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Sample records for damping mechanisms analisis

  1. On damping mechanisms in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    A partial differential equation model of a cantilevered beam with a tip mass at its free end is used to study damping in a composite. Four separate damping mechanisms consisting of air damping, strain rate damping, spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis are considered experimentally. Dynamic tests were performed to produce time histories. The time history data is then used along with an approximate model to form a sequence of least squares problems. The solution of the least squares problem yields the estimated damping coefficients. The resulting experimentally determined analytical model is compared with the time histories via numerical simulation of the dynamic response. The procedure suggested here is compared with a standard modal damping ratio model commonly used in experimental modal analysis.

  2. On damping mechanisms in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A partial differential equation model of a cantilevered beam with a tip mass at its free end is used to study damping in a composite. Four separate damping mechanisms consisting of air damping, strain rate damping, spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis are considered experimentally. Dynamic tests were performed to produce time histories. The time history data is then used along with an approximate model to form a sequence of least squares problems. The solution of the least squares problem yields the estimated damping coefficients. The resulting experimentally determined analytical model is compared with the time histories via numerical simulation of the dynamic response. The procedure suggested here is compared with a standard modal damping ratio model commonly used in experimental modal analysis.

  3. Damping mechanisms of a pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolfo, Gilles; Castex, Daniel; Vigué, Jacques

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the damping mechanisms of a pendulum. The originality of our setup is the use of a metal strip suspension and the development of extremely sensitive electric measurements of the pendulum velocity and position. Their sensitivity is absolutely necessary for a reliable measurement of the pendulum damping time constant because this measurement is possible only for very low oscillation amplitudes, when air friction forces quadratic in velocity have a negligible contribution to the observed damping. We have thus carefully studied damping by air friction forces, which is the dominant mechanism for large values of the Reynolds number Re but which is negligible in the Stokes regime, {Re} ∼ 1. In this last case, we have found that the dominant damping is due to internal friction in the metal strip, a universal effect called anelasticity, and, for certain frequencies, to resonant coupling to the support of the pendulum. All our measurements are well explained by theory. We believe this paper would be of interest to students in an undergraduate classical mechanics course.

  4. Modification of spastic gait through mechanical damping.

    PubMed

    Maki, B E; Rosen, M J; Simon, S R

    1985-01-01

    The effect of dissipative mechanical loads on spastic gait has been studied, to evaluate the feasibility of using mechanically damped orthoses to effect functional improvements in the gait of spastic patients. This concept is based on a hypothesis citing uninhibited, velocity-dependent stretch reflexes as a possible causal factor in spastic gait abnormalities, such as equinus and back-kneeing. In order to screen potential experimental subjects and to quantify velocity-dependent reflex behaviour, ankle rotation experiments and filmed gait analysis were performed. The results supported the existence of a velocity threshold. Orthosis simulation experiments were performed with one spastic subject, using a wearable, computer-controlled, electromechanical, below-knee orthosis simulator to apply a variety of damping loads to the ankle as the subject walked. Results indicated that appropriate damping can improve local joint kinematics. The damping causes a reduction in muscle stretch velocity which apparently results in reduced spastic reflex activity.

  5. Spatial versus time hysteresis in damping mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Fabiano, R. H.; Wang, Y.; Inman, D. J.; Cudney, H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of continuing investigations on the task of estimating internal damping mechanisms in flexible structures. Specifically, two models for internal damping in Euler-Bernoulli beams are considered: spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis. A theoretically sound computational algorithm for estimation is described, and experimental results are discussed. It is concluded that both models perform well in the sense that they accurately predict response for the experiments conducted.

  6. Investigation on the mechanism of damping behavior of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Gong, Xinglong; Deng, Huaxia; Qin, Lijun; Xuan, Shouhu

    2012-12-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are a group of smart materials which have many applications such as dynamic vibration absorbers, engine mounts, and so on. The damping behavior is important for applications of MREs. However, the mechanism of the damping of MREs has not been investigated thoroughly. In this study, MREs are modeled as special particle reinforced composites with magneto-induced properties and the mechanism of the damping behavior of MREs is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It has been found that there are three types of damping property in MREs: the intrinsic damping, the interface damping and the magneto-mechanical damping. The presented damping model is successfully validated by damping tests on a series of MRE samples. Furthermore, the relationships between the damping properties and formulas of MREs are discussed; this provides guidance for the manufacture of MREs with various damping properties.

  7. Experimental verification of damping mechanisms in a composite beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, Harley H.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of estimating the distributed damping parameters based on the measured modal parameters (frequency and damping ratios) was derived. Three different mathematical models were used to model the damping mechanism of a quasi-isotropic pultruded cantilevered beam. These three models were (1) viscous (air) damping, (2) strain rate damping, and (3) both viscous and strain rate damping. The eigenvalues of the partial differential equation model were found to be uninfluenced by any of the three assumed damping models. Values were obtained for each of the damping models as well as the modulus of elasticity of the beam. It was found that the two-parameter damping model provided the best fit to measured modal data. However, the two-parameter damping model could only reproduce the measured damping ratios to within 85 percent.

  8. Metallic materials for mechanical damping capacity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crăciun, R. C.; Stanciu, S.; Cimpoeșu, R.; (Dragoș Ursanu, A. I.; Manole, V.; Paraschiv, P.; Chicet, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Some metallic materials exhibit good damping capacity of mechanical energy into thermal energy. This property along with the others metallic characteristics make this materials interesting for a big number of applications. These materials can be used as bumpers in different applications including automotive field. Beside grey cast iron and shape memory alloys few new metallic materials are presented for the supposition of high damping capacity. We analyze the causes that increase the internal friction of some metallic materials and possibilities to enhance this property through different mechanical, physical or chemical methods. Shape memory alloys, especially those based on copper, present a different damping capacity on martensite, austenite or transition state. In the transformation range M ↔A, which in case of copper base shape memory alloys is quite large, the metallic intelligent materials present a high internal friction, almost comparable with natural rubber behavior that can transform mechanical energy into thermal energy till a certain value of the external solicitation. These materials can be used as noise or small vibrations bumpers or even as shock absorbers in automotive industry.

  9. Mechanical Design of the DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yiming; Wu, Jian; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Yunlong; Chen, Dengyi; Chang, Jin

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer, DAMPE, is a new designed satellite developed for the CASs new Innovation 2020 program. As the main component of DAMPE, the new designed BGO calorimeter consists of 308 BGO Crystals coupled with photomultiplier tube.The reliability and safety of the BGO Calorimeter structure play a very important role in the operation of whole detector. During the rocket launch, the calorimeter structure should be stable against vibration and environmental factors to ensure detector works in good conditions. In this article, we make the BGO calorimeter structure design, and then prove that it will work in the environments of rocket launch and flight.

  10. Atomistic Mechanisms for Viscoelastic Damping in Inorganic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Raghavan

    Viscoelasticity, a ubiquitous material property, can be tuned to engineer a wide range of fascinating applications such as mechanical dampers, artificial tissues, functional foams and optoelectronics, among others. Traditionally, soft matter such as polymers and polymer composites have been used extensively for viscoelastic damping applications, owing to the inherent viscous nature of interactions between polymer chains. Although this leads to good damping characteristics, the stiffness in these materials is low, which in turn leads to limitations. In this context, hard inorganic materials and composites are promising candidates for enhanced damping, owing to their large stiffness and, in some cases large loss modulus. Viscoelasticity in these materials has been relatively unexplored and atomistic mechanisms responsible for damping are not apparent. Therefore, the overarching goal of this work is to understand mechanisms for viscoelastic damping in various classes of inorganic composites and alloys at an atomistic level from molecular dynamics simulations. We show that oscillatory shear deformation serves as a powerful probe to explain mechanisms for exceptional damping in hitherto unexplored systems. The first class of inorganic materials consists of crystalline phases of a stiff inclusion in a soft matrix. The two crystals within the composite, namely the soft and a stiff phase, individually show a highly elastic behavior and a very small loss modulus. On the other hand, a composite with the two phases is seen to exhibit damping that is about 20 times larger than predicted theoretical bounds. The primary reason for the damping is due to large anharmonicity in phonon-phonon coupling, resulting from the composite microstructure. A concomitant effect is the distribution of shear strain, which is observed to be highly inhomogeneous and mostly concentrated in the soft phase. Interestingly, the shear frequency at which the damping is greatest is observed to scale with

  11. The effect of mechanical damping loads on disabling action tremor.

    PubMed

    Aisen, M L; Arnold, A; Baiges, I; Maxwell, S; Rosen, M

    1993-07-01

    Patients with severe action tremor have uncontrollable, relatively rapid oscillatory motion super-imposed on otherwise useable slower voluntary motor activity. Because a mechanical damper produces an opposing force proportional to velocity, applying damping loads to tremorous limbs should attenuate the (high-velocity) tremor component of movement while permitting the slower purposeful portion to proceed relatively unopposed. In this study, the effect of upper extremity damping in three degrees of freedom was examined in 10 patients with cerebellar action tremor due to multiple sclerosis or traumatic brain injury. Variable amounts of damping were applied by prototype energy-dissipating orthoses which generated resistive viscous loads by means of computer-controlled magnetic particle brakes. All patients experienced statistically and functionally significant tremor reduction with the application of damping.

  12. On passive damping mechanisms in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1982-01-01

    The significance is explained of even tiny amounts of passive energy dissipation to ensure successful stabilization of large, flexible space structures. Study of scale effects on various mechanisms indicates that modal damping ratios are likely to decrease as size increases in a family of similar structures. Paper focuses on thermal dissipation induced by strain gradients during vibration of monolithic configurations. Past work and the expected magnitudes of this damping are reviewed, along with reasons why it is, to some degree, under the designer's control. In the search for the highest practical values, unidirectional metallic composites and other arrangements are examined

  13. Nanoscale shape-memory alloys for ultrahigh mechanical damping.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Jose; Nó, Maria L; Schuh, Christopher A

    2009-07-01

    Shape memory alloys undergo reversible transformations between two distinct phases in response to changes in temperature or applied stress. The creation and motion of the internal interfaces between these phases during such transformations dissipates energy, making these alloys effective mechanical damping materials. Although it has been shown that reversible phase transformations can occur in nanoscale volumes, it is not known whether these transformations have a sample size dependence. Here, we demonstrate that the two phases responsible for shape memory in Cu-Al-Ni alloys are more stable in nanoscale pillars than they are in the bulk. As a result, the pillars show a damping figure of merit that is substantially higher than any previously reported value for a bulk material, making them attractive for damping applications in nanoscale and microscale devices.

  14. Integrated mechanics for the passive damping of polymer-matrix composites and composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent developments on integrated damping mechanics for unidirectional composites, laminates, and composite structures are reviewed. Simplified damping micromechanics relate the damping of on-axis and off-axis composites to constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, fiber orientation, temperature, and moisture. Laminate and structural damping mechanics for thin composites are summarized. Discrete layer damping mechanics for thick laminates, including the effects of interlaminar shear damping, are developed and semianalytical predictions of modal damping in thick simply supported specialty composite plates are presented. Applications show the advantages of the unified mechanics, and illustrate the effect of fiber volume ratio, fiber orientation, structural geometry, and temperature on the damping. Additional damping properties for composite plates of various laminations, aspect ratios, fiber content, and temperature illustrate the merits and ranges of applicability of each theory (thin or thick laminates).

  15. Nonlinear damping in mechanical resonators made from carbon nanotubes and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, A.; Moser, J.; Chaste, J.; Zdrojek, M.; Wilson-Rae, I.; Bachtold, A.

    2011-06-01

    The theory of damping is discussed in Newton's Principia and has been tested in objects as diverse as the Foucault pendulum, the mirrors in gravitational-wave detectors and submicrometre mechanical resonators. In general, the damping observed in these systems can be described by a linear damping force. Advances in nanofabrication mean that it is now possible to explore damping in systems with one or more atomic-scale dimensions. Here we study the damping of mechanical resonators based on carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets. The damping is found to strongly depend on the amplitude of motion, and can be described by a nonlinear rather than a linear damping force. We exploit the nonlinear nature of damping in these systems to improve the figures of merit for both nanotube and graphene resonators. For instance, we achieve a quality factor of 100,000 for a graphene resonator.

  16. Nonlinear damping in mechanical resonators made from carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    PubMed

    Eichler, A; Moser, J; Chaste, J; Zdrojek, M; Wilson-Rae, I; Bachtold, A

    2011-05-15

    The theory of damping is discussed in Newton's Principia and has been tested in objects as diverse as the Foucault pendulum, the mirrors in gravitational-wave detectors and submicrometre mechanical resonators. In general, the damping observed in these systems can be described by a linear damping force. Advances in nanofabrication mean that it is now possible to explore damping in systems with one or more atomic-scale dimensions. Here we study the damping of mechanical resonators based on carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets. The damping is found to strongly depend on the amplitude of motion, and can be described by a nonlinear rather than a linear damping force. We exploit the nonlinear nature of damping in these systems to improve the figures of merit for both nanotube and graphene resonators. For instance, we achieve a quality factor of 100,000 for a graphene resonator.

  17. A Physical Molecular Mechanics Method for Damped Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pragya; Wang, Bo; Fernandez, Laura E; Truhlar, Donald G

    2017-03-22

    Damped dispersion can be a significant component of the interaction energy in many physical and chemical processes, for example, physisorption and noncovalent complexation. For physically interpreting and modeling such processes, it is convenient to have an analytic method to calculate damped dispersion that is readily applicable across the entire periodic table. Of the available methods to calculate damped dispersion energy for interacting systems with overlapping charge distributions, we select symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) as providing a reasonable definition, and of the possible analytic forms, we choose the D3(BJ) method. However, the available parameterizations of D3(BJ) include not only damped dispersion energy but also corrections for errors in specific exchange-correlation functionals. Here we present a parameterization that provides a physical measure of damped dispersion without such density functional corrections. The method generalizes an earlier method of Pernal and coworkers to all elements from hydrogen to plutonium.

  18. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  19. Damping mechanisms of single-clamped and prestressed double-clamped resonant polymer microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, S.; Hierold, C.

    2008-11-01

    In this article, an investigation of the damping mechanisms of resonant single- and double-clamped polymer microbeams for a frequency range from 10 kHz to 5 MHz is presented. The suspended structures are made of SU-8, an epoxy-type photoresist, by means of a sacrificial layer technique. The vibration was measured with a laser-Doppler vibrometer in high vacuum at different temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. The influence of air damping in rarefied air was investigated and the intrinsic damping mechanisms were determined in high vacuum (p <0.05 Pa). After excluding a variety of possible damping factors, the dominant intrinsic dissipation mechanism of the single-clamped microbeams was understood to be the material damping with maximum quality factors (Q) of around 70 at 20 °C. Quality factors of up to 720 at 20 °C were measured for stringlike double-clamped microbeams, which suggest a different intrinsic damping mechanism than material loss. It is shown that internal damping mechanisms due to flexure and elongation have a small impact on the damping of stretched strings. Modeling the clamping loss based on the wave transmission into the suspended anchor plates indicates that it is the dominant intrinsic dissipation in the prestressed double-clamped microresonators. At atmospheric pressure it was shown that at low frequencies the quality factors of single-clamped and stringlike double-clamped microbeams are limited by the squeeze-film air damping. At high frequencies the quality factors are limited by the specific intrinsic damping. In between the two particular regions with a specific dominant damping mechanism the quality factors show a maximum.

  20. Identification of the dominant precession-damping mechanism in Fe, Co, and Ni by first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, K; Idzerda, Y U; Stiles, M D

    2007-07-13

    The Landau-Lifshitz equation reliably describes magnetization dynamics using a phenomenological treatment of damping. This Letter presents first-principles calculations of the damping parameters for Fe, Co, and Ni that quantitatively agree with existing ferromagnetic resonance measurements. This agreement establishes the dominant damping mechanism for these systems and takes a significant step toward predicting and tailoring the damping constants of new materials.

  1. Vibration Damping Materials and Their Applications in Nano/Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems: A Review.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Nitin; Kaur, Davinder

    2015-03-01

    The present review explores an overall view of the vibration damping materials ranging from traditionally used viscoelastic materials for macroscale damping to hybrid thin film heterostructures for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Vibration damping materials like rubbers, polymers, metals, metal-matrix composites and smart materials are reviewed in terms of damping capacity, stiffness, mechanical strength and figure of merit. Nanoscale shape memory alloys, piezoelectric materials, carbon nanotubes, their composites and thin films are promising materials for future nanoscale damping devices. The main focus of this article is on our development of new vibration damping approach for MEMS structures comprising of ferroelastic/ferroelastic thin film heterostructures. For the first time, nanoindentation has been explored as an alternative tool to evaluate the damping capability of actual components (e.g., thin films for MEMS) where production of dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) test samples is not feasible. A comprehensive insight on the existing vibration damping materials and our new approach would definitely trigger some important applications in nano- and micro-electro-mechanical systems.

  2. The ROSETTA PHILAE Lander damping mechanism as probe for the Comet soil strength.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roll, R.

    2015-10-01

    The ROSETTA Lander is equipped with an one axis damping mechanism to dissipate kinetic energy during the touch down. This damping is necessary to avoid damages to the Lander by a hard landing shock and more important to avoid re-bouncing from ground with high velocity. The damping mechanism works best for perpendicular impact, which means the velocity vector is parallel to the damper axis and all three feet touch the ground at the same time. That is usually not the case. Part of the impact energy can be transferred into rotational energy at ground contact if the impact is not perpendicular. This energy will lift up the Lander from the ground if the harpoons and the hold down thruster fail, as happen in mission. The damping mechanism itself is an electrical generator, driven by a spindle inside a telescopic tube. This tube was extended in mission for landing by 200mm. A maximum damping length of 140mm would be usually required to compensate a landing velocity of 1m/s, if the impact happens perpendicular on hard ground. After landing the potentiometer of the telescopic tube reading shows a total damping length of only 42,5mm. The damping mechanism and the overall mechanical behavior of the Lander at touch down are well tested and characterized and transferred to a multi-body computer model. The incoming and outgoing flightpath of PHILAE allow via computer-simulation the reconstruction of the touch down. It turns out, that the outgoing flight direction is dominated by the local ground slope and that the damping length is strongly dependent on the soil strength. Damping of soft comet ground must be included to fit the damping length measured. Scenario variations of the various feet contact with different local surface features (stone or regolith) and of different soil models finally lead to a restricted range for the soil strength at the touch down area.

  3. Damped Mechanical Oscillator: Experiment and Detailed Energy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corridoni, Tommaso; D'Anna, Michele; Fuchs, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The damped oscillator is discussed in every high school textbook or introductory physics course, and a large number of papers are devoted to it in physics didactics journals. Papers typically focus on kinematic and dynamic aspects and less often on energy. Among the latter, some are devoted to the peculiar decreasing behavior of energy…

  4. Electroresponsive Aqueous Silk Protein As “Smart” Mechanical Damping Fluid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of an electroresponsive aqueous silk protein polymer as a smart mechanical damping fluid. The aqueous polymer solution is liquid under ambient conditions, but is reversibly converted into a gel once subjected to an electric current, thereby increasing or decreasing in viscosity. This nontoxic, biodegradable, reversible, edible fluid also bonds to device surfaces and is demonstrated to reduce friction and provide striking wear protection. The friction and mechanical damping coefficients are shown to modulate with electric field exposure time and/or intensity. Damping coefficient can be modulated electrically, and then preserved without continued power for longer time scales than conventional “smart” fluid dampers. PMID:24750065

  5. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.; Farmer, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis for modeling damping seals for use in Space Shuttle main engine turbomachinery is being produced. Development of a computational fluid mechanics code for turbulent, incompressible flow is required.

  6. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The pressure solution for incompressible flow was investigated in support of a computational fluid mechanics model which simulates the damping seals considered for use in the space shuttle main engine turbomachinery. Future work directions are discussed briefly.

  7. Application of damping mechanism model and stacking fault probability in Fe-Mn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Wen, Y.H.; Li, N. Teng, J.; Ding, S.; Xu, Y.G.

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, the damping mechanism model of Fe-Mn alloy was analyzed using dislocation theory. Moreover, as an important parameter in Fe-Mn based alloy, the effect of stacking fault probability on the damping capacity of Fe-19.35Mn alloy after deep-cooling or tensile deformation was also studied. The damping capacity was measured using reversal torsion pendulum. The stacking fault probability of {gamma}-austenite and {epsilon}-martensite was determined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile analysis. The microstructure was observed using scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results indicated that with the strain amplitude increasing above a critical value, the damping capacity of Fe-19.35Mn alloy increased rapidly which could be explained using the breakaway model of Shockley partial dislocations. Deep-cooling and suitable tensile deformation could improve the damping capacity owning to the increasing of stacking fault probability of Fe-19.35Mn alloy.

  8. Utilising Nonlinear Air Damping as a Soft Mechanical Stopper for MEMS Vibration Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Tuan; Du, Sijun; Arroyo, Emmanuelle; Jia, Yu; Seshia, Ashwin

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on the theory and experimental verification of utilising air damping as a soft stopper mechanism for piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting to enhance shock resistance. Experiments to characterise device responsiveness under various vibration conditions were performed at different air pressure levels, and a dimensionless model was constructed with nonlinear damping terms included to model PVEH response. The relationship between the quadratic damping coefficient ζ n and air pressure is empirically established, and an optimal pressure level is calculated to trade off harvestable energy and device robustness for specific environmental conditions.

  9. Effects of Delaminations on the Damped Dynamic Characteristics of Composite Laminates: Mechanics and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical and experimental work is presented on the damped free-vibration of delaminated laminates and beams. A laminate theory is developed where the unknown kinematic perturbations induced by a delamination crack are treated as additional degrees of freedom. The generalized stiffness, inertia and damping matrices of the laminate are formulated. An analytical solution is developed for the prediction of natural frequencies, modes and modal damping in composite beams with delamination cracks. Evaluations of the mechanics on various cantilever beams with a central delamination are performed. Experimental results for the modal frequencies and damping of composite beams with a single delamination are also presented and correlations between analytical predictions and measured data are shown. The effects of delamination vary based on crack size, laminate configuration, and mode order. The implications of the mechanics in developing delamination detection techniques are also discussed.

  10. Mechanical loading, damping, and load-driven bone formation in mouse tibiae.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Todd; Wanis, Mina; Ayoub, Ramez; Zhao, Liming; Watts, Nelson B; Bhattacharya, Amit; Akkus, Ozan; Robling, Alexander; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical loads play a pivotal role in the growth and maintenance of bone and joints. Although loading can activate anabolic genes and induce bone remodeling, damping is essential for preventing traumatic bone injury and fracture. In this study we investigated the damping capacity of bone, joint tissue, muscle, and skin using a mouse hindlimb model of enhanced loading in conjunction with finite element modeling to model bone curvature. Our hypothesis was that loads were primarily absorbed by the joints and muscle tissue, but that bone also contributed to damping through its compression and natural bending. To test this hypothesis, fresh mouse distal lower limb segments were cyclically loaded in axial compression in sequential bouts, with each subsequent bout having less surrounding tissue. A finite element model was generated to model effects of bone curvature in silico. Two damping-related parameters (phase shift angle and energy loss) were determined from the output of the loading experiments. Interestingly, the experimental results revealed that the knee joint contributed to the largest portion of the damping capacity of the limb, and bone itself accounted for approximately 38% of the total phase shift angle. Computational results showed that normal bone curvature enhanced the damping capacity of the bone by approximately 40%, and the damping effect grew at an accelerated pace as curvature was increased. Although structural curvature reduces critical loads for buckling in beam theory, evolution apparently favors maintaining curvature in the tibia. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia revealed that in response to axial loading, bone formation was significantly enhanced in the regions that were predicted to receive a curvature-induced bending moment. These results suggest that in addition to bone's compressive damping capacity, surrounding tissues, as well as naturally-occurring bone curvature, also contribute to mechanical damping, which may ultimately affect

  11. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in viscoelastic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in plates. The Sophie German equation of classical plate theory is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes, (1985). However, this procedure is not limited to this representation. The governing characteristic equation is decoupled through separation of variables, yielding a solution similar to that of undamped classical plate theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as the transient response problem.

  12. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in distributed parameter models which may be easily applied to models such as rod, plate, and beam equations. The general linear boundary value vibration equation is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes. The governing characteristic equations are decoupled through separation of variables yielding solutions similar to those of undamped classical theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as transient response. Example problems and solutions are provided demonstrating the similarity of the solutions to those of the classical theories and transient responses of nonviscous systems.

  13. Free-Inertial and Damped-Inertial Navigation Mechanization and Error Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-18

    AD-A014 356 FREE-INERTIAL AND DAMPED-INERTIAL NAVIGATION MECHANIZATION AND ERROR EQUATIONS Warren G. Heller Analytic Sciences Corporation Prepared...IHI IL JI -J THE ANALYTIC SCIENCES CORPORATION TR-312-1-1 FREE-INERTIAL AND DAMPED-INERTIAL NAViGATION MECHANIZATION AND ERROR EQUATIONS Ap~ril 18...PERIOO COVC/REO Fr-,- 1wer l and Dmped-Inertial Navigation Technical Mechanization and Error Equations 8/20-73 - 8/20/74 S. PjLtFORJ4djNjOjO, REPORT

  14. Disagreement between correlations of quantum mechanics and stochastic electrodynamics in the damped parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, D. T.; Drummond, P. D.; Munro, W. J.

    2000-10-01

    Intracavity and external third order correlations in the damped nondegenerate parametric oscillator are calculated for quantum mechanics and stochastic electrodynamics (SED), a semiclassical theory. The two theories yield greatly different results, with the correlations of quantum mechanics being cubic in the system's nonlinear coupling constant and those of SED being linear in the same constant. In particular, differences between the two theories are present in at least a mesoscopic regime. They also exist when realistic damping is included. Such differences illustrate distinctions between quantum mechanics and a hidden variable theory for continuous variables.

  15. Experimental investigation and CFD simulation of active damping mechanism for propellant slosh in spacecraft launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuva, Dhawal

    2011-07-01

    Motion of propellant in the liquid propellant tanks due to inertial forces transferred from actions like stage separation and trajectory correction of the launch vehicle is known as propellant slosh. If unchecked, propellant slosh can reach resonance and lead to complete loss of the spacecraft stability, it can change the trajectory of the vehicle or increase consumption of propellant from the calculated requirements, thereby causing starvation of the latter stages of the vehicle. Predicting the magnitude of such slosh events is not trivial. Several passive mechanisms with limited operating range are currently used to mitigate the effects of slosh. An active damping mechanism concept developed here can operate over a large range of slosh frequencies and is much more effective than passive damping devices. Spherical and cylindrical tanks modeled using the ANSYS CFX software package considers the free surface of liquid propellant exposed to atmospheric pressure. Hydrazine is a common liquid propellant and since it is toxic, it cannot be used in experiment. But properties of hydrazine are similar to the properties of water; therefore water is substituted as propellant for experimental study. For close comparison of the data, water is substituted as propellant in CFD simulation. The research is done in three phases. The first phase includes modeling free surface slosh using CFD and validation of the model by comparison to previous experimental results. The second phase includes developing an active damping mechanism and simulating the behavior using a CFD model. The third phase includes experimental development of damping mechanism and comparing the CFD simulation to the experimental results. This research provides an excellent tool for low cost analysis of damping mechanisms for propellant slosh as well as proves that the concept of an active damping mechanism developed here, functions as expected.

  16. Asymptotic stability of a mechanical robotics model with damping and delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahlon, Baruch; Schmidt, Darrell

    2005-03-01

    In this paper we study the asymptotic stability of a mechanical robotics model with damping and delay. This model yields a certain linear third order delay differential equation. In proving our results we make use of Pontryagin's theory for quasi-polynomials.

  17. Perturbation analysis of internal balancing for lightly damped mechanical systems with gyroscopic and circulatory forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, P. A.; Mingori, D. L.; Wei, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Approximate expressions are developed for internally balanced singular values corresponding to the modes of mechanical systems with gyroscopic forces, light damping, and small circulatory forces. A brief overview is first given of the balanced realization model reduction method, including a discussion of recent work. The models considered are defined, and a perturbation analysis is used to show that the modal representation becomes asymptotically balanced as damping reduces to zero. The approximate balanced singular values are calculated, and a simple example of a flexible, dual-spin spacecraft is given as an illustration of the results.

  18. Effect of microstructure on the mechanical and damping behaviour of dragonfly wing veins

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, H.; Shafiei, A.; Darvizeh, A.; Dirks, J.-H.; Appel, E.; Gorb, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Insect wing veins are biological composites of chitin and protein arranged in a complex lamellar configuration. Although these hierarchical structures are found in many ‘venous wings' of insects, very little is known about their physical and mechanical characteristics. For the first time, we carried out a systematic comparative study to gain a better understanding of the influence of microstructure on the mechanical characteristics and damping behaviour of the veins. Morphological data have been used to develop a series of three-dimensional numerical models with different material properties and geometries. Finite-element analysis has been employed to simulate the mechanical response of the models under different loading conditions. The modelling strategy used in this study enabled us to determine the effects selectively induced by resilin, friction between layers, shape of the cross section, material composition and layered structure on the stiffness and damping characteristics of wing veins. Numerical simulations suggest that although the presence of the resilin-dominated endocuticle layer results in a much higher flexibility of wing veins, the dumbbell-shaped cross section increases their bending rigidity. Our study further shows that the rubber-like cuticle, friction between layers and material gradient-based design contribute to the higher damping capacity of veins. The results of this study can serve as a reference for the design of novel bioinspired composite structures. PMID:26998340

  19. Effect of microstructure on the mechanical and damping behaviour of dragonfly wing veins.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, H; Shafiei, A; Darvizeh, A; Dirks, J-H; Appel, E; Gorb, S N

    2016-02-01

    Insect wing veins are biological composites of chitin and protein arranged in a complex lamellar configuration. Although these hierarchical structures are found in many 'venous wings' of insects, very little is known about their physical and mechanical characteristics. For the first time, we carried out a systematic comparative study to gain a better understanding of the influence of microstructure on the mechanical characteristics and damping behaviour of the veins. Morphological data have been used to develop a series of three-dimensional numerical models with different material properties and geometries. Finite-element analysis has been employed to simulate the mechanical response of the models under different loading conditions. The modelling strategy used in this study enabled us to determine the effects selectively induced by resilin, friction between layers, shape of the cross section, material composition and layered structure on the stiffness and damping characteristics of wing veins. Numerical simulations suggest that although the presence of the resilin-dominated endocuticle layer results in a much higher flexibility of wing veins, the dumbbell-shaped cross section increases their bending rigidity. Our study further shows that the rubber-like cuticle, friction between layers and material gradient-based design contribute to the higher damping capacity of veins. The results of this study can serve as a reference for the design of novel bioinspired composite structures.

  20. Effect of Aging Treatment on the Damping Capacity and Mechanical Properties of Mg-6Al-1Zn Alloy

    PubMed Central

    El-Morsy, Abdel-Wahab; Farahat, Ahmed I. Z.

    2015-01-01

    The damping capacity and mechanical properties of Mg-6Al-1Zn alloy after heat treatment were investigated. The damping characteristics of un-heat-treated, solution treated, and aged Mg-6Al-1Zn specimens were determined by measuring the damping ratio and the logarithmic decrement of free vibrations of a bending beam clamped at one side. The microstructural evaluations confirmed that the β-Mg17Al12 phase was reprecipitated after aging and increased with an increase in aging time. The peak level of damping ratio and logarithmic decrement was obtained after 34 hr of aging time, over which the damping capacity declined according to increasing amount of strong pining points. PMID:25918738

  1. On the Damping-Induced Self-Recovery Phenomenon in Mechanical Systems with Several Unactuated Cyclic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Dong Eui; Jeon, Soo

    2013-12-01

    The damping-induced self-recovery phenomenon refers to the fundamental property of underactuated mechanical systems: if an unactuated cyclic variable is under a viscous damping-like force and the system starts from rest, then the cyclic variable will always move back to its initial condition as the actuated variables come to a stop. The regular momentum conservation phenomenon can be viewed as the limit of the damping-induced self-recovery phenomenon in the sense that the self-recovery phenomenon disappears as the damping goes to zero. This paper generalizes the past result on damping-induced self-recovery for the case of a single unactuated cyclic variable to the case of multiple unactuated cyclic variables. We characterize a class of external forces that induce new conserved quantities, which we call the damping-induced momenta. The damping-induced momenta yield first-order asymptotically stable dynamics for the unactuated cyclic variables under some conditions, thereby inducing the self-recovery phenomenon. It is also shown that the viscous damping-like forces impose bounds on the range of trajectories of the unactuated cyclic variables. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the analytical discoveries: the planar pendulum with gimbal actuators and the three-link planar manipulator on a horizontal plane.

  2. A Mechanical System Damping Measurement Technique Using a One-Degree-of-Freedom (1DOF) Cylindrical Gas Bearing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    sec for roll rate obtained with a one-spot tachometer ring, ± 0.001 in.-Ibf for viscous damping moment, or, in terms of energy dissipation, ± 1 mW. The...coulomb rolling-moment uncertainty could not be established because of its variable nature. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES mechanical damping...to the moment to be deducted from all other data. For some classes of aerodynamic configurations at hypersonic speeds , the tare damping moment can

  3. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  4. Nonlinearity of mechanical damping and stiffness of a spring-suspended sectional model system for wind tunnel tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guangzhong; Zhu, Ledong

    2015-10-01

    The wind tunnel test of spring-suspended sectional models (SSSM) is an important means in the research of wind engineering, which is very frequently employed to check the performances of flutter and vortex-induced resonance of bridges as well as to identify the various aerodynamic and aeroelastic parameters of bridge components, such as aerodynamic derivatives of self-excited forces. However, in practice, the mechanical damping ratios and natural frequencies of SSSM system are prevailingly supposed to be constant in the whole procedure of a test. This assumption often leads to notable errors of the test results or dispersion of the identified aerodynamic parameters because the mechanical damping ratios and natural frequencies of SSSM system are proved to vary in fact to some extent with the change of oscillating amplitude. On that account, the mechanical nonlinearity of SSSM system is investigated and discussed in this paper by taking a flat-closed box section as a research background. The conventional linear model is firstly proved to fail to predict precisely the long-duration free decay responses of the SSSM system. The formulae of equivalent linearization approximation (ELA) are then derived by using a multiple-scale method to model the mechanical nonlinearities in the first-order approximate sense, and a time-domain system identification method is proposed on this basis to identify equivalent amplitude-dependent (EAD) damping ratio and frequency. The proposed ELA and nonlinear system identification methods are then found to be precise enough to model the mechanical nonlinearities of SSSM system. The characteristics of EAD damping ratio and frequency of both the bending and torsional modes are then discussed in detail. It is then found that the major energy dissipation of SSSM vibrations at both the bending and torsional modes generally comes from the combined effect of viscous damping and quadratic damping. However, for the vibration at the bending mode with

  5. Universal damping mechanism of quantum vibrations in deep sub-barrier fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the damping of quantum octupole vibrations near the touching point when two colliding nuclei approach each other in the mass-asymmetric 16 O + 208 Pb system, for which the strong fusion hindrance was clearly observed. We, for the first time, apply the random-phase approximation method to the heavy-mass asymmetric dinuclear system to calculate the transition strength B (E 3 ) as a function of the center-of-mass distance. The obtained B (E 3 ) strengths are substantially damped near the touching point, because the single-particle wave functions of the two nuclei strongly mix with each other and a neck is formed. The energy-weighted sums of B (E 3 ) are also strongly correlated with the damping factor, which is phenomenologically introduced in the standard coupled-channel calculations to reproduce the fusion hindrance. This strongly indicates that the damping of the quantum vibrations universally occurs in the deep sub-barrier fusion reactions.

  6. Simulation of Thin-Film Damping and Thermal Mechanical Noise Spectra for Advanced Micromachined Microphone Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Neal A.; Okandan, Murat; Littrell, Robert; Bicen, Baris; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2008-01-01

    In many micromachined sensors the thin (2–10 μm thick) air film between a compliant diaphragm and backplate electrode plays a dominant role in shaping both the dynamic and thermal noise characteristics of the device. Silicon microphone structures used in grating-based optical-interference microphones have recently been introduced that employ backplates with minimal area to achieve low damping and low thermal noise levels. Finite-element based modeling procedures based on 2-D discretization of the governing Reynolds equation are ideally suited for studying thin-film dynamics in such structures which utilize relatively complex backplate geometries. In this paper, the dynamic properties of both the diaphragm and thin air film are studied using a modal projection procedure in a commonly used finite element software and the results are used to simulate the dynamic frequency response of the coupled structure to internally generated electrostatic actuation pressure. The model is also extended to simulate thermal mechanical noise spectra of these advanced sensing structures. In all cases simulations are compared with measured data and show excellent agreement—demonstrating 0.8 pN/√Hz and 1.8 μPa/√Hz thermal force and thermal pressure noise levels, respectively, for the 1.5 mm diameter structures under study which have a fundamental diaphragm resonance-limited bandwidth near 20 kHz. PMID:19081811

  7. Simulation of Thin-Film Damping and Thermal Mechanical Noise Spectra for Advanced Micromachined Microphone Structures.

    PubMed

    Hall, Neal A; Okandan, Murat; Littrell, Robert; Bicen, Baris; Degertekin, F Levent

    2008-06-01

    In many micromachined sensors the thin (2-10 μm thick) air film between a compliant diaphragm and backplate electrode plays a dominant role in shaping both the dynamic and thermal noise characteristics of the device. Silicon microphone structures used in grating-based optical-interference microphones have recently been introduced that employ backplates with minimal area to achieve low damping and low thermal noise levels. Finite-element based modeling procedures based on 2-D discretization of the governing Reynolds equation are ideally suited for studying thin-film dynamics in such structures which utilize relatively complex backplate geometries. In this paper, the dynamic properties of both the diaphragm and thin air film are studied using a modal projection procedure in a commonly used finite element software and the results are used to simulate the dynamic frequency response of the coupled structure to internally generated electrostatic actuation pressure. The model is also extended to simulate thermal mechanical noise spectra of these advanced sensing structures. In all cases simulations are compared with measured data and show excellent agreement-demonstrating 0.8 pN/√Hz and 1.8 μPa/√Hz thermal force and thermal pressure noise levels, respectively, for the 1.5 mm diameter structures under study which have a fundamental diaphragm resonance-limited bandwidth near 20 kHz.

  8. A critical damping approach for assessing the role of marrow fat on the mechanical strength of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, P; Stagni, L

    2007-01-01

    Several clinical findings revealed that post-menopausal osteoporosis and age-related osteopenia are accompanied by trabecular bone marrow fat (BMF) increase. To help understand this phenomenon, a vibrating string model is proposed, based on the hypothesis that, when bone marrow properties change, the trabecular bone structure remodels itself to preserve its critical damping state. It is found that an inverse relationship holds between trabecular average length and marrow damping coefficient. Such a result leads us to hypothesize the following bone-weakening mechanism. Since fat-rich bone marrow is a worse damper, a BMF increment causes an increase of trabecular average length, which is accomplished by the absorption of horizontal trabeculae (structurally less important than vertical trabeculae). The resulting bone patterns are in excellent agreement with clinical observations of osteoporotic bone. A definitive confirmation of the proposed mechanism will support a therapeutical approach to widespread osteopenic diseases aimed at avoiding, or limiting, BMF increase.

  9. Effect of grain and secondary phase morphologies in the mechanical and damping behavior of Al7075 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puga, H.; Carneiro, V. H.; Barbosa, J.; Soares, D.

    2016-09-01

    The present study evaluates the role of the microstructure in the static and dynamic mechanical behavior of as-cast Al7075 alloy promoted by ultrasonic treatment (US) during solidification. The characterization of samples revealed that US treatment promoted grain and intermetallics refinement, changed the shape of the intermetallic phases (equilibrium phases of soluble M and/or T (Al, Cu, Mg, Zn) and their insoluble Al-Cu-Fe compounds) and lead to their uniform distribution along the grain boundaries. Consequently, the mechanical properties and damping capacity above critical strain values were enhanced by comparison with values obtained for castings produced without US vibration. This results suggest that the grain and secondary phases refinement by US can be a promising solution to process materials to obtain high damping and high strength characteristics.

  10. Enhanced micro-vibration sensitive high-damping capacity and mechanical strength achieved in Al matrix composites reinforced with garnet-like lithium electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Yi; Xia, Yu; Jiang, Wei-Bing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Wang; Gao, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Tao; Fang, Qian-Feng

    2016-12-01

    A novel micro-vibration sensitive-type high-damping Al matrix composites reinforced with Li7-xLa3Zr2-xNbxO12 (LLZNO, x = 0.25) was designed and prepared using an advanced spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The damping capacity and mechanical properties of LLZNO/Al composites (LLZNO content: 0-40 wt.%) were found to be greatly improved by the LLZNO addition. The maximum damping capacity and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of LLZNO/Al composite can be respectively up to 0.033 and 101.2 MPa in the case of 20 wt.% LLZNO addition. The enhancement of damping and mechanical properties of the composites was ascribed to the intrinsic high-damping capacity and strengthening effects of hard LLZNO particulate. This investigation provides a new insight to sensitively suppress micro-vibration of payloads in the aerospace environment.

  11. Enhanced micro-vibration sensitive high-damping capacity and mechanical strength achieved in Al matrix composites reinforced with garnet-like lithium electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Yi; Xia, Yu; Jiang, Wei-Bing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Wang; Gao, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Tao; Fang, Qian-Feng

    2017-03-01

    A novel micro-vibration sensitive-type high-damping Al matrix composites reinforced with Li7- x La3Zr2- x Nb x O12 (LLZNO, x = 0.25) was designed and prepared using an advanced spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The damping capacity and mechanical properties of LLZNO/Al composites (LLZNO content: 0-40 wt.%) were found to be greatly improved by the LLZNO addition. The maximum damping capacity and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of LLZNO/Al composite can be respectively up to 0.033 and 101.2 MPa in the case of 20 wt.% LLZNO addition. The enhancement of damping and mechanical properties of the composites was ascribed to the intrinsic high-damping capacity and strengthening effects of hard LLZNO particulate. This investigation provides a new insight to sensitively suppress micro-vibration of payloads in the aerospace environment.

  12. Effect of hot working on the damping capacity and mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Kang, C.; Kim, K.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have received much attention for their lightweight and other excellent properties, such as low density, high specific strength, and good castability, for use in several industrial and commercial applications. However, both magnesium and its alloys show limited room-temperature formability owing to the limited number of slip systems associated with their hexagonal close-packed crystal structure. It is well known that crystallographic texture plays an important role in both plastic deformation and macroscopic anisotropy of magnesium alloys. Many authors have concentrated on improving the room- temperature formability of Mg alloys. However, despite having a lot of excellent properties in magnesium alloy, the study for various properties of magnesium alloy have not been clarified enough yet. Mg alloys are known to have a good damping capacity compared to other known metals and their alloys. Also, the damping properties of metals are generally recognized to be dependent on microstructural factors such as grain size and texture. However, there are very few studies on the relationship between the damping capacity and texture of Magnesium alloys. Therefore, in this study, specimens of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, were processed by hot working, and their texture and damping property investigated. A 60 mm × 60 mm × 40 mm rectangular plate was cut out by machining an ingot of AZ31 magnesium alloy (Mg-3Al-1Zn in mass%), and rolling was carried out at 673 K to a rolling reduction of 30%. Then, heat treatment was carried out at temperatures in the range of 573-723 K for durations in the range of 30-180 min. The samples were immediately quenched in oil after heat treatment to prevent any change in the microstructure. Texture was evaluated on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel-filtered Cu Kα radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements were conducted to observe the spatial distribution of various orientations. Specimens

  13. Quadratic Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Quadratic friction involves a discontinuous damping term in equations of motion in order that the frictional force always opposes the direction of the motion. Perhaps for this reason this topic is usually omitted from beginning texts in differential equations and physics. However, quadratic damping is more realistic than viscous damping in many…

  14. Direct path from microscopic mechanics to Debye shielding, Landau damping and wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escande, D. F.; Elskens, Yves; Doveil, F.

    2015-02-01

    The derivation of Debye shielding and Landau damping from the N-body description of plasmas is performed directly by using Newton’s second law for the N-body system. This is done in a few steps with elementary calculations using standard tools of calculus and no probabilistic setting. Unexpectedly, Debye shielding is encountered together with Landau damping. This approach is shown to be justified in the one-dimensional case when the number of particles in a Debye sphere becomes large. The theory is extended to accommodate a correct description of trapping and chaos due to Langmuir waves. On top of their well-known production of collisional transport, the repulsive deflections of electrons are shown to produce shielding, in such a way that each particle is shielded by all other ones, while keeping in uninterrupted motion.

  15. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code for application to traditional incompressible flow problems has been developed. The method is actually a slight compressibility approach which takes advantage of the bulk modulus and finite sound speed of all real fluids. The finite element numerical analog uses a dynamic differencing scheme based, in part, on a variational principle for computational fluid dynamics. The code was developed in order to study the feasibility of damping seals for high speed turbomachinery. Preliminary seal analyses have been performed.

  16. Metallurgical Characterization of the Interfaces and the Damping Mechanisms in Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    RD-A156 587 METALLURGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INTERFACES AND 1/1 THE DAMPING MECHANIS.. (U) MARTIN MARIETTA AEROSPACE DENVER CO N S MISRA 12 JUN...DTIC Martin Marietta SELEIT1D05 Denver, Colorado 80201 JL 8 ot hs apoO impublic role=*. cad sale. llsI distulbutiofln 5~ 6 18 034 ... S.All 1.0 REPORTING

  17. Turbojet engine blade damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, A. V.; Cutts, D. G.; Sridhar, S.

    1981-01-01

    The potentials of various sources of nonaerodynamic damping in engine blading are evaluated through a combination of advanced analysis and testing. The sources studied include material hysteresis, dry friction at shroud and root disk interfaces as well as at platform type external dampers. A limited seris of tests was conducted to evaluate damping capacities of composite materials (B/AL, B/AL/Ti) and thermal barrier coatings. Further, basic experiments were performed on titanium specimens to establish the characteristics of sliding friction and to determine material damping constants J and n. All the tests were conducted on single blades. Mathematical models were develthe several mechanisms of damping. Procedures to apply this data to predict damping levels in an assembly of blades are developed and discussed.

  18. Coulomb Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Viscous damping is commonly discussed in beginning differential equations and physics texts but dry friction or Coulomb friction is not despite dry friction being encountered in many physical applications. One reason for avoiding this topic is that the equations involve a jump discontinuity in the damping term. In this article, we adopt an energy…

  19. Driving mechanism for damping and g-factor in non-amorphous ferromagnetic CoFeZr ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Graët, C.; Spenato, D.; Beaulieu, N.; Dekadjevi, D. T.; Jay, J.-Ph.; Pogossian, S. P.; Warot-Fonrose, B.; Ben Youssef, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy may be induced in non-amorphous soft CoFeZr films. We used broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and complex permeability spectra to investigate the spin dynamics in CoFeZr films. We report a systematic study of the FM thickness on the fundamental dynamic parameters such as the effective magnetisation, the g-factor and relaxation mechanisms. Our study reveals that the decrease of the effective magnetisation mesured with FMR with thickness is not due to perpendicular anisotropy but to low dimentionality. Moreover, we observed a decrease of the g-factor with thickness and a modification of the ratio of the orbital to the spin magnetic moment. These films exhibit good high-frequency performance red (i.e. high permeability in a broad frequency range and a low damping) at low thickness of about a few nanometers.

  20. Evaluation of Nanomaterial Approaches to Damping in Epoxy Resin and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Structures by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G.; Heimann, Paula J.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Johnston, J. Chris; Roberts, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration mitigation in composite structures has been demonstrated through widely varying methods which include both active and passive damping. Recently, nanomaterials have been investigated as a viable approach to composite vibration damping due to the large surface available to generate energy dissipation through friction. This work evaluates the influence of dispersed nanoparticles on the damping ratio of an epoxy matrix. Limited benefit was observed through dispersion methods, however nanoparticle application as a coating resulting in up to a three-fold increase in damping.

  1. Damping, thermal, and mechanical properties of polyurethane based on poly(tetramethylene glycol)/epoxy interpenetrating polymer networks: effects of composition and isocyanate index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qihua; Chen, Shoubing; Wang, Tingmei; Zhang, Xinrui

    2011-07-01

    A series of polyurethane (PU) samples based on poly(tetramethylene glycol)/epoxy resin (EP) graft interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) were prepared and their damping, thermal, and mechanical properties were systematically studied in terms of composition and the value of the PU isocyanate index ( R). The damping properties and thermal stability measurements revealed that the formation of PU/EP IPN could improve not only the damping capacity but also the thermal stability. Meanwhile, mechanical tests showed that the tensile strengths of the IPNs decreased while their impact strengths increased with increasing PU content. The value of R also had significant impacts on the properties of the IPNs when the PU and EP ratio was fixed, which could be an effective means for manipulating the fabrication of PU/EP IPNs. The morphologies of the PU/EP IPNs were observed by SEM and AFM characterization and the relationship between the morphologies and properties is discussed. With the results in hand, the PU/EP IPNs hold promise for use in structural damping materials.

