging were identified. The RBUS was reported as “normal” in 75.0%. On VCUG, any VUR was identified in 41.7%, VUR grade >II in 20.9%, and VUR grade >III in 2.8%. Many individual RBUS findings were significantly associated with VUR on VCUG. Despite these strong univariate associations, multivariate modeling

  16. Development and testing of biosensors that quantitatively and specifically detect organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.; Keim, P.; Kuske, C.; Willardson, B.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to develop a more sensitive and less expensive method of detecting organic contaminants. Assaying complex environmental samples for organic contaminant content is costly and labor intensive. This often limits extensive testing. Sensitive microbial biosensors that detect specific organic contaminants in complex waste mixtures without prior separation from other waste components have been developed. Some soil microbes degrade organic compounds that contaminate the environment. These bacteria sense minute quantities of particular organic compounds then respond by activating genes encoding enzymes that degrade these molecules. Genetic manipulation of these gene regulatory processes has been employed to develop unique biosensors that detect specific organic compounds using standard biochemical assays. Such biosensors allow rapid, sensitive testing of environmental samples for selected organic contaminants. The cost of biosensor assays is at least 100-fold less than present methods, allowing more rapid and extensive testing and site characterization.

  17. Factors affecting sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic test: the exercise thallium scintigram

    SciTech Connect

    Detrano, R.; Janosi, A.; Lyons, K.P.; Marcondes, G.; Abbassi, N.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1988-04-01

    Technical and methodological factors might affect the reported accuracies of diagnostic tests. To assess their influence on the accuracy of exercise thallium scintigraphy, the medical literature (1977 to 1986) was non-selectively searched and meta-analysis was applied to the 56 publications thus retrieved. These were analyzed for year of publication, sex and mean age of patients, percentage of patients with angina pectoris, percentage of patients with prior myocardial infarction, percentage of patients taking beta-blocking medications, and for angiographic referral (workup) bias, blinding of tests, and technical factors. The percentage of patients with myocardial infarction had the highest correlation with sensitivity (0.45, p = 0.0007). Only the inclusion of subjects with prior infarction and the percentage of men in the study group were independently and significantly (p less than 0.05) related to test sensitivity. Both the presence of workup bias and publication year adversely affected specificity (p less than 0.05). Of these two factors, publication year had the strongest association by stepwise linear regression. This analysis suggests that the reported sensitivity of thallium scintigraphy is higher and the specificity lower than that expected in clinical practice because of the presence of workup bias and the inappropriate inclusion of post-infarct patients.

  18. Proposal for a Specific Aerobic Test for Football Players: The “Footeval”

    PubMed Central

    Manouvrier, Christophe; Cassirame, Johan; Ahmaidi, Saïd

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of the “Footeval” test, which evaluates football players’ aerobic level in conditions close to those of football practice (intermittent, including technical skills). Twenty-four highly trained subjects from an elite football academy (17.8 ± 1.4 years, 5 training sessions per week) performed two Footeval sessions in a period of 7 days. Physiological variables measured during these sessions (VO2max 58.1 ± 5.6 and 58.7 ± 6.2 ml·min-1·kg-1; RER 1.18 ± 0.06 and 1.19 ± 0.05; LaMax 11.0 ±1.4 and 10.8 ±1.1 µmol·L-1; HRmax 194 ± 6 and 190 ± 7 b·min-1; Final step 10.71 ± 1.2 and 10.83 ± 1.13 and the RPE = 10) highlighted maximal intensity and confirmed that players reached physiological exhaustion. Comparison of values measured in both sessions showed large to very large correlations (Final level; 0.92, VO2max; 0.79, HRmax; 0.88, LaMax; 0.87) and high ICC (Final level; 0.93, VO2max; 0.87, HRmax; 0.90, LaMax; 0.85) except for RER (r = 0.22, ICC = 0.21). In addition, all subjects performed a time limit (Tlm) exercise with intensity set at maximal aerobic specific speed + 1 km·h-1, in order to check the maximal value obtained during the Footeval test. Statistical analysis comparing VO2max, HRmax and RER from the Footeval and Tlm exercise proved that values from Footeval could be considered as maximal values (r for VO2max; 0.82, HRmax; 0.77 and ICC for VO2max; 0.92, HRmax; 0.91). This study showed that Footeval is a reproducible test that allows maximal aerobic specific speed to be obtained at physiological exhaustion. Moreover, we can also affirm that this test meets the physiological exhaustion criteria as defined in the literature (RER ≥ 1, 1; LaMax ≥ 8 µmol·L-1; HR = HRmax; no increase of VO2 despite the increase of speed; RPE =10). Key points “Footeval” is a new test for football that is able to evaluate aerobic capacity in football specific conditions. This study

  19. Cellular oxidative damage is more sensitive to biosynthetic rate than to metabolic rate: A test of the theoretical model on hornworms (Manduca sexta larvae).

    PubMed

    Amunugama, Kaushalya; Jiao, Lihong; Olbricht, Gayla R; Walker, Chance; Huang, Yue-Wern; Nam, Paul K; Hou, Chen

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theoretical model from an energetic viewpoint for unraveling the entangled effects of metabolic and biosynthetic rates on oxidative cellular damage accumulation during animal's growth, and test the model by experiments in hornworms. The theoretical consideration suggests that most of the cellular damages caused by the oxidative metabolism can be repaired by the efficient maintenance mechanisms, if the energy required by repair is unlimited. However, during growth a considerable amount of energy is allocated to the biosynthesis, which entails tradeoffs with the requirements of repair. Thus, the model predicts that cellular damage is more influenced by the biosynthetic rate than the metabolic rate. To test the prediction, we induced broad variations in metabolic and biosynthetic rates in hornworms, and assayed the lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl. We found that the increase in the cellular damage was mainly caused by the increase in biosynthetic rate, and the variations in metabolic rate had negligible effect. The oxidative stress hypothesis of aging suggests that high metabolism leads to high cellular damage and short lifespan. However, some empirical studies showed that varying biosynthetic rate, rather than metabolic rate, changes animal's lifespan. The conflicts between the empirical evidence and the hypothesis are reconciled by this study.

  20. 'No man is an island'. Testing the specific role of social isolation in formal thought disorder.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Paulo; Spray, Amy; Sellwood, William; Bentall, Richard P

    2015-12-15

    Recent work has focused on the role of the environment in psychosis with emerging evidence that specific psychotic experiences are associated with specific types of adversity. One risk factor that has been often associated with psychosis is social isolation, with studies identifying isolation as an important feature of prodromal psychosis and others reporting that social networks of psychotic patients are smaller and less dense than those of healthy individuals. In the present study, we tested a prediction that social isolation would be specifically associated with formal thought disorder. 80 patients diagnosed with psychosis-spectrum disorder and 30 healthy participants were assessed for formal thought disorder with speech samples acquired during an interview that promoted personal disclosure and an interview targeting everyday topics. Social isolation was significantly associated with formal thought disorder in the neutral interview and in the salient interview, even when controlling for comorbid hallucinations, delusions and suspiciousness. Hallucinations, delusions and suspiciousness were not associated with social isolation when formal thought disorder was controlled for. Formal thought disorder is robustly and specifically associated with social isolation. Social cognitive mechanisms and processes are discussed which may explain this relationship as well as implications for clinical practice and future research.

  1. A Beverage-Specific Measure of Expectancies for Malt Liquor: Development and Initial Testing

    PubMed Central

    Collins, R. Lorraine; Vincent, Paula C.; Bradizza, Clara M.; Kubiak, Audrey J.; Falco, Diana L.

    2011-01-01

    Malt liquor (ML) is a unique, high alcohol content beverage marketed to encourage heavy drinking. We developed the Malt Liquor Expectancy Questionnaire (MLEQ), a beverage-specific measure of alcohol expectancies and examined its association with ML use, total alcohol use and alcohol problems. Forty positive and 40 negative expectancy items were administered to a sample of 639 young adults who regularly consumed ML. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses led to the development of the 30-item MLEQ. The MLEQ consists of two positive (i.e., Social Facilitation and Enjoyment, Enhanced Sexuality) and two negative factors (i.e., Aggression and Negative Consequences; Impairment and Physical Symptoms) that possess good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent validity. The psychometrically sound MLEQ contributes to the limited research on beverage-specific expectancies and heavy drinking. PMID:21928870

  2. A beverage-specific measure of expectancies for malt liquor: development and initial testing.

    PubMed

    Collins, R Lorraine; Vincent, Paula C; Bradizza, Clara M; Kubiak, Audrey J; Falco, Diana L

    2011-12-01

    Malt liquor (ML) is a unique, high alcohol content beverage marketed to encourage heavy drinking. We developed the Malt Liquor Expectancy Questionnaire (MLEQ), a beverage-specific measure of alcohol expectancies, and examined its association with typical weekly ML use, typical weekly alcohol use, and alcohol problems. Forty positive and 40 negative expectancy items were administered to a sample of 639 young adults who regularly consumed ML. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses led to the development of the 30-item MLEQ. The MLEQ consists of two positive (i.e., Social Facilitation and Enjoyment, Enhanced Sexuality) and two negative factors (i.e., Aggression and Negative Consequences; Impairment and Physical Symptoms) that possess good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent validity. The psychometrically sound MLEQ contributes to the limited research on beverage-specific expectancies and heavy drinking.

  3. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A Type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Part 178, Section 178.350 (49 CFR 178.350). This program is called the DOT-7A Program. The DOT-7A Program is currently administered by the DOE, Division of Quality Verification and Transportation Safety, DOE/EH-33.3, at DOE-Headquarters in Germantown, Maryland. This document presents approximately 200 different packagings that have been determined to meet the requirements for a DOT Specification 7A Type A packaging per 49 CFR 178.350. It was originally prepared in 1987 by Monsanto Research Corporation -- Mound Laboratory for the DOE`s Security Evaluation Program to facilitate the regulation changes implemented by HM-169 for all DOE contractors. In September 1989, the program was transferred to Westinghouse Hanford Company, which is located in Richland, Washington. The specific packaging data contained in this document will serve to meet the requirements of 49 CFR 173.415(a) for ``. . . documentation of tests . . . `` when the packagings are used as prescribed herein. However, shippers are cautioned that additional documentation will be needed to fulfill all of the requirements for a particular shipment. Most important is the evaluation of the contents to be shipped for compatibility with the packaging and that their characteristics are bounded by the simulated contents used in qualification testing.

  4. Rabies Group-Specific Ribonucleoprotein Antigen and a Test System for Grouping and Typing of Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, L. G.; Dietzschold, B.; Dierks, R. E.; Matthaeus, W.; Enzmann, P.-J.; Strohmaier, K.

    1973-01-01

    Cell-associated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) was isolated from BHK-21 cells infected with several strains of rabies and rabies-related viruses. The RNP-antigen from rabies and related viruses induced the formation of complement-fixing, precipitating, and immunofluorescent antibodies, and proved to be the group-specific antigen common to all rabies viruses. Antigens of the envelope which induce virus-neutralizing antibodies are apparently determinative for the serotype of a virus as evidenced by two-way neutralization tests. A combination of these methods seems to be a useful approach to the serological grouping and typing of rhabdoviruses. Images PMID:4196634

  5. The sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic test of sequence-space synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rothen, Nicolas; Jünemann, Kristin; Mealor, Andy D; Burckhardt, Vera; Ward, Jamie

    2016-12-01

    People with sequence-space synesthesia (SSS) report stable visuo-spatial forms corresponding to numbers, days, and months (amongst others). This type of synesthesia has intrigued scientists for over 130 years but the lack of an agreed upon tool for assessing it has held back research on this phenomenon. The present study builds on previous tests by measuring the consistency of spatial locations that is known to discriminate controls from synesthetes. We document, for the first time, the sensitivity and specificity of such a test and suggest a diagnostic cut-off point for discriminating between the groups based on the area bounded by different placement attempts with the same item.

