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Sample records for danish blue mussels

  1. Assessment of blue mussel Mytilus edulis fisheries and waterbird shellfish-predator management in the Danish Wadden Sea.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Karsten; Kristensen, Per Sand; Clausen, Preben

    2010-11-01

    We assessed the blue mussel Mytilus edulis fishery management scheme introduced in 1994 in the Danish Wadden Sea that regulate fishing vessels, fishery quota, set-aside for mussel-eating birds and established zones closed to mussel fishery. The results showed (i) a reduction in the blue mussel biomass and mussel bed areas in zones closed to fishery, (ii) decrease in eiders Somateria mollissima numbers and increase or stable numbers for oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus and herring gull Larus argentatus and (iii) that energy estimations based on ecological food requirements for the mussel-eating birds should be at least three times larger, than the amount set-aside in the mussel management scheme. It is concluded that the mussel management scheme had been unable to stabilize or increase the blue mussel stocks and to secure stable or increasing numbers for all target bird species. Thus, it is recommended to revise the present blue mussel management scheme in the Danish Wadden Sea, to continue and improve mussel stock and bird surveys, and to consider novel studies of the mussel-eating birds' energetics for improved set-aside estimates and future assessments.

  2. Levels of hydrocarbons in mussels, Mytilus edulis, and surface sediments from Danish coastal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.

    1981-02-01

    Until recently, most effort in oil pollution research has been spent on investigating the effects of oil spills and use of detergents. The effects of long-term low level input to the marine environment are much less elucidated. This study represents the first step in a project concerning chronic oil pollution undertaken by the Marine Pollution Laboratory, Denmark. Results from previous studies on this subject in the area concerned, which have not been internationally published, are also included. In a series of Danish coastal localities, samples of surface sediments (top cm) were taken and samples of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were collected by SCUBA diving.

  3. Isolation of Vibrionaceae from wild blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) adults and their impact on blue mussel larviculture.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Mieke; Bossier, Peter; Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Delahaut, Vyshal; Rayhan, Ali Md; Gupta, Nipa; Islam, Shikder Saiful; Yumo, Elsie; Nevejan, Nancy; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Defoirdt, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) is known as a robust bivalve species, although its larviculture appears to be highly susceptible to diseases. In this study, we isolated 17 strains from induced mortality events in healthy wild-caught blue mussel adults and demonstrated that they caused between 17% and 98% mortality in blue mussel larvae in a newly developed, highly controlled immersion challenge test model. Eight of the isolates belong to the Splendidus clade of vibrios, while the other isolates belong to the genus Photobacterium. The genomes of the most virulent Vibrio isolate and the most virulent Photobacterium isolate were sequenced and contained several genes encoding factors that have previously been linked to virulence towards bivalves. In vitro tests confirmed that all 17 isolates were positive for these virulence factors. The sequenced genomes also contained a remarkably high number of multidrug resistance genes. We therefore assessed the sensitivity of all isolates to a broad range of antibiotics and found that there were indeed many strong positive correlations between the sensitivities of the isolates to different antibiotics. Our data provide an ecological insight into mass mortality in blue mussels as they indicate that wild mussels contain a reservoir of pathogenic bacteria. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Native Mussels Alter Nutrient Availability and Reduce Blue ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nutrient cycling is a key process that ties all organisms together. This is especially apparent in stream environments in which nutrients are taken up readily and cycled through the system in a downstream trajectory. Ecological stoichiometry predicts that biogeochemical cycles of different elements are interdependent because the organisms that drive these cycles require fixed ratios of nutrients. There is growing recognition that animals play an important role in biogeochemical cycling across ecosystems. In particular, dense aggregations of consumers can create biogeochemical hotspots in aquatic ecosystems via nutrient translocation. We predicted that filter-feeding freshwater mussels, which occur as speciose, high biomass aggregates, would create biogeochemical hotspots in streams by altering nutrient limitation and algal dynamics. In a field study, we manipulated nitrogen and phosphorus using nutrient-diffusing substrates in areas with high and low mussel abundance, recorded algal growth and community composition, and determined in situ mussel excretion stoichiometry at 18 sites in 3 rivers (Kiamichi, Little, and Mt. Fork rivers, southcentral U.S.). Our results indicate that mussels greatly influence ecosystem processes by modifying the nutrients that limit primary productivity. Sites without mussels were N-limited with ~26% higher abundances of N-fixing blue-green algae, while sites with high mussel densities were co-limited (N and P) and dominated by diatoms

  5. Multiple invertebrate lysozymes in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ørjan M; Nilsen, Inge Waller; Sletten, Knut; Myrnes, Bjørnar

    2003-09-01

    Initial analyses of lysozyme activities in individual blue mussels Mytilus edulis indicated variations in features of activity from the crystalline style to the remaining body parts (the soft body). Two separate larger scale lysozyme isolations were performed employing extracts from 1000 styles and 50 soft bodies, respectively. The soft body origin contained one, or one major, lysozyme that was purified to homogeneity. This 13 kDa protein, designated bm-lysozyme, was sequence-analysed and found to represent the product of a recently published invertebrate-type lysozyme gene from M. edulis. Three additional lysozymes were isolated from the style extract and one of them was fully purified. All four lysozymes showed different profiles of enzymatic features such as responses to pH, ionic strengths and divalent cations. From the results and the profound differences demonstrated we believe that the observed multiple forms of lysozyme activities in blue mussel reflect multiple genes instead of individual lysozyme variants and that the lysozymes serve different functions in the blue mussel.

  6. Predator-prey interactions between blue crabs and ribbed mussels living in clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Junda

    1991-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions between blue crabs ( Callinectes sapidus) and ribbed mussels ( Geukensia demissa) were studied by manipulating different components of mussel clump structure in the laboratory to test their effects on the mussels' susceptibility to crab predation. Mussels with stronger attachment strength or those buried deeper in the sediment suffered lower mortality. Blue crabs showed no significant size selectivity when two size classes of mussles (30-40 and 50-60 mm in shell heights) were offered. When juvenile mussels were attached to adult conspecifics and completely buried in the centres of clumps as in the field, blue crabs did not actively search for them. The crabs, however, did consume juveniles as by-products when they preyed upon the adult mussels to which the juveniles were attached.

  7. Butyltin residues in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and arkshells (Scapharca broughtonii) collected from Korean coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyae-Kyung; Takahashi, Shin; Min, Byung-Yoon; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2002-01-01

    Butyltin compounds (BTs) including tributyltin (TBT) and its degradation products, di- (DBT) and mono-butyltin (MBT), were determined in bivalves such as blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and arkshells (Scapharca broughtonii) collected from Korean coastal waters. BTs were detected in all the blue mussels and arkshells analyzed. The concentrations of total butyltin (sigmaBTs: MBT + DBT + TBT) in blue mussels and arkshells ranged from 49 to 2500 ng/g and 29 to 87 ng/g wet weight, respectively. Higher concentrations of BTs were found in blue mussels collected from Okpo and Kohyonsong Bays and Jangsengpo Harbor where large shipyards and harbors are located with dry-dock facilities. This suggested that maritime activities nearby the harbors play a major role as the source of BTs. Concentrations of TBT in mussels collected from Korea were one of the highest values reported, suggesting ongoing TBT contamination in Korea. Among BTs, TBT was the predominant compound both in blue mussels and arkshells collected from almost all the sampling locations, indicating the fresh input of TBT in Korean coastal waters. Smaller mussels tended to accumulate BTs at higher concentrations than larger ones, which may be due to higher filtration rate of small mussels and/or contact with surface microlayer in intertidal zones.

  8. The Edible Blue Mussel: A Learning Experience for Marine Education. Northern New England Marine Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Coll. of Education.

    The major unifying concept for each of the disciplinary sections in this curriculum infusion unit is that the blue mussel is an easily obtainable, high quality, very palatable seafood. A section is provided for teacher familiarity with the anatomy and ecological background of the mussel. The guide is arranged by discipline areas. Sections provide…

  9. The Edible Blue Mussel: A Learning Experience for Marine Education. Northern New England Marine Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Coll. of Education.

    The major unifying concept for each of the disciplinary sections in this curriculum infusion unit is that the blue mussel is an easily obtainable, high quality, very palatable seafood. A section is provided for teacher familiarity with the anatomy and ecological background of the mussel. The guide is arranged by discipline areas. Sections provide…

  10. Bioaccumulation of metals by blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) deployed in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, D.G.; Bergen, B.J.; Nelson, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    As part of a marine Superfund site remedial monitoring program, blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were deployed for 28 day intervals to monitor the levels of bioavailable copper, cadmium, lead, nickel and zinc in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts. Dissolved and particulate seawater samples were collected periodically during twelve separate deployments and analyzed for these metals also. Bioconcentration factors, the concentration in mussel tissue normalized to dissolved, particulate and total seawater concentrations, were calculated. Previous studies conducted at this site demonstrated that these six metals bioconcentrate in blue mussels and that bioaccumulation patterns vary for each metal. The sources of this variability are discussed with respect to the partitioning of each metal in seawater.

  11. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein Mefp-1 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-01-17

    The present invention comprises a Mytilus edulis cDNA sequenc having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 (Mefp-1), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-1 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-1 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-1 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-1 gene sequence will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  12. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein MEFP-2 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-02-07

    The present invention includes a Mytilus edulis cDNA having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-2 (Mefp-2), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-2 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-2 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-2 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-2 gene sequences will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  13. Mussel fishery affects diet and reduces body condition of Eiders Somateria mollissima in the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laursen, Karsten; Asferg, Karen S.; Frikke, John; Sunde, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Although the Danish Wadden Sea is of international importance for several bird species, large-scale blue mussel Mytilus edulis fishing took place from 1984-1987, ceasing thereafter due to low mussel stocks. Mussel fishing removes much of the blue mussel biomass, especially larger individuals. Hence we predict that intensive mussel fishing will affect their predators, such as the Eider Somateria mollissima, which is predominantly a blue mussel feeder by, 1) reducing the amount of blue mussels in their diet relative to alternative prey items, 2) exploitation of smaller blue mussel shell classes, 3) loss of body condition, 4) changing feeding distribution to aggregate to the remaining mussel stocks, and 5) decreasing numbers. Before winter 1986/87 blue mussel biomass was estimated at 40,600 tons, decreasing to 15,400 tons in 1987/88 due to mussel fishery. We collected Eiders in both periods to monitor their diet and body mass and used aerial surveys to determine changes in numbers and distribution. Between the two periods, blue mussels declined in the Eiders diet, numbers of Eiders with empty stomachs increased and the mean length of blue mussel taken by Eiders decreased. Eider body condition declined from 1986/87 to 1987/88, mostly the result of the reduction in numbers of individuals with blue mussel remains in their gizzards and in better body condition compared to those taking alternative food items or having empty gizzards. Eiders shifted their distribution from the southern part of the Danish Wadden Sea to the northern part, where the remaining blue mussel stocks were situated. Eider numbers were lowest in 1987/88, the year of lowest blue mussel stocks. We conclude that intensive mussel fishery affected the Eider's diet, reduced their body condition and affected distribution and abundance. The results also showed that availability of blue mussels may have a key role in building up and maintaining body condition in Eiders during winter.

  14. Comparison of PCB and trace metal bioaccumulation in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the ribbed mussel, Modiolus demissus, in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.G.; Bergen, B.J.; Cobb, D.J.

    1995-03-01

    The accumulation of PCBs and trace metals was compared at 14-d intervals between two filter-feeding bivalves, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the ribbed mussel, Modiolus demissus, after deployment in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, for up to 56 d. Contaminant uptake in deployed organisms also was compared with indigenous ribbed mussels. Significant mortality occurred in blue mussels after 28 d, when water temperatures exceeded 25 C. Therefore, tissue-residue comparisons between species are presented only up to day 28, while those between deployed and indigenous ribbed mussels continue to day 56. Results indicated that total PCB tissue residues and congener distributions were not statistically different in the two mussel species on day 28. Total PCB concentrations in both deployed mussel species reached approximately 30 {mu}g g{sup {minus}1} dry weight by day 28. Additionally, total PCB concentrations and congener distributions in the deployed ribbed mussels were not statistically different from the indigenous ribbed mussels on day 28, demonstrating that steady state was attained within 28 d. With respect to metal uptake, no single accumulation pattern occurred for the eight metals quantified. After 28 d, lead, cadmium, and iron concentrations in deployed blue and ribbed mussels were statistically similar. However, nickel and zinc accumulations were significantly greater in the blue mussels, and copper, chromium, and manganese were accumulated to significantly higher concentrations in the ribbed mussels. The comparison between the ribbed mussels indicated that cadmium and lead concentrations were significantly higher in indigenous than in deployed mussels after 28 d.

  15. Comparative study of predatory responses in blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) produced in suspended long line cultures or collected from natural bottom mussel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf; Tørring, Ditte

    2012-03-01

    Blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) are a valuable resource for commercial shellfish production and may also have uses as a tool in habitat improvement, because mussel beds can increase habitat diversity and complexity. A prerequisite for both commercial mussel production and habitat improvement is the availability of seed mussels collected with minimum impact on the benthic ecosystem. To examine whether mussels collected in suspended cultures can be used for bottom culture production and as tool in habitat improvement, the differences in predatory defence responses between suspended and bottom mussels exposed to the predatory shore crab ( Carcinus maenas L.) were tested in laboratory experiments and in the field. Predatory defence responses (byssal attachment and aggregation) and morphological traits were tested in laboratory, while growth and mortality were examined in field experiments. Suspended mussels had an active response in relation to the predator by developing a significantly firmer attachment to the substrate and a closer aggregated structure. Bottom mussels had a passive strategy by having a thicker shell and larger relative size of the adductor muscle. In a field experiment mussels originated from suspended cultures had a higher length increment and lower mortality when compared to bottom mussels. It is concluded that suspended mussels potentially are an alternative resource to bottom culture and can be used in habitat improvement of mussel beds, but that the use of suspended mussels has to be tested further in large-scale field experiments.

  16. Heavy metals in blue mussels (mytilus edulis) in the Bergen Harbor area, Western Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, V.; Johannessen, P.J.; Maage, A.

    1996-12-31

    Heavy metal discharges to the marine environment are of great concern all over the world. Both essential (e.g., Fe, Zn, Cu) and non essential (e.g., Hg, Cd, Pb) metals are toxic to living organism when subjected to high concentration. Many heavy metals accumulate in organisms and some also accumulate in the food chain. The anthropogenic heavy metal outlets can in this way both reduce marine species diversity and ecosystem. Further, by consuming seafood, humans will be exposed to the metals with a potential danger to human health. Goldberg proposed to use marine mussels to monitor contamination levels of coastal waters. Since then marine mussels, especially the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), has been used widely as a surveillance organism. The blue mussel is regarded a suitable species for this purpose because it accumulates metals, it sessile, has a relatively long life span, is large enough for individual analysis, can tolerate a relatively wide range of temperature and salinity regimes, and can also synthesize the metal-binding protein, metallothionein, for metal detoxification. Furthermore, the blue mussel is a popular and tasteful food source and is suitable for culturing. The world-wide annual yield of mussels during the period 1988 to 1992 was about 1.3 million tons, of which about 0.5 million tons was Mytilus edulis. In Norway, the annual production was 77 tons in 1990. The interest of culturing mussels has increased in recent years, but the consumption of mussels has been hampered both by toxic algae and high levels of heavy metals. The latter is of special concern to those close to urban or industrial areas. This study investigated whether blue mussels in the Bergen Harbor area were contaminated with the heavy metals zinc, copper, lead, cadmium, and mercury, evaluating whether humans could eat them. 21 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Seasonal and intertidal impact on DNA adduct levels in gills of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.).

    PubMed

    Skarphédinsdóttir, Halldóra; Ericson, Gunilla; Halldórsson, Halldór P; Svavarsson, Jörundur

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate possible seasonal variation in DNA adduct levels in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis), and to investigate the impact of intertidal exposure on the DNA adduct levels, i.e. to explore if DNA adduct levels in mussels in the intertidal zone differ from those in the subtidal zone. Blue mussels were deployed separately in the intertidal and subtidal zone at a contaminated and a reference site in Iceland, and sampled regularly during one year. Gill DNA adduct levels were found to be higher in mussels in the intertidal zone compared to the subtidal zone at the contaminated site, the difference being largest in winter. Total PAH tissue levels were also higher in mussels in the intertidal zone. Seasonal variation was observed in both DNA adduct and PAH tissue levels in mussels at the contaminated site, with lower levels from the time of transplantation in summer to autumn, maximum levels in winter, which decreased to lower levels again in spring and summer the following year. DNA adducts and PAH levels were low or below the detection limits in mussels at the reference site at all times, both in the intertidal and subtidal zone.

  18. Proteomic responses of blue mussel (Mytilus) congeners to temperature acclimation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Peter A; Zuzow, Marcus J; Tomanek, Lars

    2012-04-01

    The ability to acclimate to variable environmental conditions affects the biogeographic range of species, their success at colonizing new habitats, and their likelihood of surviving rapid anthropogenic climate change. Here we compared responses to temperature acclimation (4 weeks at 7, 13 and 19°C) in gill tissue of the warm-adapted intertidal blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, an invasive species in the northeastern Pacific, and the cold-adapted M. trossulus, the native congener in the region, to better understand the physiological differences underlying the ongoing competition. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, we showed that warm acclimation caused changes in cytoskeletal composition and proteins of energy metabolism in both species, consistent with increasing rates of filtration and respiration due to increased ciliary activity. During cold acclimation, changes in cytoskeletal proteins were accompanied by increasing abundances of oxidative stress proteins and molecular chaperones, possibly because of the increased production of aldehydes as indicated by the upregulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase. The cold-adapted M. trossulus showed increased abundances of molecular chaperones at 19°C, but M. galloprovincialis did not, suggesting that the two species differ in their long-term upper thermal limits. In contrast, the warm-adapted M. galloprovincialis showed a stronger response to cold acclimation than M. trossulus, including changes in abundance in more proteins and differing protein expression profiles between 7 and 13°C, a pattern absent in M. trossulus. In general, increasing levels of oxidative stress proteins inversely correlate with modifications in Krebs cycle and electron transport chain proteins, indicating a trade-off between oxidative stress resistance and energy production. Overall, our results help explain why M. galloprovincialis has replaced M. trossulus in southern California over the last century, but

  19. Modeling the Role of Zebra Mussels in the Proliferation of Blue-green Algae in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under model assumptions from Saginaw Bay 1991, selective rejection of blue-green algae by zebra mussels appears to be a necessary factor in the enhancement of blue-green algae production in the presence of zebra mussels. Enhancement also appears to depend on the increased sedime...

  20. Modeling the Role of Zebra Mussels in the Proliferation of Blue-green Algae in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under model assumptions from Saginaw Bay 1991, selective rejection of blue-green algae by zebra mussels appears to be a necessary factor in the enhancement of blue-green algae production in the presence of zebra mussels. Enhancement also appears to depend on the increased sedime...

  1. Numerical modelling of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) bacterial contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Tomasz; Doré, William J.; Lyons, Kieran; Nolan, Glenn D.

    2014-05-01

    Bivalve shellfish such as oysters and mussels can concentrate human pathogens when grown in areas impacted by municipal wastewater. Under EU regulation this risk to consumers is controlled by determining the sanitary quality of bivalve shellfish production areas based on the concentration of Escherichia coli present in shellfish flesh. The authors present a modelling approach to simulate an uptake of E. coli from seawater and subsequent depuration by Mytilus edulis. The model that dynamically predicts E. coli concentration in the mussel tissue is embedded within a 3-D numerical modelling system comprising hydrodynamic, biogeochemical, shellfish ecophysiological and the newly proposed microbial modules. The microbial module has two state variables, namely, the concentrations of E. coli in water and in the mussel tissue. Novel formulations to calculate the filtration rates by mussels and the resulting uptake of bacteria are proposed; these rates are updated at every computational time step. Concentrations of E. coli in seawater are also updated accordingly taking into account the amounts ingested by mussels. The model has been applied to Bantry Bay in the south-west of Ireland. The results indicate that the model is capable of reproducing the official classification of shellfish waters in the bay based on monthly sampling at several stations. The predicted filtration rates and ratios of E. coli in water and mussels also compare well with the literature. The model thus forms a tool that may be used to assist in the classification of shellfish waters at much greater spatial and temporal detail than that offered by a field monitoring programme. Moreover, it can also aid in designing an efficient monitoring programme. The model can also be utilised to determine the contribution of individual point sources of pollution on the microbial loading in mussels and, when incorporated into an operational framework, it can provide a short-term forecasting of microbial

  2. Relationship between oxygen concentration, respiration and filtration rate in blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baojun; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2017-06-01

    The large water-pumping and particle-capturing gills of the filter-feeding blue mussel Mytilus edulis are oversized for respiratory purposes. Consequently, the oxygen uptake rate of the mussel has been suggested to be rather insensitive to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the ambient water, since the diffusion rate of oxygen from water flowing through the mussel determines oxygen uptake. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the oxygen uptake in mussels exposed to various oxygen concentrations. These concentrations were established via N2-bubbling of the water in a respiration chamber with mussels fed algal cells to stimulate fully opening of the valves. It was found that mussels exposed to oxygen concentrations decreasing from 9 to 2 mg O2 /L resulted in a slow but significant reduction in the respiration rate, while the filtration rate remained high and constant. Thus, a decrease of oxygen concentration by 78% only resulted in a 25% decrease in respiration rate. However, at oxygen concentrations below 2 mg O2 /L M. edulis responded by gradually closing its valves, resulting in a rapid decrease of filtration rate, concurrent with a rapid reduction of respiration rate. These observations indicated that M. edulis is no longer able to maintain its normal aerobic metabolism at oxygen concentration below 2 mg O2/L, and there seems to be an energy-saving mechanism in bivalve molluscs to strongly reduce their activity when exposed to low oxygen conditions.

  3. Ocean acidification and host-pathogen interactions: blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, encountering Vibrio tubiashii.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Maria E; Baden, Susanne P; Russ, Sarah; Ellis, Robert P; Gong, Ningping; Hernroth, Bodil E

    2014-04-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) can shift the ecological balance between interacting organisms. In this study, we have used a model system to illustrate the interaction between a calcifying host organism, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and a common bivalve bacterial pathogen, Vibrio tubiashii, with organisms being exposed to a level of acidification projected to occur by the end of the 21st century. OA exposures of the mussels were carried out in relative long-term (4 months) and short-term (4 days) experiments. We found no effect of OA on the culturability of V. tubiashii, in broth or in seawater. OA inhibited mussel shell growth and impaired crystalline shell structures but did not appear to affect mussel immune parameters (i.e haemocyte counts and phagocytotic capacity). Despite no evident impact on host immunity or growth and virulence of the pathogen, V. tubiashii was clearly more successful in infecting mussels exposed to long-term OA compared to those maintained under ambient conditions. Moreover, OA exposed V. tubiashii increased their viability when exposed to haemocytes of OA-treated mussel. Our findings suggest that even though host organisms may have the capacity to cope with periods of OA, these conditions may alter the outcome of host-pathogen interactions, favouring the success of the latter.

  4. Metabolism of pectenotoxins in brown crabs Cancer pagurus fed with blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoxin

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the metabolism of pectenotoxins in brown crabs ( Cancer pagurus). The crabs were fed with blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis) for 21 d then depurated for 42 d. We extracted the toxins from the digestive glands of contaminated crabs, uncontaminated crabs (control group), and the meat of blue mussels using methanol. Extracts of the crab digestive glands were fractionated by liquid-liquid partitioning and solid phase extraction. The fractions were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography coupled with ion-trap mass spectrometry (LC-MSn). We detected a new PTX-like compound, designated as metabolite-1. The MS2 mass spectrum of the metabolite-1 [M+Na]+ ion at m/z 897.5 revealed fragment ions at m/z 853.5 and 555.5, typical of those exhibited by other pectenotoxins.

  5. Dechlorane Plus induces oxidative stress and decreases cyclooxygenase activity in the blue mussel.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Pierre-Luc; Fortier, Marlène; Fraser, Marc; Parent, Lise; Vaillancourt, Cathy; Verreault, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Dechlorane Plus (DP) is a chlorinated flame retardant used mainly in electrical wire and cable coating, computer connectors, and plastic roofing materials. Concentrations of DP (syn and anti isomers) are increasingly being reported in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. However, there is exceedingly little information on the exposure-related toxicity of DP in aquatic organisms, especially in bivalves. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo and in vitro effects of DP exposure on histopathology, lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, phagocytosis capacity and efficiency, and DNA strand breakage in the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) following a 29days exposure (0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0μg DP/L). Blue mussels accumulated DP in muscle and digestive gland in a dose-dependent manner. LPO levels in gills were found to increase by 82% and 67% at the 0.01 and 1.0μg DP/L doses, respectively, while COX activity in gills decreased by 44% at the 1μg/L dose. No histopathological lesion was found in gonads following DP exposure. Moreover, no change in hemocyte DNA strand breakage, phagocytosis rate, and viability was observed following DP exposure. Present study showed that toxicity of DP may occur primarily via oxidative stress in the blue mussel and potentially other bivalves, and that gills represent the most responsive tissue to this exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cloning and expression in Pichia pastoris of a blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) beta-mannanase gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingze; Sellos, Daniel; Janson, Jan-Christer

    2002-03-01

    Using PCR, cloning and sequencing techniques, a 1.1-kb complementary DNA fragment encoding for a beta-mannanase (mannan endo-1,4-beta-mannosidase, EC 3.2.1.78) has been identified in the digestive gland of blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. The cDNA sequence shows significant sequence identity to several beta-mannanases in glycoside hydrolase family 5. The beta-mannanase gene has been isolated and sequenced from gill tissue of blue mussel and contains five introns. The beta-mannanase has been expressed extracellularly in Pichia pastoris using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor signal sequence. The beta-mannanase was produced in a 14-L fermenter with an expression level of 900 mg.L-1. The expression level is strongly affected by the induction temperature. A two-step purification procedure, composed of a combination of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and ion exchange chromatography, is required to give a pure beta-mannanase. However, due to post-translational modifications, structural varieties regarding molecular mass and isoelectric point were obtained. The specific activity of the purified recombinant M. edulis beta-mannanase was close to that of the wild-type enzyme. Also pH and temperature optima were the same as for the native protein. In conclusion, P. pastoris is regarded as a suitable host strain for the production of blue mussel beta-mannanase. This is the first time a mollusc beta-mannanase has been characterized at the DNA level.

  7. Lipid-soluble conjugates of hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers in blue mussels from the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Dennis; Jensen, Sören; Asplund, Lillemor

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) of proposed natural origin have been detected throughout the food web of the Baltic Sea. Some OH-PBDEs have been shown to disrupt oxidative phosphorylation and the thyroid hormone system in exposed organisms. This paper describes an investigation into the fate of OH-PBDEs in the Baltic Sea's predominant specie, the blue mussel. The main focus was on the conjugation of OH-PBDEs with lipophilic moieties (e.g., fatty acids) and the potential role this transformation mechanism may have in heavily exposed mussels in nature. Analytical methods were developed to accurately determine the concentrations of these conjugates in blue mussels collected on different occasions during the summer in a coastal area of the Baltic proper. The measured concentrations of conjugated OH-PBDEs were compared to those of the unconjugated parent compounds, and it was found that in some cases, the levels of the conjugated derivatives can be equal or even higher than the levels of the unconjugated OH-PBDEs. This is, to our knowledge, the first study on lipid-soluble OH-PBDE conjugates, and the first study to investigate the occurrence of such conjugates of halogenated phenolic compounds in environmentally exposed mussels. The mussels were also found to contain hydrolysable water-soluble derivatives of OH-PBDEs (such as e.g., glucuronic acid and/or sulfate conjugates etc.). These were tentatively determined to be of lower concentration (by up to an order of magnitude) than that of the OH-PBDEs which were conjugated with lipophilic moieties.

  8. Growth potential of blue mussels (M. edulis) exposed to different salinities evaluated by a Dynamic Energy Budget model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maar, Marie; Saurel, Camille; Landes, Anja; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf

    2015-08-01

    For blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, one major constrain in the Baltic Sea is the low salinities that reduce the efficiency of mussel production. However, the effects of living in low and variable salinity regimes are rarely considered in models describing mussel growth. The aim of the present study was to incorporate the effects of low salinity into an eco-physiological model of blue mussels and to identify areas suitable for mussel production. A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model was modified with respect to i) the morphological parameters (DW/WW-ratio, shape factor), ii) change in ingestion rate and iii) metabolic costs due to osmoregulation in different salinity environments. The modified DEB model was validated with experimental data from different locations in the Western Baltic Sea (including the Limfjorden) with salinities varying from 8.5 to 29.9 psu. The identified areas suitable for mussel production in the Baltic Sea are located in the Little Belt area, the Great Belt, the southern Kattegat and the Limfjorden according to the prevailing salinity regimes. The new model can be used for supporting site selection of new mussel nutrient extraction cultures in the Baltic Sea that suffers from high eutrophication symptoms or as part of integrated multi-trophic aquaculture production. The model can also be used to predict the effects of salinity changes on mussel populations e.g. in climate change studies.

  9. Efficiencies of polychlorinated biphenyl assimilation from water and algal food by the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerk, M.; Gilek, M.

    1999-04-01

    A novel method was used to estimate assimilation efficiencies (AEs) of dissolved and food associated PCBs (IUPAC 31, 49, and 153) by the Baltic Sea blue mussel (Mytilus edulis). Mussels were exposed to radiolabeled PCBs in a series of short-term toxicokinetic experiments at different algal food concentrations, both at apparent steady-state (ASS) and non-steady-state (NSS) conditions in respect to PCB partitioning between water and algae. The PCB AEs were calculated using a physiologically based bioaccumulation model where experimentally determined uptake and exposure rates at ASS and NSS conditions were combined into linear equation systems, which were solved for PCB AE from water and food. A positive relationship between PCB uptake and algae clearance by the mussels was observed for all three PCBs. The PCB AEs from both water and food increased with congener hydrophobicity (octanol/water partition coefficient [K{sub ow}]), but AEs decreased with increases in water pumping and filtration rate of the mussels, respectively. The average contribution of food-associated PCB to the total uptake also increased with K{sub ow} from approximately 30% for PCB 31 and PCB 49 to 50% for PCB 153, mainly as a consequence of increased sorption to the algal food.