  2. On the method of interconnection and damping assignment passivity-based control for the stabilization of mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Dong Eui

    2014-09-01

    Interconnection and damping assignment passivity-based control (IDA-PBC) is an excellent method to stabilize mechanical systems in the Hamiltonian formalism. In this paper, several improvements are made on the IDA-PBC method. The skew-symmetric interconnection submatrix in the conventional form of IDA-PBC is shown to have some redundancy for systems with the number of degrees of freedom greater than two, containing unnecessary components that do not contribute to the dynamics. To completely remove this redundancy, the use of quadratic gyroscopic forces is proposed in place of the skew-symmetric interconnection submatrix. Reduction of the number of matching partial differential equations in IDA-PBC and simplification of the structure of the matching partial differential equations are achieved by eliminating the gyroscopic force from the matching partial differential equations. In addition, easily verifiable criteria are provided for Lyapunov/exponential stabilizability by IDA-PBC for all linear controlled Hamiltonian systems with arbitrary degrees of underactuation and for all nonlinear controlled Hamiltonian systems with one degree of underactuation. A general design procedure for IDA-PBC is given and illustrated with examples. The duality of the new IDA-PBC method to the method of controlled Lagrangians is discussed. This paper renders the IDA-PBC method as powerful as the controlled Lagrangian method.

  3. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  4. Mechanical characteristics of rat vibrissae: resonant frequencies and damping in isolated whiskers and in the awake behaving animal.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Mitra J; Johnson, Nicholas J; Towal, R Blythe; Assad, Christopher

    2003-07-23

    We investigated the natural resonance properties and damping characteristics of rat macrovibrissae (whiskers). Isolated whiskers rigidly fixed at the base showed first-mode resonance peaks between 27 and 260 Hz, principally depending on whisker length. These experimentally measured resonant frequencies were matched using a theoretical model of the whisker as a conical cantilever beam, with Young's modulus as the only free parameter. The best estimate for Young's modulus was approximately 3-4 GPa. Results of both vibration and impulse experiments showed that the whiskers are strongly damped, with damping ratios between 0.11 and 0.17. In the behaving animal, whiskers that deflected past an object were observed to resonate but were damped significantly more than isolated whiskers. The time course of damping varied depending on the individual whisker and the phase of the whisking cycle, which suggests that the rat may modulate biomechanical parameters that affect damping. No resonances were observed for whiskers that did not contact the object or during free whisking in air. Finally, whiskers on the same side of the face were sometimes observed to move in opposite directions over the full duration of a whisk. We discuss the potential roles of resonance during natural exploratory behavior and specifically suggest that resonant oscillations may be important in the rat's tactile detection of object boundaries.

  5. Mechanical characteristics of rat vibrissae: resonant frequencies and damping in isolated whiskers and in the awake behaving animal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Mitra J.; Johnson, Nicholas J.; Towal, R. Blythe; Assad, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the natural resonance properties and damping characteristics of rat macrovibrissae (whiskers). Isolated whiskers rigidly fixed at the base showed first-mode resonance peaks between 27 and 260 Hz, principally depending on whisker length. These experimentally measured resonant frequencies were matched using a theoretical model of the whisker as a conical cantilever beam, with Young's modulus as the only free parameter. The best estimate for Young's modulus was approximately 3-4 GPa. Results of both vibration and impulse experiments showed that the whiskers are strongly damped, with damping ratios between 0.11 and 0.17. In the behaving animal, whiskers that deflected past an object were observed to resonate but were damped significantly more than isolated whiskers. The time course of damping varied depending on the individual whisker and the phase of the whisking cycle, which suggests that the rat may modulate biomechanical parameters that affect damping. No resonances were observed for whiskers that did not contact the object or during free whisking in air. Finally, whiskers on the same side of the face were sometimes observed to move in opposite directions over the full duration of a whisk. We discuss the potential roles of resonance during natural exploratory behavior and specifically suggest that resonant oscillations may be important in the rat's tactile detection of object boundaries.

  6. Damping in Space Constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vreugd, Jan; de Lange, Dorus; Winters, Jasper; Human, Jet; Kamphues, Fred; Tabak, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Monolithic structures are often used in optomechanical designs for space applications to achieve high dimensional stability and to prevent possible backlash and friction phenomena. The capacity of monolithic structures to dissipate mechanical energy is however limited due to the high Q-factor, which might result in high stresses during dynamic launch loads like random vibration, sine sweeps and shock. To reduce the Q-factor in space applications, the effect of constrained layer damping (CLD) is investigated in this work. To predict the damping increase, the CLD effect is implemented locally at the supporting struts in an existing FE model of an optical instrument. Numerical simulations show that the effect of local damping treatment in this instrument could reduce the vibrational stresses with 30-50%. Validation experiments on a simple structure showed good agreement between measured and predicted damping properties. This paper presents material characterization, material modeling, numerical implementation of damping models in finite element code, numerical results on space hardware and the results of validation experiments.

  7. Superconductive material and magnetic field for damping and levitation support and damping of cryogenic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A superconductive load bearing support without a mechanical contact and vibration damping for cryogenic instruments in space is presented. The levitation support and vibration damping is accomplished by the use of superconducting magnets and the 'Meissner' effect. The assembly allows for transfer of vibration energy away from the cryogenic instrument which then can be damped by the use of either an electronic circuit or conventional vibration damping mean.

  8. Nonlinear damping identification from transient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clifford B.; Wereley, Norman M.

    1999-06-01

    To study new damping augmentation methods for helicopter rotor systems, accurate and reliable nonlinear damping identification techniques are needed. For example, current studies on applications of magnetorheological (MR) dampers for rotor stability augmentation suggest that a strong Coulomb damping characteristic will be manifested as the field applied to the MR fluid is maximized. Therefore, in this work, a single degree of freedom (SDOF) system having either nonlinear Coulomb or quadratic damping is considered. This paper evaluates three analyses for identifying damping from transient test data; an FFT-based moving block analysis, an analysis based on a periodic Fourier series decomposition, and a Hilbert transform based technique. Analytical studies are used to determine the effects of block length, noise, and error in identified modal frequency on the accuracy of the identified damping level. The FFT-based moving block has unacceptable performance for systems with nonlinear damping. These problems were remedied in the Fourier series based analysis and acceptable performance is obtained for nonlinear damping identification from both this technique and the Hilbert transform based method. To more closely simulate a helicopter rotor system test, these techniques were then applied to a signal composed of two closely spaced modes. This data was developed to simulate a response containing the first lag and 1/rev modes. The primary mode of interest (simulated lag mode) had either Coulomb or quadratic damping, and the close mode (1/rev) was either undamped or had a specified viscous damping level. A comprehensive evaluation of the effects of close mode amplitude, frequency, and damping level was performed. A classifier was also developed to identify the dominant damping mechanism in a signal of 'unknown' composition. This classifier is based on the LMS error of a fit of the analytical envelope expression to the experimentally identified envelope signal. In most

  9. Damping characteristics of the Ti-rich TiNi melt-spun ribbon measured by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. H.; Chen, T. H.; Wu, S. K.; Lin, K. N.

    2010-05-01

    Damping characteristics of melt-spun Ti51Ni49 ribbons are investigated by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). The as-spun Ti51Ni49 ribbons are crystalline and possess a uniform grain size distribution with an average diameter of 3 μm. The DMA results reveal that the tan δ value of the martensitic transformation peak increases with an increase in the temperature rate and applied deformation amplitude but decreases with an increase in the deformation frequency. Compared to amorphous or crystallized Ti50Ni25Cu25 melt-spun ribbons, the as-spun Ti51Ni49 ribbon was found to have a higher damping capacity during martensitic transformation when DMA tests were conducted at a cooling rate of 3 °C min-1 and a deformation frequency of 10 Hz. Besides, the as-spun Ti51Ni49 ribbon also exhibits a much higher inherent internal friction than bulk Ti50Ni50 or Ti51Ni39Cu10 shape memory alloys under isothermal conditions. The Ti51Ni49 melt-spun ribbon does not exhibit a relaxation peak, which is usually obtained in bulk Ti-Ni-based alloys or crystallized Ti50Ni25Cu25 melt-spun ribbons at about -75 °C in the DMA tan δ curve.

  10. Increased damping of irregular resonators.

    PubMed

    Russ, S; Sapoval, B

    2002-03-01

    It is shown that fractal drums and jagged geometry resonators may be more damped than ordinary Euclidean systems. Several damping mechanisms are examined and studied by numerical calculations. The results depend on the dissipation mechanisms but globally they increase with localization, frequency, and the irregularity of the resonator. The increased dissipation is due to the uneven spatial distribution of the vibrational amplitude in two different ways. First, it is related to the partial confinement of the vibrational modes. Secondly, increased dissipation may be due to singularities in the amplitude distribution. This is the case when a few points exist where the vibration is pinned to zero inducing local logarithmic singularities. This last effect can be spectacular: a single defect can dominate the surface damping by viscous forces of a square drum.

  11. Iterative Lineshape Analysis of Quadrupolar Echo Spectra of a Damped CD 3 Quantum Rotor: Preliminary Evidence of a Novel Mechanism of Stochastic Spin Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, S.; Olejniczak, Z.; Detken, A.; Haeberlen, U.

    2001-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the wealth of information about damped quantum rotation of CD3 groups, contained in quadrupolar echo spectra, can be fully explored in a broad temperature range using a method of iterative analysis of the spectral lineshapes. The recently reported lineshape equation which, apart from the quantum tunneling and the dissipative Alexander-Binsch terms, contains an additional dissipative term having no classical analog is shown to be capable of describing even subtle details of the spectra of a crystal of acetylsalicylic acid-CD3 oriented specifically in the magnetic field. Preliminary evidence of the occurrence of this novel dissipative mechanism in the system studied is reported. The results obtained seem to suggest that there is no "classical limit" in the dissipative behavior of this system.

  12. Understanding the Damped SHM without ODEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2016-01-01

    Instead of solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the damped simple harmonic motion (SHM) is surveyed qualitatively from basic mechanics and quantitatively by the instrumentality of a graph of velocity against displacement. In this way, the condition b ? [square root]4mk for the occurrence of the non-oscillating critical damping and…

  13. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D. M.; ...

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  14. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  15. Increased damping in irregular resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapoval, Bernard; Asch, Mark; Felix, Simon; Filoche, Marcel

    2005-04-01

    The relation between shape and damping of shallow acoustical cavities has been studied numerically in the case where the dissipation occurs only on the cavity walls. It is first found that whatever the type of geometrical irregularity, many, but not all the modes are localized. It is shown that the localization mechanism is what is called weak localization. The more irregular, the smaller the quality factors are found. However this effect is very different for the non-localized and the localized modes. For non-localized modes the damping increases roughly proportionally to the cavity surface. The localized modes are even more damped. These results generalize the results already obtained both numerically and experimentally on prefractal acoustical cavities. [B. Sapoval, O. Haeberle, and S. Russ, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2014-2019 (1997); B. Hebert, B. Sapoval, and S. Russ, ibid. 105, 1567-1576 (1999)].

  16. Determining material damping type by comparing modal frequency estimators.

    PubMed

    Anthony, D K; Simón, F; Juan, Jesús

    2009-09-01

    The accuracy of modal frequency and damping estimators for non-lightly damped single degree of freedom systems depend on the response parameter used as well as the damping mechanism. Therefore, in order to make accurate modal parameter measurements, the damping mechanism at play must be known to be either viscous or hysteretic a priori. Here, comparisons between the evaluated frequency values are used to glean this information. The damping mechanism of an experimental system (consisting of resilient layer and mass plate) is then determined using two simple modal parameter estimators and applying statistical methods.

  17. Landau damping of auroral hiss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Winningham, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral hiss is observed to propagate over distances comparable to an Earth radius from its source in the auroral oval. The role of Landau damping is investigated for upward propagating auroral hiss. By using a ray tracing code and a simplified model of the distribution function, the effect of Landau damping is calculated for auroral hiss propagation through the environment around the auroral oval. Landau damping is found to be the likely mechanism for explaining some of the one-sided auroral hiss funnels observed by Dynamics Explorer 1. It is also found that Landau damping puts a lower limit on the wavelength of auroral hiss. Poleward of the auroral oval, Landau damping is found in a typical case to limit omega/k(sub parallel) to values of 3.4 x 10(exp 4) km/s or greater, corresponding to resonance energies of 3.2 keV or greater and wavelengths of 2 km or greater. For equatorward propagation, omega/k(sub parallel) is limited to values greater than 6.8 x 10(exp 4) km/s, corresponding to resonance energies greater than 13 keV and wavelengths greater than 3 km. Independent estimates based on measured ratios of the magnetic to electric field intensity also show that omega/k(sub parallel) corresponds to resonance energies greater than 1 keV and wavelengths greater than 1 km. These results lead to the difficulty that upgoing electron beams sufficiently energetic to directly generate auroral hiss of the inferred wavelength are not usually observed. A partial transmission mechanism utilizing density discontinuities oblique to the magnetic field is proposed for converting auroral hiss to wavelengths long enough to avoid damping of the wave over long distances. Numerous reflections of the wave in an upwardly flared density cavity could convert waves to significantly increased wavelengths and resonance velocities.

  18. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury.

  19. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    2001-08-01

    A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571-1582 (1999) and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  20. Eigensolutions of non-proportionally damped systems based on continuous damping sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro, Mario

    2016-02-01

    The viscous damping model has been widely used to represent dissipative forces in structures under mechanical vibrations. In multiple degree of freedom systems, such behavior is mathematically modeled by a damping matrix, which in general presents non-proportionality, that is, it does not become diagonal in the modal space of the undamped problem. Eigensolutions of non-proportional systems are usually estimated assuming that the modal damping matrix is diagonally dominant (neglecting the off-diagonal terms) or, in the general case, using the state-space approach. In this paper, a new closed-form expression for the complex eigenvalues of non-proportionally damped system is proposed. The approach is derived assuming small damping and involves not only the diagonal terms of the modal damping matrix, but also the off-diagonal terms, which appear under higher order. The validity of the proposed approach is illustrated through a numerical example.

  1. Engineered damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J.; Ray, Manas C.; Baz, Amr M.

    2001-07-01

    Engineered Damping Treatments (EDT) that have high damping characteristics per unit volume are presented. The EDT's under consideration, consist of cellular viscoelastic damping matrices with optimally selected cell configuration, size and distribution. The cellular topology of the EDT's is designed using Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) strategies and the obtained optimal configurations will be manufactured using the state-of-the-art technology of Rapid Prototyping (RP). The EDT's are modeled using the finite element method in an attempt to determine the optimal topologies that maximize the strain energy, maximize the damping characteristics and minimize the total weight. The CAD files of the prototypes of the EDT's. The damping characteristics of the manufactured EDT's are evaluated and compared with the corresponding characteristics obtained by conventional solid damping treatments in order to emphasize the importance of using optimally configured damping treatment to achieve high damping characteristics. The presented procedures are invaluable for designing efficient damping treatments for many military and civilian structures whose vibrations and noise must be effectively controlled.

  2. Critically damped quantum search.

    PubMed

    Mizel, Ari

    2009-04-17

    Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we find that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum O(sqrt[N]) and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

  3. Damping Mechanisms for Microgravity Vibration Isolation (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project No. 94-07)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, M. S.; Eldridge, J. T.; Ferebee, R. C.; Lassiter, J. O.; Redmon, J. W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    As a research facility for microgravity science, the International Space Station (ISS) will be used for numerous investigations such as protein crystal growth, combustion, and fluid mechanics experiments which require a quiescent acceleration environment across a broad spectrum of frequencies. These experiments are most sensitive to low-frequency accelerations and can tolerate much higher accelerations at higher frequency. However, the anticipated acceleration environment on ISS significantly exceeds the required acceleration level. The ubiquity and difficulty in characterization of the disturbance sources precludes source isolation, requiring vibration isolation to attenuate the anticipated disturbances to an acceptable level. This memorandum reports the results of research in active control methods for microgravity vibration isolation.

  4. Decoherence and Landau-Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The terminologies, decoherence and Landau damping, are often used concerning the damping of a collective instability. This article revisits the difference and relation between decoherence and Landau damping. A model is given to demonstrate how Landau damping affects the rate of damping coming from decoherence.

  5. Liquid-induced damping of mechanical feedback effects in single electron tunneling through a suspended carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, D. R.; Stiller, P. L.; Strunk, Ch.; Hüttel, A. K.

    2015-09-21

    In single electron tunneling through clean, suspended carbon nanotube devices at low temperature, distinct switching phenomena have regularly been observed. These can be explained via strong interaction of single electron tunneling and vibrational motion of the nanotube. We present measurements on a highly stable nanotube device, subsequently recorded in the vacuum chamber of a dilution refrigerator and immersed in the {sup 3}He/ {sup 4}He mixture of a second dilution refrigerator. The switching phenomena are absent when the sample is kept in the viscous liquid, additionally supporting the interpretation of dc-driven vibration. Transport measurements in liquid helium can thus be used for finite bias spectroscopy where otherwise the mechanical effects would dominate the current.

  6. Nonlinear Landau damping of Alfven waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.

    1971-01-01

    Demonstration that large-amplitude linearly or elliptically polarized Alfven waves propagating parallel to the average magnetic field can be dissipated by nonlinear Landau damping. The damping is due to the longitudinal electric field associated with the ion sound wave which is driven (in second order) by the Alfven wave. The damping rate can be large even in a cold plasma (beta much less than 1, but not zero), and the mechanism proposed may be the dominant one in many plasmas of astrophysical interest.

  7. Turbine blade damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research results and progress on the performance of bladed systems is reported the different topics discussed include: the study of turbine blade damping; forced vibrations of friction damped beam moistures in two dimensions; and a users manual for a computer program for dynamic analysis of bladed systems.

  8. Variations of hybrid damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1998-06-01

    Damping is important to structures and can be achieved through the addition of viscoelastic materials (VEM). The damping of the VEM is enhanced if a constraining layer is attached to the VEM. If this constraining layer is active, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). In the last few years, ACLD has proven to be superior in vibration control to active or passive damping. The active element makes ACLD more effective than passive constrained layer damping. It also provides a fail-safe in case of breakdown of the active element that is not present for purely active control. It is shown that the control effort needed to damp vibration using ACLD can be significantly higher than purely active control. In order to combine the inherent damping of passive control with the effectiveness of the active element, this paper will explore different variations of active, passive and hybrid damping. Some of the variations include: passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) separate from active element but on the same side of beam, PCLD separate from active on the opposite side of the beam, and active element underneath PCLD. The discretized system equations will be obtained using assumed modes method and Lagrange's equation. The damping will be modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. The optimal placement and size of the active, passive, ACLD and hybrid treatments will be found using different schemes. The issue of overshoot and settling time of the output and control force using LQR will be addressed, as well as the control effort, passive and active vibration suppression, and LQR cost function. It will be shown that the hybrid treatments are capable of greater vibration control for lower control effort for different optimization schemes. 31

  9. Microscale damping using thin film active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrigan, Catherine A.; Ho, Ken K.; Mohanchandra, K. P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2007-04-01

    This paper focuses on understanding and developing a new approach to dampen MEMS structures using both experiments and analytical techniques. Thin film Nitinol and thin film Terfenol-D are evaluated as a damping solution to the micro scale damping problem. Stress induced twin boundary motion in Nitinol is used to passively dampen potentially damaging vibrations. Magnetic domain wall motion is used to passively dampen vibration in Terfenol-D. The thin films of Nitinol, Nitinol/Silicon laminates and Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminates have been produced using a sputter deposition process and damping properties have been evaluated. Dynamic testing shows substantial damping (tan δ) measurable in each case. Nitinol film samples were tested in the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to determine phase transformation temperatures. The twin boundary mechanism by which energy absorption occurs is present at all points below the Austenite start temperature (approximately 69°C in our film) and therefore allows damping at cold temperatures where traditional materials fail. Thin film in the NiTi/Si laminate was found to produce substantially higher damping (tan δ = 0.28) due to the change in loading condition. The NiTi/Si laminate sample was tested in bending allowing the twin boundaries to be reset by cyclic tensile and compressive loads. The thin film Terfenol-D in the Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminate was shown to produce large damping (tan δ = 0.2). In addition to fabricating and testing, an analytical model of a heterogeneous layered thin film damping material was developed and compared to experimental work.

  10. Non-Linear Slosh Damping Model Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Propellant tank slosh dynamics are typically represented by a mechanical model of spring mass damper. This mechanical model is then included in the equation of motion of the entire vehicle for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) analysis. For a partially-filled smooth wall propellant tank, the critical damping based on classical empirical correlation is as low as 0.05%. Due to this low value of damping, propellant slosh is potential sources of disturbance critical to the stability of launch and space vehicles. It is postulated that the commonly quoted slosh damping is valid only under the linear regime where the slosh amplitude is small. With the increase of slosh amplitude, the critical damping value should also increase. If this nonlinearity can be verified and validated, the slosh stability margin can be significantly improved, and the level of conservatism maintained in the GN&C analysis can be lessened. The purpose of this study is to explore and to quantify the dependence of slosh damping with slosh amplitude. Accurately predicting the extremely low damping value of a smooth wall tank is very challenging for any Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool. One must resolve thin boundary layers near the wall and limit numerical damping to minimum. This computational study demonstrates that with proper grid resolution, CFD can indeed accurately predict the low damping physics from smooth walls under the linear regime. Comparisons of extracted damping values with experimental data for different tank sizes show very good agreements. Numerical simulations confirm that slosh damping is indeed a function of slosh amplitude. When slosh amplitude is low, the damping ratio is essentially constant, which is consistent with the empirical correlation. Once the amplitude reaches a critical value, the damping ratio becomes a linearly increasing function of the slosh amplitude. A follow-on experiment validated the developed nonlinear damping relationship. This discovery can

  11. Damping by branching: a bioinspiration from trees.

    PubMed

    Theckes, B; Langre, E de; Boutillon, X

    2011-12-01

    Man-made slender structures are known to be sensitive to high levels of vibration due to their flexibility which often cause irreversible damage. In nature, trees repeatedly endure large amplitudes of motion, mostly caused by strong climatic events, yet with minor or no damage in most cases. A new damping mechanism inspired by the architecture of trees is identified here and characterized in the simplest tree-like structure, a Y-shaped branched structure. Through analytical and numerical analyses of a simple two-degree-of-freedom model, branching is shown to be the key ingredient in this protective mechanism that we call damping-by-branching. It originates in the geometrical nonlinearities so that it is specifically efficient to damp out large amplitudes of motion. A more realistic model, using flexible beam approximation, shows that the mechanism is robust. Finally, two bioinspired architectures are analyzed, showing significant levels of damping achieved via branching with typically 30% of the energy being dissipated in one oscillation. This concept of damping-by-branching is of simple practical use in the design of very slender and flexible structures subjected to extreme dynamical loadings.

  12. Damped flexible seal

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, Neil J.; Amaral, Antonio M.

    1992-10-27

    A damped flexible seal assembly for a torpedo isolates the tailcone thereof rom vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly. A pair of outside flanges, each of which include an inwardly facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, provide a watertight seal against the outer non-rotating surface of the drive shaft assembly. An inside flange includes an outwardly-facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, and provides a watertight seal against the inner surface of the tail cone. Two cast-in-place elastomeric seals provide a watertight seal between the flanges and further provide a damping barrier between the outside flanges and the inside flanges for damping vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly before the energy can reach the tailcone through the seal assembly.

  13. Novel Nano-particle, Temperature-Independent Damping System: Basic Science and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-31

    the mechanical components of the dampers are filled with selected particles. The advantages of particle damping over the conventional damping...temperature ranges. 2. The particle size is much smaller than the scale of the container surface roughness, therefore the particles will fill the...For thrust damping or radial damping, the mechanical components of the dampers are filled with properly selected nanoparticles. -U- Vertical

  14. The Study of Damped Harmonic Oscillations Using an Electronic Counter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    We study damped harmonic oscillations in mechanical systems like the loaded spring and simple pendulum with the help of an oscillation measuring electronic counter. The experimental data are used in a software program that solves the differential equation for damped vibrations of any system and determines its position, velocity and acceleration as…

  15. Nonlinear Landau damping in quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofei, Zhang; Jiarong, Li

    1995-08-01

    The semiclassical kinetic equations for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) are discussed by the multiple time-scale method. The mechanism of nonlinear Landau damping owing to non-Abelian and nonlinear wave-particle interactions in QGP is investigated, and the nonlinear Landau damping rate for the longitudinal color eigenwaves in the long-wavelength limit is calculated.

  16. The DAMPE Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhang; Tao, Ma; Yongyi, Huang

    2016-07-01

    The first Chinese space observatory DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) was successfully launched on Dec. 17th, 2015. One major scientific object of DAMPE is to measure electrons between 5GeV to 10TeV with excellent energy resolution (1.5% at 800GeV) to search for possible dark matter signatures. The detector consists of four subsystems: a plastic scintillator detector (PSD), a silicon-tungsten tracker (STK), a BGO calorimeter (BGO), and a neutron detector (NUD). The NUD on board DAMPE is designed to detect moderated neutrons via the boron capture of thermal neutrons in boron-doped plastics. Given the fact that hadron showers initiated in the BGO calorimeter by incident nuclei tend to be followed by significantly more neutron activities comparing to electromagnetic cascades triggered by electrons, the NUD provides an additional order of magnitude hadron rejection capability to improve the overall e/p discrimination of DAMPE up to 10 ^{5}. Preliminary analysis of the in-orbit data is given, together with comparisons to the results obtained by a detailed GEANT4 simulation of the NUD instrument.

  17. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  18. Radiation damping on cryoprobes.

    PubMed

    Shishmarev, Dmitry; Otting, Gottfried

    2011-12-01

    Radiation damping on 600 and 800 MHz cryoprobes was investigated. The phase angle β between a vector 90° phase shifted to the precessing magnetization and the rf field induced in the coil was found to depend markedly on whether an FID was being acquired or not. The magnitude of the radiation damping field was sufficiently strong to restore 95% of the equilibrium water magnetization of a 90% H2O sample in a 5 mm sample tube within about 5 ms following a 165° pulse. This can be exploited in water flip-back versions of NOESY and TOCSY experiments of proteins, but care must be taken to limit the effect of the radiation damping field from the water on the Ha protons. Long water-selective pulses can be applied only following corrections. We developed a program for correcting pulse shapes if β is non-zero. The WATERGATE scheme is shown to be insensitive to imperfections introduced by radiation damping.

  19. Nutational Damping Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.; Sharma, I.

    2000-10-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of complex rotational states for several asteroids and comets, as well as by the ongoing and planned spacecraft missions to such bodies, which should allow their rotational states to be accurately determined, we revisit the problem of the nutational damping of small solar system bodies. The nutational damping of asteroids has been approximately analyzed by Prendergast (1958), Burns and Safronov (1973), and Efroimsky and Lazarian (2000). Many other similar dynamical studies concern planetary wobble decay (e.g., Peale 1973; Yoder and Ward 1979), interstellar dust grain alignment (e.g., Purcell 1979; Lazarian and Efroimsky 1999) and damping of Earth's Chandler wobble (Lambeck 1980). Recall that rotational energy loss for an isolated body aligns the body's angular momentum vector with its axis of maximum inertia. Assuming anelastic dissipation, simple dimensional analysis determines a functional form of the damping timescale, on which all the above authors agree. However, the numerical coefficients of published results are claimed to differ by orders of magnitude. Differences have been ascribed to absent physics, to solutions that fail to satisfy boundary conditions perfectly, and to unphysical choices for the Q parameter. The true reasons for the discrepancy are unclear since, despite contrary claims, the full 3D problem (nutational damping of an anelastic ellipsoid) is analytically intractable so far. To move the debate forward, we compare the solution of a related 2D problem to the expressions found previously, and we present results from a finite element model. On this basis, we feel that previous rates for the decay of asteroidal tumbling (Harris 1994), derived from Burns and Safronov (1973), are likely to be accurate, at least to a factor of a few. Funded by NASA.

  20. Anti-damping effect of radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Li, H.; Shen, Y. F.; Yuan, X. Z.; Zi, J.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-damping effect of radiation reaction, which means the radiation reaction does non-negative work on a radiating charge, is investigated at length by using the Lorentz-Dirac equation (LDE) for the motion of a point charge respectively acted on by (a) a pure electric field, (b) a pure magnetic field and (c) the fields of an electromagnetic wave. We found that the curvature of the charge's trajectory plays an important role in the radiation reaction force, and the anti-damping effect cannot take place for the real macroscopic motions of a point charge. The condition for this anti-damping effect to take place is that the gradient of the external force field must exceed a certain value over the region of magnitude of the classical radius of massive charges (~10-15 m). Our results are potentially helpful to lessen the controversy on LDE and justify it as the correct classical equation describing the radiating charge's motion. If this anti-damping effect of LDE were a real existing physical process, it could serve as a mechanism within the context of classical electrodynamics for the stability of hydrogen atoms. Using the picture of an electron in quantum electrodynamics, namely the negative bare charge surrounded by the polarized positive charges of vacuum, we can obtain a reasonable explanation for the energy transferred to the electron during the occurrence of the anti-damping effect, on which the venerable work of Wheeler and Feynman has thrown some light.

  1. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Jensen, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  2. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  3. Biomimetic Gradient Polymers with Enhanced Damping Capacities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Huan; Guo, Jing; Cheng, Beichen; Cao, Yuan; Lu, Shengjun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Designing gradient structures, mimicking biological materials, such as pummelo peels and tendon, is a promising strategy for developing advanced materials with superior energy damping capacities. Here a facile and effective approach for fabricating polymers with composition gradients at millimeter length scale is presented. The gradient thiol-ene polymers (TEPs) are created by the use of density difference of ternary thiol-ene-ene precursors and the subsequent photo-crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. The compositional gradients are analyzed via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), compressive modulus testing, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation, and swelling measurements. In contrast to homogeneous TEPs networks, the resultant gradient polymer shows a broader effective damping temperature range combining with good mechanical properties. The present result provides an effective route toward high damping materials by the fabrication of gradient structures.

  4. Fluid damping of cylindrical liquid storage tanks.

    PubMed

    Habenberger, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed in order to calculate the damping effects of viscous fluids in liquid storage tanks subjected to earthquakes. The potential equation of an ideal fluid can satisfy only the boundary conditions normal to the surface of the liquid. To satisfy also the tangential interaction conditions between liquid and tank wall and tank bottom, the potential flow is superimposed by a one-dimensional shear flow. The shear flow in this boundary layer yields to a decrease of the mechanical energy of the shell-liquid-system. A damping factor is derived from the mean value of the energy dissipation in time. Depending on shell geometry and fluid viscosity, modal damping ratios are calculated for the convective component.

  5. Gilbert damping in magnetic layered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, E.; Cinal, M.; Edwards, D. M.; Umerski, A.

    2014-07-01

    bilayer. Such a nonlocal damping mechanism, related to spin pumping, is almost absent in other investigated bilayers: Co/Cu, Co/Ag, and Co/Au.

  6. Effect of Ti addition on the structural, mechanical and damping properties of magnetron sputtered Ni-Mn-Sn ferromagnetic shape memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Nitin; Kaur, Davinder

    2012-12-01

    Titanium (Ti) co-sputtered Ni50.4Mn34.7Sn14.9 films deposited by magnetron sputtering onto Si(1 0 0) substrates at 823 K were investigated. X-ray diffraction profiles revealed the formation of highly (2 2 0)-oriented Ni-Mn-Sn-Ti austenite phase with significant decrease in grain size with increasing Ti power. Hardness (H), elastic modulus (Er), damping (tan δ), figure of merit (FOM) and coefficient of restitution (e) of the films were evaluated using nanoindentation tests. A significant improvement in the hardness (10.5 GPa) and toughness H^3/E_r^2 (0.040) was observed in the Ni51.0Mn28.2Sn11.0Ti9.7 nanocomposite film as compared with pure Ni50.4Mn34.7Sn14.9films. An impact model, which incorporates material behaviour, is presented that predicts the experimentally observed material quantities, including energy dissipation metrics such as the coefficient of restitution e with high accuracy. The highest damping factor (tan δ = 0.061), high FOM (0.79) with low coefficient of restitution (e = 0.28) quantifies excellent energy dissipation capacity in the Ni51.0Mn28.2Sn11.0Ti9.7 nanocomposite. Temperature dependence of magnetization (M-T) curves showed an increase in martensitic transformation temperatures with increasing Ti content. The Ni-Mn-Sn-Ti composite films exhibit ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature.

  7. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C K; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ).

  8. Passively Damped Laminated Piezoelectric Shell Structures with Integrated Electric Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-field mechanics are presented for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates interfaced with distributed passive electric components. The equations of motion for laminated piezoelectric shell structures with embedded passive electric networks are directly formulated and solved using a finite element methodology. The modal damping and frequencies of the piezoelectric shell are calculated from the poles of the system. Experimental and numerical results are presented for the modal damping and frequency of composite beams with a resistively shunted piezoceramic patch. The modal damping and frequency of plates, cylindrical shells and cylindrical composite blades with piezoelectric-resistor layers are predicted. Both analytical and experimental studies illustrate a unique dependence of modal damping and frequencies on the shunting resistance and show the effect of structural shape and curvature on piezoelectric damping.

  9. Vibrational modes and damping in the cochlear partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has been assumed in models of cochlear mechanics that the primary role of the cochlear active process is to counteract the damping of the basilar membrane, the vibration of which is much larger in a living animal than post mortem. Recent measurements of the relative motion between the reticular lamina and basilar membrane imply that this assumption is incorrect. We propose that damping is distributed throughout the cochlear partition rather than being concentrated in the basilar membrane. In the absence of significant damping, the cochlear partition possesses three modes of vibration, each associated with its own locus of Hopf bifurcations. Hair-cell activity can amplify any of these modes if the system's operating point lies near the corresponding bifurcation. The distribution of damping determines which mode of vibration predominates. For physiological levels of damping, only one mode produces a vibration pattern consistent with experimental measurements of relative motion and basilar-membrane motion.

  10. Flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Suzuki, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Shimizu, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.; Akiyama, T.; Emoto, M.; Evans, T.; Dinklage, A.; Du, X.; Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Goto, T.; Hasuo, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Ichiguchi, K.; Ishizawa, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Kamiya, K.; Kasahara, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kato, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Mukai, K.; Murakami, I.; Murakami, S.; Narushima, Y.; Nunami, M.; Ohdach, S.; Ohno, N.; Osakabe, M.; Pablant, N.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Shoji, M.; Sudo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Todo, Y.; Wang, H.; Yamada, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Ejiri, A.; Furukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Igami, H.; Isobe, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Oya, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Sanpei, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tokitani, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sugama, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Idei, H.; Isayama, A.; Kitajima, S.; Masamune, S.; Shinohara, K.; Bawankar, P. S.; Bernard, E.; von Berkel, M.; Funaba, H.; Huang, X. L.; Ii, T.; Ido, T.; Ikeda, K.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Moon, C.; Muto, S.; Miyazawa, J.; Ming, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ozaki, T.; Oishi, T.; Ohno, M.; Pandya, S.; Seki, R.; Sano, R.; Saito, K.; Sakaue, H.; Takemura, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, H.; Toi, K.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Zhang, H.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.

    2015-01-01

    The driving and damping mechanism of plasma flow is an important issue because flow shear has a significant impact on turbulence in a plasma, which determines the transport in the magnetized plasma. Here we report clear evidence of the flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field. Abrupt damping of the toroidal flow associated with a transition from a nested magnetic flux surface to a stochastic magnetic field is observed when the magnetic shear at the rational surface decreases to 0.5 in the large helical device. This flow damping and resulting profile flattening are much stronger than expected from the Rechester–Rosenbluth model. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that the flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport. PMID:25569268

  11. Nonlinear damping and quasi-linear modelling.

    PubMed

    Elliott, S J; Ghandchi Tehrani, M; Langley, R S

    2015-09-28

    The mechanism of energy dissipation in mechanical systems is often nonlinear. Even though there may be other forms of nonlinearity in the dynamics, nonlinear damping is the dominant source of nonlinearity in a number of practical systems. The analysis of such systems is simplified by the fact that they show no jump or bifurcation behaviour, and indeed can often be well represented by an equivalent linear system, whose damping parameters depend on the form and amplitude of the excitation, in a 'quasi-linear' model. The diverse sources of nonlinear damping are first reviewed in this paper, before some example systems are analysed, initially for sinusoidal and then for random excitation. For simplicity, it is assumed that the system is stable and that the nonlinear damping force depends on the nth power of the velocity. For sinusoidal excitation, it is shown that the response is often also almost sinusoidal, and methods for calculating the amplitude are described based on the harmonic balance method, which is closely related to the describing function method used in control engineering. For random excitation, several methods of analysis are shown to be equivalent. In general, iterative methods need to be used to calculate the equivalent linear damper, since its value depends on the system's response, which itself depends on the value of the equivalent linear damper. The power dissipation of the equivalent linear damper, for both sinusoidal and random cases, matches that dissipated by the nonlinear damper, providing both a firm theoretical basis for this modelling approach and clear physical insight. Finally, practical examples of nonlinear damping are discussed: in microspeakers, vibration isolation, energy harvesting and the mechanical response of the cochlea.

  12. Translational damping on high-frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Perry A.

    Flapping fliers such as insects and birds depend on passive translational and rotational damping to terminate quick maneuvers and to provide a source of partial stability in an otherwise unstable dynamic system. Additionally, passive translational and rotational damping reduce the amount of active kinematic changes that must be made to terminate maneuvers and maintain stability. The study of flapping-induced damping phenomena also improves the understanding of micro air vehicle (MAV) dynamics needed for the synthesis of effective flight control strategies. Aerodynamic processes which create passive translational and rotational damping as a direct result of symmetric flapping with no active changes in wing kinematics have been previously studied and were termed flapping counter-force (FCF) and flapping counter-torque (FCT), respectively. In this first study of FCF measurement in air, FCF generation is measured using a pendulum system designed to isolate and measure the relationship of translational flapping-induced damping with wingbeat frequency for a 2.86 gram mechanical flapper equipped with real cicada wings. Analysis reveals that FCF generation and wingbeat frequency are directly proportional, as expected from previous work. The quasi-steady FCF model using Blade-Element-Theory is used as an estimate for translational flapping-induced damping. In most cases, the model proves to be accurate in predicting the relationship between flapping-induced damping and wingbeat frequency. "Forward-backward" motion proves to have the strongest flapping-induced damping while "up-down" motion has the weakest.

  13. Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF) breadboard is being developed in response to NASA's mission and goals to advance the scientific knowledge of microgravity research, materials science, and related technologies. The objective of the MDF is to dampen the fluid flows due to density gradients and surface tension gradients in conductive melts by introducing a magnetic field during the sample processing. The MDF breadboard will serve as a proof of concept that the MDF performance requirements can be attained within the International Space Station resource constraints.

  14. The Joint Damping Experiment (JDX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkman, Steven L.; Bingham, Jeff G.; Crookston, Jess R.; Dutson, Joseph D.; Ferney, Brook D.; Ferney, Greg D.; Rowsell, Edwin A.

    1997-01-01

    The Joint Damping Experiment (JDX), flown on the Shuttle STS-69 Mission, is designed to measure the influence of gravity on the structural damping of a high precision three bay truss. Principal objectives are: (1) Measure vibration damping of a small-scale, pinjointed truss to determine how pin gaps give rise to gravity-dependent damping rates; (2) Evaluate the applicability of ground and low-g aircraft tests for predicting on-orbit behavior; and (3) Evaluate the ability of current nonlinear finite element codes to model the dynamic behavior of the truss. Damping of the truss was inferred from 'Twang' tests that involve plucking the truss structure and recording the decay of the oscillations. Results are summarized as follows. (1) Damping, rates can change by a factor of 3 to 8 through changing the truss orientation; (2) The addition of a few pinned joints to a truss structure can increase the damping by a factor as high as 30; (3) Damping is amplitude dependent; (4) As gravity induced preloads become large (truss long axis perpendicular to gravity vector) the damping is similar to non-pinjointed truss; (5) Impacting in joints drives higher modes in structure; (6) The torsion mode disappears if gravity induced preloads are low.

  15. Nonlinear Landau damping and Alfven wave dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Miller, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear Landau damping has been often suggested to be the cause of the dissipation of Alfven waves in the solar wind as well as the mechanism for ion heating and selective preacceleration in solar flares. We discuss the viability of these processes in light of our theoretical and numerical results. We present one-dimensional hybrid plasma simulations of the nonlinear Landau damping of parallel Alfven waves. In this scenario, two Alfven waves nonresonantly combine to create second-order magnetic field pressure gradients, which then drive density fluctuations, which in turn drive a second-order longitudinal electric field. Under certain conditions, this electric field strongly interacts with the ambient ions via the Landau resonance which leads to a rapid dissipation of the Alfven wave energy. While there is a net flux of energy from the waves to the ions, one of the Alfven waves will grow if both have the same polarization. We compare damping and growth rates from plasma simulations with those predicted by Lee and Volk (1973), and also discuss the evolution of the ambient ion distribution. We then consider this nonlinear interaction in the presence of a spectrum of Alfven waves, and discuss the spectrum's influence on the growth or damping of a single wave. We also discuss the implications for wave dissipation and ion heating in the solar wind.

  16. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  17. The DAMPE silicon-tungsten tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzarello, P.; Ambrosi, G.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Bernardini, P.; Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A.; Cadoux, F.; Caprai, M.; De Mitri, I.; Domenjoz, M.; Dong, Y.; Duranti, M.; Fan, R.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gargano, F.; Gong, K.; Guo, D.; Husi, C.; Ionica, M.; La Marra, D.; Loparco, F.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mesa, J.; Nardinocchi, A.; Nicola, L.; Pelleriti, G.; Peng, W.; Pohl, M.; Postolache, V.; Qiao, R.; Surdo, A.; Tykhonov, A.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, H.; Weber, M.; Wu, D.; Wu, X.; Zhang, F.

    2016-09-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV-10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m2. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  18. SPATIAL DAMPING OF PROPAGATING KINK WAVES IN PROMINENCE THREADS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2011-01-10

    Transverse oscillations and propagating waves are frequently observed in threads of solar prominences/filaments and have been interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. We investigate the spatial damping of propagating kink MHD waves in transversely nonuniform and partially ionized prominence threads. Resonant absorption and ion-neutral collisions (Cowling's diffusion) are the damping mechanisms taken into account. The dispersion relation of resonant kink waves in a partially ionized magnetic flux tube is numerically solved by considering prominence conditions. Analytical expressions of the wavelength and damping length as functions of the kink mode frequency are obtained in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For typically reported periods of thread oscillations, resonant absorption is an efficient mechanism for the kink mode spatial damping, while ion-neutral collisions have a minor role. Cowling's diffusion dominates both the propagation and damping for periods much shorter than those observed. Resonant absorption may explain the observed spatial damping of kink waves in prominence threads. The transverse inhomogeneity length scale of the threads can be estimated by comparing the observed wavelengths and damping lengths with the theoretically predicted values. However, the ignorance of the form of the density profile in the transversely nonuniform layer introduces inaccuracies in the determination of the inhomogeneity length scale.

  19. Damping phenomena in a wire rope vibration isolation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, M. L.; Cutchins, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    A study is presented of the dynamic characteristics of a wire rope vibration isolation system constructed with helical isolators, with emphasis placed on the analytical modeling of damping mechanisms in the system. An experimental investigation is described in which the static stiffness curve, hysteresis curves, phase plane trajectories, and frequency response curves are obtained. A semiempirical model having nonlinear stiffness, nth-power velocity damping, and variable Coulomb friction damping is developed, and the results are compared to experimental data. Several observations and conclusions are made about the dynamic phenomena in a typical wire rope vibration isolation system based on the experimental and semiempirical results.

  20. Damping phenomena in a wire rope vibration isolation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.; Cutchins, Malcolm A.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the dynamic characteristics of a wire rope vibration isolation system constructed with helical isolators is presented. Emphasis is placed on the analytical modeling of damping mechanisms in the system. An experimental investigation is described in which the static stiffness curve, hysteresis curves, phase trajectories, and frequency response curves were obtained. A semi-empirical model having nonlinear stiffness, nth-power velocity damping, and variable Coulomb friction damping is developed and results are compared to experimental data. Conclusions about dynamic phenomena in the wire rope system are made based on the experimental and semi-empirical results.

  1. Comparison of dislocation damping in aluminum-based metal-matrix composites with that in pure aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenden, A.; Cook, L. S.

    The piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique was used at frequencies near 80 kHz and at temperatures in the range 300-1150 K to make measurements of mechanical damping, dynamic Young's modulus and strain amplitude on small specimens of pure aluminum and several metal matrix composites. The results permitted an elucidation of the dependence of damping level on strain amplitude and temperature. The study also permitted an examination of some aspects of the damping mechanisms, in particular dislocation damping.

  2. Damping measurements using operational data

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have measured modal damping using strain-gauge data from an operating wind turbine. This new technique for measuring modal damping is easier and less expensive than previously used methods. Auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the strain-gauge data have been shown to consist of decaying sinusoids which correspond to the modal frequencies and damping ratios of the wind turbine. The authors have verified the method by extracting damping values from an analytically generated data set. Actual operating response data from the DOE/Sandia 34-m Test Bed has been used to calculate modal damping ratios as a function of rotor rotation rate. This capability will allow more accurate fatigue life prediction and control.

  3. Random Response of Linear Hysteretic Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Floris, Claudio

    2008-07-08

    The probabilistic characterization of the response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator with linear hysteretic damping excited by ground motion described by zero mean stationary Gaussian processes is achieved by profiting from a steady-state solution of the motion equation, valid when the excitation is given by the superposition of harmonics. The model of linear hysteretic damping has been introduced to fit damping mechanisms in which the dissipation rate is independent of frequency, and mathematically it is described by the Hilbert transform of the response. Though this model is debated since it violates the principle of causality, its intrinsic simplicity makes it preferable to other models. The steady-state solution of the motion equation proposed in this paper allows a closed form evaluation of the respone mean square value. However, the numerical examples show that this quantity is affected by the mechanism of energy dissipation only when this is large. On the contrary, for a low capacity of dissipation the response mean square value is rather insensitive to the dissipation mechanism.

  4. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. M.

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  5. Flux-driven algebraic damping of diocotron modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chim, Chi Yung; O’Neil, Thomas M.

    2015-06-29

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 and m = 2 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius R{sub m}, where there is a matching of ω{sub m} = mω{sub E} (R{sub m}) for the mode frequency ω{sub m} and E × B-drift rotation frequency ω{sub E}. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This new mechanism of damping is due to transfer of canonical angular momentum from the mode to halo particles, as they are swept around the “cat’s eye” orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction. This paper provides a simple derivation of the time dependence of the mode amplitudes.

  6. Flux-driven algebraic damping of diocotron modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 and m = 2 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius Rm, where there is a matching of ωm = mωE (Rm) for the mode frequency ωm and E × B-drift rotation frequency ωE. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This new mechanism of damping is due to transfer of canonical angular momentum from the mode to halo particles, as they are swept around the "cat's eye" orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction. This paper provides a simple derivation of the time dependence of the mode amplitudes.

  7. Nonlinear damping calculation in cylindrical gear dynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien; Thomas, Marc

    2012-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamic problem posed by cylindrical gear systems has been extensively covered in the literature. Nonetheless, a significant proportion of the mechanisms involved in damping generation remains to be investigated and described. The main objective of this study is to contribute to this task. Overall, damping is assumed to consist of three sources: surrounding element contribution, hysteresis of the teeth, and oil squeeze damping. The first two contributions are considered to be commensurate with the supported load; for its part however, squeeze damping is formulated using expressions developed from the Reynolds equation. A lubricated impact analysis between the teeth is introduced in this study for the minimum film thickness calculation during contact losses. The dynamic transmission error (DTE) obtained from the final model showed close agreement with experimental measurements available in the literature. The nonlinear damping ratio calculated at different mesh frequencies and torque amplitudes presented average values between 5.3 percent and 8 percent, which is comparable to the constant 8 percent ratio used in published numerical simulations of an equivalent gear pair. A close analysis of the oil squeeze damping evidenced the inverse relationship between this damping effect and the applied load.