  6. Designing a biased specification-based subjective test of image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibman, Amy R.

    2015-03-01

    Specification-based subjective tests (SBSTs) form the basis for almost all performance analysis of image and video quality estimators (QEs). Our ability to compare the efficacy of different QEs across a wide range of applications depends on careful design of these SBST, so the conclusions that are drawn about how well a QE performs are reliable and accurate. In this paper, we explore methods to design biased SBSTs for image and video QEs. A biased SBST will produce an estimate of the performance of a given QE that is systematically different than its actual performance. We demonstrate by proof of concept that it's possible to create SBSTs that generate misleading or biased Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficients between subjective and objective scores, and we present some diagnostics that begin to evaluate when influential observations have been included in the SBST. Understanding how to create biased tests is a first step toward the overall goal of creating more effective unbiased SBSTs.

  7. Mission Control Center (MCC) System Specification for the Shuttle Orbital Flight Test (OFT) Timeframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    System specifications to be used by the mission control center (MCC) for the shuttle orbital flight test (OFT) time frame were described. The three support systems discussed are the communication interface system (CIS), the data computation complex (DCC), and the display and control system (DCS), all of which may interfere with, and share processing facilities with other applications processing supporting current MCC programs. The MCC shall provide centralized control of the space shuttle OFT from launch through orbital flight, entry, and landing until the Orbiter comes to a stop on the runway. This control shall include the functions of vehicle management in the area of hardware configuration (verification), flight planning, communication and instrumentation configuration management, trajectory, software and consumables, payloads management, flight safety, and verification of test conditions/environment.

  8. The Reliability, Validity and Applicability of Two Sport-Specific Power Tests in Synchronized Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Peric, Mia; Zenic, Natasa; Mandic, Gordana Furjan; Sekulic, Damir; Sajber, Dorica

    2012-01-01

    Sport-specific tests are rarely investigated in synchronized swimming (synchro). The aim of this research was to study the reliability and the validity of two sport-specific tests that are based on synchro elements, namely, the Barracuda thrust (“Barracuda”) and the Boost. The Barracuda is a move in which the swimmer begins in the back pike position (head down with the legs perpendicular to the surface of the water) and then moves the legs and hips rapidly upward, unrolling the body to obtain a maximal vertical position above the surface of the water. The Boost occurs when the swimmer rises rapidly out of the water, head first, to bring as much of the body as possible above the surface of the water. Both patterns are considered power moves and are therefore theoretically related to explosive strength. This study involved 22 female competitive synchro swimmers aged 16–18 years. The variables examined included performance on the Barracuda, Boost and countermovement jump and anthropometric measures (body height, body weight and body composition). Statistical analyses showed appropriate reliability for all tests, with no systematic bias between trials. A factor analysis calculated for the Barracuda, Boost and countermovement jump revealed one significant factor based on the Guttmann-Kaiser criterion with all three tests significantly projected. The structure of the significant factor did not change if the results for the Boost and Barracuda were normalized for body height. The Boost and Barracuda, but not the countermovement jump, were significantly correlated with the competitive achievements of the swimmers. In conclusion, the Boost and Barracuda are reliable and valid measures of the explosive strength of synchronized swimmers and are significantly related to competitive achievement. PMID:23487473

  9. Comparison of test specific sediment effect concentrations with marine sediment quality assessment guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Long, E.R.; MacDonald, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    As part of NOAA`s National Status and Trends (NS and T) Bioeffects Assessment program and studies conducted by the National Biological Service, numerous sediment quality assessment surveys have recently been conducted along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US using the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development tests with pore water. Additional toxicity tests were also conducted in conjunction with most of these studies. The areas that have been sampled include Boston harbor, Massachusetts; Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, and Savannah River, South Carolina; St. Simon Sound, Georgia; Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrew Bay, and Pensacola Bay, Florida; Galveston Bay, Lavaca Bay, and Sabine Lake, Texas, and 200 stations in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. Sufficient data are now available from this series of surveys to calculate test specific sediment effect concentrations (SECs). Based on these recent studies, SECs were developed for the sea urchin porewater and amphipod tests and compared with existing marine sediment quality assessment guidelines.

  10. Development, validity, and reliability of a ballet-specific aerobic fitness test.

    PubMed

    Twitchett, Emily; Nevill, Alan; Angioi, Manuela; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and assess the reliability and validity of a multi-stage, ballet-specific aerobic fitness test to be used in a dance studio setting. The test consists of five stages, each four minutes long, that increase in intensity. It uses classical ballet movement of an intermediate-level of difficulty, thus emphasizing physiological demand rather than skill. The demand of each stage was determined by calculating the mean oxygen uptake during its final minute using a portable gas analyser. After an initial familiarization period, eight female subjects performed the test twice within seven days. The results showed significant differences in oxygen consumption between stages (p < 0.001), but not between trials. Pearson correlation co-efficients produced a very good linear relationship between trials (r = 0.998, p < 0.001). Bland-Altman reliability analysis revealed the 95% limits of agreement to be ± 6.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), showing good agreement between trials. The oxygen uptake in our subjects equated positively to previous estimates for class and performance, confirming validity. It was concluded that the test is suitable for use among classical ballet dancers, with many possible applications.

  11. Degradation in PV Encapsulation Strength of Attachment: An Interlaboratory Study Towards a Climate-Specific Test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David; Annigoni, Eleonora; Ballion, Amal; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Bruckman, Laura S.; Burns, David M.; Chen, Xinxin; Feng, Jiangtao; French, Roger H.; Fowler, Sean; Honeker, Christian C.; Kempe, Michael; Khonkar, Hussam; Kohl, Michael; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Phillips, Nancy H.; Scott, Kurt P.; Sculati-Meillaud, Fanny; Wohlgemuth, John

    2016-06-06

    Reduced strength of attachment of the encapsulant resulting from the outdoor environment, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, may decrease photovoltaic (PV) module lifetime by enabling widespread corrosion of internal components. To date, few studies exist showing how the adhesion of PV components varies with environmental stress. We have conducted an interlaboratory experiment to provide an understanding that will be used to develop climatic specific module tests. Factors examined in the study included the UV light source (lamp type), temperature, and humidity to be proposed for use in accelerated aging tests. A poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA) formulation often used in veteran PV installations was studied using a compressive shear test - to quantify the strength of attachment at the EVA/glass interface. Replicate laminated glass/polymer/glass coupon specimens were weathered at 12 institutions using a variety of indoor chambers or field aging. Shear strength, shear strain, and toughness were measured using a mechanical load-frame for the compressive shear test, with subsequent optical imaging and electron microscopy of the separated surfaces.

  12. Degradation in PV Encapsulant Strength of Attachment: An Interlaboratory Study Towards a Climate-Specific Test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Annigoni, Eleonora; Ballion, Amal; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Bruckman, Laura S.; Burns, David M.; Chen, Xinxin; Feng, Jiangtao; French, Roger H.; Fowler, Sean; Honeker, Christian C.; Kempe, Michael D.; Khonkar, Hussam; Kohl, Michael; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Phillips, Nancy H.; Scott, Kurt P.; Sculati-Meillaud, Fanny; Wohlgemuth, John H.

    2016-11-21

    Reduced strength of attachment of the encapsulant resulting from the outdoor environment, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, may decrease photovoltaic (PV) module lifetime by enabling widespread corrosion of internal components. To date, few studies exist showing how the adhesion of PV components varies with environmental stress. We have conducted an interlaboratory experiment to provide an understanding that will be used to develop climatic specific module tests. Factors examined in the study included the UV light source (lamp type), temperature, and humidity to be proposed for use in accelerated aging tests. A poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA) formulation often used in veteran PV installations was studied using a compressive shear test - to quantify the strength of attachment at the EVA/glass interface. Replicate laminated glass/polymer/glass coupon specimens were weathered at 12 institutions using a variety of indoor chambers or field aging. Shear strength, shear strain, and toughness were measured using a mechanical load-frame for the compressive shear test, with subsequent optical imaging and electron microscopy of the separated surfaces.

  13. The Specific Protein Kinase R (PKR) Inhibitor C16 Protects Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Brain Damages by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in a Neonatal Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jinglei; Tan, Yongchang; Li, Yinjiao; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Brain injuries induced by hypoxia-ischemia in neonates contribute to increased mortality and lifelong neurological dysfunction. The specific PKR inhibitor C16 has been previously demonstrated to exert a neuroprotective role in adult brain injuries. However, there is no recent study available concerning its protective role in hypoxia-ischemia-induced immature brain damage. Therefore, we investigated whether C16 protects against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia injuries in a neonatal rat model. Material/Methods Postnatal day 7 (P7) rats were used to establish classical hypoxia-ischemia animal models, and C16 postconditioning with 100 ug/kg was performed immediately after hypoxia. Western blot analysis was performed to quantify the phosphorylation of the PKR at 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and phosphorylation of NF-κB 24h after hypoxia exposure. The TTC stain for infarction area and TUNEL stain for apoptotic cells were assayed 24 h after the brain hypoxia. Gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α was performed at 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h. Results The level of PKR autophosphorylation was increased dramatically, especially at 3 h (C16 group vs. HI group, P<0.01). Intraperitoneal C16 administration reduced the infarct volume and apoptosis ratio after this insult (C16 group vs. HI group<0.01), and C16 reduced proinflammatory cytokines mRNA expression, partly through inhibiting NF-κB activation (C16 group vs. HI group<0.05). Conclusions C16 can protect immature rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by modulating neuroinflammation. PMID:28008894

  14. p53 shapes genome-wide and cell type-specific changes in microRNA expression during the human DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Janky, Rekin’s; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Aerts, Stein; Madan Babu, M; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2014-01-01

    The human DNA damage response (DDR) triggers profound changes in gene expression, whose nature and regulation remain uncertain. Although certain micro-(mi)RNA species including miR34, miR-18, miR-16 and miR-143 have been implicated in the DDR, there is as yet no comprehensive description of genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs triggered by DNA breakage in human cells. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with rigorous integrative computational analyses, to describe genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs during the human DDR. The changes affect 150 of 1523 miRNAs known in miRBase v18 from 4–24 h after the induction of DNA breakage, in cell-type dependent patterns. The regulatory regions of the most-highly regulated miRNA species are enriched in conserved binding sites for p53. Indeed, genome-wide changes in miRNA expression during the DDR are markedly altered in TP53-/- cells compared to otherwise isogenic controls. The expression levels of certain damage-induced, p53-regulated miRNAs in cancer samples correlate with patient survival. Our work reveals genome-wide and cell type-specific alterations in miRNA expression during the human DDR, which are regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. These findings provide a genomic resource to identify new molecules and mechanisms involved in the DDR, and to examine their role in tumor suppression and the clinical outcome of cancer patients. PMID:25486198

  15. p53 shapes genome-wide and cell type-specific changes in microRNA expression during the human DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Janky, Rekin's; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Aerts, Stein; Madan Babu, M; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2014-01-01

    The human DNA damage response (DDR) triggers profound changes in gene expression, whose nature and regulation remain uncertain. Although certain micro-(mi)RNA species including miR34, miR-18, miR-16 and miR-143 have been implicated in the DDR, there is as yet no comprehensive description of genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs triggered by DNA breakage in human cells. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with rigorous integrative computational analyses, to describe genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs during the human DDR. The changes affect 150 of 1523 miRNAs known in miRBase v18 from 4-24 h after the induction of DNA breakage, in cell-type dependent patterns. The regulatory regions of the most-highly regulated miRNA species are enriched in conserved binding sites for p53. Indeed, genome-wide changes in miRNA expression during the DDR are markedly altered in TP53-/- cells compared to otherwise isogenic controls. The expression levels of certain damage-induced, p53-regulated miRNAs in cancer samples correlate with patient survival. Our work reveals genome-wide and cell type-specific alterations in miRNA expression during the human DDR, which are regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. These findings provide a genomic resource to identify new molecules and mechanisms involved in the DDR, and to examine their role in tumor suppression and the clinical outcome of cancer patients.