  10. Validation of trophic and anthropic underwater noise as settlement trigger in blue mussels

    PubMed Central

    Jolivet, Aurélie; Tremblay, Rejean; Olivier, Fréderic; Gervaise, Cédric; Sonier, Rémi; Genard, Bertrand; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Like the majority of benthic invertebrates, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis has a bentho-pelagic cycle with its larval settlement being a complex phenomenon involving numerous factors. Among these factors, underwater noise and pelagic trophic conditions have been weakly studied in previous researches. Under laboratory conditions, we tested the hypothesis that picoplankton assimilation by the pediveliger blue mussel larvae acts as a food cue that interacts with anthropic underwater sound to stimulate settlement. We used 13C-labeling microalgae to validate the assimilation of different picoplankton species in the tissues of pediveliger larvae. Our results clearly confirm our hypothesis with a significant synergic effect of these two factors. However, only the picoeukaryotes strains assimilated by larvae stimulated the settlement, whereas the non-ingested picocyanobacteria did not. Similar positive responses were observed with underwater sound characterized by low frequency vessel noises. The combination of both factors (trophic and vessel noise) drastically increased the mussel settlement by an order of 4 compared to the control (without picoplankton and noise). Settlement levels ranged from 16.5 to 67% in 67 h. PMID:27644947

  11. Validation of trophic and anthropic underwater noise as settlement trigger in blue mussels.

    PubMed

    Jolivet, Aurélie; Tremblay, Rejean; Olivier, Fréderic; Gervaise, Cédric; Sonier, Rémi; Genard, Bertrand; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2016-09-20

    Like the majority of benthic invertebrates, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis has a bentho-pelagic cycle with its larval settlement being a complex phenomenon involving numerous factors. Among these factors, underwater noise and pelagic trophic conditions have been weakly studied in previous researches. Under laboratory conditions, we tested the hypothesis that picoplankton assimilation by the pediveliger blue mussel larvae acts as a food cue that interacts with anthropic underwater sound to stimulate settlement. We used (13)C-labeling microalgae to validate the assimilation of different picoplankton species in the tissues of pediveliger larvae. Our results clearly confirm our hypothesis with a significant synergic effect of these two factors. However, only the picoeukaryotes strains assimilated by larvae stimulated the settlement, whereas the non-ingested picocyanobacteria did not. Similar positive responses were observed with underwater sound characterized by low frequency vessel noises. The combination of both factors (trophic and vessel noise) drastically increased the mussel settlement by an order of 4 compared to the control (without picoplankton and noise). Settlement levels ranged from 16.5 to 67% in 67 h.

  12. Validation of trophic and anthropic underwater noise as settlement trigger in blue mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Aurélie; Tremblay, Rejean; Olivier, Fréderic; Gervaise, Cédric; Sonier, Rémi; Genard, Bertrand; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Like the majority of benthic invertebrates, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis has a bentho-pelagic cycle with its larval settlement being a complex phenomenon involving numerous factors. Among these factors, underwater noise and pelagic trophic conditions have been weakly studied in previous researches. Under laboratory conditions, we tested the hypothesis that picoplankton assimilation by the pediveliger blue mussel larvae acts as a food cue that interacts with anthropic underwater sound to stimulate settlement. We used 13C-labeling microalgae to validate the assimilation of different picoplankton species in the tissues of pediveliger larvae. Our results clearly confirm our hypothesis with a significant synergic effect of these two factors. However, only the picoeukaryotes strains assimilated by larvae stimulated the settlement, whereas the non-ingested picocyanobacteria did not. Similar positive responses were observed with underwater sound characterized by low frequency vessel noises. The combination of both factors (trophic and vessel noise) drastically increased the mussel settlement by an order of 4 compared to the control (without picoplankton and noise). Settlement levels ranged from 16.5 to 67% in 67 h.

  13. Bioaccumulation kinetics of brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, K.; Bjoerk, M.; Burreau, S.; Gilek, M. )

    1999-06-01

    Baltic Sea blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, IUPAC congeners 47, 99, and 153) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, congeners 31, 52, 77, 118, and 153) in a flow-through experimental setup for 44 d. After the exposure phase, the mussels were allowed to depurate in natural brackish water for 26 d. After analyses, uptake clearance rate coefficients (k[sub u]), depuration rate coefficients (k[sub d]), and bioaccumulation factors (BAF) were calculated. A rapid uptake of all PBDEs and PCBs was observed, especially for PBDE congeners 47 and 99. The depuration rate decreased with increasing hydrophobicity as expected for the PCBs, but for the PBDEs, depuration rate coefficients appeared to be of the same magnitude for all three congeners independently of log K[sub OW]. The BAFs obtained for PBDE 47 and PBDE 99 were higher than for all other substances in the study, severalfold higher than for PCBs of similar hydrophobicity. The presented data indicate that the bioaccumulation potential of PBDEs, extensively used as flame retardants, is similar or higher than that of PCBs for filter feeding organisms such as blue mussels.

  14. Effect of starvation on trace metal levels in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Uthe, J.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The use of bivalves as monitors of marine coastal contamination has become widespread. However, many investigations have shown that numerous factors affect contaminant concentrations, in particular trace metals, in mussels tissues. This is not surprising since some metals, e.g., copper and zinc, have well-established physiological roles, while others, such as cadmium, are toxic to higher animals and have no known physiological function. An organism can serve as a quantitative indicator of environmental contamination only if a tissue contaminant concentration or burden reflects the contamination of the animal's environment in a rational way. The authors have investigated the effect of starvation on a number of trace elements in blue mussels (mytilus edulis) to determine which elements were not eliminated as the animal starved (a burden control model) and which elements were excreted (a concentration control model) in response to decreasing tissue weight.

  15. Deeply hidden inside introduced biogenic structures - Pacific oyster reefs reduce detrimental barnacle overgrowth on native blue mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschbaum, Christian; Cornelius, Annika; Goedknegt, M. Anouk

    2016-11-01

    In sedimentary coastal ecosystems shells of epibenthic organisms such as blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) provide the only major attachment surface for barnacle epibionts, which may cause detrimental effects on their mussel basibionts by e.g. reducing growth rate. In the European Wadden Sea, beds of native blue mussels have been invaded by Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas, which transformed these beds into mixed reefs of oysters with mussels. In this study, we determined the spatial distribution of M. edulis and their barnacle epibionts (Semibalanus balanoides) within the reef matrix. Mean mussel density near the bottom was about twice as high compared to the mussel density near the top of an oyster reef, whereas barnacles on mussels showed a reversed pattern. Barnacle dry weight per mussel was on average 14 times higher near the top than at the bottom. This pattern was confirmed by experimentally placing clean M. edulis at the top and on the bottom of oyster reefs at two sites in the Wadden Sea (island of Texel, The Netherlands; island of Sylt, Germany). After an experimental period of five weeks (April and May 2015, the main settlement period of S. balanoides), the number of barnacles per mussel was at both sites significantly higher on mussels near the top compared to near the bottom. We conclude that the oyster reef matrix offers a refuge for M. edulis: inside reefs they are not only better protected against predators but also against detrimental barnacle overgrowth. This study shows that alien species can cause beneficial effects for native organisms and should not be generally considered as a risk for the recipient marine ecosystems.

  16. Local effects of blue mussels around turbine foundations in an ecosystem model of Nysted off-shore wind farm, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maar, Marie; Bolding, Karsten; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.; Timmermann, Karen

    2009-08-01

    The development of off-shore wind farms along the coastline of north-west Europe is rapidly increasing; it is therefore important to study how this will affect the marine environment. The present study modelled the growth and feed-backs of blue mussels in natural beds and on turbine foundations in an off-shore wind farm (OWF) located in a shallow coastal ecosystem by coupling a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model to a small-scale 3D hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model. The model results showed that blue mussels located higher up in the water column on turbine pillars achieved a 7-18 times higher biomass than those located on the scour protection because the former experience an enhanced advective food supply. Secondly, the high biomasses of blue mussels on foundations created local 'hot spots' of biological activity and changed ecosystem dynamics due to their feed-backs e.g. ingestion of microplankton and copepods, excretion of ammonium and egestion of faecal pellets. The model results were supported by field measurements around foundations of Chl a concentrations and biomasses of the fauna community. Our study emphasised that OWFs seem to be particularly favourable for blue mussels in the western Baltic Sea and that the functioning of the OWFs as artificial reef ecosystems depends upon how the blue mussels interact with their local pelagic and benthic environment.

  17. Dominance of blue mussels versus consumer-mediated enhancement of benthic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Peter; Wahl, Martin

    2004-03-01

    In the shallow subtidal of Kiel Fjord (western Baltic Sea), the blue mussel Mytilus edulis is the dominant competitor for space. Vertically suspended settlement substrata in the upper 6 m of the water column almost invariably become dominated by M. edulis within a few summer months. However, not all naturally available hard substrata bear mussel monocultures. In three in situ experiments we investigated the dominance of mussels and the influence of local consumers on establishment and dynamics of a benthic community: (a) the natural course of succession in the absence of benthic consumers was followed on vertically suspended settlement substrata, (b) settling plates were exposed to natural recruitment being either accessible or inaccessible to all benthic consumers, and (c) the three major local consumer species, viz. the shore crab Carcinus maenas, the starfish Asterias rubens and the periwinkle Littorina littorea, were enclosed separately in cages containing a settling panel to assess species-specific consumer effects on recruitment. The results illustrate that in this region of the Baltic Sea mussels do have the potential to dominate ungrazed substrata within a few weeks and that top-down effects (predation and grazing) may control community structure. While some species - mussels in particular - were suppressed by consumption, others seemed to benefit from the presence of consumers. Thus, barnacles and algae thrived when consumers were present. Blue mussels being the locally dominant competitor, the beneficial effects of consumers on barnacles and algae were presumably indirect ones through consumer-caused release from asymmetrical competition. The isolated effects of C. maenas, A. rubens and L. littorea, on recruitment differed in quality (positive vs. negative), quantity (strength of effect) and specificity. Barnacle recruitment was significantly reduced in the presence of both starfish and shore crabs. Diatom recruitment was significantly reduced by snails

  18. Condition and biochemical profile of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) cultured at different depths in a cold water coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardi, Daria; Mills, Terry; Donnet, Sebastien; Parrish, Christopher C.; Murray, Harry M.

    2017-08-01

    The growth and health of cultured blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are affected by environmental conditions. Typically, culture sites are situated in sheltered areas near shore (i.e., < 1 km distance from land, < 20 m depth); however, land runoff, user conflicts and environmental impact in coastal areas are concerns and interest in developing deep water (> 20 m depth) mussel culture has been growing. This study evaluated the effect of culture depth on blue mussels in a cold water coastal environment (Newfoundland, Canada). Culture depth was examined over two years from September 2012 to September 2014; mussels from three shallow water (5 m) and three deep water (15 m) sites were compared for growth and biochemical composition; culture depths were compared for temperature and chlorophyll a. Differences between the two years examined were noted, possibly due to harsh winter conditions in the second year of the experiment. In both years shallow and deep water mussels presented similar condition; in year 2 deep water mussels had a significantly better biochemical profile. Lipid and glycogen analyses showed seasonal variations, but no significant differences between shallow and deep water were noted. Fatty acid profiles showed a significantly higher content of omega-3 s (20:5ω3; EPA) and lower content of bacterial fatty acids in deep water sites in year 2. Everything considered, deep water appeared to provide a more favorable environment for mussel growth than shallow water under harsher weather conditions.

  19. Experimental Transmission of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus from the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis, to Cohabitating Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Smolts

    PubMed Central

    Pietrak, Michael R.; Bricknell, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Integrated multitrophic aquaculture (IMTA) reduces the environmental impacts of commercial aquaculture systems by combining the cultivation of fed species with extractive species. Shellfish play a critical role in IMTA systems by filter-feeding particulate-bound organic nutrients. As bioaccumulating organisms, shellfish may also increase disease risk on farms by serving as reservoirs for important finfish pathogens such as infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). The ability of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) to bioaccumulate and transmit IPNV to naive Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts was investigated. To determine the ability of mussels to filter and accumulate viable IPNV, mussels were held in water containing log 4.6 50% tissue culture infective dose(s) (TCID50) of the West Buxton strain of IPNV ml−1. Viable IPNV was detected in the digestive glands (DGs) of IPNV-exposed mussels as early as 2 h postexposure. The viral load in mussel DG tissue significantly increased with time and reached log 5.35 ± 0.25 TCID50 g of DG tissue−1 after 120 h of exposure. IPNV titers never reached levels that were significantly greater than that in the water. Viable IPNV was detected in mussel feces out to 7 days postdepuration, and the virus persisted in DG tissues for at least 18 days of depuration. To determine whether IPNV can be transmitted from mussels to Atlantic salmon, IPNV-exposed mussels were cohabitated with naive Atlantic salmon smolts. Transmission of IPNV did occur from mussels to smolts at a low frequency. The results demonstrate that a nonenveloped virus, such as IPNV, can accumulate in mussels and be transferred to naive fish. PMID:23872575

  20. BMAA detected as neither free nor protein bound amino acid in blue mussels.

    PubMed

    Rosén, Johan; Westerberg, Erik; Schmiedt, Sebastian; Hellenäs, Karl-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The results of this study imply that β-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) obtained from extracts of blue mussels from the Swedish west coast is neither free nor protein bound. The results were obtained by separation (precipitation and ultrafiltration) of low and high molecular weight compounds from neutral extracts of blue mussels, and treatment of these extracts with low and high concentrations of acids, varying time and temperature. The main portion of BMAA was obtained from the low molecular weight fraction, released or formed at 95 °C in dilute acids. The measured amount of BMAA did not increase by strong acid treatment. Lysine was used as reference and was only released at significant amounts when treating the high molecular weight fraction with concentrated acid. The results also indicated that breakage of peptide bonds was not involved in the formation/release of BMAA in these extracts unless any BMAA peptide bond would be significantly more susceptible to dilute acid than e.g. the monitored lysine peptide bond. BMAA was measured using isotope dilution and detection of the underivatized compound by HILIC-UHPLC-MS/MS (Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography, Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography, tandem Mass Spectrometry). The findings might add to the understanding of conflicting data in the literature regarding the occurrence of BMAA, and have implications for studies on possible biomagnification of BMAA in the food chain and bioavailability from food.

  1. The Effects of Natural Hybridization on the Regulation of Doubly Uniparental Mtdna Inheritance in Blue Mussels (Mytilus Spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, P. D.; Secor, C. L.; Hilbish, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    Blue mussels in the Mytilus edulis species complex have a doubly uniparental mode of mtDNA inheritance with separate maternal and paternal mtDNA lineages. Female mussels inherit their mtDNA solely from their mother, while males inherit mtDNA from both parents. In the male gonad the paternal mtDNA is preferentially replicated so that only paternal mtDNA is transmitted from fathers to sons. Hybridization is common among differentiated blue mussel taxa; whenever it involves M. trossulus, doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance is disrupted. We have found high frequencies of males without and females with paternal mtDNA among hybrid mussels produced by interspecific matings between M. galloprovincialis and M. trossulus. In contrast, hybridization between M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis does not affect doubly uniparental inheritance, indicating a difference in the divergence of the mechanisms regulating mtDNA inheritance among the three blue mussel taxa. Our data indicate a high frequency of disrupted mtDNA transmission in F(1) hybrids and suggest that two separate mechanisms, one regulating the transmission of paternal mtDNA to males and another inhibiting the establishment of paternal mtDNA in females, act to regulate doubly uniparental inheritance. We propose a model for the regulation of doubly uniparental inheritance that is consistent with these observations. PMID:8878689

  2. Effect of copper and cadmium ions on heart function and calpain activity in blue mussel Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Bakhmet, Igor N; Kantserova, Nadezhda P; Lysenko, Liudmila A; Nemova, Nina N

    2012-01-01

    The heart rate and calpain activity of blue mussels Mytilus edulis from the sublittoral zone, exposed to different levels of water-borne copper and cadmium, was investigated in a long-term experiment. The content of cadmium and copper in the blue mussel was determined using flame and graphite Atomic absorption spectroscopy. The observed concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 89.1 μg/g dry weight for cadmium and from 6.1 to 51.0 μg/g dry weight for copper in the control and highest concentration, respectively. Initially, increase in cardiac activity in response to copper and Cadmium exposure was observed under all pollutant concentrations (5-250 and 10-500 μg/L, respectively). The calpain-like activity in gills and hepatopancreas of the mussels treated with metals changed in dose- and time-dependent manner: from a sharp rise at the 250 μg/L concentration of copper on the first day to a significant decrease under the effect of Cadmium in the concentration of 500 μg/L on the third day of the experiment. These results suggest that: (i) heart rate oscillation may reflect active adaptation of blue mussels to contamination and (ii) animals have different sensitivity to copper and Cadmium according to the role of the metals in the mussels' life activity.

  3. New esters of okadaic acid in seawater and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Torgersen, Trine; Miles, Christopher O; Rundberget, Thomas; Wilkins, Alistair L

    2008-10-22

    Marine algal toxins of the okadaic acid (OA) group can occur as diol esters and sulfated diol esters in algae and as fatty acid esters in shellfish. Several of these ester forms have been identified, but the most common procedure for detecting OA group toxin esters is by measuring the increase in parent toxin after alkaline hydrolysis. Use of this alkaline hydrolysis method led to the discovery of high levels of conjugates of OA and dinophysistoxins-2 (DTX2) in seawater and of OA, DTX1, and DTX2 in blue mussel hepatopancreas (HP) from Flødevigen, Norway, during a bloom of Dinophysis spp. In the water sample, a C 8-diol ester, a C 9-diol ester, and a previously undescribed C 8-triol ester of OA were characterized using HPLC-MS (2), -MS (3), and -MS (4) in combination with various derivatization procedures. Palmitic acid (16:0) ester derivatives of these diol/triol esters were found in mussel HP and characterized using HPLC-MS (2), -MS (3), and -MS (4). To the authors' knowledge, hybrid diol-fatty acid esters of OA have not been previously described. Mass spectral analysis showed the presence of two forms of hybrid esters: one with the fatty acid conjugated to the 7-OH of the OA moiety and the other with the fatty acid conjugated to the OH group in the "diol" moiety. In the water sample, the C 8-diol ester was the most abundant, whereas in the mussels, the 16:0-C 9-diol hybrid ester was most abundant, and only minor amounts of the 16:0-C 8-diol hybrid ester were detected, suggesting that C 8- and C 9-diol esters of OA may be metabolized differently in blue mussels. 7- O-acyl esters of OA, DTX1, and DTX2 are thought to contribute to shellfish toxicity by being hydrolyzed in the human stomach to the parent toxins, and the newly characterized hybrid esters are likely to contribute similarly.

  4. Potential environmental drivers of a regional blue mussel mass mortality event (winter of 2014, Breton Sound, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsenaere, Pierre; Soletchnik, Patrick; Le Moine, Olivier; Gohin, Francis; Robert, Stéphane; Pépin, Jean-François; Stanisière, Jean-Yves; Dumas, Franck; Béchemin, Christian; Goulletquer, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    In the context of global change, increasing mariculture production has raised particular concerns regarding its environmental impact and sustainability. Molluscs and particularly blue mussel account for a significant part of this total production. Although blue mussels are considered to be pretty resilient to environmental disturbances, we report in this study an unprecedented mussel mortality event that occurred during the winter of 2014 in the Breton Sound. 9000 metric tonnes of mussels were lost and mortality rates up to 100% were recorded at some farming areas. Through a coupling approach, the present work aims to better understand the potential environmental drivers associated with those mortalities. Firstly, we analysed long-term in situ and satellite data from environmental monitoring networks (available since 1998) to characterize the variability of seawater masses of the sound during the winter of 2014. Secondly, we used modelling simulations to study the possible relationship between seawater hydrodynamics and observed spatio-temporal patterns of mussel mortalities. From January to April 2014 at the long-line culture site where mortalities started, seawater temperatures ranged from 8.3 to 13.3 °C (10.2 ± 0.8 °C). Salinity and turbidity values showed successive and short drops (below 16; 29.3 ± 2.3) and numerous peaks (above 70 NTU; 17.4 ± 13.4 NTU) respectively. Winter conditions of 2014 were encountered along the entire French Atlantic coastline and linked to the sixth highest positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO +) index recorded since 1865. These particular environmental variations characterized the winter of 2014 but also others whereas no comparable mussel mortality rates were reported. Exact causes of the 2014 mortality event are still unknown but we showed these environmental variations could not alone be responsible. These have likely affected the sensitivity of the blue mussel populations that were already weakened by early spawning

  5. The relevance of age to selected heavy metals within soft tissues of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to address the relationship between age and concentrations of selected toxic trace metals within soft tissues of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis). Blue mussels are commonly employed as sentinels of national and international biomonitoring programs because of their more or less ubiquitous distribution and ability to bioaccumulate pollutants of concern. For this study, mussels ranging in size from 50-80 millimeters (mm) were collected from two sites near Portland, Maine. Whole soft tissues from mussels ranging in age from 2-10 years were analyzed to determine concentrations of total zinc, cadmium, iron, lead, manganese, copper, and chromium. Results indicated a relatively high metal Coefficient of Variation (C.V.) between individuals from both sampling sites. In addition, copper, lead, cadmium, manganese and iron concentrations were found to be statistically related to tissue dry weight. Only two of the seven metals (cadmium and chromium) exhibited a correlation with mussel age. Data generated in this study reflect a need for investigators to exercise caution in comparing the quality of different coastal regions based on tissue burdens alone.

  6. Phylogenetic and morphological characterisation of the green algae infesting blue mussel Mytilus edulis in the North and South Atlantic oceans.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco; Feist, Stephen W; Guillou, Laure; Harkestad, Lisbeth S; Bateman, Kelly; Renault, Tristan; Mortensen, Stein

    2008-09-24

    Blue mussels Mytilus edulis with shell deformations and green pustules containing parasitic algae were collected at 3 coastal sites (Burøy, Norway; Bockholm, Denmark; Goose Green, Falkland Islands). A comparative study, including mussel histopathology, algal morphology, ultrastructure and phylogenetic position was performed. Green pustules were mainly located in the posterior portion of the mantle and gonad tissues and the posterior adductor muscle. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of algal cells with similar morphology to Coccomyxa parasitica. Algae were oval shaped with a single nucleus and chloroplast, 1 or 2 mitochondria and a dense granular cytoplasm with a lipid inclusion body, Golgi apparatus and small vesicles. Partial small subunit (SSU) rRNA phylogeny confirmed the inclusion of parasitic algae into the Coccomyxa clade. However, the sequence identity between almost full SSU rRNA sequences of parasitic algae and others in this clade yielded an unexpected result. Green algae from mussels were distant from C. parasitica Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP) strain 216/18 (94% identity), but very similar (99% identity) to C. glaronensis (a lichen endosymbiont) and green endophytes from the tree Ginkgo biloba. The CCAP strain 216/18 was a sister sequence to Nannochloris algae, far from the Coccomyxa clade. These results suggest a misidentification or outgrowth of the original CCAP strain 216/18 by a different 'Nannochloris-like' trebouxiophycean organism. In contrast, our sequences directly obtained from infested mussels could represent the true C. parasitica responsible for the green pustules in blue mussels.

  7. Arsenic speciation in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) along a highly contaminated arsenic gradient.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Koch, I; Moriarty, M; Reimer, K J

    2012-03-20

    Arsenic is naturally present in marine ecosystems, and these can become contaminated from mining activities, which may be of toxicological concern to organisms that bioaccumulate the metalloid into their tissues. The toxic properties of arsenic are dependent on the chemical form in which it is found (e.g., toxic inorganic arsenicals vs nontoxic arsenobetaine), and two analytical techniques, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), were used in the present study to examine the arsenic species distribution in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) obtained from an area where there is a strong arsenic concentration gradient as a consequence of mining impacted sediments. A strong positive correlation was observed between the concentration of inorganic arsenic species (arsenic compounds with no As-C bonds) and total arsenic concentrations present in M. edulis tissues (R(2) = 0.983), which could result in significant toxicological consequences to the mussels and higher trophic consumers. However, concentrations of organoarsenicals, dominated by arsenobetaine, remained relatively constant regardless of the increasing As concentration in M. edulis tissue (R(2) = 0.307). XANES bulk analysis and XAS two-dimensional mapping of wet M. edulis tissue revealed the presence of predominantly arsenic-sulfur compounds. The XAS mapping revealed that the As(III)-S and/or As(III) compounds were concentrated in the digestive gland. However, arsenobetaine was found in small and similar concentrations in the digestive gland as well as the surrounding tissue suggesting arsenobetaine may being used in all of the mussel's cells in a physiological function such as an intracellular osmolyte.

  8. Arsenic Speciation in Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis) Along a Highly Contaminated Arsenic Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley-Martin, K.J.; Koch, I.; Moriarty, M.; Reimer, K.J.

    2012-11-01

    Arsenic is naturally present in marine ecosystems, and these can become contaminated from mining activities, which may be of toxicological concern to organisms that bioaccumulate the metalloid into their tissues. The toxic properties of arsenic are dependent on the chemical form in which it is found (e.g., toxic inorganic arsenicals vs nontoxic arsenobetaine), and two analytical techniques, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), were used in the present study to examine the arsenic species distribution in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) obtained from an area where there is a strong arsenic concentration gradient as a consequence of mining impacted sediments. A strong positive correlation was observed between the concentration of inorganic arsenic species (arsenic compounds with no As-C bonds) and total arsenic concentrations present in M. edulis tissues (R{sup 2} = 0.983), which could result in significant toxicological consequences to the mussels and higher trophic consumers. However, concentrations of organoarsenicals, dominated by arsenobetaine, remained relatively constant regardless of the increasing As concentration in M. edulis tissue (R{sup 2} = 0.307). XANES bulk analysis and XAS two-dimensional mapping of wet M. edulis tissue revealed the presence of predominantly arsenic-sulfur compounds. The XAS mapping revealed that the As(III)-S and/or As(III) compounds were concentrated in the digestive gland. However, arsenobetaine was found in small and similar concentrations in the digestive gland as well as the surrounding tissue suggesting arsenobetaine may being used in all of the mussel's cells in a physiological function such as an intracellular osmolyte.

  9. Physiological response of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis to differences in food and temperature in the Gulf of Maine.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Michael P; Bailey, Meredith A; Merselis, Daniel G; Morrison, John R

    2010-08-01

    Studies performed in the Gulf of Maine (GOM) during the spring of 2006 examined populations of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis at several intertidal locations. Several parameters were measured including maximum length, diet (stable isotope composition), and the physiological performance of individual mussels using condition indices and RNA/DNA ratios. These same mussels were also assessed for their response to differences in seawater temperature by quantifying the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP70) and the activities of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD). These data were then interpreted in the context of sea surface and air temperatures as well as chlorophyll a concentration and the genetic structure of mussel populations. Populations of M. edulis throughout the GOM were found to be genetically homogenous and consumed a mixed diet of phytoplankton and detritus. Mussels exposed to higher seawater temperatures also showed a significant increase in the expression of HSP70 and activities of SOD. The site-specific interplay between the amount of energy gained from the available food resources and the costs associated with protection against the effects of elevated seawater temperatures shows that these mussels exhibit phenotypic plasticity at different sites which could play an important role in the population dynamics of this key member of the rocky intertidal.

  10. Resource subsidies from multi-trophic aquaculture affect isotopic niche width in wild blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldrick, C. K.; Jelinski, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are boreo-temperate, filter-feeding bivalves common to intertidal areas. As filter-feeders they have been employed in open-water, multi-tropic aquaculture systems to reduce organic benthic loading though the exploitation of suspended particulate organic materials. We compared δ13C and δ15N signatures and the isotopic niches of mussels growing in, and adjacent to, an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia, Canada, and using this information evaluated the contribution of aquaculture-derived effluent to their diet. Farm-sampled mussels had the least intraspecific isotopic variation compared to mussels sampled at the reference site. The interaction between time (i.e. sampling dates) and site did not significantly affect the isotopic composition of mussels; however significant variation was detected in δ15N values as a function of sampling date and particulate organic matter. A two-source isotopic mixing model indicated that marine particulate organic matter and IMTA farm effluent were approximately equal in importance (~ 46 % and ~ 54 %, respectively) to the diet of IMTA-retrieved mussels. Uptake of IMTA farm waste by M. edulis supports their use as economic extractives while also mitigating farmed sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) nutrient loading to the aquatic environment.

  11. Integrated biomarker assessment of the effects of tailing discharges from an iron ore mine using blue mussels (Mytilus spp.).

    PubMed

    Brooks, Steven J; Harman, Christopher; Hultman, Maria T; Berge, John Arthur

    2015-08-15

    The blue mussel (Mytilus spp.) has been used to assess the potential biological effects of the discharge effluent from the Sydvaranger mine, which releases its tailings into Bøk fjord at Kirkenes in the north of Norway. Metal bioaccumulation and a suite of biomarkers were measured in mussels positioned for 6 weeks at varying distances from the discharge outlet. The biomarkers used included: stress on stress (SS); condition index (CI); cellular energy allocation (CEA); micronuclei formation (MN); lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), basophilic cell volume (VvBAS); and neutral lipid (NL) accumulation. The individual biomarkers were integrated using the integrated biological response (IBR/n) index. The accumulation of Fe was significantly higher in mussels located closer to the discharge outlet, indicating that these mussels had been exposed to the suspended mine effluent. The IBR/n results were in good agreement with the location of the mussels in relation to the distance from the discharge outlet and expected exposure to the mine effluent. Several biomarkers showed responses resulting in higher IBR/n values of analysed mussels within a 3 km distance from the tailing discharge.

  12. Effect of infection with Metacercariae of Himasthla elongata (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) on cardiac activity and growth rate in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmet, Igor; Nikolaev, Kirill; Levakin, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    Trematode parasites can affect their molluscan hosts, which serve as the first intermediate hosts in their life cycles, in manifold ways, but little is known about trematode-induced effects on their second intermediate hosts. Experimental infection of blue mussels Mytilus edulis serving as second intermediate hosts for larval stages (metacercariae) of the trematodes Himasthla elongata was studied in field experiments during one year. The heart rates and growth rates of noninfected mussels were significantly higher than those of infected mussels. During the summer, the heart rates of noninfected mussels showed rhythmic oscillations, whereas the parasitized animals displayed no any rhythmicity. There was a significant difference between the infected and uninfected mussels in relation to heart rates and temperature. The results indicate that mussels infected with H. elongata metacercariae may be at an energetic disadvantage relative to noninfected mussels. Furthermore, trematode infection may disrupt neuronal control of cardiac function.