  8. Reducing extrinsic damping of surface acoustic waves at gigahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelda, Dhruv; Sadhu, Jyothi; Ghossoub, Marc G.; Ertekin, Elif; Sinha, Sanjiv

    2016-04-01

    High-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in the gigahertz range can be generated using absorption from an ultrafast laser in a patterned metallic grating on a substrate. Reducing the attenuation at these frequencies can yield better sensors as well as enable them to better probe phonon and electron-phonon interactions near surfaces. It is not clear from existing experiments which mechanisms dominate damping at high frequencies. We calculate damping times of SAWs due to various mechanisms in the 1-100 GHz range to find that mechanical loading of the grating on the substrate dominates dissipation by radiating energy from the surface into the bulk. To overcome this and enable future measurements to probe intrinsic damping, we propose incorporating distributed acoustic Bragg reflectors in the experimental structure. Layers of alternating materials with contrasting acoustic impedances embedded a wavelength away from the surface serve to reflect energy back to the surface. Using numerical simulations, we show that a single Bragg reflector is sufficient to increase the energy density at the surface by more than five times. We quantify the resulting damping time to find that it is longer than the intrinsic damping time. The proposed structure can enable future measurements of intrinsic damping in SAWs at ˜100 GHz.

  9. Relativity Damps OPEP in Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Manoj K.

    1998-09-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac--Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. We find that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. We show that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of M*/M with increasing density. We point out that if derivative-coupled OPEP is the preferred form of nuclear effective Lagrangian nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter is in trouble. Lacking the notion of M* it cannot replicate the damping. We suggest an examination of the feasibility of using pseudoscalar coupled πN interaction before reaching a final conclusion about nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter.

  10. Relativity damps OPEP in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac-Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. The author finds that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. He shows that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of M{sup *}/M with increasing density. He points out that if derivative-coupled OPEP is the preferred form of nuclear effective lagrangian nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter is in trouble. Lacking the notion of M{sup *} it cannot replicate the damping. He suggests an examination of the feasibility of using pseudoscalar coupled {pi}N interaction before reaching a final conclusion about nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter.

  11. On the damping capacity of cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of experimental data on the amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) in terms of various theoretical models has revealed a staged character and the main mechanisms of the processes of energy dissipation in graphite with increasing amplitude of vibrations upon cyclic loading. It is shown that the level of the damping capacity of lamellar cast iron depends on the relationship between the elastic and strength characteristics of graphite and the matrix phase. In cast irons with a rigid matrix structure (pearlite, martensite), the energy dissipation is determined by the volume fraction and morphology of the initial graphite phase. In cast irons with a softer metallic phase (ferrite), the contact interaction of graphite inclusions with the matrix and the properties of the matrix introduce additional sources of high damping.

  12. Plasmon damping in graphene out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Basov, Dimitri; Fogler, Michael

    Motivated by recent experiments with graphene under high photoexcitation, we study theoretically plasmons of graphene in the two-temperature regime, i.e., the regime where electrons are much hotter than the lattice. We calculate the plasmon damping due to scattering of electrons by acoustic phonons, which is the dominant intrinsic contribution in clean graphene. As the system relaxes to equilibrium, the plasmon frequency adiabatically changes with time. We show that this causes a partial compensation of the plasmon damping. A similar mechanism may apply to another collective mode (the energy wave) predicted to exist in graphene in the low-frequency hydrodynamic regime. Implications for infrared and THz pump-probe experiments are discussed.

  13. Self-Damping Sprung Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Self-damping sprung wheel provides shock-absorbing suspension for wheelchair, reducing user's discomfort when traversing rough terrain or obstacles. Pair of self-damping sprung wheels installed in place of conventional large rear wheels of standard wheelchair, which user operates in conventional manner. Rim deflects in vicinity of contact with ground or floor. Includes inner and outer hoops bending when obstacle encountered. Shear deformation of elastomeric hoop between them absorbs energy. Thus, three hoops act together as damping spring. Alternative version of wheel designed for bicycle.

  14. Bearing-Cartridge Damping Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggins, David G.; Scharrer, Joseph K.; Chen, Wei C.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed design for improved ball-bearing cartridge, damping seal in form of thin-layer fluid journal bearing incorporated into cartridge. Damping seal acts as auxiliary bearing, relieving bearing balls of significant portions of both static and dynamic bearing loads. Damping from seal reduces dynamic loads even further by reducing amplitude of vibrations in second vibrational mode of rotor, which mode occurs when rotor turning at nearly full operating speed. Intended for use in high-pressure-oxygen turbopump of Space Shuttle main engine, also applicable to other turbomachinery bearings.

  15. Electrorheologically damped impact system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardt, Lee R.

    1991-05-01

    An impact switch is described having a housing containing a rigid coaxial conductor entering one end. An inner cylindrical contact extends axially inward from and beyond the in housing end of an outer tubular contact which has a spiral spring extending axially from within a recess therein. The free end of the spring supports a mass spaced from the end of the inner contact. The contacts, spring and mass are enclosed within a flexible shroud spaced from the inner wall of the housing. The space between the shroud and housing contains an electrorheological fluid, the viscosity of which is a function of the voltage supplied by two electrodes extending through the housing and into the fluid. The voltage controlled viscosity permits control of damping of the shroud, mass, and spring movements in response to impact caused switch deceleration and control of time for switch closure and fuze delay by means of mass contact with the inner cylindrical contact, or spring contact with the outer tubular contact.

  16. Pseudo-damping in undamped plates and shells.

    PubMed

    Carcaterra, A; Akay, A; Lenti, F

    2007-08-01

    Pseudo-damping is a counter-intuitive phenomenon observed in a special class of linear structures that exhibit an impulse response characterized by a decaying amplitude, even in the absence of any dissipation mechanism. The conserved energy remains within but designated parts of the system. Pseudo-damping develops when the natural frequency distribution of the system includes condensation points. The recently formulated theoretical foundation of this phenomenon, based on mathematical properties of special trigonometric series, makes it possible to describe a class of mechanical systems capable of displaying pseudo-damping characteristics. They include systems with discrete oscillators and one-dimensional continuous beamlike structures already reported by the authors in recent studies. This paper examines development of pseudo-damping phenomenon in two-dimensional structures, using plates and shells as examples, and shows how a preloaded plate on an elastic foundation can lead to pseudo-damping. Moreover, in the case of curved shell elements examined here, pseudo-damping can result due to the curvature of the structure, which naturally introduces condensation points in the modal density.

  17. Bridge feedback for active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Lurie, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for broadband damping augmentation of a structural system in which the active members (with feedback control) were developed such that their mechanical input impedance can be electrically adjusted to maximize the energy dissipation rate in the structural system. The active member consists of sensors, an actuator, and a control scheme. A mechanical/electrical analogy is described to model the passive structures and the active members in terms of their impedance representation. As a result, the problem of maximizing dissipative power is analogous to the problem of impedance matching in the electrical network. Closed-loop performance was demonstrated for single- and multiple-active-member controlled truss structure.

  18. Landau damping in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Summers, Danny

    1991-01-01

    The Landau damping of electrostatic Langmuir waves and ion-acoustic waves in a hot, isotropic, nonmagnetized, generalized Lorentzian plasma is analyzed using the modified plasma dispersion function. Numerical solutions for the real and imaginary parts of the wave frequency omega sub 0 - (i)(gamma) have been obtained as a function of the normalized wave number (k)(lambda sub D), where lambda sub D is the electron Debye length. For both particle distributions the electrostatic modes are found to be strongly damped at short wavelengths. At long wavelengths, this damping becomes less severe, but the attenuation of Langmuir waves is much stronger for a generalized Lorentzian plasma than for a Maxwellian plasma. It is concluded that Landau damping of ion-acoustic waves is only slightly affected by the presence of a high energy tail, but is strongly dependent on the ion temperature.

  19. Damping measurements using operational data

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured modal damping using strain-gauge data from an operating wind turbine. Previously, such measurements were difficult and expensive. Auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the strain-gauge data have been shown to consist of decaying sinusoids which correspond to the modal frequencies and damping ratios of the wind turbine. We have verified the method by extracting damping values from an analytically generated data set. Actual operating response data from the DOE/Sandia 34-meter Test Bed has been used to calculate modal damping ratios as a function of rotor rotation rate. This capability will allow more accurate fatigue life prediction and control. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  1. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  2. Simple suppression of radiation damping.

    PubMed

    Khitrin, A K; Jerschow, Alexej

    2012-12-01

    Radiation damping is known to cause line-broadening and frequency shifts of strong resonances in NMR spectra. While several techniques exist for the suppression of these effects, many require specialized hardware, or are only compatible with the presence of few strong resonances. We describe a simple pulse sequence for radiation damping suppression in spectra with many strong resonances. The sequence can be used as-is to generate simple spectra or as a signal excitation part in more advanced experiments.

  3. Turbomachinery rotor support with damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, George L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Damping seals, damping bearings, and a support sleeve are presented for the ball bearings of a high speed rotor. The ball bearings consist of a duplex set having the outer races packaged tightly within the sleeve while the sleeve provides a gap with a support member so that the bearings may float with the sleeve. The sleeve has a web extending radially between the pair of outer races and acts in conjunction with one or more springs to apply an axial preload to the outer races. The sleeves have a series of slits which provide the sleeve with a spring-like quality so that the spring acts to center the rotor upon which the bearings are mounted during start up and shut down. A damping seal or a damping bearing may be used in conjunction with the ball bearings and supporting sleeve, the damping seal and damping bearing having rotor portions including rigid outer surfaces mounted within the bore of a stator portion having triangular shaped pockets on the surface facing the rotor. Axial gates are provided between adjacent pockets in sections of the stator permitting fluid to flow with less resistance axially relative to the flow of fluids circumferentially between the rotor and the stator.

  4. Damping characterization in large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.; Eke, Estelle M.

    1991-01-01

    This research project has as its main goal the development of methods for selecting the damping characteristics of components of a large structure or multibody system, in such a way as to produce some desired system damping characteristics. The main need for such an analytical device is in the simulation of the dynamics of multibody systems consisting, at least partially, of flexible components. The reason for this need is that all existing simulation codes for multibody systems require component-by-component characterization of complex systems, whereas requirements (including damping) often appear at the overall system level. The main goal was met in large part by the development of a method that will in fact synthesize component damping matrices from a given system damping matrix. The restrictions to the method are that the desired system damping matrix must be diagonal (which is almost always the case) and that interbody connections must be by simple hinges. In addition to the technical outcome, this project contributed positively to the educational and research infrastructure of Tuskegee University - a Historically Black Institution.

  5. The frictionless damping of a piston in thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringuier, E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper revisits Rüchardt’s experiment and the two-chamber variant of Clark and Katz, where the oscillating motion of a freely sliding piston involves the adiabatic exponent of the gas enclosed in a thermally isolated chamber. While the common theoretical account of the experiment correctly predicts the frequency of the oscillation, the damping is usually ascribed to a linear frictional force of an undetermined mechanical nature. In this paper, we argue that the irreversibility of the damped motion calls for a thermodynamical treatment involving dissipation (entropy production). The theory of Rüchardt’s experiment is reworked at the undergraduate level by allowing entropy to change owing to heat transfer into or out of the chamber. It is calculated that a linear heat transfer can explain the observed damping without assuming any mechanical friction. The calculation is quantitatively supported by an experiment. It is also calculated that the mechanical and thermal equilibrations occur at the same rate. Besides possibly improving Rüchardt and Clark-and-Katz apparatuses by shedding light on the damping, the paper helps to better grasp thermodynamics, and how to use entropy, by constrasting the mechanical and thermodynamical reasonings on the example of the damped motion of a piston.

  6. Damping capacity of TiNi-based shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, L. J.; Jiang, H. C.; Liu, S. W.; Zhao, X. Q.

    2007-07-01

    Damping capacity is another primary characteristic of shape memory alloys (SMA) besides shape memory effect and superelasticity. Damping behavior of Ti-riched TiNi SMA, porous TiNi SMA and a novel TiNi/AlSi composite have been investigated using dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) in this investigation. All these alloys are in martensitic state at room temperature and thus possess the high potential application value. Ti 50.2Ni 49.8 SMA has better damping capacity in pure martensitic state and phase transformation region due to the motion of martensite twin interface. As a kind of promising material for effective dampers and shock absorbing devices, porous TiNi SMA can exhibit higher damping capacity than the dense one due to the existence of the three-dimensioned connecting pore structure. It is found that the internal friction of porous TiNi SMA mainly originates from microplastic deformation and mobility of martensite interface and increases with the increase of the porosity. A novel TiNi/AlSi composite has been developed successfully by infiltrating AlSi alloy into the open pores of porous TiNi alloy with 60% porosity through compression casting. It shows the same phase transformation characteristics as the porous TiNi alloy. The damping capacity of the composite has been increased and the compressive strength has been also promoted remarkably. Suggestions for developing higher damping alloys based on TiNi shape memory alloy are proposed in this paper.

  7. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed.

  8. Landau Damping of Transverse Waves in the Exosphere by Fast Particle Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidman, D. A.; Jaggi, R. K.

    1962-01-01

    We have investigated the Landau damping of transverse waves propagating in the thermal exospheric plasma, by fast particle fluxes which also exist in these regions. The most intense non-thermal fluxes so far detected are those of the auroral producing electrons and protons measured by McIlwain. We find that these fluxes may considerably damp the propagation of whistler modes through some regions. The damping of hydromagnetic waves in the exosphere by this mechanism is negligible.

  9. Estimation of impact damping parameters for a cam-follower system based on measurements and analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Sriram; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-12-01

    A new cam-follower system experiment capable of generating periodic impacts is utilized to estimate the impact damping model parameters. The experiment is designed to precisely measure the forces and acceleration during impulsive events. The impact damping force is described as a product of a damping coefficient, the indentation displacement raised to the power of a damping index, and the time derivative of the indentation displacement. A novel time-domain based technique and a signal processing procedure are developed to accurately estimate the damping coefficient and index. The measurements are compared to the predictions from a corresponding contact mechanics model with trial values of damping parameters on the basis of a particular residue; both parameters are quantified based on the minimization of this residue. The estimated damping parameters are justified using the literature and an equivalent coefficient of restitution model is developed. Also, some unresolved issues regarding the impact damping model are addressed.

  10. Analytical modeling of squeeze air film damping of biomimetic MEMS directional microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishfaque, Asif; Kim, Byungki

    2016-08-01

    Squeeze air film damping is introduced in microelectromechanical systems due to the motion of the fluid between two closely spaced oscillating micro-structures. The literature is abundant with different analytical models to address the squeeze air film damping effects, however, there is a lack of work in modeling the practical sensors like directional microphones. Here, we derive an analytical model of squeeze air film damping of first two fundamental vibration modes, namely, rocking and bending modes, of a directional microphone inspired from the fly Ormia ochracea's ear anatomy. A modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects is used in the analysis. Pressure distribution under the vibrating diaphragm is derived by using Green's function. From mathematical modeling of the fly's inspired mechanical model, we infer that bringing the damping ratios of both modes in the critical damping range enhance the directional sensitivity cues. The microphone parameters are varied in derived damping formulas to bring the damping ratios in the vicinity of critical damping, and to show the usefulness of the analytical model in tuning the damping ratios of both modes. The accuracy of analytical damping results are also verified by finite element method (FEM) using ANSYS. The FEM results are in full compliance with the analytical results.

  11. The effect of simulated space thermal environment on damping capacity of metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Ouellet, L.; Nikanpour, Darius; Lo, J.

    2003-09-01

    Damping capacity is one of important parameters that engineers need to consider when they select materials for space structure applications. The materials studied in this paper are high performance SiC particulate reinforced aluminum and Al2O3 woven fabric reinforced aluminum composites. Changes in damping capacity of the materials in simulated space thermal environment were studied using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA). Comparing to the conventional aluminum alloy, the composites have significantly higher damping capacity. The experiment demonstrated that thermal cycling to sub-ambient temperature can significantly affects the damping capacity of metal matrix composites. The long-term effects of space thermal cycling on the composites were also discussed.

  12. Error analysis and feasibility study of dynamic stiffness matrix-based damping matrix identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgen, Gokhan O.; Kim, Jay H.

    2009-02-01

    Developing a method to formulate a damping matrix that represents the actual spatial distribution and mechanism of damping of the dynamic system has been an elusive goal. The dynamic stiffness matrix (DSM)-based damping identification method proposed by Lee and Kim is attractive and promising because it identifies the damping matrix from the measured DSM without relying on any unfounded assumptions. However, in ensuing works it was found that damping matrices identified from the method had unexpected forms and showed traces of large variance errors. The causes and possible remedies of the problem are sought for in this work. The variance and leakage errors are identified as the major sources of the problem, which are then related to system parameters through numerical and experimental simulations. An improved experimental procedure is developed to reduce the effect of these errors in order to make the DSM-based damping identification method a practical option.

  13. Theoretical prediction of the damping of a railway wheel with sandwich-type dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merideno, Inaki; Nieto, Javier; Gil-Negrete, Nere; Giménez Ortiz, José Germán; Landaberea, Aitor; Iartza, Jon

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a procedure for predicting the damping added to a railway wheel when sandwich-type dampers are installed. Although there are different ways to reduce the noise generated by a railway wheel, most devices are based on the mechanism of increasing wheel damping. This is why modal damping ratios are a clear indicator of the efficiency of the damping device and essential when a vibro-acoustic study of a railway wheel is carried out. Based on a number of output variables extracted from the wheel and damper models, the strategy explained herein provides the final damping ratios of the damped wheel. Several different configurations are designed and experimentally tested. Theoretical and experimental results agree adequately, and it is demonstrated that this procedure is a good tool for qualitative comparison between different solutions in the design stages.

  14. The improved damping of superconductor bearings for 35 kWh superconductor flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. H.; Park, B. J.; Jung, S. Y.; Han, S. C.; Lee, W. R.; Bae, Y. C.

    2013-02-01

    A 35 kWh Superconductor Flywheel Energy Storage system (SFES) using hybrid bearing sets, which is composed of a high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing and an active magnet damper (AMD), has been developed at KEPCO Research Institute (KEPRI). Damping is a source of energy loss but necessary for the stability of the flywheel system. We found that the damping of HTS bearings can be improved by thermal insulating bolts, which play a role of passive type external damper. To investigate the source of the increased damping, damping coefficients were measured with HTS bearings using insulating bolts made of three kinds of polymer materials. The damping coefficient was raised over 3000 N s/m in the case of PEEK bolts. The value was almost a quarter of the AMD. In this study, thermoelastic and Coulomb friction damping mechanisms are discussed. The main damping mechanism was the thermoelastic damping of the bolts themselves. And interfacial gap between the insulating bolt and metal chamber, which increased during the cooling process, was considered to be the cause of the anisotropic damping coefficients. Finally, the effects of the HTS bearings on the first critical speed are shown.

  15. A novel approach to the analysis of squeezed-film air damping in microelectromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weilin; Li, Hongxia; Chatterjee, Aveek N.; Elfadel, Ibrahim (Abe M.; Ender Ocak, Ilker; Zhang, TieJun

    2017-01-01

    Squeezed-film damping (SFD) is a phenomenon that significantly affects the performance of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The total damping force in MEMS mainly include the viscous damping force and elastic damping force. Quality factor (Q factor) is usually used to evaluate the damping in MEMS. In this work, we measure the Q factor of a resonator through experiments in a wide range of pressure levels. In fact, experimental characterizations of MEMS have some limitations because it is difficult to conduct experiments at very high vacuum and also hard to differentiate the damping mechanisms from the overall Q factor measurements. On the other hand, classical theoretical analysis of SFD is restricted to strong assumptions and simple geometries. In this paper, a novel numerical approach, which is based on lattice Boltzmann simulations, is proposed to investigate SFD in MEMS. Our method considers the dynamics of squeezed air flow as well as fluid-solid interactions in MEMS. It is demonstrated that Q factor can be directly predicted by numerical simulation, and our simulation results agree well with experimental data. Factors that influence SFD, such as pressure, oscillating amplitude, and driving frequency, are investigated separately. Furthermore, viscous damping and elastic damping forces are quantitatively compared based on comprehensive simulation. The proposed numerical approach as well as experimental characterization enables us to reveal the insightful physics of squeezed-film air damping in MEMS.

  16. Unfolding the damping behavior of multilayer graphene membrane in the low-frequency regime.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Debrupa; Das, Santanu; Choi, Wonbong; Agarwal, Arvind

    2012-05-22

    The damping behavior of few-layered graphene membrane in the low-frequency regime of mechanical loading is investigated in the present study. Damping of graphene has significant applications in micro/nanoscale devices and macroscale dynamic systems for absorbing shock-generated energies. Damping behavior of graphene is experimentally evaluated, for the first time, by dynamic mechanical analysis at the nanoscale with cyclic mechanical loading in the range 0.1-50 μN applied at a frequency range of 10-250 Hz. This study reveals 260% higher damping on graphene membranes than a silicon surface. The damping shows excellent reproducibility and remains steady even after 100,000 cycles. The damping of multilayer graphene membrane, supported on a Si/SiO(2) substrate, shows a strong dependence on the frequency of cyclic loading. The mechanism governing impressive damping of a graphene membrane is elucidated by structural changes such as ripple formation, ripple wave propagation, and z-axis compression. Damping behavior of a graphene membrane in this low-frequency regime is also found to depend on the number of graphene layers and is explained as the interplay between in-plane sp(2) and out-of-plane van der Waals forces. These findings are important for establishing the potential of graphene for applications in macro- to nanoscale structures that require continuous absorption of shock waves without destruction/failure.

  17. Check valve with poppet damping mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line is presented where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction as well as provided a guiding function. The dashpot is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the plunger member becomes jammed in the dashpot.

  18. Check valve with poppet damping mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1993-08-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line is presented where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction as well as provided a guiding function. The dashpot is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the plunger member becomes jammed in the dashpot.

  19. Check valve with poppet damping mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1992-06-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line is presented where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction as well as provided a guiding function. The dashpot is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the plunger member becomes jammed in the dashpot.

  20. Damping of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Solar Prominence Fine Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution observations of solar filaments and prominences reveal that these large-scale coronal structures are formed by a myriad of long and thin ribbons, here called threads, which are piled up to form the prominence body. Evidences suggest that these fine structures are magnetic flux tubes anchored in the solar photosphere, which are partially filled with the cool and dense prominence material. Individual and collective oscillations of prominence and filament fine structures are frequently reported by means of oscillatory variations in Doppler signals and spectral line intensity. Common features of these observations are that the reported oscillatory periods are usually in a narrow range between 2 and 10 minutes, that the velocity amplitudes are smaller than ˜3 km/s, and that the oscillations seem to be strongly damped after a few periods. Typically, the ratio of the damping time, tD, to the period, P, is tD/P < 10. While the oscillations have been interpreted in the context of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, i.e., in terms of the MHD normal modes supported by the filament thread body and/or propagating MHD waves, the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the damping are not well-known and a comparative study between different damping mechanisms is needed. In this Thesis, we study the efficiency of several physical mechanisms for the damping of MHD oscillations in prominence fine structures. Both individual and collective oscillations of threads are analyzed. We model a filament thread as a straight cylindrical magnetic flux tube with prominence conditions, embedded in a magnetized environment representing the solar coronal medium. The basic MHD equations are applied to the model and contain non-ideal terms accounting for effects as, e.g., non-adiabatic mechanisms, magnetic diffusion, ion-neutral collisions, etc., that may be of relevance in prominence plasmas and whose role on the damping of the oscillations is assessed. Our method combines

  1. Vibration Damping Circuit Card Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald Allen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibration damping circuit card assembly includes a populated circuit card having a mass M. A closed metal container is coupled to a surface of the populated circuit card at approximately a geometric center of the populated circuit card. Tungsten balls fill approximately 90% of the metal container with a collective mass of the tungsten balls being approximately (0.07) M.

  2. Surfactant damping of water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary S.; Dowling, David R.; Schultz, William W.

    1997-11-01

    The most well known and perhaps most important distinguishing characteristic of a water surface laden with surfactant is the profound increase in small-wave damping with the addition of even small amounts of surfactant material. It would seem to follow that damping increases with increasing surfactant concentration. This is undoubtedly true for some surfactants, however our experiments with a soluble surfactant show that it is possible to increase surfactant concentration and measure a decrease in damping. While the increased concentration is accompanied by a dramatic decrease in measured static surface tension, some of the capillary-wave frequency regime is less damped. Experimental measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the wave speed are compared with existing theory where at least one other physical quantity besides surface tension is needed to properly model the interface. Our on-going work with insoluble surfactants may also provide an example of this type of behavior for materials that do not readily transfer to and from the bulk water. [Supported by the Office of Naval Research

  3. Dealing with damping-off

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Damping-off is a common disease that rots and kills both seeds and recently germinated seedlings. The disease is caused by number of different soilborne pathogens, including true fungi (Botrytis, Fusarium, and Rhizoctonia species) and oomycetes (Phytophthora and Pythium species). The seedlings of mo...

  4. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  5. Squeezed states of damped oscillator chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    The Caldirola-Kanai model of one-dimensional damped oscillator is extended to the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping. The correlated and squeezed states for the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping are constructed. Based on the concept of the integrals of motion, it is demonstrated how squeezing phenomenon arises due to parametric excitation.

  6. Six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Leonard S.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 1 Jan. - 31 Mar. 1993 on six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application is presented. A performance and cost report is included. Topics covered include: actuator testing; mechanical amplifier design; and neural network control system development and experimental evaluation.

  7. The One-Dimensional Damped Forced Harmonic Oscillator Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores-Hidalgo, G.; Barone, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give a general solution to the problem of the damped harmonic oscillator under the influence of an arbitrary time-dependent external force. We employ simple methods accessible for beginners and useful for undergraduate students and professors in an introductory course of mechanics.

  8. A Look at Damped Harmonic Oscillators through the Phase Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshbod, Yousef; Latulippe, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Damped harmonic oscillations appear naturally in many applications involving mechanical and electrical systems as well as in biological systems. Most students are introduced to harmonic motion in an elementary ordinary differential equation (ODE) course. Solutions to ODEs that describe simple harmonic motion are usually found by investigating the…

  9. Magnetization damping in noncollinear spin valves with antiferromagnetic interlayer couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Takahiro; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Takahashi, Saburo

    2015-08-01

    We study the magnetic damping in the simplest of synthetic antiferromagnets, i.e., antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled spin valves, in the presence of applied magnetic fields that enforce noncolliear magnetic configurations. We formulate the dynamic exchange of spin currents in a noncollinear texture based on the spin-diffusion theory with quantum mechanical boundary conditions at the ferrromagnet/normal-metal interfaces and derive the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations coupled by the interlayer static and dynamic exchange interactions. We predict noncollinearity-induced additional damping that is modulated by an applied magnetic field. We compare theoretical results with published experiments.

  10. Design of passive piezoelectric damping for space structures. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W., IV; Aldrich, Jack B.; Vonflotow, Andreas H.

    1994-01-01

    Passive damping of structural dynamics using piezoceramic electromechanical energy conversion and passive electrical networks is a relatively recent concept with little implementation experience base. This report describes an implementation case study, starting from conceptual design and technique selection, through detailed component design and testing to simulation on the structure to be damped. About 0.5kg. of piezoelectric material was employed to damp the ASTREX testbed, a 500kg structure. Emphasis was placed upon designing the damping to enable high bandwidth robust feedback control. Resistive piezoelectric shunting provided the necessary broadband damping. The piezoelectric element was incorporated into a mechanically-tuned vibration absorber in order to concentrate damping into the 30 to 40 Hz frequency modes at the rolloff region of the proposed compensator. A prototype of a steel flex-tensional motion amplification device was built and tested. The effective stiffness and damping of the flex-tensional device was experimentally verified. When six of these effective springs are placed in an orthogonal configuration, strain energy is absorbed from all six degrees of freedom of a 90kg. mass. A NASTRAN finite element model of the testbed was modified to include the six-spring damping system. An analytical model was developed for the spring in order to see how the flex-tensional device and piezoelectric dimensions effect the critical stress and strain energy distribution throughout the component. Simulation of the testbed demonstrated the damping levels achievable in the completed system.

  11. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  12. Spin-Damping in an RF atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Romalis, Michael V.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2009-05-01

    Optically pumped atomic magnetometers have demonstrated an improved sensitivity over standard tuned coils for frequencies less than 50 MHz, making these radio-frequency (RF) magnetometers attractive for low-field NMR (for example, Budker and Romalis, Nature Physics 3, April 2007). Such magnetometers are often plagued by transient effects resulting in decreased sensitivity. The decay time of these transients, or ringing, can last for milliseconds, which is particularly detrimental for rapidly decaying NMR signals. We have found that actively damping the ringing of the atomic spins can significantly reduce such dead time. This spin-damping of the atomic transients is achieved through a negative feedback mechanism in which part of the optical signal during ringing is used to apply an RF field forcing the realignment of the atomic spins with the static magnetic field. We have successfully implemented spin-damping in 100 μs and recovered our femto-Tesla signal previously obscured by the ringing.

  13. Research on the damping properties of Fe12O19Sr/the polyurethane elastomer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Qin, Yan; Sun, P. C.; Huang, Z. X.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic elastomer composite is a promising damping material. In this paper, both strontium ferrite (Fe12O19Sr) powders and polyurethane elastomer which were mixed by mechanical blending method were used as the magnetic filler and as the matrix respectively, the properties of the magnetic damping composite materials were studied. The results show that the magnetic properties of the magnetic elastomers composite are enhanced with the ferrite loading. The mechanical properties and Shore hardness are highly influenced by mass fraction of ferrite particles. The damping properties of magnetic elastomer composite reach best when the strontium ferrite loading is 15phr, and the damping properties deteriorate when the loading continue increasing. The damping properties of the composites with the X direction of magnetization are better than that with Y direction of magnetization.

  14. Magnetoacoustic heating by ion Landau damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L.

    1980-01-01

    The Vlasov-fluid model of Freidberg (1972) is used to study the resonance heating of a sharp-boundary screw pinch. The analysis provides the first treatment of the magnetoacoustic heating of a cylindrical plasma by means of ion Landau damping, which was identified as a viable dissipative mechanism for the conversion of magnetoacoustic wave energy into ion thermal energy. In addition, local and global energy conservation are considered, and formulae and numerical results for the thermal energy doubling time and the associated induced rf electric fields are presented. It is shown that collisionless absorption can provide a heating mechanism when an equilibrium plasma column is pumped by oscillations of the confining magnetic field at a frequency near the oblique magnetoacoustic frequency.

  15. Magnetoacoustic heating by ion Landau damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, L.

    1980-07-01

    The Vlasov-fluid model of Freidberg (1972) is used to study the resonance heating of a sharp-boundary screw pinch. The analysis provides the first treatment of the magnetoacoustic heating of a cylindrical plasma by means of ion Landau damping, which was identified as a viable dissipative mechanism for the conversion of magnetoacoustic wave energy into ion thermal energy. In addition, local and global energy conservation are considered, and formulae and numerical results for the thermal energy doubling time and the associated induced rf electric fields are presented. It is shown that collisionless absorption can provide a heating mechanism when an equilibrium plasma column is pumped by oscillations of the confining magnetic field at a frequency near the oblique magnetoacoustic frequency.

  16. Cocured damped layers in composite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rotz, C.A. ); Barrett, D.J. )

    1992-01-01

    A study was made on the feasibility of laminating and cocuring graphite fiber-epoxy prepreg with plies of commercially available damping materials for form beams and hat-stiffened panels. Experiments showed that cocuring did not adversely affect the damping materials and that excellent structural damping properties could be obtained. The construction of the hat-stiffened panels proved that complex parts containing damping materials could be fabricated. Dynamic testing of these components showed that internal architectural features could be designed to promote damping in primary structure.

  17. Quantifying acoustic damping using flame chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boujo, E.; Denisov, A.; Schuermans, B.; Noiray, N.

    2016-12-01

    Thermoacoustic instabilities in gas turbines and aeroengine combustors falls within the category of complex systems. They can be described phenomenologically using nonlinear stochastic differential equations, which constitute the grounds for output-only model-based system identification. It has been shown recently that one can extract the governing parameters of the instabilities, namely the linear growth rate and the nonlinear component of the thermoacoustic feedback, using dynamic pressure time series only. This is highly relevant for practical systems, which cannot be actively controlled due to a lack of cost-effective actuators. The thermoacoustic stability is given by the linear growth rate, which results from the combination of the acoustic damping and the coherent feedback from the flame. In this paper, it is shown that it is possible to quantify the acoustic damping of the system, and thus to separate its contribution to the linear growth rate from the one of the flame. This is achieved by post-processing in a simple way simultaneously acquired chemiluminescence and acoustic pressure data. It provides an additional approach to further unravel from observed time series the key mechanisms governing the system dynamics. This straightforward method is illustrated here using experimental data from a combustion chamber operated at several linearly stable and unstable operating conditions.

  18. Integrated analysis and design of thick composite structures for optimal passive damping characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The development of novel composite mechanics for the analysis of damping in composite laminates and structures and the more significant results of this effort are summarized. Laminate mechanics based on piecewise continuous in-plane displacement fields are described that can represent both intralaminar stresses and interlaminar shear stresses and the associated effects on the stiffness and damping characteristics of a composite laminate. Among other features, the mechanics can accurately model the static and damped dynamic response of either thin or thick composite laminates, as well as, specialty laminates with embedded compliant damping layers. The discrete laminate damping theory is further incorporated into structural analysis methods. In this context, an exact semi-analytical method for the simulation of the damped dynamic response of composite plates was developed. A finite element based method and a specialty four-node plate element were also developed for the analysis of composite structures of variable shape and boundary conditions. Numerous evaluations and applications demonstrate the quality and superiority of the mechanics in predicting the damped dynamic characteristics of composite structures. Finally, additional development was focused on the development of optimal tailoring methods for the design of thick composite structures based on the developed analytical capability. Applications on composite plates illustrated the influence of composite mechanics in the optimal design of composites and the potential for significant deviations in the resultant designs when more simplified (classical) laminate theories are used.

  19. Human hoppers compensate for simultaneous changes in surface compression and damping.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Chet T; Farley, Claire T

    2006-01-01

    On a range of elastic and damped surfaces, human hoppers and runners adjust leg mechanics to maintain similar spring-like mechanics of the leg and surface combination. In a previous study of adaptations to damped surfaces, we changed surface damping and stiffness simultaneously to maintain constant surface compression. The current study investigated whether hoppers maintain spring-like mechanics of the leg-surface combination when surface damping alone changes (elastic and 1000-4800 N s m(-1)). We found that hoppers adjusted leg mechanics to maintain similar spring-like mechanics of the leg-surface combination and center of mass dynamics on all surfaces. Over the range of surface damping, vertical stiffness of the leg-surface combination increased by only 12% and center of mass displacement decreased by only 6% despite up to 55% less compression of more heavily damped surfaces. In contrast, a simulation predicted a 44% decrease in vertical displacement with no adjustment to leg mechanics. To compensate for the smaller and slower compression of more heavily damped surfaces, the stance legs compressed by up to 4.1 +/- 0.2 cm further and reached peak compression sooner. To replace energy lost by damped surfaces, hoppers performed additional leg work by extending the legs during takeoff by up to 3.1 +/- 0.2 cm further than they compressed during landing. We conclude that humans simultaneously adjust leg compression magnitude and timing, as well as mechanical work output, to conserve center of mass dynamics on damped surfaces. Runners may use similar strategies on natural energy-dissipating surfaces such as sand, mud and snow.

  20. Radiation damping in real time.

    PubMed

    Mendes, A C; Takakura, F I

    2001-11-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of a charge interacting with its own radiation, which originates the radiation damping. The real-time equation of motion for the charge and the associated Langevin equation is found in classical limit. The equation of motion for the charge allows one to obtain the frequency-dependent coefficient of friction. In the lowest order we find that although the coefficient of static friction vanishes, there is dynamical dissipation represented by a non-Markovian dissipative kernel.

  1. Electromagnetic induction and damping: Quantitative experiments using a PC interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Avinash; Mohapatra, Y. N.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2002-04-01

    A bar magnet, attached to an oscillating system, passes through a coil periodically, generating a series of electromotive force pulses. A novel method for the quantitative verification of Faraday's law is described which eliminates all errors associated with angular measurements, thereby revealing subtle features of the underlying mechanics. When electromagnetic damping is activated by short-circuiting the coil, a distinctly linear decay of the oscillation amplitude is observed. A quantitative analysis reveals an interesting interplay of the electromagnetic and mechanical time scales.

  2. Experimental Vibration Damping Characteristics of the Third-stage Rotor of a Three-stage Transonic Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gage output power spectra. The combined damping consists of the aerodynamic damping and the structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given corrected speed, weight flow, and pressure ratio while the structural and mechanical damping is assumed to remain constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third-stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for the design equivalent speed with the stator blades reset for maximum efficiency. The compressor overall preformance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third-stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  3. Gravitational damping of Alfven waves in stellar atmospheres and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. K.; Mullan, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    We consider how gravity affects the propagation of Alfven waves in a stellar atmosphere. We show that when the ion gyrofrequency exceeds the collision rate, the waves are absorbed at a rate proportional to the gravitational acceleration g. Estimates show that this mechanism can readily account for the observed energy losses in the solar chromosphere. The mechanism predicts that the pressure at the top of the chromosphere P(sub Tc) should scale with g as P(sub Tc) proportional to g(exp delta), where delta approximately equals 2/3; this is close to empirical results which suggest delta approximately equals 0.6. Gravitational damping leads to deposition of energy at a rate proportional to the mass of the particles. Hence, heavier ion are heated more effectively than protons. This is consistent with the observed proportionality between ion temperature and mass in the solar wind. Gravitational damping causes the local g to be effectively decreased by an amount proportional to the wave energy. This feature affects the acceleration of the solar wind. Gravitational damping may also lead to self-regulation of the damping of Alfven waves in stellar winds: this is relevant in the context of slow massive winds in cool giants.

  4. Simultaneously high stiffness and damping in nanoengineered microtruss composites.

    PubMed

    Meaud, Julien; Sain, Trisha; Yeom, Bongjun; Park, Sei Jin; Shoultz, Anna Brieland; Hulbert, Gregory; Ma, Zheng-Dong; Kotov, Nicholas A; Hart, A John; Arruda, Ellen M; Waas, Anthony M

    2014-04-22

    Materials combining high stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation are needed in automotive, aviation, construction, and other technologies where structural elements are exposed to dynamic loads. In this paper we demonstrate that a judicious combination of carbon nanotube engineered trusses held in a dissipative polymer can lead to a composite material that simultaneously exhibits both high stiffness and damping. Indeed, the combination of stiffness and damping that is reported is quite high in any single monolithic material. Carbon nanotube (CNT) microstructures grown in a novel 3D truss topology form the backbone of these nanocomposites. The CNT trusses are coated by ceramics and by a nanostructured polymer film assembled using the layer-by-layer technique. The crevices of the trusses are then filled with soft polyurethane. Each constituent of the composite is accurately modeled, and these models are used to guide the manufacturing process, in particular the choice of the backbone topology and the optimization of the mechanical properties of the constituent materials. The resulting composite exhibits much higher stiffness (80 times) and similar damping (specific damping capacity of 0.8) compared to the polymer. Our work is a step forward in implementing the concept of materials by design across multiple length scales.

  5. A procedure for the evaluation of damping effects in composite laminated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an approach based on experimental tests and numerical simulations for taking into account damping effects during the design and the analysis of composite structures. The experiments are conducted using the Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and unidirectional coupons are tested to characterize the damping properties of the plies. Starting from these results, first order shear deformation theory is applied to determine the damping properties of the laminate, which are then used in the context of a numerical procedure based on finite element analyses and strain energy method. The results are presented for an aircraft stiffened panel, illustrating the evaluation of the specific damping capacities of the structure, and performing direct transient analyses to investigate the effect of damping on the panel response to pulse loadings.

  6. Determination of blade stresses under constant speed and transient conditions with nonlinear damping

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, J.S.; Vyas, N.S.

    1996-04-01

    Determination of resonant stresses is an important step in the life estimation of turbomachine blades. Resonance may occur either at a steady operating speed or under transient conditions of operation when the blade passes through a critical speed. Damping plays a significant role in limiting the amplitudes of vibration and stress values. The blade damping mechanism is very complex in nature, because of interfacial slip, material hysteresis, and gas dynamic damping occurring simultaneously. In this paper, a numerical technique to compute the stress response of a turbine blade with nonlinear damping characteristics, during steady and transient operations of the rotor, is presented. Damping is defined as a function of vibratory mode, rotor speed, and strain amplitude. The technique is illustrated by computing the stress levels at resonant rotor speeds for typical operation of a turbomachine.

  7. Dynamic Stiffness and Damping Characteristics of a High-Temperature Air Foil Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2001-01-01

    Using a high-temperature optically based displacement measurement system, a foil air bearing's stiffness and damping characteristics were experimentally determined. Results were obtained over a range of modified Sommerfeld Number from 1.5E6 to 1.5E7, and at temperatures from 25 to 538 C. An Experimental procedure was developed comparing the error in two curve fitting functions to reveal different modes of physical behavior throughout the operating domain. The maximum change in dimensionless stiffness was 3.0E-2 to 6.5E-2 over the Sommerfeld Number range tested. Stiffness decreased with temperature by as much as a factor of two from 25 to 538 C. Dimensionless damping was a stronger function of Sommerfeld Number ranging from 20 to 300. The temperature effect on damping being more qualitative, showed the damping mechanism shifted from viscous type damping to frictional type as temperature increased.

  8. Magnetomechanical damping and magnetoelastic hysteresis in permalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercuta, A.; Mihalca, I.

    2002-11-01

    The inverse Wiedemann effect (IWE) consisting in longitudinal magnetization reversals was detected with a cylindrical permalloy layer subjected to circular DC magnetic fields while performing low frequency (~1 Hz) free torsion oscillations. Hysteresis occurring in the magnetization vs elastic strain dependence (the `magnetoelastic hysteresis') suggested irreversible processes activated mechanically. Joint vibration and magnetization time records were carried out by means of an experimental set-up including inverted pendulum and conventional integrating fluxmeter, in order to compare the relative energy losses ascribed to the magnetomechanical damping (MMD) and to the magnetoelastic hysteresis, respectively. The experimental results clearly pointed out a close connection between IWE and MMD providing evidence that, when simultaneously examined, both effects reflect the same basic phenomenon: the irreversible magnetization changes induced by the elastic strain.

  9. ICAN/DAMP-integrated composite analyzer with damping analysis capabilities: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitrious A.; Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the computer code ICAN/DAMP (Integrated Composite Analyzer with Damping Analysis Capabilities) for the prediction of damping in polymer-matrix composites. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and is a version of the ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer) computer program. The code incorporates a new module for synthesizing the material damping from micromechanics to laminate level. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are programmed relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from on-axis damping values. The hygrothermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites caused by temperature and moisture variation is modeled along with the damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix. The temperature rise is continuously vibrating composite plies and composite laminates is also estimated. The ICAN/DAMP user's manual provides descriptions of the damping analysis module's functions, structure, input requirements, output interpretation, and execution requirements. It only addresses the changes required to conduct the damping analysis and is used in conjunction with the 'Second Generation Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) Computer Code' user's manual (NASA TP-3290).

  10. Introduction to DAMPE event reconstruction (On behalf of DAMPE collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high energy particle physics experiment satellite, launched on 17 Dec 2015. To measure basic attributes of cosmic ray particles, DAMPE is equipped with four sub-detectors, BGO calorimeter (BGO), plastic scintillator detector (PSD), silicon tungsten tracker (STK) and neutron detector (NUD). On orbit, the high energy particle data are acquired and recorded by well-designed Data Acquisition system. After that, a series of elaborate event reconstruction algorithms are implemented to determine the energy, direction and particle ID of each event. The energy reconstruction algorithm firstly treats the sum of the BGO crystal energy as the overall energy estimator and various corrections are performed to calculate energy leakage from side and back of the calorimeter. The track reconstruction starts with cluster finding in STK, then shower axis of BGO and barycentre of clusters are used to extract seed of tracks. These seeds will be projected on the next layer by Kalman Filter method which will finally give location and direction of particle tracks. Based on shower development in BGO and tracks reconstructed by STK, we also combine data from PSD and NUD and developed a series of algorithms to evaluate particle's charge and identification. In this talk, we will describe technical strategies of event reconstruction and provide their basic performance.

  11. Damped transverse oscillations of interacting coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto; Luna, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Damped transverse oscillations of magnetic loops are routinely observed in the solar corona. This phenomenon is interpreted as standing kink magnetohydrodynamic waves, which are damped by resonant absorption owing to plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field. The periods and damping times of these oscillations can be used to probe the physical conditions of the coronal medium. Some observations suggest that interaction between neighboring oscillating loops in an active region may be important and can modify the properties of the oscillations. Here we theoretically investigate resonantly damped transverse oscillations of interacting nonuniform coronal loops. We provide a semi-analytic method, based on the T-matrix theory of scattering, to compute the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations of an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylindrical loops. The effect of resonant damping is included in the T-matrix scheme in the thin boundary approximation. Analytic and numerical results in the specific case of two interacting loops are given as an application.

  12. Dampness in buildings and health. Nordic interdisciplinary review of the scientific evidence on associations between exposure to "dampness" in buildings and health effects (NORDDAMP).

    PubMed

    Bornehag, C G; Blomquist, G; Gyntelberg, F; Järvholm, B; Malmberg, P; Nordvall, L; Nielsen, A; Pershagen, G; Sundell, J

    2001-06-01

    Several epidemiological investigations concerning indoor environments have indicated that "dampness" in buildings is associated to health effects such as respiratory symptoms, asthma and allergy. The aim of the present interdisciplinary review is to evaluate this association as shown in the epidemiological literature. A literature search identified 590 peer-reviewed articles of which 61 have been the foundation for this review. The review shows that "dampness" in buildings appears to increase the risk for health effects in the airways, such as cough, wheeze and asthma. Relative risks are in the range of OR 1.4-2.2. There also seems to be an association between "dampness" and other symptoms such as tiredness, headache and airways infections. It is concluded that the evidence for a causal association between "dampness" and health effects is strong. However, the mechanisms are unknown. Several definitions of dampness have been used in the studies, but all seems to be associated with health problems. Sensitisation to mites may be one but obviously not the only mechanism. Even if the mechanisms are unknown, there is sufficient evidence to take preventive measures against dampness in buildings.

  13. Vitreous Enamel Damping Material Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    PROCEDURES 3 2.1. EXPERIMENTAL 3 2.1.1. GLASS PREPARATION 3 2.1.2. METHOD OF COATING APPLICATION 3 2.1.3. VIBRATION DAMPING MEASUREMENTS 3 2.2. CALCULATION OF...discussion in this report. fL 2 SECTION II TECHNICAL PROCEDURES 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL 2.1.1 Glass Preparation All of the compositions, except the standard...After heat treatments of composition "B", a- cristobalite and devitrite (Na20.3CaO-6SiO 2) appear as crystalline phases; a- cristobalite being the major

  14. Application of the theory of damping of kink oscillations by radiative cooling of coronal loop plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, R. J.; Erdélyi, R.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We present here a first comparative study between the observed damping of numerous fast kink oscillations and the theoretical model of their damping due to the cooling of coronal loops. The theory of damping of kink oscillations due to radiation of the solar plasma with a temporally varying background is applied here to all known cases of coronal kink oscillations. Methods: A recent dynamic model of cooling coronal loops predicts that transverse oscillations of such loops could be significantly damped due to the radiative cooling process (Morton & Erdélyi 2009, ApJ, 707, 750). The cooling of the loop plasma also has the consequence that the kink oscillation has a time-dependent frequency. The theory is applied to a relatively large number of known and reported examples of TRACE observations of damped kink oscillations. Results: We find that, for cooling timescales that are typical of EUV loops (500-2000 s), the observed damping of the transversal (i.e. kink) oscillations can be accounted for almost entirely by the cooling process in half of the examples. No other dissipative mechanism(s) seems to be needed to model the damping. In the remaining other examples, the cooling process does not appear to be able to account fully for the observed damping, though could still have a significant influence on the damping. In these cases another mechanism(s), e.g. resonant absorption, may be additionally required to account for the complete decay of oscillations. Also, we show that because of the dynamic nature of the background plasma, allowing for a time-dependent frequency provides a better fit profile for the data points of observations than a fit profile with a constant frequency, opening novel avenues for solar magneto-seismology.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMPING IN BOLTED LAP JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    C. MALONEY; D. PEAIRS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    The dynamic response of a jointed beam was measured in laboratory experiments. The data were analyzed and the system was mathematically modeled to establish plausible representations of joint damping behavior. Damping is examined in an approximate, local linear framework using log decrement and half power bandwidth approaches. in addition, damping is modeled in a nonlinear framework using a hybrid surface irregularities model that employs a bristles-construct. Experimental and analytical results are presented.