  16. Roche DAT immunoassay: sensitivity and specificity testing for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Crooks, C Richard; Brown, Sue

    2010-03-01

    Laboratory testing of oral fluid for drugs of abuse continues to expand in the workplace, legal, treatment, and health settings. In this study, we assessed recently developed homogeneous Roche DAT screening assays for amphetamines, cocaine metabolite [benzoylecgonine (BZE)], methamphetamines, and opiates in oral fluid. Precision and accuracy were assessed using control samples at +/-25% of cutoff. Sensitivity, specificity, and agreement compared to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was assessed by analysis of oral fluid specimens collected from 994 subjects enrolled in a drug treatment or probation and parole drug-testing program. An additional 180 research specimens from Kroll Laboratories were analyzed for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Screening cutoff concentrations (ng/mL) were as follows: amphetamines, 40; cocaine metabolite, 3; methamphetamines, 40; and opiates, 10. LC-MS-MS analyses were performed with the following cutoff concentrations (ng/mL): amphetamine, 40; BZE, 2.0; methamphetamine, 40; and codeine or morphine, 10. The percent coefficient of variation ranged from 3.4% to 7.3%. Sensitivity and specificity of the Roche DAT assays compared to LC-MS-MS were > 94%, and agreement was > 96% for the four assays. The performance of the Roche DAT assays suggests these new homogeneous screening assays will be an attractive alternative to existing more labor-intensive enzyme immunoassays.

  17. Site-specific copper-catalyzed oxidation of α-synuclein: tightening the link between metal binding and protein oxidative damage in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Marco C; Rodriguez, Esaú E; Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Torres-Monserrat, Valentina; Binolfi, Andrés; Quintanar, Liliana; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Fernández, Claudio O

    2014-05-05

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) has been linked to the pathological effects associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Cu(II) binds specifically at the N-terminus of AS and triggers its aggregation. Site-specific Cu(I)-catalyzed oxidation of AS has been proposed as a plausible mechanism for metal-enhanced AS amyloid formation. In this study, Cu(I) binding to AS was probed by NMR spectroscopy, in combination with synthetic peptide models, site-directed mutagenesis, and C-terminal-truncated protein variants. Our results demonstrate that both Met residues in the motif (1)MDVFM(5) constitute key structural determinants for the high-affinity binding of Cu(I) to the N-terminal region of AS. The replacement of one Met residue by Ile causes a dramatic decrease in the binding affinity for Cu(I), whereas the removal of both Met residues results in a complete lack of binding. Moreover, these Met residues can be oxidized rapidly after air exposure of the AS-Cu(I) complex, whereas Met-116 and Met-127 in the C-terminal region remain unaffected. Met-1 displays higher susceptibility to oxidative damage compared to Met-5 because it is directly involved in both Cu(II) and Cu(I) coordination, resulting in closer exposure to the reactive oxygen species that may be generated by the redox cycling of copper. Our findings support a mechanism where the interaction of AS with copper ions leads to site-specific metal-catalyzed oxidation in the protein under physiologically relevant conditions. In light of recent biological findings, these results support a role for AS-copper interactions in neurodegeneration in PD.

  18. Development of a polymerase chain reaction test for specific identification of the urinary tract pathogen Aerococcus urinae.

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, M; Collins, M D

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction test was developed for identification of the gram-positive urinary tract pathogen Aerococcus urinae. Oligonucleotide primers were based on highly specific sequences within the small-subunit rRNA gene. A confirmatory test based on hybridization of the amplified products to a highly specific internal probe was also developed. Images PMID:7684752

  19. Design of a pseudo-physiological test bench specific to the development of biodegradable metallic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Julie; Hermawan, Hendra; Dubé, Dominique; Mantovani, Diego

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular stents have proven effective in treating coronary and peripheral arterial occlusions. Since the first attempts, metals used to make these devices have been generally selected, and designed to be highly resistant to corrosion. Therefore, as almost the totality of metallic biomaterials, they are implanted on a long-term basis. However, complications associated with permanent stents, such as in-stent restenosis and thrombosis, have often been reported. In order to reduce those complications, it would be clinically useful to develop a new family of degradable stents. An interesting material for fabrication of degradable stents is based on magnesium, an essential element involved in human metabolism. Success in using magnesium alloys for the fabrication of endovascular devices is closely related to the properties of the selected alloy. In this context, a test bench was specifically designed to reproduce the physiological conditions to which stents are submitted when implanted in the coronary arteries. Then the test bench was validated using a magnesium-based alloy. Results showed that the corrosion rate and the corrosion mechanisms vary with the applied shear stress and that corrosion products strongly depend on the composition of the corrosive solution. This test bench will thus be useful in further investigations for the development of metallic alloys as degradable biomaterials.

  20. Specifications for a coupled neutronics thermal-hydraulics SFR test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassone, A.; Smirnov, A. D.; Tikhomirov, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    Coupling neutronics/thermal-hydraulics calculations for the design of nuclear reactors are a growing trend in the scientific community. This approach allows to properly represent the mutual feedbacks between the neutronic distribution and the thermal-hydraulics properties of the materials composing the reactor, details which are often lost when separate analysis are performed. In this work, a test case for a generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), based on the ASTRID concept developed by CEA, is proposed. Two sub-assemblies (SA) characterized by different fuel enrichment and layout are considered. Specifications for the test case are provided including geometrical data, material compositions, thermo-physical properties and coupling scheme details. Serpent and ANSYS-CFX are used as reference in the description of suitable inputs for the performing of the benchmark, but the use of other code combinations for the purpose of validation of the results is encouraged. The expected outcome of the test case are the axial distribution of volumetric power generation term (q‴), density and temperature for the fuel, the cladding and the coolant.

  1. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A type A packaging. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D L

    1997-08-04

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 49, Part 178 (49 CFR 178). This document summarizes the evaluation and testing performed for all of the packagings successfully qualified in this program. This document supersedes DOE Evaluation Document for DOT-7A Type A Packaging (Edling 1987), originally issued in 1987 by Monsanto Research Corporation Mound Laboratory (MLM), Miamisburg, Ohio, for the Department of Energy, Security Evaluation Program (I)P-4. Mound Laboratory issued four revisions to the document between November 1988 and December 1989. In September 1989, the program was transferred to Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) in Richland, Washington. One additional revision was issued in March 1990 by Westinghouse Hanford. This revision reflects the earlier material and incorporates a number of changes. Evaluation and testing activities on 1208 three DOT-7A Program Dockets resulted in the qualification of three new packaging configurations, which are incorporated herein and summarized. This document presents approximately 300 different packagings that have been determined to meet the requirements for a DOT-7A, type A packaging per 49 CFR 178.350.

  2. Functional and structural analyses of mouse genomic regions screened by the morphological specific-locus test.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B

    1989-05-01

    Genetic analyses of certain classes of mutations recovered in the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) have characterized arrays of deletions, overlapping at the marked loci. Complementation maps, generated for several of the regions, have identified a number of functional units surrounding each marked locus and have ordered the mutations into complementation groups. Molecular entry to all but one of the marked regions has been achieved by (1) identifying proviral integrations in, or close to, the specific loci (d, se, a, c); (2) mapping random anonymous clones from appropriately enriched libraries to the longest deleted segments, then submapping to more limited segments on the basis of complementation and deletion-breakpoint maps (c, p); (3) similarly mapping known clones thought to be located in pertinent chromosomal regions (p, c, d); and (4) cloning specific genes that reside in regions corresponding to the deletions (b, c, p). The molecular analyses have confirmed that genetically-inferred deletions are structural deletions of DNA. The emerging physical maps are concordant with the complementation maps, and in several cases have discriminated among members of a complementation group with respect to breakpoint positions. Deletion-breakpoint-fusion fragments have prove to be highly useful for making large chromosomal jumps to facilitate physical mapping. The recent advances toward correlating physical and functional maps of specific regions of the mouse genome owe much to the existence of arrays of mutations involving loci marked in the SLT. In turn, the characterizations of these regions have made it possible to demonstrate qualitative differences among mutations resulting from different treatments. This new capability for qualitative analysis, which will increase as the molecular studies proceed, further enhances the value of the SLT, which has been extensively used for quantitative studies in germ-cell mutagenesis.

  3. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation via AC-29-2C Combining Test Rig Damage Progression Data with Fielded Rotorcraft Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final of three reports published on the results of this project. In the first report, results were presented on nineteen tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig on spiral bevel gear sets designed to simulate helicopter fielded failures. In the second report, fielded helicopter HUMS data from forty helicopters were processed with the same techniques that were applied to spiral bevel rig test data. Twenty of the forty helicopters experienced damage to the spiral bevel gears, while the other twenty helicopters had no known anomalies within the time frame of the datasets. In this report, results from the rig and helicopter data analysis will be compared for differences and similarities in condition indicator (CI) response. Observations and findings using sub-scale rig failure progression tests to validate helicopter gear condition indicators will be presented. In the helicopter, gear health monitoring data was measured when damage occurred and after the gear sets were replaced at two helicopter regimes. For the helicopters or tails, data was taken in the flat pitch ground 101 rotor speed (FPG101) regime. For nine tails, data was also taken at 120 knots true airspeed (120KTA) regime. In the test rig, gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed while gear health monitoring data and operational parameters were measured and tooth damage progression documented. For the rig tests, the gear speed was maintained at 3500RPM, a one hour run-in was performed at 4000 in-lb gear torque, than the torque was increased to 8000 in-lbs. The HUMS gear condition indicator data evaluated included Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS) or Diagnostic Algorithm 1(DA1), + 3 Sideband Index (SI3) and + 1 Sideband Index (SI1). These were selected based on their sensitivity in detecting contact fatigue damage modes from analytical, experimental and historical helicopter data. For this report, the helicopter dataset was reduced to

  4. A novel specimen-specific methodology to optimise the alignment of long bones for experimental testing.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Vee San; Bull, Anthony M J

    2015-12-16

    The choice of coordinate system and alignment of bone will affect the quantification of mechanical properties obtained during in-vitro biomechanical testing. Where these are used in predictive models, such as finite element analysis, the fidelic description of these properties is paramount. Currently in bending and torsional tests, bones are aligned on a pre-defined fixed span based on the reference system marked out. However, large inter-specimen differences have been reported. This suggests a need for the development of a specimen-specific alignment system for use in experimental work. Eleven ovine tibiae were used in this study and three-dimensional surface meshes were constructed from micro-Computed Tomography scan images. A novel, semi-automated algorithm was developed and applied to the surface meshes to align the whole bone based on its calculated principal directions. Thereafter, the code isolates the optimised location and length of each bone for experimental testing. This resulted in a lowering of the second moment of area about the chosen bending axis in the central region. More importantly, the optimisation method decreases the irregularity of the shape of the cross-sectional slices as the unbiased estimate of the population coefficient of variation of the second moment of area decreased from a range of (0.210-0.435) to (0.145-0.317) in the longitudinal direction, indicating a minimisation of the product moment, which causes eccentric loading. Thus, this methodology serves as an important pre-step to align the bone for mechanical tests or simulation work, is optimised for each specimen, ensures repeatability, and is general enough to be applied to any long bone.