  13. Effects of nanopolystyrene on the feeding behavior of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.).

    PubMed

    Wegner, A; Besseling, E; Foekema, E M; Kamermans, P; Koelmans, A A

    2012-11-01

    As the industrial production of nanoplastic and the degradation of microplastic into smaller particles at sea increase, the potential amount of nanoplastics in the marine environment rises. It has been reported that mussels uptake 100-nm polystyrene (PS) beads; to date, however, the effects of this uptake on the organism are unknown. In the present study, the authors investigated the effects of 30-nm PS on the feeding behavior of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) by exposing the organism to different nano PS and different algae (Pavlova lutheri) concentrations. The state of nano PS aggregation in the exposure medium was assessed using dynamic light scattering. In all treatments that contained nano PS, M. edulis produced pseudofeces. The total weight of the feces and pseudofeces increased with increasing nano PS and increasing algae concentration. Furthermore, M. edulis reduced its filtering activity when nano PS was present but still caused a decrease in the apparent nano PS concentration in the water. The presence of nano PS around the foot of M. edulis after the bioassay confirmed that the organism removed nano PS from the water. Chronic effect studies are therefore needed to investigate the effects of nanoplastics in M. edulis and possible consequences for its predators, including humans.

  14. Improved Plate Assay for Antifouling Substances Using Blue Mussel Mytilus edulis galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Sera; Iida; Adachi; Shizuri

    2000-07-01

    An improved plate assay for screening antifoulants against blue mussels, Mytilus edulis galloprovincialis, was designed based on an assay contrived by Ina and colleagues. To obtain more reliable results, the number of test mussels for one sample was increased from 4 to 10. Cardboard pieces used as test plates were cut into rectangular shapes to separate the test sample and the blank zone, which are of the same area. Activity was expressed numerically. In this improved method, several inhibitors of byssus thread formation were isolated by using a smaller amount of sample per area than in the original method. Previously our laboratory developed a foot-stimulating bioassay for the same purpose. This method requires only a small amount of sample and is therefore useful for isolating antifouling substances from natural sources, including marine organisms. However, the inhibition of byssus thread formation cannot be directly evaluated in the foot-stimulating method. The improved plate assay and the foot-stimulating method were examined and compared using a secosterol from the sponge Dysidea granulosa and CuSO(4).

  15. Enhanced accumulation of PCB congeners by Baltic Sea blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, with increased algae enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Gilek, M.; Bjoerk, M.; Broman, D.; Kautsky, N.; Naef, C.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine if natural variations in the quantity of phytoplankton-derived particulate and dissolved organic carbon influences the accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the tissues of Baltic Sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). In a laboratory flow-through experiment the authors exposed M. edulis to the technical PCB mixture Aroclor{reg_sign} 1248 for 21 d at three different enrichments of the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas sp., 0.10, 0.16, and 0.32 mg particulate organic carbon (POC)/L. Tissue and water concentrations were determined for seven PCB congeners and 21-d bioaccumulation factors were calculated against total water concentrations. Contrary to what would be expected, an increase in algae enrichment from 0.10 to 0.32 mg POC/L resulted in an enhanced PCB accumulation by a factor of approx. 2. This increase in PCB accumulation was more pronounced for PCB congeners with lower hydrophobicity. These observations have implications for the design of laboratory accumulation studies and potentially for PCB accumulation and cycling in field populations of suspension-feeding mussels in response to changes in eutrophication status.

  16. Allometric equations for maximum filtration rate in blue mussels Mytilus edulis and importance of condition index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul S.; Pleissner, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between body dry weight ( W) and shell length ( L) of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, can be expressed by the condition index (CI = W/ L 3) which varies from population to population and during the year. Here, we examine the influence of CI on the relationships between maximum filtration rate ( F, l h-1), W (g), and L (mm) as described by the equations: F W = aW b and F L = cL d , respectively. This is done by using available and new experimental laboratory data on M. edulis obtained by members of the same research team using different methods and controlled diets of cultivated algal cells. For all data, it was found that F W = 6.773 W 0.678 and F L = 0.00135 L 2.088 which are very similar to equations for mussels with `medium condition' (CI = 4-6 mg cm-3): F W = 6.567 W 0.681 and F L = 0.00150 L 2.051, with b- and d-values within a few percent of the theoretically expected of 2/3 and 2, respectively. Further, based on the present data, we propose a correction factor expressed by the empirical relation F W / F L = 0.3562CI2/3 which implies that F W tends to underestimate the actual filtration rate ( F L ) when CI < 4.70 and to overestimate the filtration rate when CI > 4.70.

  17. Sewage treatment plant associated genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea and Swedish west coast

    PubMed Central

    Lönn, Mikael; Lind, Emma E.; Świeżak, Justyna; Smolarz, Katarzyna; Grahn, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Human-derived environmental pollutants and nutrients that reach the aquatic environment through sewage effluents, agricultural and industrial processes are constantly contributing to environmental changes that serve as drivers for adaptive responses and evolutionary changes in many taxa. In this study, we examined how two types of point sources of aquatic environmental pollution, harbors and sewage treatment plants, affect gene diversity and genetic differentiation in the blue mussel in the Baltic Sea area and off the Swedish west coast (Skagerrak). Reference sites (REF) were geographically paired with sites from sewage treatments plant (STP) and harbors (HAR) with a nested sampling scheme, and genetic differentiation was evaluated using a high-resolution marker amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). This study showed that genetic composition in the Baltic Sea blue mussel was associated with exposure to sewage treatment plant effluents. In addition, mussel populations from harbors were genetically divergent, in contrast to the sewage treatment plant populations, suggesting that there is an effect of pollution from harbors but that the direction is divergent and site specific, while the pollution effect from sewage treatment plants on the genetic composition of blue mussel populations acts in the same direction in the investigated sites. PMID:27812424

  18. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North and Mid-Atlantic): Blue mussel

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, R.I.E.

    1989-06-01

    The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L. is a widely distributed and locally abundant bivalve mollusc in the North and Mid-Atlantic Regions. It is a valuable commercial species; regional landings in 1986 were worth nearly $4 million. It is a semi-sessile species, anchored by byssus threads to firm surfaces in littoral and sub-littoral environments at salinities ranging from 5 to 35 ppt. It is a suspension feeder, ingesting phytoplankton and detrital particles in the size range of 3--30 /mu/m. The geographical range of the species is limited by lethal water temperatures above 27/degree/C in the south and by temperatures too low for growth and reproduction in the north. Animals from the northern end of the range are stressed by temperatures above 20/degree/C, whereas those near the southern distributional limit are not severely stressed by temperatures as high as 25/degree/C. The blue mussel is diecious and oviparous. The planktotrophic larvae take about 3 weeks to develop and metamorphose. The environmental tolerances of larvae are more restricted than those of adults. The juveniles grow to approximately 1.5 mm while attached to filamentous algae before being carried by water currents to reattach to a firm substrate, often close to adult mussels. Larval and adult blue mussels are important prey items for many animals, including crabs, fishes, and birds. 95 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Sewage treatment plant associated genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea and Swedish west coast.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Josefine; Lönn, Mikael; Lind, Emma E; Świeżak, Justyna; Smolarz, Katarzyna; Grahn, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Human-derived environmental pollutants and nutrients that reach the aquatic environment through sewage effluents, agricultural and industrial processes are constantly contributing to environmental changes that serve as drivers for adaptive responses and evolutionary changes in many taxa. In this study, we examined how two types of point sources of aquatic environmental pollution, harbors and sewage treatment plants, affect gene diversity and genetic differentiation in the blue mussel in the Baltic Sea area and off the Swedish west coast (Skagerrak). Reference sites (REF) were geographically paired with sites from sewage treatments plant (STP) and harbors (HAR) with a nested sampling scheme, and genetic differentiation was evaluated using a high-resolution marker amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). This study showed that genetic composition in the Baltic Sea blue mussel was associated with exposure to sewage treatment plant effluents. In addition, mussel populations from harbors were genetically divergent, in contrast to the sewage treatment plant populations, suggesting that there is an effect of pollution from harbors but that the direction is divergent and site specific, while the pollution effect from sewage treatment plants on the genetic composition of blue mussel populations acts in the same direction in the investigated sites.

  20. 2-DE Mapping of the Blue Mussel Gill Proteome: The Usual Suspects Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rocher, Béatrice; Bultelle, Florence; Chan, Philippe; Le Foll, Frank; Letendre, Julie; Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Olivier, Stéphanie; Péden, Romain; Poret, Agnès; Vaudry, David; Knigge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis, L. 1758) is an ecologically important and commercially relevant bivalve. Because of its ability to bioconcentrate xenobiotics, it is also a widespread sentinel species for environmental pollution, which has been used in ecotoxicological studies for biomarker assessment. Consequently, numerous proteomics studies have been carried out in various research contexts using mussels of the genus Mytilus, which intended to improve our understanding of complex physiological processes related to reproduction, adaptation to physical stressors or shell formation and for biomarker discovery. Differential-display 2-DE proteomics relies on an extensive knowledge of the proteome with as many proteoforms identified as possible. To this end, extensive characterization of proteins was performed in order to increase our knowledge of the Mytilus gill proteome. On average, 700 spots were detected on 2-DE gels by colloidal blue staining, of which 122 different, non-redundant proteins comprising 203 proteoforms could be identified by tandem mass spectrometry. These proteins could be attributed to four major categories: (i) “metabolism”, including antioxidant defence and degradation of xenobiotics; (ii) “genetic information processing”, comprising transcription and translation as well as folding, sorting, repair and degradation; (iii) “cellular processes”, such as cell motility, transport and catabolism; (iv) “environmental information processing”, including signal transduction and signalling molecules and interaction. The role of cytoskeleton proteins, energetic metabolism, chaperones/stress proteins, protein trafficking and the proteasome are discussed in the light of the exigencies of the intertidal environment, leading to an enhanced stress response, as well as the structural and physiological particularities of the bivalve gill tissue. PMID:28248261

  1. Synthesis, structure elucidation, and determination of polyhalogenated N-methylpyrroles (PMPs) in blue mussels.

    PubMed

    Hauler, Carolin; Vetter, Walter

    2017-09-23

    Polyhalogenated N-methylpyrroles (PMPs) are halogenated natural products (HNPs) recently detected in seagrass, blue mussels, and other marine organisms. In this study, we synthesized 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-N-methylpyrrole (Cl4-MP), 2,3,4,5-tetrabrominated-N-methylpyrrole (Br4-MP, aka TBMP), and mixed tetrahalogenated (Cl and Br) N-methylpyrrole congeners. Use of one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR verified the structures of isolated/enriched 3,4-dibromo-2,5-dichloro-N-methylpyrrole (3,4-Br2-2,5-Cl2-MP), 2,3,4-tribromo-5-chloro-N-methylpyrrole (2,3,4-Br3-5-Cl-MP), and 3-bromo-2,4,5-trichloro-N-methylpyrrole (3-Br-2,4,5-Cl3-MP). GC/EI-MS and GC/ECNI-MS mass spectra of the five PMPs were studied with regard to fragmentation pattern and individual responses which were strongly affected by the presence (or absence) of Br in α-position(s). Quantitative solutions of the synthesized standards were used to determine the elution order of isomers and to quantify PMPs in selected blue mussel samples (Mytilus sp.) from the European Atlantic coast (Spain, France), the North Sea (the Netherlands, Germany) and Baltic Sea (Germany). PMPs were detected in all samples and the concentrations ranged between 0.6 and 52 μg/kg lipids with Br4-MP being the most abundant representative of this substance class.

  2. Characterization of an inducible isoform of the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Manduzio, Hélène; Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Rocher, Béatrice; Leboulenger, François; Galap, Camille

    2003-06-19

    Aerobic organisms are protected against oxidative stress by antioxidant systems which mobilise enzymes such as the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) which transfers O2(.-) to H2O2. In this paper, we report the characterization of three isoforms of Cu/Zn-SOD in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and we show that one of these isoforms is strongly inducible. Cytosolic extracts of digestive gland and gills from adult blue mussels were analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or isoelectric focusing followed by in situ staining for SOD activity. Two main bands of Cu/Zn-SOD were obtained at pI 4.7 and 4.6 corresponding to native apparent molecular weight values of 205 and 155 kDa. Blue mussels from chemically contaminated area in Le Havre harbour exhibited a third Cu/Zn-SOD isoform characterized by a more acidic isoelectric point (pI 4.55) and a native apparent molecular weight of 130 kDa. When maintained in clean marine water, mussels from this area showed a transitory decrease in total SOD activity accompanied by the disappearance of the SOD-3 band. Conversely, the exposure (4 and 8 h, and 3 and 7 days) of control blue mussels to copper (25 microg l(-1)) markedly increased SOD-3 band while the total SOD activity did not systematically change. Taken together our results suggest that the variations of SOD expression pattern in Mytihus edulis could be used as a tool for the marine environment monitoring.

  3. Applying Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory to simulate growth and bio-energetics of blue mussels under low seston conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosland, R.; Strand, Ø.; Alunno-Bruscia, M.; Bacher, C.; Strohmeier, T.

    2009-08-01

    A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model for simulation of growth and bioenergetics of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis) has been tested in three low seston sites in southern Norway. The observations comprise four datasets from laboratory experiments (physiological and biometrical mussel data) and three datasets from in situ growth experiments (biometrical mussel data). Additional in situ data from commercial farms in southern Norway were used for estimation of biometrical relationships in the mussels. Three DEB parameters (shape coefficient, half saturation coefficient, and somatic maintenance rate coefficient) were estimated from experimental data, and the estimated parameters were complemented with parameter values from literature to establish a basic parameter set. Model simulations based on the basic parameter set and site specific environmental forcing matched fairly well with observations, but the model was not successful in simulating growth at the extreme low seston regimes in the laboratory experiments in which the long period of negative growth caused negative reproductive mass. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model was moderately sensitive to changes in the parameter and initial conditions. The results show the robust properties of the DEB model as it manages to simulate mussel growth in several independent datasets from a common basic parameter set. However, the results also demonstrate limitations of Chl a as a food proxy for blue mussels and limitations of the DEB model to simulate long term starvation. Future work should aim at establishing better food proxies and improving the model formulations of the processes involved in food ingestion and assimilation. The current DEB model should also be elaborated to allow shrinking in the structural tissue in order to produce more realistic growth simulations during long periods of starvation.

  4. Natural products for mitigation of fouling by the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, in marine water intake systems

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.T.; Zheng, D.

    1995-06-01

    In search of natural antifouling products, sedentary organisms - free of epibiotic communities - were collected from the inter- and subtidal zones of Long Island Sound. Crude solvent extracts from these specimens were subjected to 2 - 4 bioassays to screen for: (1) microbila sensitivity, (2) response of mussel byssal thread secretion using Mytilus edulis, (3) mussel larval settlement response, and (4) bacterial attachment response. Of the 86 extracts derived from 24 organisms, six very promising extracts have been isolated from local algae and invertebrates that exhibit strong antifouling activity against the blue mussel, the major biofouler in northeastern American coastal utilities. The most promising extracts exhibiting strong inhibition of microbial growth and settlement. The process of identification of the active agent through further purification and subsequent bioassays is ongoing. A model hybrid coating, incorporating an extract from Fucuc filiformis into a silicon polymer-based matrix (EXTRUDE{sup {trademark}}), effectively prevented byssal thread attachment by juvenile blue mussels and killed specimens close to treated areas within 10 days.

  5. Efficiency of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) spat collectors in highly dynamic tidal environments of the Lower Saxonian coast (southern North Sea).

    PubMed

    Walter, Uwe; Liebezeit, Gerd

    2003-07-01

    Traditional mussel culture in the Wadden Sea, southern North Sea, is carried out by taking seed mussels of about 1-4 cm shell length from natural beds and transplanting them to permanently water covered sites. Besides the damage done to the natural beds, the ratio of seeded to harvested mussels is only about 1:1-1.3, i.e. about the same tonnage of mussels seeded is recovered. In addition, this technique relies exclusively on natural spat falls, which do not occur regularly. In order to overcome these difficulties spat collectors have been deployed in the Jade Bay, southern North Sea. These provided suitable settlement grounds for mussel larvae. Blue mussel weights reached weights of about 8-9 kg/m collector rope with maximum shell lengths of 4-5 cm within one growing season.

  6. Effect of ocean acidification on the early life stages of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazeau, F.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Dawber, C.; Pronker, A. E.; Peene, F.; Peene, J.; Heip, C. H. R.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2010-04-01

    Several experiments have shown a decrease of growth and calcification of organisms at decreased pH levels but relatively few studies have focused on early life stages which are believed to be more sensitive to environmental disturbances such as hypercapnia. Here, we present experimental data demonstrating that the growth of planktonic mussel (Mytilus edulis) larvae is significantly affected by a decrease of pH to a level expected for the end of the century. Even though there was no significant effect of a 0.25-0.34 pH unit decrease on hatching and mortality rates during the first 2 days of development nor during the following 13-day period prior to settlement, final shells were, respectively, 4.5±1.3 and 6.0±2.3% smaller at pHNBS~7.8 than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1. Moreover, a decrease of 12.0±5.4% of shell thickness was observed. More severe impacts were found with a decrease of ~0.5 pHNBS unit during the first 2 days of development which could be attributed to a decrease of calcification due toslight undersaturation of seawater with respect to aragonite. Indeed, important effects on both hatching and D-veliger shell growth were found. Hatching rates were 24±4% lower while D-veliger shells were 12.7±0.9% smaller at pHNBS~7.6 than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1. Although these results show that blue mussel larvae are still able to develop a shell in seawater undersaturated with respect to aragonite, decreases of hatching rates and shell growth suggest a negative impact of ocean acidification on the future survival of bivalve populations potentially leading to significant ecological and economical losses.

  7. Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Hernroth, B; Baden, S; Tassidis, H; Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Bergström Lind, S; Bergquist, J

    2016-08-01

    Here, we aimed to investigate potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, as gills are directly facing seawater and the changing pH (predicted to be reduced from ∼8.1 to ∼7.7 by 2100). The AMP activity of gill and haemocyte extracts was compared at pH 6.0, 7.7 and 8.1, with a radial diffusion assay against Escherichia coli. The activity of the gill extracts was not affected by pH, while it was significantly reduced with increasing pH in the haemocyte extracts. Gill extracts were also tested against different species of Vibrio (V. parahaemolyticus, V. tubiashii, V. splendidus, V. alginolyticus) at pH 7.7 and 8.1. The metabolic activity of the bacteria decreased by ∼65-90%, depending on species of bacteria, but was, as in the radial diffusion assay, not affected by pH. The results indicated that AMPs from gills are efficient in a broad pH-range. However, when mussels were pre-exposed for pH 7.7 for four month the gill extracts presented significantly lower inhibit of bacterial growth. A full in-depth proteome investigation of gill extracts, using LC-Orbitrap MS/MS technique, showed that among previously described AMPs from haemocytes of Mytilus, myticin A was found up-regulated in response to lipopolysaccharide, 3 h post injection. Sporadic occurrence of other immune related peptides/proteins also pointed to a rapid response (0.5-3 h p.i.). Altogether, our results indicate that the gills of blue mussels constitute an important first line defence adapted to act at the pH of seawater. The antimicrobial activity of the gills is however modulated when mussels are under the pressure of ocean acidification, which may give future advantages for invading pathogens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Mass spectrometry data from a quantitative analysis of protein expression in gills of immuno-challenged blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Mi, J; Hernroth, B; Bergquist, J; Lind, S Bergström

    2016-09-01

    Here, we provide the dataset associated with our research article on the potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, "Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)" [1]. Blue mussels were stimulated with lipopolysaccharides and samples were collected at different time points post injection. Protein extracts were prepared from the gills, digested using trypsin and a full in-depth proteome investigation was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Protein identification and quantification was performed using the MaxQuant 1.5.1.2 software, "MaxQuant enables high peptide identification rates, individualized p.p.b.-range mass accuracies and proteome-wide protein quantification" [2].

  9. Invasive blue mussels threaten regional scale genetic diversity in mainland and remote offshore locations: the need for baseline data and enhanced protection in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jonathan P A; Zbawicka, Małgorzata; Westfall, Kristen M; Wenne, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Human-mediated biological transfers of species have substantially modified many ecosystems with profound environmental and economic consequences. However, in many cases, invasion events are very hard to identify because of the absence of an appropriate baseline of information for receiving sites/regions. In this study, use of high-resolution genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms - SNPs) highlights the threat of introduced Northern Hemisphere blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) at a regional scale to Southern Hemisphere lineages of blue mussels via hybridization and introgression. Analysis of a multispecies SNP dataset reveals hotspots of invasive Northern Hemisphere blue mussels in some mainland New Zealand locations, as well as the existence of unique native lineages of blue mussels on remote oceanic islands in the Southern Ocean that are now threatened by invasive mussels. Samples collected from an oil rig that has moved between South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand were identified as invasive Northern Hemisphere mussels, revealing the relative ease with which such non-native species may be moved from region to region. In combination, our results highlight the existence of unique lineages of mussels (and by extension, presumably of other taxa) on remote offshore islands in the Southern Ocean, the need for more baseline data to help identify bioinvasion events, the ongoing threat of hybridization and introgression posed by invasive species, and the need for greater protection of some of the world's last great remote areas. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Accumulation, transformation and breakdown of DSP toxins from the toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuta in blue mussels, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Hansen, Per Juel; Krock, Bernd; Vismann, Bent

    2016-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxins (DTX) and pectenotoxins (PTX) produced by the dinoflagellates Dinophysis spp. can accumulate in shellfish and cause diarrhetic shellfish poisoning upon human consumption. Shellfish toxicity is a result of algal abundance and toxicity as well as accumulation and depuration kinetics in mussels. We mass-cultured Dinophysis acuta containing OA, DTX-1b and PTX-2 and fed it to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis under controlled laboratory conditions for a week to study toxin accumulation and transformation. Contents of OA and DTX-1b in mussels increased linearly with incubation time, and the net toxin accumulation was 66% and 71% for OA and DTX-1b, respectively. Large proportions (≈50%) of both these toxins were transformed to fatty acid esters. Most PTX-2 was transformed to PTX-2 seco-acid and net accumulation was initially high, but decreased progressively throughout the experiment, likely due to esterification and loss of detectability. We also quantified depuration during the subsequent four days and found half-life times of 5-6 days for OA and DTX-1b. Measurements of dissolved toxins revealed that depuration was achieved through excreting rather than metabolizing toxins. This is the first study to construct a full mass balance of DSP toxins during both accumulation and depuration, and we demonstrate rapid toxin accumulation in mussels at realistic in situ levels of Dinophysis. Applying the observed accumulation and depuration kinetics, we model mussel toxicity, and demonstrate that a concentration of only 75 Dinophysis cells l(-1) is enough to make 60 mm long mussels exceed the regulatory threshold for OA equivalents.

  11. Perturbation induced changes in substrate use by the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, in sedimentary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wa Kangeri, Arno K.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Barkman, Barbara R.; Donker, Jasper J. A.; Joppe, Daniel J.; Dankers, Norbert M. J. A.

    2014-01-01

    For sessile benthic marine organisms adhesion to a stable substrate is important for survival. Sedimentary systems, however, generally lack stable surfaces. How sessile species like the mussel, Mytilus edulis, are able to achieve stability in unstable sediments is not fully understood. An intertidal mussel bed in the tidal flats in the Western portion of the Dutch Wadden Sea was selected to investigate adhesion behavior of M. edulis. Sampling was conducted along a hydrodynamic gradient along the Front-edge, Center and Back-edge of a mussel bed. Mussels along the bed edges were characterized by adhesion to fine shell debris and high numbers of byssus threads. Mussels in the center of the bed were characterized by adhesion to shells of living conspecifics and relatively low numbers of byssus threads. An experimental investigation to isolate the role of perturbation on adhesion strategies was carried out under laboratory conditions. Experimental results show that under perturbed conditions mussels developed increased numbers of byssus threads relative to mussels left unperturbed. Additionally, mussels subjected to perturbation preferentially adhered more frequently to fine shell debris while unperturbed mussels adhered more frequently to conspecifics. Results show that differentiation in adhesion strategy is driven by physical perturbation and mediated by bed density. The results also suggest that adhesion by mussels in a sedimentary environment is a selective process in which larger shell fragments and shells of conspecifics are the preferred substrate.

  12. Alteration of shell nacre micromorphology in blue mussel Mytilus edulis after exposure to free-ionic silver and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zuykov, Michael; Pelletier, Emilien; Belzile, Claude; Demers, Serge

    2011-07-01

    This study describes the morphology of inner shell surface (ISS) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis Linnaeus after short-term exposures to radiolabeled silver in free-ionic ((110m)Ag(+)) and engineered nanoparticulate ((110m)AgNPs, <40 nm) phases. Radiolabeled silver in starting solutions was used in a similar low concentration (∼15 Bq mL(-1)) for both treatments. After exposure experiments radiolabeled silver was leached from the ISS using HCl. It concentration for shells from both treatments was ∼0.5 Bq mL(-1). Whole ISS of young individuals and prismatic layer of adults showed no evidence of any major alteration process after silver uptake. However, the nacre portion of adult mussels exposed to both treatments revealed distinct doughnut shape structures (DSS) formed by calcium carbonate micrograins that covered the surface of aragonite tablets. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging revealed the existence of only minor differences in DSS morphology between mussels exposed to Ag(+) and AgNPs. From literature survey, DSS were also found in bivalves exposed to Cd(2+). The DSS occurring in a specimen of a field-collected bivalve is also shown. Formation of distinctive DSS can be explained by a disturbance of the shell calcification mechanism. Although the occurrence of DSS is not exclusively associated with metal bioavailability to the mussels, the morphology of DSS seems to be linked to the speciation of the metal used in the uptake experiments.

  13. Negative effects of blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis) presence in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) beds in Flensborg fjord, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinther, Hanne Fogh; Laursen, Jens Sund; Holmer, Marianne

    2008-03-01

    The effect of blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis) presence in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) beds was studied from June 2004 to July 2005 in Flensborg fjord, Denmark. The field experiments were conducted at two stations, one with only Z. marina (Eelgrass station) present and one where M. edulis were present in the Z. marina beds (Mixed station). Zostera marina parameters were measured (growth of leaves, shoot density, leaf length, and nutrient content) in combination with epiphyte cover and sediment parameters (sulphate reduction rates, sediment nutrient fluxes, organic content, C, N and P content) to examine possible positive and negative effects of the mussels on eelgrass performance. The fluxes of ammonium from the sediments were stimulated at all sampling dates at the Mixed station, and possibly stimulated epiphyte growth at this station. Further 15N signals in epiphytes from the Mixed station suggested that excretion products from the mussels were important nitrogen sources at this station. Sulphate reduction rates were enhanced at the Mixed station and also sediment sulphide concentrations increased under mussel influence, which may have resulted in sulphide toxicity and decreased growth of Z. marina at this station. The study indicates that for Z. marina beds in Flensborg Fjord the effects of M. edulis in seagrass beds are primarily negative, and raises the question whether this leads to negative effects on the stability and expansion of Z. marina beds.

  14. Elevated extracellular pH during early shell formation in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K.; Melzner, F.; Himmerkus, N.; Hu, M.; Bleich, M.

    2016-02-01

    Marine calcifiers are amongst the most vulnerable organisms to ocean acidification (OA). However, limited studies investigate the mechanisms underlying their hindered performance under OA stress. Working with larval stages of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, we use microsensors to study the pH and calcium conditions necessary for shell deposition. Using 45-48 hour, D-veliger stages, we discover alkaline conditions with respect to ambient seawater pH by 0.28 pH units and higher calcium concentrations (by 0.54mM) in the extra pallial space beneath the growing shell that likely promotes the rapid synthesis of the first shell. We further use enzyme assays in combination with immuno-stainings of sodium-potassium ATPase (NKA) and proton ATPase (VHA) to provide information on the major ion regulatory pathways that enable transport of calcium carbonate required for shell formation and pH homeostasis. We also use the juvenile stages of M. edulis to understand how extracellular pH regulation close to the shell formation site will be influenced by OA stress. This allows us to describe the pH dependency of early shell formation and to begin to develop a model of the ion regulatory network that facilitates biomineralisation in the organism. The results are discussed in the context of environmental change and consequences for mollusc developmental success.

  15. Regional genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, J.; Lind, E. E.; Corell, H.; Grahn, M.; Smolarz, K.; Lönn, M.

    2017-08-01

    Connectivity plays an important role in shaping the genetic structure and in evolution of local adaptation. In the marine environment barriers to gene flow are in most cases caused by gradients in environmental factors, ocean circulation and/or larval behavior. Despite the long pelagic larval stages, with high potential for dispersal many marine organisms have been shown to have a fine scale genetic structuring. In this study, by using a combination of high-resolution genetic markers, species hybridization data and biophysical modeling we can present a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary landscape for a keystone species in the Baltic Sea, the blue mussel. We identified distinct genetic differentiation between the West Coast, Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea regions, with lower gene diversity in the Bothnian Sea. Oceanographic connectivity together with salinity and to some extent species identity provides explanations for the genetic differentiation between the West Coast and the Baltic Sea (Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea). The genetic differentiation between the Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea cannot be directly explained by oceanographic connectivity, species identity or salinity, while the lower connectivity to the Bothnian Sea may explain the lower gene diversity.