  16. Radiation damping in metal nanoparticle pairs.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Christian; Schmidt, Benjamin; von Plessen, Gero

    2007-02-01

    The radiation damping rate of plasmon resonances in pairs of spherical gold nanoparticles is calculated. The radiative line width of the plasmon resonance indicates significant far-field coupling between the nanoparticles over distances many times the particle diameter. The radiation damping of the coupled particle-plasmon mode alternates between superradiant and subradiant behavior when the particle spacing is varied. At small particle spacings where near-field coupling occurs, the radiation damping rate lies far below that of an isolated particle.

  17. Hysteretic damping in rotordynamics: An equivalent formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Amati, Nicola

    2010-10-01

    The hysteretic damping model cannot be applied to time domain dynamic simulations: this is a well-known feature that has been discussed in the literature since the time when analog computers were widespread. The constant equivalent damping often introduced to overcome this problem is also discussed, and its limitations are stated, in particular those linked with its application in rotordynamics to simulate rotating damping. An alternative model based on the nonviscous damping (NVD) model, but with a limited number of additional degrees of freedom, is proposed, and the relevant equations are derived. Some examples show applications to the rotordynamics field.

  18. Viscous damped space structure for reduced jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James F.; Davis, L. Porter

    1987-01-01

    A technique to provide modal vibration damping in high performance space structures was developed which uses less than one once of incompressible fluid. Up to 50 percent damping can be achieved which can reduce the settling times of the lowest structural mode by as much as 50 to 1. This concept allows the designers to reduce the weight of the structure while improving its dynamic performance. Damping by this technique is purely viscous and has been shown by test to be linear over 5 orders of input magnitude. Amplitudes as low as 0.2 microinch were demonstrated. Damping in the system is independent of stiffness and relatively insensitive to temperature.

  19. Material Damping Experiments at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Marie; White, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A unique experimental facility has been designed to measure damping of materials at cryogenic temperatures. The test facility pays special attention to removing other sources of damping in the measurement by avoiding frictional interfaces, decoupling the test specimen from the support system, and by using a non-contacting measurement device; Damping data is obtained for materials (AI, GrEp, Be, Fused Quartz), strain amplitudes (less than 10-6 ppm), frequencies (20Hz-330Hz) and temperatures (20K-293K) relevant to future precision optical space missions. The test data shows a significant decrease in viscous damping at cryogenic temperatures and can be as low as 10-4%, but the amount of the damping decrease is a function of frequency and material. Contrary to the other materials whose damping monotonically decreased with temperature, damping of Fused Quartz increased substantially at cryo, after reaching a minimum at around l50 K. The damping is also shown to be insensitive to strain for low strain levels. At room temperatures, the test data correlates well to the analytical predictions of the Zener damping model. Discrepancies at cryogenic temperatures between the model predictions and the test data are observed.

  20. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-08-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer`s response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping.

  1. Damped Lyman-α Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, P.; Ledoux, C.

    Recently, Prochaska & Wolfe (1997) have used Keck spectra of 17 DLA absorbers to investigate the kinematics of the neutral gas using unsaturated low excitation transitions such as Si iiλ 1808. They show that the absorption profiles are inconsistent with models of galactic haloes with random motions, spherically infalling gas and slowly rotating hot disks. The CDM model (Kauffmann 1996) is rejected as it produces disks with rotation velocities too small to account for the large observed velocity broadening of the absorption lines. Models of thick disks (h ~0.3 R, where h is the vertical scale and R the radius) with large rotational velocity (v 225kms-1) can reproduce the data. By combining new data on five damped systems with information gathered in the literature, we study the kinematics of the low and high-ionization phases in a sample of 26 damped Lyman-α systems in the redshift range 1.17 - 4.38. We show that the broader the line the more asymmetric, as expected in case rotation dominates the line broadening. However this correlation does not hold for velocities larger than 150 km/s indicating that evidence for rotational motions if any is restricted to velocity broadenings Δ V < 150kms-1. The systems with Δ V > 200kms-1 are peculiar with kinematics consistent with random motions. They show sub-systems as those expected if the objects are in the process of merging.

  2. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  3. Acoustic transducer with damping means

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.; Adamson, Gerald E.

    1976-11-02

    An ultrasonic transducer specifically suited to high temperature sodium applications is described. A piezoelectric active element is joined to the transducer faceplate by coating the faceplate and juxtaposed active element face with wetting agents specifically compatible with the bonding procedure employed to achieve the joint. The opposite face of the active element is fitted with a backing member designed to assure continued electrical continuity during adverse operating conditions which can result in the fracturing of the active element. The fit is achieved employing a spring-loaded electrode operably arranged to electrically couple the internal transducer components, enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing, to accessory components normally employed in transducer applications. Two alternative backing members are taught for assuring electrical continuity. The first employs a resilient, discrete multipoint contact electrode in electrical communication with the active element face. The second employs a resilient, elastomeric, electrically conductive, damped member in electrical communication with the active element face in a manner to effect ring-down of the transducer. Each embodiment provides continued electrical continuity within the transducer in the event the active element fractures, while the second provides the added benefit of damping.

  4. Tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for damped structures under random load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The classical problem for the application of a tuned vibration absorber is to minimize the response of a structural system, such as displacement, velocity, acceleration or to maximize the energy dissipated by tuned vibration absorber. The development of explicit optimal absorber parameters is challenging for a damped structural system since the fixed points no longer exist in the frequency response curve. This paper aims at deriving a set of simple design formula of tuned vibration absorber with nonlinear viscous damping based on the frequency tuning for harmonic load for a damped structural system under white noise excitation. The vibration absorbers being considered include tuned mass damper (TMD) and liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA). Simple approximate expression for the standard deviation velocity response of tuned vibration absorber for damped primary structure is also derived in this study to facilitate the estimation of the damping coefficient of TMD with nonlinear viscous damping and the head loss coefficient of LCVA. The derived results indicate that the higher the structural inherent damping the smaller the supplementary damping provided by a tuned vibration absorber. Furthermore, the optimal damping of tuned vibration absorber is shown to be independent of structural damping when it is tuned using the frequency tuning for harmonic load. Finally, the derived closed-form expressions are demonstrated to be capable of predicting the optimal parameters of tuned vibration absorbers with sufficient accuracy for preliminary design of tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for a damped primary structure.

  5. Application of viscous and Iwan modal damping models to experimental measurements from bolted structures

    DOE PAGES

    Deaner, Brandon J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Starr, Michael James; ...

    2015-01-20

    Measurements are presented from a two-beam structure with several bolted interfaces in order to characterize the nonlinear damping introduced by the joints. The measurements (all at force levels below macroslip) reveal that each underlying mode of the structure is well approximated by a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with a nonlinear mechanical joint. At low enough force levels, the measurements show dissipation that scales as the second power of the applied force, agreeing with theory for a linear viscously damped system. This is attributed to linear viscous behavior of the material and/or damping provided by the support structure. At larger forcemore » levels, the damping is observed to behave nonlinearly, suggesting that damping from the mechanical joints is dominant. A model is presented that captures these effects, consisting of a spring and viscous damping element in parallel with a four-parameter Iwan model. As a result, the parameters of this model are identified for each mode of the structure and comparisons suggest that the model captures the stiffness and damping accurately over a range of forcing levels.« less

  6. Application of viscous and Iwan modal damping models to experimental measurements from bolted structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deaner, Brandon J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Starr, Michael James; Segalman, Daniel J.; Sumali, Hartono

    2015-01-20

    Measurements are presented from a two-beam structure with several bolted interfaces in order to characterize the nonlinear damping introduced by the joints. The measurements (all at force levels below macroslip) reveal that each underlying mode of the structure is well approximated by a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with a nonlinear mechanical joint. At low enough force levels, the measurements show dissipation that scales as the second power of the applied force, agreeing with theory for a linear viscously damped system. This is attributed to linear viscous behavior of the material and/or damping provided by the support structure. At larger force levels, the damping is observed to behave nonlinearly, suggesting that damping from the mechanical joints is dominant. A model is presented that captures these effects, consisting of a spring and viscous damping element in parallel with a four-parameter Iwan model. As a result, the parameters of this model are identified for each mode of the structure and comparisons suggest that the model captures the stiffness and damping accurately over a range of forcing levels.

  7. Quasienergy formulation of damped response theory.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Kasper; Kauczor, Joanna; Kjaergaard, Thomas; Jørgensen, Poul

    2009-07-28

    We present a quasienergy-based formulation of damped response theory where a common effective lifetime parameter has been introduced for all excited states in terms of complex excitation energies. The introduction of finite excited state lifetimes leads to a set of (complex) damped response equations, which have the same form to all orders in the perturbation. An algorithm is presented for solving the damped response equations in Hartree-Fock theory and Kohn-Sham density functional theory. The use of the quasienergy formulation allows us to obtain directly the computationally simplest expressions for damped response functions by applying a set of response parameter elimination rules, which minimize the total number of damped response equations to be solved. In standard response theory broadened absorption spectra are obtained by ad hoc superimposing lineshape functions onto the absorption stick spectra, whereas an empirical lineshape function common to all excitations is an integrated part of damped response theory. By superimposing the lineshape functions inherent in damped response theory onto the stick spectra of standard response theory, we show that the absorption spectra obtained in standard and damped response theory calculations are identical. We demonstrate that damped response theory may be applied to obtain absorption spectra in all frequency ranges, also those that are not readily addressed using standard response theory. This makes damped response theory an effective tool, e.g., for determining absorption spectra for large molecules, where the density of the excited states may be very high, and where standard response theory therefore is not applicable in practice. A thorough comparison is given between our formulation of damped response theory and the formulation by Norman et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 194103 (2005)].

  8. Estimation on nonlinear damping in second order distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    An approximation and convergence theory for the identification of nonlinear damping in abstract wave equations is developed. It is assumed that the unknown dissipation mechanism to be identified can be described by a maximal monotone operator acting on the generalized velocity. The stiffness is assumed to be linear and symmetric. Functional analytic techniques are used to establish that solutions to a sequence of finite dimensional (Galerkin) approximating identification problems in some sense approximate a solution to the original infinite dimensional inverse problem.

  9. Gravitational radiation resistance, radiation damping and field fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, G.

    1981-03-01

    Application is made of two different generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorems and their derivations to the calculation of the gravitational quadrupole radiation resistance using the radiation-reaction force given by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler and the usual tidal force on one hand and the tidal force and the free gravitational radiation field on the other hand. The quantum-mechanical version (including thermal generalizations) of the well known classical quadrupole radiation damping formula is obtained as a function of the radiation resistance.

  10. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.

  11. Bending rate damping in elastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wang, Y.; Fabiano, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation of the bending rate damping model for elastic structures are presented. A model for which the internal damping term is physically plausible and which can accomodate cantilevered boundary conditions is discussed. The model formulation and mathematical foundations are given, and numerical results are discussed.

  12. Damping device for a stationary labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Aini, Yehia M. (Inventor); Mitchell, William S. (Inventor); Roberts, Lawrence P. (Inventor); Montgomery, Stuart K. (Inventor); Davis, Gary A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A stationary labyrinth seal system includes a seal housing having an annular cavity, a plurality of damping devices, and a retaining ring. The damping devices are positioned within the annular cavity and are maintained within the annular cavity by the retaining ring.

  13. Magnetic dipole oscillations and radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Daniel R.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the problem of radiation damping for a magnetic dipole oscillating in a magnetic field. An equation for the radiation reaction torque is derived, and the damping of the oscillations is described. Also discussed are runaway solutions for a rotating magnetic dipole moving under the influence of the reaction torque, with no external torque.

  14. DAMPs from Cell Death to New Life

    PubMed Central

    Vénéreau, Emilie; Ceriotti, Chiara; Bianchi, Marco Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Our body handles tissue damage by activating the immune system in response to intracellular molecules released by injured tissues [damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs)], in a similar way as it detects molecular motifs conserved in pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns). DAMPs are molecules that have a physiological role inside the cell, but acquire additional functions when they are exposed to the extracellular environment: they alert the body about danger, stimulate an inflammatory response, and finally promote the regeneration process. Beside their passive release by dead cells, some DAMPs can be secreted or exposed by living cells undergoing a life-threatening stress. DAMPs have been linked to inflammation and related disorders: hence, inhibition of DAMP-mediated inflammatory responses is a promising strategy to improve the clinical management of infection- and injury-elicited inflammatory diseases. However, it is important to consider that DAMPs are not only danger signals but also central players in tissue repair. Indeed, some DAMPs have been studied for their role in tissue healing after sterile or infection-associated inflammation. This review is focused on two exemplary DAMPs, HMGB1 and adenosine triphosphate, and their contribution to both inflammation and tissue repair. PMID:26347745

  15. Optimization of SMA layers in composite structures to enhance damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghdoust, P.; Cinquemani, S.; Lecis, N.; Bassani, P.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of lightweight structures can be severely affected by vibration. New design concepts leading to lightweight, slender structural components can increase the vulnerability of the components to failure due to excessive vibration. The intelligent approach to address the problem would be the use of materials which are more capable in dissipating the energy due to their high value of loss factor. Among the different materials available to achieve damping, much attention has been attached to the use of shape memory alloys (SMAs) because of their unique microstructure, leading to good damping capacity. This work describes the design and optimization of a hybrid layered composite structure for the passive suppression of flexural vibrations in slender and light structures. Embedding the SMA layers in composite structure allows to combine different properties: the lightness of the base composite (e.g. fiber glass), the mechanical strength of the insert of metallic material and the relevant damping properties of SMA, in the martensitic phase. In particular, we put our attention on embedding the CuZnAl in the form of thin sheet in a layered composite made by glass fiber reinforced epoxy. By appropriately positioning of the SMA sheets so that they are subjected to the maximum curvature, the damping of the hybrid system can be considerably enhanced. Accordingly analytical method for evaluating the energy dissipation of the thin sheets with different shapes and patterns is developed and is followed by a shape optimization based on genetic algorithm. Eventually different configurations of the hybrid beam structure with different patterns of SMA layer are proposed and compared in the term of damping capacity.

  16. Analytical Solution and Physics of a Propellant Damping Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; Peugeot, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA design teams have been investigating options for "detuning" Ares I to prevent oscillations originating in the vehicle solid-rocket main stage from synching up with the natural resonance of the rest of the vehicle. An experimental work started at NASA MSFC center in 2008 using a damping device showed great promise in damping the vibration level of an 8 resonant tank. However, the mechanisms of the vibration damping were not well understood and there were many unknowns such as the physics, scalability, technology readiness level (TRL), and applicability for the Ares I vehicle. The objectives of this study are to understand the physics of intriguing slosh damping observed in the experiments, to further validate a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software in propellant sloshing against experiments with water, and to study the applicability and efficiency of the slosh damper to a full scale propellant tank and to cryogenic fluids. First a 2D fluid-structure interaction model is built to model the system resonance of liquid sloshing and structure vibration. A damper is then added into the above model to simulate experimentally observed system damping phenomena. Qualitative agreement is found. An analytical solution is then derived from the Newtonian dynamics for the thrust oscillation damper frequency, and a slave mass concept is introduced in deriving the damper and tank interaction dynamics. The paper will elucidate the fundamental physics behind the LOX damper success from the derivation of the above analytical equation of the lumped Newtonian dynamics. Discussion of simulation results using high fidelity multi-phase, multi-physics, fully coupled CFD structure interaction model will show why the LOX damper is unique and superior compared to other proposed mitigation techniques.

  17. Modeling and measurement of geometrically nonlinear damping in a microcantilever-nanotube system.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bongwon; Cho, Hanna; Yu, Min-Feng; Vakakis, Alexander F; McFarland, Donald Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A

    2013-10-22

    Nonlinear mechanical systems promise broadband resonance and instantaneous hysteretic switching that can be used for high sensitivity sensing. However, to introduce nonlinear resonances in widely used microcantilever systems, such as AFM probes, requires driving the cantilever to an amplitude that is too large for any practical applications. We introduce a novel design for a microcantilever with a strong nonlinearity at small cantilever oscillation amplitude arising from the geometrical integration of a single BN nanotube. The dynamics of the system was modeled theoretically and confirmed experimentally. The system, besides providing a practical design of a nonlinear microcantilever-based probe, demonstrates also an effective method of studying the nonlinear damping properties of the attached nanotube. Beyond the typical linear mechanical damping, the nonlinear damping contribution from the attached nanotube was found to be essential for understanding the dynamical behavior of the designed system. Experimental results obtained through laser microvibrometry validated the developed model incorporating the nonlinear damping contribution.

  18. Landau damping in a turbulent setting

    SciTech Connect

    Plunk, G. G.

    2013-03-15

    To address the problem of Landau damping in kinetic turbulence, we consider the forcing of the linearized Vlasov equation by a stationary random source. It is found that the time-asymptotic density response is dominated by resonant particle interactions that are synchronized with the source. The energy consumption of this response is calculated, implying an effective damping rate, which is the main result of this paper. Evaluating several cases, it is found that the effective damping rate can differ from the Landau damping rate in magnitude and also, remarkably, in sign. A limit is demonstrated in which the density and current become phase-locked, which causes the effective damping to be negligible; this result offers a fresh perspective from which to reconsider recent observations of kinetic turbulence satisfying critical balance.

  19. Damping characteristics of damaged fiber composite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, K.

    1986-01-01

    Defects in fiber composite components produce changes with respect to the vibrational characteristics of the material. These changes can be recognized in the form of a frequency shift or an alteration of the damping process. The present investigation is concerned with questions regarding the possibility of a utilization of the changes in suitable defect-detecting inspection procedures. A description is given of a method for measuring the damping characteristics of a specimen. This method provides a spectrum of the damping coefficients of the sample as a basis for a comprehensive evaluation of the damping behavior. The correlation between defects and change in the damping characteristics is demonstrated with the aid of results obtained in measurements involving specimens of carbon-fiber composites and a component consisting of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics.

  20. Magnetic damping of rotation. [in satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opik, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Based on Wilson's (1977) article on the magnetic effects on space vehicles and other celestial bodies, the magnetic damping of rotation is considered. The inadequacy of the interstellar magnetic field in overcoming solar wind shielding and thus influencing the rotation of bodies is described. The ionospheric shielding of the interstellar field is discussed along with the permeability and magnetic damping by the solar or stellar wind. Star formation and angular momentum is discussed and attention is given to the magnetic damping of unshielded small bodies. Calculations of the rate for damping through random particle impact are made. Theories concerning the rotation of asteroids and the origin of meteorites are reviewed. The shielding process of ionospheric plasmas is outlined and the damping effect of the geomagnetic field on the rotation of artificial satellites is evaluated.

  1. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  2. Large space structure damping design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Several FORTRAN subroutines and programs were developed which compute complex eigenvalues of a damped system using different approaches, and which rescale mode shapes to unit generalized mass and make rigid bodies orthogonal to each other. An analytical proof of a Minimum Constrained Frequency Criterion (MCFC) for a single damper is presented. A method to minimize the effect of control spill-over for large space structures is proposed. The characteristic equation of an undamped system with a generalized control law is derived using reanalysis theory. This equation can be implemented in computer programs for efficient eigenvalue analysis or control quasi synthesis. Methods to control vibrations in large space structure are reviewed and analyzed. The resulting prototype, using electromagnetic actuator, is described.

  3. Effect of surfaces on thermoelastic damping of nano-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, S.; Inamdar, M. M.; Pawaskar, D. N.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the role of surfaces on thermoelastic damping of flexural vibrations in nanobeams. In the past, the role of surfaces on thermoelastic damping of a vibrating nanobeam has been discussed by considering only mechanical interaction between surfaces and the rest of bulk without accounting for thermal interaction between them. In this paper we account for heat flow due to conduction between the surface and bulk and a coupled thermo-mechanical heat equation for a thermoelastic surface has been derived. Quality factor of vibrating rectangular nanobeam has been computed using modified thermal boundary conditions for the bulk under adiabatic surface conditions. An expression for surface heat capacity used in modified boundary conditions has been derived using the modified Debye model. A simplified expression for quality factor of thin rectangular nanobeam has been obtained. We note that the quality factor and the frequency at which the maximum dissipation occurs is a function of both mechanical and thermal properties of surface. It has also been noticed that the relative change in thermoelastic dissipation due to surface effect is a function of operating frequency. The present analysis shows that effect of surfaces on quality factor and peak damping frequency increases with decrease in beam thickness. Coupled heat equation for a surface derived in the present work can be used for any general thermoelastic surface.

  4. Analysis and optimal design of thick composite structures with passive damping considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A design methodology to tailor thick composite plates for optimal static and damping performance is presented. The method is based on discrete layer composite mechanics, hence, is suitable for thick composite laminates. The design criteria include static deflections, frequency and damping constraints. Evaluations on cross-ply simply-supported plates illustrate the advantages of the methodology. Comparisons with design methods based on the classical laminate theory show significant deviations in the resultant optimal designs at higher thicknesses.

  5. Development of Semi-Empirical Damping Equation for Baffled Tank with Oblate Spheroidal Dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff; Brodnick, Jacob; Eberhart, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Propellant slosh is a potential source of disturbance that can significantly impact the stability of space vehicles. The slosh dynamics are typically represented by a mechanical model of a spring-mass-damper. This mechanical model is then included in the equation of motion of the entire vehicle for Guidance, Navigation and Control analysis. The typical parameters required by the mechanical model include natural frequency of the slosh, slosh mass, slosh mass center location, and the critical damping ratio. A fundamental study has been undertaken at NASA MSFC to understand the fluid damping physics from a ring baffle in the barrel section of a propellant tank. An asymptotic damping equation and CFD blended equation have been derived by NASA MSFC team to complement the popularly used Miles equation at different flow regimes. The new development has found success in providing a nonlinear damping model for the Space Launch System. The purpose of this study is to further extend the semi-empirical damping equations into the oblate spheroidal dome section of the propellant tanks. First, previous experimental data from the spherical baffled tank are collected and analyzed. Several methods of taking the dome curvature effect, including a generalized Miles equation, area projection method, and equalized fill height method, are assessed. CFD simulation is used to shed light on the interaction of vorticity around the baffle with the locally curved wall and liquid-gas interface. The final damping equation will be validated by a recent subscale test with an oblate spheroidal dome conducted at NASA MSFC.

  6. Validation Of Equivalent Viscous Damping Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquer Araujo, Xavier; Fransen, S. H. J. A.; Germes, S.; Thiry, N.

    2012-07-01

    An important step in the design and verification process of spacecraft structures is the coupled dynamic analysis with the launch vehicle in the low-frequency domain. To obtain accurate predictions of the satellite’s dynamic environment it is essential that the damping of the system is correctly defined and taken into account within the resolution methodologies for the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). When working with finite element models, the materials’ damping is characterized by structural damping ratios. In addition, most of the load cases present in the CLA are transient excitations so the resolution of the equations of motion must be done in the time domain. Unfortunately, transient analyses cannot be carried out using structural damping models. Thus, a transformation from a structural to a viscous damping characterization is necessary. Nevertheless, this transformation is not trivial. There exist many methodologies aiming at computing an equivalent viscous damping matrix of the system so it can be used in transient analyses. This paper describes the results obtained in the validation of equivalent viscous damping methodologies used in the European Space Agency. This work permitted to identify the limitations of these methodologies and to come up with an enhanced methodology that predicts more reliable results.

  7. SLC positron damping ring optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, J.P.; Rivkin, L.

    1984-12-01

    The basic SLAC Linear Collider operation scheme assumes the use of two damping rings, one for the e/sup -/, one for the e/sup +/, in order to reduce the colliding beam normalized emittances to 30..pi.. ..mu..radm hence raising the corresponding luminosity by a factor 170. The e/sup -/ damping ring which optics was designed by H. Wiedemann, has been extensively studied and modelled since it's completion at the end of 1982. The e/sup +/ damping ring to be built soon will be based on the same design except for some modifications resulting from the studies on the e/sup -/ damping ring which clearly pointed out two major optics weak points: the extracted normalized emittances are 30 to 60% bigger than the design values, which already left no margin for unavoidable blow-up between the damping rings and the SLC interaction point, and the chromaticity correction based on distributed sextupole components provided by shaping the ends of the bending magnet poles was insufficient. Moreover the QDI quadrupoles introduce a strong coupling between transverse planes due to an undesirable skew component. The present note describes the basic modifications of the ring lattice and main equipment positions in order to improve the first two points in the Positron Damping Ring. The QDI quadrupole design has already been modified and magnets of a new type will be implemented in both damping rings.

  8. Material damping experiments at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Marie B.; White, Christopher

    2003-12-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be operating at temperatures below 40K to image in the infrared. The 7-m class telescope will require nanometric jitter stability of the optical elements such as the primary and secondary mirrors. Of particular concern is the vibration response of these cryogenic systems when subjected to on-board disturbance sources such as the reaction wheels, the amplitude of which is governed by damping. Unfortunately there is relatively little data available for flight grade materials at these temperatures and within the frequency bands of interest. The paper will describe the experimental setup designed to measure viscous damping to values as low 10^-4%. The tests measure damping from room temperature all the way down to 20K in a controlled thermal and disturbance free environment. Data is obtained for strain levels of about 0.1 micro-strain down to nano-strains to verify vibration level effects on material damping. Damping is also measured for several frequencies in the range of 20Hz to 300Hz to assess the trend of damping as a function of vibrational frequency. Data for several materials, such as Aluminum, Beryllium, Quartz, and various composites are presented. The data is compared to analytical predictions using the Zener damping theory and is shown to match well at room temperature but to disagree at colder temperatures.

  9. Dynamic stiffness and damping of porcine muscle specimens.

    PubMed

    Aimedieu, P; Mitton, D; Faure, J P; Denninger, L; Lavaste, F

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the mechanical properties of the muscles of the buttock, using dynamic compression (5-->30 Hz). Tests were conducted in vitro on porcine muscles, using a lever arm device, which applied a dynamic load onto cylindrical samples. A two-parameter viscoelastic model allowed the calculation of stiffness and damping of the samples with respect to frequency. The average stiffness curve showed a monotonous increase (5 Hz: 8.5 kN/m-->30 Hz: 347 kN/m). Concerning damping, between 5 and 20 Hz, values were typically inferior to 300 Ns/m, which then increased till 30 Hz (556 Ns/m). The lever arm device may be used to evaluate dynamic properties of other biological tissues also.

  10. On damping in the vicinity of critical points.

    PubMed

    Virgin, L N; Wiebe, R

    2013-06-28

    The effect of damping on the behaviour of oscillations in the vicinity of bifurcations of nonlinear dynamical systems is investigated. Here, our primary focus is single degree-of-freedom conservative systems to which a small linear viscous energy dissipation has been added. Oscillators with saddle-node, pitchfork and transcritical bifurcations are shown analytically to exhibit several interesting characteristics in the free decay response near a bifurcation. A simple mechanical oscillator with a transcritical bifurcation is used to experimentally verify the analytical results. A transcritical bifurcation was selected because it may be used to represent generic bifurcation behaviour. It is shown that the damping ratio can be used to predict a change in the stability with respect to changing system parameters.

  11. Secondary metabolites from Penicillium corylophilum isolated from damp buildings.

    PubMed

    McMullin, David R; Nsiama, Tienabe K; Miller, J David

    2014-01-01

    Indoor exposure to the spores and mycelial fragments of fungi that grow on damp building materials can result in increased non-atopic asthma and upper respiratory disease. The mechanism appears to involve exposure to low doses of fungal metabolites. Penicillium corylophilum is surprisingly common in damp buildings in USA, Canada and western Europe. We examined isolates of P. corylophilum geographically distributed across Canada in the first comprehensive study of secondary metabolites of this fungus. The sesquiterpene phomenone, the meroterpenoids citreohybridonol and andrastin A, koninginin A, E and G, three new alpha pyrones and four new isochromans were identified from extracts of culture filtrates. This is the first report of koninginins, meroterpenoids and alpha pyrones from P. corylophilum. These secondary metabolite data support the removal of P. corylophilum from Penicillium section Citrina and suggest that further taxonomic studies are required on this species.

  12. A Resonant Damping Study Using Piezoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Duffy, K. P.; Choi, B. B.; Morrison, C. R.; Jansen, R. H.; Provenza, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue (HCF) problems requiring damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery blade research, a feasibility study of resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches with passive and active control techniques has been conducted on cantilever beam specimens. Test results for the passive damping circuit show that the optimum resistive shunt circuit reduces the third bending resonant vibration by almost 50%, and the optimum inductive circuit reduces the vibration by 90%. In a separate test, active control reduced vibration by approximately 98%.

  13. Oscillation damped movement of suspended objects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Transportation of objects using overhead cranes or manipulators can induce pendulum motion of the object. Residual oscillation from transportation typically must be damped or allowed to decay before the next process can take place. By properly programming the acceleration of the transporting device (e.g., crane) an oscillation damped transport and swing free stop is obtainable. This paper reviews the theory associated with oscillation damped trajectories for simply suspended objects and describes a particular implementation using a CIMCORP XR 6100 gantry robot. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Investigation of Damping Physics and CFD Tool Validation for Simulation of Baffled Tanks at Variable Slosh Amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Determination of slosh damping is a very challenging task as there is no analytical solution. The damping physics involves the vorticity dissipation which requires the full solution of the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations. As a result, previous investigations were mainly carried out by extensive experiments. A systematical study is needed to understand the damping physics of baffled tanks, to identify the difference between the empirical Miles equation and experimental measurements, and to develop new semi-empirical relations to better represent the real damping physics. The approach of this study is to use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology to shed light on the damping mechanisms of a baffled tank. First, a 1-D Navier-Stokes equation representing different length scales and time scales in the baffle damping physics is developed and analyzed. Loci-STREAM-VOF, a well validated CFD solver developed at NASA MSFC, is applied to study the vorticity field around a baffle and around the fluid-gas interface to highlight the dissipation mechanisms at different slosh amplitudes. Previous measurement data is then used to validate the CFD damping results. The study found several critical parameters controlling fluid damping from a baffle: local slosh amplitude to baffle thickness (A/t), surface liquid depth to tank radius (d/R), local slosh amplitude to baffle width (A/W); and non-dimensional slosh frequency. The simulation highlights three significant damping regimes where different mechanisms dominate. The study proves that the previously found discrepancies between Miles equation and experimental measurement are not due to the measurement scatter, but rather due to different damping mechanisms at various slosh amplitudes. The limitations on the use of Miles equation are discussed based on the flow regime.

  15. Turbine blade friction damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A lumped parameter method, implemented on a VAX 11/780 computer shows that the primary parameters affecting the performance of the friction damper of the first stage turbine of the SSME high pressure fuel pump are: the damper-blade coefficient of friction; the normal force applied to the friction interface; the amplitude of the periodic forcing function; the relative phase angle of the forcing functions for adjacent blades bridged by a damper (effectively, the engine order of the forcing function); and the amount of hysteretic damping that acts to limit the vibration amplitude of the blade in its resonance modes. The low order flexural resonance vibration modes of HPFTP blades without dampers, with production dampers, and with two types of lightweight experimental dampers were evaluated in high speed spin pit tests. Results agree with those of the analytical study in that blades fitted with production friction dampers experienced the airfoil-alone flexural resonance mode, while those without dampers or with lighter weight dampers did not. No blades fitted with dampers experienced the whole blade flexural resonance mode during high speed tests, while those without dampers did.

  16. High Temperature Damping Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    A high temperature damping test apparatus has been developed using a high heat flux CO 2 laser rig in conjunction with a TIRA S540 25 kHz Shaker and Polytec OFV 5000 Vibrometer system. The test rig has been successfully used to determine the damping performance of metallic and ceramic protective coating systems at high temperature for turbine engine applications. The initial work has been primarily focused on the microstructure and processing effects on the coating temperature-dependence damping behavior. Advanced ceramic coatings, including multicomponent tetragonal and cubic phase thermal barrier coatings, along with composite bond coats, have also been investigated. The coating high temperature damping mechanisms will also be discussed.

  17. Tracing Plant Defense Responses in Roots upon MAMP/DAMP Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Kei; Saijo, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes how to apply microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) or damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) solutions to Arabidopsis roots to trace defense responses in the root. Plants sense the presence of microbes via the perception of MAMPs or DAMPs by surface-localized pattern recognition receptors. The mechanisms governing plant root immunity are poorly characterized compared with those underlying plant immunity in the leaf, despite the fact that plant roots constantly interact with countless microbes living in soils that carry potential MAMPs and could stimulate the production of plant-derived DAMPs during colonization. To understand how a plant root immune system detects and reacts to the potential sources of a stimulus, we describe a simple method to monitor activation of root immunity upon MAMP/DAMP treatment by measuring relative expression of defense-related genes by RT-qPCR.

  18. Damping and local control of mirror suspensions for laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, K. A.; Shapiro, B. N.

    2012-04-01

    The mirrors of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors hang from multi-stage suspensions. These support the optics against gravity while isolating them from external vibration. Thermal noise must be kept small so mechanical loss must be minimized and the resulting structure has high-Q resonances rigid-body modes, typically in the frequency range between about 0.3 Hz and 20 Hz. Operation of the interferometer requires these resonances to be damped. Active damping provides the design flexibility required to achieve rapid settling with low noise. In practice there is a compromise between sensor performance, and hence cost and complexity, and sophistication of the control algorithm. We introduce a novel approach which combines the new technique of modal damping with methods developed from those applied in GEO 600. This approach is predicted to meet the goals for damping and for noise performance set by the Advanced LIGO project.

  19. Numerical design and test on an assembled structure of a bolted joint with viscoelastic damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, Chaima; Balmes, Etienne; Guskov, Mikhail

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical assemblies are subjected to many dynamic loads and modifications are often needed to achieve acceptable vibration levels. While modifications on mass and stiffness are well mastered, damping modifications are still considered difficult to design. The paper presents a case study on the design of a bolted connection containing a viscoelastic damping layer. The notion of junction coupling level is introduced to ensure that sufficient energy is present in the joints to allow damping. Static performance is then addressed and it is shown that localization of metallic contact can be used to meet objectives, while allowing the presence of viscoelastic materials. Numerical prediction of damping then illustrates difficulties in optimizing for robustness. Modal test results of three configurations of an assembled structure, inspired by aeronautic fuselages, are then compared to analyze the performance of the design. While validity of the approach is confirmed, the effect of geometric imperfections is shown and stresses the need for robust design.

  20. Random vibrations of quadratic damping systems. [optimum damping analysis for automobile suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireteanu, T.

    1974-01-01

    An oscillating system with quadratic damping subjected to white noise excitation is replaced by a nonlinear, statistically equivalent system for which the associated Fokker-Planck equation can be exactly solved. The mean square responses are calculated and the optimum damping coefficient is determined with respect to the minimum mean square acceleration criteria. An application of these results to the optimization of automobile suspension damping is given.

  1. Simplified Model of Nonlinear Landau Damping

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Yampolsky and N. J. Fisch

    2009-07-16

    The nonlinear interaction of a plasma wave with resonant electrons results in a plateau in the electron distribution function close to the phase velocity of the plasma wave. As a result, Landau damping of the plasma wave vanishes and the resonant frequency of the plasma wave downshifts. However, this simple picture is invalid when the external driving force changes the plasma wave fast enough so that the plateau cannot be fully developed. A new model to describe amplification of the plasma wave including the saturation of Landau damping and the nonlinear frequency shift is proposed. The proposed model takes into account the change of the plasma wave amplitude and describes saturation of the Landau damping rate in terms of a single fluid equation, which simplifies the description of the inherently kinetic nature of Landau damping. A proposed fluid model, incorporating these simplifications, is verified numerically using a kinetic Vlasov code.

  2. Roll Damping Characterisation Program: User Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    sallying test. The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) have developed a software-based tool called the Roll Damping Characterisation...Murray Riding Maritime Division Murray obtained a Bachelor of Science (Honours) Degree from the

  3. Electron beam depolarization in a damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    1993-04-01

    Depolarization of a polarized electron beam injected into a damping ring is analyzed by extending calculations conventionally applied to proton synchrotrons. Synchrotron radiation in an electron ring gives rise to both polarizing and depolarizing effects. In a damping ring, the beam is stored for a time much less than the time for self polarization. Spin flip radiation may therefore be neglected. Synchrotron radiation without spin flips, however, must be considered as the resonance strength depends on the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude which changes as the electron beam is radiation damped. An expression for the beam polarization at extraction is derived which takes into account radiation damping. The results are applied to the electron ring at the Stanford Linear Collider and are compared with numerical matrix formalisms.

  4. Oscillation damping means for magnetically levitated systems

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2009-01-20

    The present invention presents a novel system and method of damping rolling, pitching, or yawing motions, or longitudinal oscillations superposed on their normal forward or backward velocity of a moving levitated system.

  5. Collisional damping of the geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhe

    2013-03-15

    The frequency and damping rate of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is revisited by using a gyrokinetic model with a number-conserving Krook collision operator. It is found that the damping rate of the GAM is non-monotonic as the collision rate increases. At low ion collision rate, the damping rate increases linearly with the collision rate; while as the ion collision rate is higher than v{sub ti}/R, where v{sub ti} and R are the ion thermal velocity and major radius, the damping rate decays with an increasing collision rate. At the same time, as the collision rate increases, the GAM frequency decreases from the (7/4+{tau})v{sub ti}/R to (1+{tau})v{sub ti}/R, where {tau} is the ratio of electron temperature to ion temperature.

  6. Turbine blade with tuned damping structure

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X.; Messmann, Stephen J.

    2015-09-01

    A turbine blade is provided comprising: a root; an airfoil comprising an external wall extending radially from the root and having a radially outermost portion; and a damping structure. The external wall may comprise first and second side walls joined together to define an inner cavity of the airfoil. The damping structure may be positioned within the airfoil inner cavity and coupled to the airfoil so as to define a tuned mass damper.

  7. Analysis of nonlinear damping properties of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakova, Olga I.; Smolin, Igor Yu.; Bezmozgiy, Iosif M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes research results of nonlinear damping properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics. The experimental and computational research is performed on flat composite specimens with the gradual structure complication (from 1 to 12 layers). Specimens are subjected to three types of testing which are modal, harmonic and transient analyses. Relationships between the amplitude response and damping ratio are obtained by means of the analysis of variance as the result of this research.

  8. Quantum damped oscillator I: Dissipation and resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz

    2006-04-15

    Quantization of a damped harmonic oscillator leads to so called Bateman's dual system. The corresponding Bateman's Hamiltonian, being a self-adjoint operator, displays the discrete family of complex eigenvalues. We show that they correspond to the poles of energy eigenvectors and the corresponding resolvent operator when continued to the complex energy plane. Therefore, the corresponding generalized eigenvectors may be interpreted as resonant states which are responsible for the irreversible quantum dynamics of a damped harmonic oscillator.

  9. Aerospace Structures Technology Damping Design Guide. Volume 3. Damping Material Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    1.1 DAMPING MATERIAL PROPERTIES 1 3 1.2 THE STANDARIZED MATERIAL DATA I 1.2.1 Nomogram Cover Sheet 3 ’ 1.2.2 The Reduced Nomogram 4 1.2.3 Reading...MATERIALS 6 2 DAMPING MATERIAL PROPERTY DATA 14 3 STRUCTURAL EPOXIES AND OTHER MATERIALS 469 3.1 STRUCTURAL EPOXIES 469 3.2 STRUCTURAL PLASTICS 477 3.3...Data Listing II 6 Temperature Shift Function and Its Properties 12 7 Typical TCA Plot 13 8 Quick Reference Chart for Damping Materials 15 9 Damping vs

  10. Transient analysis for damping identification in rotating composite beams with integral damping layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clifford B.; Wereley, Norman M.

    1996-10-01

    The first objective of this paper is to evaluate the performance of damping identification algorithms. The second objective is to determine the feasibility of damping augmentation in rotating composite beams via passive constrained layer damping (PCLD). Damping identification schemes were applied to four rectangular cross-section laminated composite beams with cocured integral damping layers over the span of the beam. The cocured beam consisted of a twenty-ply balanced and symmetric cross-ply Gr/Ep composite host structure, a top and bottom damping layer of viscoelastic material (VEM), and a 2-ply Gr/Ep constraining layer sandwiching the viscoelastic material to the host structure. Four VEM thicknesses were considered: 0, 5, 10, and 15 mils. The cantilevered beams were tested at rotational speeds ranging from 0 to 900 RPM in a vacuum chamber. Excitation in bending was provided using piezo actuators, and the bending response was measured using full strain gauge bridges. Transient data were analysed using logarithmic decrement, a Hilbert transform technique, and an FFT- based moving block analysis. When compared to the beam with no VEM, a 19.2% volume fraction (15 mil layer) of viscoelastic in the beam produced a 400% increase in damping ratio in the non-rotating case, while at 900 RPM, the damping ratio increased only 360%. Overall structural damping was reduced as a function of RPM, due to centrifugal stiffening.

  11. Validation of equivalent viscous damping methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquer Araujo, Xavier; Fransen, Sebastiaan H. J. A.; Germès, Sylvain; Thiry, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    An important step in the design and verification process of spacecraft structures is the coupled dynamic analysis with the launch vehicle in the low-frequency domain. To obtain accurate predictions of the satellite's dynamic environment, it is essential that the damping of the system is correctly defined and taken into account within the resolution methodologies for the coupled loads analysis (CLA). When working with finite element models, the materials' damping is characterized by structural damping ratios. In addition, most of the load cases present in the CLA are transient excitations, and so the resolution of the equations of motion must be done in the time domain. Unfortunately, in the CLA, transient analyses cannot be carried out using structural damping models. Thus, a transformation from a structural to a viscous damping characterization is necessary in this case. Nevertheless, this transformation is not trivial. There exist many methodologies for computing an equivalent viscous damping (EqVD) matrix of the system which can be used in transient analyses. This paper describes the results obtained from the validation of EqVD methodologies used in the European Space Agency. This work identifies the limitations of these methodologies and comes up with an enhanced methodology that predicts more reliable results.

  12. Hybrid Damping System for an Electronic Equipment Mounting Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David; Kolkailah, Faysal A.; Cavalli, J. R.; Elghandour, Eltahry

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and construct a vibration control system for an electronic equipment shelf to be evaluated in the NASA Dryden FTF-11. The vibration control system was a hybrid system which included passive and active damping techniques. Passive damping was fabricated into the equipment shelf using ScothDamp(trademark) damping film and aluminum constraining layers. Active damping was achieved using a two channel active control circuit employing QuickPack(trademark) sensors and actuators. Preliminary Chirp test results indicated passive damping smoothed the frequency response while active damping reduced amplitudes of the frequency response for most frequencies below 500Hz.

  13. Hybrid Damping System for an Electronic Equipment Mounting Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David; Kolkailah, Faysal A.; Cavalli, J. R.; Elghandour, Eltahry

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and construct a vibration control system for an electronic equipment shelf to be evaluated in the NASA Dryden FTF-II. The vibration control system was a hybrid system which included passive and active damping techniques. Passive damping was fabricated into the equipment shelf using ScothDamp(trademark) damping film and aluminum constraining layers. Active damping was achieved using a two channel active control circuit employing QuickPack(trademark) sensors and actuators. Preliminary Chirp test results indicated passive damping smoothed the frequency response while active damping reduced amplitudes of the frequency response for most frequencies below 500Hz.

  14. Damping of Quasi-stationary Waves Between Two Miscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    2002-01-01

    Two viscous miscible liquids with an initially sharp interface oriented vertically inside a cavity become unstable against oscillatory external forcing due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The instability causes growth of quasi-stationary (q-s) waves at the interface between the two liquids. We examine computationally the dynamics of a four-mode q-s wave, for a fixed energy input, when one of the components of the external forcing is suddenly ceased. The external forcing consists of a steady and oscillatory component as realizable in a microgravity environment. Results show that when there is a jump discontinuity in the oscillatory excitation that produced the four-mode q-s wave, the interface does not return to its equilibrium position, the structure of the q-s wave remains imbedded between the two fluids over a long time scale. The damping characteristics of the q-s wave from the time history of the velocity field show overdamped and critically damped response; there is no underdamped oscillation as the flow field approaches steady state. Viscous effects serve as a dissipative mechanism to effectively damp the system. The stability of the four-mode q-s wave is dependent on both a geometric length scale as well as the level of background steady acceleration.

  15. Backscattering and Nonparaxiality Arrest Collapse of Damped Nonlinear Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fibich, G.; Ilan, B.; Tsynkov, S.

    2002-01-01

    The critical nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) models the propagation of intense laser light in Kerr media. This equation is derived from the more comprehensive nonlinear Helmholtz equation (NLH) by employing the paraxial approximation and neglecting the backscattered waves. It is known that if the input power of the laser beam (i.e., L(sub 2) norm of the initial solution) is sufficiently high, then the NLS model predicts that the beam will self-focus to a point (i.e.. collapse) at a finite propagation distance. Mathematically, this behavior corresponds to the formation of a singularity in the solution of the NLS. A key question which has been open for many years is whether the solution to the NLH, i.e., the 'parent' equation, may nonetheless exist and remain regular everywhere, in particular for those initial conditions (input powers) that lead to blowup in the NLS. In the current study, we address this question by introducing linear damping into both models and subsequently comparing the numerical solutions of the damped NLH (boundary-value problem) with the corresponding solutions of the damped NLS (initial-value problem). Linear damping is introduced in much the same way as done when analyzing the classical constant-coefficient Helmholtz equation using the limiting absorption principle. Numerically, we have found that it provides a very efficient tool for controlling the solutions of both the NLH and NHS. In particular, we have been able to identify initial conditions for which the NLS solution does become singular. whereas the NLH solution still remains regular everywhere. We believe that our finding of a larger domain of existence for the NLH than that for the NLS is accounted for by precisely those mechanisms, that have been neglected when deriving the NLS from the NLH, i.e., nonparaxiality and backscattering.

  16. Intrinsic Damping of Collective Spin Modes in a Two-Dimensional Fermi Liquid with Spin-Orbit Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, Dmitrii; Maiti, Saurabh

    2015-03-01

    We address the issue damping of spin collective modes in systems with spin orbit coupling in 2D. We show that these modes exist for arbitrary nature of spin-orbit coupling and are intrinsically damped even in the long wavelength limit. This damping is driven by electron-electron interactions and is unique to spin orbit coupled systems. Its origin is linked to an imperfect cancellation of the self energy and vertex contributions of the interaction. In the Fermi-liquid language, this is an effect arising from residual interaction between quasiparticles. This damping mechanism exists already at T=0 and without impurities and/or phonons. We also discuss the consequences of this damping for the experiment. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation via Grant NSF DMR-1308972.

  17. Experimental analysis of viscous and material damping in microstructures through the interferometric microscopy technique with climatic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pasquale, Giorgio

    2013-09-01

    This study describes an experimental analysis of energy dissipation due to damping sources in microstructures and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) components using interferometric microscopy techniques. Viscous damping caused by the surrounding air (squeeze film damping) and material damping are measured using variable geometrical parameters of samples and under different environmental conditions. The equipment included a self-made climatic chamber which was used to modify the surrounding air pressure. Results show the relationship between damping coefficients and sample geometry caused by variation in airflow resistance and the relationship between quality factor and air pressure. The experimental results will provide a useful data source for validating analytic models and calibrating simulations. A thorough discussion about interferometry applied to experimental mechanics of MEMS will also contribute to the reduction of the knowledge gap between specialists in optical methods and microsystem designers.

  18. Human-in-the-loop evaluation of RMS Active Damping Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Active Damping Augmentation is the insertion of Controls-Structures Integration Technology to benefit the on-orbit performance of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. The goal is to reduce the vibration decay time of the Remote Manipulator System following normal payload maneuvers and operations. Simulation of Active Damping Augmentation was conducted in the realtime human-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The objective of this study was to obtain a qualitative measure of operational performance improvement from astronaut operators and to obtain supporting quantitative performance data. Sensing of vibratory motions was simulated using a three-axis accelerometer mounted at the end of the lower boom of the Remote Manipulator System. The sensed motions were used in a feedback control law to generate commands to the joint servo mechanisms which reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the Remote Manipulator System with an attached 3990 lb. payload was successfully demonstrated. Six astronaut operators examined the performance of an Active Damping Augmentation control law following single-joint and coordinated six-joint translational and rotational maneuvers. Active Damping Augmentation disturbance rejection of Orbiter thruster firings was also evaluated. Significant reductions in the dynamic response of the 3990 lb. payload were observed. Astronaut operators recommended investigation of Active Damping Augmentation benefits to heavier payloads where oscillations are a bigger problem (e.g. Space Station Freedom assembly operators).