  5. Results from irradiation tests on D0 Run 2a silicon detectors at the Radiation Damage Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.; Cerber, C.; Ke, Z.; Korjanevsky, S.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lipton, R.; Lackey, J.; Merkin, M.; Rapidis, P.; Rykalin, V.; Shabalina, E.; Spiegel, L.; Stutte, L.; Webber, B.; /Kansas U. /Kansas State U. /Illinois U., Chicago /Fermilab /Moscow State U. /Zurich U. /NICADD, DeKalb

    2006-03-01

    Several different spare modules of the D0 experiment Silicon Microstrip Tracker (SMT) have been irradiated at the Fermilab Booster Radiation Damage Facility (RDF). The total dose received was 2.1 MRads with a proton flux of {approx} 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} p/cm{sup 2} sec. The irradiation was carried out in steps of 0.3 or 0.6 MRad, with several days between the steps to allow for annealing and measurements. The leakage currents and depletion voltages of the devices increased with dose, as expected from bulk radiation damage. The double sided, double metal devices showed worse degradation than the less complex detectors.

  6. Assessment of Rapid Tests for Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific Antibodies in Recently Infected Individuals▿

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Brian; Wong, Ernest; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Liska, Sally; Hecht, Frederick; Dowling, Terri; Obeso, Martha; Phillips, Susan S.; Pandori, Mark W.

    2008-01-01

    We have evaluated four current Food and Drug Administration-cleared rapid tests for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific antibodies with a panel of specimens from recently infected individuals. Recent infection was detected by RNA-based screening coupled with enzyme immunoassay-based testing. We found that the sensitivities of the various rapid tests vary greatly with regard to their ability to detect HIV-specific antibodies in recently infected individuals. PMID:18234875

  7. Toward a consolidation of the CPV-specific-test procedures for inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voarino, Philippe; Dominguez, César; Bier, Anthony; Roujol, Yannick; Mangeant, Christophe; Baudrit, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    The inverter in a photovoltaic system assures two essential functions. The first is to track the maximum power point of the system IV curve throughout variable environmental conditions. The second is to convert DC power delivered by the PV panels into AC power. Nowadays, in order to qualify inverters, manufacturers and certifying organisms use mainly European and/or CEC efficiency standards. The question arises if these are still representative of CPV system behaviour. We propose to use a set of CPV - specific weighted average and a representative dynamic response to have a better determination of the static and dynamic MPPT efficiencies. Four string-sized commercial inverters used in real CPV plants have been tested.

  8. Signal processing and display interface studies. [performance tests - design analysis/equipment specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Signal processing equipment specifications, operating and test procedures, and systems design and engineering are described. Five subdivisions of the overall circuitry are treated: (1) the spectrum analyzer; (2) the spectrum integrator; (3) the velocity discriminator; (4) the display interface; and (5) the formatter. They function in series: (1) first in analog form to provide frequency resolution, (2) then in digital form to achieve signal to noise improvement (video integration) and frequency discrimination, and (3) finally in analog form again for the purpose of real-time display of the significant velocity data. The formatter collects binary data from various points in the processor and provides a serial output for bi-phase recording. Block diagrams are used to illustrate the system.

  9. A dedicated system for topographical working memory: evidence from domain-specific interference tests.

    PubMed

    Piccardi, L; Nori, R; Boccia, M; Barbetti, S; Verde, P; Guariglia, C; Ferlazzo, F

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we used single- and dual-task conditions to investigate the nature of topographical working memory to better understand what type of task can hamper performance during navigation. During dual-task conditions, we considered four different sources of interference: motor (M), spatial motor (SM), verbal (i.e. articulatory suppression AS) and spatial environmental (SE). In order to assess the nature of topographical working memory, we used the Walking Corsi Test, asking the participants to perform two tasks simultaneously (M, SM, AS and SE). Our results showed that only spatial-environmental interference hampers the execution of a topographical working memory task, suggesting a task-domain-specific effect. We also found general gender differences in the topographical working memory capabilities: men were more proficient than women, regardless of the type of interferences. However, like men, women performed worse when a spatial-environmental interference was present.

  10. An extremely sensitive species-specific ARMS PCR test for the presence of tiger bone DNA.

    PubMed

    Wetton, Jon H; Tsang, Carol S F; Roney, Chris A; Spriggs, Adrian C

    2002-04-18

    The survival of the tiger (Panthera tigris) is seriously threatened by poaching to provide raw materials for traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). Most highly prized are the tiger's bones, which are used in combination with other animal and plant derivatives in pills and plasters for the treatment of rheumatism and other ailments. Hundreds of patent remedies have been produced which claim to contain tiger bone, but proof of its presence is needed if legislation prohibiting the trade in endangered species is to be enforced.A highly sensitive tiger-specific real-time PCR assay has been developed to address this problem. Using primers specific to the tiger mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, successful amplification has been reliably achieved from blood, hair and bone as well as from a range of TCMs spiked with 0.5% tiger bone. Although capable of detecting fewer than 10 substrate molecules, the seven varieties of TCM pills and plasters tested showed no detectable trace of tiger DNA before spiking. Furthermore, sequencing several "tiger bone" fragments seized from TCM shops has shown that they actually originated from cattle and pigs. The potential effects of traditional bone preparation methods, evidence that much lower concentrations are used than alleged on TCM packaging, and substitution of bones from other species all suggest a low likelihood of detecting tiger DNA in patent medicines. Despite this, the basic methods have been thoroughly proven and can be readily applied to derivatives from other Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) protected species, providing a rapid and highly sensitive forensic test for species of origin. Potential applications to the monitoring of wild populations are demonstrated by the successful identification of shed hairs and faecal samples.

  11. De Novo Donor-Specific HLA Antibodies Developing Early or Late after Transplant Are Associated with the Same Risk of Graft Damage and Loss in Nonsensitized Kidney Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cioni, Michela; Nocera, Arcangelo; Innocente, Annalisa; Tagliamacco, Augusto; Trivelli, Antonella; Basso, Sabrina; Quartuccio, Giuseppe; Fontana, Iris; Magnasco, Alberto; Drago, Francesca; Gurrado, Antonella; Guido, Ilaria; Compagno, Francesca; Garibotto, Giacomo; Klersy, Catherine; Verrina, Enrico; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Cardillo, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    De novo posttransplant donor-specific HLA-antibody (dnDSA) detection is now recognized as a tool to identify patients at risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and graft loss. It is still unclear whether the time interval from transplant to DSA occurrence influences graft damage. Utilizing sera collected longitudinally, we evaluated 114 consecutive primary pediatric kidney recipients grafted between 2002 and 2013 for dnDSA occurrence by Luminex platform. dnDSAs occurred in 39 patients at a median time of 24.6 months. In 15 patients, dnDSAs developed within 1 year (early-onset group), while the other 24 seroconverted after the first posttransplant year (late-onset group). The two groups were comparable when considering patient- and transplant-related factors, as well as DSA biological properties, including C1q and C3d complement-binding ability. Only recipient age at transplant significantly differed in the two cohorts, with younger patients showing earlier dnDSA development. Late AMR was diagnosed in 47% of the early group and in 58% of the late group. Graft loss occurred in 3/15 (20%) and 4/24 (17%) patients in early- and late-onset groups, respectively (p = ns). In our pediatric kidney recipients, dnDSAs predict AMR and graft loss irrespective of the time elapsed between transplantation and antibody occurrence. PMID:28367453

  12. Bloodstream form-specific up-regulation of silent vsg expression sites and procyclin in Trypanosoma brucei after inhibition of DNA synthesis or DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sheader, Karen; te Vruchte, Daniëlle; Rudenko, Gloria

    2004-04-02

    The African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei transcribes the active variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene from one of about 20 VSG expression sites (ESs). In order to study ES control, we made reporter lines with a green fluorescent protein gene inserted behind the promoter of different ESs. We attempted to disrupt the silencing machinery, and we used fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis for the rapid and sensitive detection of ES up-regulation. We find that a range of treatments that either block nuclear DNA synthesis, like aphidicolin, or modify DNA-like cisplatin and 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine results in up-regulation of silent ESs. Aphidicolin treatment was the most effective, with almost 80% of the cells expressing green fluorescent protein from a silent ES. All of these treatments blocked the cells in S phase. In contrast, a range of toxic chemicals had little or no effect on expression. These included berenil and pentamidine, which selectively cleave the mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA, the metabolic inhibitors suramin and difluoromethylornithine, and the mitotic inhibitor rhizoxin. Up-regulation also affected other RNA polymerase I (pol I) transcription units, as procyclin genes were also up-regulated after cells were treated with either aphidicolin or DNA-modifying agents. Strikingly, this up-regulation of silent pol I transcription units was bloodstream form-specific and was not observed in insect form T. brucei. We postulate that the redistribution of a limiting bloodstream form-specific factor involved in both silencing and DNA repair results in the derepression of normally silenced pol I transcription units after DNA damage.

  13. Novel methylation specific real-time PCR test for the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Akanksha; Mielnik, Anna; Schlegel, Peter N; Paduch, Darius A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a molecular assay for the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome (KS), based on the detection of supernumerary X-chromosomes (X-chs). DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of twenty-six 47,XXY males; two 46,XY/47,XXY males; twenty-two 46,XY males; and 15 females; and deaminated. Methylation-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (MS-qPCR) was performed using primers for unmethylated and methylated copies of the X-ch inactive-specific transcript (XIST-U and XIST-M) gene. X-ch disomy was determined on the basis of XIST methylation status. Degree of mosaicism in the 46,XY/47,XXY males was compared with karyotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) results. Data analysis was performed using the Roche® LightCycler software V. 3.5.3., including determination of crossing points (CPs) by fit-point analysis and melting curve analysis. X-ch disomy was detected in all female controls and KS patients; male controls expressed XIST-M only. CPs ranged from 29.5 to 32.5 (standard deviation (s.d.) 0.8) for XIST-U and from 29 to 31 (s.d. 0.6) for XIST-M. Limit of detection of mosaicism was 1%. Based on XIST-U/XIST-M ratios for the two 47,XXY/46,XY patients, the calculated degree of mosaicism (1.8% and 17.8%) was comparable to FISH results (2.3% and 15%, respectively). Turnaround time from DNA deamination to final data analysis was under 9 h. We conclude that MS-qPCR is a sensitive, specific and rapid test for the detection of X-ch disomy, with applicability for the screening and diagnosis of KS, even in the setting of low grade 47,XXY/46,XY mosaicism. PMID:24923458

  14. Drawing on Indigenous Criteria for More Authentic Assessment in a Specific-Purpose Language Test: Health Professionals Interacting with Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, John