  16. SAR of Sponge-Inspired Hemibastadin Congeners Inhibiting Blue Mussel PhenolOxidase

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Hendrik; Hagenow, Jens; Chung, Mi-Young; Hellio, Claire; Weber, Horst; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Hemibastadin derivatives, including the synthetically-derived 5,5′-dibromohemibastadin-1 (DBHB), are potent inhibitors of blue mussel phenoloxidase (PO), which is a key enzyme involved in the firm attachment of this invertebrate to substrates and, thus, a promising molecular target for anti-fouling research. For a systematic investigation of the enzyme inhibitory activity of hemibastadin derivatives, we have synthesized nine new congeners, which feature structural variations of the DBHB core structure. These structural modifications include, e.g., different halogen substituents present at the aromatic rings, different amine moieties linked to the (E)-2-(hydroxyimino)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid, the presence of free vs. substituted aromatic hydroxyl groups and a free vs. methylated oxime group. All compounds were tested for their inhibitory activity towards the target enzyme in vitro, and IC50 values were calculated. Derivatives, which structurally closely resemble sponge-derived hemibastadins, revealed superior enzyme inhibitory properties vs. congeners featuring structural moieties that are absent in the respective natural products. This study suggests that natural selection has yielded structurally-optimized antifouling compounds. PMID:25988522

  17. Impact of rainfall on the hygienic quality of blue mussels and water in urban areas in the Inner Oslofjord, Norway.

    PubMed

    Tryland, Ingun; Myrmel, Mette; Østensvik, Øyvin; Wennberg, Aina C; Robertson, Lucy J

    2014-08-15

    The effects of precipitation on the hygienic quality of water and blue mussels collected from five different localities in the urban areas in the Inner Oslofjord were investigated, with samples analysed for Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., pathogenic Vibrio spp., Norovirus, Sapovirus, Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis. The sampling sites were located at varying distances from the outlet of combined sewer overflows (CSO)-impacted rivers/streams. In general, 1-3 log₁₀ increases in fecal indicator bacteria and human pathogens were observed after heavy rainfalls. Blue mussels appeared to be a useful indicator of the impact of sewage at these sites, and generally a good correlation was identified between concentrations of E. coli and other human pathogens in the mussels. Provision of general advice to the public of avoiding areas near the outlets of CSO-impacted rivers after heavy rainfall may reduce the risk of gastroenteritis by bathers and others that may swallow water during recreational activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of ocean acidification on the early life stages of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazeau, F.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Dawber, C.; Pronker, A. E.; Peene, F.; Peene, J.; Heip, C. H. R.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2010-07-01

    Several experiments have shown a decrease of growth and calcification of organisms at decreased pH levels. There is a growing interest to focus on early life stages that are believed to be more sensitive to environmental disturbances such as hypercapnia. Here, we present experimental data, acquired in a commercial hatchery, demonstrating that the growth of planktonic mussel (Mytilus edulis) larvae is significantly affected by a decrease of pH to a level expected for the end of the century. Even though there was no significant effect of a 0.25-0.34 pH unit decrease on hatching and mortality rates during the first 2 days of development nor during the following 13-day period prior to settlement, final shells were respectively 4.5±1.3 and 6.0±2.3% smaller at pHNBS~7.8 (pCO2~1100-1200 μatm) than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1 (pCO2~460-640 μatm). Moreover, a decrease of 12.0±5.4% of shell thickness was observed after 15d of development. More severe impacts were found with a decrease of ~0.5 pHNBS unit during the first 2 days of development which could be attributed to a decrease of calcification due to a slight undersaturation of seawater with respect to aragonite. Indeed, important effects on both hatching and D-veliger shell growth were found. Hatching rates were 24±4% lower while D-veliger shells were 12.7±0.9% smaller at pHNBS~7.6 (pCO2~1900 μatm) than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1 (pCO2~540 μatm). Although these results show that blue mussel larvae are still able to develop a shell in seawater undersaturated with respect to aragonite, the observed decreases of hatching rates and shell growth could lead to a significant decrease of the settlement success. As the environmental conditions considered in this study do not necessarily reflect the natural conditions experienced by this species at the time of spawning, future studies will need to consider the whole larval cycle (from fertilization to settlement) under environmentally relevant conditions in order to

  19. Effect of seawater desalination and oil pollution on the lipid composition of blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea.

    PubMed

    Fokina, N N; Bakhmet, I N; Shklyarevich, G A; Nemova, N N

    2014-12-01

    A study on the effect oil pollution under normal and reduced salinity had on blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea in an aquarium-based experiment and in the natural habitat revealed a change in gill total lipids as a compensatory response. The cholesterol concentration and the cholesterol/phospholipids ratio in gills were found to reflect the impact of the environmental factors (oil pollution and desalination), and evidence adaptive changes in the cell membrane structure. An elevated content of storage lipids (chiefly triacylglycerols) in the mussels in the aquarium experiment indicates, first of all, the uptake and accumulation of oil products in gill cells under both normal and reduced seawater salinity, while high triacylglycerols level in gill littoral mussels from 'control' biotope in the Gulf of Kandalaksha is primarily associated with the mussel׳s pre-spawning period.

  20. Detection of norovirus genotype I.3b and II.4 in bioaccumulated blue mussels using different virus recovery methods.

    PubMed

    Comelli, Heidi Lange; Rimstad, Espen; Larsen, Stig; Myrmel, Mette

    2008-09-30

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the most common non bacterial human pathogens associated with shellfish borne gastroenteritis. Norovirus detection is based on molecular procedures such as reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. A variety of methods have been developed to extract viral RNA from complex shellfish matrixes and to reduce the level of RT-PCR inhibitors. The present study had three objectives: 1) Determine the most appropriate sample treatment protocol for detection of NoVs in mussels, 2) Examine whether there is a variation of the binding affinity between a NoV GI and a GII strain to mussel digestive tissue and how this influences the detection sensitivity, 3) Establish an internal control for sample processing and virus detection. Three RNA extraction methods were evaluated on extracts from blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) spiked with NoV GII.4. The most efficient RNA extraction method was subsequently used for evaluation of three virus recovery methods of blue mussels bio accumulated with NoV GI.3b and GII.4. Mengovirus was evaluated as an internal process control and TaqMan RT-PCRs were used for virus detection. Elution of the two viruses from shellfish tissue differed, indicating a difference in binding affinities. Only a method based upon Proteinase K digestion followed by NucliSenseasyMAG was able to detect both NoV GI.3b and GII.4 (3.0% and 3.5% recovery respectively). The results show that the processing method influences the possibility to detect different variants of NoV.

  1. The role of habitat-selection in restricting invasive blue mussel advancement to protect native populations in San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, N.; Saarman, N. P.; Pogson, G.

    2013-12-01

    Introduced species contribute to decline of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Introduced species threaten native species by increasing competition for space and resources, changing their habitat, and disrupting species interactions. Protecting native species is crucial to preserving ecosystem services (i.e. medicinal, agricultural, ecological, and cultural benefits) for future generations. In marine communities, the number of invasive species is dramatically increasing every year, further magnifying the negative impact on native species. This research determines if habitat-specific selection can protect native species from their invasive relatives, and could allow targeted habitat restoration for native species to maintain high levels of biodiversity. Blue mussels provide an ideal system for studying the impact of an invasive species (Mytilus galloprovincialis) on native mussels (M. trossulus), because M. galloprovincialis is marked as one of the world's 100 worst invasive species. Hybridization between M. galloprovincialis and M. trossulus occurs wherever their distributions overlap (i.e. Japan, Puget Sound, and central California). In central California, hybrids form in a broad variety of habitats ever since M. galloprovincialis was introduced about 100 years ago. The current level of threat posed to native mussels in central California is unknown. When population growth rate of an invasive species is higher than the native within a hybrid zone, the invader's genes become more prominent in the hybrids than the native species' genes. This uneven mix of genes and decrease of pure native mussels threatens to drive M. trossulus to extinction. Therefore, it is important to research which environment fosters highest success of pure native species. We conducted a field experiment in San Francisco Bay where mussels were reared in different habitats. We then collected samples and extracted DNA from each treatment, and genotyped them by a next-generation sequencing

  2. Toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis: a redox proteomic investigation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wentao; Culloty, Sarah; Darmody, Grainne; Lynch, Sharon; Davenport, John; Ramirez-Garcia, Sonia; Dawson, Kenneth A; Lynch, Iseult; Blasco, Julian; Sheehan, David

    2014-08-01

    Relatively little is known about the fate and effects of nanomaterials even in relatively simple organisms such as Mytilus edulis. Here, copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NP) are shown to induce dose-dependent toxic effects at the biochemical, physiological and tissue levels in the blue mussel. Stable CuO NP suspensions were sized by differential light scattering and nanoparticle tracking analysis to yield average particle diameters of approximately 100 nm. These were administered to M. edulis, at doses of 400, 700 and 1000 ppb. Ingested copper was predominantly located in the gill tissue with small amounts in digestive gland. Fifteen coomassie-stained spots were excised from two dimensional gel electrophoresis separations of gill tissue extacts and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. These contained six unique proteins (alpha- and beta-tubulin, actin, tropomyosin, triosephosphate isomerase and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase). Of these, two spots (actin and triosephosphate isomerase) showed decreased protein thiols while three (alpha-tubulin, tropomyosin and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase) showed increased carbonylation which is indicative of protein oxidation of cytoskeleton and enzymes in response to CuO NP. The neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay revealed toxicity due to the CuO NPs which was comparable with toxic metal oxide nanoparticles such as chromium and cobalt. In contrast, non-toxic titanium and gold metal oxide nanoparticles gave no NRRT effects at similar NP concentrations. Histology revealed deposition of pigmented brown cells in response to CuO NP, located predominantly along the mantle and gill margin but also lining digestive tubules and some of the sinuses and distributed throughout the connective tissue and in the adductor muscle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Does natural selection explain the fine scale genetic structure at the nuclear exon Glu-5' in blue mussels from Kerguelen?

    PubMed

    Gérard, Karin; Roby, Charlotte; Bierne, Nicolas; Borsa, Philippe; Féral, Jean-Pierre; Chenuil, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The Kerguelen archipelago, isolated in the Southern Ocean, shelters a blue mussel Mytilus metapopulation far from any influence of continental populations or any known hybrid zone. The finely carved coast leads to a highly heterogeneous habitat. We investigated the impact of the environment on the genetic structure in those Kerguelen blue mussels by relating allele frequencies to habitat descriptors. A total sample comprising up to 2248 individuals from 35 locations was characterized using two nuclear markers, mac-1 and Glu-5', and a mitochondrial marker (COI). The frequency data from 9 allozyme loci in 9 of these locations were also reanalyzed. Two other nuclear markers (EFbis and EFprem's) were monomorphic. Compared to Northern Hemisphere populations, polymorphism in Kerguelen blue mussels was lower for all markers except for the exon Glu-5'. At Glu-5', genetic differences were observed between samples from distinct regions (F CT = 0.077), as well as within two regions, including between samples separated by <500 m. No significant differentiation was observed in the AMOVA analyses at the two other markers (mac-1 and COI). Like mac-1, all allozyme loci genotyped in a previous publication, displayed lower differentiation (Jost's D) and F ST values than Glu-5'. Power simulations and confidence intervals support that Glu-5' displays significantly higher differentiation than the other loci (except a single allozyme for which confidence intervals overlap). AMOVA analyses revealed significant effects of the giant kelp Macrocystis and wave exposure on this marker. We discuss the influence of hydrological conditions on the genetic differentiation among regions. In marine organisms with high fecundity and high dispersal potential, gene flow tends to erase differentiation, but this study showed significant differentiation at very small distance. This may be explained by the particular hydrology and the carved coastline of the Kerguelen archipelago, together with

  4. Predation of the ribbed mussel geukensia demissa by the blue crab callinectes sapidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, R.

    Callinectes sapidus fed extensively on Geukensia demissa in laboratory aquaria. Several predation techniques used by Callinectes to open its prey are reported. Prey value decreases monotonically with increasing mussel size. Crabs consumed mussels over a wide size range but were generally reluctant to feed on larger mussels whilst smaller, more profitably prey was available. The relative importance of 'energy maximization' and 'time minimization' could not be distinguished. The distribution and population structure of Geukensia at Beaufort, N. Carolina are briefly considered in terms of the foraging strategy of Callinectes.

  5. Specific congener profiles of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in blue mussel in Osaka Bay in Japan: Aqueous solubilities of PCDDs and PCDFs

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Hideaki; Takayama, Koji; Mimura, Mayumi; Kashimoto, Takashi ); Fukushima, Shigehiko )

    1989-09-01

    The authors have monitored polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in the coastal waters of Japan by using blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) as a biological indicator. The levels of both chemicals were surmised to closely relate to the number of municipal incinerators and the population densities in the cities adjoining the sampling location. The main contamination source in Osaka Bay, which is heavy polluted with PCDDs and PCDFs, was determined to be the fly ash from municipal waste incinerators based upon analytical results of blue mussel from Osaka Bay sediments, sediments from Osaka Bay, and sediments from a river, which is located near a typical urban municipal waste incinerator. However, there was a remarkable difference in congener profiles of PCDDs and PCDFs between the blue mussel and the fly ash, that is, the mussel mainly contained tetraCDDs and tetraCDFs with congener ratios of 56 {plus minus} 9.7% and 62 {plus minus} 6.0%, respectively, whereas the fly ash contained the higher chlorinated PCDDs and PCDFs as major congeners. In this study, the specific congener profiles of PCDDs and PCDFs in blue mussel were investigated from the point of view of their water solubilities.

  6. Differential patterns of male and female mtDNA exchange across the Atlantic Ocean in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Riginos, Cynthia; Hickerson, Michael J; Henzler, Christine M; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2004-11-01

    Comparisons among loci with differing modes of inheritance can reveal unexpected aspects of population history. We employ a multilocus approach to ask whether two types of independently assorting mitochondrial DNAs (maternally and paternally inherited: F- and M-mtDNA) and a nuclear locus (ITS) yield concordant estimates of gene flow and population divergence. The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is distributed on both North American and European coastlines and these populations are separated by the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Gene flow across the Atlantic Ocean differs among loci, with F-mtDNA and ITS showing an imprint of some genetic interchange and M-mtDNA showing no evidence for gene flow. Gene flow of F-mtDNA and ITS causes trans-Atlantic population divergence times to be greatly underestimated for these loci, although a single trans-Atlantic population divergence time (1.2 MYA) can be accommodated by considering all three loci in combination in a coalescent framework. The apparent lack of gene flow for M-mtDNA is not readily explained by different dispersal capacities of male and female mussels. A genetic barrier to M-mtDNA exchange between North American and European mussel populations is likely to explain the observed pattern, perhaps associated with the double uniparental system of mitochondrial DNA inheritance.

  7. Mitogenomics of southern hemisphere blue mussels (Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia): Insights into the evolutionary characteristics of the Mytilus edulis complex

    PubMed Central

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Quintero-Galvis, Julian F.; Mesas, Andres; D’Elía, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Marine blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) are widespread species that exhibit an antitropical distribution with five species occurring in the Northern Hemisphere (M. trossulus, M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. californianus and M. coruscus) and three in the Southern Hemisphere (M. galloprovincialis, M. chilensis and M. platensis). Species limits in this group remain controversial, in particular for those forms that live in South America. Here we investigated structural characteristics of marine mussels mitogenomes, based on published F mtDNA sequences of Northern Hemisphere species and two newly sequenced South American genomes, one from the Atlantic M. platensis and another from the Pacific M. chilensis. These mitogenomes exhibited similar architecture to those of other genomes of Mytilus, including the presence of the Atp8 gene, which is missing in most of the other bivalves. Our evolutionary analysis of mitochondrial genes indicates that purifying selection is the predominant force shaping the evolution of the coding genes. Results of our phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of Pteriomorphia and fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships among its five orders. Finally, the low genetic divergence of specimens assigned to M. chilensis and M. platensis suggests that these South American marine mussels represent conspecific variants rather than distinct species. PMID:27241855

  8. Quality assessment of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis): comparison between commercial and wild types.

    PubMed

    De Witte, B; Devriese, L; Bekaert, K; Hoffman, S; Vandermeersch, G; Cooreman, K; Robbens, J

    2014-08-15

    This study compared species identity, microplastics, chemical and microbial contamination between consumption mussels and wild type mussels, collected at Belgian department stores and Belgian groynes and quaysides, respectively. Species identification based on genetic analysis showed a high number of Mytilus (M.) edulis compared to M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis/galloprovincialis hybrid mussels. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.6 to 5.1 fibres/10 g of mussel. A higher prevalence of orange fibres at quaysides is related to fisheries activities. Chemical contamination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorobiphenyls could be related to industrial activities and water turbidity, with maximum concentrations at the quayside of port Zeebrugge. The inverse was noted for Escherichia coli contamination, which was relatively low at Zeebrugge quayside with a total count of 3.9 × 10(2)CFU/100 g tissue, due to limited agricultural effluents. Results of this complementary analysis stress the importance of integrated monitoring and quality assessment.

  9. Does acute lead (Pb) contamination influence membrane fatty acid composition and freeze tolerance in intertidal blue mussels in arctic Greenland?

    PubMed

    Thyrring, Jakob; Juhl, Bodil Klein; Holmstrup, Martin; Blicher, Martin E; Sejr, Mikael K

    2015-11-01

    In their natural habitats, organisms are exposed to multiple stressors. Heavy metal contamination stresses the cell membrane due to increased peroxidation of lipids. Likewise, sub-zero air temperatures potentially reduce membrane functionality in ectothermal animals. We tested if acute lead (Pb) exposure for 7 days would influence survival in intertidal blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) after exposure to realistic sub-zero air temperatures. A full factorial experiment with five tissue Pb concentrations between 0 and 3500 μg Pb/g and six sub-zero temperatures from 0 to -17 °C were used to test the hypothesis that sub-lethal effects of Pb may increase the lethality caused by freezing in blue mussels exposed to temperatures simulating Greenland winter conditions. We found a significant effect of temperature on mortality. However, the short-term exposure to Pb did not result in any effects of Pb, nor did we find interactions between Pb and temperature. We analysed the relative abundance of major phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in the gill tissue, but we found no significant effect of Pb tissue concentration on PLFA composition. Results suggest that Pb accumulation has limited effects on freeze tolerance and does not induce membrane damage in terms of persistent lipid peroxidation.

  10. Accumulation of gliotoxin, a cytotoxic mycotoxin from Aspergillus fumigatus, in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Grovel, Olivier; Pouchus, Yves François; Verbist, Jean-François

    2003-09-01

    A strain of Aspergillus fumigatus has been isolated from sediments of a mussel bed. When cultured in hyper saline conditions (with sea-water), it produces a cytotoxic and immunosuppressive toxin, gliotoxin, which is excreted in an exudate. In order to know if this toxin could represent a risk for shellfish consumers, an experiment of bioaccumulation of gliotoxin in mussel has been carried out. After 6 days of contamination, toxin was accumulated in the meat of the mussels, at a level up to 2.9 microg/mg of extract weight, with a mode of contamination different to the classical digestive process described for a majority of marine toxins, but similar to the contamination mode of domoic acid.

  11. Accumulation of copper, chromium, and arsenic in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from laboratory and field exposures to wood treated with chromated copper arsenate type C

    SciTech Connect

    Adler-Ivanbrook, L.; Breslin, V.T.

    1999-02-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to examine the uptake of Cu, Cr, and As leached from southern yellow pine (SYP) treated with chromated copper arsenate type C (CCA-C), as well as effects on mortality and growth, in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Mussels were exposed to CCA-C-treated wood at a preservative retention of 40 kg/m{sup 3} and control (nontreated) SYP in laboratory flow-through sea table and field exposure experiments for 9 months in 1994 and 3 months in 1995. Mussels were sampled at regular intervals to evaluate possible short- and long-term exposure effects., Individual mussels were measured to determine the length, dry weight, and condition index. Mussel tissues were than analyzed for Cu, Cr, and As. Results showed few significant differences in condition index, dry weight, and length between CCA-C-exposed and control mussels. In addition, no statistically significant differences in mortality were found between the mussels exposed to CCA-C-treated and nontreated SYP in the laboratory flow-through sea table and field exposure experiments. Significant differences in Cu, As, and Cr contents in mussel tissues between treatments were few, and generally cannot be attributed to exposure to CCA-C-treated SYP. The lack of Cu, Cr, and As uptake from CCA-C-treated SYP was attributed to the low, although continuous, rate of release of these elements from CCA-C-treated wood and to the experimental design, which allowed continuous flushing, prohibiting the accumulation of these elements in the water surrounding the mussels.

  12. Hydroxylated and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and their main food, Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus × Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Anna-Karin; Chen, Vivian Lindberg; Larsson, Kjell; Bergman, Åke; Asplund, Lillemor

    2016-02-01

    Long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) that breed in northern Europe and western Siberia and commonly winter in the Baltic Sea, are threatened by a significant population decrease. The ducks are, by primarily feeding on Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus × Mytilus edulis) while wintering in the Baltic Sea, potentially subjected to high levels of toxic hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs). To assess long-tailed ducks exposure to polybrominated phenols (PBPs), polybrominated anisoles (PBAs), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), their methylated counterparts (MeO-PBDEs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), livers of ten long-tailed ducks wintering in the Baltic Sea were analysed. Pattern and levels of analytes in long-tailed ducks (liver) and blue mussels sampled in March and May at nine sites in the Baltic Sea were compared. The geometric mean concentration (ng/g l.w.) in livers of long-tailed ducks and Baltic blue mussels were: Σ(2)PBPs: 0.57 and 48; Σ(2)PBAs: 0.83 and 11; Σ(7)OH-PBDEs: 6.1 and 45; Σ(7)MeO-PBDEs: 3.8 and 69; Σ(7)PBDEs: 8.0 and 7.2, respectively. Based on an estimated daily intake of 450 g fresh blue mussel meat, long-tailed ducks daily dietary intake of brominated substances while foraging in the Baltic Sea in March-May was estimated to; 390 ng Σ(2)PBPs, 90 ng Σ(2)PBAs, 370 ng Σ(7)OH-PBDEs, 590 ng Σ(7)MeO-PBDEs and 59 ng Σ(7)PBDEs. The low levels of PBPs, PBAs, OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs in the long-tailed duck livers compared to blue mussel, despite a continuous daily intake, suggest that these compounds are poorly retained in long-tailed ducks. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Uptake and effects of microplastics on cells and tissue of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. after an experimental exposure.

    PubMed

    von Moos, Nadia; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Köhler, Angela

    2012-10-16

    In this study, we investigated if industrial high-density polyethylene (HDPE) particles, a model microplastic free of additives, ranging > 0-80 μm are ingested and taken up into the cells and tissue of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. The effects of exposure (up to 96 h) and plastic ingestion were observed at the cellular and subcellular level. Microplastic uptake into the gills and digestive gland was analyzed by a new method using polarized light microscopy. Mussel health status was investigated incorporating histological assessment and cytochemical biomarkers of toxic effects and early warning. In addition to being drawn into the gills, HDPE particles were taken up into the stomach and transported into the digestive gland where they accumulated in the lysosomal system after 3 h of exposure. Our results show notable histological changes upon uptake and a strong inflammatory response demonstrated by the formation of granulocytomas after 6 h and lysosomal membrane destabilization, which significantly increased with longer exposure times. We provide proof of principle that microplastics are taken up into cells and cause significant effects on the tissue and cellular level, which can be assessed with standard cytochemical biomarkers and polarized light microscopy for microplastic tracking in tissue.

  14. Oxidation-reduction potential and lipid oxidation in ready-to-eat blue mussels in red sauce: criteria for package design.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Kanishka; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Rasco, Barbara; Tang, Juming; Sablani, Shyam S

    2017-01-01

    Ready-to-eat in-package pasteurized blue mussels in red sauce requires refrigerated storage or in combination with an aerobic environment to prevent the growth of anaerobes. A low barrier packaging may create an aerobic environment; however, it causes lipid oxidation in mussels. Thus, evaluation of the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh) (aerobic/anaerobic nature of food) and lipid oxidation is essential. Three packaging materials with oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of 62 (F-62), 40 (F-40) and 3 (F-3) cm(3) m(-2) day(-1) were selected for this study. Lipid oxidation was measured by color changes in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 532 nm (TBARS@532) and 450 nm (TBARS@450). Significantly higher (P < 0.05) TBARS@532 was found in mussels packaged in higher OTR film. TBARS@450 in mussels packaged with F-62 and F-40 gradually increased during refrigerated storage (3.5 ± 0.5 °C), but remained constant after 20 days of storage for mussels packaged with F-3. The Eh of pasteurized sauce was not significantly affected (P > 0.05) by OTR and remained negative (< -80 mV) during storage. Negative Eh values can support the growth of anaerobes such as Clostridium botulinum. The headspace oxygen concentration was reduced by about 50% from its initial value during pasteurization, and then further declined during storage. The headspace oxygen concentration was higher in trays packaged with higher OTR film. Mussels packed with high OTR film showed higher lipid oxidation, indicating that high barrier film is required for packaging of mussels. Pasteurized mussels must be kept in refrigerated storage to prevent growth of anaerobic proteolytic C. botulinum spores under temperature abuse. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Geographic and temporal patterns of variation in total mercury concentrations in blood of harlequin ducks and blue mussels from Alaska.

    PubMed

    Savoy, Lucas; Flint, Paul; Zwiefelhofer, Denny; Brant, Heather; Perkins, Christopher; Taylor, Robert; Lane, Oksana; Hall, Jeff; Evers, David; Schamber, Jason

    2017-04-15

    We compared total mercury (Hg) concentrations in whole blood of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) sampled within and among two geographically distinct locations and across three years in southwest Alaska. Blue mussels were collected to assess correlation between Hg concentrations in locally available forage and birds. Mercury concentrations in harlequin duck blood were significantly higher at Unalaska Island (0.31±0.19 mean±SD, μg/g blood) than Kodiak Island (0.04±0.02 mean±SD, μg/g blood). We found no evidence for annual variation in blood Hg concentration between years at Unalaska Island. However, blood Hg concentration did vary among specific sampling locations (i.e., bays) at Unalaska Island. Findings from this study demonstrate harlequin ducks are exposed to environmental sources of Hg, and whole blood Hg concentrations are associated with their local food source. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Parasites and pathogens of the endosymbiotic pea crab (Pinnotheres pisum) from blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) in England.

    PubMed

    Longshaw, Matt; Feist, Stephen W; Bateman, Kelly S

    2012-02-01

    A histopathological survey of the commensal pea crab (Pinnotheres pisum) from the mantle cavities of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) has been conducted. A total of 266 pea crabs from eight sites around the English coastline were examined. Of these, 82 were negative for any visible infections by histology. The remaining pea crabs were infected with an intranuclear bacilliform virus designated as P. pisum bacilliform virus (PpBV) in the hepatopancreatic epithelial cells, peritrichous ciliates on the gills, an intracytoplasmic microsporidian infection of the hepatopancreatocytes, a myophilic microsporidian infection, the gregarine Cephaloidophora fossor in the hepatopancreas, the entoniscid isopod Pinnotherion vermiforme, a low level nematode infection and an acanthocephalan cystacanth. Host reactions to infections were generally subdued. Results are discussed in relation to the endocommensal habitat of the pea crabs.

  17. Geographic and temporal patterns of variation in total mercury concentrations in blood of harlequin ducks and blue mussels from Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoy, Lucas; Flint, Paul L.; Zwiefelhofer, Denny; Brant, Heather; Perkins, Christopher R.; Taylor, Robert J.; Lane, Oksana P.; Hall, Jefferson S.; Evers, David C.; Schamber, Jason

    2017-01-01

    We compared total mercury (Hg) concentrations in whole blood of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) sampled within and among two geographically distinct locations and across three years in southwest Alaska. Blue mussels were collected to assess correlation between Hg concentrations in locally available forage and birds. Mercury concentrations in harlequin duck blood were significantly higher at Unalaska Island (0.31 ± 0.19 mean ± SD, μg/g blood) than Kodiak Island (0.04 ± 0.02 mean ± SD, μg/g blood). We found no evidence for annual variation in blood Hg concentration between years at Unalaska Island. However, blood Hg concentration did vary among specific sampling locations (i.e., bays) at Unalaska Island. Findings from this study demonstrate harlequin ducks are exposed to environmental sources of Hg, and whole blood Hg concentrations are associated with their local food source.

  18. Selection against blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) homozygotes under various stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Myrand, B; Tremblay, R; Sévigny, J-M

    2002-01-01

    Three mussel groups differing in mean multilocus heterozygosity (MLH) were used to examine the MLH-fitness relationship. Mussels were submitted to aerobic and anaerobic stressful conditions in the laboratory, and their LT(50) was measured. Mortality was not random in two of the three groups and affected the homozygous individuals more. This selective mortality caused a significant increase in the mean MLH of the survivors, but only for the two groups characterized by the lowest initial MLH and significant deficits in heterozygotes at the onset of the experiments. While these experiments were ongoing, the same two groups also suffered a 40% mortality rate in lantern nets under field conditions. This mortality also increased the mean MLH in survivors. All groups showed strong inverse relationships between MLH and standard metabolism. Our results suggest that the higher resistance of more heterozygous individuals is related to their lower metabolic needs.

  19. Differential dynamics of dinophysistoxins and pectenotoxins between blue mussel and common cockle: a phenomenon originating from the complex toxin profile of Dinophysis acuta.

    PubMed

    Vale, Paulo

    2004-08-01

    Different toxin profiles of dinophysistoxins and pectenotoxins have been reported before between blue mussel and other bivalve species, such as common cockle, razor clam, clams, etc. Comparison of toxins present in plankton in mussel growing areas and in cockle growing areas, respectively, showed there was no particular incidence of dinophysistoxin-2 (DTX2) in plankton from mussel growing areas that could account for the higher percentage of DTX2 in relation to okadaic acid (OA) found in mussels; or of pectenotoxin-2 in cockle growing areas that could explain the higher levels of pectenotoxin-2 seco acid (PTX2sa) found in cockles. A detoxification experiment between mussels and cockles showed the higher percentage of DTX2 in mussels was due to slower elimination of this toxin in relation to OA; while the lower levels of PTX2sa were due to quicker elimination by mussels than by cockles. The slower elimination of DTX2 explains why in late summer and autumn this toxin gradually accumulate in mussels throughout the entire coast, while other bivalves species have a lower percentage of DTX2, very close to the 3:2 OA:DTX2 ratio found in natural plankton assemblages when Dinophysis acuta predominates. In the clam Donax spp., DTX2 concentration also tends to build up in relation to OA, this being made up predominantly by free DTX2 while esterified DTX2 is found only in trace levels (similarly to what is found in mussel for DTX2). We hypothesise that the esterified forms of OA and DTX2 are more easily eliminated than the free forms, by all shellfish species. The free forms are more difficult to eliminate. This is particularly notable in these two species that present a very low conversion of DTX2 into acyl esters. The high pool of free toxins is partially responsible for these two species (mussel and Donax clams) being the sentinel species for DSP contamination throughout the Portuguese coast. Esters of OA and DTX2 were found in a plankton sample where D. acuta was the

  20. Protein isolation from blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) using an acid and alkaline solubilisation technique--process characteristics and functionality of the isolates.