  19. Viscous damping and spring force calculation of regularly perforated MEMS microstructures in the Stokes' approximation

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, Dorel; Murray, Bruce T.; Miles, Ronald N.

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of applications for microstructure devices consisting of a regular pattern of perforations, and many of these utilize fluid damping. For the analysis of viscous damping and for calculating the spring force in some cases, it is possible to take advantage of the regular hole pattern by assuming periodicity. Here a model is developed to determine these quantities based on the solution of the Stokes' equations for the air flow. Viscous damping is directly related to thermal-mechanical noise. As a result, the design of perforated microstructures with minimal viscous damping is of real practical importance. A method is developed to calculate the damping coefficient in microstructures with periodic perforations. The result can be used to minimize squeeze film damping. Since micromachined devices have finite dimensions, the periodic model for the perforated microstructure has to be associated with the calculation of some frame (edge) corrections. Analysis of the edge corrections has also been performed. Results from analytical formulas and numerical simulations match very well with published measured data. PMID:24058267

  20. RESONANTLY DAMPED KINK MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED FILAMENT THREAD

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L. E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.e

    2009-12-10

    Transverse oscillations of solar filament and prominence threads have been frequently reported. These oscillations have the common features of being of short period (2-10 minutes) and being damped after a few periods. The observations are interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes, whereas resonant absorption in the Alfven continuum and ion-neutral collisions are candidates to be the damping mechanisms. Here, we study both analytically and numerically the time damping of kink MHD waves in a cylindrical, partially ionized filament thread embedded in a coronal environment. The thread model is composed of a straight and thin, homogeneous filament plasma, with a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer where the plasma physical properties vary continuously from filament to coronal conditions. The magnetic field is homogeneous and parallel to the thread axis. We find that the kink mode is efficiently damped by resonant absorption for typical wavelengths of filament oscillations, the damping times being compatible with the observations. Partial ionization does not affect the process of resonant absorption, and the filament plasma ionization degree is only important for the damping for wavelengths much shorter than those observed. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the phenomenon of resonant absorption is studied in a partially ionized plasma.

  1. FORWARD MODELING OF PROPAGATING SLOW WAVES IN CORONAL LOOPS AND THEIR FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DAMPING

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Sudip; Banerjee, Dipankar; Magyar, Norbert; Yuan, Ding; Doorsselaere, Tom Van

    2016-03-20

    Propagating slow waves in coronal loops exhibit a damping that depends upon the frequency of the waves. In this study we aim to investigate the relationship of the damping length (L{sub d}) with the frequency of the propagating wave. We present a 3D coronal loop model with uniform density and temperature and investigate the frequency-dependent damping mechanism for the four chosen wave periods. We include the thermal conduction to damp the waves as they propagate through the loop. The numerical model output has been forward modeled to generate synthetic images of SDO/AIA 171 and 193 Å channels. The use of forward modeling, which incorporates the atomic emission properties into the intensity images, allows us to directly compare our results with the real observations. The results show that the damping lengths vary linearly with the periods. We also measure the contributions of the emission properties on the damping lengths by using density values from the simulation. In addition to that we have also calculated the theoretical dependence of L{sub d} with wave periods and showed that it is consistent with the results we obtained from the numerical modeling and earlier observations.

  2. Investigation of Damping Physics and CFD Tool Validation for Simulation of Baffled Tanks at Variable Slosh Amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    To meet the flight control damping requirement, baffles of various configurations have been devised to increase the natural viscous damping and decrease the magnitude of the slosh forces and torques. In the design of slosh baffles, the most widely used damping equation is the one derived by Miles, which is based on the experiments of Keulegan and Carpenter. This equation has been used in predicting damping of the baffled tanks in different diameters ranging from 12 to 112 inches. The analytical expression of Miles equation is easy to use, especially in the design of complex baffle system. Previous investigations revealed that some experiments had shown good agreements with the prediction method of Miles, whereas other experiments have shown significant deviations. For example, damping from Miles equation differs from experimental measurements by as much as 100 percent over a range of tank diameters from 12 to 112 inches, oscillation amplitudes from 0.1 to 1.5 baffle widths, and baffle depths of 0.3 to 0.5 tank radius. Previously, much of this difference has been attributed to experimental scatter. A systematical study is needed to understand the damping physics of baffled tanks, to identify the difference between Miles equation and experimental measurement, and to develop new semi-empirical relations to better represent the real damping physics. The approach of this study is to use CFD technology to shed light on the damping mechanisms of a baffled tank. First, a 1-D Navier-Stokes equation representing different length scales and time scales in the baffle damping physics is developed and analyzed. A well validated CFD solver, developed at NASA MSFC, Loci-STREAM-VOF, is applied to study vorticity field around the baffle and around the fluid interface to highlight the dissipation mechanisms at different slosh amplitudes. Previous measurement data are then used to validate the CFD damping results. The study found several critical parameters controlling fluid damping

  3. Introduction to the scientific application system of DAMPE (On behalf of DAMPE collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high energy particle physics experiment satellite, launched on 17 Dec 2015. The science data processing and payload operation maintenance for DAMPE will be provided by the DAMPE Scientific Application System (SAS) at the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) of Chinese Academy of Sciences. SAS is consisted of three subsystems - scientific operation subsystem, science data and user management subsystem and science data processing subsystem. In cooperation with the Ground Support System (Beijing), the scientific operation subsystem is responsible for proposing observation plans, monitoring the health of satellite, generating payload control commands and participating in all activities related to payload operation. Several databases developed by the science data and user management subsystem of DAMPE methodically manage all collected and reconstructed science data, down linked housekeeping data, payload configuration and calibration data. Under the leadership of DAMPE Scientific Committee, this subsystem is also responsible for publication of high level science data and supporting all science activities of the DAMPE collaboration. The science data processing subsystem of DAMPE has already developed a series of physics analysis software to reconstruct basic information about detected cosmic ray particle. This subsystem also maintains the high performance computing system of SAS to processing all down linked science data and automatically monitors the qualities of all produced data. In this talk, we will describe all functionalities of whole DAMPE SAS system and show you main performances of data processing ability.

  4. On the modal damping ratios of shear-type structures equipped with Rayleigh damping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetti, T.; Silvestri, S.

    2006-04-01

    The effects of added manufactured viscous dampers upon shear-type structures are analytically investigated here for the class of Rayleigh damping systems. The definitions of mass proportional damping (MPD) and stiffness proportional damping (SPD) systems are briefly recalled and their physical counterpart is derived. From basic physics, a detailed mathematical demonstration that the first modal damping ratio of a structure equipped with the MPD system is always larger than the first modal damping ratio of a structure equipped with the SPD system is provided here. All results are derived for the class of structures characterised by constant values of lateral stiffness and storey mass, under the equal "total size" constraint. The paper also provides closed form demonstrations of other properties of modal damping ratios which further indicate that the MPD and the SPD systems are respectively characterised by the largest and the smallest damping efficiency among Rayleigh damping systems subjected to base excitation. A numerical application with realistic data corresponding to an actual seven-storey building structure is presented to illustrate and verify the theoretical findings.

  5. Effects of damping wigglers on beam dynamics in the NLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Wu, Ying

    2001-06-16

    To achieve the required damping time in the main damping rings for the Next Linear Collider (NLC), a wiggler will be required in each ring with integrated squared field strength up to 110 T{sup 2}m. There are concerns that nonlinear components of the wiggler field will damage the dynamic aperture of the ring, leading to poor injection efficiency. Severe effects from an insertion device have been observed and corrected in SPEAR 2. In this paper, we describe a model that we have developed to study the effects of the damping wiggler, compare the predictions of the model with actual experience in the case of the SPEAR 2 wiggler, and consider the predicted effects of current damping wiggler design on the NLC main damping rings.

  6. Damping and spectral formation of upstream whistlers

    SciTech Connect

    Orlowski, D.S.; Russell, C.T.; Krauss-Varban, D.

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler shift and the whistler dispersion relation indicate that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a finite band of frequencies. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wideband whistlers using the sum of seven drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the ISEE 1 electron data. For two cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra, is between 5 and 7. The overall spectral, wave, and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock, as well as propagation and damping properties indicated that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead, the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp, most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities. 57 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Radiation damping in microcoil NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, V. V.

    2006-04-01

    Radiation damping arises from the field induced in the receiver coil by large bulk magnetization and tends to selectively drive this magnetization back to equilibrium much faster than relaxation processes. The demand for increased sensitivity in mass-limited samples has led to the development of microcoil NMR probes that are capable of obtaining high quality NMR spectra with small sample volumes (nL-μL). Microcoil probes are optimized to increase sensitivity by increasing either the sample-to-coil ratio (filling factor) of the probe or quality factor of the detection coil. Though radiation damping effects have been studied in standard NMR probes, these effects have not been measured in the microcoil probes. Here a systematic evaluation of radiation damping effects in a microcoil NMR probe is presented and the results are compared with similar measurements in conventional large volume samples. These results show that radiation-damping effects in microcoil probe is much more pronounced than in 5 mm probes, and that it is critically important to optimize NMR experiments to minimize these effects. As microcoil probes provide better control of the bulk magnetization, with good RF and B0 inhomogeneity, in addition to negligible dipolar field effects due to nearly spherical sample volumes, these probes can be used exclusively to study the complex behavior of radiation damping.

  8. Radiation damping in microcoil NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V V

    2006-04-01

    Radiation damping arises from the field induced in the receiver coil by large bulk magnetization and tends to selectively drive this magnetization back to equilibrium much faster than relaxation processes. The demand for increased sensitivity in mass-limited samples has led to the development of microcoil NMR probes that are capable of obtaining high quality NMR spectra with small sample volumes (nL-microL). Microcoil probes are optimized to increase sensitivity by increasing either the sample-to-coil ratio (filling factor) of the probe or quality factor of the detection coil. Though radiation damping effects have been studied in standard NMR probes, these effects have not been measured in the microcoil probes. Here a systematic evaluation of radiation damping effects in a microcoil NMR probe is presented and the results are compared with similar measurements in conventional large volume samples. These results show that radiation-damping effects in microcoil probe is much more pronounced than in 5 mm probes, and that it is critically important to optimize NMR experiments to minimize these effects. As microcoil probes provide better control of the bulk magnetization, with good RF and B0 inhomogeneity, in addition to negligible dipolar field effects due to nearly spherical sample volumes, these probes can be used exclusively to study the complex behavior of radiation damping.

  9. Damping and fluidelastic instability in two-phase cross-flow heat exchanger tube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Joaquin E.

    flux, and its dependency is a function of void fraction. A dimensional analysis was carried out to investigate the relationship between damping and two-phase flow related parameters. As a result, the inclusion of surface tension in the form of the Capillary number appears to be useful when combined with the two-phase component of the damping ratio (interfacial damping). A strong dependence of damping on flow regime was observed when plotting the interfacial damping versus the void fraction, introducing an improvement over the previous result obtained by normalizing the two-phase damping, which does not exhibit this behaviour. The interfacial velocity model was selected to represent the fluidelastic data in two-phase experiments, due to the inclusion of the tube array geometry and density ratio effects, which does not exist for the pitch velocity approach. An essential component in reliably establishing the velocity threshold for fluidelastic instability, is a measure of the energy dissipation available in the system to balance the energy input from the flow. The present analysis argues that the damping in-flow is not an appropriate measure and demonstrates that the use of quiescent fluid damping provides a better measure of the energy dissipation, which produces a much more logical trend in the stability behaviour. This value of damping, combined with the RAD density and the interfacial velocity, collapses the available data well and provides the expected trend of two-phase flow stability data over the void fraction range from liquid to gas flows. The resulting stability maps represent a significant improvement over existing maps for predicting fluidelastic instability of tube bundles in two-phase flows. This result also tends to confirm the hypothesis that the basic mechanism of fluidelastic instability is the same for single and two-phase flows.

  10. Passive damping concepts for slender columns in space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Z.; Ekhelikar, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of three different passive damping concepts is conducted for a slender member with partial rotational end restraints. Over a hundred full-scale natural vibration experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of mass-string, polyethylene tubing, and chain damping concepts. The damping properties obtained from the experiments were used in the approximate analyses based on the partial differential equation of motion for the problem. The comparison of the experimental and the theoretical deflection-time relations shows that the velocity-dependent damping model used in the theory is adequate. From the experimental results, the effect of end connection friction and induced axial forces on damping is identified. The definition of an efficiency index is proposed based on the damping ratio and the mass of a given passive damping device. Using this definition, the efficiencies of the three damping devices are compared. The polyethylene tubing concept resulted into a low damping efficiency.

  11. Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a quantum-mechanical theory for Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures of arbitrary shape. We show that the electron surface scattering, which facilitates plasmon decay in small nanostructures, can be incorporated into the metal dielectric function on par with phonon and impurity scattering. The derived surface scattering rate is determined by the local field polarization relative to the metal-dielectric interface and is highly sensitive to the system geometry. We illustrate our model by providing analytical results for surface scattering rate in some common shape nanostructures. Our results can be used for calculations of hot carrier generation rates in photovoltaics and photochemistry applications.

  12. Measurement of damping of graphite epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The design of an experiment to measure the damping of a cylindrical graphite-epoxy specimen with a three point support and a knife edge support is described as well as equipment used in tests conducted to determine the influence of the support at the two ends of the specimen and to simulate an idealized free-free boundary condition at the two edges. A curve fitting technique is being used to process the frequency response data obtained. Experiments conducted on the thin plate specimen also reveal the influence of the end support condition on the damping ratio of the specimen. The damping ratio values measured for both specimens appear to be strongly influenced by the shape of the specimen and appear to depend on length and fiber orientation as well as the presence of discontinuities such as sharp bends, corners, and notches.

  13. Turbine blade damping device with controlled loading

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John J

    2013-09-24

    A damping structure for a turbomachine rotor. The damping structure including an elongated snubber element including a first snubber end rigidly attached to a first blade and extending toward an adjacent second blade, and an opposite second snubber end positioned adjacent to a cooperating surface associated with the second blade. The snubber element has a centerline extending radially inwardly in a direction from the first blade toward the second blade along at least a portion of the snubber element between the first and second snubber ends. Rotational movement of the rotor effects relative movement between the second snubber end and the cooperating surface to position the second snubber end in frictional engagement with the cooperating surface with a predetermined damping force determined by a centrifugal force on the snubber element.

  14. Radiation damping in focusing-dominated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Chen, Pisin; Ruth, R.D.

    1995-06-01

    A quasi-classical method is developed to calculate the radiation damping of a relativistic particle in a straight, continuous focusing system. In one limiting case where the pitch angle of the particle {theta}{sub p} is much larger than the radiation opening angle 1/{gamma}, the radiation power spectrum is similar to synchrotron radiation and the relative damping rate of the transverse action is proportional to the relative energy loss rate. In the other limiting case where {theta}{sub p} {much_lt} 1/{gamma}, the radiation is dipole in nature and the relative damping rate of the transverse action is energy-independent and is much faster than the relative energy rate. Quantum excitation to the transverse action is absent in this focusing channel. These results can be extended to bent systems provided that the focusing field dominates over the bending field.

  15. Resolving photons from cosmic ray in DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zunlei; Chang, Jin; Li, Xiang; Dong, TieKuang; Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer(DAMPE), which took to the skies on 17 December, is designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. The proportion of photons in the cosmic ray is very small, so it's difficult to distinguish between photons and 'background', but necessary for any DAMPE gamma-ray science goals.The paper present a algorithm to identify photons from 'background' mainly by the tracker/converter, which promote pair conversion and measure the directions of incident particles, and an anticoincidence detector,featuring an array of plastic scintillator to detect the charged particles.The method has been studied by simulating using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code and adjusted by the BeamTest at CERN in December,2014.In addition,DAMPE photon detection capabilities can be checked using the flight data.

  16. Turbine blade damping device with controlled loading

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John J.

    2015-09-29

    A damping structure for a turbomachine rotor. The damping structure including an elongated snubber element including a first snubber end rigidly attached to a first blade and extending toward an adjacent second blade, and an opposite second snubber end positioned adjacent to a cooperating surface associated with the second blade. The snubber element has a centerline extending radially inwardly in a direction from the first blade toward the second blade along at least a portion of the snubber element between the first and second snubber ends. Rotational movement of the rotor effects relative movement between the second snubber end and the cooperating surface to position the second snubber end in frictional engagement with the cooperating surface with a predetermined damping force determined by a centrifugal force on the snubber element.

  17. Viscous damping of perforated planar micromechanical structures

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, D.; Miles, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    The paper gives an analytical approximation to the viscous damping coefficient due to the motion of a gas between a pair of closely spaced fluctuating plates in which one of the plates contains a regular system of circular holes. These types of structures are important parts of many microelectromechanical devices realized in MEMS technology as microphones, microaccelerometers, resonators, etc. The pressure satisfies a Reynolds’ type equation with coefficients accounting for all the important effects: compressibility of the gas, inertia and possibly slip of the gas on the plates. An analytical expression for the optimum number of circular holes which assure a minimum value of the total damping coefficient is given. This value realizes an equilibrium between the squeeze-film damping and the viscous resistance of the holes. The paper also provides analytical design formulas to be used in the case of regular circular perforated plates. PMID:19365579

  18. Radiation Damping in a Focusing Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Ronald D.

    1996-05-01

    In electron storage rings synchrotron radiation leads to the damping of the three degrees of freedom of the particle trajectory towards a stable closed orbit transversely and a fixed stable phase longitudinally. At the same time, the emission of discrete quanta leads to diffusion in all three degrees of freedom. These two competing effects result in an equilibrium beam emittance that depends upon the parameters of the storage ring. In the case above, the radiation in the bending fields dominates, and the radiation due to the focusing fields is either neglected or taken into account perturbatively. In this talk we study the opposite case, a continuous focusing channel in which the radiation and its reaction are dominated by the strong focusing field. If there is a bending field, it is much weaker than the focusing field. In such focusing systems, we find that the radiation is synchrotron-like for larger betatron oscillation amplitudes and undulator-like for smaller amplitudes. However, quantum excitation is absent for any oscillation amplitude, and the damping exhibits asymmetry in favor of the transverse degree of freedom as the amplitude becomes smaller. In the undulator regime, the damping turns into exponential in the transverse direction, much faster than the total energy damping in this system. In principle, the particle could damp to the transverse ground state of the harmonic oscillator, reaching a minimum normalized emittance, γ ɛ_min = hbar/2mc, limited only by the uncertainty principle. In the case of a bent focusing system, we find that the lack of quantum excitation and asymmetric damping still hold provided that the bending field is sufficiently weak.

  19. Validation of High-Resolution CFD Method for Slosh Damping Extraction of Baffled Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Propellant slosh is a potential source of disturbance critical to the stability of space vehicles. The slosh dynamics are typically represented by a mechanical model of a spring-mass-damper. This mechanical model is then included in the equation of motion of the entire vehicle for Guidance, Navigation and Control analysis. A Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program developed at MSFC was applied to extract slosh damping in the baffled tank from the first principle. First the experimental data using water with sub-scale smooth wall tank were used as the baseline validation. It is demonstrated that CFD can indeed accurately predict low damping values from the smooth wall at different fill levels. The damping due to a ring baffles at different depths from the free surface was then simulated, and fairly good agreement with experimental measurement was observed. Comparison with an empirical correlation of Miles equation is also made.

  20. Lag-stabilized force feedback damping

    SciTech Connect

    Petterson, B.J.; Robinett, R.D.; Werner, J.C.

    1991-05-01

    A lag-stabilized, force feedback controller for damping initial and residual oscillations of a planar, cantilevered flexible arm has been analytically developed and experimentally implemented on a commercial robot. The controller feeds back force sensor measurements that are delayed in time and proportional to the displacement (angular orientation) of the arm in order to damp the oscillation. As a result of the lag (contrary to popular belief), the controlled robot system is stable and provides tunable performance on a Cincinnati Milacron T3-786 robot. 3 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Particle systems and nonlinear Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Villani, Cédric

    2014-03-15

    Some works dealing with the long-time behavior of interacting particle systems are reviewed and put into perspective, with focus on the classical Kolmogorov–Arnold–Moser theory and recent results of Landau damping in the nonlinear perturbative regime, obtained in collaboration with Clément Mouhot. Analogies are discussed, as well as new qualitative insights in the theory. Finally, the connection with a more recent work on the inviscid Landau damping near the Couette shear flow, by Bedrossian and Masmoudi, is briefly discussed.

  2. Optimal piezoelectric switching technique for vibration damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Marcus; Oleskiewicz, Robert

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes piezoelectric switching techniques for vibration damping. The dynamical behaviour of a piezoceramics connected to a switching LR shunt and the dissipated energy are obtained using a fundamental piezoelectric model. All calculations are performed in a normalized way and highlight the influence of the electromechanical coupling coefficient of the piezoceramics and the shunt parameters. For the first time, a precise result for the dynamics of a shunted piezoceramics is derived. The analytic results are used to determine the optimal switching sequence and external branch parameters in order to maximize the damping performance. The results are validated by measurements of a clamped beam.

  3. Wind turbine blade with viscoelastic damping

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Ryan A.; Mullings, Justin L.

    2017-01-10

    A wind turbine blade (60) damped by viscoelastic material (54, 54A-F) sandwiched between stiffer load-bearing sublayers (52A, 52B, 56A, 56B) in portions of the blade effective to damp oscillations (38) of the blade. The viscoelastic material may be located in one or more of: a forward portion (54A) of the shell, an aft portion (54D) of the shell, pressure and suction side end caps (54B) of an internal spar, internal webbing walls (54C, 54E), and a trailing edge core (54F).

  4. Inertia-Wheel Vibration-Damping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromechanical system would damp vibrations in large, flexible structure. In active vibration-damping system motors and reaction wheels at tips of appendages apply reaction torques in response to signals from accelerometers. Velocity signal for vibrations about one axis processes into control signal to oppose each of n vibrational modes. Various modes suppressed one at a time. Intended primarily for use in spacecraft that has large, flexible solar panels and science-instrument truss assembly, embodies principle of control interesting in its own right and adaptable to terrestrial structures, vehicles, and instrument platforms.

  5. Damping Goes the Distance in Golf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1980s, Dr. Benjamin Dolgin of NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a concept for a high-damping graphite/viscoelastic material for the Strategic Defense Initiative (popularly referred to as "Star Wars"), as part of a space-based laser anti-missile program called "Asterix." Dolgin drummed up this concept with the intention of stabilizing weapons launch platforms in space, where there is no solid ground to firmly support these structures. Without the inclusion of high-damping material, the orbital platforms were said to vibrate for 20 minutes after force was applied - a rate deemed "unacceptable" by leaders of the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  6. Delay of Transition Using Forced Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, Reginald J.

    2014-01-01

    Several experiments which have reported a delay of transition are analyzed in terms of the frequencies of the induced disturbances generated by different flow control elements. Two of the experiments employed passive stabilizers in the boundary layer, one leading-edge bluntness, and one employed an active spark discharge in the boundary layer. It is found that the frequencies generated by the various elements lie in the damping region of the associated stability curve. It is concluded that the creation of strong disturbances in the damping region stabilizes the boundary-layer and delays the transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  7. Damping of the wrist joint during voluntary movement.

    PubMed

    Milner, T E; Cloutier, C

    1998-10-01

    Damping characteristics of the musculoskeletal system were investigated during rapid voluntary wrist flexion movements. Oscillations about the final position were induced by introducing a load with the characteristics of negative damping, which artificially reduced the damping of the wrist. Subjects responded to increases in the negatively damped load by stronger cocontraction of wrist flexor and extensor muscles during the stabilization phase of the movement. However, their ability to counteract the effects of the negatively damped load diminished as the negative damping increased. Consequently, the number and frequency of oscillations increased. The oscillations were accompanied by phase-locked muscle activity superimposed on underlying tonic muscle activation. The wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased with the increased cocontraction that accompanied more negatively damped loads, although changes in the damping coefficient were less systematic than the stiffness. Analysis of successive half-cycles of the oscillation revealed that the wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased, despite decreasing muscle activation, as oscillation amplitude and velocity declined. This indicates that the inverse dependence of the damping coefficient on oscillation velocity contributes significantly to damping of joint motion. It is suggested that this property helps to offset a negative contribution to damping from the stretch reflex.

  8. The Stochastic Nonlinear Damped Wave Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbu, V. Da Prato, G.

    2002-12-19

    We prove the existence of an invariant measure for the transition semigroup associated with a nonlinear damped stochastic wave equation in R{sup n} of the Klein-Gordon type. The uniqueness of the invariant measure and the structure of the corresponding Kolmogorov operator are also studied.

  9. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  10. Radiation damping in pulsed Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Chris; Marklund, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    We consider the effects of radiation damping on the electron dynamics in a Gaussian-beam model of a laser field. For high intensities, i.e., with dimensionless intensity a0≫1, it is found that the dynamics divides into three regimes. For low-energy electrons (low initial γ factor, γ0) the radiation damping effects are negligible. At higher energies, but still at 2γ0damping alters the final displacement and the net energy change of the electron. For 2γ0>a0 one is in a regime of radiation-reaction-induced electron capture. This capture is found to be stable with respect to the spatial properties of the electron beam and results in a significant energy loss of the electrons. In this regime the plane-wave model of the laser field provides a good description of the dynamics, whereas for lower energies the Gaussian-beam and plane-wave models differ significantly. Finally the dynamics is considered for the case of an x-ray free-electron laser field. It is found that the significantly lower intensities of such fields inhibit the damping effects.

  11. Scattering Theory of Mesoscopic Gilbert Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brataas, Arne

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic damping determines the performance of magnetic devices including high-frequency oscillators, hard drives, magnetic random access memories, magnetic logic devices, and magnetic field sensors. The drive to improve these devices, to reduce the response time of sensors and the physical dimensions has led to a greater focus on studying the friction force a changing magnetization experiences. We study the magnetization dynamics of single domain ferromagnets and domain walls in contact with a thermal bath by scattering theory. We recover the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and express the Gilbert damping tensor in terms of the scattering matrix [1,2]. Dissipation of magnetic energy equals energy current pumped out of the system by the time-dependent magnetization, with separable spin-relaxation induced bulk and spin-pumping generated interface contributions [3]. The scattering theory of Gilbert damping is suitable for first-principles calculations that include disorder and spin-orbit coupling on an equal footing [4]. In linear response, our scattering theory for the Gilbert damping tensor is equivalent with the Kubo formalism. [4pt] [1] A. Brataas, Y. Tserkovnyak, and G. E. W. Bauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 037207 (2008). [0pt] [2] K. M. D. Hals, A. K. Nguyen, and A. Brataas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 256601 (2009). [0pt] [3] Y. Tserkovnyak, A. Brataas, G. E. W. Bauer, and B. I. Halperin, Rev. Mod. Phys. 77, 1375 (2005). [0pt] [4] A. A. Starikov, P. J. Kelly, A. Brataas, Y. Tserkovnyak, and G. E. W. Bauer, unpublished.

  12. The DAMPE experiment: first data from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Mitri, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    The DAMPE satellite has been successfully launched in orbit on December 2015. The science goals of the mission include the study of high energy cosmic ray electrons, photons, protons and nuclei in a wide energy range: 109 - 1014 eV. A report on the mission status will be presented, together with on-orbit detector performance and first data coming from space.

  13. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  14. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  15. Experimental determination of material damping using vibration analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowdhury, Mostafiz R.; Chowdhury, Farida

    1990-01-01

    Structural damping is an important dynamic characteristic of engineering materials that helps to damp vibrations by reducing their amplitudes. In this investigation, an experimental method is illustrated to determine the damping characteristics of engineering materials using a dual channel Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analyzer. A portable Compaq III computer which houses the analyzer, is used to collect the dynamic responses of three metal rods. Time-domain information is analyzed to obtain the logarithmic decrement of their damping. The damping coefficients are then compared to determine the variation of damping from material to material. The variations of damping from one point to another of the same material, due to a fixed point excitation, and the variable damping at a fixed point due to excitation at different points, are also demonstrated.

  16. Chemical Interface Damping Depends on Electrons Reaching the Surface.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Benjamin; Joplin, Anneli; Kaefer, Katharina; Celiksoy, Sirin; Link, Stephan; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2017-03-28

    Metallic nanoparticles show extraordinary strong light absorption near their plasmon resonance, orders of magnitude larger compared to nonmetallic nanoparticles. This "antenna" effect has recently been exploited to transfer electrons into empty states of an attached material, for example to create electric currents in photovoltaic devices or to induce chemical reactions. It is generally assumed that plasmons decay into hot electrons, which then transfer to the attached material. Ultrafast electron-electron scattering reduces the lifetime of hot electrons drastically in metals and therefore strongly limits the efficiency of plasmon induced hot electron transfer. However, recent work has revived the concept of plasmons decaying directly into an interfacial charge transfer state, thus avoiding the intermediate creation of hot electrons. This direct decay mechanism has mostly been neglected, and has been termed chemical interface damping (CID). CID manifests itself as an additional damping contribution to the homogeneous plasmon line width. In this study, we investigate the size dependence of CID by following the plasmon line width of gold nanorods during the adsorption process of thiols on the gold surface with single particle spectroscopy. We show that CID scales inversely with the effective path length of electrons, i.e., the average distance of electrons to the surface. Moreover, we compare the contribution of CID to other competing plasmon decay channels and predict that CID becomes the dominating plasmon energy decay mechanism for very small gold nanorods.

  17. RESONANTLY DAMPED PROPAGATING KINK WAVES IN LONGITUDINALLY STRATIFIED SOLAR WAVEGUIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Verth, G.; Goossens, M.; Terradas, J.

    2011-07-20

    It has been shown that resonant absorption is a robust physical mechanism for explaining the observed damping of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere due to naturally occurring plasma inhomogeneity in the direction transverse to the direction of the magnetic field. Theoretical studies of this damping mechanism were greatly inspired by the first observations of post-flare standing kink modes in coronal loops using the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. More recently, these studies have been extended to explain the attenuation of propagating coronal kink waves observed by the Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter. In the present study, for the first time we investigate the properties of propagating kink waves in solar waveguides including the effects of both longitudinal and transverse plasma inhomogeneity. Importantly, it is found that the wavelength is only dependent on the longitudinal stratification and the amplitude is simply a product of the two effects. In light of these results the advancement of solar atmospheric magnetoseismology by exploiting high spatial/temporal resolution observations of propagating kink waves in magnetic waveguides to determine the length scales of the plasma inhomogeneity along and transverse to the direction of the magnetic field is discussed.

  18. Dynamic Stall in Pitching Airfoils: Aerodynamic Damping and Compressibility Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stall is an incredibly rich fluid dynamics problem that manifests itself on an airfoil during rapid, transient motion in which the angle of incidence surpasses the static stall limit. It is an important element of many manmade and natural flyers, including helicopters and supermaneuverable aircraft, and low-Reynolds number flapping-wing birds and insects. The fluid dynamic attributes that accompany dynamic stall include an eruption of vorticity that organizes into a well-defined dynamic stall vortex and massive excursions in aerodynamic loads that can couple with the airfoil structural dynamics. The dynamic stall process is highly sensitive to surface roughness that can influence turbulent transition and to local compressibility effects that occur at free-stream Mach numbers that are otherwise incompressible. Under some conditions, dynamic stall can result in negative aerodynamic damping that leads to limit-cycle growth of structural vibrations and rapid mechanical failure. The mechanisms leading to negative damping have been a principal interest of recent experiments and analysis. Computational fluid dynamic simulations and low-order models have not been good predictors so far. Large-eddy simulation could be a viable approach although it remains computationally intensive. The topic is technologically important owing to the desire to develop next-generation rotorcraft that employ adaptive rotor dynamic stall control.

  19. Resistor-damped electromechanical lever blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Genequand, Pierre M.; Kjelberg, Ivar

    1998-06-01

    The paper presents an innovative technical solution which provides a combined damping and isolation interface with the appropriate transmissibility characteristics between a vibrating base and a sensitive payload, typically an optical terminal/telescope. The novelty of the solution is primarily found in the implementation of uncoupling and magnification of the incurred vibrations by means of flexures combined with the implementation of energy dissipation by means of a linear electro-magnetic actuator to constitute a passive integrated resistor-damped electromechanic lever block. By means of frictionless flexible lever systems, the amplitude of the payload vibrations is adapted to the optimal range of the actuator with a magnification by a factor ranging typically between 10 and 30. Passive viscous damping is obtained by simply short-circuiting the electro-magnetic motor and can be adapted by setting the impedance of the shorting connection. The desired stiffness is provided by the passive springs of the elastic motor suspension and by the stiffness of the lever flexure blades. The mobile mass of the motors also provide a reaction mass which, like damping and stiffness, is amplified by the square of the lever factor. A theoretical model of resistor-damped electromechanical lever blocks has been established. A particular property is it the good attenuation of excited vibrations only over a set frequency range. Above this range the interface properties rejoin the ones of a rigid connection. This performance makes this type of isolators particularly suitable for integration into multi-layer vibration control systems where sensitive equipment is protected by a mix of passive and active damping/isolation devices acting optimally at different frequency ranges. Experiments performed with a dummy load (80 Kg) representative of a satellite based optical terminal demonstrated the efficiency of the system in protecting the payload by passive damping for vibration excitations

  20. Prediction of Liquid Slosh Damping Using a High Resolution CFD Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; Purandare, Ravi; Peugeot, John; West, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Propellant slosh is a potential source of disturbance critical to the stability of space vehicles. The slosh dynamics are typically represented by a mechanical model of a spring mass damper. This mechanical model is then included in the equation of motion of the entire vehicle for Guidance, Navigation and Control analysis. Our previous effort has demonstrated the soundness of a CFD approach in modeling the detailed fluid dynamics of tank slosh and the excellent accuracy in extracting mechanical properties (slosh natural frequency, slosh mass, and slosh mass center coordinates). For a practical partially-filled smooth wall propellant tank with a diameter of 1 meter, the damping ratio is as low as 0.0005 (or 0.05%). To accurately predict this very low damping value is a challenge for any CFD tool, as one must resolve a thin boundary layer near the wall and must minimize numerical damping. This work extends our previous effort to extract this challenging parameter from first principles: slosh damping for smooth wall and for ring baffle. First the experimental data correlated into the industry standard for smooth wall were used as the baseline validation. It is demonstrated that with proper grid resolution, CFD can indeed accurately predict low damping values from smooth walls for different tank sizes. The damping due to ring baffles at different depths from the free surface and for different sizes of tank was then simulated, and fairly good agreement with experimental correlation was observed. The study demonstrates that CFD technology can be applied to the design of future propellant tanks with complex configurations and with smooth walls or multiple baffles, where previous experimental data is not available.

  1. Damped and zero-damped quasinormal modes of charged, nearly extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Mark, Zachary

    2016-02-01

    Despite recent progress, the complete understanding of the perturbations of charged, rotating black holes as described by the Kerr-Newman metric remains an open and fundamental problem in relativity. In this study, we explore the existence of families of quasinormal modes of Kerr-Newman black holes whose decay rates limit to zero at extremality, called zero-damped modes in past studies. We review the nearly extremal and WKB approximation methods for spin-weighted scalar fields (governed by the Dudley-Finley equation) and give an accounting of the regimes where scalar zero-damped and damped modes exist. Using Leaver's continued fraction method, we verify that these approximations give accurate predictions for the frequencies in their regimes of validity. In the nonrotating limit, we argue that gravito-electromagnetic perturbations of nearly extremal Reissner-Nordström black holes have zero-damped modes in addition to the well-known spectrum of damped modes. We provide an analytic formula for the frequencies of these modes, verify their existence using a numerical search, and demonstrate the accuracy of our formula. These results, along with recent numerical studies, point to the existence of a simple universal equation for the frequencies of zero-damped gravito-electromagnetic modes of Kerr-Newman black holes, whose precise form remains an open question.

  2. Estimating the Effects of Damping Treatments on the Vibration of Complex Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-26

    researchers were applying sandwich beam theory to thin plate sandwich structures. Ross, Kerwin and Ungar [28] were the first to produce this theory. The...Mechanics, 32:881-886, 1965. 57 [28] Eric E. Ungar Donald Ross and E.M. Kerwin. Damping of plate flexural vibrations by means of viscoelastic

  3. Note on the Time-Dependent Damped and Forced Harmonic Oscillator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, P. G. L.

    1978-01-01

    A Hamiltonian for the time-dependent damped and forced harmonic oscillator is derived. A simple time-dependent linear canonical transformation transforms the Hamiltonian to one whose solution is readily obtained. The wave function for the corresponding quantum mechanical problem is given. (Author/GA)

  4. Damping of the Transverse Head-Tail Instability by Periodic Modulation of the Chromaticity

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, W.; Wurtele, J.S.; Sessler, A.M.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    An analytical and numerical study of the suppression of the transverse head-tail instability by modulating the chromaticity over a synchrotron period is presented. We find that a threshold can be developed, and it can be increased to a value larger than the strong head-tail instability threshold. The stability criterion derived agrees very well with the simulations. The underlying physical mechanisms of the damping scheme are rotation of the head-tail phase such that the instability does not occur, and Landau damping due to the incoherent betatron tune spread generated by the varying chromaticity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Dynamic elastic modulus and vibration damping behavior of porous silicon carbide ceramics at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenden, A.; Proffitt, C.B.; Singh, M.

    1999-10-01

    The piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT) has been used to measure the Young's modulus, E, the mechanical damping, Q{sup {minus}1}, and the strain amplitude, {epsilon}, of a sintered silicon carbide containing pores (Hexoloy-SP). The silicon carbide material used in this study had at least 14 vol% porosity. Young's modulus was found to have a linear temperature dependence from room temperature to 740 C. The damping was near 10{sup {minus}4} and was independent of strain amplitude above room temperature.

  6. Damping of dust-acoustic waves due to dust-dust interactions in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, U.; Shukla, P. K.

    1998-08-01

    The results of a kinetic model are presented which includes dust-dust collisions as a damping mechanism for the low-phase velocity dust-acoustic waves which have been observed [Pieper and Goree, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1976) 3137] in a dusty plasma device. A comparison of our theoretical results with those of observations exhibits a good agreement, and it also leads to quantitative estimates that are close to the predictions of the modified fluid theory, which has introduced a damping rate in an ad hoc manner.

  7. Phase transition in the collisionless damping regime for wave-particle interaction

    PubMed

    Firpo; Elskens

    2000-04-10

    Gibbs statistical mechanics is derived for the Hamiltonian system coupling a wave to N particles self-consistently. This identifies Landau damping with a regime where a second order phase transition occurs. For nonequilibrium initial data with warm particles, a critical initial wave intensity is found: above it, thermodynamics predicts a finite wave amplitude in the limit N-->infinity; below it, the equilibrium amplitude vanishes. Simulations support these predictions providing new insight into the long-time nonlinear fate of the wave due to Landau damping in plasmas.

  8. Effect of heat treatment on stiffness and damping of SiC/Ti-15-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment on material properties of SiC/Ti-15-3 was measured by vibration tests. Heat treatment changes the microstructure, which was found to stiffen the matrix and reduce its damping capacity. Test results indicate how these changes in the matrix affect the corresponding properties of the composite. Measurements show that heat treatment affects damping properties of the composite to a greater extent than stiffness properties. The extent of change in mechanical properties is shown to depend on heat treatment temperature and exposure time.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Assessment of Vibro-Acoustic Behavior of Rubber-Damped Railway Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pešek, Luděk; Půst, Ladislav

    The reduction of noise and vibrations is very important task in many industrial and transport applications. The sources of intensive noise and vibrations are also tram and railway wheels at high speeds. Therefore the modern types of steel railway wheels contain the visco-elastic paddings. The first problem treated in this contribution is concerned with the theoretical and experimental investigation of the thermo-mechanical properties of rubber-like damping elements loaded with prestress by harmonic force. The dynamic modal and spectral properties of the whole railway wheel with damping elements will be investigated by the 3-D FEM model as the second problem.

  10. A Field-Particle Correlation Technique to Explore the Collisionless Damping of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Kristopher

    2016-10-01

    The nature of the dominant mechanisms which damp turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations remains an unanswered question in the study of a variety of collisionless plasma systems. Proposed damping mechanisms can be generally, but not exclusively, classified as resonant, e.g. Landau and cyclotron damping, non-resonant, e.g. stochastic ion heating, and intermittent, e.g. energization via current sheets or magnetic reconnection. To determine the role these mechanisms play in turbulent plasmas, we propose the application of field-particle correlations to time series of single spatial point observations of the type typically measured in the solar wind. This correlation, motivated by the form of the collisionless Vlasov equation, is the time averaged product of the factors comprising the nonlinear field-particle interaction term. The correlation both captures the secular transfer of energy between fields and perturbed plasma distributions by averaging out the conservative oscillatory energy transfer, and retains the velocity space structure of the secular transfer, allowing for observational characterization of the damping mechanism. Field-particle correlations are applied to a set of nonlinear kinetic numerical simulations of increasing complexity, including electrostatic, gyrokinetic, and hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell systems. These correlations are shown to capture the secular energy transfer between fields and particles and distinguish between the mechanisms accessible to the chosen system. We conclude with a discussion of the application of this general technique to data from current and upcoming spacecraft missions, including MMS, DSCOVR, Solar Probe Plus and THOR, which should help in determining which damping mechanisms operate in a variety of heliospheric plasmas. This work was performed in collaboration with Gregory Howes, Jason TenBarge, Nuno Loureiro, Ryusuke Numata, Francesco Valetini, Oreste Pezzi, Matt Kunz, Justin Kasper, and Chris Chen, with support from Grants

  11. Harnessing Three Dimensional Anatomy of Graphene Foam to Induce Superior Damping in Hierarchical Polyimide Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Pranjal; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2017-03-01

    Graphene foam-based hierarchical polyimide composites with nanoengineered interface are fabricated in this study. Damping behavior of graphene foam is probed for the first time. Multiscale mechanisms contribute to highly impressive damping in graphene foam. Rippling, spring-like interlayer van der Waals interactions and flexing of graphene foam branches are believed to be responsible for damping at the intrinsic, interlayer and anatomical scales, respectively. Merely 1.5 wt% graphene foam addition to the polyimide matrix leads to as high as ≈300% improvement in loss tangent. Graphene nanoplatelets are employed to improve polymer-foam interfacial adhesion by arresting polymer shrinkage during imidization and π-π interactions between nanoplatelets and foam walls. As a result, damping behavior is further improved due to effective stress transfer from the polymer matrix to the foam. Thermo-oxidative stability of these nanocomposites is investigated by exposing the specimens to glass transition temperature of the polyimide (≈400 °C). The composites are found to retain their damping characteristics even after being subjected to such extreme temperature, attesting their suitability in high temperature structural applications. Their unique hierarchical nanostructure provides colossal opportunity to engineer and program material properties.

  12. Damping properties of a beam with vacuum-packed granular damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajkowski, Jacek Mateusz; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajer, Czesław I.

    2015-04-01

    An experimental study of the properties of a layered beam partially treated with a damping element based on a granular material is presented. The beam structure comprises two aluminium face strips connected at the tip by a hermetic, elastic envelope, filled with bulk granules. Changing the underpressure value inside the airtight envelope allows variation of the mechanical properties of such a complex system, like stiffness or damping coefficients. Four types of granules, different in size, shape, and material, were examined to find the most promising one. A detailed discussion of the experimental amplitude, frequency, and damping capacity of the cantilever is given. The Zener, Kelvin-Voigt, and classic Maxwell models were employed for modelling and parameter identification. The range of applicability and limitations of the proposed solution has been given, as well as the benefits from the application.

  13. Geometric reasoning about damped and forced harmonic motion in the complex plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Hunter G.

    2015-09-01

    Complex-valued functions are commonly used to solve differential equations for one-dimensional motion of a harmonic oscillator with linear damping, a sinusoidal driving force, or both. However, the usual approach treats complex functions as an algebraic shortcut, neglecting geometrical representations of those functions and discarding imaginary parts. This article emphasizes the benefit of using diagrams in the complex plane for such systems, in order to build intuition about harmonic motion and promote spatial reasoning and the use of varied representations. Examples include the analysis of exact time sequences of various kinematic events in damped harmonic motion, sense-making about the phase difference between a driving force and the resulting motion, and understanding the discrepancy between the resonant frequency and the natural undamped frequency for forced, damped harmonic motion. The approach is suitable for supporting instruction in undergraduate upper-division classical mechanics.

  14. Laminar flow control with distributed surface actuation: damping Tollmien-Schlichting waves with active surface displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, Nikolas; King, Rudibert; Pätzold, Andreas; Nitsche, Wolfgang; Haller, Daniel; Woias, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Control strategies for laminar flow control above an unswept wing are investigated. An actuation method based on a flexible membrane displaced by multiple piezo-polymer composite elements is developed for wind tunnel experiments. A model predictive control algorithm is applied to control the multi-bar actuator. The direct negative superposition method of damping Tollmien-Schlichting waves is compared to a biomimetic approach imitating the damping mechanisms of a compliant skin. In both cases, a model predictive control algorithm is applied to control the multi-bar actuator segments. For the biomimetic approach, reduced, real-time solvable models of compliant surfaces are developed and parametrized by direct optimization and according to numerically generated optimal wall properties. Damping results of up to 85 % RMS value are achieved, shifting the onset of transition about 100 mm downstream with a single actuation membrane. Additional experiments with cascaded multiple membranes show the potential for a further shift.

  15. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  16. Numerical and Experimental Characterizations of Damping Properties of SMAs Composite for Vibration Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Bassani, P.; Tuissi, A.; Carnevale, M.; Lecis, N.; LoConte, A.; Previtali, B.

    2012-12-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are very interesting smart materials not only for their shape memory and superelastic effects but also because of their significant intrinsic damping capacity. The latter is exhibited upon martensitic transformations and especially in martensitic state. The combination of these SMA properties with the mechanical and the lightweight of fiberglass-reinforced polymer (FGRP) is a promising solution for manufacturing of innovative composites for vibration suppression in structural applications. CuZnAl sheets, after laser patterning, were embedded in a laminated composite between a thick FGRP core and two thin outer layers with the aim of maximizing the damping capacity of the beam for passive vibration suppression. The selected SMA Cu66Zn24Al10 at.% was prepared by vacuum induction melting; the ingot was subsequently hot-and-cold rolled down to 0.2 mm thickness tape. The choice of a copper alloy is related to some advantages in comparison with NiTiCu SMA alloys, which was tested for the similar presented application in a previous study: lower cost, higher storage modulus and consequently higher damping properties in martensitic state. The patterning of the SMA sheets was performed by means of a pulsed fiber laser. After the laser processing, the SMA sheets were heat treated to obtain the desired martensitic state at room temperature. The transformation temperatures were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The damping properties were determined, at room temperature, on full-scale sheet, using a universal testing machine (MTS), with cyclic tensile tests at different deformation amplitudes. Damping properties were also determined as a function of the temperature on miniature samples with a dynamical mechanical analyzer (DMA). Numerical modeling of the laminated composite, done with finite element method analysis and modal strain energy approaches, was performed to estimate the corresponding total damping capacity and then

  17. Effects of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert damping on domain growth.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kazue

    2016-12-01

    Domain patterns are simulated by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with an easy-axis anisotropy. If the Gilbert damping is removed from the LLG equation, it merely describes the precession of magnetization with a ferromagnetic interaction. However, even without the damping, domains that look similar to those of scalar fields are formed, and they grow with time. It is demonstrated that the damping has no significant effects on domain growth laws and large-scale domain structure. In contrast, small-scale domain structure is affected by the damping. The difference in small-scale structure arises from energy dissipation due to the damping.

  18. Effects of damping on mode shapes, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and acceleration admittances were calculated for a realistic NASTRAN structural model of space shuttle for three conditions: liftoff, maximum dynamic pressure and end of solid rocket booster burn. The realistic model of the orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket motors included the representation of structural joint transmissibilities by finite stiffness and damping elements. Methods developed to incorporate structural joints and their damping characteristics into a finite element model of the space shuttle, to determine the point damping parameters required to produce realistic damping in the primary modes, and to calculate the effect of distributed damping on structural resonances through the calculation of admittances.