    2016-01-01

    The "indigenous assessment practices" (Jacoby & McNamara, 1999) in selected health professions were investigated to inform a review of the scope of assessment in the speaking sub-test of a specific-purpose English language test for health professionals, the Occupational English Test (OET). The assessment criteria in current use on…

  15. Test Anxiety among College Students with Specific Reading Disability (Dyslexia): Nonverbal Ability and Working Memory as Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jason M.; Lindstrom, Will; Foels, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Test anxiety and its correlates were examined with college students with and without specific reading disability (RD; n = 50 in each group). Results indicated that college students with RD reported higher test anxiety than did those without RD, and the magnitude of these differences was in the medium range on two test anxiety scales. Relative to…

  16. Testing the Language of German Cerebral Palsy Patients with Right Hemispheric Language Organization after Early Left Hemispheric Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwilling, Eleonore; Krageloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Konietzko, Andreas; Winkler, Susanne; Lidzba, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Language functions are generally represented in the left cerebral hemisphere. After early (prenatally acquired or perinatally acquired) left hemispheric brain damage language functions may be salvaged by reorganization into the right hemisphere. This is different from brain lesions acquired in adulthood which normally lead to aphasia. Right…

  17. Susceptibility to UV damage in Impatiens capensis (Balsaminaceae): testing for opportunity costs to shade-avoidance and population differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dixon, P; Weinig, C; Schmitt, J

    2001-08-01

    Plastic increases in leaf secondary compounds may be an adaptive strategy that reduces the damaging effects of high-energy, ultraviolet radiation (UV). Here, we examine (1) the relationship between fitness and anthocyanin and flavonoid concentrations in experimental, UV environments, (2) the effects of UV on Impatiens capensis plants derived from woodland and clearing sites, and (3) whether susceptibility to UV damage is reduced by exposure to high ratios of red : far-red wavelengths (R : FR), which also stimulate the production of leaf compounds. Seedlings from each site were exposed to either high R : FR typical of sunlight or low R : FR characteristic of foliar shade, after which plants were moved into ambient UV or UV-removal treatments. Ultraviolet radiation stimulated the production of anthocyanins and flavonoids. However, higher anthocyanin concentrations were associated with lower biomass in the UV environment. Relative to the clearing population, reproductive output of the woodland population was more detrimentally affected by exposure to UV, despite its higher concentration of anthocyanins. Increased anthocyanin production may therefore be a stress response rather than an adaptive one. The greater tolerance of the clearing population to UV suggests that populations with an evolutionary history of UV exposure evolve mechanisms to limit damage. The R : FR pretreatments did not influence susceptibility to UV damage.

  18. Specificity and false positive rates of the Test of Memory Malingering, Rey 15-item Test, and Rey Word Recognition Test among forensic inpatients with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Love, Christopher M; Glassmire, David M; Zanolini, Shanna Jordan; Wolf, Amanda

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the specificity and false positive (FP) rates of the Rey 15-Item Test (FIT), Word Recognition Test (WRT), and Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) in a sample of 21 forensic inpatients with mild intellectual disability (ID). The FIT demonstrated an FP rate of 23.8% with the standard quantitative cutoff score. Certain qualitative error types on the FIT showed promise and had low FP rates. The WRT obtained an FP rate of 0.0% with previously reported cutoff scores. Finally, the TOMM demonstrated low FP rates of 4.8% and 0.0% on Trial 2 and the Retention Trial, respectively, when applying the standard cutoff score. FP rates are reported for a range of cutoff scores and compared with published research on individuals diagnosed with ID. Results indicated that although the quantitative variables on the FIT had unacceptably high FP rates, the TOMM and WRT had low FP rates, increasing the confidence clinicians can place in scores reflecting poor effort on these measures during ID evaluations.

  19. A process approach to the Bender-Gestalt test and its use in differentiating schizophrenic, brain-damaged, and medical patients.

    PubMed

    Mermelstein, J J

    1983-03-01

    Developed a processing model that would account for the shifting of attention that occurs as individuals copy Bender-Gestalt designs. Process-oriented variations of the Bender-Gestalt test were designed that emphasized each of the three processes hypothesized to contribute to Bender-Gestalt performance: Perceptual-motor integration, attentional factors, and short-term memory. A standard Bender-Gestalt and the three variations were administered to 24 schizophrenics, 24 brain-damaged patients, and 24 medical patients, matched for intelligence and sex. Protocols were scored blindly by the Pascal-Suttell and Hain methods. Discriminant function analysis based upon the four versions of the Bender-Gestalt test classified patients as schizophrenic or brain-damaged at a significantly higher rate than the standard Bender-Gestalt scored by either the Pascal-Suttell or Hain system.

  20. Degradation in PV Encapsulation Transmittance: An Interlaboratory Study Toward a Climate-Specific Test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Hacke, Peter L.; Kempe, Michael D.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Annigoni, Eleonora; Sculati-Meillaud, Fanny; Ballion, Amal; Kohl, Michael; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Bruckman, Laura S.; French, Roger H.; Burns, David; Phillips, Nancy H.; Feng; Jiangtao; Elliott, Lamont; Scott, Kurt P.; Fowler, Sean; Gu, Xiaohong; Honeker, Christian C.; Khonkar, Hussam; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Shioda, Tsy

    2015-06-14

    Reduced optical transmittance of encapsulation resulting from ultraviolet (UV) degradation has frequently been identified as a cause of decreased PV module performance through the life of installations in the field. The present module safety and qualification standards, however, apply short UV doses only capable of examining design robustness or 'infant mortality' failures. Essential information that might be used to screen encapsulation through product lifetime remains unknown. For example, the relative efficacy of xenon-arc and UVA-340 fluorescent sources or the typical range of activation energy for degradation is not quantified. We have conducted an interlaboratory experiment to provide the understanding that will be used towards developing a climate- and configuration-specific (UV) weathering test. Five representative, known formulations of EVA were studied in addition to one TPU material. Replicate laminated silica/polymer/silica specimens are being examined at 14 institutions using a variety of indoor chambers (including Xe, UVA-340, and metal-halide light sources) or field aging. The solar-weighted transmittance, yellowness index, and the UV cut-off wavelength, determined from the measured hemispherical transmittance, are examined to provide understanding and guidance for the UV light source (lamp type) and temperature used in accelerated UV aging tests. Index Terms -- reliability, durability, thermal activation.

  1. Degradation in PV Encapsulation Transmittance: An Interlaboratory Study Towards a Climate-Specific Test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Annigoni, Eleonora; Ballion, Amal; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Bruckman, Laura S.; Burns, David M.; Chen, Xinxin; Elliott, L.; Feng, J.; French, Roger H.; Fowler, S.; Gu, X.; Hacke, Peter L.; Honeker, C. C.; Kempe, Michael D.; Khonkar, H.; Kohl, M.; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Phillips, N. H.; Scott, K. P.; Sculati-Meillaud, F.; Shioda, T.; Suga, S.; Watanabe, S.; Wohlgemuth, John H.

    2015-06-14

    Reduced optical transmittance of encapsulants resulting from ultraviolet (UV) degradation has frequently been identified as a cause of decreased PV module performance through the life of service in the field. The present module safety and qualification standards, however, apply short UV doses only capable of examining design robustness or 'infant mortality' failures. Essential information that might be used to screen encapsulation through product lifetime remains unknown. For example, the relative efficacy of xenon-arc and UVA-340 fluorescent sources or the typical range of activation energy for degradation is not quantified. We have conducted an interlaboratory experiment to provide the understanding that will be used towards developing a climate- and configuration-specific (UV) weathering test. Five representative, known formulations of EVA were studied in addition to one TPU material. Replicate laminated silica/polymer/silica specimens are being examined at 14 institutions using a variety of indoor chambers (including Xenon, UVA-340, and metal-halide light sources) or field aging. The solar-weighted transmittance, yellowness index, and the UV cut-off wavelength, determined from the measured hemispherical transmittance, are examined to provide understanding and guidance for the UV light source (lamp type) and temperature used in accelerated UV aging tests.

  2. Strain-Specific Battery of Tests for Domains of Mania: Effects of Valproate, Lithium and Imipramine

    PubMed Central

    Flaisher-Grinberg, Shlomit; Einat, Haim

    2010-01-01

    The lack of efficient animal models for bipolar disorder (BPD), especially for the manic pole, is a major factor hindering the research of its pathophysiology and the development of improved drug treatments. The present study was designed to identify an appropriate mouse strain for modeling some behavioral domains of mania and to evaluate the effects of drugs using this strain. The study compared the behavior of four strains: Black Swiss, C57Bl/6, CBA/J and A/J mice in a battery of tests that included spontaneous activity; sweet solution preference; light/dark box; resident-intruder; forced-swim and amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. Based on the ‘manic-like’ behavior demonstrated by the Black Swiss strain, the study evaluated the effects of the mood stabilizers valproate and lithium and of the antidepressant imipramine in the same tests using this strain. Results indicated that lithium and valproate attenuate the ‘manic-like’ behavior of Black Swiss mice whereas imipramine had no effects. These findings suggest that Black Swiss mice might be a good choice for modeling several domains of mania and distinguishing the effects of drugs on these specific domains. However, the relevance of the behavioral phenotype of Black Swiss mice to the biology of BPD is unknown at this time and future studies will investigate molecular differences between Black Swiss mice and other strains and asess the interaction between strain and mood stabilizing treatment. PMID:21423422

  3. Degradation in PV Encapsulation Transmittance: An Interlaboratory Study Towards a Climate-Specific Test: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Annigoni, Eleonora; Ballion, Amal; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Bruckman, Laura S.; Burns, David M.; Chen, Xinxin; Elliott, Lamont; Feng, Jiangtao; French, Roger H.; Fowler, Sean; Gu, Xiaohong; Hacke, Peter L.; Honeker, Christian C.; Kempe, Michael D.; Khonkar, Hussam; Kohl, Michael; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Phillips, Nancy H.; Scott, Kurt P.; Sculati-Meillaud, Fanny; Shioda, Tsuyos

    2015-08-12

    Reduced optical transmittance of encapsulants resulting from ultraviolet (UV) degradation has frequently been identified as a cause of decreased PV module performance through the life of service in the field. The present module safety and qualification standards, however, apply short UV doses only capable of examining design robustness or 'infant mortality' failures. Essential information that might be used to screen encapsulation through product lifetime remains unknown. For example, the relative efficacy of xenon-arc and UVA-340 fluorescent sources or the typical range of activation energy for degradation is not quantified. We have conducted an interlaboratory experiment to provide the understanding that will be used towards developing a climate- and configuration-specific (UV) weathering test. Five representative, known formulations of EVA were studied in addition to one TPU material. Replicate laminated silica/polymer/silica specimens are being examined at 14 institutions using a variety of indoor chambers (including Xenon, UVA-340, and metal-halide light sources) or field aging. The solar-weighted transmittance, yellowness index, and the UV cut-off wavelength, determined from the measured hemispherical transmittance, are examined to provide understanding and guidance for the UV light source (lamp type) and temperature used in accelerated UV aging tests.