    PubMed

    Vareltzis, Patroklos K; Undeland, Ingrid

    2012-12-01

    The pH shift method was developed to isolate proteins from low-value raw materials by solubilisation at high or low pH followed by precipitation. In this paper the application of the pH shift method on isolated mussel (Mytilus edulis) meat and whole mussels is reported. Highest protein solubilisation was achieved at pH values of 2.6 and 12. The optimum precipitation pH values were established as around 5.8 following acid solubilisation and 5.2 following alkaline solubilisation. Protein recoveries were 430 and 580 g kg(-1) with the acid and alkaline processes respectively. Using whole crushed mussels, the corresponding recoveries were 310 and 480 g kg(-1). Process modifications to further improve protein recovery resulted in only a marginal increase. Lipid oxidation was not induced during pH shift processing, but heavy proteolysis occurred during the acid process version. Proteolysis could not be prevented by porcine plasma protein. Alkali-produced proteins performed better in all functionality tests compared with acid-produced proteins. The acid process removed slightly more lipids, recovered relatively more cysteine, methionine and lysine and resulted in whiter isolates. The pH shift method can be successfully used to extract functional proteins from mussels and add value to blue mussels unsuitable for human consumption (with or without shells). Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Mussel Glue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A mytilus edilus, a common blue ocean mussel is attaching itself to the underside of a wet glass in a laboratory. It secretes a glue like substance in the form of multiple threads which attach to surfaces such as shells, rocks, piers and ships. This natural super glue hardens within minutes and tightly affixes to its selected platform even in the roughest seas. Its superior adhesive properties suggest many practical applications. One company, Bio-Polymers, Inc., has developed a synthetic mussel glue for the commercial market.

  2. The development and implementation of a method using blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) as biosentinels of Cryptosporidium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii contamination in marine aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Sarah E; Keely, Scott P; Ware, Michael W; Schable, Nancy; See, Mary Jean; Gregorio, Dominic; Zou, Xuan; Su, Chunlei; Dubey, J P; Villegas, Eric N

    2015-12-01

    Surveillance monitoring for microbial water quality typically involves collecting single discrete grab samples for analyzing only one contaminant. While informative, current approaches suffer from poor recoveries and only provide a limited snapshot of the microbial contaminants only at the time of collection. To overcome these limitations, bivalves have been proposed as effective biosentinels of water quality particularly for their ability to efficiently concentrate and retain microbial contaminants for long periods of time. In this study, we examined the use of indigenous blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) as biosentinels to monitor for the presence of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium water. An efficient method to extract oocyst DNA from various mussel tissues followed by PCR-based detection of these pathogens was developed, which resulted in the detection down to 10 oocysts. This method was then used to conduct a small survey in Point Lobos and Morro Bay, California to determine prevalence T. gondii and Cryptosporidium. Results revealed that mussels from Morro Bay were contaminated with T. gondii (33 %), while mussels from Point Lobos were contaminated with T. gondii (54 %) and Cryptosporidium (26.9 %) oocysts. Phylogenetic analysis using the SSU rRNA gene identified two novel Cryptosporidium parvum-like genotypes. Overall, this study demonstrated the application of using native California Mytilus spp. as biosentinels for pathogen contamination along the central California shorelines. More importantly, T. gondii and Cryptosporidium were found at higher prevalence rates in Morro Bay and in Point Lobos, an area not previously reported to be contaminated with these pathogens.

  3. Structural diversity of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the byssus of blue mussels upon refolding.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Michael H; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Blue mussels firmly adhere to a variety of different substrates by the byssus, an extracorporal structure consisting of several protein threads. These threads are mainly composed of fibrillar collagens called preCols which are embedded in a proteinaceous matrix. One of the two so far identified matrix proteins is the Proximal Thread Matrix Protein 1 (PTMP1). PTMP1 comprises two von Willebrand factor type A-like domains (A1 and A2) in a special arrangement. Here, we describe the refolding of recombinant PTMP1 from inclusion bodies. PTMP1 refolded into two distinct monomeric isoforms. Both isomers exhibited alternative intramolecular disulfide bonds. One of these isomers is thermodynamically favored and presumably represents the native form of PTMP1, while the other isoform is kinetically favored but is likely non-native. Oligomerization during refolding was influenced by, but not strictly dependent on disulfide formation. The conformational stability of PTMP1 indicates an influence of intramolecular disulfides on the native state, but not on unfolding intermediates. Monomeric PTMP1 exhibited a high thermal stability, dependent on the pH of the surrounding environment. Especially under acidic conditions the disulfide bonds were critically involved in thermal stability.

  4. Does the marine biotoxin okadaic acid cause DNA fragmentation in the blue mussel and the pacific oyster?

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Moira; O'Halloran, John; O'Brien, Nora M; van Pelt, Frank F N A M

    2014-10-01

    Two bivalve species of global economic importance: the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis and the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas were exposed in vivo, to the diarrhoetic shellfish toxin okadaic acid (OA), and impacts on DNA fragmentation were measured. Shellfish were exposed using two different regimes, the first was a single (24 h) exposure of 2.5 nM OA (∼0.1 μg/shellfish) and algal feed at the beginning of the trial (T0), after which shellfish were only fed algae. The second was daily exposure of shellfish to two different concentrations of OA mixed with the algal feed over 7 days; 1.2 nM OA (∼0.05 μg OA/shellfish/day) and 50 nM OA (∼2 μg OA/shellfish/day). Haemolymph and hepatopancreas cells were extracted following 1, 3 and 7 days exposure. Cell viability was measured using the trypan blue exclusion assay and remained above 85% for both cell types. DNA fragmentation was examined using the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. A significant increase in DNA fragmentation was observed in the two cell types from both species relative to the controls. This increase was greater in the pacific oyster at the higher toxin concentration. However, there was no difference in the proportion of damage measured between the two cell types, and a classic dose response was not observed, increasing toxin concentration did not correspond to increased DNA fragmentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  6. The impact of TiO2 nanoparticles on uptake and toxicity of benzo(a)pyrene in the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Farkas, J; Bergum, S; Nilsen, E W; Olsen, A J; Salaberria, I; Ciesielski, T M; Bączek, T; Konieczna, L; Salvenmoser, W; Jenssen, B M

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles are emerging contaminants of concern. Knowledge on their environmental impacts is scarce, especially on their interactive effects with other contaminants. In this study we investigated effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NP) on the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and determined their influence on the bioavailability and toxicity of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), a carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Blue mussels were exposed to either TiO2NP (0.2 and 2.0 mg L(-1)) or B(a)P (20 μg L(-1)) and to the respective combinations of these two compounds. Aqueous contaminant concentrations, the uptake of Ti and B(a)P into mussel soft tissue, effects on oxidative stress and chromosomal damage were analyzed. The uncoated TiO2NP agglomerated rapidly in the seawater. The presence of TiO2NP significantly reduced the bioavailability of B(a)P, shown by lowered B(a)P concentrations in exposure tanks and in mussel tissue. The activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were impacted by the various exposure regimes, indicating oxidative stress in the contaminant exposure groups. While SOD activity was increased only in the 0.2TiO2NP exposure group, CAT activity was enhanced in both combined exposure groups. The GPx activity was increased only in the groups exposed to the two single compounds. In hemocytes, increased chromosomal damage was detected in mussels exposed to the single compounds, which was further increased after exposure to the combination of compounds. In this study we show that the presence of TiO2NP in the exposure system reduced B(a)P uptake in blue mussels. However, since most biomarker responses did not decrease despite of the lower B(a)P uptake in combined exposures, the results suggest that TiO2NP can act as additional stressor, or potentially alters B(a)P toxicity by activation.

  7. Adaptive genetic variation distinguishes Chilean blue mussels (Mytilus chilensis) from different marine environments.

    PubMed

    Araneda, Cristián; Larraín, María Angélica; Hecht, Benjamin; Narum, Shawn

    2016-04-26

    Chilean mussel populations have been thought to be panmictic with limited genetic structure. Genotyping-by-sequencing approaches have enabled investigation of genomewide variation that may better distinguish populations that have evolved in different environments. We investigated neutral and adaptive genetic variation in Mytilus from six locations in southern Chile with 1240 SNPs obtained with RAD-seq. Differentiation among locations with 891 neutral SNPs was low (FST = 0.005). Higher differentiation was obtained with a panel of 58 putative outlier SNPs (FST = 0.114) indicating the potential for local adaptation. This panel identified clusters of genetically related individuals and demonstrated that much of the differentiation (~92%) could be attributed to the three major regions and environments: extreme conditions in Patagonia, inner bay influenced by aquaculture (Reloncaví), and outer bay (Chiloé Island). Patagonia samples were most distinct, but additional analysis carried out excluding this collection also revealed adaptive divergence between inner and outer bay samples. The four locations within Reloncaví area were most similar with all panels of markers, likely due to similar environments, high gene flow by aquaculture practices, and low geographical distance. Our results and the SNP markers developed will be a powerful tool supporting management and programs of this harvested species.

  8. Distribution and elimination of (/sup 14/C)octachlorostyrene in cod (Gadus morhua), rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri, and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Ingebrigtsen, K.; Solbakken, J.E.; Norheim, G.; Nafstad, I.

    1988-01-01

    Cod (Gadus morhua) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were given a single oral dose of 100 microCi/kg b.w. of (/sup 14/C)octachlorostyrene ((/sup 14/C)OCS) in peanut oil. Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) was exposed to (/sup 14/C)OCS in water. The distribution and elimination of the compound was studied by liquid scintillation counting and whole-body autoradiography. The highest degree of radioactivity in the cod and rainbow trout was measured in the liver and the visceral fat, respectively. The degree of radioactivity in the brain of cod exceeded that of the rainbow trout by a factor between 2 and 4 at all survival times. In addition to bile excretion of (/sup 14/C)OCS-derived radioactivity, a possible excretion over the intestinal mucosa was suggested. The rate of elimination was slow in both species, and substantial amounts of radioactivity remained in the tissues 90 d after administration. In the blue mussel, the highest degree of radioactivity was found in the hepatopancreas. Substantial amounts of radioactivity were present in the mussel tissues 60 d after administration.

  9. Proteomics of hyposaline stress in blue mussel congeners (genus Mytilus): implications for biogeographic range limits in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Tomanek, Lars; Zuzow, Marcus J; Hitt, Lauren; Serafini, Loredana; Valenzuela, Jacob J

    2012-11-15

    Climate change is affecting species' physiology, pushing environmental tolerance limits and shifting distribution ranges. In addition to temperature and ocean acidification, increasing levels of hyposaline stress due to extreme precipitation events and freshwater runoff may be driving some of the reported recent range shifts in marine organisms. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, we characterized the proteomic responses of the cold-adapted blue mussel Mytilus trossulus, a native to the Pacific coast of North America, and the warm-adapted M. galloprovincialis, a Mediterranean invader that has replaced the native from the southern part of its range, but may be limited from expanding north due to hyposaline stress. After exposing laboratory-acclimated mussels for 4 h to two different experimental treatments of hyposaline conditions and one control treatment (24.5, 29.8 and 35.0 psu, respectively) followed by a 0 and 24 h recovery at ambient salinity (35 psu), we detected changes in the abundance of molecular chaperones of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), indicating protein unfolding, during stress exposure. Other common responses included changes in small GTPases of the Ras superfamily during recovery, which suggests a role for vesicle transport, and cytoskeletal adjustments associated with cell volume, as indicated by cytoskeletal elements such as actin, tubulin, intermediate filaments and several actin-binding regulatory proteins. Changes of proteins involved in energy metabolism and scavenging of reactive oxygen species suggest a reduction in overall energy metabolism during recovery. Principal component analyses of protein abundances suggest that M. trossulus is able to respond to a greater hyposaline challenge (24.5 psu) than M. galloprovincialis (29.8 psu), as shown by changing abundances of proteins involved in protein chaperoning, vesicle transport, cytoskeletal adjustments by actin-regulatory proteins, energy metabolism and

  10. Kinetics of accumulation and transformation of paralytic shellfish toxins in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Juan; Reyero, Ma Isabel; Franco, José

    2003-12-01

    Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were fed cultures of the Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning agent Alexandrium minutum (Strain AL1V) for a 15-day period and, for the next 12 days, they were fed the non-toxic species Tetraselmis suecica, in order to monitor the intoxication/detoxification process. The toxin content in the bivalve was checked daily throughout the experiment. During the time-course of the experiment, the toxin profile of the bivalves changed substantially, showing increasingly greater differences from the proportions found in the toxigenic dinoflagellate used as food. The main processes involved in the accumulation of toxins and in the variation of the toxic profiles were implemented in a series of numerical models and the usefulness of those models to describe the actual intoxication/detoxification kinetics was assessed. Models that did not include transformations between toxins were unable to describe the kinetics, even when different detoxification rates were allowed for the toxins involved. The models including epimerization and reduction provided a good description of the kinetics whether or not differential detoxification was allowed for the different toxins, suggesting that the differences in detoxification rates between the toxins are not an important factor in regulating the change of the toxic profile. The implementation of Michaelis-Menten kinetics to describe the two reductive transformations produced a model that had a poorer fit to the data observed than the model that included only a first order kinetics. This suggests that, it is very unlikely that any enzymatic reaction is involved in the reduction of the hydroxycarbamate (OH-GTXs) to carbamate (H-GTXs) gonyautoxins.

  11. Environmental hypoxia but not minor shell damage affects scope for growth and body condition in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (L.).

    PubMed

    Sanders, Trystan; Widdicombe, Steve; Calder-Potts, Ruth; Spicer, John I

    2014-04-01

    The effects of short-term (7 d) exposure to environmental hypoxia (2.11 mg O₂ L⁻¹; control: 6.96 mg O₂ L⁻¹) and varying degrees of shell damage (1 or 2, 1 mm diameter holes; control: no holes) on respiration rate, clearance rate, ammonia excretion rate, scope for growth (SFG) and body condition index were investigated in adult blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). There was a significant hypoxia-related reduction in SFG (>6.70 to 0.92 J g⁻¹ h⁻¹) primarily due to a reduction in energy acquisition as a result of reduced clearance rates during hypoxia. Shell damage had no significant affect on any of the physiological processes measured or the SFG calculated. Body condition was unaffected by hypoxia or shell damage. In conclusion, minor physical damage to mussels had no effect on physiological energetics but environmental hypoxia compromised growth, respiration and energy acquisition presumably by reducing feeding rates.

  12. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  13. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  14. Interaction of TiO2 nanoparticles with proteins from aquatic organisms: the case of gill mucus from blue mussel.

    PubMed

    Bourgeault, Adeline; Legros, Véronique; Gonnet, Florence; Daniel, Regis; Paquirissamy, Aurélie; Bénatar, Clémence; Spalla, Olivier; Chanéac, Corinne; Renault, Jean-Philippe; Pin, Serge

    2017-04-07

    To better understand the mechanisms of TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) uptake and toxicity in aquatic organisms, we investigated the interaction of NPs with the proteins found in gill mucus from blue mussels. Mucus is secreted by many aquatic organisms and is often their first line of defense against pathogens, xenobiotics, and other sources of environmental stress. Here, five TiO2 NPs and one SiO2 NP were incubated with gill mucus and run out on a one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel for a comparative qualitative analysis of the free proteins in the mucosal solution and the proteins bound to NPs. We then used nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to identify proteins of interest. Our data demonstrated dissimilar protein profiles between the crude mucosal solution and proteins adsorbed on NPs. In particular, extrapallial protein (EP), one of the most abundant mucus proteins, was absent from the adsorbed proteins. After thermal denaturation experiments, this absence was attributed to the EP content in aromatic amino acids that prevents protein unfolding and thus adsorption on the NP. Moreover, although the majority of the protein corona was qualitatively similar across the NPs tested here (SiO2 and TiO2), a few proteins in the corona showed a specific recruitment pattern according to the NP oxide (TiO2 vs SiO2) or crystal structure (anatase TiO2 vs rutile TiO2). Therefore, protein adsorption may vary with the type of NP. Graphical abstract Proteins with adsorption selectivity as identified from isolated bands.

  15. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea.

    PubMed

    Katolikova, Marina; Khaitov, Vadim; Väinölä, Risto; Gantsevich, Michael; Strelkov, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME) and M. trossulus (MT), co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1) in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2) mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3) in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4) at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been overlooked in

  16. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea

    PubMed Central

    Katolikova, Marina; Khaitov, Vadim; Väinölä, Risto; Gantsevich, Michael; Strelkov, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME) and M. trossulus (MT), co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1) in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2) mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3) in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4) at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been overlooked in

  17. Does natural selection explain the fine scale genetic structure at the nuclear exon Glu-5′ in blue mussels from Kerguelen?

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Karin; Roby, Charlotte; Bierne, Nicolas; Borsa, Philippe; Féral, Jean-Pierre; Chenuil, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The Kerguelen archipelago, isolated in the Southern Ocean, shelters a blue mussel Mytilus metapopulation far from any influence of continental populations or any known hybrid zone. The finely carved coast leads to a highly heterogeneous habitat. We investigated the impact of the environment on the genetic structure in those Kerguelen blue mussels by relating allele frequencies to habitat descriptors. A total sample comprising up to 2248 individuals from 35 locations was characterized using two nuclear markers, mac-1 and Glu-5′, and a mitochondrial marker (COI). The frequency data from 9 allozyme loci in 9 of these locations were also reanalyzed. Two other nuclear markers (EFbis and EFprem's) were monomorphic. Compared to Northern Hemisphere populations, polymorphism in Kerguelen blue mussels was lower for all markers except for the exon Glu-5′. At Glu-5′, genetic differences were observed between samples from distinct regions (FCT = 0.077), as well as within two regions, including between samples separated by <500 m. No significant differentiation was observed in the AMOVA analyses at the two other markers (mac-1 and COI). Like mac-1, all allozyme loci genotyped in a previous publication, displayed lower differentiation (Jost's D) and FST values than Glu-5′. Power simulations and confidence intervals support that Glu-5′ displays significantly higher differentiation than the other loci (except a single allozyme for which confidence intervals overlap). AMOVA analyses revealed significant effects of the giant kelp Macrocystis and wave exposure on this marker. We discuss the influence of hydrological conditions on the genetic differentiation among regions. In marine organisms with high fecundity and high dispersal potential, gene flow tends to erase differentiation, but this study showed significant differentiation at very small distance. This may be explained by the particular hydrology and the carved coastline of the Kerguelen archipelago, together with

  18. [Effect of excretion-secretion products of some fouling species on the biochemical parameters of blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the White Sea].

    PubMed

    Skidchenko, V S; Vysotskaia, R U; Krupnova, M Iu; Khalaman, V V

    2011-01-01

    The effect of excretion-secretion products (ESP) of five abundant fouling invertebrate species (bivalve mollusks Hiatella arctica and Mytilus edulis, solitary ascidia Styela rustica, sponge Halichondria panicea, and sea starAsterias rubens, inhabiting the White Sea) on the biochemical status of blue mussel M. edulis was assessed by the dynamics of lysosomal enzymes activity (nucleases, glycoside hydrolases, and cathepsins). ESP of conspecific species had no effect on the metabolism of the mollusks of this species. ESP of A. rubens, S. rustica, and H. panicea activated the same enzymes. First, acid RNase and glycoside hydrolases activity increased, but in different ways. The metabolites of H. arctica affected the activity of proteometabolism enzymes.

  19. Gulfwatch: monitoring spatial and temporal patterns of trace metal and organic contaminants in the Gulf of Maine (1991-1997) with the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L.

    PubMed

    Chase, M E; Jones, S H; Hennigar, P; Sowles, J; Harding, G C; Freeman, K; Wells, P G; Krahforst, C; Coombs, K; Crawford, R; Pederson, J; Taylor, D

    2001-06-01

    Gulfwatch, established in 1991, is an international contaminant monitoring program in which the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is used as an indicator of the level and extent of contamination in the Gulf of Maine. Since 1991, trace metals, PAHs, PCBs, and OC pesticides have been measured in mussel tissues at 56 sites. The distribution of most metals was relatively uniform throughout the Gulf with the exception of Ag, Pb and Cr. However, the concentration of organic contaminants increased in a north-to-south direction. High concentrations of contaminants were correlated with large human population density and proximity to large rivers. Temporal analysis of five sites revealed that the majority of contaminant concentrations were either unchanged or decreasing. The concentrations of most contaminants were lower than the median of the National Status and Trends (NS & T) Mussel Watch with the exceptions of Cr, Hg, Pb and sigma PCB24. Hg concentrations at > 80% of the Gulfwatch sites exceeded the NS & T median +1 SD. Gulfwatch continues as a primary contaminant monitoring program in the Gulf of Maine.

  20. The Influence of Organic Material and Temperature on the Burial Tolerance of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Considerations for the Management of Marine Aggregate Dredging

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Richard S.; Black, Kenny D.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Experimental Approach Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic smothering events using a multi-factorial design, including organic matter concentration, temperature, sediment fraction size and duration of burial as important predictor variables. Results and Discussion Mussel mortality was significantly higher in organically loaded burials when compared to control sediments after just 2 days. Particularly, M. edulis specimens under burial in fine sediment with high (1%) concentrations of organic matter experienced a significantly higher mortality rate (p<0.01) than those under coarse control aggregates. Additionally, mussels exposed to the summer maximum temperature treatment (20°C) exhibited significantly increased mortality (p<0.01) compared to those in the ambient treatment group (15°C). Total Oxygen Uptake rates of experimental aggregates were greatest (112.7 mmol m-2 day-1) with 1% organic loadings in coarse sediment at 20°C. Elevated oxygen flux rates in porous coarse sediments are likely to be a function of increased vertical migration of anaerobically liberated sulphides to the sediment-water interface. However, survival of M. edulis under bacterial mats of Beggiatoa spp. indicates the species’ resilience to sulphides and so we propose that the presence of reactive organic matter within the burial medium may facilitate bacterial growth and increase mortality through pathogenic infection. This may be exacerbated under the stable interstitial conditions in fine sediment and increased bacterial metabolism under high temperatures. Furthermore, increased temperature may impose metabolic demands upon the mussel that cannot be met during burial-induced anaerobiosis. Summary Lack of

  1. Carcinogenicity of Black Rock Harbor sediment to the eastern oyster and trophic transfer of Black Rock Harbor carcinogens from the blue mussel to the winter flounder

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, G.R.; Yevich, P.P.; Malcolm, A.R. ); Harshbarger, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) developed neoplastic disorders when experimentally exposed both in the laboratory and field to chemically contaminated sediment from Black Rock Harbor (BRH), Bridgeport, Connecticut. Neoplasia was observed in oysters after 30 or 60 days of continuous exposure in a laboratory flow-through system to a 20 mg/L suspension of BRH sediment plus postexposure periods of 3, 30, or 60 days. Composite tumor incidence was 13.6% for both exposures. Tumor occurrence was highest in the renal excretory epithelium, followed in order by gill, gonad, gastrointestinal, heart, and embryonic neural tissue. Regression of experimental neoplasia was not observed when the stimulus was discontinued. In field experiments, gill neoplasms developed in oysters, deployed in cages for 30 days at BRH and 36 days at a BRH dredge material disposal area in Central Long Island Sound, and kidney and gastrointestinal neoplasms developed in caged oysters deployed 40 days in Quincy Bay, Boston Harbor. Oysters exposed to BRH sediment in the laboratory and in the field accumulated high concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and chlorinated pesticides. Chemical analyses demonstrated high concentrations of PCBs, PAHs, chlorinated pesticides, and heavy metals in BRH sediment. Known genotoxic carcinogens, cocarcinogens, and tumor promoters were present as contaminants. The uptake of parent PAH and PCBs from BRH sediment observed in oysters also occurs in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Winter flounder fed BRH-contaminated blue mussels contained xenobiotic chemicals analyzed in mussels. The flounder developed renal and pancreatic neoplasms and hepatotoxic neoplastic precursor lesions, demonstrating trophic transfer of sediment-bound carcinogens up the food chain.

  2. Carcinogenicity of Black Rock Harbor sediment to the eastern oyster and trophic transfer of Black Rock Harbor carcinogens from the blue mussel to the winter flounder.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, G R; Yevich, P P; Harshbarger, J C; Malcolm, A R

    1991-01-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) developed neoplastic disorders when experimentally exposed both in the laboratory and field to chemically contaminated sediment from Black Rock Harbor (BRH), Bridgeport, Connecticut. Neoplasia was observed in oysters after 30 and 60 days of continuous exposure in a laboratory flow-through system to a 20 mg/L suspension of BRH sediment plus postexposure periods of 0, 30, or 60 days. Composite tumor incidence was 13.6% (49 neoplasms in 40, n = 295) for both exposures. Tumor occurrence was highest in the renal excretory epithelium, followed in order by gill, gonad, gastrointestinal, heart, and embryonic neural tissue. Regression of experimental neoplasia was not observed when the stimulus was discontinued. In field experiments, gill neoplasms developed in oysters deployed in cages for 30 days at BRH and 36 days at a BRH dredge material disposal area in Central Long Island Sound, and kidney and gastrointestinal neoplasms developed in caged oysters deployed 40 days in Quincy Bay, Boston Harbor. Oysters exposed to BRH sediment in the laboratory and in the field accumulated high concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and chlorinated pesticides. Chemical analyses demonstrated high concentrations of PCBs, PAHs, chlorinated pesticides, and heavy metals in BRH sediment. Known genotoxic carcinogens, co-carcinogens, and tumor promoters were present as contaminants. The uptake of parent PAH and PCBs from BRH sediment observed in oysters also occurs in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Winter flounder fed BRH-contaminated blue mussels contained xenobiotic chemicals analyzed in mussels. The flounder developed renal and pancreatic neoplasms and hepatotoxic neoplastic precursor lesions, demonstrating trophic transfer of sediment-bound carcinogens up the food chain. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:2050083

  3. Alteration of Gene Expression Profile in Kidney of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Treated with Protein Hydrolysate of Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis) by DNA Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Junli; Dai, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yanping; Meng, Lu; Ye, Jian; Ma, Xuting

    2015-01-01

    Marine organisms are rich sources of bioactive components, which are often reported to have antihypertensive effects. However, the underlying mechanisms have yet to be fully identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the antihypertensive effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of blue mussel protein (HBMP) in rats. Peptides with in vitro ACE inhibitory activity were purified from HBMP by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. And the amino acid sequences of isolated peptides were estimated to be Val-Trp, Leu-Gly-Trp, and Met-Val-Trp-Thr. To study its in vivo action, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were orally administration with high- or low-dose of HBMP for 28 days. Major components of the renin-angiotensin (RAS) system in serum of SHRs from different groups were analyzed, and gene expression profiling were performed in the kidney of SHRs, using the Whole Rat Genome Oligonucleotide Microarray. Results indicated although genes involved in RAS system were not significantly altered, those related to blood coagulation system, cytokine and growth factor, and fatty acids metabolism were remarkablely changed. Several genes which were seldom reported to be implicated in pathogenesis of hypertension also showed significant expression alterations after oral administration of HBMP. These data provided valuable information for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the potential antihypertensive activities of HBMP, and will contribute towards increased value-added utilization of blue mussel protein. PMID:26517713

  4. The influence of ph and waterborne metals on egg fertilization of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), the oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and the sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus).

    PubMed

    Riba, Inmaculada; Gabrielyan, Bardukh; Khosrovyan, Alla; Luque, Angel; Del Valls, T Angel

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the combined effect of pH and metals on the egg fertilization process of two estuarine species, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), the oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and a marine species, the sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus). The success of egg fertilization was examined after exposure of gametes to sediment extracts of various degrees of contamination at pH 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0. At the pH levels from 6.5 to 8.0, the egg fertilization of the different species demonstrated different sensitivity to metal and/or acidic exposure. In all species, the results revealed that egg fertilization was almost completely inhibited at pH 6.0. The egg fertilization of the blue mussel M. edulis was the least sensitive to the exposure while that of the sea urchin P. lividus demonstrated a concentration-dependent response to the pH levels from 6.5 to 8.0. The results of this study revealed that acidity increased the concentration of several metal ions (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) but reduced its availability to the organisms, probably related to the reactivity of the ions with most non-metals or to the competition among metals and other waterborne constituents.

  5. Protein responses in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) exposed to organic pollutants: a combined CYP-antibody/proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Henrik; Schiedek, Doris; Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Goksøyr, Anders

    2006-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies were raised against highly conserved, trans-metazoan sequences of cytochrome P450 (CYP) families 2 and 4 and used to investigate responses in the common blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) exposed to various organic contaminants. The results were evaluated by means of cross-reacting proteins on Western blots of both one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, and by scanning spectroscopy measurements of total CYP content. Furthermore, a proteomic approach was applied aimed at elucidating exposure-related protein changes in a more general term. Identities of isolated proteins were searched by means of peptide mass fingerprints obtained from MALDI-TOF MS analyses. The results demonstrated that both antibodies rendered several cross-reactive bands when probed on Western blots. The most obvious cross-reaction of the CYP2 antibody was with a strongly expressed protein of size approximately 57kDa, pI 4.5-4.6, whereas the CYP4 antibody cross-reacted with a protein of size approximately 55kDa, pI 5.6. However, expression of cross-reacting proteins did not change as a result of the exposures, and resulted only in small and insignificant fluctuations in total CYP content. As a contrast, silver-stained 2DE gels showed that several microsomal proteins were affected in individuals exposed to diallylphthalate as well as crude oil, with and without a spike of alkylphenols and PAHs. Mass spectrometry based analyses of excised, trypsin-digested spots did so far not decipher the identities of the proteins affected by the exposures, nor of those cross-reacting with CYP2 and CYP4 antibodies. This study has underlined the power of the proteomic approach in environmental toxicology, although protein identification was not successful. The missing identities of the proteins cross-reacting with the CYP2- and CYP4-antibodies does not enable a clear conclusion as to whether or not these peptides actually represent CYP iso-enzymes.