  19. Comparison of approaches to quantify arterial damping capacity from pressurization tests on mouse conduit arteries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Wang, Zhijie; Lakes, Roderic S; Chesler, Naomi C

    2013-05-01

    Large conduit arteries are not purely elastic, but viscoelastic, which affects not only the mechanical behavior but also the ventricular afterload. Different hysteresis loops such as pressure-diameter, pressure-luminal cross-sectional area (LCSA), and stress-strain have been used to estimate damping capacity, which is associated with the ratio of the dissipated energy to the stored energy. Typically, linearized methods are used to calculate the damping capacity of arteries despite the fact that arteries are nonlinearly viscoelastic. The differences in the calculated damping capacity between these hysteresis loops and the most common linear and correct nonlinear methods have not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was thus to examine these differences and to determine a preferred approach for arterial damping capacity estimation. Pressurization tests were performed on mouse extralobar pulmonary and carotid arteries in their physiological pressure ranges with pressure (P) and outer diameter (OD) measured. The P-inner diameter (ID), P-stretch, P-Almansi strain, P-Green strain, P-LCSA, and stress-strain loops (including the Cauchy and Piola-Kirchhoff stresses and Almansi and Green strains) were calculated using the P-OD data and arterial geometry. Then, the damping capacity was calculated from these loops with both linear and nonlinear methods. Our results demonstrate that the linear approach provides a reasonable approximation of damping capacity for all of the loops except the Cauchy stress-Almansi strain, for which the estimate of damping capacity was significantly smaller (22 ± 8% with the nonlinear method and 31 ± 10% with the linear method). Between healthy and diseased extralobar pulmonary arteries, both methods detected significant differences. However, the estimate of damping capacity provided by the linear method was significantly smaller (27 ± 11%) than that of the nonlinear method. We conclude that all loops except the Cauchy stress

  20. Chiral damping in magnetic domain-walls (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jue, Emilie; Safeer, C. K.; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stéphane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurélien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-10-01

    The Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is responsible for chiral magnetic textures (skyrmions, spin spiral structures, …) in systems with structural inversion asymmetry and high spin-orbit coupling. It has been shown that the domain wall (DW) dynamics in such materials can be explained by chiral DWs with (partly or fully) Néel structure, whose stability derives from an interfacial DMI [1]. In this work, we show that DMI is not the only effect inducing chiral dynamics and demonstrate the existence of a chiral damping [2]. This result is supported by the study of the asymmetry induced by an in-plane magnetic field on field induced domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. Whereas the asymmetry of the DW motion is consistent with the spatial symmetries expected with the DMI, we show that this asymmetry cannot be attributed to an effective field but originates from a purely dissipative mechanism. The observation of chiral damping, not only enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, but since it can coexist with DMI it is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices. [1] A. Thiaville, et al., EPL 100, 57002 (2012) [2] E. Jué, et al., Nat. Mater., in press (doi: 10.1038/nmat4518)

  1. Inertially excited beam vibrations damped by Vacuum Packed Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmidt, T.; Zalewski, R.

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of an inertially excited steel cantilever beam encapsulated in a hermetic sleeve filled with polypropylene grains is investigated experimentally and theoretically. An electric motor rotating an unbalanced mass is attached at the end of the beam to generate forced vibrations of the system. Changing the underpressure in the sleeve results in changes of the stiffness and dissipative properties of the composite structure, which allow one to control the resonant characteristics of the system. Is is shown that the amplitude of vibrations can be reduced in this way. This innovative semi-active method of vibration damping is based on the jamming mechanism of the granules, and proved to be efficient in the reduction of the free vibrations of the beam, which was studied in the authors’ latest paper. In the present work, it is confirmed that the classical Bernoulli-Euler beam model with Kelvin-Voigt damping provides a satisfactory explanation of the observed relation between the vibrations amplitude and underpressure.

  2. Instantaneous Frequency and Damping from Transient Ring-Down Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2015-10-01

    Broadband impact excitation in structural dynamics is a common technique used to detect and characterize nonlinearities in mechanical systems since it excites many frequencies of a structure at once and can be applied with a variety of boundary conditions. Non-stationary time signals from transient ring-down measurements require time-frequency analysis tools to observe variations in frequency and energy dissipation as the response evolves. This work uses the short-time Fourier transform to estimate the instantaneous frequency and damping ratio from either measured or simulated transient ring-down data. By combining the discrete Fourier transform with an expanding or contracting window function that moves along the time axis, the resulting spectrum is used to estimate the instantaneous frequencies, damping and complex Fourier coefficients. This method is demonstrated on a multi-degree-of-freedom beam with a cubic spring attachment, and investigates the amplitudefrequency dependence in connection to the undamped nonlinear normal modes. A second example shows the results from experiment ring-down response on a beam with a lap joint, and reveals how the system behaves as energy dissipates.

  3. Damping and isolation of the GHM mini-oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2000-04-01

    Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method has been shown to be an effective approach to model viscoelastic materials (VEMs). In the GHM model, a mini-oscillator has been used as the mechanical analogy to illustrate the relation of GHM parameters. However, the GHM mini-oscillators have not been studied in depth so far. In this paper, the damping and isolation characteristics of this two degree-of-freedom mini- oscillator are analyzed. Those characteristics are crucial to the effectiveness and limitations of the passive and hybrid (active-passive) vibration suppression techniques employing VEMs. Under harmonic excitations, the corresponding nondimensional relationships among parameters are derived. The transmissibility due to force and base excitations is investigated with respect to various parameters. The damping ability of the mini-oscillator is also evaluated. For those critical points and special cases, their conditions are identified and discussed. Several unique distinctions are observed when compared to previous studies on vibration absorbers and isolators. The analysis results of this research provide more understanding and physical insight to designers when considering VEM-based configurations including passive and hybrid systems for the purpose of vibration isolation and control.

  4. Mold exposure and respiratory health in damp indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cox-Ganser, Jean M

    2011-01-01

    Almost all modern buildings experience at least minor, and sometimes serious, water damage during their life span. Excess moisture in buildings becomes a critical factor for mold (fungal) proliferation in nutrient-rich environments. As a result, building occupants may be exposed to increased levels of microbial agents such as fungal spores, cell fragments, cell wall components, or toxins. Such exposures may result in various diseases and symptoms, both respiratory and non-respiratory. Respiratory health complaints are common in damp buildings and have been more thoroughly studied than non-respiratory complaints. Respiratory diseases and symptoms which may be produced by exposure to indoor fungi include asthma development, exacerbation of asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, cough, wheeze, dyspnea (shortness of breath), nasal and throat symptoms, and respiratory infections. In addition to these illnesses, rhinosinusitis and sarcoidosis in water-damaged building occupants are also drawing more scientific attention. In this article, we explore the evidence for adverse effects of fungal exposure on respiratory health in damp indoor environments and potential disease mechanisms related to the exposure.

  5. Nanoscale damping characteristics of boron nitride nanotubes and carbon nanotubes reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Richa; Nieto, Andy; Chen, Han; Mora, Maria; Agarwal, Arvind

    2013-11-27

    This study compares the damping behavior of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement in PLC, a biodegradable copolymer. The damping behavior of PLC composites reinforced with 2 wt % or 5 wt % nanotube filler is evaluated by nanodynamic mechanical analysis (NanoDMA). The addition of 2 wt % CNT leads to the greatest enhancement in damping (tan δ) behavior. This is attributed to pullout in CNTs because of lower interfacial shear strength with the polymer matrix and a more effective sword-in-sheath mechanism as opposed to BNNTs which have bamboo-like nodes. BNNTs however have a superior distribution in the PLC polymer matrix enabling higher contents of BNNT to further enhance the damping behavior. This is in contrast with CNTs which agglomerate at higher concentrations, thus preventing further improvement at higher concentrations. It is observed that for different compositions, tan δ values show no significant changes over varying dynamic loads or prolonged cycles. This shows the ability of nanotube mechanisms to function at varying strain rates and to survive long cycles.

  6. A soft damping function for dispersion corrections with less overfitting.

    PubMed

    Ucak, Umit V; Ji, Hyunjun; Singh, Yashpal; Jung, Yousung

    2016-11-07

    The use of damping functions in empirical dispersion correction schemes is common and widespread. These damping functions contain scaling and damping parameters, and they are usually optimized for the best performance in practical systems. In this study, it is shown that the overfitting problem can be present in current damping functions, which can sometimes yield erroneous results for real applications beyond the nature of training sets. To this end, we present a damping function called linear soft damping (lsd) that suffers less from this overfitting. This linear damping function damps the asymptotic curve more softly than existing damping functions, attempting to minimize the usual overcorrection. The performance of the proposed damping function was tested with benchmark sets for thermochemistry, reaction energies, and intramolecular interactions, as well as intermolecular interactions including nonequilibrium geometries. For noncovalent interactions, all three damping schemes considered in this study (lsd, lg, and BJ) roughly perform comparably (approximately within 1 kcal/mol), but for atomization energies, lsd clearly exhibits a better performance (up to 2-6 kcal/mol) compared to other schemes due to an overfitting in lg and BJ. The number of unphysical parameters resulting from global optimization also supports the overfitting symptoms shown in the latter numerical tests.

  7. A soft damping function for dispersion corrections with less overfitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucak, Umit V.; Ji, Hyunjun; Singh, Yashpal; Jung, Yousung

    2016-11-01

    The use of damping functions in empirical dispersion correction schemes is common and widespread. These damping functions contain scaling and damping parameters, and they are usually optimized for the best performance in practical systems. In this study, it is shown that the overfitting problem can be present in current damping functions, which can sometimes yield erroneous results for real applications beyond the nature of training sets. To this end, we present a damping function called linear soft damping (lsd) that suffers less from this overfitting. This linear damping function damps the asymptotic curve more softly than existing damping functions, attempting to minimize the usual overcorrection. The performance of the proposed damping function was tested with benchmark sets for thermochemistry, reaction energies, and intramolecular interactions, as well as intermolecular interactions including nonequilibrium geometries. For noncovalent interactions, all three damping schemes considered in this study (lsd, lg, and BJ) roughly perform comparably (approximately within 1 kcal/mol), but for atomization energies, lsd clearly exhibits a better performance (up to 2-6 kcal/mol) compared to other schemes due to an overfitting in lg and BJ. The number of unphysical parameters resulting from global optimization also supports the overfitting symptoms shown in the latter numerical tests.

  8. Passive damping of composite blades using embedded piezoelectric modules or shape memory alloy wires: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, F.; de Oliveira, R.; Sigg, A.; Schnyder, V.; Delpero, T.; Jaehne, R.; Bergamini, A.; Michaud, V.; Ermanni, P.

    2012-07-01

    Emission reduction from civil aviation has been intensively addressed in the scientific community in recent years. The combined use of novel aircraft engine architectures such as open rotor engines and lightweight materials offer the potential for fuel savings, which could contribute significantly in reaching gas emissions targets, but suffer from vibration and noise issues. We investigated the potential improvement of mechanical damping of open rotor composite fan blades by comparing two integrated passive damping systems: shape memory alloy wires and piezoelectric shunt circuits. Passive damping concepts were first validated on carbon fibre reinforced epoxy composite plates and then implemented in a 1:5 model of an open rotor blade manufactured by resin transfer moulding (RTM). A two-step process was proposed for the structural integration of the damping devices into a full composite fan blade. Forced vibration measurements of the plates and blade prototypes quantified the efficiency of both approaches, and their related weight penalty.

  9. Nonlinear Landau damping in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiwamoto, Y.; Benson, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    A model is presented to explain the non-resonant waves which give rise to the diffuse resonance observed near 3/2 f sub H by the Alouette and ISIS topside sounders, where f sub H is the ambient electron cyclotron frequency. In a strictly linear analysis, these instability driven waves will decay due to Landau damping on a time scale much shorter than the observed time duration of the diffuse resonance. Calculations of the nonlinear wave particle coupling coefficients, however, indicate that the diffuse resonance wave can be maintained by the nonlinear Landau damping of the sounder stimulated 2f sub H wave. The time duration of the diffuse resonance is determined by the transit time of the instability generated and nonlinearly maintained diffuse resonance wave from the remote short lived hot region back to the antenna. The model is consistent with the Alouette/ISIS observations, and clearly demonstrates the existence of nonlinear wave-particle interactions in the ionosphere.

  10. Harmonic cavities for the NLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    de Santis, S.; Wolski, A.

    2003-05-29

    To achieve high luminosity, a linear collider needs damping rings to produce beams with very small transverse emittances. In the NLC, design constraints place the Main Damping Rings in a parameter regime where intrabeam scattering (IBS) is likely to be a limitation on the emittance, and hence on the final luminosity. It is possible to mitigate the effects of IBS by lengthening the bunch: this may be achieved by redesigning the lattice with higher momentum compaction, or by use of higher harmonic cavities. Here, we consider the latter approach. We estimate the required bunch lengthening that might be needed, outline some appropriate parameters for the harmonic cavities, and discuss some of the effects that might be introduced or exacerbated by the cavities, such as synchronous phase variation along the bunch train.

  11. Movers and shakers: granular damping in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, M N; Kollmer, J E; Sack, A; Heckel, M; Mueller, P; Pöschel, T

    2011-07-01

    The response of an oscillating granular damper to an initial perturbation is studied using experiments performed in microgravity and granular dynamics simulations. High-speed video and image processing techniques are used to extract experimental data. An inelastic hard sphere model is developed to perform simulations and the results are in excellent agreement with the experiments. In line with previous work, a linear decay of the amplitude is observed. Although this behavior is typical for a friction-damped oscillator, through simulation it is shown that this effect is still present even when friction forces are absent. A simple expression is developed which predicts the optimal damping conditions for a given amplitude and is independent of the oscillation frequency and particle inelasticities.

  12. Enthalpy damping for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    For inviscid steady flow problems where the enthalpy is constant at steady state, it was previously proposed to use the difference between the local enthalpy and the steady state enthalpy as a driving term to accelerate convergence of iterative schemes. This idea is analyzed, both on the level of the partial differential equation and on the level of a particular finite difference scheme. It is shown that for the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations, a hyperbolic system with eigenvalues on the imaginary axis, there is no enthalpy damping strategy which moves all the eigenvalues into the open left half plane. For the numerical scheme, however, the analysis shows and examples verify that enthalpy damping is potentially effective in accelerating convergence to steady state.

  13. Enthalpy damping for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    For inviscid steady flow problems where the enthalpy is constant at steady state, it was previously proposed to use the difference between the local enthalpy and the steady state enthalpy as a driving term to accelerate convergence of iterative schemes. This idea is analyzed, both on the level of the partial differential equation and on the level of a particular finite difference scheme. It is shown that for the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations, a hyperbolic system with eigenvalues on the imaginary axis, there is no enthalpy damping strategy which moves all the eigenvalues into the open left half plane. For the numerical scheme, however, the analysis shows and examples verify that enthalpy damping is potentially effective in accelerating convergence to steady state.

  14. Utilising HVDC to damp power oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Smed, T.; Andersson, G. . Dept. of Electric Power Systems)

    1993-04-01

    In this paper, damping of slow oscillations with active and reactive power modulation of HVDC-links is analyzed with the aim of gaining a physical insight into the problem. The analysis shows that active power modulation is efficient when applied to a short mass-scaled electrical distance from one of the swinging machines, and reactive power modulation is most efficient when there exists a well-defined power flow direction and the modulation is made at a point close to the electrical midpoint between the swinging machines. It is shown that the intuitively appealing feedback signals frequency and derivative of the voltage are appropriate for active and reactive power modulation, respectively. The impact of the constraints imposed by the HVDC equations are analyzed, and it is determined when the implicit reactive power modulation resulting from constant [gamma] control may be detrimental for the damping.

  15. Pressurized fluid damping of nanoelectromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Svitelskiy, Oleksiy; Sauer, Vince; Liu, Ning; Cheng, Kar-Mun; Finley, Eric; Freeman, Mark R; Hiebert, Wayne K

    2009-12-11

    Interactions of nanoscale structures with fluids are of current interest both in the elucidation of fluid dynamics at these small scales, and in determining the ultimate performance of nanoelectromechanical systems outside of vacuum. We present a comprehensive study of nanomechanical damping in three gases (He, N2, CO2), and liquid CO2. Resonant dynamics in multiple devices of varying size and frequency is measured over 10 decades of pressure (1 mPa-20 MPa) using time-domain stroboscopic optical interferometry. The wide pressure range allows full exploration of the regions of validity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow damping models. Observing free molecular flow behavior extending above 1 atm, we find a fluid relaxation time model to be valid throughout, but not beyond, the non-Newtonian regime, and a Newtonian flow vibrating spheres model to be valid in the viscous limit.

  16. Development of Transverse Modes Damped DLA Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.

    2009-01-22

    As the dimensions of accelerating structures become smaller and beam intensities higher, the transverse wakefields driven by the beam become quite large with even a slight misalignment of the beam from the geometric axis. These deflection modes can cause inter-bunch beam breakup and intra-bunch head-tail instabilities along the beam path, and thus BBU control becomes a critical issue. All new metal based accelerating structures, like the accelerating structures developed at SLAC or power extractors at CLIC, have designs in which the transverse modes are heavily damped. Similarly, minimizing the transverse wakefield modes (here the HEMmn hybrid modes in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures) is also very critical for developing dielectric based high energy accelerators. In this paper, we present the design of a 7.8 GHz transverse mode damped DLA structure currently under construction, along with plans for the experimental program.

  17. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  18. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  19. The impact damped harmonic oscillator in free decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; North, C. M.

    1987-01-01

    The impact-damped oscillator in free decay is studied by using time history solutions. A large range of oscillator amplitude is covered. The amount of damping is correlated with the behavior of the impacting mass. There are three behavior regimes: (1) a low amplitude range with less than one impact per cycle and very low damping, (2) a useful middle amplitude range with a finite number of impacts per cycle, and (3) a high amplitude range with an infinite number of impacts per cycle and progressively decreasing damping. For light damping the impact damping in the middle range is: (1) proportional to impactor mass, (2) additive to proportional damping, (3) a unique function of vibration amplitude, (4) proportional to 1-epsilon, where epsilon is the coefficient of restitution, and (5) very roughly inversely proportional to amplitude. The system exhibits jump phenomena and period doublings. An impactor with 2 percent of the oscillator's mass can produce a loss factor near 0.1.

  20. Damping in Ferrous Shape Memory Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    time it has been proposed that the solution lies in the approach of energy dissipation by using metallic structural materials which have inherent...and automotive manufacturing plants, has never achieved commercial producton . 1-b. Ferromagnetic alloys, such as Fe-Cr alloys High damping Fe-Cr alloys...Pre-exsiring mar~en-si,ýe worms orwie treenred orieL a ion ! A Lr cow s SL AL 14- L AL Figure 26. Schematic illustration of various processes involved

  1. Fluidic Technology Investigation - Suspension Damping Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    IF (w (I LT’ CVM)~4$1 IF ( Wrf 1 0 i CmpY MX2)V?1112wW~ CALL ORPArIP:(Pcx) pP,i.,IERR) .......-or pi i v~,R4p CAlLA (QAI)Rr7,4,?,T.ERR) T F Z (I ~LT C V...Damper Damping Devices Suspension Systems Shock Absorbers Adaptive Suspension Systems Hydro -Fluidics 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary

  2. Robot vibration control using inertial damping forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Han; Book, Wayne J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper concerns the suppression of the vibration of a large flexible robot by inertial forces of a small robot which is located at the tip of the large robot. A controller for generating damping forces to a large robot is designed based on the two time scale model. The controller does not need to calculate the quasi-steady variables and is efficient in computation. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the inertial forces and the controller designed.

  3. Robot vibration control using inertial damping forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Han; Book, Wayne J.

    1989-01-01

    The suppression is examined of the vibration of a large flexible robot by inertial forces of a small robot which is located at the tip of the large robot. A controller for generating damping forces to a large robot is designed based on the two time scale mode. The controller does not need to calculate the quasi-steady state variables and is efficient in computation. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the inertial forces and the controller designed.

  4. Damping Materials, Finite Elements and Special Projects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    made of either Haynes Alloy Number 188, Hastalloy C, Hastalloy X, or 17 - 4PH stainless steel Hastalloy X. Figure 1.26 is a schematic of the test...Motors Corporation (DDA), conducted a cooperative effort to characterize a DDA proprietary temperature damping material. The UDRI supplied two 17 - 4PH ...range at which the 17 - 4PH stainless steel beams could be tested. Serious discrepancy was noted between the structural loss factors derived from the room

  5. Vibration Damping Response of Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    to predict the vibration damping of these coposites. L lein Irauu, .. rii. se i-s foi tesi specimel gC-miLtrics oSl0y, so that - material...manner that the strain in the x direction was determined. This development results in the transverse strain given as av (x,y,z) avO (x,y)ei~ t a 2wO(xy) ei

  6. Test rig with active damping control for the simultaneous evaluation of vibration control and energy harvesting via piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, S.; Rohlfing, J.; Infante, F.; Mayer, D.; Herold, S.

    2016-09-01

    Piezoelectric transducers can be used to harvest electrical energy from structural vibrations in order to power continuously operating condition monitoring systems local to where they operate. However, excessive vibrations can compromise the safe operation of mechanical systems. Therefore, absorbers are commonly used to control vibrations. With an integrated device, the mechanical energy that otherwise would be dissipated can be converted via piezoelectric transducers. Vibration absorbers are designed to have high damping factors. Hence, the integration of transducers would lead to a low energy conversion. Efficient energy harvesters usually have low damping capabilities; therefore, they are not effective for vibration suppression. Thus, the design of an integrated device needs to consider the two conflicting requirements on the damping. This study focuses on the development of a laboratory test rig with a host structure and a vibration absorber with tunable damping via an active relative velocity feedback. A voice coil actuator is used for this purpose. To overcome the passive damping effects of the back electromagnetic force a novel voltage feedback control is proposed, which has been validated both in simulation and experimentally. The aim of this study is to have a test rig ready for the introduction of piezo-transducers and available for future experimental evaluations of the damping effect on the effectiveness of vibration reduction and energy harvesting efficiency.

  7. Collisional damping rates for plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    The distinction between the plasma dynamics dominated by collisional transport versus collective processes has never been rigorously addressed until recently. A recent paper [P. H. Yoon et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 033203 (2016)] formulates for the first time, a unified kinetic theory in which collective processes and collisional dynamics are systematically incorporated from first principles. One of the outcomes of such a formalism is the rigorous derivation of collisional damping rates for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, which can be contrasted to the heuristic customary approach. However, the results are given only in formal mathematical expressions. The present brief communication numerically evaluates the rigorous collisional damping rates by considering the case of plasma particles with Maxwellian velocity distribution function so as to assess the consequence of the rigorous formalism in a quantitative manner. Comparison with the heuristic ("Spitzer") formula shows that the accurate damping rates are much lower in magnitude than the conventional expression, which implies that the traditional approach over-estimates the importance of attenuation of plasma waves by collisional relaxation process. Such a finding may have a wide applicability ranging from laboratory to space and astrophysical plasmas.

  8. Synchrosqueezed wavelet transform for damping identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalec, Marko; Slavič, Janko; Boltežar, Miha

    2016-12-01

    Synchrosqueezing is a procedure for improving the frequency localization of a continuous wavelet transform. This research focuses on using a synchrosqueezed wavelet transform (SWT) to determine the damping ratios of a vibrating system using a free-response signal. While synchrosqueezing is advantageous due to its localisation in the frequency, damping identification with the original SWT is not sufficiently accurate. Here, the synchrosqueezing was researched in detail, and it was found that an error in the frequency occurs as a result of the numerical calculation of the preliminary frequencies. If this error were to be compensated, a better damping identification would be expected. To minimize the frequency-shift error, three different strategies are investigated: the scale-dependent coefficient method, the shifted-coefficient method and the autocorrelated-frequency method. Furthermore, to improve the SWT, two synchrosqueezing criteria are introduced: the average SWT and the proportional SWT. Finally, the proposed modifications are tested against close modes and the noise in the signals. It was numerically and experimentally confirmed that the SWT with the proportional criterion offers better frequency localization and performs better than the continuous wavelet transform when tested against noisy signals.

  9. A comparison of viscoelastic damping models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Joseph C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Inman, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Modern finite element methods (FEM's) enable the precise modeling of mass and stiffness properties in what were in the past overwhelmingly large and complex structures. These models allow the accurate determination of natural frequencies and mode shapes. However, adequate methods for modeling highly damped and high frequency dependent structures did not exist until recently. The most commonly used method, Modal Strain Energy, does not correctly predict complex mode shapes since it is based on the assumption that the mode shapes of a structure are real. Recently, many techniques have been developed which allow the modeling of frequency dependent damping properties of materials in a finite element compatible form. Two of these methods, the Golla-Hughes-McTavish method and the Lesieutre-Mingori method, model the frequency dependent effects by adding coordinates to the existing system thus maintaining the linearity of the model. The third model, proposed by Bagley and Torvik, is based on the Fractional Calculus method and requires fewer empirical parameters to model the frequency dependence at the expense of linearity of the governing equations. This work examines the Modal Strain Energy, Golla-Hughes-McTavish and Bagley and Torvik models and compares them to determine the plausibility of using them for modeling viscoelastic damping in large structures.

  10. Active damping of the SOFIA Telescope assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keas, Paul J.; Dunham, Edward; Lampater, Ulrich; Pfüller, Enrico; Teufel, Stefan; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Wiedemann, Manuel; Wolf, Jürgen

    2012-09-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) employs a 2.5-meter reflector telescope in a Boeing 747SP. The telescope is housed in an open cavity and is subjected to aeroacoustic and inertial disturbances in flight. To meet pointing requirements, SOFIA must achieve a pointing stability of approximately 0.5 arcseconds RMS. An active damping control system is being developed for SOFIA to reduce image jitter and image degradation due to resonance of the telescope assembly. Our paper discusses the history of the active damping design for SOFIA, from early concepts to the current implementation which has recently completed a ground and flight testing for proof-of-concept. We describe some milestones in the analysis and testing of the telescope assembly which guided the development of the vibration control system. The control synthesis approach and current implementation of the active damping control system is presented. Finally, we summarize the performance observed in early flight tests and the steps that are currently foreseen to completing the development of this system.

  11. Mode- and size-dependent Landau-Lifshitz damping in magnetic nanostructures: evidence for nonlocal damping.

    PubMed

    Nembach, Hans T; Shaw, Justin M; Boone, Carl T; Silva, T J

    2013-03-15

    We demonstrate a strong dependence of the effective damping on the nanomagnet size and the particular spin-wave mode that can be explained by the theory of intralayer transverse-spin pumping. The effective Landau-Lifshitz damping is measured optically in individual, isolated nanomagnets as small as 100 nm. The measurements are accomplished by use of a novel heterodyne magneto-optical microwave microscope with unprecedented sensitivity. Experimental data reveal multiple standing spin-wave modes that we identify by use of micromagnetic modeling as having either localized or delocalized character, described generically as end and center modes. The damping parameter of the two modes depends on both the size of the nanomagnet as well as the particular spin-wave mode that is excited, with values that are enhanced by as much as 40% relative to that measured for an extended film. Contrary to expectations based on the ad hoc consideration of lithography-induced edge damage, the damping for the end mode decreases as the size of the nanomagnet decreases. The data agree with the theory for damping caused by the flow of intralayer transverse spin currents driven by the magnetization curvature. These results have serious implications for the performance of nanoscale spintronic devices such as spin-torque-transfer magnetic random access memory.

  12. Ripples in the energy of a damped oscillator: The experimental point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basano, Lorenzo; Ottonello, Pasquale; Palestini, Valeria

    1996-10-01

    An irreversible transformation of mechanical into thermal energy takes place during the motion of a damped harmonic oscillator, with the result that the level of the total mechanical energy of the system, as a first approximation, decays exponentially with time. A detailed description of this decrease, however, is not usually supplied in textbooks of classical mechanics or general physics. As Karlow has recently pointed out, the negative-exponential decay is modulated by a sequence of energy ripples, owing to the dissipation rate being not constant during the motion. Up to now, the analysis of this behavior has been based only on theoretical considerations; in this work we present the corresponding experimental evidence based on a couple of laboratory demonstrations that use an electrical RLC circuit and a hydrodynamically damped mechanical pendulum.

  13. Discrete-layered damping model of multilayer plate with account of internal damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Gazizullin, R. K.

    2016-11-01

    Construction of discrete-layered damping model of multilayer plate in small displacement and deformations with account of internal damping of layers of Thompson- Kelvin-Voight model is presented. Based on derived equations, analytical solution is given to the static damping problem of simply supported single-layer rectangular plate subjected to uniformly distributed pressure, which is applied to one of its boundary planes. Convergence to the three-dimensional case is analysed for the obtained solution with respect to the dependence on dimension of mesh in the thickness direction of plate. For thin plates, dimension reduction of the formulated problem is set on the basis of simplifying hypothesis applied for each layer.

  14. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  15. Active member bridge feedback control for damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Lurie, Boris J.

    1992-01-01

    An active damping augmentation approach using active members in a structural system is described. The problem of maximizing the vibration damping in a lightly damped structural system is considered using the analogy of impedance matching between the load and source impedances in an electrical network. The proposed active damping augmentation approach therefore consists of finding the desired active member impedances that maximize the vibration damping, and designing a feedback control in order to achieve desired active member impedances. This study uses a bridge feedback concept that feeds back a combination of signals from sensors of the axial force and relative velocity across the active member to realize the desired active member impedance. The proposed active damping augmentation approach and bridge feedback concept were demonstrated on a three-longeron softly suspended truss structure.

  16. Vibration control through passive constrained layer damping and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1997-05-01

    To add damping to systems, viscoelastic materials (VEM) are added to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the VEM, a constraining layer is attached. When this constraining layer is an active element, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). Recently, the investigation of ACLD treatments has shown it to be an effective method of vibration suppression. In this paper, the treatment of a beam with a separate active element and passive constrained layer (PCLD) element is investigated. A Ritz- Galerkin approach is used to obtain discretized equations of motion. The damping is modeled using the GHM method and the system is analyzed in the time domain. By optimizing on the performance and control effort for both the active and passive case, it is shown that this treatment is capable of lower control effort with more inherent damping, and is therefore a better approach to damp vibration.

  17. Research on damping properties optimization of variable-stiffness plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-kai, QI; Xian-tao, YIN; Cheng, SHEN

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates damping optimization design of variable-stiffness composite laminated plate, which means fibre paths can be continuously curved and fibre angles are distinct for different regions. First, damping prediction model is developed based on modal dissipative energy principle and verified by comparing with modal testing results. Then, instead of fibre angles, the element stiffness and damping matrixes are translated to be design variables on the basis of novel Discrete Material Optimization (DMO) formulation, thus reducing the computation time greatly. Finally, the modal damping capacity of arbitrary order is optimized using MMA (Method of Moving Asymptotes) method. Meanwhile, mode tracking technique is employed to investigate the variation of modal shape. The convergent performance of interpolation function, first order specific damping capacity (SDC) optimization results and variation of modal shape in different penalty factor are discussed. The results show that the damping properties of the variable-stiffness plate can be increased by 50%-70% after optimization.

  18. Dynamic analyses of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers incorporating viscous damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Zhao, Jianwen; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, based on the standard linear solid rheological model, a dynamics model of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers (DEs) is developed with incorporation of viscous damping effect. Numerical calculations are employed to predict the damping effect on the dynamic performance of DEs. With increase of damping force, the DEs show weak nonlinearity and vibration strength. Phase diagrams and Poincaré maps are utilized to detect the dynamic stability of DEs, and the results indicate that a transition from aperiodic vibration to quasi-periodic vibration occurs with enlargement of damping force. The resonance properties of DEs including damping effect are subsequently analyzed, demonstrating a reduction of resonant frequency and resonance peak with increase of damping force.

  19. Higher order mode damping in an ALS test cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, A.F.; Lamberston, G.R. ); Barry, W. )

    1990-06-01

    The higher order mode attenuation scheme proposed for the Advanced Light Source accelerating cavities consists of two broad-band dampers placed 90{degrees} apart on the outer edge. In order to assess the damping efficiency a test assembly was built. The HOM damping was obtained by comparing the peak values of the transmission through the cavity for both the damped and the undamped case. Because of the high number of modes and frequency shifts due to the damping gear, the damping was assessed statistically, by averaging over several modes. In the frequency range from 1.5 to 5.5 GHz, average damping greater than 100 was obtained. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  20. Imaging of Damped Ly-alpha Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jim, K. T. C.; Roth, K. C.

    1998-05-01

    Intervening H I gas clouds toward QSOs give rise to damped Ly-alpha absorption. Because of the high column density (N(H I)>= 2*E(20) cm(-2) ) these systems have been thought to be galactic disks in some stage of formation. However, because potential optical counterparts have not been identified for most damped Ly-alpha systems, it is possible that some of the absorbing systems could be dwarf irregular galaxies or low surface brightness galaxies, and are thus difficult to image. In any case, the absorbers are expected to have small angular separation from the QSOs, and so high resolution imaging is required to differentiate the absorbers from the QSOs. Because previous studies have not shown any dominant morphological form for the few candidate objects known, our images are obtained with the Hawaii tip-tilt system in order to achieve the best possible morphological classification. By imaging in the NIR and optical bands that bracket the 4000 Angstroms break of these Ly-alpha absorbers, we can more readily select candidate objects by photometrically constraining their redshifts. In our sample of 14 QSOs with abosorbers from 1damped Ly-alpha absorption systems which have no previously optically-identified counterparts, and for some of which we have Keck HIRES spectra. Companion papers in this session present the spectral analysis of two of these QSO's (Roth et al., Bauer et al.) and studies of M81 as a possible local analog of the Ly-alpha absorbers (Kolhatkar et al.)

  1. Researches on Track Reconstruction for DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T. S.; Lei, S. J.; Zang, J. J.; Chang, J.; Wu, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is aimed to study the existence and distribution of dark matter via observation of high energy particles in space with unprecedented large energy bandwidth, high energy resolution, and high space resolution. The track reconstruction is to restore the positions and angles of the incident particles using the multiple observations of different channels at different positions, and its accuracy determines the angular resolution of the detector. The track reconstruction is mainly based on the observations of two sub-detectors, namely, the Silicon Tracker (STK) detector and the BGO (Bi_4Ge_3O12) calorimeter. In accordance with the design and structure of the two sub-detectors and using the data collected during the beam tests and ground tests, we provide a detailed introduction of the track reconstruction of DAMPE data, including three basic steps, the selection of track hits, the fitting of track hits, and the judgement of the best track among (most probably) many of them. Since a high energy particle most probably leaves more than one hit in each level of the STK and BGO, we first provide a method to constrain the STK clusters for the track reconstruction using the rough result of the BGO reconstruction. We apply two different algorithms, the Kalman filter and the least square linear fitting, to fit the track hits. The consistency of the results obtained independently via the two algorithms confirms the validity of our track reconstruction results, and we discuss the advantages/disadvantages of each method. Several criteria combining the BGO and STK detection are discussed for picking out the most possible track among all the tracks found in the track reconstruction. Using the track reconstruction methods mentioned in this article and the beam test data, we confirm that the angular resolution of DAMPE satisfies the requirement in design.

  2. Nutation damping in viscoelastic tumbling rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien; Efroimsky, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Presently, 138 asteroids show signs of being in non-principal spin states (Warner et al. 2009, updated September 2015). Such spin is often called `tumble' or `wobble'. The instantaneous rotation axis of a wobbling body performs nutation about the direction of the (conserved) angular-momentum vector. Incited by collisions and YORP, wobble is mitigated by internal dissipation due to the nutation-caused alternating stresses inside the asteroid.The knowledge of the timescale related to the damping of the nutation angle is complementary to the knowledge of the timescales associated with collisions and YORP. Previous evaluations of the nutation relaxation rate were based on an inherently inconsistent approach that may be called "Q-model". First, the elastic energy in a periodically deforming rotator was calculated in assumption of the deformation being elastic. Therefrom, the energy dissipation rate was determined by introducing an ad hoc quality factor Q. This ignored the fact that friction (and the ensuing existence of Q) is due to deviation from elasticity.We use the viscoelastic Maxwell model which naturally implies dissipation (as any other viscoelastic model would). In this approach, we compute the power and damping time for an oblate ellipsoid and a prism. Now, the viscosity assumes the role of the product μQ in the empirical Q-model, with μ being the rigidity. Contrarily to the Q-model, our model naturally gives a null dissipation for a shape tending to a sphere. We also explore when the constant part of the stress can be ignored in the derivation of the damping time. The neglect of prestressing turns out to be legitimate for the mean viscosity exceeding a certain threshold value.

  3. Status of the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.M.; Davies-White, W.A.; Delahaye, J.P.; Fieguth, T.H.; Hofmann, A.; Jager, J.; Kloeppel, P.K.; Lee, M.J.; Linebarger, W.A.; Rivkin, L.

    1985-06-01

    Electron beams of full design energy 1.21 GeV and nearly full design intensity 4 x 10/sup 10/ particles/pulse (design 5 x 10/sup 10/) have been extracted from the Stanford Linac and successfully stored in the electron damping ring. Beams of less intensity have been extracted from the ring and reinjected into the Linac. The present intensity limits are not thought to be fundamental. The operating experience with the electron ring and the status of the construction of the positron ring will be discussed. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. HVDC system control for damping subsynchronous oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Piwko, R.J.; Larsen, E.V.

    1982-07-01

    A method for designing a supplemental subsynchronous damping control (SSDC) for an HVDC transmission system is described. The SSDC eliminates torsional instabilities caused by interaction between conventional HVDC controls and turbine-generator rotor torsional modes of vibration. Results of digital simulation used in the design process are compared with measurements made on an HVDC simulator. Results of both digital simulations and HVDC simulator tests which demonstrate SSDC performance are shown. This research and development effort was sponsored by EPRI under RP1425-1.

  5. Radiation damping in closed expanding universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernui, Armando

    The dynamics of a coupled model (harmonic oscillator-relativistic scalar field) in Conformal Robertson-Walker (k = +1) spacetimes is investigated. The exact radiation-reaction equation of the source-including the retarded radiation terms due to the closed space geometry - is obtained and analyzed. A suitable family of Lyapunov functions is constructed to show that, if the spacetime expands monotonely, then the source's energy damps. A numerical simulation of this equation for expanding Universes, with and without Future Event Horizon, is performed.

  6. System for damping vibrations in a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-11-24

    A system for damping vibrations in a turbine includes a first rotating blade having a first ceramic airfoil, a first ceramic platform connected to the first ceramic airfoil, and a first root connected to the first ceramic platform. A second rotating blade adjacent to the first rotating blade includes a second ceramic airfoil, a second ceramic platform connected to the second ceramic airfoil, and a second root connected to the second ceramic platform. A non-metallic platform damper has a first position in simultaneous contact with the first and second ceramic platforms.

  7. Coatings for High-Temperature Vibration Damping of Turbines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    damping is provided by both the thin bond- coat and thermal barrier coating (TBC) in TBC coated superalloy system, (ii) the damping from each component...bond- coat and the TBC itself, and (iii) damping from EB-PVD deposited TBCs and platinum-modified nickel aluminide bond- coats occur at the same...closer to chemical equilibrium with existing superalloys than those currently used as bond- coats . Also, depending on the platinum content, the nickel

  8. Test particle study of Landau damping of steepening magnetosonic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Barnes, A.

    1982-01-01

    A test particle study of Landau damping of steepening large-amplitude magnetosonic waves is made. Motions of test particles in a model of a steepening large-amplitude magnetosonic wave are traced. The kinetic energy change of the ensemble of test particles is computed to estimate the effective Landau damping rate of the magnetosonic wave. The numerical results are compared with the linear kinetic theory of Landau damping and interpreted in terms of a simple physical picture for particle trapping.

  9. Critical damping constant of microwave-assisted magnetization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Toshiki; Arai, Hiroko; Matsumoto, Rie; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Microwave-assisted switching of magnetization in a perpendicularly magnetized disk was theoretically studied and special attention was paid to the effect of a damping constant on the switching field. We found that there exists a critical damping constant above which the switching field suddenly increases. We derived an analytical expression of the critical damping constant and showed that it decreases with increasing frequency of the microwave field, while it increases with increasing amplitude of the microwave field and the effective anisotropy field.

  10. Existence and damping of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M.; Mett, R.R.

    1991-12-01

    A new method of analyzing the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) from kinetic theory is presented. The analysis includes electron parallel dynamics non-perturbatively, an effect which is found to strongly influence the character and damping of the TAE -- contrary to previous theoretical predictions. The normal electron Landau damping of the TAE is found to be higher than previously expected, and may explain recent experimental measurements of the TAE damping coefficient. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Confinement-dependent damping in a layered liquid.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-03-23

    We present atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of the conservative oscillatory solvation forces and the damping in confined films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane using small amplitude modulation with magnetic driving. We find distinct maxima in the interaction damping upon probing the discrete molecular layers, supporting earlier observations of the same phenomenon using AFM with an acoustic driving scheme. The maxima in the damping are located at the same tip-surface separation as the maxima in the conservative oscillatory interaction stiffness.

  12. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  13. Design and fabrication of integrally damped composite fan blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmatka, John B.; Appuhn, Geoffrey

    1999-06-01

    The design, analysis, and fabrication methods of embedding small viscoelastic damping patches into scaled composite fan blades is presented, where the goal is to improve the blade fatigue characteristics by increasing the damping in the chord-wise modes. This discussion concentrates on improving the damping levels in a research composite shell/titanium spar fan blade, developed by NASA-Lewis and Pratt and Whitney. First, the geometry and material definition of the existing composite fan blade are presented. Second, methods for sizing and locating the damping patch are presented based upon the modal strain energy method. The layered damping patch is composed of outer layers of a TEDLAR (or KAPTON) barrier film, which encompasses a viscoelastic damping material and loose- weave scrim cloth (creep protection). Two different patch sizes and locations are discussed to provide maximum damping as well as optimal damping. Finally, procedures are outlined for fabricating the integrally damped composite fan blades. Fabricated blades will be tested at the NASA-Lewis vacuum facility.

  14. Dependence of Kambersky damping on Fermi level and spin orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, T.; Victora, R. H.

    2014-05-07

    Kambersky damping represents the loss of magnetic energy from the electrons to the lattice through the spin orbit interaction. It is demonstrated that, for bcc Fe-based transition metal alloys, the logarithm of the energy loss is proportional to the density of states at the Fermi level. Both inter and intraband damping are calculated for spins at arbitrary angle to the previously examined [001] direction. Although the easy axis 〈100〉 shows isotropic relaxation and achieves the minimum damping value of 0.002, other directions, such as 〈110〉, show substantial anisotropic damping.

  15. Significance of modeling internal damping in the control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Several simple systems are examined to illustrate the importance of the estimation of damping parameters in closed-loop system performance and stability. The negative effects of unmodeled damping are particularly pronounced in systems that do not use collocated sensors and actuators. An example is considered for which even the actuators (a tip jet nozzle and flexible hose) for a simple beam produce significant damping which, if ignored, results in a model that cannot yield a reasonable time response using physically meaningful parameter values. It is concluded that correct damping modeling is essential in structure control.

  16. Development of Composite Materials with High Passive Damping Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-15

    SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14 . ABSTRACT The structures studied in this ONR...2.1.2 Measures of damping 8 2.1.3 Measurement methods 9 2.2 Damping in Sandwich Structures. 9 2.2.1 Analytical models 10 2.2.2 Damping and damage 14 ...2.2.3 Finite element models 14 2.2.4 Statistical energy analysis method 15 CHAPTER 3 ANALYSIS OF DAMPING IN SANDWICH MATERIALS. 24 3.1 Equation of

  17. Damping of superfluid flow by a thermal cloud.

    PubMed

    Meppelink, R; Koller, S B; Vogels, J M; Stoof, H T C; van der Straten, P

    2009-12-31

    One of the principal signatures of superfluidity is the frictionless flow of a superfluid through another substance. Here, we study the flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate through a thermal cloud and study its damping for different harmonic confinements and temperatures. The damping rates close to the collisionless regime are found to be in good agreement with Landau damping and become smaller for more homogeneous systems. In the hydrodynamic regime, we observe additional damping due to collisions, and we discuss the implications of these findings for superfluidity in this system.

  18. Excitation of magnetization using a modulated radiation damping field.

    PubMed

    Walls, Jamie D; Huang, Susie Y; Lin, Yung-Ya

    2006-10-12

    In this work, pulsed-field gradients are used to modulate the radiation damping field generated by the detection coil in an NMR experiment in order that spins with significantly different chemical shifts can affect one another via the radiation damping field. Experiments performed on solutions of acetone/water and acetone/DMSO/water demonstrate that spins with chemical shift differences much greater than the effective radiation damping field strength can still be coupled by modulating the radiation damping field. Implications for applications in high-field NMR and for developing sensitive magnetization detectors are discussed.

  19. The Effects of Nonlinear Damping on Post-flutter Behavior Using Geometrically Nonlinear Reduced Order Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pengchao

    Recent studies of the occurrence of post-flutter limit cycle oscillations (LCO) of the F-16 have provided good support to the long-standing hypothesis that this phenomenon involves a nonlinear structural damping. A potential mechanism for the appearance of nonlinearity in the damping are the nonlinear geometric effects that arise when the deformations become large enough to exceed the linear regime. In this light, the focus of this investigation is first on extending nonlinear reduced order modeling (ROM) methods to include viscoelasticity which is introduced here through a linear Kelvin-Voigt model in the undeformed configuration. Proceeding with a Galerkin approach, the ROM governing equations of motion are obtained and are found to be of a generalized van der Pol-Duffing form with parameters depending on the structure and the chosen basis functions. An identification approach of the nonlinear damping parameters is next proposed which is applicable to structures modeled within commercial finite element software. The effects of this nonlinear damping mechanism on the post-flutter response is next analyzed on the Goland wing through time-marching of the aeroelastic equations comprising a rational fraction approximation of the linear aerodynamic forces. It is indeed found that the nonlinearity in the damping can stabilize the unstable aerodynamics and lead to finite amplitude limit cycle oscillations even when the stiffness related nonlinear geometric effects are neglected. The incorporation of these latter effects in the model is found to further decrease the amplitude of LCO even though the dominant bending motions do not seem to stiffen as the level of displacements is increased in static analyses.

  20. Check valve with poppet dashpot/frictional damping mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1993-08-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition is presented. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot housing with a bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction, providing a guiding function. The plunger member is arranged with a dashpot ring to frictionally contact the dashpot bore and has an interior tortuous flow path from one side to the other side of the dashpot ring. The dashpot housing is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the dashpot ring becomes jammed in the dashpot housing.

  1. Check valve with poppet dashpot/frictional damping mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition is presented. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot housing with a bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction, providing a guiding function. The plunger member is arranged with a dashpot ring to frictionally contact the dashpot bore and has an interior tortuous flow path from one side to the other side of the dashpot ring. The dashpot housing is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the dashpot ring becomes jammed in the dashpot housing.

  2. Check valve with poppet dashpot/frictional damping mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1992-06-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition is presented. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot housing with a bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction, providing a guiding function. The plunger member is arranged with a dashpot ring to frictionally contact the dashpot bore and has an interior tortuous flow path from one side to the other side of the dashpot ring. The dashpot housing is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the dashpot ring becomes jammed in the dashpot housing.

  3. Suppression of combustion oscillations with mechanical damping devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Nonarray absorbing devices were investigated for use in rocket thrust chambers as instability suppressors. A theory for designing absorbing devices suitable for rocket application is derived, and a nonarray computer program is developed. The experimental program used to verify the theory is discussed. It is concluded that individual acoustical devices can be designed for maximum energy absorption, and it is recommended that single resonators be designed so that the ratio of the aperture diameter to the product of the quarter-wave length and cavity backing depth is less than one.

  4. Evaluation Techniques for Determining Damping Mechanisms on Titanium Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    cause of component failure for all modern military gas turbine engines. Hard coatings, such as magnesium aluminate spinel, have been found to provide...through internal friction within the applied coating and between the coating and the bonded surface. Magnesium aluminate spinel (MgO+Al2O3) is a hard...inside the chamber by a string. Magnet excitation was used to excite the specimen within the pressure vessel. Cobalt discs were attached to both

  5. Modeling and evaluation of damping coefficient of eddy current dampers in rotordynamic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detoni, J. G.; Cui, Q.; Amati, N.; Tonoli, A.

    2016-07-01

    Eddy current dampers (ECD) can be used to introduce damping in rotordynamic applications. ECDs are contactless in nature and can be made to introduce negligible drag force, thus being a perfect match for passive magnetic bearings such as permanent magnet bearings and superconducting bearings. However, modeling and estimating the amount of damping introduced by an ECD is a difficult task due to complicated geometry and working conditions. The present study presents a novel method for modeling and identification of the damping characteristics of ECDs for rotordynamic applications. The proposed method employs an analytical dynamic model of the ECD and curve fitting with results of electromagnetic finite element (FE) models to obtain the parameters characterizing the ECD's mechanical impedance. The damping coefficient can be obtained with great accuracy from a single FE solution in quasistatic conditions. The validity of the proposed method is limited to the case of ECDs employing an axisymmetric conductor, such as a disc or a cylinder, thus covering most cases in rotordynamic applications. Finally, the accuracy of the identification procedure is verified experimentally by comparing the model's results with experimental tests.