  4. Testing chemotherapeutic agents in the feather follicle identifies a selective blockade of cell proliferation and a key role for sonic hedgehog signaling in chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guojiang; Wang, Hangwei; Yan, Zhipeng; Cai, Linyan; Zhou, Guixuan; He, Wanzhong; Paus, Ralf; Yue, Zhicao

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents induce complex tissue responses in vivo and damage normal organ functions. Here we use the feather follicle to investigate details of this damage response. We show that cyclophosphamide treatment, which causes chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice and man, induces distinct defects in feather formation: feather branching is transiently and reversibly disrupted, thus leaving a morphological record of the impact of chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the rachis (feather axis) remains unperturbed. Similar defects are observed in feathers treated with 5-fluorouracil or taxol but not with doxorubicin or arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C). Selective blockade of cell proliferation was seen in the feather branching area, along with a downregulation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) transcription, but not in the equally proliferative rachis. Local delivery of the Shh inhibitor, cyclopamine, or Shh silencing both recapitulated this effect. In mouse hair follicles, those chemotherapeutic agents that disrupted feather formation also downregulated Shh gene expression and induced hair loss, whereas doxorubicin or Ara-C did not. Our results reveal a mechanism through which chemotherapeutic agents damage rapidly proliferating epithelial tissue, namely via the cell population-specific, Shh-dependent inhibition of proliferation. This mechanism may be targeted by future strategies to manage chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

  5. Statistically tested comparisons of the accuracy of forecasting methods for age-specific and sex-specific mortality and life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Shang, Han Lin

    2015-01-01

    Although there are continuing developments in the methods for forecasting mortality, there are few comparisons of the accuracy of the forecasts. The subject of the statistical validity of these comparisons, which is essential to demographic forecasting, has all but been ignored. We introduce Friedman's test statistics to examine whether the differences in point and interval forecast accuracies are statistically significant between methods. We introduce the Nemenyi test statistic to identify which methods give results that are statistically significantly different from others. Using sex-specific and age-specific data from 20 countries, we apply these two test statistics to examine the forecast accuracy obtained from several principal component methods, which can be categorized into coherent and non-coherent forecasting methods.

  6. Is HPV DNA testing specificity comparable to that of cytological testing in primary cervical cancer screening? Results of a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, Claudia; Flotta, Domenico; Bianco, Aida; Nobile, Carmelo G A; Pavia, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Human-papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing has been proposed as an alternative to primary cervical cancer screening using cytological testing. Review of the evidence shows that available data are conflicting for some aspects. The overall goal of the study is to update the performance of HPV DNA as stand-alone testing in primary cervical cancer screening, focusing particularly on the aspects related to the specificity profile of the HPV DNA testing in respect to cytology. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Eight articles were included in the meta-analysis. Three outcomes have been investigated: relative detection, relative specificity, and relative positive predictive value (PPV) of HPV DNA testing versus cytology. Overall evaluation of relative detection showed a significantly higher detection of CIN2+ and CIN3+ for HPV DNA testing versus cytology. Meta-analyses that considered all age groups showed a relative specificity that favored the cytology in detecting both CIN2+ and CIN3+ lesions whereas, in the ≥30 years' group, specificity of HPV DNA and cytology tests was similar in detecting both CIN2+ and CIN3+ lesions. Results of the pooled analysis on relative PPV showed a not significantly lower PPV of HPV DNA test over cytology. A main key finding of the study is that in women aged ≥30, has been found an almost overlapping specificity between the two screening tests in detecting CIN2 and above-grade lesions. Therefore, primary screening of cervical cancer by HPV DNA testing appears to offer the right balance between maximum detection of CIN2+ and adequate specificity, if performed in the age group ≥30 years.

  7. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  8. Standardization of the carbon-phenolic materials and processes. Vol. 2: Test methods and specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, William B.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon-phenolic composite materials are used in the ablation process in the nozzles of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The nozzle is lined with carbon cloth-phenolic resin composites. The extreme heat and erosion of the burning propellant are controlled by the carbon-phenolic composite by means of ablation, a heat and mass transfer process in which a large amount of heat is dissipated by sacrificailly removing material from a surface. Phenolic materials ablate with the initial formation of a char. The depth of the char is a function of the heat conduction coefficient of the composite. The char layer is a poor conductor so it protects the underlying phenolic composite from the high heat of the burning propellant. The nozzle component ablative liners (carbon cloth-phenolic resin composites) are tape wrapped, hydroclave and/or autoclave cured, machined and assembled. The tape consists of prepreg broadcloth. The materials flow sheet for the nozzle ablative liners is given. The prepreg is a three component system: phenolic resin, carbon cloth, and carbon filler. This is Volume 2 of the report, Test Methods and Specifications.

  9. Rare attributes in finite universe: Hypotheses testing specification and exact randomized upper confidence bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.

    1993-03-01

    When attributes are rare and few or none are observed in the selected sample from a finite universe, sampling statisticians are increasingly being challenged to use whatever methods are available to declare with high probability or confidence that the universe is near or completely attribute-free. This is especially true when the attribute is undesirable. Approximations such as those based on normal theory are frequently inadequate with rare attributes. For simple random sampling without replacement, an appropriate probability distribution for statistical inference is the hypergeometric distribution. But even with the hypergeometric distribution, the investigator is limited from making claims of attribute-free with high confidence unless the sample size is quite large using nonrandomized techniques. In the hypergeometric setting with rare attributes, exact randomized tests of hypothesis a,re investigated to determine the effect on power of how one specifies the null hypothesis. In particular, specifying the null hypothesis as zero attributes does not always yield maximum possible power. We also consider the hypothesis specification question under complex sampling designs including stratified random sampling and two-stage cluster sampling (one case involves random selection at first stage and another case involves probability proportional to size without replacement selection at first stage). Also under simple random sampling, this article defines and presents a simple algorithm for the construction of exact randomized'' upper confidence bounds which permit one to possibly report tighter bounds than those exact bounds obtained using nonrandomized'' methods.

  10. Rare attributes in finite universe: Hypotheses testing specification and exact randomized upper confidence bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.

    1993-03-01

    When attributes are rare and few or none are observed in the selected sample from a finite universe, sampling statisticians are increasingly being challenged to use whatever methods are available to declare with high probability or confidence that the universe is near or completely attribute-free. This is especially true when the attribute is undesirable. Approximations such as those based on normal theory are frequently inadequate with rare attributes. For simple random sampling without replacement, an appropriate probability distribution for statistical inference is the hypergeometric distribution. But even with the hypergeometric distribution, the investigator is limited from making claims of attribute-free with high confidence unless the sample size is quite large using nonrandomized techniques. In the hypergeometric setting with rare attributes, exact randomized tests of hypothesis a,re investigated to determine the effect on power of how one specifies the null hypothesis. In particular, specifying the null hypothesis as zero attributes does not always yield maximum possible power. We also consider the hypothesis specification question under complex sampling designs including stratified random sampling and two-stage cluster sampling (one case involves random selection at first stage and another case involves probability proportional to size without replacement selection at first stage). Also under simple random sampling, this article defines and presents a simple algorithm for the construction of exact ``randomized`` upper confidence bounds which permit one to possibly report tighter bounds than those exact bounds obtained using ``nonrandomized`` methods.

  11. A dipstick test combined with urine specific gravity improved the accuracy of proteinuria determination in pregnancy screening.

    PubMed

    Makihara, Natsuko; Yamasaki, Mineo; Morita, Hiroki; Yamada, Hideto

    2011-01-21

    Proteinuria screening using a semi-quantitative dipstick test of the spot urine in antenatal clinic is known to have high false-positive rates. The aim of this study was to assess availability of a dipstick test combined with the urine specific gravity for the determination of pathological proteinuria. A dipstick test was performed on 582 urine samples obtained from 283 pregnant women comprising 260 with normal blood pressure and 23 with pregnancy-induced hypertension. The urine protein (P) and creatinine (C) concentrations, specific gravity (SG), P/C ratio were determined, and compared with dipstick test results. The P concentration increased along the stepwise augmentations in dipstick test result. Frequencies of the urine samples with 0.265 or more P/C ratio were 0.7% with - dipstick test result, 0.7% with the ± result, 3.3% with the 1+ result, and 88.9% with the ≥2+ result. However, if the urine specific gravity was low, frequencies of the high P/C ratio were 5.0% with ± dipstick test result and 9.3% with the 1+ result. A dipstick test result of ≥2+ seems appropriate for a criterion of positive screening for pathological proteinuria in antenatal care. A dipstick test combined with the urine specific gravity may be useful for outpatient clinic screening.

  12. Comparison of side effects of pentagastrin test and calcium stimulation test in patients with increased basal calcitonin concentration: the gender-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Ubl, Philipp; Gincu, Tatiana; Keilani, Mohammad; Ponhold, Lothar; Crevenna, Richard; Niederle, Bruno; Hacker, Marcus; Li, Shuren

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the side effects of the pentagastrin test and the calcium stimulation test in patients with increased basal calcitonin concentration, especially the gender-specific differences of side effects. A total of 256 patients (123 females and 133 males, mean age of 56 ± 27 years, range 21-83 years) had both pentagastrin and calcium stimulation tests. All patients filled in a questionnaire regarding the side effects within 30 min after completion of the stimulation tests. The differences of side effects between female and male patients as well as between the pentagastrin stimulation test and the calcium stimulation test were evaluated. Warmth feeling was the most frequent occurring side effect in all patients who had both pentagastrin and calcium stimulation tests, followed by nausea, altered gustatory sensation, and dizziness. The incidences of urgency to micturate (p < 0.05) and dizziness (p < 0.05) were significantly increased in the female patients as compared to male patients by calcium stimulation test. Significant higher incidences of urgency to micturate (p < 0.05) and warmth feeling (p < 0.05) were found by calcium stimulation test as compared with those by pentagastrin test in female patients. The incidences of nausea (p < 0.05) and abdominal cramping (p < 0.05) in male patients were significantly higher by pentagastrin stimulation test than by calcium stimulation test. There is a significant gender-specific difference in side effects induced by calcium stimulation test. Female patients have fewer side effects by pentagastrin test than by calcium stimulation test. Male patients may tolerate the calcium stimulation test better than the pentagastrin test.

  13. Observed physical processes in mechanical tests of PBX9501 and recomendations for experiments to explore a possible plasticity/damage threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Buechler, Miles A.

    2012-05-02

    This memo discusses observations that have been made in regards to a series of monotonic and cyclic uniaxial experiments performed on PBX9501 by Darla Thompson under Enhanced Surveilance Campaign support. These observations discussed in Section Cyclic compression observations strongly suggest the presence of viscoelastic, plastic, and damage phenomena in the mechanical response of the material. In Secton Uniaxial data analysis and observations methods are discussed for separating out the viscoelastic effects. A crude application of those methods suggests the possibility of a critical stress below which plasticity and damage may be negligible. The threshold should be explored because if it exists it will be an important feature of any constitutive model. Additionally, if the threshold exists then modifications of experimental methods may be feasible which could potentially simplify future experiments or provide higher quality data from those experiments. A set of experiments to explore the threshold stress are proposed in Section Exploratory tests program for identifying threshold stress.