  6. Intra-population variability of ocean acidification impacts on the physiology of Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus edulis): integrating tissue and organism response.

    PubMed

    Stapp, L S; Thomsen, J; Schade, H; Bock, C; Melzner, F; Pörtner, H O; Lannig, G

    2016-12-05

    Increased maintenance costs at cellular, and consequently organism level, are thought to be involved in shaping the sensitivity of marine calcifiers to ocean acidification (OA). Yet, knowledge of the capacity of marine calcifiers to undergo metabolic adaptation is sparse. In Kiel Fjord, blue mussels thrive despite periodically high seawater PCO2, making this population interesting for studying metabolic adaptation under OA. Consequently, we conducted a multi-generation experiment and compared physiological responses of F1 mussels from 'tolerant' and 'sensitive' families exposed to OA for 1 year. Family classifications were based on larval survival; tolerant families settled at all PCO2 levels (700, 1120, 2400 µatm) while sensitive families did not settle at the highest PCO2 (≥99.8% mortality). We found similar filtration rates between family types at the control and intermediate PCO2 level. However, at 2400 µatm, filtration and metabolic scope of gill tissue decreased in tolerant families, indicating functional limitations at the tissue level. Routine metabolic rates (RMR) and summed tissue respiration (gill and outer mantle tissue) of tolerant families were increased at intermediate PCO2, indicating elevated cellular homeostatic costs in various tissues. By contrast, OA did not affect tissue and routine metabolism of sensitive families. However, tolerant mussels were characterised by lower RMR at control PCO2 than sensitive families, which had variable RMR. This might provide the energetic scope to cover increased energetic demands under OA, highlighting the importance of analysing intra-population variability. The mechanisms shaping such difference in RMR and scope, and thus species' adaptation potential, remain to be identified.

  7. Across-shelf distribution of blue mussel larvae in the northern Gulf of Maine: consequences for population connectivity and a species range boundary.

    PubMed

    Yund, Philip O; Tilburg, Charles E; McCartney, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Studies of population connectivity have largely focused on along-shelf, as opposed to across-shelf, processes. We hypothesized that a discontinuity in across-shelf mixing caused by the divergence of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC) from shore acts as an ecological barrier to the supply of mussel larvae to the coast. Existing data on the relative abundance of two congeneric blue mussels, Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus, were analysed to quantify the association of M. trossulus with the colder temperature signal of the EMCC and generate larval distribution predictions. We then sampled the across-shelf distribution of larvae along two transects during 2011. Larvae were identified using restriction digests of PCR amplicons from the mitochondrial 16S rDNA. Mytilus edulis larvae were consistently abundant on either the inshore and offshore transect ends, but not homogeneously distributed across the shelf, while M. trossulus larvae were less common throughout the study area. The divergence of the EMCC from shore appears to create a break in the connectivity of M. edulis populations by isolating those inshore of the EMCC from upstream larval sources. Across-shelf transport processes can thus produce connectivity patterns that would not be predicted solely on the basis of along-shelf processes.

  8. Across-shelf distribution of blue mussel larvae in the northern Gulf of Maine: consequences for population connectivity and a species range boundary

    PubMed Central

    Yund, Philip O.; Tilburg, Charles E.; McCartney, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of population connectivity have largely focused on along-shelf, as opposed to across-shelf, processes. We hypothesized that a discontinuity in across-shelf mixing caused by the divergence of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC) from shore acts as an ecological barrier to the supply of mussel larvae to the coast. Existing data on the relative abundance of two congeneric blue mussels, Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus, were analysed to quantify the association of M. trossulus with the colder temperature signal of the EMCC and generate larval distribution predictions. We then sampled the across-shelf distribution of larvae along two transects during 2011. Larvae were identified using restriction digests of PCR amplicons from the mitochondrial 16S rDNA. Mytilus edulis larvae were consistently abundant on either the inshore and offshore transect ends, but not homogeneously distributed across the shelf, while M. trossulus larvae were less common throughout the study area. The divergence of the EMCC from shore appears to create a break in the connectivity of M. edulis populations by isolating those inshore of the EMCC from upstream larval sources. Across-shelf transport processes can thus produce connectivity patterns that would not be predicted solely on the basis of along-shelf processes. PMID:27018654

  9. The influence of structural features of marine humic substances on the accumulation rates of cadmium by a blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Pempkowiak, J.; Kozuch, J. ); Southon, T. )

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory experiments revealed that both concentration and origin of humic substances (HS) influence the accumulation rates of cadmium by the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. In the concentration of humic substances typical of seawater, the increase is about 60% and 100%, respectively, for aquatic and sedimentary humic substances. The phenomenon was attributed to the stimulation of cadmium uptake due to complexing properties of the substances toward cadmium. Complexing capacity of sedimentary humic substances was found to be 0.57 [mu]g/mg HS, that of aquatic substances 0.41 [mu]g/mg HS. Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) [sup 13]C NMR of the investigated humic substances revealed differences in the spectra at about 175, 100, 55 and 32 ppm. This was attributed to the varying content of oxygen containing functional groups involved in formation of complexes with metal ions. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Highly regenerable mussel-inspired Fe₃O₄@polydopamine-Ag core-shell microspheres as catalyst and adsorbent for methylene blue removal.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yijun; Yan, Bin; Xu, Haolan; Chen, Jian; Liu, Qingxia; Deng, Yonghong; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-06-11

    We report a facile method to synthesize Fe3O4@polydopamine (PDA)-Ag core-shell microspheres. Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are deposited on PDA surfaces via in situ reduction by mussel-inspired PDA layers. High catalytic activity and fast adsorption of a model dye methylene blue (MB) at different pH values are achieved mainly due to the presence of monodisperse Ag NPs and electrostatic interactions between PDA and MB. The as-prepared Fe3O4@PDA-Ag microspheres also show high cyclic stability (>27 cycles), good acid stability, and fast regeneration ability, which can be achieved efficiently within several minutes by using NaBH4 as the desorption agent, showing great potentials in a wide range of applications.

  11. Organochlorine compounds in blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, and Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, from seven sites in the Lower Saxonian Wadden Sea, Southern North Sea.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Barbara; Liebezeit, Gerd

    2009-12-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) collected at seven locations in the Lower Saxonian Wadden Sea in January and February 2007 were analysed for organochlorine compounds. Contaminants were present in all samples, albeit with variable amounts and composition. The highest values were found in the Jade Bay. Congener PCB 153 was the contaminant which had the highest content of all organochlorines tested (475.75-937.39 ng/g lipid). DDT was detected in one sample only while DDD and DDE were found in all samples, the latter with contents up to 351.34 ng/g lipid. No clear differentiation could be made in terms of accumulation of organochlorines for M. edulis and C. gigas. Comparison with data from 2001 to 2006 showed an increase in 2007, which may be due to the different season the samples were taken.

  12. An examination of the ingestion, bioaccumulation, and depuration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    Doyle, John J; Ward, J Evan; Mason, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The production rates of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles for consumer products far exceed the pace at which research can determine the effects of these particles in the natural environment. Sedentary organisms such as suspension-feeding bivalves are particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic contaminants, such as nanoparticles, that enter coastal environments. The purpose of this work was to examine the ingestion, bioaccumulation, and depuration rates of TiO2 nanoparticles by two species of suspension-feeding bivalves, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Two representative TiO2 nanoparticles, UV-Titan M212 (Titan) and Aeroxide P25 (P25), were delivered to the animals either incorporated into marine snow or added directly to seawater at a concentration of 1.0 mg/L for exposure periods of 2 and 6 h. After feeding, the animals were transferred to filtered-seawater and allowed to depurate. Feces and tissues were collected at 0, 12, 24, 72, and 120 h, post-exposure, and analyzed for concentrations of titanium by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Results indicated that the capture and ingestion (i.e., transfer to the gut) of TiO2 nanoparticles by both mussels and oysters was not dependent on the presence of marine snow, and weight-standardized clearance rates of bivalves exposed to TiO2 nanoparticles were not significantly different than those of unexposed control animals. Both species ingested about half of the nanoparticles to which they were exposed, and >90% of the nanoparticles were egested in feces within 12 h, post-exposure. The findings of this study demonstrate that mussels and oysters can readily ingest both Titan and P25 nanoparticles regardless of the form in which they are encountered, but depurate these materials over a short period of time. Importantly, bioaccumulation of Titan and P25 nanoparticles does not occur in mussels and oysters following exposures of up to 6 h.

  13. Studying longterm effects of micro gravity on basic immune functions - The development of an application based on the measuring of phagocytosis activity of Blue Mussel hemocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Eckehardt

    The immunsystem of astronauts exposed to microgravity is declining. Whether this effect is caused by microgravity or in combination with cosmic radiation is so far not clear. The immune system of vertebrates has several defence strategies but the basic immune response (Phagocytosis) is present as well in invertebrates. Phagocytotic cells are drawn by chemotaxis to the origin of an infection. By adhesion, ingestion and phagosome formation foreign particles, bacteria etc are transported inside of a cell were they are destroyed by native powerful biocides. Related to this biocide production is the formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). ROS can be measured by luminescence. The effects of microgravity will be simultaneously tested by exposure of phagocytotic hemocytes on orbit under microgravity, artificial gravity and, on ground under natural gravity. To address this purpose defined pools of Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes will be launched frozen to the ISS. References for all batches will stay on ground. Shortly after arrival and then in three-month intervals batches of the same pool will be thawed and reconstituted. The phagocytosis related production of ROS will be stimulated with opsonized Zymosan. Luminescence will be measured and the data will be sent to ground. The experiment is scheduled for the Columbus Biolab early 2009. In preparation of this flight experiments the following procedures were investigated and the results will be presented: - a protocol for the cryoconservation and reconstituton of blue mussel hemocytes. - preliminary results of phagocytosis activity by reconstituted hemocytes after cryo-conservation and hemocytes without cryo-conservation treatment. The TRIPLELUX-B Experiment contributes to risk assessment concerning longterm immunotoxicity under space flight conditions. The immune system of invertebrates has not been studied so far in space. The choice of the phagocytes from invertebrates is justified by the claim to study the

  14. Comparative cryopreservation study of trochophore larvae from two species of bivalves: Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and Blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Paredes, E; Bellas, J; Adams, S L

    2013-12-01

    Oysters and mussels are among the most farmed species in aquaculture industry around the world. The aim of this study was to test the toxicity of cryoprotective agents to trochophore larvae from two different species of bivalves and develop an improved cryopreservation protocol to ensure greater efficiency in the development of cryopreserved trochophores (14 h old oyster larvae and 20 h old mussel larvae) to normal D-larvae for future developments of hatchery spat production. The cryopreservation protocol producing the best results for oyster trochophores (60.0 ± 6.7% normal D-larvae) was obtained by holding at 0 °C for 5 min then cooling at 1 °C min(-1) to -10 °C and holding for 5 min before cooling at 0.5 °C to -35 °C, holding 5 min and then plunging into liquid nitrogen (LN), using 10% ethylene glycol. For mussel experiments, no significant differences were found when cooling at 0.5 °C min(-1) or at 1 °C min(-1) for CPA combinations with 10% ethylene glycol and at 0.5 °C min(-1). Using these combinations, around half of trochophores were able to develop to normal D-larvae post-thawing (48.9 ± 7.6% normal D-larvae).

  15. Bioaccumulation of tritiated water in phytoplankton and trophic transfer of organically bound tritium to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Benedict C; Bradshaw, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Large releases of tritium are currently permitted in coastal areas due to assumptions that it rapidly disperses in the water and has a low toxicity due to its low energy emissions. This paper presents a laboratory experiment developed to identify previously untested scenarios where tritium may concentrate or transfer in biota relevant to Baltic coastal communities. Phytoplankton populations of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Nodularia spumigena were exposed at different growth-stages, to tritiated water (HTO; 10 MBq l(-1)). Tritiated D. tertiolecta was then fed to mussels, Mytilus edulis, regularly over a period of three weeks. Activity concentrations of phytoplankton and various tissues from the mussel were determined. Both phytoplankton species transformed HTO into organically-bound tritium (OBT) in their tissues. D. tertiolecta accumulated significantly more tritium when allowed to grow exponentially in HTO than if it had already reached the stationary growth phase; both treatments accumulated significantly more than the corresponding treatments of N. spumigena. No effect of growth phase on bioaccumulation of tritium was detectable in N. spumigena following exposure. After mussels were given 3 feeds of tritiated D. tertiolecta, significant levels of tritium were detected in the tissues. Incorporation into most mussel tissues appeared to follow a linear relationship with number of tritiated phytoplankton feeds with no equilibrium, highlighting the potential for biomagnification. Different rates of incorporation in species from a similar functional group highlight the difficulties in using a 'representative' species for modelling the transfer and impact of tritium. Accumulations of organic tritium into the mussel tissues from tritiated-phytoplankton demonstrate an environmentally relevant transfer pathway of tritium even when water-concentrations are reduced, adding weight to the assertion that organically bound tritium acts as a persistent organic pollutant. The

  16. Experimental study on the bioaccumulation of oxytetracycline and oxolinic acid by the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis). An evaluation of its ability to bio-monitor antibiotics in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Le Bris, Hervé; Pouliquen, Hervé

    2004-03-01

    The ability of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) to act as a potential antibiotic bioindicator in marine waters was experimentally tested by the study of the kinetics of two veterinary antibiotics (oxolinic acid: OA and oxytetracycline: OTC). Antibiotic uptake was fast in the soft parts of the mussels. OA was quickly eliminated while OTC was released more slowly (half-life in viscera=3.9 days). OA and OTC were preferentially accumulated in gills and in viscera, respectively. Bio-accumulation factors were low (maximum: 2 for OTC in viscera) in accordance with the low K(ow)s. It was assumed that the higher OTC bioaccumulation pattern was related to its binding to mineral and organic compounds that led to its activity inhibition (62%). The antibiotics were persistent in shells (OTC half-life=8.3 days). Most veterinary and human antibiotics such as tetracyclines and sulphonamides have low log K(ow)(<2) and should weakly accumulate in mussel. This might limit the use of blue mussel to bio-monitor antibiotics in the marine environment.

  17. Spawning and multiple end points of the embryo-larval bioassay of the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lmk).

    PubMed

    Resgalla, Charrid

    2016-10-01

    Since the 1960s, little has been done to improve and simulate the use of short-duration chronic bioassays of bivalve embryos, particularly in mussels. However, these test organisms offer great advantages in relation to other groups, due to the ease of obtaining breeders in cultivation systems, in the environment and any time, and due to their high sensitivity to chemicals or contaminants. To contribute some methodological aspects, this study uses techniques to stimulate spawning or improve the obtaining of gametes for use in bioassays with the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. It also evaluates different criteria for determining the effect on the larvae, for estimation of EC50 and NOEC values, based on morphological analysis of developmental delay and the biometrics of the larvae. KCl proved to be a reliable inducer of spawning, with positive responses in 10 of the 12 months of the year tested. Moreover, this chemical, in association with NH4Cl, demonstrated the capacity to activate immature oocytes obtained from extirpated gonads, enabling an improvement in fertilization rates. The different criteria adopted to determine the effects on the larvae in the assays with reference toxicants (SDS and K2Cr2O7) resulted in EC50 and NOEC values without significant differences, indicating reliability in the results and freedom in the choice of criteria of effect to be adopted in the trials.

  18. Validation of the flooding dose technique to determine fractional rates of protein synthesis in a model bivalve species, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.).

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ian D; Nicholls, Ruth; Malham, Shelagh K; Whiteley, Nia M

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, use of the flooding dose technique using (3)H-Phenylalanine is validated for measuring whole-animal and tissue-specific rates of protein synthesis in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (61mm shell length; 4.0g fresh body mass). Following injection, the phenylalanine-specific radioactivities in the gill, mantle and whole-animal free pools were elevated within one hour and remained elevated and stable for up to 6h following injection of (3)H-phenylalanine into the posterior adductor muscle. Incorporation of (3)H-phenylalanine into body protein was linear over time following injection and the non-significant intercepts for the regressions suggested incorporation into body protein occurred rapidly after injection. These results validate the technique for measuring rates of protein synthesis in mussels. There were no differences in the calculated rates following 1-6h incubation in gill, mantle or whole-animal and fractional rates of protein synthesis from the combined time course data were 9.5±0.8%d(-1) for the gill, 2.5±0.3%d(-1) for the mantle and 2.6±0.3%d(-1) for the whole-animal, respectively (mean values±SEM). The whole-animal absolute rate of protein synthesis was calculated as 18.9±0.6mg protein day(-1). The use of this technique in measuring one of the major components of maintenance metabolism and growth will provide a valuable and convenient tool in furthering our understanding of the protein metabolism and energetics of this keystone marine invertebrate and its ability to adjust and respond to fluctuations, such as that expected as a result of climate change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cloning and sequencing of a molluscan endo-beta-1,4-glucanase gene from the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Janson, J C; Sellos, D

    2001-07-01

    Using polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing techniques, a complementary DNA encoding a low molecular mass cellulase (endo-1,4-beta-D-glucanase, EC 3.2.1.4) has been identified in the digestive gland of the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis. It contains a 5' untranslated region, a 633-nucleotide ORF encoding a 211 amino-acid protein, including a 17 amino-acid signal peptide and a complete 3' untranslated region. At the C-terminal end of the purified mature protein, a 13 amino-acid peptide is lacking in comparison to the protein sequence deduced from the ORF. This peptide is probably removed as a consequence of post-translational amidation of the C-terminal glutamine. The endoglucanase genes have been isolated and sequenced from both Swedish and French mussels. The coding parts of these two sequences are identical. Both genes contain two introns, the positions of which are conserved. However the length of the introns are different due to base substitutions, insertions or deletions showing the existence of interspecies length polymorphism. The percentage of similarity for the introns of the two gene sequences is 96.9%. This is the first time a molluscan cellulase is characterized at DNA level. Amino acid sequence-based classification has revealed that the enzyme belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase family 45 [B. Henrissat (Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Végétales, CNRS, Joseph Fourier Université, Grenoble, France), personal communication]. There is no cellulose binding domain associated with the sequence.

  20. Seasonal variation in biomarkers in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua): implications for environmental monitoring in the Barents Sea.

    PubMed

    Nahrgang, J; Brooks, S J; Evenset, A; Camus, L; Jonsson, M; Smith, T J; Lukina, J; Frantzen, M; Giarratano, E; Renaud, P E

    2013-02-01

    In the Barents Sea, the limited data on biological relevant indicators and their responses to various anthropogenic stressors have hindered the development of a consistent scientific basis for selecting indicator species and developing practical procedures for environmental monitoring. Accordingly, the main aim of the present study was to develop a common set of baseline values for contaminants and biomarkers in three species, and to identify their strengths and limitations in monitoring of the Barents Sea. Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were sampled from a north Norwegian fjord in March, June, September and December 2010. Digestive glands from the bivalve species and liver from Atlantic cod were analysed for biomarkers of oxidative stress (catalase [CAT], glutathione peroxidase [GPX], glutathione-S-transferase activities [GST], lipid peroxidation as thiobarbituric reactive substances [TBARS] and total oxyradical scavenging capacity [TOSC]), biotransformation (ethoxyresorufine-O-deethylase activity [EROD]) and general stress (lysosomal membrane stability [LMS]). Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals in the bivalves and PAH metabolites in fish bile were quantified. Finally, energy reserves (total lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) and electron transport system (ETS) activity in the digestive gland of the bivalves and liver of Atlantic cod provided background information for reproductive cycle and general physiological status of the organisms. Blue mussel and Icelandic scallop showed very similar trends in biological cycle, biomarker expression and seasonality. Biomarker baselines in Atlantic cod showed weaker seasonal variability. However, important biological events may have been undetected due to the large time intervals between sampling occasions. Physiological biomarkers such as energy reserves and ETS activity were recommended as complementary parameters to the

  1. Cellular localization of lead using an antibody-based detection system and enzyme activity changes in the gills and digestive gland of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Einsporn, Sonja; Bressling, Jana; Koehler, Angela

    2009-02-01

    Marine organisms are continuously exposed to heavy metals in their environment. Bivalve mollusks such as the blue mussel Mytilus edulis accumulate high levels of heavy metals effecting cellular homeostasis and functions. Lead (Pb) exposure (2.5 mg/L of lead (II) nitrate for 10 d) and depuration (10 d in clean seawater) experiments were conducted to study its intracellular fate in the gills and digestive gland of M. edulis. For this purpose, an antibody-based detection method for ultrastructural localization and a subcellular fractionation approach for chemical analysis of Pb were used. In addition, effects of Pb on enzyme activities involved in oxyradical scavenging, such as the conjugative enzyme glutathione-S-transferase and the antioxidative enzyme catalase, were determined. The ultrastructural studies showed that Pb was mainly detected in lysosomes of gill epithelial cells and digestive cells. Lead was also detected in cell nuclei and granular hemocytes. Higher metal concentrations were measured by chemical analysis in subcellular fractions of the gills compared to those of the digestive gland. Increased activities of glutathione-S-transferase were found in gills after exposure and remained elevated during the depuration period, whereas glutathione-S-transferase activity remained unaffected in the digestive gland. Catalase activities showed no changes after Pb exposure, neither in the gills nor in the digestive gland. We conclude that gill cells are major sites of uptake and accumulation for dissolved Pb and are involved in sequestration and detoxification of this metal in M. edulis.

  2. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Emilie; Pédelucq, Julie; Fortier, Marlène; Brousseau, Pauline; Auffret, Michel; Budzinski, Hélène; Fournier, Michel

    2015-07-01

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The ocean is not deep enough: pressure tolerances during early ontogeny of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Nélia C; Thatje, Sven; Tyler, Paul A

    2009-02-22

    Early ontogenetic adaptations reflect the evolutionary history of a species. To understand the evolution of the deep-sea fauna and its adaptation to high pressure, it is important to know the effects of pressure on their shallow-water relatives. In this study we analyse the temperature and pressure tolerances of early life-history stages of the shallow-water species Mytilus edulis. This species expresses a close phylogenetic relationship with hydrothermal-vent mussels of the subfamily Bathymodiolinae. Tolerances to pressure and temperature are defined in terms of fertilization success and embryo developmental rates in laboratory-based experiments. In M. edulis, successful fertilization under pressure is possible up to 500 atm (50.66 MPa), at 10, 15 and 20 degrees C. A slower embryonic development is observed with decreasing temperature and with increasing pressure; principally, pressure narrows the physiological tolerance window in different ontogenetic stages of M. edulis, and slows down metabolism. This study provides important clues on possible evolutionary pathways of hydrothermal vent and cold-seep bivalve species and their shallow-water relatives. Evolution and speciation patterns of species derive mostly from their ability to adapt to variable environmental conditions, within environmental constraints, which promote morphological and genetic variability, often differently for each life-history stage. The present results support the view that a direct colonization of deep-water hydrothermal vent environments by a cold eurythermal shallow-water ancestor is indeed a possible scenario for the Mytilinae, challenging previous hypothesis of a wood/bone to seep/vent colonization pathway.

  4. Removal of silver nanoparticles by mussel-inspired Fe3O4@ polydopamine core-shell microspheres and its use as efficient catalyst for methylene blue reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Maoling; Li, Yinying; Yue, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    The removal of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from water is highly needed because of their increasing use and potential risk to the environment due to their toxic effects. Catalysis over AgNPs has received significant attention because of their highly catalytic performance. However, their use in practical applications is limited due to high cost and limited resources. Here, we present for the first time that the mussel-inspired Fe3O4@polydopamine (Fe3O4@PDA) nanocomposite can be used for efficient removal and recovery of AgNPs. Adsorption of AgNPs over Fe3O4@PDA was confirmed by TEM, FT-IR, XRD, TGA and magnetic property. The adsorption efficiency of AgNPs by Fe3O4@PDA was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, ionic strength and concentration of AgNPs. The kinetic data were well fitted to a pseudo-second order kinetic model. The isotherm data were well described by Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 169.5 mg/g, which was higher than those by other adsorbents. Notably, the obtained AgNPs-Fe3O4@PDA exhibited highly catalytic activity for methylene blue reduction by NaBH4 with a rate constant of 1.44 × 10−3/s, which was much higher than those by other AgNPs catalysts. The AgNPs-Fe3O4@PDA promised good recyclability for at least 8 cycles and acid resistant with good stability. PMID:28202922

  5. Removal of silver nanoparticles by mussel-inspired Fe3O4@ polydopamine core-shell microspheres and its use as efficient catalyst for methylene blue reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Maoling; Li, Yinying; Yue, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Yuming

    2017-02-01

    The removal of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from water is highly needed because of their increasing use and potential risk to the environment due to their toxic effects. Catalysis over AgNPs has received significant attention because of their highly catalytic performance. However, their use in practical applications is limited due to high cost and limited resources. Here, we present for the first time that the mussel-inspired Fe3O4@polydopamine (Fe3O4@PDA) nanocomposite can be used for efficient removal and recovery of AgNPs. Adsorption of AgNPs over Fe3O4@PDA was confirmed by TEM, FT-IR, XRD, TGA and magnetic property. The adsorption efficiency of AgNPs by Fe3O4@PDA was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, ionic strength and concentration of AgNPs. The kinetic data were well fitted to a pseudo-second order kinetic model. The isotherm data were well described by Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 169.5 mg/g, which was higher than those by other adsorbents. Notably, the obtained AgNPs-Fe3O4@PDA exhibited highly catalytic activity for methylene blue reduction by NaBH4 with a rate constant of 1.44 × 10‑3/s, which was much higher than those by other AgNPs catalysts. The AgNPs-Fe3O4@PDA promised good recyclability for at least 8 cycles and acid resistant with good stability.

  6. Removal of silver nanoparticles by mussel-inspired Fe3O4@ polydopamine core-shell microspheres and its use as efficient catalyst for methylene blue reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Maoling; Li, Yinying; Yue, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Yuming

    2017-02-16

    The removal of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from water is highly needed because of their increasing use and potential risk to the environment due to their toxic effects. Catalysis over AgNPs has received significant attention because of their highly catalytic performance. However, their use in practical applications is limited due to high cost and limited resources. Here, we present for the first time that the mussel-inspired Fe3O4@polydopamine (Fe3O4@PDA) nanocomposite can be used for efficient removal and recovery of AgNPs. Adsorption of AgNPs over Fe3O4@PDA was confirmed by TEM, FT-IR, XRD, TGA and magnetic property. The adsorption efficiency of AgNPs by Fe3O4@PDA was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, ionic strength and concentration of AgNPs. The kinetic data were well fitted to a pseudo-second order kinetic model. The isotherm data were well described by Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 169.5 mg/g, which was higher than those by other adsorbents. Notably, the obtained AgNPs-Fe3O4@PDA exhibited highly catalytic activity for methylene blue reduction by NaBH4 with a rate constant of 1.44 × 10(-3)/s, which was much higher than those by other AgNPs catalysts. The AgNPs-Fe3O4@PDA promised good recyclability for at least 8 cycles and acid resistant with good stability.

  7. The influence of cross-linking on protein-protein interactions in a marine adhesive: the case of two byssus plaque proteins from the blue mussel.

    PubMed

    Fant, Camilla; Elwing, Hans; Höök, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between two proteins, Mefp-1 and Mefp-2, from the byssal plaque of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique. The challenge in using a surface-sensitive technique to investigate the interaction between two strongly adhesive proteins was met by coupling a biotinylated version of one of the proteins (b-Mefp-1) to an inert two-dimensional arrangement of streptavidin (SA) formed on top of a biotin-doped supported phospholipid bilayer. The interaction between Mefp-1 and Mefp-2 was further investigated by addition of Mefp-2 to SA-coupled b-Mefp-1, where the latter was either in the native state or cross-linked using sodium periodate (NaIO(4)), Cu(2+), or mushroom tyrosinase. With this coupling strategy it is shown that a requirement for attraction between the two proteins is that tyrosinase is used as the cross-linking agent of b-Mefp-1. By inhibiting the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase it is also shown that enzymatic activity is required for both efficient binding of tyrosinase to SA-coupled b-Mefp-1 as well as for the subsequent binding of Mefp-2. In contrast, spontaneous adsorption of Mefp-1 to a methyl-terminated (thiolated) gold surface followed by addition of Mefp-2 results in binding of Mefp-2 for all cross-linking agents. This suggests that cross-linking of Mefp-1 adsorbed on a solid surface induces structural changes in the adsorbed protein layer, resulting in exposure of free surface patches on which Mefp-2 binds.

  8. Purification, characterization and amino-acid sequence analysis of a thermostable, low molecular mass endo-beta-1,4-glucanase from blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Hellman, U; Ersson, B; Janson, J C

    2000-08-01

    A cellulase (endo-beta-1,4-D-glucanase, EC 3.2.1.4) from blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) was purified to homogeneity using a combination of acid precipitation, heat precipitation, immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography. Purity was analyzed by SDS/PAGE, IEF and RP-HPLC. The cellulase (endoglucanase) was characterized with regard to enzymatic properties, isoelectric point, molecular mass and amino-acid sequence. It is a single polypeptide chain of 181 amino acids cross-linked with six disulfide bridges. Its molecular mass, as measured by MALDI-MS, is 19 702 Da; a value of 19 710.57 Da was calculated from amino-acid composition. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was estimated by isoelectric focusing in a polyacrylamide gel to a value of 7.6. According to amino-acid composition, the theoretical pI is 7.011. The effect of temperature on the endoglucanase activity, with carboxymethyl cellulose and amorphous cellulose as substrates, respectively, was studied at pH 5.5 and displayed an unusually broad optimum activity temperature range between 30 and 50 degrees C. Another unusual feature is that the enzyme retains 55-60% of its maximum activity at 0 degrees C. The enzyme readily degrades amorphous cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose but displays no hydrolytic activity towards crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and shows no cross-specificity for xylan; there is no binding to Avicel. The enzyme can withstand 10 min at 100 degrees C without irreversible loss of enzymatic activity. Amino-acid sequence-based classification has revealed that the enzyme belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 45, subfamily 2 (B. Henrissat, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Végétales, CNRS, Joseph Fourier Université, Grenoble, France, personal communication).