  6. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics of charged particles including the effects of radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hong; Burby, Joshua; Davidson, Ronald; Fisch, Nathaniel; Chung, Moses

    2015-11-01

    The effects of radiation damping (radiation reaction) on accelerating charged particles in modern high-intensity accelerators and high-intensity laser beams have becoming increasingly important. Especially for electron accelerators and storage rings, radiation damping is an effective mechanism and technique to achieve high beam luminosity. We develop Hamiltonian and Lagrangian descriptions of the classical dynamics of a charged particle including the effects of radiation damping in the general electromagnetic focusing channels encountered in accelerators. The direct connection between the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories and the more fundamental QED description of the synchrotron radiation process is also addressed. In addition to their theoretical importance, the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories of the radiation damping also enable us to numerically integrate the dynamics using advanced structure-preserving geometric algorithms. These theoretical developments can also be applied to runaway electrons and positrons generated during the disruption or startup of tokamak discharges. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  7. On the efficacy of friction damping in the presence of nonlinear modal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krack, Malte; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2016-05-01

    This work addresses friction-induced modal interactions in jointed structures, and their effects on the passive mitigation of vibrations by means of friction damping. Under the condition of (nearly) commensurable natural frequencies, the nonlinear character of friction can cause so-called nonlinear modal interactions. If harmonic forcing near the natural frequency of a specific mode is applied, for instance, another mode may be excited due to nonlinear energy transfer and thus contribute considerably to the vibration response. We investigate how this phenomenon affects the performance of friction damping. To this end, we study the steady-state, periodic forced vibrations of a system of two beams connected via a local mechanical friction joint. The system can be tuned to continuously adjust the ratio between the first two natural frequencies in the range around the 1:3 internal resonance, in order to trigger or suppress the emergence of modal interactions. Due to the re-distribution of the vibration energy, the vibration level can in fact be reduced in certain situations. However, in other situations, the multi-harmonic character of the vibration has detrimental effects on the effective damping provided by the friction joint. The resulting response level can be significantly larger than in the absence of modal interactions. Moreover, it is shown that the vibration behavior is highly sensitive in the neighborhood of internal resonances. It is thus concluded that the condition of internal resonance should be avoided in the design of friction-damped systems.

  8. Measuring Collisionless Damping in Heliospheric Plasmas using Field-Particle Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    An innovative field-particle correlation technique is proposed that uses single-point measurements of the electromagnetic fields and particle velocity distribution functions to investigate the net transfer of energy from fields to particles associated with the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in weakly collisional plasmas, such as the solar wind. In addition to providing a direct estimate of the local rate of energy transfer between fields and particles, it provides vital new information about the distribution of that energy transfer in velocity space. This velocity-space signature can potentially be used to identify the dominant collisionless mechanism responsible for the damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind. The application of this novel field-particle correlation technique is illustrated using the simplified case of the Landau damping of Langmuir waves in an electrostatic 1D-1V Vlasov-Poisson plasma, showing that the procedure both estimates the local rate of energy transfer from the electrostatic field to the electrons and indicates the resonant nature of this interaction. Modifications of the technique to enable single-point spacecraft measurements of fields and particles to diagnose the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind are discussed, yielding a method with the potential to transform our ability to maximize the scientific return from current and upcoming spacecraft missions, such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Solar Probe Plus missions.

  9. Characterization of damping in microfibrous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobramaney, Pregassen; Flowers, George T.; Dean, Robert N.

    2012-04-01

    MEMS gyroscopes are used in many applications including harsh environments such as high-power, high-frequency acoustic noise. If the latter is at the natural frequency of the gyroscope, the proof mass will be overexcited giving rise to a corrupted gyroscope output. To mitigate the effect of the high-power, high-frequency acoustic noise, it is proposed to use nickel microfibrous sheets as an acoustic damper. For this purpose, the characterization of vibration damping in Nickel microfibrous sheets was examined in the present research effort. The sheets were made from nickel fibers with cellulose as a binding agent using a wet-lay papermaking technique. Sintering was done at 1000 °C to remove all the cellulose giving rise to a porous material. Square sheets of 20 cm were made from three diameters of nickel fibers namely 4, 8, and 12 microns. The sheets were cut into smaller pieces to fit the requirements of a fixture specially designed for this study. The fixture was attached to a LDS V408 shaker with a mass resting on a stack of the microfibrous sheets to simulate transmitted vibration by base motion with the sheet stack acting as a damper. A series of experiments was conducted using these 3 fiber diameters, different number of layers of microfibrous sheets and varying the vibration amplitude. From the collected vibration data, the stiffness and damping ratio of the microfibrous material was characterized.

  10. Damping of Crank-Nicolson error oscillations.

    PubMed

    Britz, D; Østerby, O; Strutwolf, J

    2003-07-01

    The Crank-Nicolson (CN) simulation method has an oscillatory response to sharp initial transients. The technique is convenient but the oscillations make it less popular. Several ways of damping the oscillations in two types of electrochemical computations are investigated. For a simple one-dimensional system with an initial singularity, subdivision of the first time interval into a number of equal subintervals (the Pearson method) works rather well, and so does division with exponentially increasing subintervals, where however an optimum expansion parameter must be found. This method can be computationally more expensive with some systems. The simple device of starting with one backward implicit (BI, or Laasonen) step does damp the oscillations, but not always sufficiently. For electrochemical microdisk simulations which are two-dimensional in space and using CN, the use of a first BI step is much more effective and is recommended. Division into subintervals is also effective, and again, both the Pearson method and exponentially increasing subintervals methods are effective here. Exponentially increasing subintervals are often considerably more expensive computationally. Expanding intervals over the whole simulation period, although capable of satisfactory results, for most systems will require more cpu time compared with subdivision of the first interval only.

  11. Study on vibration suppression based on particle damping in centrifugal field of gear transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wangqiang; Li, Jiani; Wang, Sheng; Fang, Xiaomeng

    2016-03-01

    Though particle damping technology has been applied to vibration suppression in steady state, there are few reports about the study of particle dampers in centrifugal fields because of its nonlinear damping performance and complex mechanism. Introducing particle damping technology into gear transmission will effectively reduce the vibration from gear engaging, especially for harsh working conditions, such as high temperature and oil lubrication. In this paper, we have explored the mechanism of gear excitation and determined the relationship between the rotational speed and gear's modal parameters in centrifugal fields. A mechanical model of the particle damper based on the discrete element method (DEM) in centrifugal fields has been established. Furthermore, the DEM model has been verified by comparing simulation data with experimental data. Based on the model, we have discussed the particle damper's energy dissipation mechanism in centrifugal fields, as well as the calculation method of energy dissipation. Moreover, the influence of the particle size on energy dissipation characteristics has been analyzed. The results can provide theoretical guidance for vibration and noise reduction of the gear transmission.

  12. Stochastic acceleration and magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Alina; Telezhinsky, Igor; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Pohl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Tycho's Supernova remnant (SNR) is also known as historical Supernova SN 1572 of Type Ia. Having exploded in a relatively clean environment and with a known age, it represents an ideal astrophysical testbed for the study of cosmic-ray acceleration and related phenomena. A number of studies suggest that shock acceleration with very efficient magnetic-field amplification is needed to explain the rather soft radio spectrum and the narrow rims observed in X-rays. We show that the wideband spectrum of Tycho's SNR can be alternatively well explained when accounting for stochastic acceleration as a secondary process. The re-acceleration of particles in the turbulent region immediately downstream of the shock provided by the fast-mode waves is efficient enough to impact particle spectra over several decades in energy. Our self-consistent model contains hydrodynamic simulations of the SNR plasma flow. The particle spectra are obtained from the time-dependent transport equation and the background magnetic field is computed either from the induction equation or it follows analytic profiles depending on the considered model. Although not as efficient as standard diffusive shock acceleration, stochastic acceleration leaves its imprint on the particle spectra. This is especially notable in the emission at radio wavelengths and soft γ-rays. Excessively strong magnetic fields and the so-called Alfvénic drift are not required in this scenario. The narrow X-ray and radio rims arise from damping of the turbulent magnetic field. We find a lower limit for the downstream magnetic field strength, Bd = 173 µG and investigate the energy-dependence of the X-ray filament width. We conclude that stochastic re-acceleration is an important mechanism for modifying particle and emission spectra in SNR and that the magnetic-field damping should be taken into account to properly explain the synchrotron intensity profiles of Tycho.

  13. A New MEMS Gyroscope Used for Single-Channel Damping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zengping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fuxue; Wang, Biao

    2015-04-30

    The silicon micromechanical gyroscope, which will be introduced in this paper, represents a novel MEMS gyroscope concept. It is used for the damping of a single-channel control system of rotating aircraft. It differs from common MEMS gyroscopes in that does not have a drive structure, itself, and only has a sense structure. It is installed on a rotating aircraft, and utilizes the aircraft spin to make its sensing element obtain angular momentum. When the aircraft is subjected to an angular rotation, a periodic Coriolis force is induced in the direction orthogonal to both the angular momentum and the angular velocity input axis. This novel MEMS gyroscope can thus sense angular velocity inputs. The output sensing signal is exactly an amplitude-modulation signal. Its envelope is proportional to the input angular velocity, and the carrier frequency corresponds to the spin frequency of the rotating aircraft, so the MEMS gyroscope can not only sense the transverse angular rotation of an aircraft, but also automatically change the carrier frequency over the change of spin frequency, making it very suitable for the damping of a single-channel control system of a rotating aircraft. In this paper, the motion equation of the MEMS gyroscope has been derived. Then, an analysis has been carried to solve the motion equation and dynamic parameters. Finally, an experimental validation has been done based on a precision three axis rate table. The correlation coefficients between the tested data and the theoretical values are 0.9969, 0.9872 and 0.9842, respectively. These results demonstrate that both the design and sensing mechanism are correct.

  14. A New MEMS Gyroscope Used for Single-Channel Damping

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zengping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fuxue; Wang, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The silicon micromechanical gyroscope, which will be introduced in this paper, represents a novel MEMS gyroscope concept. It is used for the damping of a single-channel control system of rotating aircraft. It differs from common MEMS gyroscopes in that does not have a drive structure, itself, and only has a sense structure. It is installed on a rotating aircraft, and utilizes the aircraft spin to make its sensing element obtain angular momentum. When the aircraft is subjected to an angular rotation, a periodic Coriolis force is induced in the direction orthogonal to both the angular momentum and the angular velocity input axis. This novel MEMS gyroscope can thus sense angular velocity inputs. The output sensing signal is exactly an amplitude-modulation signal. Its envelope is proportional to the input angular velocity, and the carrier frequency corresponds to the spin frequency of the rotating aircraft, so the MEMS gyroscope can not only sense the transverse angular rotation of an aircraft, but also automatically change the carrier frequency over the change of spin frequency, making it very suitable for the damping of a single-channel control system of a rotating aircraft. In this paper, the motion equation of the MEMS gyroscope has been derived. Then, an analysis has been carried to solve the motion equation and dynamic parameters. Finally, an experimental validation has been done based on a precision three axis rate table. The correlation coefficients between the tested data and the theoretical values are 0.9969, 0.9872 and 0.9842, respectively. These results demonstrate that both the design and sensing mechanism are correct. PMID:25942638

  15. Vibrational resonance in Duffing systems with fractional-order damping.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Zhu, H

    2012-03-01

    The phenomenon of vibrational resonance (VR) is investigated in over- and under-damped Duffing systems with fractional-order damping. It is found that the factional-order damping can induce change in the number of the steady stable states and then lead to single- or double-resonance behavior. Compared with vibrational resonance in the ordinary systems, the following new results are found in the fractional-order systems. (1) In the overdamped system with double-well potential and ordinary damping, there is only one kind of single-resonance, whereas there are double-resonance and two kinds of single-resonance for the case of fractional-order damping. The necessary condition for these new resonance behaviors is the value of the fractional-order satisfies α > 1. (2) In the overdamped system with single-well potential and ordinary damping, there is no resonance, whereas there is a single-resonance for the case of fractional-order damping. The necessary condition for the new result is α > 1. (3) In the underdamped system with double-well potential and ordinary damping, there are double-resonance and one kind of single-resonance, whereas there are double-resonance and two kinds of single-resonance for the case of fractional-order damping. The necessary condition for the new single-resonance is α < 1. (4) In the underdamped system with single-well potential, there is at most a single-resonance existing for both the cases of ordinary and fractional-order damping. In the underdamped systems, varying the value of the fractional-order is equivalent to change the damping parameter for some cases.

  16. Driving-dependent damping of Rabi oscillations in two-level semiconductor systems.

    PubMed

    Mogilevtsev, D; Nisovtsev, A P; Kilin, S; Cavalcanti, S B; Brandi, H S; Oliveira, L E

    2008-01-11

    We propose a mechanism to explain the nature of the damping of Rabi oscillations with an increasing driving-pulse area in localized semiconductor systems and have suggested a general approach which describes a coherently driven two-level system interacting with a dephasing reservoir. Present calculations show that the non-Markovian character of the reservoir leads to the dependence of the dephasing rate on the driving-field intensity, as observed experimentally. Moreover, we have shown that the damping of Rabi oscillations might occur as a result of different dephasing mechanisms for both stationary and nonstationary effects due to coupling to the environment. Present calculated results are found in quite good agreement with available experimental measurements.

  17. Multiple resonance damping or how do trees escape dangerously large oscillations?

    PubMed

    Spatz, Hanns-Christof; Brüchert, Franka; Pfisterer, Jochen

    2007-10-01

    To further understand the mechanics of trees under dynamic loads, we recorded damped oscillations of a Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) tree and of its stem without branches. Eigenfrequencies of the branches were calculated and compared to the oscillation frequency of the intact tree. The term eigenfrequency is used here to characterize the calculated resonance frequency of a branch fixed at the proximal end to a solid support. All large branches had nearly the same frequency as the tree. This property is a prerequisite for the distribution of mechanical energy between stem and branches and leads to an enhanced efficiency of damping. We propose that trees constitute systems of coupled oscillators tuned to allow optimal energy dissipation.

  18. Damped regional-scale stress inversions: Methodology and examples for southern California and the Coalinga aftershock sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, J.L.; Michael, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new focal mechanism stress inversion technique to produce regional-scale models of stress orientation containing the minimum complexity necessary to fit the data. Current practice is to divide a region into small subareas and to independently fit a stress tensor to the focal mechanisms of each subarea. This procedure may lead to apparent spatial variability that is actually an artifact of overfitting noisy data or nonuniquely fitting data that does not completely constrain the stress tensor. To remove these artifacts while retaining any stress variations that are strongly required by the data, we devise a damped inversion method to simultaneously invert for stress in all subareas while minimizing the difference in stress between adjacent subareas. This method is conceptually similar to other geophysical inverse techniques that incorporate damping, such as seismic tomography. In checkerboard tests, the damped inversion removes the stress rotation artifacts exhibited by an undamped inversion, while resolving sharper true stress rotations than a simple smoothed model or a moving-window inversion. We show an example of a spatially damped stress field for southern California. The methodology can also be used to study temporal stress changes, and an example for the Coalinga, California, aftershock sequence is shown. We recommend use of the damped inversion technique for any study examining spatial or temporal variations in the stress field.

  19. Multi-DOF rotor model based measurement of stiffness and damping for active magnetic bearing using multi-frequency excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kejian; Zhu, Changsheng; Chen, Liangliang; Qiao, Xiaoli

    2015-08-01

    To represent the support characteristic of active magnetic bearings (AMB), the commonly used parameters are the equivalent stiffness and the equivalent damping, which inherit the parameters of the stiffness and the damping from traditional mechanical bearings. First, by analyzing the diversity and the similarity between traditional mechanical bearing and AMB, the prior condition for applying the parametric representation of equivalent stiffness and equivalent damping to AMB is illuminated. Then, a method for measuring the equivalent stiffness and the equivalent damping of AMB-rotor system is proposed with multi-frequency excitation. One of its outstanding features is that the proposed method is based on the multi-degree of freedom (DOF) rotor model, not the single- DOF model, because the single DOF model cannot be suitably applied to the multi-DOF AMB-rotor systems. Otherwise, in order to decrease the identification error, the multi-frequency excitation can achieve the lowest peak value by means of appropriate selection for the relative phasing of each component, so that the possibility of the rotor displacement exceeding clearances of AMB and the magnetic force reaching saturation is minimized. Finally, the experiments, which are carried out on an AMB-rotor test rig with a vertical shaft, indicate that the proposed method can efficiently reduce the peak value for the superimposed multi-frequency excitation and correctly identify the equivalent stiffness and equivalent damping of AMB-rotor system.

  20. Evaluation of the Contribution of Multiple DAMPs and DAMP Receptors in Cell Death-Induced Sterile Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Zubin; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3), ATP (and its receptor P2X7), antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e), and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models. PMID:25127469

  1. Estimation of squeeze-film damping and inertial coefficients from experimental free-decay data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. B.; of Mechanical Engineers, London.

    1987-01-01

    The results are given for an experimental program concerned with a parametric identification of the damping and inertial coefficients of a cylindrical squeeze-film bearing, through an analysis of transient response data. The results enable the operating range for which a linear model of the squeeze-film is appropriate to be determined. Comparisons are made between the estimated coefficients and theoretical predictions. Presentation is by courtesy of the Council of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, London.

  2. Cooperation of charges in photosynthetic O2 evolution. II - Damping of flash yield oscillation, deactivation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbush, B.; Kok, B.; Mcgloin, M. P.

    1971-01-01

    A quantitative analysis is made of a linear four-step model for photosynthetic molecular oxygen evolution in which each photochemical trapping center or an associated enzyme cycles through five oxidation states. Based on data obtained with isolated chloroplasts, a number of aspects were considered, including the two perturbations which damp the oscillation of the oxygen flash yield in a flash sequence. The kinetics and the mechanism of deactivation was another aspect investigated.

  3. Interdigitated interdigital transducer for surface elastometry of soft damping tissue.

    PubMed

    Danicki, Eugene; Nowicki, Andrzej; Tasinkevych, Yuriy

    2013-06-01

    Measurement of the shear elastic constant of soft and highly damping tissue of high Poisson ratio is quite a challenging task. It is proposed to evaluate shear wave velocity and damping of tissue by measuring the shear skimming bulk waves using one interdigitated interdigital transducer on a piezoelectric layer, such as polyvinylidene fluoride, applied to the surface of the small tissue sample.

  4. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-07-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius r = Rw at the wall of the trap. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This paper explains with analytic theory the new algebraic damping due to particle transport by both mobility and diffusion. As electrons are swept around the "cat's eye" orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a dipole (m = 1) density distribution. From this distribution, the electric field component perpendicular to the core displacement produces E × B-drift of the core back to the axis, that is, damps the m = 1 mode. The parallel component produces drift in the azimuthal direction, that is, causes a shift in the mode frequency.

  5. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produce a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius rres, where f = mfE × B (rres) . The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This poster explains with analytic theory and simulations the new algebraic damping due to both mobility and diffusive fluxes. As electrons are swept around the ``cat's eye'' orbits of resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a dipole (m = 1) density distribution, and the electric field from this distribution produces an E × B drift of the core back to the axis, i.e. damps the m = 1 mode. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570.

  6. Management of seedling damping-off of alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vigorous and productive alfalfa stand starts with strong and uniform seedling establishment. Seed rot and seedling damping-off are a significant cause of poor stand establishment in wet soils. A number of organisms cause seed rot and seedling damping-off including several species of Pythium. As a ...

  7. Dissociation between two subgroups of the suprachiasmatic nucleus affected by the number of damped oscillated neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos HT

    2017-03-01

    In mammals, the main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain synchronizes the body rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycle. The SCN is composed of about 2 ×104 neurons which can be classified into three oscillatory phenotypes: self-sustained oscillators, damped oscillators, and arrhythmic neurons. Exposed to an artificial external light-dark cycle with a period of 22 h instead of 24 h , two subgroups of the SCN can become desynchronized (dissociated). The ventrolateral (VL) subgroup receives photic input and is entrained to the external cycle and a dorsomedial (DM) subgroup oscillates with its endogenous (i.e., free running) period and is synchronized to the external light-dark cycle through coupling from the VL. In the present study, we examined the effects of damped oscillatory neurons on the dissociation between VL and DM under an external 22 h cycle. We found that, with increasing numbers of damped oscillatory neurons located in the VL, the dissociation between the VL and DM emerges, but if these neurons are increasingly present in the DM the dissociation disappears. Hence, the damped oscillatory neurons in different subregions of the SCN play distinct roles in the dissociation between the two subregions of the SCN. This shows that synchrony between SCN subregions is affected by the number of damped oscillatory neurons and the location of these cells. We suggest that more knowledge on the number and the location of these cells may explain why some species do show a dissociation between the subregions and others do not, as the distribution of oscillatory types of neurons offers a plausible and novel candidate mechanism to explain heterogeneity.

  8. Comparison of damping treatments for gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Robert W.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    1996-05-01

    High frequency vibration of gas turbine fan blades is a high cycle fatigue concern. Friction damping devices are ineffective in suppressing high frequency vibration modes and external damping treatments are plagued by creep concerns. An alternative approach is to apply viscoelastic material internally in the blades. In this paper, an analytical comparison of internal damping treatments for fan blades is presented. The fan blade is modeled as a solid, flat, cantilevered titanium plate. Internal portions are removed producing cavities that are filled with viscoelastic material. Configurations with one, two, and three cavities are modeled using the modal strain energy method in conjunction with finite element analysis to estimate damping. Results show that appreciable damping levels for high frequency modes are possible with stiff viscoelastic material. Other design criteria are also considered. Results indicate that the hydrostatic load from the viscoelastic material on the cavity walls may be a concern.

  9. Prevalence of dampness and mold in European housing stock.

    PubMed

    Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla

    2012-09-01

    An assessment of the prevalence of dampness and mold in European housing stock was carried out. It is based on general indicators of dampness and mold in dwellings reported in the literature. The assessment relies on recent studies, taking into account regional and climatic differences, as well as differences in study design, methodology, and definitions. Data were available from 31 European countries. Weighted prevalence estimates are 12.1% for damp, 10.3% for mold, 10.0% for water damage, and 16.5% for a combination of any one or more indicators. Significant (up to 18%) differences were observed for dampness and mold prevalence estimates depending on survey factors, region, and climate. In conclusion, dampness and/or mold problems could be expected to occur in one of every six of the dwellings in Europe. Prevalence and occurrence of different types of problems may vary across geographical areas, which can be partly explained by differences in climate.

  10. Damping strapdown inertial navigation system based on a Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Li, Jiushun; Cheng, Jianhua; Hao, Yong

    2016-11-01

    A damping strapdown inertial navigation system (DSINS) can effectively suppress oscillation errors of strapdown inertial navigation systems (SINSs) and improve the navigation accuracy of SINSs. Aiming at overcoming the disadvantages of traditional damping methods, a DSINS, based on a Kalman filter (KF), is proposed in this paper. Using the measurement data of accelerometers and calculated navigation parameters during the navigation process, the expression of the observation equation is derived. The calculation process of the observation in both the internal damping state and the external damping state is presented. Finally, system oscillation errors are compensated by a KF. Simulation and test results show that, compared with traditional damping methods, the proposed method can reduce system overshoot errors and shorten the convergence time of oscillation errors effectively.

  11. Effects of ion motion on linear Landau damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Kong, Xiang-Mu; Su, Fu-Fang

    2017-02-01

    The effects of ion motion on Landau damping has been studied by the use of one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson simulation. It is shown that the ion motion may significantly change the development of the linear Landau damping. When the ion mass is multiple of proton mass, its motion will halt the linear Landau damping at some time due to the excitation of ion acoustic waves. The latter will dominate the system evolution at the later stage and hold a considerable fraction of the total energy in the system. With very small ion mass, such as in electron-positron plasma, the ion motion can suppress the linear Landau damping very quickly. When the initial field amplitude is relatively high such as with the density perturbation amplitude δn/n0 > 0.1, the effect of ion motion on Landau damping is found to be weak or even ignorable.

  12. Nonlinear damping model for flexible structures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Weijian

    1990-01-01

    The study of nonlinear damping problem of flexible structures is addressed. Both passive and active damping, both finite dimensional and infinite dimensional models are studied. In the first part, the spectral density and the correlation function of a single DOF nonlinear damping model is investigated. A formula for the spectral density is established with O(Gamma(sub 2)) accuracy based upon Fokker-Planck technique and perturbation. The spectral density depends upon certain first order statistics which could be obtained if the stationary density is known. A method is proposed to find the approximate stationary density explicitly. In the second part, the spectral density of a multi-DOF nonlinear damping model is investigated. In the third part, energy type nonlinear damping model in an infinite dimensional setting is studied.

  13. Impact of Damping Uncertainty on SEA Model Response Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah; Cabell, Randolph; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is commonly used to predict high-frequency vibroacoustic levels. This statistical approach provides the mean response over an ensemble of random subsystems that share the same gross system properties such as density, size, and damping. Recently, techniques have been developed to predict the ensemble variance as well as the mean response. However these techniques do not account for uncertainties in the system properties. In the present paper uncertainty in the damping loss factor is propagated through SEA to obtain more realistic prediction bounds that account for both ensemble and damping variance. The analysis is performed on a floor-equipped cylindrical test article that resembles an aircraft fuselage. Realistic bounds on the damping loss factor are determined from measurements acquired on the sidewall of the test article. The analysis demonstrates that uncertainties in damping have the potential to significantly impact the mean and variance of the predicted response.

  14. Damping of thermal acoustic oscillations in hydrogen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Youfan; Timmerhaus, Klaus D.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic waves initiated by a large temperature gradient along a tube are defined as thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs). These oscillations have been damped by introducing such sound absorbing techniques as acoustic filters, resonators, etc.. These devices serve as an acoustic sink that is used to absorb or dissipate the acoustic energy thereby eliminating or damping such oscillations. Several empirical damping techniques, such as attaching a resonator as a side branch or inserting a wire in the tube, have been developed in the past and have provided reasonable success. However, the effect of connecting tube radius, length, and resonator volume on the damping of thermal acoustic oscillations has not been evaluated quantitatively. Further, these methods have not been effective when the oscillating tube radius was relatively large. Detailed theoretical analyses of these techniques including a newly developed method for damping oscillations in a tube of relatively large radius are provided in this presentation.

  15. Passively Shunted Piezoelectric Damping of Centrifugally-Loaded Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Min, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center have been investigating shunted piezoelectric circuits as potential damping treatments for turbomachinery rotor blades. This effort seeks to determine the effects of centrifugal loading on passively-shunted piezoelectric - damped plates. Passive shunt circuit parameters are optimized for the plate's third bending mode. Tests are performed both non-spinning and in the Dynamic Spin Facility to verify the analysis, and to determine the effectiveness of the damping under centrifugal loading. Results show that a resistive shunt circuit will reduce resonant vibration for this configuration. However, a tuned shunt circuit will be required to achieve the desired damping level. The analysis and testing address several issues with passive shunt circuit implementation in a rotating system, including piezoelectric material integrity under centrifugal loading, shunt circuit implementation, and tip mode damping.

  16. Damping assembly for a torque converter clutch

    SciTech Connect

    Dull, D.C.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes a turbine damped torque converter and clutch. It comprises: a pressure plate; a torque converter turbine; a torque converter impeller; means including a control chamber for the pressure plate means for controlling the apply and release of the clutch for engaging the clutch with the impeller; a torque converter output shaft; a planetary gear arrangement including an input gear drivingly connected with the pressure plate, a reaction gear drivingly connected with the turbine, an output member drivingly connected with the output shaft and pinion gear means meshing with the input gear and the reaction gear for drivingly interconnecting the turbine and the pressure plate at a drive ratio of the turbine to the pressure plate of less than 1:1; and one-way drive means disposed between the turbine and the output shaft for preventing the turbine from overrunning the output shaft.

  17. Active vibration damping using smart material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, John S.; Yan, Zhuang

    1994-01-01

    We consider the modeling and active damping of an elastic beam using distributed actuators and sensors. The piezoelectric ceramic material (PZT) is used to build the actuator. The sensor is made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). These materials are glued on both sides of the beam. For the simple clamped beam, the closed loop controller has been shown to be able to extract energy from the beam. The shape of the actuator and its influence on the closed loop system performance are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to suppress the selected mode by choosing the appropriate actuator layout. It is also shown that by properly installing the sensor and determining the sensor shape we can further extract and manipulate the sensor signal for our control need.

  18. Exact Damping for Relativistic Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, D. G.

    2000-10-01

    The damping coefficient for a relativistic plasma may be reduced to a single integral with no approximations through use of the Newberger sum rules when k_z=0. Expanding the integral in a series, the leading term agrees with the leading term of the weak relativistic function F_7/2(z), but the remaining terms are not alike. The single expansion parameter is proportional to λ z, indicating that the result may NOT be accurately expressed as a series involving products of Bessel functions of argument λ times functions F_q(z). Expressions for the imaginary parts of all dielectric tensor elements will be presented. The real parts of the tensor elements are not as simple, but because the elements are analytic, they must likewise be modified.

  19. Pair creation: Back reactions and damping

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, J. C. R.; Mizerny, V. A.; Prozorkevich, A. V.; Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.; Smolyansky, S. A.; Vinnik, D. V.

    1999-12-01

    We solve the quantum Vlasov equation for fermions and bosons, incorporating spontaneous pair creation in the presence of back reactions and collisions. Pair creation is initiated by an external impulse field and the source term is non-Markovian. A simultaneous solution of Maxwell's equation in the presence of feedback yields an internal current and electric field that exhibit plasma oscillations with a period {tau}{sub pl}. Allowing for collisions, these oscillations are damped on a time scale {tau}{sub r} determined by the collision frequency. Plasma oscillations cannot affect the early stages of the formation of a quark-gluon plasma unless {tau}{sub r}>>{tau}{sub pl} and {tau}{sub pl}{approx}1/{lambda}{sub QCD}{approx}1 fm/c. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  20. Transient growth of damped baroclinic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, B.

    1985-01-01

    A solution of the linear initial value problem for the model of Eady with the inclusion of Ekman damping is presented. This model exhibits large transient growth of perturbations for synoptic cyclone spatial scales and a realistic value of the vertical turbulent viscosity coefficient despite the fact that all normal modes are exponentially decaying. Similar results are found for the model of Charney, implying that exponential instability cannot, in general, serve to explain the occurrence of cyclone scale disturbances in midlatiudes. Rather these are seen to arise additionally and perhaps predominantly from the release of mean flow potential energy by favorably configured initial perturbations. The Petterssen criterion for midlatitude cyclogenesis results naturally from this development as does its extension to the formation of subtropical monsoon depressions. Implications for the maintenance of midlatitude temperature gradients are discussed.

  1. Eddy-current-damped microelectromechanical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Polosky, Marc A.

    2007-10-30

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) device is disclosed that includes a shuttle suspended for movement above a substrate. A plurality of permanent magnets in the shuttle of the MEM device interact with a metal plate which forms the substrate or a metal portion thereof to provide an eddy-current damping of the shuttle, thereby making the shuttle responsive to changes in acceleration or velocity of the MEM device. Alternately, the permanent magnets can be located in the substrate, and the metal portion can form the shuttle. An electrical switch closure in the MEM device can occur in response to a predetermined acceleration-time event. The MEM device, which can be fabricated either by micromachining or LIGA, can be used for sensing an acceleration or deceleration event (e.g. in automotive applications such as airbag deployment or seat belt retraction).

  2. Eddy-current-damped microelectromechanical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Polosky, Marc A.

    2009-12-15

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) device is disclosed that includes a shuttle suspended for movement above a substrate. A plurality of permanent magnets in the shuttle of the MEM device interact with a metal plate which forms the substrate or a metal portion thereof to provide an eddy-current damping of the shuttle, thereby making the shuttle responsive to changes in acceleration or velocity of the MEM device. Alternately, the permanent magnets can be located in the substrate, and the metal portion can form the shuttle. An electrical switch closure in the MEM device can occur in response to a predetermined acceleration-time event. The MEM device, which can be fabricated either by micromachining or LIGA, can be used for sensing an acceleration or deceleration event (e.g. in automotive applications such as airbag deployment or seat belt retraction).

  3. Radiation damping in atomic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Horsley, S A R; Artoni, M; La Rocca, G C

    2011-07-22

    The force exerted on a material by an incident beam of light is dependent upon the material's velocity in the laboratory frame of reference. This velocity dependence is known to be difficult to measure, as it is proportional to the incident optical power multiplied by the ratio of the material velocity to the speed of light. Here we show that this typically tiny effect is greatly amplified in multilayer systems composed of resonantly absorbing atoms exhibiting ultranarrow photonic band gaps. The amplification effect for optically trapped 87Rb is shown to be as much as 3 orders of magnitude greater than for conventional photonic-band-gap materials. For a specific pulsed regime, damping remains observable without destroying the system and significant for material velocities of a few ms(-1).

  4. Forced oscillations in quadratically damped systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.

    1978-01-01

    Bayliss (1975) has studied the question whether in the case of linear differential equations the relationship between the stability of the homogeneous equations and the existence of almost periodic solutions to the inhomogeneous equation is preserved by finite difference approximations. In the current investigation analogous properties are considered for the case in which the damping is quadratic rather than linear. The properties of the considered equation for arbitrary forcing terms are examined and the validity is proved of a theorem concerning the characteristics of the unique solution. By using the Lipschitz continuity of the mapping and the contracting mapping principle, almost periodic solutions can be found for perturbations of the considered equation. Attention is also given to the Lipschitz continuity of the solution operator and the results of numerical tests which have been conducted to test the discussed theory.

  5. Highly compliant shape memory polymer gels for tunable damping and reversible adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, Randy A.; Berg, Michael C.; Gold, Christopher S.; Leighliter, Brad; Morton, Jeffrey T.; Lenhart, Joseph L.

    2016-02-01

    Materials that can dynamically change their properties to better adapt to the local environment have potential utility in robotics, aerospace, and coatings. For some of these applications, most notably robotics, it is advantageous for these responsive materials to be highly compliant in an effort to provide dynamic changes in adhesion and mechanical damping within a broad temperature operational environment. In this report, non-aqueous, highly compliant shape-memory polymer gels are developed by incorporating a low density of chemical cross-links into a physically cross-linked thermoplastic elastomer gel. Chemical cross-linkers were evaluated by varying there size and degree of functionality to determine the impact on the mechanical and adhesive properties. As a result of the chemical cross-linking, the gels exhibit modulus plateaus around room temperature and at elevated temperatures above 100 °C, where the thermoplastic elastomer gel typically melts. The materials were designed so that moduli in the plateaued regions were above and below the Dahlquist criteria of 4 × 104 Pa, respectively, where materials with a modulus below this value typically exhibit an increase in adhesion. The shape memory polymer gels were also integrated into fiber-reinforced composites to determine the temperature-dependent changes in mechanical damping. It is anticipated that this work will provide insight into materials design to provide dynamic changes in adhesion and damping to improve robotic appendage manipulation and platform mobility.

  6. Magneto-induced large deformation and high-damping performance of a magnetorheological plastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Taixiang; Gong, Xinglong; Xu, Yangguang; Pang, Haoming; Xuan, Shouhu

    2014-10-01

    A magnetorheological plastomer (MRP) is a new kind of soft magneto-sensitive polymeric composite. This work reports on the large magneto-deforming effect and high magneto-damping performance of MRPs under a quasi-statical shearing condition. We demonstrate that an MRP possesses a magnetically sensitive malleability, and its magneto-mechanical behavior can be analytically described by the magneto-enhanced Bingham fluid-like model. The magneto-induced axial stress, which drives the deformation of the MRP with 70 wt % carbonyl iron powder, can be tuned in a large range from nearly 0.0 kPa to 55.4 kPa by an external 662.6 kA m-1 magnetic field. The damping performance of an MRP has a significant correlation with the magnetic strength, shear rate, carbonyl iron content and shear strain amplitude. For an MRP with 60 wt % carbonyl iron powder, the relative magneto-enhanced damping effect can reach as high as 716.2% under a quasi-statically shearing condition. Furthermore, the related physical mechanism is proposed, and we reveal that the magneto-induced, particle-assembled microstructure directs the magneto-mechanical behavior of the MRP.

  7. Magnetic Damping of Solid Solution Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, Frank R.; Benz, K. W.; Corell, Arne; Dold, Peter; Cobb, Sharon D.; Volz, Martin P.; Motakef, Shariar

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct the Earth-based research sufficient to successfully propose a flight experiment (1) to experimentally test the validity of the modeling predictions applicable to the magnetic damping of convective flows in conductive melts as this applies to the bulk growth of solid solution semiconducting materials in the reduced gravitational levels available in low Earth orbit and (2) to assess the effectiveness of steady magnetic fields in reducing the fluid flows occurring in these materials during space processing. To achieve the objectives of this investigation, we are carrying out a comprehensive program in the Bridgman and floating-zone configurations using the solid solution alloy system Ge-Si. This alloy system was chosen because it has been studied extensively in environments that have not simultaneously included both low gravity and an applied magnetic field. Also, all compositions have a high electrical conductivity, and the materials parameters permit high growth rates compared to many other commonly studied alloy semiconductors. An important supporting investigation is determining the role, if any, that thermoelectromagnetic convection (TEMC) plays during growth of these materials in a magnetic field. Some compositional anomalies observed by us in magnetic grown crystals can only be explained by TEMC; this has significant implications for the deployment of a Magnetic Damping Furnace in space. This effect will be especially important in solid solutions where the growth interface is, in general, neither isothermal nor isoconcentrational. It could be important in single melting point materials, also, if faceting takes place producing a non-isothermal interface.

  8. Magnetic Damping of Solid Solution Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, Frank R.; Benz, K. W.; Croell, Arne; Dold, Peter; Cobb, Sharon D.; Volz, Martin P.; Motakef, Shariar

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to: (1) experimentally test the validity of the modeling predictions applicable to the magnetic damping of convective flows in electrically conductive melts as this applies to the bulk growth of solid solution semiconducting materials; and (2) assess the effectiveness of steady magnetic fields in reducing the fluid flows occurring in these materials during processing. To achieve the objectives of this investigation, we are carrying out a comprehensive program in the Bridgman and floating-zone configurations using the solid solution alloy system Ge-Si. This alloy system has been studied extensively in environments that have not simultaneously included both low gravity and an applied magnetic field. Also, all compositions have a high electrical conductivity, and the materials parameters permit reasonable growth rates. An important supporting investigation is determining the role, if any, that thermoelectromagnetic convection (TEMC) plays during growth of these materials in a magnetic field. TEMC has significant implications for the deployment of a Magnetic Damping Furnace in space. This effect will be especially important in solid solutions where the growth interface is, in general, neither isothermal nor isoconcentrational. It could be important in single melting point materials, also, if faceting takes place producing a non-isothermal interface. In conclusion, magnetic fields up to 5 Tesla are sufficient to eliminate time-dependent convection in silicon floating zones and possibly Bridgman growth of Ge-Si alloys. In both cases, steady convection appears to be more significant for mass transport than diffusion, even at 5 Tesla in the geometries used here. These results are corroborated in both growth configurations by calculations.

  9. Experimental Observations on Material Damping at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Chia-Yen; Levine, Marie; Shido, Lillian; Leland, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a unique experimental facility designed to measure damping of materials at cryogenic temperatures for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The test facility removes other sources of damping in the measurement by avoiding frictional interfaces, decoupling the test specimen from the support system, and by using a non-contacting measurement device. Damping data reported herein are obtained for materials (Aluminum, Aluminum/Terbium/Dysprosium, Titanium, Composites) vibrating in free-free bending modes with low strain levels (< 10(exp -6) ppm). The fundamental frequencies of material samples are ranged from 14 to 202 Hz. To provide the most beneficial data relevant to TPF-like precision optical space missions, the damping data are collected from room temperatures (around 293 K) to cryogenic temperatures (below 40 K) at unevenly-spaced intervals. More data points are collected over any region of interest. The test data shows a significant decrease in viscous damping at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic damping can be as low as 10(exp -4) %, but the amount of the damping decrease is a function of frequency and material. However, Titanium 15-3-3-3 shows a remarkable increase in damping at cryogenic temperatures. It demonstrates over one order of magnitude increase in damping in comparison to Aluminum 6061-T6. Given its other properties (e.g., good stiffness and low conductivity) this may prove itself to be a good candidate for the application on TPF. At room temperatures, the test data are correlated well with the damping predicted by the Zener theory. However, large discrepancies at cryogenic temperatures between the Zener theory and the test data are observed.

  10. Magnetization damping in two-component metal oxide micropowder and nanopowder compacts by broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Jamal Ben; Brosseau, Christian

    2006-12-01

    The microwave damping mechanisms in magnetic inhomogeneous systems have displayed a richness of phenomenology that has attracted widespread interest over the years. Motivated by recent experiments, we report an extensive experimental study of the Gilbert damping parameter of multicomponent metal oxides micro- and nanophases. We label the former by M samples, and the latter by N samples. The main thrust of this examination is the magnetization dynamics in systems composed of mixtures of magnetic (γ-Fe2O3) and nonmagnetic (ZnO and epoxy resin) materials fabricated via powder processing. Detailed ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements on N and M samples are described so to determine changes in the microwave absorption over the 6-18GHz frequency range as a function of composition and static magnetic field. The FMR linewidth and the field dependent resonance were measured for the M and N samples, at a given volume fraction of the magnetic phase. The asymmetry in the form and change in the linewidth for the M samples are caused by the orientation distribution of the local anisotropy fields, whereas the results for the N samples suggest that the linewidth is very sensitive to details of the spatial magnetic inhomogeneities. For N samples, the peak-to-peak linewidth increases continuously with the volume content of magnetic material. The influence of the volume fraction of the magnetic phase on the static internal field was also investigated. Furthermore, important insights are gleaned through analysis of the interrelationship between effective permeability and Gilbert damping constant. Different mechanisms have been considered to explain the FMR linewidth: the intrinsic Gilbert damping, the broadening induced by the magnetic inhomogeneities, and the extrinsic magnetic relaxation. We observed that the effective Gilbert damping constant of the series of N samples are found to be substantially smaller in comparison to M samples. This effect is attributed to the surface

  11. Smart actuators: a novel technique for active damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, Michael; Moldovan, Klaus; Goetz, Bernt

    1995-05-01

    Sensors are important components for any automatic process. Their function is to measure physical variables, and thus to allow automatic actions in a technical process, for example in a manufacturing sequence or a measurement. Selecting a sensor for a process, it is mostly overlooked that actuators used in a process also have sensory properties. The reactions of actuators to the state of a process give the possibility to extract relevant information out of the process with actuators. In using the sensory properties of actuators the costs for additional sensors can be saved. Even more important, under some circumstances it may not even be possible to place a special sensor directly at the location of interest: In that case the information about the physical variable is only accessible by analyzing the return signal of the actuator. An example of such a smart actuator combining active and sensory properties is demonstrated in a simple experiment. This experiment shows a steel ball supported as a pendulum. The steel ball can be pushed off, and on swinging back it can be caught in a single pass without any bounce. The actuator uses the piezoelectric effect which shows the underlying principle most clearly: Application of the reversibility of physical effects. In this case mechanical energy can either be produced or absorbed. This experiment is means as a demonstration model for students. It is also used for preliminary investigations developing a fast, actively damped tipping mechanism (optical scanner).

  12. Characterization of viscoelastic response and damping of composite materials used in flywheel rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianmin

    The long-term goal for spacecraft flywheel systems with higher energy density at the system level requires new and innovative composite material concepts. Multi-Direction Composite (MDC) offers significant advantages over traditional filament-wound and multi-ring press-fit filament-wound wheels in providing higher energy density (i.e., less mass), better crack resistance, and enhanced safety. However there is a lack of systematic characterization for dynamic properties of MDC composite materials. In order to improve the flywheel materials reliability, durability and life time, it is very important to evaluate the time dependent aging effects and damping properties of MDC material, which are significant dynamic parameter for vibration and sound control, fatigue endurance, and impact resistance. The physical aging effects are quantified based on a set of creep curves measured at different aging time or different aging temperature. One parameter (tau) curve fit was proposed to represent the relationship of aging time and aging temperature between different master curves. The long term mechanical behavior was predicted by obtained master curves. The time and temperature shift factors of matrix were obtained from creep curves and the aging time shift rate were calculated. The aging effects on composite are obtained from experiments and compared with prediction. The mechanical quasi-behavior of MDC composite was analyzed. The correspondence principle was used to relate quasi-static elastic properties of composite materials to time-dependent properties of its constituent materials (i.e., fiber and matrix). The Prony series combined with the multi-data fitting method was applied to inverse Laplace transform and to calculate the time dependent stiffness matrix effectively. Accelerated time-dependent deformation of two flywheel rim designs were studied for a period equivalent to 31 years and are compared with hoop reinforcement only composite. Damping of pure resin and T700

  13. Viperid Envenomation Wound Exudate Contributes to Increased Vascular Permeability via a DAMPs/TLR-4 Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rucavado, Alexandra; Nicolau, Carolina A.; Escalante, Teresa; Kim, Junho; Herrera, Cristina; Gutiérrez, José María; Fox, Jay W.

    2016-01-01

    Viperid snakebite envenomation is characterized by inflammatory events including increase in vascular permeability. A copious exudate is generated in tissue injected with venom, whose proteomics analysis has provided insights into the mechanisms of venom-induced tissue damage. Hereby it is reported that wound exudate itself has the ability to induce increase in vascular permeability in the skin of mice. Proteomics analysis of exudate revealed the presence of cytokines and chemokines, together with abundant damage associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) resulting from both proteolysis of extracellular matrix and cellular lysis. Moreover, significant differences in the amounts of cytokines/chemokines and DAMPs were detected between exudates collected 1 h and 24 h after envenomation, thus highlighting a complex temporal dynamic in the composition of exudate. Pretreatment of mice with Eritoran, an antagonist of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), significantly reduced the exudate-induced increase in vascular permeability, thus suggesting that DAMPs might be acting through this receptor. It is hypothesized that an “Envenomation-induced DAMPs cycle of tissue damage” may be operating in viperid snakebite envenomation through which venom-induced tissue damage generates a variety of DAMPs which may further expand tissue alterations. PMID:27886127

  14. A unified approach to aerodynamic damping and drag/lift instabilities, and its application to dry inclined cable galloping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, J. H. G.; Larose, G. L.

    2006-02-01

    Inclined cables of cable-stayed bridges often experience large amplitude vibrations. One of the potential excitation mechanisms is dry inclined cable galloping, which has been observed in wind tunnel tests but which has not previously been fully explained theoretically. In this paper, a general expression is derived for the quasi-steady aerodynamic damping (positive or negative) of a cylinder of arbitrary cross-section yawed/inclined to the flow, for small amplitude vibrations in any plane. The expression covers the special cases of conventional quasi-steady aerodynamic damping, Den Hartog galloping and the drag crisis, as well as dry inclined cable galloping. A nondimensional aerodynamic damping parameter governing this behaviour is proposed, which is a function of only the Reynolds number, the angle between the wind velocity and the cable axis, and the orientation of the vibration plane. Measured static force coefficients from wind tunnel tests have been used with the theoretical expression to predict values of this parameter. Two main areas of instability (i.e. negative aerodynamic damping) have been identified, both in the critical Reynolds number region, one of which was previously observed in separate wind tunnel tests on a dynamic cable model. The minimum values of structural damping required to prevent dry inclined cable galloping are defined, and other factors in the behaviour in practice are discussed.

  15. Experiences with active damping and impedance-matching compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betros, Robert S.; Alvarez, Oscar S.; Bronowicki, Allen J.

    1993-09-01

    TRW has been implementing active damping compensators on smart structures for the past five years. Since that time there have been numerous publications on the use of impedance matching techniques for structural damping augmentation. The idea of impedance matching compensators came about by considering the flow of power in a structure undergoing vibration. The goal of these compensators is to electronically dissipate as much of this flowing power as possible. This paper shows the performance of impedance matching compensators used in smart structures to be comparable to that of active damping compensators. Theoretical comparisons between active damping and impedance matching methods are made using PZT actuators and sensors. The effects of these collocated and non-collocated PZT sensors and actuators on the types of signals they sense and actuate are investigated. A method for automatically synthesizing impedance matching compensators is presented. Problems with implementing broad band active damping and impedance matching compensators on standard Digital Signal Processing (DSP) chips are discussed. Simulations and measurements that compare the performance of active damping and impedance matching techniques for a lightly damped cantilevered beam are shown.