  14. Cytogenetic damage after 131-iodine treatment for hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. A study using the micronucleus test.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, S; Carbonell, E; Galofré, P; Creus, A; Marcos, R

    1999-12-01

    To detect the incidence and persistence of potential chromosome damage induced by iodine-131 therapy, we applied the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay to peripheral blood lymphocytes from hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I. Two groups of patients were evaluated in a longitudinal study; one group was composed of 47 hyperthyroid patients and the other of 39 thyroid cancer patients. In the hyperthyroidism group, the micronuclei frequency was determined before 131I therapy and 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after it. Furthermore, an additional sample was taken from a subgroup of 17 hyperthyroidism patients 6 months after treatment. In the thyroid cancer group, the analysis was also conducted over time, and four samples were studied: before treatment and 1 week, 6 months and 1 year later. Simultaneously, a cross-sectional study was performed with 70 control subjects and 54 thyroid cancer patients who had received the last therapeutic dose 1-6 years before the present study. In the hyperthyroidism group a significant increase in the micronuclei average was found over time. In the sample obtained 6 months after therapy, the micronuclei mean frequency was practically the same as in the sample taken 3 months before. In the thyroid cancer group a twofold increase in the frequency of micronuclei was seen 1 week after therapy. Although this value decreased across time, the micronuclei frequency obtained 1 year after 131I therapy remained higher than the value found before it. Concerning the data from the cross-sectional study, a significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei was detected in the subgroup of thyroid cancer patients treated between 1 and 3 years before the current study. These results indicate that exposure to 131I therapy induces chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes and that the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay is sensitive enough to detect the genetic damage by exposure to sufficiently high levels of radiation from

  15. Characterization of impact damage resistance of CF/PEEK and CF/toughened epoxy laminates under low and high velocity impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Hideo; Adachi, Tadaharu; Tateishi, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    1995-12-31

    In order to use composite materials in aeronautical turbo engines, their resistance to impact damage must be understood. In this work the subperforation flat-wise impact resistance of three kinds of high resistance material systems were evaluated under low and high velocity impact tests. Tested systems were AS4/PEEK (APC-2/AS4, ICI-Fiberite), AS4/PEEK+IL, which consists of APC-2 prepreg and PEEK film inserted between layers as an interleave, and toughened epoxy system T800/{number_sign}3900 (Toray). To investigate the effects of stacking sequence on resistance, three lay-ups -- (0/+30/0/{minus}30)s, (0/+60/0/{minus}60)s, and (0/+45/90/{minus}45)s -- were tested. A drop weight system was used for the low velocity tests, where the velocity ranged from 1.5 to 3.1 m/s. An air gun system was used for the high velocity tests, where the velocity range was between 50 and 100 m/s. The relation between damage area (DA) and impact energy (IE) was linear, and the ratio of the DA/IE quantified the impact resistance of each specimen. The value of DA/IE for the high velocity tests was larger than the value for low velocity tests. To estimate the lay-up effect, a stacking parameter {beta}, which indicates the difference of the inplane stiffness between the adjacent laminae, was proposed. A proportional relation between the DA/IE and the {beta} was obtained. The value of (DA/IE)/{beta}, which was independent of stacking sequence, indicated the impact resistance of the tested material systems for both velocity levels. The ratio of (DA/IE)/{beta} for the high velocity to the value for the low velocity changed with material systems.

  16. Unidimensional IRT Item Parameter Estimates across Equivalent Test Forms with Confounding Specifications within Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlock, Ki Lynn; Turner, Ronna

    2016-01-01

    When constructing multiple test forms, the number of items and the total test difficulty are often equivalent. Not all test developers match the number of items and/or average item difficulty within subcontent areas. In this simulation study, six test forms were constructed having an equal number of items and average item difficulty overall.…

  17. Language Learner Strategies and Linguistic Competence as Factors Affecting Achievement Test Scores in English for Specific Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurkovic, Violeta

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the effect of two factors on achievement test scores in English as a foreign language for specific purposes in higher education: preexisting linguistic competence and frequency of use of language learner strategies. The rationale for the analysis of language learner strategies as a factor affecting achievement test outcomes is…

  18. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  19. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  20. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  1. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  2. Extending the Scope of Speaking Assessment Criteria in a Specific-Purpose Language Test: Operationalizing a Health Professional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hagan, Sally; Pill, John; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Criticism of specific-purpose language (LSP) tests is often directed at their limited ability to represent fully the demands of the target language use situation. Such criticisms extend to the criteria used to assess test performance, which may fail to capture what matters to participants in the domain of interest. This paper reports on the…

  3. DOE/NV/25946--1586 Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, M.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Prothro, L.; Reed, D.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE N1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 0.1 ton of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE N2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1.0 ton of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE N3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE N2, and at the same depth as SPE N2, within the damage zone created by the SPE N2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE N2 shot and prior to the SPE N3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE N2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE N2 core hole included geophysical logging, a

  4. Spontaneous mutations recovered as mosaics in the mouse specific-locus test.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Russell, W L

    1996-11-12

    The specific-locus test (SLT) detects new mutants among mice heterozygous for seven recessive visible markers. Spontaneous mutations can be manifested not only as singleton whole-body mutants in controls (for which we report new data), but as mosaics-either visible (manifesting mottled coat color) in the scored generation (G2) or masked, among the wild-type parental generation (G1). Masked G1 mosaics reveal themselves by producing clusters of whole-body mutants in G2. We provide evidence that most, if not all, mosaics detected in the SLT (both radiation and control progenies) result from a single-strand spontaneous mutation subsequent to the last premeiotic mitosis and before the first postmeiotic one of a parental genome-the "perigametic interval." Such events in the genomes of the G1 and Gzero results, respectively, in visible and masked 50:50 mosaics. Per cell cycle, the spontaneous mutation rate in the perigametic interval is much higher than that in pregamete mitotic divisions. A clearly different locus spectrum further supports the hypothesis of different origin, and casts further doubt on the validity of the doubling-dose risk-estimation method. Because mosaics cannot have arisen in mitotic germ cells, and are not induced by radiation exposure in the perigametic interval, they should not be included in calculations of radiation-induced germ-line mutation rates. For per-generation calculations, inclusion of mosaics yields a spontaneous frequency 1.7 times that calculated from singletons alone for mutations contributed by males; including both sexes, the multiple is 2.2.

  5. Association of black race with follow-up of an abnormal prostate-specific antigen test.

    PubMed

    Turner, Barbara J; Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Weiner, Mark G

    2011-02-01

    Delayed evaluation after a clearly abnormal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) result may contribute to more advanced prostate cancer at diagnosis in black men. In 46 primary care practices over a period of 4.5 years, we studied men aged more than 50 years without known prostate cancer who had a PSA of at least 10.0 ng/mL for the first time. PSA follow-up included: a urology appointment, a new prostate diagnosis, or repeat PSA test. Cox proportional hazards models assessed time to follow-up, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and health care factors with censoring at a time that represents excessive delay (200 days). Among all 724 study men (27% black), delay until PSA follow-up averaged 115.2 days (+/- 79.7 d) and the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for follow-up was shorter for black men than nonblack men (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.00-1.51). However, black men were more likely to have had prior urology care and had higher index PSA levels than other men; both factors were associated with shorter follow-up. After adjustment, delay did not differ for black vs nonblack race (HR, 1.05; 95% Cl, 0.78-1.43) but men aged at least 75 years had a longer delay than men aged 74 years or less (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.89). Despite black men having greater risk of advanced prostate disease at diagnosis and better linkage to urologic care, follow-up was delayed, on average, by more than 3 months and did not differ by race. These results reveal a potentially important, remediable factor to improve prostate cancer prevention and care for black men.

  6. The reliability and validity of a soccer-specific nonmotorised treadmill simulation (intermittent soccer performance test).

    PubMed

    Aldous, Jeffrey W F; Akubat, Ibrahim; Chrismas, Bryna C R; Watkins, Samuel L; Mauger, Alexis R; Midgley, Adrian W; Abt, Grant; Taylor, Lee

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the reliability and validity of a novel nonmotorised treadmill (NMT)-based soccer simulation using a novel activity category called a "variable run" to quantify fatigue during high-speed running. Twelve male University soccer players completed 3 familiarization sessions and 1 peak speed assessment before completing the intermittent soccer performance test (iSPT) twice. The 2 iSPTs were separated by 6-10 days. The total distance, sprint distance, and high-speed running distance (HSD) were 8,968 ± 430 m, 980 ± 75 m and 2,122 ± 140 m, respectively. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was found between repeated trials of the iSPT for all physiological and performance variables. Reliability measures between iSPT1 and iSPT2 showed good agreement (coefficient of variation: <4.6%; intraclass correlation coefficient: >0.80). Furthermore, the variable run phase showed HSD significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.05) in the last 15 minutes (89 ± 6 m) compared with the first 15 minutes (85 ± 7 m), quantifying decrements in high-speed exercise compared with the previous literature. This study validates the iSPT as a NMT-based soccer simulation compared with the previous match-play data and is a reliable tool for assessing and monitoring physiological and performance variables in soccer players. The iSPT could be used in a number of ways including player rehabilitation, understanding the efficacy of nutritional interventions, and also the quantification of environmentally mediated decrements on soccer-specific performance.

  7. Power Supply System for the Atlas Experiment: Design Specifications, Implementation, Test and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, M.; Citterio, M.; Latorre, S.; Lanza, A.; Cova, P.; Delmonte, N.; Giuliani, F.

    2014-06-01

    The planned upgrade of instrumentation sensitivity in the ATLAS experiment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN, calls for a new type of power distribution architecture. Moreover, power supplies require DC-DC power converters able to work in very hostile environment and maintaining high level of Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Safety (denoted as RAMS requirements) during the experimental activity. Two main issues need to be discussed: first, electronic devices and equipment must operate in very high background of both charged and neutral particles and high static magnetic field and, second, the increase of the radiation background and the requirements of new front-end electronics are indeed incompatible with the current capability of the actual distribution system. The APOLLO R&D collaboration, funded by the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), aims to study dedicated topologies of both distribution system and DC-DC power converters and to design, build and test demonstrators, developing the needed technology for the industrialization phase. The collaboration has designed a 3kW, 280V-12V converter (MC) based on the Switch in Line architecture (SIL), a DC to DC phase-shifted converter characterized by a disposition in line of the MOSFETs with good soft switching performances, and in the last year many steps have been taken to enhance the power dissipation and the reliability and to improve the general features of the designed converter. In particular a new water heat sink was designed on the basis of TFD simulation accounting for the layout of the specific converter. Experimental activities in order to characterize both thermal and electrical features of the MC confirm the correctness of the adopted design criteria.

  8. Detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in fresh colostrum: a modification of the virus neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Bedekovic, Tomislav; Mihaljevic, Zeljko; Jungic, Andreja; Lemo, Nina; Lojkic, Ivana; Cvetnic, Zeljko; Cac, Zeljko

    2013-03-01

    To eliminate cytotoxic effects of colostrum on cells, a modified virus neutralization test (VNT) for the detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in colostrum was developed. The new test was compared to the World Organization for Animal Health-recommended VNT and the results evaluated. The agreement of the new test compared to the standard VNT was determined to be 98%, whereas sensitivity and specificity of the modified VNT compared to the standard VNT were 100%. Bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific antibodies were detected in 42 sera samples and 38 colostrum samples. The antibody titers in serum and colostrum showed a high correlation (n = 56, r = 0.9719, P < 0.001). The modified virus neutralization technique described herein succeeds in eliminating cytotoxic effects and can be readily applied for the detection of specific antibodies against other infectious agents in colostrum.

  9. The development of a test specification to determine the rollover protection of passengers in light commercial vehicles fitted with canopies.