  9. Is prolonged sitting at work associated with the time course of neck–shoulder pain? A prospective study in Danish blue-collar workers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Korshøj, Mette; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Holtermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine the extent to which objectively measured sitting time at work is associated with the course of neck–shoulder pain across 1 year in blue-collar workers. Methods Data were analysed from 625 blue-collar workers in the Danish PHysical ACTivity cohort with Objective measurements (DPHACTO) cohort study (2012–2013). Objective data on sitting time were collected at baseline using accelerometry. Self-reported pain intensity (numeric rating scale 0–10) in the neck–shoulder region was registered for 1 year using repeated text messages (14 in total). Linear mixed models were used to determine the relationship between per cent time in sitting at work and trajectories of neck–shoulder pain, with and without adjustment for demographic, occupational and lifestyle factors, and baseline pain intensity. Results More sitting time at work was associated with a faster decline in pain intensity over 12 months, as indicated by a statistically significant effect of sitting on pain trajectories in the crude (p=0.020) and fully adjusted models (p=0.027). Conclusions In blue-collar workers, more sitting time at work was associated with a favourable development of pain intensity over time. The relationship between sitting at work and pain needs further investigation before explicit recommendations and guidelines on sedentary behaviour among blue-collar workers can be developed. PMID:28186937

  10. Mitochondrial DNA copy number is maintained during spermatogenesis and in the development of male larvae to sustain the doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA system in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Sano, Natsumi; Obata, Mayu; Ooie, Yosiyasu; Komaru, Akira

    2011-08-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial (mt) DNA has been reported in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In DUI, males inherit both paternal (M type) and maternal (F type) mtDNA. Here we investigated changes in M type mtDNA copy numbers and mitochondrial mass in testicular cells by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. The ratios of M type mtDNA copy numbers to nuclear DNA content were not different between haploid (1n), diploid (2n) and tetraploid (4n) spermatogenic cells. The mitochondrial mass decreased gradually during spermatogenesis. These results suggest that mtDNA and mitochondrial mass are maintained during spermatogenesis. We then traced M type mtDNA in larvae after fertilization. M type mtDNA was maintained up to 24 h after fertilization in the male-biased crosses, but decreased significantly in female-biased crosses (predicted by Mito Tracker staining pattern). These results are strikingly different from those reported for mammals and fish, where it is well known that the mitochondria and mtDNA are reduced during spermatogenesis and that sperm mitochondria and mtDNA are eliminated soon after fertilization. Thus, the M type mtDNA copy number is maintained during spermatogenesis and in the development of male larvae to sustain the DUI system in the blue mussel.

  11. Infestation of the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis by the copepod Pseudomyicola spinosus and its relation to size, density, and condition index of the host.

    PubMed

    Angel Olivas-Valdez, José; Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge

    2002-02-01

    The copepod Pseudomyicola spinosus infests marine mussels and other commercial bivalve species. There is a lack of information on the infestation process and on its relationship to size, density, and health of the host. To obtain this information, an infestation study of the copepod in Mytilus galloprovincialis in field conditions was carried out. Results showed that the intensity of infestation is closely related to host size [F((2,810))=198.33; p<0.001], but not to density [F((2,810))=0.96; p<0.38]. After an initial colonization of the host by the infested copepodite stages, an equilibrium between the intensity of the infestation and host size is maintained; mean intensity in small mussels was 1.57, in medium mussels it was 4.23, and in large mussels it was 9.86. Adult stages were observed after a period of 30 days, and ovigerous females were observed after a period of 45 days. Copepods may be found on the branches and mantle (89.5%) and inside the digestive tract (10.5%); in this last case and at the end of the study period some histological disorders were found such as obstruction of the intestine, rupture of the digestive epithelia, and encapsulations around digestive tissues. Most infested mussels showed the lowest meat weight in relation to shell weight; however, the reproductive stage may affect this observation. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  12. Is prolonged sitting at work associated with the time course of neck-shoulder pain? A prospective study in Danish blue-collar workers.

    PubMed

    Hallman, David M; Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Korshøj, Mette; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Holtermann, Andreas

    2016-11-10

    This study aimed to determine the extent to which objectively measured sitting time at work is associated with the course of neck-shoulder pain across 1 year in blue-collar workers. Data were analysed from 625 blue-collar workers in the Danish PHysical ACTivity cohort with Objective measurements (DPHACTO) cohort study (2012-2013). Objective data on sitting time were collected at baseline using accelerometry. Self-reported pain intensity (numeric rating scale 0-10) in the neck-shoulder region was registered for 1 year using repeated text messages (14 in total). Linear mixed models were used to determine the relationship between per cent time in sitting at work and trajectories of neck-shoulder pain, with and without adjustment for demographic, occupational and lifestyle factors, and baseline pain intensity. More sitting time at work was associated with a faster decline in pain intensity over 12 months, as indicated by a statistically significant effect of sitting on pain trajectories in the crude (p=0.020) and fully adjusted models (p=0.027). In blue-collar workers, more sitting time at work was associated with a favourable development of pain intensity over time. The relationship between sitting at work and pain needs further investigation before explicit recommendations and guidelines on sedentary behaviour among blue-collar workers can be developed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Effects of Black Rock Harbor Dredged Material on the Scope for Growth of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis after Laboratory and Field Exposures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    maintained in all five llaboratory exposure treatment:s,. Thisi concentration 21 ... . . ....... N air i~ne 2mrm capillary lubing polycorbonole . jugs stn... air stones to provide sufficient oxygen and to ensure even distribution of suspended particulates (Figure 5). 22...ability of the mussel to depurate or metabolize this compound. Field Exposure 97. Estimated from residues. The first method used to determine pos

  14. Are forward bending of the trunk and low back pain associated among Danish blue-collar workers? A cross-sectional field study based on objective measures.

    PubMed

    Villumsen, Morten; Samani, Afshin; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Gupta, Nidhi; Madeleine, Pascal; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between the duration of objectively measured forward bending of the trunk and low back pain (LBP) intensity among 198 Danish blue-collar workers (male = 115; female = 83). The duration of forward bending of ≥ 30°, ≥ 60° and ≥ 90° was divided into high (the highest tertile) and low-moderate (the remaining tertiles) categories. High (>5) and low ( ≤ 5) pain intensities were categorised from a self-reported 0-9 scale. Results of multi-adjusted logistic regressions indicated no significant positive associations between forward bending and LBP intensity. On the contrary, higher duration of forward bending of ≥ 30° was associated with lower LBP intensity during all day (OR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.15-1.02; p = 0.05) and work (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.17-1.15; p = 0.09). This indication of a negative association may be explained by fear-avoidance behaviour of the blue-collar worker, job crafting or healthy worker effect.

  15. Environmental Factors Influencing Human Viral Pathogens and Their Potential Indicator Organisms in the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: the First Scandinavian Report

    PubMed Central

    Hernroth, Bodil E.; Conden-Hansson, Ann-Christine; Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi; Girones, Rosina; Allard, Annika K.

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigate human enteric virus contaminants in mussels from three sites on the west coast of Sweden, representing a gradient of anthropogenic influence. Mussels were sampled monthly during the period from February 2000 to July 2001 and analyzed for adeno-, entero-, Norwalk-like, and hepatitis A viruses as well as the potential viral indicator organisms somatic coliphages, F-specific RNA bacteriophages, bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides fragilis, and Escherichia coli. The influence of environmental factors such as water temperature, salinity, and land runoff on the occurrence of these microbes was also included in this study. Enteric viruses were found in 50 to 60% of the mussel samples, and there were no pronounced differences between the samples from the three sites. E. coli counts exceeded the limit for category A for shellfish sanitary safety in 40% of the samples from the sites situated in fjords. However, at the site in the outer archipelago, this limit was exceeded only once, in March 2001, when extremely high levels of atypical indole-negative strains of E. coli were registered at all three sites. The environmental factors influenced the occurrence of viruses and phages differently, and therefore, it was hard to find a coexistence between them. This study shows that, for risk assessment, separate modeling should be done for every specific area, with special emphasis on environmental factors such as temperature and land runoff. The present standard for human fecal contamination, E. coli, seems to be an acceptable indicator of only local sanitary contamination; it is not a reliable indicator of viral contaminants in mussels. To protect consumers and get verification of “clean” mussels, it seems necessary to analyze for viruses as well. The use of a molecular index of the human contamination of Swedish shellfish underscores the need for reference laboratories with high-technology facilities. PMID:12200309

  16. Pacific blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus) abundance in the Gulf of Alaska: Synthesis of Gulf Watch data (2006-2013) and a consideration of major recruitment events (1989-2013)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monson, Daniel H.; Dean, Thomas; Lindeberg, M.R.; Bodkin, James L.; Coletti, Heather A.; Esler, Daniel N.; Kloecker, Kim; Weitzman, Ben P.; Ballachey, Brenda E.

    2015-01-01

    Pacific blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus) are abundant and wide-spread primary consumers in the intertidal zone throughout the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). As a component of the Gulf Watch Alaska monitoring program, they represent a key member of intertidal communities and an important prey resource to a number of nearshore vertebrate predators. Our goal is to understand variation in abundance of M. trossulus over large temporal and spatial scales and over a variety of habitats in the northern GOA to determine the bottom-up factors that influence recruitment and the top-down forces that control total biomass. This information is needed to predict consequences of variation due to incremental climate change, periodic regime shifts, and catastrophic change caused by oil spills or natural events such as severe winters.

  17. Measurements of biomarker levels in flounder (Platichthys flesus) and blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus) from the Gulf of Gdańsk (southern Baltic).

    PubMed

    Kopecka, Justyna; Lehtonen, Kari K; Barsiene, Janina; Broeg, Katja; Vuorinen, Pekka J; Gercken, Jens; Pempkowiak, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the EU funded BEEP project a set of biomarkers, gross morphometric indices and tissue concentrations of selected organic pollutants were measured in flounder (Platichthys flesus) and mussels (Mytilus trossulus) collected twice a year (April and October) from three sites in the inner Gulf of Gdańsk between autumn 2001 and spring 2003. In flounder, seasonal differences in most biomarkers were observed, but no correlations with tissue pollutant levels could be found. In mussels, highly variable levels in biomarker responses were seen, but no clear seasonal or spatial trends, directly related to tissue concentrations, could be established. The observed biomarkers distribution the study sites are probably mostly caused by interannual, seasonal and individual variability and, in case of flounder, possibly by exchange of stocks between the sampling sites.

  18. Application of a weight of evidence approach utilising biological effects, histopathology and contaminant levels to assess the health and pollution status of Irish blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Giltrap, Michelle; Ronan, Jenny; Tanner, Colby; O'Beirn, Francis X; Lyons, Brett P; Mag Aoidh, Rónán; Rochford, Heather; McHugh, Brendan; McGovern, Evin; Wilson, James

    2016-12-01

    A weight of evidence (WOE) approach, integrating biological effects, mussel histopathology and tissue contaminant levels is proposed to evaluate mussel health and pollution status. Contaminant levels, histopathology and several biological effects (BEs) including Lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), acetylcholinesterase (AChe), metallothionein proteins (MT) and alkali labile phosphate (ALP), in Mytilus edulis are presented, improving the current knowledge base for these data. Potential links between histopathology, BEs and contaminants and ranking of sites are investigated with an integrated response (IR) indexing technique. Histopathological condition indices (Ih) in mussel digestive gland are used to calculate health indices. A spatial and temporal assessment is conducted at Irish coastal locations. Linear mixed effects modelling revealed effects of confounding factors such as reproductive condition on NRRT (gonad stage (p < 0.001)). Higher prevalence of inflammation, brown cells and epithelial thinning of the digestive gland was evident at Dublin and Wexford and this linked well with the Ih. Levels of contaminants were generally found to be low with few exceptions as were BE responses. Using the IR approach, Dublin was ranked as being most impacted while Shannon ranked the least impacted, this being consistent with the BE ranking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A 1982-1992 surveillance programme on Danish pottery painters. Biological levels and health effects following exposure to soluble or insoluble cobalt compounds in cobalt blue dyes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, J M; Poulsen, O M

    1994-06-30

    This paper provides a short overview of cobalt-related diseases with particular reference to the potential carcinogenicity of cobalt compounds, and a review of a 10-year surveillance programme on plate painters exposed to cobalt in two Danish porcelain factories. Clinical experience and epidemiological studies have demonstrated that cobalt exposure may lead to severely impaired lung function, i.e. hard metal lung disease and occupational cobalt-related asthma, contact dermatitis and cardiovascular effects. However, the evidence for the carcinogenicity of cobalt and cobalt compounds is considered inadequate (IARC, 1991). Most frequently, exposure to cobalt occurs simultaneously with exposure to other elements known to pose a health risk, (e.g. nickel, arsenic, chromium, tungsten). The importance of cobalt as sole causal agent in hard metal lung diseases, cardiomyopathy and cancer are still a matter of controversy. In the two Danish porcelain factories, cobalt blue underglaze dyes have been used since 1888. In contrast to the exposure experience of hard metal factories, the exposure of plate painters occurs with only low trace levels of other potentially harmful compounds such as the carcinogenic metals nickel, arsenic and chromium. Consequently, the nearly-pure cobalt exposure makes the plate painters an attractive group for studies on the health effects of cobalt. During the period 1982-1992 the surveillance programme showed a profound reduction in the urine level of cobalt (Co-U) from 100-fold to 10-fold above the median level of the unexposed control subjects. In the same period, the airborne cobalt exposure declined from 1356 nmol/m3 to 454 nmol/m3, the Danish occupational exposure limit being 845 nmol/m3. In 1982, when the cobalt exposure was above the occupational exposure limit, the plate painters showed a chronic impaired lung function. The obstructive effects may be similar to some of the effects observed in hard metal workers. In 1988, a study on the

  20. Improved detection of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine using N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of N-butylnicotinic acid for the localization of BMAA in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Andrýs, Rudolf; Zurita, Javier; Zguna, Nadezda; Verschueren, Klaas; De Borggraeve, Wim M; Ilag, Leopold L

    2015-05-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an important non-protein amino acid linked to neurodegenerative diseases, specifically amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Because it can be transferred and bioaccumulated higher up the food chain, it poses significant public health concerns; thus, improved detection methods are of prime importance for the identification and management of these toxins. Here, we report the successful use of N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of N-butylnicotinic acid (C4-NA-NHS) for the efficient separation of BMAA from its isomers and higher sensitivity in detecting BMAA compared to the current method of choice using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) derivatization. Implementation of this efficient method allowed localization of BMAA in the non-visceral tissues of blue mussels, suggesting that more efficient depuration may be required to remove this toxin prior to consumption. This is a crucial method in establishing the absence or presence of the neurotoxic amino acid BMAA in food, environmental or biomedical samples.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA transmitted from sperm in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis showing doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria, quantified by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Sano, Natsumi; Obata, Mayu; Komaru, Akira

    2010-07-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial DNA transmission to progeny has been reported in the mussel, Mytilus. In DUI, males have both paternally (M type) and maternally (F type) transmitted mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but females have only the F type. To estimate how much M type mtDNA enters the egg with sperm in the DUI system, ratios of M type to F type mtDNA were measured before and after fertilization. M type mtDNA content in eggs increased markedly after fertilization. Similar patterns in M type content changes after fertilization were observed in crosses using the same males. To compare mtDNA quantities, we subsequently measured the ratios of mtDNA to the 28S ribosomal RNA gene (an endogenous control sequence) in sperm or unfertilized eggs using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. F type content in unfertilized eggs was greater than the M type in sperm by about 1000-fold on average. M type content in spermatozoa was greater than in unfertilized egg, but their distribution overlapped. These results may explain the post-fertilization changes in zygotic M type content. We previously demonstrated that paternal and maternal M type mtDNAs are transmitted to offspring, and hypothesized that the paternal M type contributed to M type transmission to the next generation more than the maternal type did. These quantitative data on M and F type mtDNA in sperm and eggs provide further support for that hypothesis.

  2. The Mussels' Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolzenburg, William

    1992-01-01

    Presents research findings about mussels, an indicator species for the health of U.S. rivers and streams. Provides mussel descriptions, a history of the decline of mussel populations and cooperative efforts to repair damaged ecosystems cited as the root of the problem. (MCO)

  3. The Mussels' Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolzenburg, William

    1992-01-01

    Presents research findings about mussels, an indicator species for the health of U.S. rivers and streams. Provides mussel descriptions, a history of the decline of mussel populations and cooperative efforts to repair damaged ecosystems cited as the root of the problem. (MCO)

  4. Predation on exotic zebra mussels by native fishes: Effects on predator and prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoulick, D.D.; Lewis, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    1. Exotic zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, occur in southern U.S. waterways in high densities, but little is known about the interaction between native fish predators and zebra mussels. Previous studies have suggested that exotic zebra mussels are low profitability prey items and native vertebrate predators are unlikely to reduce zebra mussel densities. We tested these hypotheses by observing prey use of fishes, determining energy content of primary prey species of fishes, and conducting predator exclusion experiments in Lake Dardanelle, Arkansas. 2. Zebra mussels were the primary prey eaten by 52.9% of blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus; 48.2% of freshwater drum, Aplodinotus grunniens; and 100% of adult redear sunfish, Lepomis microlophus. Blue catfish showed distinct seasonal prey shifts, feeding on zebra mussels in summer and shad, Dorosoma spp., during winter. Energy content (joules g-1) of blue catfish prey (threadfin shad, Dorosoma petenense; gizzard shad, D. cepedianum; zebra mussels; and asiatic clams, Corbicula fluminea) showed a significant species by season interaction, but shad were always significantly greater in energy content than bivalves examined as either ash-free dry mass or whole organism dry mass. Fish predators significantly reduced densities of large zebra mussels (>5 mm length) colonising clay tiles in the summers of 1997 and 1998, but predation effects on small zebra mussels (???5 mm length) were less clear. 3. Freshwater drum and redear sunfish process bivalve prey by crushing shells and obtain low amounts of higher-energy food (only the flesh), whereas blue catfish lack a shell-crushing apparatus and ingest large amounts of low-energy food per unit time (bivalves with their shells). Blue catfish appeared to select the abundant zebra mussel over the more energetically rich shad during summer, then shifted to shad during winter when shad experienced temperature-dependent stress and mortality. Native fish predators can suppress adult zebra

  5. Detection of mutagenicity in mussels and their ambient water

    SciTech Connect

    Kira, Shohei; Hayatsu, Hikoya; Ogata, Masana )

    1989-10-01

    Mussels provide an excellent system for monitoring marine pollutants: the system is often called mussel watch. Investigators have reported the susceptibility of this organism to petroleum hydrocarbons and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The authors showed the applicability of this organism to monitor oil pollutions by detecting organosulfur compounds in field samples. In the present study, they undertook the mutagen screening of mussel bodies and ambient water, and investigated the correlation between the mussel- and water-mutagenicities. Mutagenic compounds being detected here are those adsorbable to blue cotton or blue rayon and extractable with a methanol-ammonia solution, and the Ames assay was used for the detection of mutagenicity, with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 as the ester strain and with S9-mix for metabolic activation.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mussel and fish from the Finnish Archipelago Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Marine organisms are known to adsorb and accumulate PAH's from water. Mussels due to their widespread distribution in coastal waters have been studied in many laboratory and field experiments for their responses to PAH exposures. The occurrence of PAH's has been studied also in fish. This report presents preliminary data for the PAH content in blue mussel and fish from the Finnish Archipelago Sea. Mussel and fish samples were collected from the Finnish Archipelago Sea during 1978-1979.

  7. Freshwater mussels of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James D.; Butler, Robert S.; Warren, Gary L.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    An exhaustive guide to all aspects of the freshwater mussel fauna in Florida,Freshwater Mussels of Florida covers the ecology, biology, distribution, and conservation of the many species of bivalve mollusks in the Sunshine State. In the past three decades, researchers, the public, businesses that depend on wildlife, and policy makers have given more attention to the threatened natural diversity of the Southeast, including freshwater mussels. This compendium meets the increasingly urgent need to catalog this imperiled group of aquatic organisms in the United States.

  8. Surface chemistry: Mussel power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The adhesive proteins secreted by mussels are the inspiration behind a versatile approach to the surface modification of a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, resulting in the fabrication of multifunctional coatings for a variety of applications.

  9. The use of waste mussel shells for the adsorption of dyes and heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Chrysi A.; Krey, Grigorios; Stamatis, Nikolaos; Kallaniotis, Argyris

    2016-04-01

    Mussel culture is very important sector of the Greek agricultural economy. The majority of mussel culture activities take place in the area of Central Macedonia, Greece, 60% of total mussel production in Greece producing almost 12 tons of waste mussels shells on a daily basis. Currently there is no legislation concerning the disposal of mussel shells. In the present study the waste shells were used for the removal of dyes and heavy metals from aqueous solutions while powdered mussel shells were added in activated sludge processes for the removal of hexavalent chromium. Mussel shells were cleaned, dried and then crushed in order to form a powder. Powdered mussels shells were used in standard adsorption experiments for the removal of methylene blue and methyl red as well as for the removal of Cr (VI), Cd and Cu. Moreover the powdered mussel shells were added in laboratory scale activated sludge reactors treating synthetic wastewater with hexavalent chromium, in order investigate the effects in activated sludge processes and their potential attribution to the removal of hexavalent chromium. Adsorption experiments indicated almost 100% color removal, while adsorption was directly proportional to the amount of powdered mussel shells added in each case. The isotherms calculated for the case of methylene blue indicated similar adsorption capacity and properties to those of the commercially available activated carbon SAE 2, Norit. High removal efficiencies were observed for the metals, especially in the case of chromium and copper. The addition of powdered mussel shells in the activated sludge processes enhanced the removal of chromium and phosphorus, while enabled the formation of heavier activated sludge flocs and thus enhanced the settling properties of the activated sludge.

  10. Zebra mussel life history

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    The success of introduced zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas) and Dreissena bugensis Andrusova) can be related in large parttot a life history that is unlike that of the indigenous freshwater fauna and yet is conserved with marine bivalves. Following external fertilization and embryological development, there is a brief trochophore stage. With the development of a velum and the secretion of a D-shaped larval shell, the larva becomes a D-shaped veliger, which is the first recognizable planktonic larva. Later, the secretion of a second larval shell leads to the last obligate free-swimming veliger stage known as the veliconcha. The last larval stage known as the pediveliger, however, can both swim using its velum or crawl using its fully-functional foot. Pediveligers actively select substrates on which they {open_quotes}settle{close_quotes} by secreting byssal threads and undergo metamorphosis to become plantigrade mussels. The secretion of the adult shell and concomitant changes in growth axis leads to the heteromyariant or mussel-like shape, which is convergent with marine mussels. Like a number of other bivalves, zebra mussels produce byssal threads as adults, but these attachments may be broken enabling their translocation to new areas. The recognition and examination of these life history traits will lead to a better understanding of zebra mussel biology.

  11. Zebra mussel monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hennagir, T.

    1994-01-01

    In less than a decade, zebra mussels have become the latest environmental scourge to plague the North American power industry. Infestations in the Great Lakes region have already reached natural disaster proportions. The invasion shows little sign of subsiding; Michigan's inland waters are the next most likely threatened area. In the southern United States, the mussles' migration has extended about 50 miles deeper than experts had originally predicted. By the year 2000, zebra mussel monitoring and control efforts will cost business and industry $5 billion, according to the federal Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990. Estimates of more than $1 million to control mussel fouling are projected for the Great Lakes area alone. While small independent hydropower stations are not as susceptible to zebra mussles as coal or nuclear facilities, there is cause for concern. Infestations can quickly foul hydropower plant components, hampering equipment operation and reducing facility efficiency. In extreme cases, leaving the mussels unchecked can result in stoplog gate flow blockage or false water level gauge readings. Advance prevention is often an effective first-line of defense against this troublesome, rapidly spreading and extremely prolific mollusk. Mussel monitoring efforts should begin a year in advance of when zebra mussels are expected to appear in a given location. Hydropower facility components that come into contact or rely exclusively on raw water are at greatest risk, as are other external components such as embayment walls, screens, trashracks and fish ladders.

  12. Zebra mussel mitigation; overview

    SciTech Connect

    Claudi, R.

    1995-06-01

    Zebra mussels cause a number of problems to industrial raw water users as well as having serious impact on civil structures exposed to mussel infested waters. The largest volume of water (up to 90% of the total) drawn into most industrial and power generating plants, is for cooling and heat transfer. The rest of the volume is used for other plant processes, such as make-up in steam systems, and service systems used for cleaning, air conditions, fire protection and human consumption. All raw water systems are vulnerable to zebra mussel infestation to greater or lesser degree. To-date, many different chemical and non-chemical techniques for zebra mussel control have been investigated. However, the treatment of choice for most facilities is based on chemical control. This has been the common practice in Europe and so far it has been the case in North America. This is likely to change as the environmental constraints on release of chemicals into natural water bodies continue to increase. This paper deals with the different steps raw water users should take when deciding on a mitigation strategy, the mitigation measures available to-date and those that have been proposed for the control of zebra mussels in industrial systems.

  13. Mussel adhesion - essential footwork.

    PubMed

    Waite, J Herbert

    2017-02-15

    Robust adhesion to wet, salt-encrusted, corroded and slimy surfaces has been an essential adaptation in the life histories of sessile marine organisms for hundreds of millions of years, but it remains a major impasse for technology. Mussel adhesion has served as one of many model systems providing a fundamental understanding of what is required for attachment to wet surfaces. Most polymer engineers have focused on the use of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (Dopa), a peculiar but abundant catecholic amino acid in mussel adhesive proteins. The premise of this Review is that although Dopa does have the potential for diverse cohesive and adhesive interactions, these will be difficult to achieve in synthetic homologs without a deeper knowledge of mussel biology; that is, how, at different length and time scales, mussels regulate the reactivity of their adhesive proteins. To deposit adhesive proteins onto target surfaces, the mussel foot creates an insulated reaction chamber with extreme reaction conditions such as low pH, low ionic strength and high reducing poise. These conditions enable adhesive proteins to undergo controlled fluid-fluid phase separation, surface adsorption and spreading, microstructure formation and, finally, solidification. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Field Verification Program (Aquatic Disposal). Effects of Black Rock Harbor Dredged Material on the Histopathology of The Blue Mussel Mytilus edulis and Polychaete Worm Nephtys incisa After Laboratory and Field Exposures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    152 FIELD VERIFICATION PROGRAM (U TIC DISPOSAL) EFFECTS 1/2 EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG PS ENVIR .. ESIFIE P P YVICH ET AL. SEP 97 WES/TR/D-67-8 F/S...analyses throughout the study included PCBs, PAHs, the pesticide ethvlan, and eight metals. 73. A representative subset of chemicals was selected for...the mussels (50 percent) in this group had some histopath- ology of the digestive divertlcula. However, the damage was not as extensive 61 rd S.. A S

  15. Of Mussels and Men.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Some species are more equal than others. Robert T. Paine (American ecologist, 1933-2016) discovered that if you remove starfish - what he called a "keystone species" - from a tide pool, the complex ecosystem collapses. Without the predator starfish, mussels choke out other animals and plants. This phenomenon is general. Sea otters eat the sea urchins that eat the kelp that provides food and habitat for other species. On the vast Serengeti plains, wildebeest "mow" the grass, protecting habitat for many other species. Understanding the "rules" that govern the numbers and diversity of species in an ecosystem is essential to efficient and sustainable management. But those same rules apply to us. Free of predation, humans are swarming over the planet, choking out other species. We are the planetary mussels. What next? A "mussel-bound" world, or perhaps renewed microbial predation?

  16. Of Mussels and Men

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Some species are more equal than others. Robert T. Paine (American ecologist, 1933–2016) discovered that if you remove starfish – what he called a “keystone species” – from a tide pool, the complex ecosystem collapses. Without the predator starfish, mussels choke out other animals and plants. This phenomenon is general. Sea otters eat the sea urchins that eat the kelp that provides food and habitat for other species. On the vast Serengeti plains, wildebeest “mow” the grass, protecting habitat for many other species. Understanding the “rules” that govern the numbers and diversity of species in an ecosystem is essential to efficient and sustainable management. But those same rules apply to us. Free of predation, humans are swarming over the planet, choking out other species. We are the planetary mussels. What next? A “mussel-bound” world, or perhaps renewed microbial predation? PMID:27585022

  17. Chemical and ancillary data associated with bed sediment, young of year Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) tissue, and mussel (Mytilus edulis and Geukensia demissa) tissue collected after Hurricane Sandy in bays and estuaries of New Jersey and New York, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Deshpande, Ashok D.; Blazer, Vicki; Galbraith, Heather S.; Dockum, Bruce W.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Colella, Kaitlyn; Deetz, Anna C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Sharack, Beth; Summer, Lisa; Timmons, DeMond; Trainor, John J.; Wieczorek, Daniel; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.

    2015-09-09

    Twenty three PCB congeners, 9 PBDE congeners, and 20 OCPs were detected in composite mussel samples collected throughout the study area. The co-eluting PCB congeners 153 and 132, PBDE 47, 99, and 100, and p,p’-DDE were detected in samples from each site. The highest median concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs were present in mussels from Raritan Bay, N.Y., whereas the highest median concentrations of OCPs were present in mussels from Fire Island Inlet, N.Y., and Shark River, N.J. Mytilus edulis (blue mussels) and Geukensia demissa (ribbed mussels) were thin-sectioned and aged. The blue mussels collected ranged in age from 4 to 13 years, and the ribbed mussels ranged in age from 3 to 12 years.

  18. Population genetic structure of mussels from the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulnheim, H.-P.; Gosling, E.

    1988-03-01

    In a macrogeographic survey, the population genetic structure of mussels from various regions of the Baltic Sea, a large semi-enclosed brackish-water basin, was examined with reference to Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis samples from the North Sea, Irish coast and southern Portugal. Electrophoretically detectable variation was analysed at 6 polymorphic enzyme loci ( Ap, Est-D, Lap-2, Odh, Pgi and Pgm). Evidence was provided of a remarkably large amount of biochemical genetic differentiation among ecologically and morphologically divergent mussel populations in the Baltic. Patterns of allele frequencies in low-salinity populations from the area of the Baltic Proper were demonstrated to be widely homogeneous but contrast strongly with those of the western Baltic, the latter resembling populations from marine habitats of the North Sea. Associated with a pronounced salinity gradient, the spatial heterogeneity in gene-pool structure is indicated by steep clines of allele frequency changes in the area of the eastern Danish isles. The adaptive significance of the observed allozymic variation is suggested. From genetic distance estimates, the subdivision of population structure is discussed in relation to the significant amount of differentiation detected within Mytilus populations to date and to the evolutionary time required for the divergence of Baltic mussel populations. The allozymic data provide evidence for the genetic distinctiveness of mussels from the low-salinity areas of the Baltic. Their position at the specific or subspecific level of classification requires further consideration.