  16. Design, analysis, and testing of high frequency passively damped struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yiu, Y. C.; Davis, L. Porter; Napolitano, Kevin; Ninneman, R. Rory

    1993-01-01

    Objectives of the research are: (1) to develop design requirements for damped struts to stabilize control system in the high frequency cross-over and spill-over range; (2) to design, fabricate and test viscously damped strut and viscoelastically damped strut; (3) to verify accuracy of design and analysis methodology of damped struts; and (4) to design and build test apparatus, and develop data reduction algorithm to measure strut complex stiffness. In order to meet the stringent performance requirements of the SPICE experiment, the active control system is used to suppress the dynamic responses of the low order structural modes. However, the control system also inadvertently drives some of the higher order modes unstable in the cross-over and spill-over frequency range. Passive damping is a reliable and effective way to provide damping to stabilize the control system. It also improves the robustness of the control system. Damping is designed into the SPICE testbed as an integral part of the control-structure technology.

  17. Perceptual studies of violin body damping and vibrato.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Claudia; Woodhouse, Jim; Cheng, Felicia P-H; Cross, Ian; Blackwell, Alan F; Moore, Brian C J

    2010-01-01

    This work explored how the perception of violin notes is influenced by the magnitude of the applied vibrato and by the level of damping of the violin resonance modes. Damping influences the "peakiness" of the frequency response, and vibrato interacts with this peakiness by producing fluctuations in spectral content as well as in frequency and amplitude. Initially, it was shown that thresholds for detecting a change in vibrato amplitude were independent of body damping, and thresholds for detecting a change in body damping were independent of vibrato amplitude. A study of perceptual similarity using triadic comparison showed that vibrato amplitude and damping were largely perceived as independent dimensions. A series of listening tests was conducted employing synthesized, recorded, or live performance to probe perceptual responses in terms of "liveliness" and preference. The results do not support the conclusion that liveliness results from the combination of the use of vibrato and a "peaky" violin response. Judgments based on listening to single notes showed inconsistent patterns for liveliness, while preferences were highest for damping that was slightly less than for a reference (real) violin. In contrast, judgments by players based on many notes showed preference for damping close to the reference value.

  18. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m=2 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, C. Y.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2016-10-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 2 diocotron modes. Due to small field asymmetries a low density halo of electrons is transported radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius rres, where f = mfE × B (rres) . The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from the exponential spatial Landau damping in a linear wave-particle resonance. This poster uses analytic theory and simulations to explain the new flux-driven algebraic damping of the mode. As electrons are swept around the nonlinear ``cat's eye'' orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a quadrupole (m = 2) density distribution, which sets up an electric field that acts back on the plasma core. The field causes an E × B drift motion that symmetrizes the core, i.e. damps the m = 2 mode. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1414570, and DOE Grants DE-SC0002451.

  19. Damping and energy dissipation in soft tissue vibrations during running.

    PubMed

    Khassetarash, Arash; Hassannejad, Reza; Enders, Hendrik; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2015-01-21

    It has been well accepted that the vibrations of soft tissue cannot be simulated by a single sinusoidal function. In fact, these vibrations are a combination of several vibration modes. In this study, these modes are extracted applying a recently developed method namely, partly ensemble empirical mode decomposition (PEEMD). Then, a methodology for estimating the damping properties and energy dissipation caused by damping for each mode is used. Applying this methodology on simulated signals demonstrates high accuracy. This methodology is applied to the acceleration signals of the gastrocnemius muscle during sprinting and the differences between the damping properties of different vibration modes were identified. The results were 1) the damping property of high-frequency mode was higher than that for low-frequency modes. 2) All identified modes were in under damped condition, therefore, the vibrations had an oscillatory nature. 3) The damping ratios of lower modes are about 100% increased compared to higher modes. 4) The energy dissipation occurred in lower modes were much more than that for higher mode; According to the power spectrum of the ground reaction force (GRF), which is the input force into the body, the recent finding supports the muscle tuning paradigm. It is suggested that the damping properties and energy dissipation can be used to distinguish between different running conditions (surface, fatigue, etc.).

  20. Structural dynamics and vibrations of damped, aircraft-type structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Maurice I.

    1992-01-01

    Engineering preliminary design methods for approximating and predicting the effects of viscous or equivalent viscous-type damping treatments on the free and forced vibration of lightly damped aircraft-type structures are developed. Similar developments are presented for dynamic hysteresis viscoelastic-type damping treatments. It is shown by both engineering analysis and numerical illustrations that the intermodal coupling of the undamped modes arising from the introduction of damping may be neglected in applying these preliminary design methods, except when dissimilar modes of these lightly damped, complex aircraft-type structures have identical or nearly identical natural frequencies. In such cases, it is shown that a relatively simple, additional interaction calculation between pairs of modes exhibiting this 'modal response' phenomenon suffices in the prediction of interacting modal damping fractions. The accuracy of the methods is shown to be very good to excellent, depending on the normal natural frequency separation of the system modes, thereby permitting a relatively simple preliminary design approach. This approach is shown to be a natural precursor to elaborate finite element, digital computer design computations in evaluating the type, quantity, and location of damping treatment.

  1. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  2. Novel Slide-Ring Material/Natural Rubber Composites with High Damping Property

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wencai; Zhao, Detao; Yang, Jingna; Nishi, Toshio; Ito, Kohzo; Zhao, Xiuying; Zhang, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    A novel class of polymers called “slide-ring” (SR) materials with slideable junctions were used for high damping composites for the first time. The SR acts as the high damping phase dispersed in the natural rubber (NR) matrix, and epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) acts as the compatibilizer. The morphological, structural, and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA), rubber processing analyzer (RPA), and tensile tester. AFM and TEM results showed that the SR phase was uniformly dispersed in the composites, in a small size that is a function of ENR. DMTA and RPA results showed that the damping factor of the composites is much higher than that of NR, especially at room temperatures. Stretch hysteresis was used to study the energy dissipation of the composites at large strains. The results showed that SR and ENR can significantly improve the dissipation efficiency at strains lower than 200% strain. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study the strain-induced crystallization of the composites. The results indicated that the impact of the SR on the crystallization of NR is mitigated by the insulating effect of ENR. PMID:26949077

  3. Novel Slide-Ring Material/Natural Rubber Composites with High Damping Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wencai; Zhao, Detao; Yang, Jingna; Nishi, Toshio; Ito, Kohzo; Zhao, Xiuying; Zhang, Liqun

    2016-03-01

    A novel class of polymers called “slide-ring” (SR) materials with slideable junctions were used for high damping composites for the first time. The SR acts as the high damping phase dispersed in the natural rubber (NR) matrix, and epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) acts as the compatibilizer. The morphological, structural, and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA), rubber processing analyzer (RPA), and tensile tester. AFM and TEM results showed that the SR phase was uniformly dispersed in the composites, in a small size that is a function of ENR. DMTA and RPA results showed that the damping factor of the composites is much higher than that of NR, especially at room temperatures. Stretch hysteresis was used to study the energy dissipation of the composites at large strains. The results showed that SR and ENR can significantly improve the dissipation efficiency at strains lower than 200% strain. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study the strain-induced crystallization of the composites. The results indicated that the impact of the SR on the crystallization of NR is mitigated by the insulating effect of ENR.

  4. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, P. Dual, J.

    2015-06-15

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  5. Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

    SciTech Connect

    Mudarri, David; Fisk, William J.

    2007-06-01

    The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.

  6. Effect of Particle Damping on an Acoustically Excited Curved Vehicle Panel Structure with varied Equipment Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, David; Smith, Andrew; Knight, Brent; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Craigmyle, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Particle dampers provide a mechanism for diverting energy away from resonant structural vibrations. This experimental study provides data from trials to determine how effective use of these dampers might be for equipment mounted to a curved orthogrid vehicle panel. Trends for damping are examined for variations in damper fill level, component mass, and excitation energy. A significant response reduction at the component level would suggest that comparatively small, thoughtfully placed, particle dampers might be advantageously used in vehicle design. The results of this test will be compared with baseline acoustic response tests and other follow-on testing involving a range of isolation and damping methods. Instrumentation consisting of accelerometers, microphones, and still photography data will be collected to correlate with the analytical results.

  7. Evaluating Attenuation of Vibration Response using Particle Impact Damping for a Range of Equipment Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Parsons, David; Smith, Andrew; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert; Craigmyle, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Particle dampers provide a mechanism for diverting energy away from resonant structural vibrations. This experimental study provides data from a series of acoustically excited tests to determine the effectiveness of these dampers for equipment mounted to a curved orthogrid panel for a launch vehicle application. Vibration attenuation trends are examined for variations in particle damper fill level, component mass, and excitation energy. A significant response reduction at the component level was achieved, suggesting that comparatively small, strategically placed, particle damper devices might be advantageously used in launch vehicle design. These test results were compared to baseline acoustic response tests without particle damping devices, over a range of isolation and damping parameters. Instrumentation consisting of accelerometers, microphones, and still photography data will be collected to correlate with the analytical results.

  8. Analytic and laser vibrometry study of squeeze film damping of MEMS cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.; Judge, John A.; Lawrence, Eric; Jarzynski, Jacek; Houston, Brian

    2006-06-01

    This study compares theoretical predictions to experimental measurements of squeeze film damping of MEMS cantilevers in a fluid environment. A series of MEMS cantilevers were fabricated on a silicon wafer. Each of the silicon beams was 2 μm thick and 18 μm wide. The lengths range from 100 to 800 μm and the air-filled gap between the cantilever and the substrate was 6 μm. An analytic model for squeeze film damping was used to predict the corresponding quality factor Q squeeze film (the ratio of the mechanical energy stored in the oscillator to the energy dissipated per cycle) for these cantilevers. The results from the modeling are compared to experimental results obtained using a Polytec MSA-400 Micro System Analyzer.

  9. The effect of resonant driving and damping on dynamic suction pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Nicholas; Miller, Laura

    2016-11-01

    Impedance pumping (or dynamic suction pumping) drives flow through a a flexible valveless tube with a single region of actuation. It is a profoundly complex pumping mechanism given that the flow velocities and directions generated depend nonlinearly upon the driving frequency, material properties, duty factor, and location of the actuation point. Given the simplicity of its actuation, it is used in biomedical devices and is thought to generate flow in a number of biological systems. In this study, we numerically simulate an elastic tube with mass using the immersed boundary method and explore the performance when it is driven over a range of frequencies and damping factors. Flow is maximized during resonance, and bulk transport is minimal when the tube is over-damped.

  10. Damping induced by ferrofluid seals in ironless loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, M.; Génevaux, J. M.; Dauchez, N.; Brouard, B.; Collas, P.; Mézière, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damping induced by ferrofluid seals in ironless loudspeakers is investigated in this paper. The magnetic field is steady but not spatially constant. A model to determine the viscous damping coefficient induced by the ferrofluid seal is derived. It is a function of geometrical parameters and local viscosity of the ferrofluid in which dependence from magnetic field, shear rate and frequency is accounted for. Comparison with experimental results shows a good agreement for the thinner seals. An overestimation of the damping is observed for higher volumes. This discrepancy comes from geometric irregularities of the magnet assembly made out of several tiles.

  11. Backup nutation damping strategy for the Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.; Eke, Estelle M.

    1989-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the design and testing of remedial measures that can be taken to achieve reasonable nutation damping of the Galileo spacecraft in the event of failure of its boom damper in flight. One scheme exploits the effects of payload motion on the nutational stability of a spinning spacecraft. However, the spacecraft-motion-compensation algorithm can only be used if the scan platform bore sight is pointed in a direction chosen to produce rapid damping of spacecraft nutation. A second method suggested for nutation damping is a thruster-based open-loop control algorithm, utilizing a pair of thrusters as actuators.

  12. Damping MEMS Devices in Harsh Environments Using Active Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-17

    properties of the layers was developed. Damping properties in Nitinol thin film due only to residual stresses was measured to be as high as tan delta...0.17 for large strain (0.9%). At lower strain levels a Nitinol /Silicon laminate was tested in a cantilever load frame. The damping value of the...film was measured to be 0.28 (at 0.27% strain). A Nitinol /Terfenol-D/Nickel laminate was fabricated and tested in a cantilever loading. The damping

  13. Effects of damping on mode shapes, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.; Merchant, D. H.; Arnquist, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and acceleration admittances were calculated for a realistic NASTRAN structural model of space shuttle for three conditions: liftoff, maximum dynamic pressure and end of solid rocket booster burn. The realistic model of the orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket motors included the representation of structural joint transmissibilities by finite stiffness and damping elements. Data values for the finite damping elements were assigned to duplicate overall low-frequency modal damping values taken from tests of similar vehicles. For comparison with the calculated admittances, position and rate gains were computed for a conventional shuttle model for the liftoff condition. Dynamic characteristics and admittances for the space shuttle model are presented.

  14. Dissipationless Damping of Compressive MHD Modes in Twisted Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, I.; Fedun, V.; Verth, G.; Goossens, M. L.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-12-01

    Axisymmetric modes in straight magentic flux tubes exhibit a cutoff in the long wavelength limit and no damping is predicted. However, as soon as weak magnetic twist is introduced inside as well as outside the magnetic flux tube the cutoff recedes. Furthermore, when density variations are also incomporated within the modelresonant absorption appears. In this work we explore analytically the expected damping times for waves within the Alfven continuum for different solar atmospheric conditions. Based on the results in this work we offer insight on recent observations of sausage wave damping in the chromosphere.

  15. Investigation of empirical damping laws for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic test data from vibration testing of a number of aerospace vehicles was made to develop an empirical structural damping law. A systematic attempt was made to fit dissipated energy/cycle to combinations of all dynamic variables. The best-fit laws for bending, torsion, and longitudinal motion are given, with error bounds. A discussion and estimate are made of error sources. Programs are developed for predicting equivalent linear structural damping coefficients and finding the response of nonlinearly damped structures.

  16. Damping and support in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; McIver, Carl R.; Mittleider, John A.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses to provide improved auxiliary damping for superconducting bearings in superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. In a superconducting bearing, a cryostat housing the superconductors is connected to a ground state with a combination of a damping strip of material, a set of linkage arms to provide vertical support, and spring washers to provide stiffness. Alternately, the superconducting bearing may be supported by a cryostat connected to a ground state by posts constructed from a mesh of fibers, with the damping and stiffness controlled by the fiber composition, size, and mesh geometry.

  17. Nonlinear Landau damping in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiwamoto, Y.; Benson, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    A model which explains the nonresonant waves which produce the diffuse resonance observed near 3/2 f(H) by the Alouette and Isis topside sounders, where f(H) is the ambient electron cyclotron frequency, is presented. These waves are the result of plasma wave instabilities driven by anisotropic electron velocity distributions initiated by the high-power short-duration sounder pulse. Calculations of the nonlinear wave-particle coupling coefficients show that the diffuse resonance wave can be maintained by nonlinear Landau damping of the sounder-stimulated 2f(H) wave which is observed with a time duration longer than that of the diffuse resonance wave. The time duration of the diffuse resonance is determined by the transit time of the instability-generated and nonlinearly maintained diffuse resonance wave from the remote short-lived hot region back to the antenna. The model is consistent with the Alouette/Isis observations and it demonstrates the existence of nonlinear wave-particle interactions in the ionosphere.

  18. Influence of quasiparticle damping on magnetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Nolting, W.

    1996-04-01

    We propose a modified alloy analogy for the single-band Hubbard model, by which we investigate the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in narrow energy bands. It is shown that a proper definition of the fictitious alloy enables self-consistent magnetic solutions to be found. The existence of spontaneous magnetism is mainly influenced by the lattice structure, the effective Coulomb coupling, and the band occupation. In accordance with the simple Stoner criterion, ferromagnetism appears in strongly correlated electron systems for band occupations, which locate the chemical potential μ in regions of high quasiparticle density of states. Rather realistic Curie temperatures are found. The macroscopic magnetic properties explain themselves via temperature-dependent quasiparticle densities of states, quasiparticle band structures, and respective spectral densities. It is shown how quasiparticle damping may depress quite substantially the stability of magnetic states by broadening corresponding spectral density peaks. Correlation effects lead to the expected splitting into two quasiparticle subbands (``Hubbard bands''), and under certain conditions to an additional exchange splitting of each of these quasiparticle subbands, as well as to a spin-dependent band narrowing, the combination of which gives rise to an unconventional ``inverse'' exchange shift at certain positions of the Brillouin zone.

  19. Investigation of damping liquids for aircraft instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keulegan, G H

    1929-01-01

    This report covers the results of an investigation carried on at the Bureau of Standards under a research authorization from, and with the financial assistance of, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The choice of a damping liquid for aircraft instruments is difficult owing to the range of temperature at which aircraft operate. Temperature changes affect the viscosity tremendously. The investigation was undertaken with the object of finding liquids of various viscosities otherwise suitable which had a minimum change in viscosity with temperature. The new data relate largely to solutions. The effect of temperature on the kinematic viscosity of the following liquids and solutions was determined in the temperature interval -18 degrees to +30 degrees C. (1) solutions of animal and vegetable oils in xylene. These were poppy-seed oil, two samples of neat's-foot oils, castor oil, and linseed oil. (2) solutions of mineral oil in xylene. These were Squibb's petrolatum of naphthene base and transformer oil. (3) glycerine solutions in ethyl alcohol and in mixture of 50-50 ethyl alcohol and water. (4) mixtures of normal butyl alcohol with methyl alcohol. (5) individual liquids, kerosene, mineral spirits, xylene, recoil oil. The apparatus consisted of four capillary-tube viscometers, which were immersed in a liquid bath in order to secure temperature control. The method of calibration and the related experimental data are presented.

  20. Loss of Landau Damping for Bunch Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-04-11

    Conditions for the existence, uniqueness and stability of self-consistent bunch steady states are considered. For the existence and uniqueness problems, simple algebraic criteria are derived for both the action and Hamiltonian domain distributions. For the stability problem, van Kampen theory is used. The onset of a discrete van Kampen mode means the emergence of a coherent mode without any Landau damping; thus, even a tiny couple-bunch or multi-turn wake is sufficient to drive the instability. The method presented here assumes an arbitrary impedance, RF shape, and beam distribution function. Available areas on the intensity-emittance plane are shown for resistive wall wake and single harmonic, bunch shortening and bunch lengthening RF configurations. Thresholds calculated for the Tevatron parameters and impedance model are in agreement with the observations. These thresholds are found to be extremely sensitive to the small-argument behaviour of the bunch distribution function. Accordingly, a method to increase the LLD threshold is suggested. This article summarizes and extends recent author's publications.

  1. Ferromagnetic resonance and damping properties of CoFeB thin films as free layers in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Wenzhe; Carter, Matthew J.; Xiao, Gang

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated the magnetization dynamics of sputtered Co40Fe40B20 thin films in a wide range of thicknesses used as free layers in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions, with the technique of broadband ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). We have observed a large interface-induced magnetic perpendicular anisotropy in the thin film limit. The out-of-plane angular dependence of the FMR measurement revealed the contributions of two different damping mechanisms in thick and thin film limits. In thinner films (< 2 nm), two-magnon scattering and inhomogeneous broadening are significant for the FMR linewidth, while the Gilbert damping dominates the linewidth in thicker films (≥ 4 nm). Lastly, we have observed an inverse scaling of Gilbert damping constant with film thickness, and an intrinsic damping constant of 0.004 in the CoFeB alloy film is determined.

  2. Damper mechanism for nuclear reactor control elements

    DOEpatents

    Taft, William Elwood

    1976-01-01

    A damper mechanism which provides a nuclear reactor control element decelerating function at the end of the scram stroke. The total damping function is produced by the combination of two assemblies, which operate in sequence. First, a tapered dashram assembly decelerates the control element to a lower velocity, after which a spring hydraulic damper assembly takes over to complete the final damping.

  3. Analysis of coils of wire rope arranged for passive damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutchins, M. A.; Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Kumar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N. G.; Tinker, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    Vibration dampers constructed with multiple loops of wire rope are studied. The literature on such devices is reviewed briefly, and dynamic and static models of them are examined. Fundamental and advanced NASTRAN models for wire rope damping are considered.

  4. Mooring Line Damping Estimation for a Floating Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design. PMID:25243231

  5. Synchrotron and collisional damping effects on runaway electron distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Eidietis, N.; Pace, D.; Cooper, C.; Shiraki, D.; Commaux, N.; Hollmann, E.; Moyer, R.; Granetz, R.; Embreus, O.; Fulop, T.; Stahl, A.; Wilkie, G.; Aleynikov, P.; Brennan, D. P.; Liu, C.

    2016-10-01

    Validated models of runaway electron (RE) dissipation are required to confidently approve safe ITER Q = 10 operation. DIII-D experiments using quiescent REs are exploring the importance of synchrotron and collisional damping terms to RE dissipation. New time and energy-resolved measurements of RE bremsstrahlung hard X-ray (HXR) emission reveal stark differences between high and low energy REs as damping terms are varied. Previously reported anomalously high RE dissipation only applies to low energy REs. At high energy (where synchrotron effects are strongest) low synchrotron damping cases reach higher peak RE energy despite weaker particle confinement. Low-energy RE decay is observed concurrently with high-energy RE growth. RE dissipation models predict bump-on-tail distributions whose properties depend on the damping terms. Measured HXR spectra are very broad, as expected for bump-on-tail distributions. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  6. Gilbert damping of ferromagnetic metals incorporating inhomogeneous spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Umetsu, Nobuyuki Miura, Daisuke; Sakuma, Akimasa

    2015-05-07

    The effects of inhomogeneous spin dynamics on magnetic damping in ferromagnetic metals are studied. On the basis of linear response theory, we derive the microscopic expression for the Gilbert damping term in a two-dimensional electron gas interacting with the magnetization via exchange coupling in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC). In the spin wave propagating with the wave vector, q, the behavior of q-dependent damping can be explained in terms of both inter- and intra-band spin excitations. The spatially dependent damping torques originating from Rashba SOC that cancel out in a uniform precession system distort the circular orbit of a magnetization-precession trajectory in the presence of inhomogeneous spin dynamics.

  7. Mooring line damping estimation for a floating wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design.

  8. An Active Damping at Blade Resonances Using Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Duffy, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing an active damping at blade resonances using piezoelectric structure to reduce excessive vibratory stresses that lead to high cycle fatigue (HCF) failures in aircraft engine turbomachinery. Conventional passive damping work was shown first on a nonrotating beam made by Ti-6A1-4V with a pair of identical piezoelectric patches, and then active feedback control law was derived in terms of inductor, resister, and capacitor to control resonant frequency only. Passive electronic circuit components and adaptive feature could be easily programmable into control algorithm. Experimental active damping was demonstrated on two test specimens achieving significant damping on tip displacement and patch location. Also a multimode control technique was shown to control several modes.

  9. Influence of damping on quantum interference - An exactly soluble model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, A. O.; Leggett, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the result of a calculation which shows the effect of damping on the quantum interference of two Gaussian wave packets in a harmonic potential. The influence-functional method, which seems to be the most appropriate one for this kind of calculation, is used. It is shown that quantum-interference effects are severely diminished by the presence of damping even when its influence on the system is only light. The corrections to the undamped formulas are always expressible in terms of the phenomenological damping constant, the temperature (in the high-temperature limit), the cutoff frequency of the reservoir oscillators, and the mean number of quanta of energy intially present in the system. Both weakly and strongly damped systems are analyzed in the regime of low and high temperatures.

  10. Damping Rotor Nutation Oscillations in a Gyroscope with Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarov, Valentine N.

    1996-01-01

    A possibility of an effective damping of rotor nutations by modulating the field of the moment transducers in synchronism with the nutation frequency is considered. The algorithms for forming the control moments are proposed and their application is discussed.

  11. Measurements of Aerodynamic Damping in the MIT Transonic Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    A method was developed and demonstrated for the direct measurement of aerodynamic forcing and aerodynamic damping of a transonic compressor. The method is based on the inverse solution of the structural dynamic equations of motion of the blade disk system in order to determine the forces acting on the system. The disturbing and damping forces acting on a given blade are determined if the equations of motion are expressed in individual blade coordinates. If the structural dynamic equations are transformed to multiblade coordinates, the damping can be measured for blade disk modes, and related to a reduced frequency and interblade phase angle. In order to measure the aerodynamic damping in this way, the free response to a known excitation is studied.

  12. Landau damping of Langmuir twisted waves with kappa distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif Aman-ur-Rehman; Mahmood, Shahzad

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic theory of Landau damping of Langmuir twisted modes is investigated in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are considered to be decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode function defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to obtain the weak damping rates of the Langmuir twisted waves in a nonthermal plasma. The strong damping effects of the Langmuir twisted waves at wavelengths approaching Debye length are also obtained by using an exact numerical method and are illustrated graphically. The damping rates of the planar Langmuir waves are found to be larger than the twisted Langmuir waves in plasmas which shows opposite behavior as depicted in Fig. 3 by J. T. Mendoça [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112113 (2012)].

  13. Estimation of full modal damping matrices from complex test modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T. K.; Chrostowski, J. D.; Pappa, Richard

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the refinements of a previously published method for estimating a full modal damping matrix from complex test modes. It also documents application of the refined method to a structure where complex test modes were derived by the ERA method from multi-input random vibration test data. A numerical example based on simulated test data is presented to demonstrate the validity of the method. The application using real data was not successful, presumably because of noise in the small phase angles of the measured complex modes. Alternative test and data reduction procedures are suggested as possible remedies to the problem. A careful analysis of measurement and data processing errors should be made to examine basic feasibility before implementing the alternative procedures. The ability to estimate a full modal damping matrix is considered important for the preflight estimation of on-orbit damping, and for the synthesis of structural damping from substructure tests.

  14. Flywheel vibration isolation test using a variable-damping isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyun-Ung; Taniwaki, Shigemune; Kinjyo, Naofumi; Izawa, Katsuhiko

    2006-04-01

    This study demonstrates the isolation performance of a variable-damping isolator using a bio-metal fiber (BMF) valve to enhance the pointing performance of observation satellites by isolating disturbances induced by reaction wheel assemblies. Vibration isolation tests of the variable-damping isolator were performed using an air-floating wheel disturbance detector to investigate whether the isolator can actually isolate flywheel vibration. In this paper, we first present a recently developed variable-damping isolator with low power consumption, and a reaction wheel disturbance detector, fabricated in a previous study, which detects low-frequency disturbances. Next, we describe the effectiveness of the variable-damping isolator based on flywheel vibration isolation test results.

  15. Resummation and the gluon damping rate in hot QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1990-08-01

    At high temperature a consistent perturbative expansion requires the resummation of an infinite subset of loop corrections into an effective expansion. This effective exansion is used to compute the gluon damping rate at leading order. 25 refs.

  16. Reduced Order Models for Dynamic Behavior of Elastomer Damping Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, B.; Legay, A.; Deü, J.-F.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of passive damping, various mechanical systems from the space industry use elastomer components (shock absorbers, silent blocks, flexible joints...). The material of these devices has frequency, temperature and amplitude dependent characteristics. The associated numerical models, using viscoelastic and hyperelastic constitutive behaviour, may become computationally too expensive during a design process. The aim of this work is to propose efficient reduced viscoelastic models of rubber devices. The first step is to choose an accurate material model that represent the viscoelasticity. The second step is to reduce the rubber device finite element model to a super-element that keeps the frequency dependence. This reduced model is first built by taking into account the fact that the device's interfaces are much more rigid than the rubber core. To make use of this difference, kinematical constraints enforce the rigid body motion of these interfaces reducing the rubber device model to twelve dofs only on the interfaces (three rotations and three translations per face). Then, the superelement is built by using a component mode synthesis method. As an application, the dynamic behavior of a structure supported by four hourglass shaped rubber devices under harmonic loads is analysed to show the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  17. The readout electronics for Plastic Scintillator Detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Yang, Haibo; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; JingZhe, Zhang; Wang, XiaoHui; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Guoqing; Ma, Xinwen

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite, which launched in December 2015, is designed to find the evidence of the existence of dark matter particles in the universe via the detection of the high-energy electrons and gamma-ray particles produced possibly by the annihilation of dark matter particles. Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) is one of major part of the satellite payload, which is comprised of a crossed pair of layers with 41 plastic scintillator-strips, each read out from both ends by the same Hamamatsu R4443MOD2 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). In order to extend linear dynamic range of detector, PMTs read out each plastic scintillator-strip separately with two dynode pickoffs. Therefore, the readout electronics system comprises of four Front-end boards to receive the pulses from 328 PMTs and implement charge measurement, which is based on the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) chip VA160, 16 bits ADC and FPGA. The electronics of the detector has been designed following stringent requirements on mechanical and thermal stability, power consumption, radiation hardness and double redundancy. Various experiments are designed and implemented to check the performance of the electronics, some excellent results has been achieved.According to experimental results analysis, it is proved that the readout electronics works well.

  18. Damping and modulus measurements in B2 transition metal aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmouche, M. R.; Wolfenden, A.

    1985-01-01

    The polycrystalline intermetallic alloys FeAl (50.9 to 58.2 percent Fe), NiAl (49.2 to 55.9 percent Ni) and CoAl (48.5 to 52.3 percent Co) have the B2 structure and are of interest for high temperature applications. The PUCOT (piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique) has been used to measure mechanical damping or internal friction and Young's modulus has been used as a function of temperature and composition for these materials. The modulus data for six CoAl alloys at temperatures up to 1300 K are presented. Examples are given of the strain amplitude dependence of internal friction for four CoAl alloys. The curves showed the break away phenomenon and are interpreted in terms of a theory dealing with the pinning of dislocation lines and their eventual break away at large strain amplitudes. The dislocation density was calculated to be about 10 to the 8th per sq m. For all the compositions (X1) of CoAl studied, a single equation could be fitted to the data.

  19. Dislocation Damping and Anisotropic Attenuation in the Earth's Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.; Farla, R. J.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.; Faul, U.; Zimmerman, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy, attributed to olivine lattice preferred orientation, suggests that tectonic deformation in the Earth's shallow upper mantle involves dislocation creep. Reversible glide of dislocations, generated by the prevailing/fossil tectonic stress, may result in anelastic relaxation that contributes to the reduction of seismic wave speeds and associated attenuation. To test this hypothesis, polycrystalline olivine specimens were synthesised from synthetic (sol-gel) precursors and hot-pressed at high temperature. The hot-pressed material is fully dense, fine-grained and essentially dry and melt-free olivine. Other, coarser-grained material was synthesised from San Carlos olivine powders. These contrasting materials provided the opportunity to distinguish between the influences of grain size and dislocation density. Selected specimens were deformed by dislocation creep either in compression or torsion and characterised for dislocation density via oxidation and backscattered electron imaging. Additionally, the dislocation recovery rate was determined for both olivines at different temperatures and time durations. The results established that a maximum temperature of 1100C should allow a relatively stable dislocation density to be maintained during prolonged mechanical testing (> 50 hours). The shear modulus and associated strain-energy dissipation in both hot-pressed and pre-deformed specimens were subsequently measured at seismic frequencies under conditions of simultaneous high pressure and temperature with torsional forced-oscillation methods. These experiments were carried out with strain amplitudes < 10-5 to permit direct comparison with seismological models. The high-temperature dissipation background, attributed in undeformed fine-grained materials to grain-boundary sliding, and the associated partial relaxation of the shear modulus, are systematically enhanced in the pre-deformed materials - suggesting a role for the dislocations introduced during the

  20. Composite slip table of dissimilar materials for damping longitudinal modes

    DOEpatents

    Gregory, Danny L.; Priddy, Tommy G.; Smallwood, David O.; Woodall, Tommy D.

    1991-01-01

    A vibration slip table for use in a vibration testing apparatus. The table s comprised of at least three composite layers of material; a first metal layer, a second damping layer, and a third layer having a high acoustic velocity relative to the first layer. The different acoustic velocities between the first and third layers cause relative shear displacements between the layers with the second layer damping the displacements between the first and third layers to reduce the table longitudinal vibration modes.

  1. Landau damping of geodesic acoustic mode in toroidally rotating tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao

    2015-06-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analyzed by using modified gyro-kinetic (MGK) equation applicable to low-frequency microinstabilities in a rotating axisymmetric plasma. Dispersion relation of GAM in the presence of arbitrary toroidal Mach number is analytically derived. The effects of toroidal rotation on the GAM frequency and damping rate do not depend on the orientation of equilibrium flow. It is shown that the toroidal Mach number M increases the GAM frequency and dramatically decreases the Landau damping rate.

  2. An efficient frequency response solution for nonproportionally damped systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Paul; Rule, William K.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented to accurately and economically calculate steady state frequency responses based on the analysis of large finite element models with nonproportional damping effects. The new method is a hybrid of the traditional nonproportional and proportional damping solution methods. It captures the advantages of each computational approach without the burden of their respective shortcomings, as demonstrated with comparative analysis performed on a large finite element model.

  3. Beliaev damping of quasiparticles in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Katz, N; Steinhauer, J; Ozeri, R; Davidson, N

    2002-11-25

    We report a measurement of the suppression of collisions of quasiparticles with ground state atoms within a Bose-Einstein condensate at low momentum. These collisions correspond to Beliaev damping of the excitations, in the previously unexplored regime of the continuous quasiparticle energy spectrum. We use a hydrodynamic simulation of the expansion dynamics, with the Beliaev damping cross section, in order to confirm the assumptions of our analysis.

  4. Development of Damped Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    DTIP FiLE COPY Applied Research Laboratory (Dto 00 CD Technical Report NO DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL...DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS by Clark A. Updike Ram B. Bhagat Technical Report No. TR 90-004 April 1990... Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C.A. Updike, R. Bhagat 1 3a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE

  5. Inverse design of nonlinearity in energy harvesters for optimum damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandchi Tehrani, Maryam; Elliott, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the inverse design method for the nonlinearity in an energy harvester in order to achieve an optimum damping. A single degree-of-freedom electromechanical oscillator is considered as an energy harvester, which is subjected to a harmonic base excitation. The harvester has a limited throw due to the physical constraint of the device, which means that the amplitude of the relative displacement between the mass of the harvester and the base cannot exceed a threshold when the device is driven at resonance and beyond a particular amplitude. This physical constraint requires the damping of the harvester to be adjusted for different excitation amplitudes, such that the relative displacement is controlled and maintained below the limit. For example, the damping can be increased to reduce the amplitude of the relative displacement. For high excitation amplitudes, the optimum damping is, therefore, dependent on the amplitude of the base excitation, and can be synthesised by a nonlinear function. In this paper, a nonlinear function in the form of a bilinear is considered to represent the damping model of the device. A numerical optimisation using Matlab is carried out to fit a curve to the amplitude-dependent damping in order to determine the optimum bilinear model. The nonlinear damping is then used in the time-domain simulations and the relative displacement and the average harvested power are obtained. It is demonstrated that the proposed nonlinear damping can maintain the relative displacement of the harvester at its maximum level for a wide range of excitation, therefore providing the optimum condition for power harvesting.

  6. Automated dynamic analytical model improvement for damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuh, J. S.; Berman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described to improve a linear nonproportionally damped analytical model of a structure. The procedure finds the smallest changes in the analytical model such that the improved model matches the measured modal parameters. Features of the method are: (1) ability to properly treat complex valued modal parameters of a damped system; (2) applicability to realistically large structural models; and (3) computationally efficiency without involving eigensolutions and inversion of a large matrix.

  7. Spin-orbit precession damping in transition metal ferromagnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, K.; Idzerda, Y. U.; Stiles, M. D.

    2008-04-01

    We provide a simple explanation, based on an effective field, for the precession damping rate due to the spin-orbit interaction. Previous effective field treatments of spin-orbit damping include only variations of the state energies with respect to the magnetization direction, an effect referred to as the breathing Fermi surface. Treating the interaction of the rotating spins with the orbits as a perturbation, we include also changes in the state populations in the effective field. In order to investigate the quantitative differences between the damping rates of iron, cobalt, and nickel, we compute the dependence of the damping rate on the density of states and the spin-orbit parameter. There is a strong correlation between the density of states and the damping rate. The intraband terms of the damping rate depend on the spin-orbit parameter cubed, while the interband terms are proportional to the spin-orbit parameter squared. However, the spectrum of band spacings is also an important quantity and does not appear to depend in a simple way on material parameters.

  8. Design and responses of Butterworth and critically damped digital filters.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D Gordon E; Dowling, James J

    2003-12-01

    For many years the Butterworth lowpass filter has been used to smooth many kinds of biomechanical data, despite the fact that it is underdamped and therefore overshoots and/or undershoots data during rapid transitions. A comparison of the conventional Butterworth filter with a critically damped filter shows that the critically damped filter not only removes the undershooting and overshooting, but has a superior rise time during rapid transitions. While analog filters always create phase distortion, both the critically damped and Butterworth filters can be modified to become zero-lag filters when the data are processed in both the forward and reverse directions. In such cases little improvement is realized by applying multiple passes. The Butterworth filter has superior 'roll-off' (attenuation of noise above the cutoff frequency) than the critically damped filter, but by increasing the number of passes of the critically damped filter the same 'roll-off' can be achieved. In summary, the critically damped filter was shown to have superior performance in the time domain than the Butterworth filter, but for data that need to be double differentiated (e.g. displacement data) the Butterworth filter may still be the better choice.

  9. Spin amplification in solution magnetic resonance using radiation damping.

    PubMed

    Walls, Jamie D; Huang, Susie Y; Lin, Yung-Ya

    2007-08-07

    The sensitive detection of dilute solute spins is critical to biomolecular NMR. In this work, a spin amplifier for detecting dilute solute magnetization is developed using the radiation damping interaction in solution magnetic resonance. The evolution of the solvent magnetization, initially placed along the unstable -z direction, is triggered by the radiation damping field generated by the dilute solute magnetization. As long as the radiation damping field generated by the solute is larger than the corresponding thermal noise field generated by the sample coil, the solute magnetization can effectively trigger the evolution of the water magnetization under radiation damping. The coupling between the solute and solvent magnetizations via the radiation damping field can be further improved through a novel bipolar gradient scheme, which allows solute spins with chemical shift differences much greater than the effective radiation damping field strength to affect the solvent magnetizations more efficiently. Experiments performed on an aqueous acetone solution indicate that solute concentrations on the order of 10(-5) that of the solvent concentration can be readily detected using this spin amplifier.

  10. Vibration and damping characteristics of cylindrical shells with active constrained layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the application of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments is extended to the vibration control of cylindrical shells. The governing equation of motion of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments is derived on the basis of the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and visco-elastic materials and an energy approach. The damping of a visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. A finite element model is developed to describe and predict the vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments. A closed-loop control system based on proportional and derivative feedback of the sensor voltage generated by the piezo-sensor of the ACLD patches is established. The dynamic behaviors of cylindrical shells with ACLD treatments such as natural frequencies, loss factors and responses in the frequency domain are further investigated. The effects of several key parameters such as control gains, location and coverage of ACLD treatments on vibration suppression of cylindrical shells are also discussed. The numerical results indicate the validity of the finite element model and the control strategy approach. The potential of ACLD treatments in controlling vibration and sound radiation of cylindrical shells used as major critical structures such as cabins of aircraft, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles is thus demonstrated.

  11. Damping characteristics of friction damped braced frame and its effectiveness in the mega-sub controlled structure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yeda; Zhang, Xunan; Sheldon, Cherry

    2007-06-01

    Based on energy dissipation and structural control principle, a new structural configuration, called the mega-sub controlled structure (MSCS) with friction damped braces (FDBs), is first presented. Meanwhile, to calculate the damping coefficient in the slipping state a new analytical method is proposed. The damping characteristics of one-storey friction damped braced frame (FDBF) are investigated, and the influence of the structural parameters on the energy dissipation and the practical engineering design are discussed. The nonlinear dynamic equations and the analytical model of the MSCS with FDBs are established. Three building structures with different structural configurations, which were designed with reference to the conventional mega-sub structures such as used in Tokyo City Hall, are comparatively investigated. The results illustrate that the structure presented in the paper has excellent dynamic properties and satisfactory control effectiveness.

  12. Damping Ring R&D at CESR-TA

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, David L.

    2015-01-23

    Accelerators that collide high energy beams of matter and anti-matter are essential tools for the investigation of the fundamental constituents of matter, and the search for new forms of matter and energy. A “Linear Collider” is a machine that would bring high energy and very compact bunches of electrons and positrons (anti-electrons) into head-on collision. Such a machine would produce (among many other things) the newly discovered Higgs particle, enabling a detailed study of its properties. Among the most critical and challenging components of a linear collider are the damping rings that produce the very compact and intense beams of electrons and positrons that are to be accelerated into collision. Hot dilute particle beams are injected into the damping rings, where they are compressed and cooled. The size of the positron beam must be reduced more than a thousand fold in the damping ring, and this compression must be accomplished in a fraction of a second. The cold compact beams are then extracted from the damping ring and accelerated into collision at high energy. The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), would require damping rings that routinely produce such cold, compact and intense beams. The goal of the Cornell study was a credible design for the damping rings for the ILC. Among the technical challenges of the damping rings; the development of instrumentation that can measure the properties of the very small beams in a very narrow window of time, and mitigation of the forces that can destabilize the beams and prevent adequate cooling, or worse lead to beam loss. One of the most pernicious destabilizing forces is due to the formation of clouds of electrons in the beam pipe. The electron cloud effect is a phenomenon in particle accelerators in which a high density of low energy electrons, build up inside the vacuum chamber. At the outset of the study, it was anticipated that electron cloud effects would limit the intensity of the positron ring

  13. Calculations of the electron-damping force on moving-edge dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohri, T.

    1982-11-01

    Dynamic effect of a moving dislocation has been recognized as one of essential features of deformation behavior at very low temperatures. Damping mechanisms are the central problems in this field. Based on the free-electron-gas model, the electron-damping force (friction force) on a moving-edge dislocation in a normal state is estimated. By applying classical MacKenzie-Sondheimer's procedures, the electrical resistivity caused by a moving dislocation is first estimated, and the damping force is calculated as a Joule-heat-energy dissipation. The calculated values are 3.63x10/sup -6/, 7.62x10/sup -7/ and 1.00x10/sup -6/ (dyn sec/cm/sup -2/) for Al, Cu and Pb, respectively. These values show fairly good agreements as compared with experimental results. Also, numerical calculations are carried out to estimate magnetic effects caused by a moving dislocation. The results are negative and any magnetic effects are not expected. In order to treat deformation behavior at very low temperatures, a unification of three important deformation problems is attempted and a fundamental equation is derived.

  14. Exact solutions for discrete breathers in a forced-damped chain.

    PubMed

    Gendelman, O V

    2013-06-01

    Exact solutions for symmetric on-site discrete breathers (DBs) are obtained in a forced-damped linear chain with on-site vibro-impact constraints. The damping in the system is caused by inelastic impacts; the forcing functions should satisfy conditions of periodicity and antisymmetry. Global conditions for existence and stability of the DBs are established by a combination of analytic and numeric methods. The DB can lose its stability through either pitchfork, or Neimark-Sacker bifurcations. The pitchfork bifurcation is related to the internal dynamics of each individual oscillator. It is revealed that the coupling can suppress this type of instability. To the contrary, the Neimark-Sacker bifurcation occurs for relatively large values of the coupling, presumably due to closeness of the excitation frequency to a boundary of the propagation zone of the chain. Both bifurcation mechanisms seem to be generic for the considered type of forced-damped lattices. Some unusual phenomena, like nonmonotonous dependence of the stability boundary on the forcing amplitude, are revealed analytically for the initial system and illustrated numerically for small periodic lattices.

  15. Added mass and damping on an oscillating surface-piercing circular column with a circular footing

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    Added mass and damping on a vertical, surface-piercing, circular cylinder or column with a submerged sharp-cornered circular floating, oscillating in water of finite and infinite depths are measured using a planar motion mechanism. The model is made of aluminum, and the outer diameters of the column and footing are 26.67 cm and 60.96 cm, and their lengths are 90.17 cm and 22.86 cm, respectively. The bodies were forced to oscillate sinusoidally with small amplitudes, for several submergences below a free surface. The added-mass and wave-damping coefficients are shown to be influenced strongly by the free-surface effect and are presented as a function of water depth, frequency and direction of oscillation and of depth of submergence from the free surface. For the vertical oscillation close to the free surface, negative added mass values are measured, and the predictions of the added mass by a 3-D diffraction theory are 10--20% lower than the experimental values at the model submergences tested. The experimental added mass coefficient values for the horizontal oscillation and the wave damping coefficients for the vertical oscillation in finite depth differ more than 100% from the corresponding 3-D theory prediction at a certain at-sea operational frequency range. This set of data provides further experimental information for the improvement of theoretical predictions.

  16. On Noether's Theorem and the Various Integrals of the Damped Linear Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Andrew J.; Hurtado, John E.; Bertinato, Chris; Betsch, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Noether's theorem provides deep insight into the connection between analytical mechanics and the integrals of dynamic systems, specifically, showing how symmetries of the action integral are connected to the integrals of motion. To demonstrate Noether's theorem, the harmonic oscillator is often used as a simple example problem. Presentations in the literature, however, often focus on the single absolutely-invariant symmetry for this problem. This paper presents a complete application of Noether's theorem to the damped harmonic oscillator, including general solutions of the divergence-invariant Killing equations and the associated integrals for all underdamped, critically-damped, and overdamped cases. This treatment brings forward several interesting issues. Five different symmetries produce independent solutions to the Killing equations, but of course, only two independent integrals exist for this second-order system. Also, integrals of a particular desired form may not be produced directly from Noether's theorem and are referred to as non-Noether or asymmetric integrals. For the damped oscillator, one such example is the time-independent integrals, referred to as motion constants.

  17. Estimation of water flow added damping on a propeller turbine blade using numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Jean-Philippe; Gosselin, Frederick P.; Etienne, Stephane

    2015-11-01

    In the province of Quebec, Canada, around 99% of the electricity generation is through hydropower. Alternative energy sources, in particular wind, are however becoming increasingly harnessed. Since electrical energy cannot be stored in appreciable amounts, generation from hydroelectric turbines must constantly be adjusted to compensate for fluctuations in wind power. This leads to more frequent turbine stops and restarts, during which the loads due to water flowing around the blades are known to cause high mechanical stresses thus reduce fatigue life. Yet, fluid flows also have desirable damping effects, a phenomenon which received little scientific attention in the case of water turbines. A method to estimate this so-called fluid flow added damping is here presented. It is based on computational structural/fluid dynamics (CSD/CFD) and is essentially non-coupled in the sense that bidirectional coupling of the CSD and CFD codes is not required. The approach used is to prescribe oscillatory modal motion of the structural boundary in the flow simulation in order to extract damping from the resulting fluid load. The method has been validated using experimental data available for a simplified test case then applied to a propeller turbine blade.

  18. Using Field-Particle Correlations to Diagnose the Collisionless Damping of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory; Klein, Kristropher

    2016-10-01

    Plasma turbulence occurs ubiquitously throughout the heliosphere, yet our understanding of how turbulence governs energy transport and plasma heating remains incomplete, constituting a grand challenge problem in heliophysics. In weakly collisional heliospheric plasmas, such as the solar corona and solar wind, damping of the turbulent fluctuations occurs due to collisionless interactions between the electromagnetic fields and the individual plasma particles. A particular challenge in diagnosing this energy transfer is that spacecraft measurements are typically limited to a single point in space. Here we present an innovative field-particle correlation technique that can be used with single-point measurements to estimate the energization of the plasma particles due to the damping of the electromagnetic fields, providing vital new information about this how energy transfer is distributed as a function of particle velocity. This technique has the promise to transform our ability to diagnose the kinetic plasma physical mechanisms responsible for not only the damping of turbulence, but also the energy conversion in both collisionless magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration. The work has been supported by NSF CAREER Award AGS-1054061, NSF AGS-1331355, and DOE DE-SC0014599.

  19. Characterization and preparation of p(U-MMA-An) interpenetrating polymer network damping and absorbing material.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Qingshan; Zhuo, Yuguo; Hong, Wei; Lv, Wenfeng; Xing, Guangzhong

    2014-06-01

    P(U-MMA-ANI) interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) damping and absorbing material is successfully synthesized by PANI particles served as an absorbing agent with the microemulsion polymerization and P(U-MMA) foam IPN network structure for substrate materials with foaming way. P(U-MMA-ANI) IPN is characterized by the compression mechanical performance testing, TG-DSC, and DSC. The results verify that the P(U-MMA) IPN foam damping material has a good compressive strength and compaction cycle property, and the optimum content of PMMA was 40% (mass) with which the SEM graphs do not present the phase separation on the macro level between PMMA and PU, while the phase separation was observed on the micro level. The DTG curve indicates that because of the formation of P(U-MMA) IPN, the decomposition temperature of PMMA and the carbamate in PU increases, while that of the polyol segment in PU has almost no change. P(U-MMA-ANI) IPN foam damping and absorbing material is obtained by PANI particles served as absorbing agent in the form of filler, and PMMA in the form of micro area in substrate material. When the content of PANI was up to 2.0% (mass), the dissipation factor of composites increased, and with the increasing of frequency the dissipation factor increased in a straight line.

  20. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.