    PubMed

    Honiball, E J; van Niekerk, J L

    2001-09-01

    In this paper, a basic test specification is proposed to assess the structural integrity of a canopy that covers the load-area of a light commercial vehicle (LCV) used to carry passengers in the rear. The proposed test specification is a first step towards improving the safety of these passengers during rollover accidents. Different test methods were evaluated for applicability, ease of use and financial implications. The mass and geometric characteristics of three different one-ton LCVs were experimentally obtained and used to determine the minimum lateral velocity that will result in a rollover should a tripping mechanism be encountered. These velocities, in conjunction with other published data, were used to determine the energy required for a pendulum qualification test. It was decided that 7.7 kJ of energy delivered by a pendulum travelling between 4 and 7 m/s just prior to impact would be the most representative load case. A finite element analysis (FEA) of the proposed impact test on a specimen canopy was completed. Thereafter, the actual pendulum impact test was conducted to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed test procedure as well as the correlation with the FEA. It was shown that both FEA and actual testing are viable qualification procedures and that they can in fact be used to reliably assess the strength of the canopy. Finally, the outline of a test specification was developed and proposed, which can be used by national regulatory institutions to assess the structural integrity of commercially manufactured canopies.

  10. Performance specifications for health physics instrumentation: portable instrumentation for use in normal work environments. Part 2. Test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, J.L.; Swinth, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Selby, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated a draft American National Standards Institute Standard N42.17 (ANSI N42.17) on performance specifications for health physics instrumentation through a project jointly funded by the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The evaluation involved testing a representative cross section of instruments against criteria in the standard. This report presents results of the testing program. A brief history of the project is included in the introduction. The instrumentation tested is described in general terms (i.e., types, ranges); however, no direct relationship between the results and a specific instrument model is made in this report. Testing requirements in ANSI N42.17D4, Revision 1 (May 1985) are summarized and the methods by which the tests are performed are discussed. Brief descriptions of the testing equipment are included in the methods section of the report. More detailed information about the draft standard, testing requirements and procedures, and the test equipment is included in ''Performance Specifications for Health Physics Instrumentation - Portable Instrumentation for Use in Normal Work Environments, Part 1: Manual of Testing Procedures.'' Results of testing are given in two formats: test-by-test and instrument-by-instrument. Discussion is included on significant and interesting findings, on comparisons of results from the same type of instruments from same and different manufacturers, and on data grouped by manufacturer. Conclusions are made on the applicability and practicality of the proposed standard and on instrument performance. Changes that have been made to the proposed standard based on findings of the testing program are listed and discussed. 22 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

  11. Walking tests during the exercise training: specific use for the cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Casillas, J-M; Hannequin, A; Besson, D; Benaïm, S; Krawcow, C; Laurent, Y; Gremeaux, V

    2013-10-01

    Walk tests, principally the six-minute walk test (6mWT), constitute a safe, useful submaximal tool for exercise tolerance testing in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The 6mWT result reflects functional status, walking autonomy and efficacy of CR on walking endurance, which is more pronounced in patients with low functional capacity (heart failure - cardiac surgery). The 6mWT result is a strong predictor of mortality. However, clinically significant changes and reliability are still subject to debate - probably because of the ambiguity in terms of the target speed (either comfortable or brisk walking). Of the other time-based walk tests, the 2-minute-walk test is the only one applicable during CR, reserved for patients with severe disabilities by its psychometric properties. Fixed-distance tests (principally the 200m fast walk test) and incremental shuttle walking, tests explore higher levels of effort and may represent a safe and inexpensive alternative to laboratory-based tests during CR. These walking tests may be useful for personalizing prescription of training programs. However, the minimum clinically significant difference has not yet been determined. Lastly, walking tests appear to be potential useful tools in promoting physical activity and behavioural changes at home. Thus, validation of other walk tests with better psychometric properties will be necessary.

  12. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... tank car that successfully passes a periodic inspection and test must be marked as prescribed in § 180... regard to any other periodic inspection and test requirements, a tank car must have an appropriate... periodic inspection interval, test technique, and acceptance criteria for the lining or coating. The...

  13. Factors Influencing the Selection of Standardized Tests for the Diagnosis of Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Stacy K.; Eickhoff, Jessica R.; Sullivan, Shanleigh F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Standardized tests are one of the primary assessment tools used by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to diagnose child language impairment. Numerous child language tests are commercially available; however, it is unknown what factors lead clinicians to select particular tests to use in clinical practice. This study investigated whether…

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 75 - Specifications and Test Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... temperature is above the dew-point temperature. If the cause of failure to meet the relative accuracy tests is... Coal and Coke Using High-Temperature Tube Furnace Combustion Methods; ASTM D4294-98, Standard Test... Spectrometry; ASTM D1552-01, Standard Test Method for Sulfur in Petroleum Products (High-Temperature...

  15. Block 4 solar cell module design and test specification for intermediate load center applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for performance of terrestrial solar cell modules intended for use in various test applications are established. During the 1979-80 time period, such applications are expected to be in the 20 to 500 kilowatt size range. A series of characterization and qualification tests necessary to certify the module design for production, and the necessary performance test for acceptance of modules are specified.

  16. An effective data mining approach for structure damage identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Soonyoung

    An efficient, neural network based, online nondestructive structural damage identification procedure is developed for determining the damage characteristics (the damage locations and the corresponding severity) from dynamic measurements in near real-time. The procedure utilizes unique data processing techniques to track the most useful modal information based on modal strain energy and to calculate the associated data based on principal component analysis for further processing in a neural network based identification scheme. With two unique features, this approach is significantly different from currently available damage identification procedures for real-time structural integrity monitoring/diagnostics. First, the most sensitive mode for the specific damage is selected in an automatic process which increases the accuracy of damage identification and decreases time spent on neural network training. Second, the approach creates unique data that extracts core characteristics from modal information for a number of different damage cases; and consequently, the accuracy of the damage identification improves significantly. This approach can be operated online providing real time structural damage identification. The method is tested for simulated damage cases, including situations of single and multiple damage in the closely-spaced frequencies of Kabe's model. The philosophy behind the proposed research is to provide a means to online and nondestructively predict the degradation of a structure's integrity (i.e. damage location and the corresponding severity, strength loss).

  17. Application of the DNA adductome approach to assess the DNA-damaging capability of in vitro micronucleus test-positive compounds.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kyoko; Yamamura, Eiji; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Yagi, Takashi; Matsuda, Tomonari; Sugiyama, Akio; Uno, Yoshifumi

    2011-03-18

    The in vitro micronucleus (MN) test is widely used for screening genotoxic compounds, but it often produces false-positive results. To consider the significance of positive results, it is important to know whether DNA adducts are formed in the cells treated with the test compound. Recently, Matsuda et al. developed the DNA adductome approach to detect DNA adducts comprehensively ([4] Kanaly, et al., Antioxid. Redox Signal., 2006, 8, 993-1001). We applied this method to assess the DNA-damaging capability of in vitro MN test-positive compounds. CHL/IU cells were treated with compounds from three categories: (1) carcinogens causing DNA alkylation, ethyl methanesulfonate and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine; (2) carcinogens producing DNA bulky adducts, 2-amino-6-phenyl-1-methylimidazo[4,5-b]pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and (3) non-carcinogens, caffeine, maltol, and sodium chloride, with or without metabolic activation. With the conditions in which all test compounds gave positive results in the MN tests, DNA was extracted from the cells and hydrolyzed to deoxyribonucleosides, which were subsequently subjected to LC/ESI-MS/MS analysis. All carcinogens (categories 1 and 2) produced various DNA adduct peaks, and some of the m/z peak values corresponded to known adducts. No non-carcinogens produced DNA adducts, indicating that these compounds produced MN through different mechanisms from the adduct formation. These results indicate that the adductome approach is useful to demonstrate DNA damage formation of MN test-positive compounds and to understand their mechanisms of action.

  18. A critical review of anaesthetised animal models and alternatives for military research, testing and training, with a focus on blast damage, haemorrhage and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Combes, Robert D

    2013-11-01

    Military research, testing, and surgical and resuscitation training, are aimed at mitigating the consequences of warfare and terrorism to armed forces and civilians. Traumatisation and tissue damage due to explosions, and acute loss of blood due to haemorrhage, remain crucial, potentially preventable, causes of battlefield casualties and mortalities. There is also the additional threat from inhalation of chemical and aerosolised biological weapons. The use of anaesthetised animal models, and their respective replacement alternatives, for military purposes -- particularly for blast injury, haemorrhaging and resuscitation training -- is critically reviewed. Scientific problems with the animal models include the use of crude, uncontrolled and non-standardised methods for traumatisation, an inability to model all key trauma mechanisms, and complex modulating effects of general anaesthesia on target organ physiology. Such effects depend on the anaesthetic and influence the cardiovascular system, respiration, breathing, cerebral haemodynamics, neuroprotection, and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Some anaesthetics also bind to the NMDA brain receptor with possible differential consequences in control and anaesthetised animals. There is also some evidence for gender-specific effects. Despite the fact that these issues are widely known, there is little published information on their potential, at best, to complicate data interpretation and, at worst, to invalidate animal models. There is also a paucity of detail on the anaesthesiology used in studies, and this can hinder correct data evaluation. Welfare issues relate mainly to the possibility of acute pain as a side-effect of traumatisation in recovered animals. Moreover, there is the increased potential for animals to suffer when anaesthesia is temporary, and the procedures invasive. These dilemmas can be addressed, however, as a diverse range of replacement approaches exist, including computer and mathematical

  19. Copper-Induced Spermatozoa Head Malformation Is Related to Oxidative Damage to Testes in CD-1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-Wei; Zhi-GangTan; Qiao, Na; Kang, Zhen-Long; Chen, Zhi-Ling; Hu, Lian-Mei; Yang, Zeng-Ming; Li, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The molecular mechanism for copper toxicity on spermatozoa quality in mice is not well understood. In a 4-week experiment, we challenged 24, 6-week-old male CD-1 mice with twice-a-week intraperitoneal copper chloride injections and evaluated spermatozoa quality, copper levels in the testes, serum testosterone, the expression of key antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPx5), and the regulated androgen receptor (AR) in the mice testes. We compared these outcomes for four groups of six mice given doses of 0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg weight copper chloride twice a week for 4 weeks. The mice demonstrated a copper increase spermatozoa head malformation in a dose-response manner. However, we observed no changes in spermatozoa viability and acrosome integrity in the ratio of mouse body weight to testes weight or in the histomorphology of the testes as the average copper level increased. Results of our RT-PCR assays, immunohistochemical tests, ELISA, and histochemistry analyses indicated that testis GPx5 expression was increased, AR expression in the testes was decreased, serum testosterone was decreased, and the activity of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase was decreased as the copper dose increased. In conclusion, these data show that sublethal exposure to copper induces spermatozoa head malformation and influences both mRNA and protein levels of GPx5 and AR which is related to copper resides in the testes.

  20. THE SPECIFICITY OF THE SABIN-FELDMAN DYE TEST WITH REFERENCE TO PROTOZOAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Kulasiri, C.

    1960-01-01

    Infections of Eimeria stiedae in normal and splenectomized rabbits and of Leishmania enriettii in normal rabbits and guinea-pigs and in splenectomized rabbits did not produce dye test antibodies. Guinea-pigs injected with Atoxoplasma sp. and rabbits immunized with cultures of Crithidia fasciculata were found to be negative for dye test antibodies. Mice which had been infected with Trypanosoma cruzi did not show dye test antibodies. All these animals, except one guinea-pig infected with Leishmania enriettii, were negative in the complement-fixation test for toxoplasmosis using the egg antigen. These findings are discussed in the light of previous reports. PMID:14412642