  19. Measuring bioavailable metals using diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and transplanted seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus), blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and sea snails (Littorina saxatilis) suspended from monitoring buoys near a former lead-zinc mine in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jens; Bach, Lis; Gustavson, Kim

    2014-01-15

    Measuring loads of bioavailable metals is important for environmental assessment near mines and other industrial sources. In this study, a setup of monitoring buoys was tested to assess loads of bioavailable metals near a former Pb-Zn mine in West Greenland using transplanted seaweed, mussels and sea snails. In addition, passive DGT samplers were installed. After a 9-day deployment period, concentrations of especially Pb, Zn and Fe in the species were all markedly elevated at the monitoring sites closest to the mine. Lead concentrations in all three species and the DGT-Pb results showed a significant linear correlation. Zinc and Fe concentrations were less correlated indicating that the mechanisms for Zn and Fe accumulation in the three species are more complex. The results show that there is still a significant load of metals from the mine and that such buoys can be an adequate method to assess present loads of bioavailable metals.

  20. A historical assessment of coastal contamination in Birch Harbor, Maine based on the analysis of mussels collected in the 1940s and the Mussel Watch Program.

    PubMed

    Apeti, D A; Lauenstein, G G; Christensen, J D; Kimbrough, K; Johnson, W E; Kennedy, M; Grant, K G

    2010-05-01

    Coastal contamination in the 1940s was assessed based on analysis of canned blue mussels presumably collected from Birch Harbor, Maine, USA. Analytical results on legacy organic contaminants were compared to long-term National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Mussel Watch (MW) monitoring data to estimate the degree of coastal contamination before World War II (WWII) when many synthetic organic compounds were first introduced into the environment. While dieldrin and chlordane were not detected in the canned mussels, dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were present at lower concentrations relative to the more recent MW data. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected, and the later were significantly higher in canned mussels relative to the MW data (p<0.05). Furthermore, moving average analysis applied to the MW data depicted three-phased temporal trend patterns (increase-decrease-steady state) for virtually all contaminants indicating an overall increased coastal contamination in post WWII era.

  1. Detroit Edison conquers zebra mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, D.B.; Buda, D.J. )

    1993-11-01

    A potentially troublesome zebra mussel infestation at Detroit Edison's Harbor Beach Power Plant was nipped in time. Reducing the oxygen content of water inside the plant's water systems and using steam to thermally treat a colony of mussels that was established in the plant's screenhouse prevented the problem. So successful was the temperature treatment that it will be used regularly as part of the plant's annual mussel removal program.

  2. Elemental fingerprinting of mussel shells to predict population sources and redistribution potential in the Gulf of Maine.

    PubMed

    Sorte, Cascade J B; Etter, Ron J; Spackman, Robert; Boyle, Elizabeth E; Hannigan, Robyn E

    2013-01-01

    As the climate warms, species that cannot tolerate changing conditions will only persist if they undergo range shifts. Redistribution ability may be particularly variable for benthic marine species that disperse as pelagic larvae in ocean currents. The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, has recently experienced a warming-related range contraction in the southeastern USA and may face limitations to northward range shifts within the Gulf of Maine where dominant coastal currents flow southward. Thus, blue mussels might be especially vulnerable to warming, and understanding dispersal patterns is crucial given the species' relatively long planktonic larval period (>1 month). To determine whether trace elemental "fingerprints" incorporated in mussel shells could be used to identify population sources (i.e. collection locations), we assessed the geographic variation in shell chemistry of blue mussels collected from seven populations between Cape Cod, Massachusetts and northern Maine. Across this ∼500 km of coastline, we were able to successfully predict population sources for over two-thirds of juvenile individuals, with almost 80% of juveniles classified within one site of their collection location and 97% correctly classified to region. These results indicate that significant differences in elemental signatures of mussel shells exist between open-coast sites separated by ∼50 km throughout the Gulf of Maine. Our findings suggest that elemental "fingerprinting" is a promising approach for predicting redistribution potential of the blue mussel, an ecologically and economically important species in the region.

  3. Community dynamics of intertidal soft-bottom mussel beds over two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttger, Heike; Asmus, Harald; Asmus, Ragnhild; Buschbaum, Christian; Dittmann, Sabine; Nehls, Georg

    2008-03-01

    Macrozoobenthos communities in the North Sea showed pronounced changes over the past decade in relation to an increasing number of invasive species and climate change. We analysed data sets spanning 22 years on abundance, biomass and species composition of intertidal soft bottom mussel beds near the island of Sylt (German Bight) in the Northern Wadden Sea, based on surveys from 1983/1984, 1990, 1993 and from 1999 to 2005. Mussel bed area and blue mussel biomass decreased, and a change in the dominance structure in the associated community comparing 1984 to mid-1990s with the period from 1999 to 2005 was observed. Coverage of the mussel beds with the algae Fucus vesiculosus decreased since the end of the 1990s. Within the study period biomass and densities of the associated community increased significantly. Dominance structure changed mainly because of increasing abundances of associated epibenthic taxa. Apart from the Pacific oyster C rassostrea gigas all other alien species were already present in the area during the study period. Community changes already started before Pacific oysters became abundant. An attempt is made to evaluate effects on the observed changes of decreasing mussel biomass, ageing of mussel beds, decreasing fucoid coverage and increasing abundances of invader. All four factors are assumed to contribute to changing community structure of intertidal mussel beds.

  4. Results of an in-situ mussel bioassay in the Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Houkal, D.; Rummel, B.; Shephard, B.

    1995-12-31

    As part of an ecological evaluation in the Puget Sound, Washington, an in situ bioassay using the blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) was conducted to determine the effect of sediment-borne chemicals on bioaccumulation and growth of shellfish. The assay included four sample stations from a contaminated embayment (Sinclair Inlet) and one station from a reference site (Holmes Harbor). At each station, 300 mussels were deployed 1 meter above the sediment surface and maintained for a period of 3 months. The length and total weight of each mussel was measured at the beginning of the exposure period and the length, total weight, tissue weight, and shell weight of each mussel was measured at the end of the exposure period. Composite tissue samples from 100 mussels were collected at the beginning and end of the exposure period and analyzed for semivolatile organic chemicals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, inorganic chemicals, organotin, and lipids. Water quality measurements (including temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and chlorophyll a) were made at each station every two weeks during the assay to characterize environmental factors influencing mussel bioaccumulation and growth. Weight growth was similar among stations in Sinclair Inlet, but was significantly greater in all Sinclair Inlet stations compared to the Holmes Harbor reference station. Length growth was statistically indistinguishable among stations in Sinclair Inlet. Only one Sinclair Inlet station had a significantly greater length growth compared to the Holmes Harbor reference station. The influence of water quality on mussel growth is presented. The correlation between sediment chemistry and bioaccumulation is discussed.

  5. Comparison of metal accumulation in mussels at different local and global scales.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Graham; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2003-02-01

    Cadmium and zinc uptake from the dissolved phase, assimilation efficiency (AE) from the dietary phase, and body burden as well as clearance rate were measured in green mussels, Perna viridis, and blue mussels Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis and Mytilus trossulus. Perna viridis was collected from four sites differentially enriched with trace metals in Hong Kong and blue mussels were collected from different climatic zones, i.e., subarctic and temperate, to allow comparisons with the more tropical green mussels. Despite similar shell length, the dry weight of mussels varied significantly between sites and species and this had a large effect on Cd and Zn accumulation, clearance rate, and metal body burden. All data were, therefore, weight adjusted to allow comparison without this confounding factor. Trace-metal body concentrations were significantly different between sites, and P. viridis collected from Tsing Yi, Hong Kong, had the highest levels of all measured metals when compared with other Hong Kong sites. There was, however, no relationship between the degree of metal enrichment and the Cd and Zn uptake (both from dissolved and particulate sources) and clearance rates. Furthermore, Cd and Zn uptake (dissolved and particulate) and clearance rate varied little between species or climatic zones of collection. Thus, over the range of body trace-metal concentrations measured and between mussel species over large geographical distances and climatic zones, the uptake rates, AEs, and clearance rates are similar when measured under the same laboratory conditions after body-size correction. When other factors such as salinity are also corrected, biomonitoring data from different areas and even utilizing different mussel species may be directly comparable. This study therefore provides important evidence in support of Mussel Watch Programs.

  6. Zebra mussel mortality with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, J.E.; Jensen, J.N.; Harrington, D.; DeGirolamo, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    The rate of mortality of the zebra mussel in response to chlorine is described by a kinetic model that combines a statistical characterization of mussel mortality with a disinfection-type modeling approach. Parameter estimates were made with nine sets of data from experiments conducted in Niagara River water. From the kinetic model, an operational diagram was constructed that describes the time to 95% mortality as a function of chlorine concentration and temperature. Either the model or the diagram can be used to assist utilities in planning chlorination treatments for controlling zebra mussels.

  7. Dreissenid mussel research priorities workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sytsma, Mark; Phillips, Stephen; Counihan, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, dreissenid mussels have yet to be detected in the northwestern part of the United States and western Canada. Infestation of one of the jurisdictions within the mussel-free Pacific Northwest would likely have significant economic, soci­etal and environmental implications for the entire region. Understanding the biology and environmental tolerances of dreissenid mussels, and effectiveness of various man­agement strategies, is key to prevention.On November 4-5, 2015, the Aquatic Bioinvasion Research and Policy Institute and the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs at Portland State University, the US Geological Survey, and the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, convened a Dreissenid Mussel Research Priorities Workshop funded by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative. The purpose of the workshop was to review dreissenid research priorities in the 2010 Quagga-Zebra Mussel Action Plan for Western U.S. Waters, reassess those priorities, incorporate new information and emerging trends, and develop priorities to strategically focus research efforts on zebra and quagga mussels in the Pacific Northwest and ensure that future research is focused on the highest priorities. It is important to note that there is some repetition among dreissenid research priority categories (e.g., prevention, detection, control, monitoring, and biology).Workshop participants with research experience in dreissenid mussel biology and management were identified by a literature review. State and federal agency managers were also invited to the workshop to ensure relevancy and practicality of the work­shop outcomes. A total of 28 experts (see sidebar) in mussel biology, ecology, and management attended the workshop.

  8. Mussel byssus and biomolecular materials.

    PubMed

    Deming, T J

    1999-02-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins are remarkable materials that display an extraordinary capability to adhere to substrates underwater. Recent investigations from groups with quite diverse areas of expertise have made substantial progress in the identification of the genes and proteins that are involved in adhesive formation. These discoveries have led to the development of recombinant proteins and synthetic polypeptides that are able to reproduce the properties of mussel adhesives for applications in medicine and biotechnology.

  9. Application of mussels as biosamplers for characterization of faecal pollution in coastal recreational waters.

    PubMed

    Roslev, P; Bukh, A S; Iversen, L; Sønderbo, H; Iversen, N

    2010-01-01

    Sources of faecal pollution in coastal recreational waters may be identified by analysing different host associated microorganisms or molecular markers. However, the microbial targets are often present at low numbers in moderately impacted waters, and often exhibit significant temporal and spatial variability in waters with fluctuating faecal loads. This patchy occurrence can limit successful detection of relevant targets in microbial source tracking studies. In this study, we explored the possibility for using the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) as a biosampler for accumulation of faecal bacteria relevant for microbial source tracking. Non-contaminated blue mussels were transferred to three coastal recreational waters affected by faecal pollution of unknown origin. Molecular markers associated with animal and human waste were targeted by PCR and compared in seawater and mussel samples. The results demonstrated that transplanted mussels in simple enclosures accumulated and retained elevated levels of molecular markers associated with different types of faecal pollution. The targets included a novel putative human associated E. coli subgroup B2 VIII clone, and animal and human associated markers in enterococci (esp, M19, M66, M90, and M91). Human (sewage) associated markers including esp and M66 were sometimes not detectable in seawater samples despite known wastewater contamination, whereas the markers were detectable in mussels. We suggest that transplanted mussels should be considered as potential biosamplers in studies focusing on identifying source of faecal pollution in low or moderately impacted recreational waters. Bioaccumulation of molecular markers in mussels for several days may represent the water quality better than traditional grab samples from the water column.

  10. Birds, seals and the suspension culture of mussels in Bantry Bay, a non-seaduck area in Southwest Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roycroft, D.; Kelly, T. C.; Lewis, L. J.

    2004-12-01

    Concerns about the environmental impacts of mariculture have grown in recent years in response to the rapid expansion of the industry. The blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis) is the main product of shellfish mariculture in the Northeast Atlantic and Baltic Sea, with approximately one third of the harvest cultured using suspended longlines within sheltered marine areas. The main aim of this study was to examine the interactions, and assess the impacts (if any) of mussel suspension culture on the seabird and seal community, employing a simultaneous study of culture and control sites. The study spanned a 20-month period (from November 2001 to August 2003) and encompassed six sites in Bantry Bay (Southwest Ireland). There was no significant difference in species richness between mussel and control sites. Similarly, species diversity did not significantly differ between the mussel and control sites although control sites were generally more diverse than mussel sites, the latter particularly dominated by large numbers of Laridae. Significantly higher numbers of Phalacrocoracidae, Laridae and Alcidae were recorded in mussel sites than in control sites. However, no significant difference was found between Gaviidae or common seal ( Phoca vitulina) numbers in mussel and control sites. Seasonal patterns of abundance were similar in mussel and control sites, with peak numbers of most species groups occurring in spring. Mussel suspension culture does not appear to have an adverse effect on the abundance of seabirds or common seals in this area. The safe perching platforms provided by suspension culture floats, combined with a number of other factors, contribute to an increased abundance of a number of seabird species, particularly Laridae. The possible interactions between vertebrate predators and mussel suspension aquaculture are discussed and possible explanations for the increased seabird abundance observed in these areas are offered.

  11. Heavy metals in seaducks and mussels from Misty Fjords National Monument in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Koehl, P.S.; Derksen, D.V.; Rothe, T.C.; Bunck, C.M.; Moore, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Quartz Hill, in Misty Fjords National Monument near Ketchikan, Alaska, is the site of a proposed molybdenum-producing mine. To provide baseline data for use in post-development comparisons, we analyzed tissues of Barrow's goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica), common mergansers (Mergus merganser), and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) for seven heavy metals that could potentially be released into the environment as a result of mining operations. Specimens were collected in 1980, 1981, and 1982 from two fjords likely to be used for discharge of tailings from the proposed mine and from two control fjords. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, chromium, molybdenum, lead, and zinc were measured in soft tissues of mussels and in kidney, liver, and muscle of birds. The highest mean concentrations of metals found in bird tissues were 55.7 ppm dry weight cadmium in kidneys and 154 ppm dry weight zinc in livers of Barrow's goldeneyes. Concentrations of several metals in blue mussels differed among seasons and locations, but the most significant finding in mussels was a maximum mean cadmium concentration of 9.6 ppm dry weight, a level higher than normally found in undisturbed areas. With the exception of 104 ppm dry weight cadmium in the kidney of one common merganser and 12.7 ppm dry weight lead in the kidney of another, concentrations of other metals in seaduck and mussel tissues were low, consistent with what would be expected for a pre-development environment. Molybdenum was found in low concentrations ( 10 ppm dry weight) in all avian kidney samples and most liver samples, but was not detected in blue mussels.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of mussel adhesive protein repeating peptide segment.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, M P; Wollman, R M; Alderfer, J L

    1997-12-01

    Mussel adhesive protein (MAP) is the adhesive agent used by the common blue sea mussel (Mytilus edulis) to attach the animal to various underwater surfaces. It is generally composed of 75 to 85 repeating decameric units with the reported primary sequence NH2-Ala(1)-Lyst(2)-Pro(3)-Ser(4)-Tyr(5)-Hyp(6)-Hyp(7)-Thr(8)-DOPA( 9)- Lys(10)-COOH. This study examines this peptide's solution-state conformation using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NMR and molecular modeling of the decamer before and after molecular dynamics calculations in water suggests a conformation that retains an overall bent helix.

  13. Substratum type and conspecific density as drivers of mussel patch formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Camilla; Geraldi, Nathan R.; Montgomery, W. I.; O'Connor, Nessa E.

    2017-03-01

    Biogenic reefs are an important component of aquatic ecosystems where they enhance biodiversity. These reefs are often established by dense aggregations of a single taxa and understanding the fundamental principles of biogenic reef formation is needed for their conservation and restoration. We tested whether substratum type and density affected the aggregation behaviour of two important biogenic-reef forming species, the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus (Linnaeus, 1758), and the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis (Linnaeus, 1758). First, we tested for effects of substratum type on mussel movement and aggregation behaviour by manipulating substrata available to mussels in mesocosms (three treatments: no sediment added, sediment added, sediment and shells added). Both mussel species moved less in treatments with sediment and with both sediment and shells present than when no sediment or shells were added and the percentage of these mussels that aggregated (clumps of two or more individuals) was lower when shells were present compared to treatments without shells, however, fewer M. modiolus attached to shells than M. edulis. There was no effect of different substratum type on patch complexity of either mussel species. In addition, motivated by our interest in the restoration of M. modiolus, we also tested experimentally whether the aggregation behaviour of M. modiolus was density-dependent. M. modiolus moved a similar distance in three density treatments (100, 200 and 300 mussels m- 2), however, their aggregation rate appeared to be greater when mussel density was higher, suggesting that the encounter rate of individuals is an important factor for aggregation. M. modiolus also formed aggregations with a higher fractal dimension in the high and medium density treatments compared to lower density, suggesting that at higher density this increased patch complexity could further facilitate increased recruitment with the enhanced habitat available for settlement. These findings add

  14. Spatial organisation and biomass development after relaying of mussel seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelle, Jacob J.; Wijsman, Jeroen W. M.; Schellekens, Tim; van Stralen, Marnix R.; Herman, Peter M. J.; Smaal, Aad C.

    2014-01-01

    It is not known whether and by what factors spatial heterogeneity in mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) affects mussel production in human-created mussel beds. In a field experiment, the same number of mussels was relayed on four different areas within plots of the same size, resulting in four treatments with different mussel densities. Density, individual weight and spatial structure of mussels were followed per treatment. The uniformly placed mussels on different areas redistributed into new patches, but mussels did not spread out over a larger area. Initial mussel density affected redistribution and mussel survival. At high densities mussels redistributed into a uniform matrix or in a few larger patches, that showed larger losses than at low densities, where mussels redistributed into a high number of patches. Growth rate and condition index of the mussels did not differ between treatments and no relation was found between treatment and number of foraging shore crabs, which was the major predator of mussels in this experiment. We hypothesise that the relation between initial mussel density and mussel loss after relaying is associated with redistribution, with less competition for space when mussels are positioned at the edge of a mussel patch. The very high mussel losses that we observed in the experiment within four weeks after relaying were the major factor in biomass development. Mussel bed formation concerns mussel growers and managers involved in natural mussel bed restoration. Initial mussel survival determines the success of these activities. The present study shows the effects of mussel relaying on spatial redistribution for the first time under field conditions, and underlines the importance of edge effects in understanding mussel loss in redistribution. Mussel survival after relaying will be higher when the mussels are distributed homogeneously and in relatively low density.

  15. [Maternity blues].

    PubMed

    Gonidakis, F

    2007-04-01

    Maternity blues is a transient change of mood that occurs mainly between the 1st and 10th day of puerpartum and is characterized by bursts of tears, mild depressive mood, anxiety and liability of mood. The frequency of maternity blues varies in different studies form 4% to 80%. A number of biological and psychosocial parameters have been studied in order to determine their correlation with maternity blues. The most well studied biological parameters are progesterone and cortizol although their relation with maternity blues has not yet been clearly defined. Stress and the emotional state of the woman during pregnancy as well as history of mood disorders or maternity blues in a previous birth are the psychosocial parameters that are more likely to correlate with the occurrence of maternity blues. Most of the authors suggest that information on maternity blues and reassurance of the woman are the best way to deal with maternity blues both on preventive and therapeutical basis.

  16. Pectenotoxin-2 seco acid: a toxin converted from pectenotoxin-2 by the New Zealand Greenshell mussel, Perna canaliculus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Mackenzie, L; Stirling, D; Adamson, J

    2001-04-01

    Comparison of pectenotoxin (PTX) profiles of toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuta, Greenshell mussels (Perna canaliculus) and Blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected from Wedge Point, Queen Charlotte Sound, New Zealand was carried out by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with turbo-ionspray ionization. Although the major PTX homologue in D. acuta was pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2), both Greenshell and Blue mussels contained pectenotoxin-2 seco acid (PTX2SA) as the predominant toxin. More than 90% of PTX2 isolated from D. acuta was rapidly converted to PTX2SA and its epimer 7-epi-pectenotoxin-2 seco acid (7-epi-PTX2SA) in the Greenshell mussel extracts. The conversion from PTX2 to PTX2SA and 7-epi-PTX2SA was not observed in phosphate buffers at various pH ranging from 4.1 to 9.1. These findings indicate that PTX2SA and 7-epi-PTX2SA are not artifact toxins resulting from hydrolysis of PTX2, but arise from the conversion of PTX2 by mussel tissues.

  17. Caged mussels and semipermeable membrane devices as indicators of organic contaminant uptake in Dorchester and Duxbury Bays, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Peven, C.S.; Uhler, A.D.; Querzoli, F.J.

    1996-02-01

    An experiment to measure organic contaminant depuration by the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) was carried out by transplanting mussels in stainless steel cages from a known contaminated site in Dorchester Bay, Massachusetts to a documented clean site in Duxbury Bay, Massachusetts approximately 30 nmi south of the original collection site. A parallel contaminant uptake experiment was performed in which mussels from Duxbury Bay were collected and deployed in similar cages in Dorchester Bay. The bivalves were collected from each transplant site at set intervals over a period of 95 days to monitor the rates and selectivity of depuration and uptake, respectively, of polynuclear atomic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and chlorinated pesticides. In a related study, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD: polyethylene bags) containing the lipid material triolein were deployed in Dorchester Bay and collected at the same frequency as the caged mussels to evaluate their effectiveness as models for estimating bioconcentration of target organic contaminants. At the Duxbury site, results suggest that the caged mussels depurated contaminants within 68 days to levels found in native animals at the site. At the Dorchester site, bivalves concentrated the contaminants to a level similar to the native M. edulis. PCB and DDT uptake rates were found to be similar between caged mussels and SPMDs; PAH uptake by the SPMDs was initially lower than by transplanted bivalves. PCB and PAH assemblages were noticeably different between bivalves and SPMDs deployed at the same site.

  18. Zebra mussels invade Lake Erie muds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkman, Paul Arthur; Haltuch, Melissa A.; Tichich, Emily; Garton, David W.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Gannon, John E.; Mackey, Scudder D.; Fuller, Jonathan A.; Liebenthal, Dale L.

    1998-01-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) originated in western Russia but have now become widespread in Europe and North America. They are widely known for their conspicuous invasion of rocks and other hard substrates in North American and European watersheds. We have found beds of zebra mussels directly colonizing sand and mud sediments each year across hundreds of square kilometres of North America's Lake Erie. This transformation of sedimentary habitats into mussel beds represents an unforeseen change in the invasive capacity of this species.

  19. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  20. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  1. Environmental DNA mapping of Zebra Mussel populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amberg, Jon; Merkes, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has become a popular tool for detecting aquatic invasive species, but advancements have made it possible to potentially answer other questions like reproduction, movement, and abundance of the targeted organism. In this study we developed a Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) eDNA protocol. We then determined if this assay could be used to help determine Zebra Mussel biomass in a lake with a well-established population of Zebra Mussels and a lake with an emerging population of mussels. Our eDNA assay detected DNA of Zebra Mussels but not DNA from more than 20 other species of fish and mussels, many commonly found in Minnesota waters. Our assay did not predict biomass. We did find that DNA from Zebra Mussels accumulated in softer substrates in both lakes, even though the mussels were predominately on the harder substrates. Therefore, we concluded that eDNA may be useful to detect the presence of Zebra Mussels in these lakes but our assay/approach could not predict biomass.

  2. Zebra mussels. The assault continues

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarre, L.

    1993-09-01

    Over the past seven years, zebra mussel infestation has spread relentlessly, fouling up utility cooling intakes and other industrial operations that draw fresh water. The striped invader has flourished in all of the Great Lakes and most of the major river systems east of and including the Mississippi. It has also migrated much deeper into the South than experts anticipated and is making its way westward. Now biologists have turned up a separate, look-alike species they fear may be just as destructive. EPRI is continuing its work to improve control techniques and has published a comprehensive monitoring and control guide that outlines the best practices currently available for dealing with the mussel problem. This article reviews the results of this work.

  3. Zebra mussel adhesion: structure of the byssal adhesive apparatus in the freshwater mussel, Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Farsad, Nikrooz; Sone, Eli D

    2012-03-01

    The freshwater zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) owes a large part of its success as an invasive species to its ability to attach to a wide variety of substrates. As in marine mussels, this attachment is achieved by a proteinaceous byssus, a series of threads joined at a stem that connect the mussel to adhesive plaques secreted onto the substrate. Although the zebra mussel byssus is superficially similar to marine mussels, significant structural and compositional differences suggest that further investigation of the adhesion mechanisms in this freshwater species is warranted. Here we present an ultrastructural examination of the zebra mussel byssus, with emphasis on interfaces that are critical to its adhesive function. By examining the attached plaques, we show that adhesion is mediated by a uniform electron dense layer on the underside of the plaque. This layer is only 10-20 nm thick and makes direct and continuous contact with the substrate. The plaque itself is fibrous, and curiously can exhibit either a dense or porous morphology. In zebra mussels, a graded interface between the animal and the substrate mussels is achieved by interdigitation of uniform threads with the stem, in contrast to marine mussels, where the threads themselves are non-uniform. Our observations of several novel aspects of zebra mussel byssal ultrastructure may have important implications not only for preventing biofouling by the zebra mussel, but for the development of new bioadhesives as well.

  4. Invasive zebra mussels (Driessena polymorpha) and Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) survive gut passage of migratory fish species: implications for dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gatlin, Michael R.; Shoup, Daniel E.; Long, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction and spread of invasive species is of great concern to natural resource managers in the United States. To effectively control the spread of these species, managers must be aware of the multitude of dispersal methods used by the organisms. We investigated the potential for survival through the gut of a migrating fish (blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus) as a dispersal mechanism for two invasive bivalves: zebra mussel (Driessena polymorpha) and Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea). Blue catfish (N = 62) were sampled over several months from Sooner Lake, Oklahoma, transported to a laboratory and held in individual tanks for 48 h. All fecal material was collected and inspected for live mussels. Survival was significantly related to water temperature in the lake at the time of collection, with no mussels surviving above 21.1 C°, whereas 12 % of zebra mussels (N = 939) and 39 % of Asian clams (N = 408) consumed in cooler water survived gut passage. This research demonstrates the potential for blue catfish to serve as a dispersal vector for invasive bivalves at low water temperatures.

  5. Dynamics of mussel plaque detachment.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Kenneth W; Zacchia, Nicholas A; Waite, J Herbert; Valentine, Megan T

    2015-09-14

    Mussels are well known for their ability to generate and maintain strong, long-lasting adhesive bonds under hostile conditions. Many prior studies attribute their adhesive strength to the strong chemical interactions between the holdfast and substrate. While chemical interactions are certainly important, adhesive performance is also determined by contact geometry, and understanding the coupling between chemical interactions and the plaque shape and mechanical properties is essential in deploying bioinspired strategies when engineering improved adhesives. To investigate how the shape and mechanical properties of the mussel's plaque contribute to its adhesive performance, we use a custom built load frame capable of fully characterizing the dynamics of the detachment. With this, we can pull on samples along any orientation, while at the same time measuring the resulting force and imaging the bulk deformations of the plaque as well as the holdfast-substrate interface where debonding occurs. We find that the force-induced yielding of the mussel plaque improves the bond strength by two orders of magnitude and that the holdfast shape improves bond strength by an additional order of magnitude as compared to other simple geometries. These results demonstrate that optimizing the contact geometry can play as important a role on adhesive performance as optimizing the chemical interactions as observed in other organisms and model systems.

  6. Use of mussel casts from archaeological sites as paleoecological indicators: An example from CA-MRN-254, Marin County, Alta California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGann, Mary; Starratt, Scott W.; Powell, Charles L.; Bieling, David G

    2016-01-01

    Archaeological investigations at prehistoric site CA-MRN-254 at the Dominican University of California in Marin County, California, revealed evidence of Native American occupation spanning the past 1,800 years. A dominant source of food for the inhabitants in the San Francisco Bay area was the intertidal, quiet-water dwelling blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus), although rare occurrences of the open coast-dwelling California mussel (Mytilus californianus) suggest that this species was also utilized sporadically. On rare occasions, cultural horizons at this site contain abundant sediment-filled casts of the smaller mussel Modiolus sp. These casts were formed soon after death when the shells filled with sediment and were roasted along with living bivalve shellfish for consumption. Thin sections of these mussel casts display sedimentological and microbiological constituents that shed light on the paleoenvironmental conditions when they were alive. Fine-grained sediment and pelletal muds comprising these casts suggest that the mussels were collected in a low energy, inner bay environment. The rare presence of the diatoms Triceratium dubium and Thalassionema nitzschioides indicate more normal marine (35 psu) and possibly warmer conditions than presently exist in San Francisco Bay. Radiocarbon dating of charcoal associated with the mussel casts containing these diatoms correlates with a 600-year period of warming from ca. A.D. 700–1300, known as the Medieval Climatic Anomaly. Results of this mussel cast study demonstrate that they have great potential for providing paleoenvironmental information at this and other archaeological sites.

  7. Changing perspectives on pearly mussels, North America's most imperiled animals

    Treesearch

    David L. Strayer; John A. Downing; Wendell R. Haag; Timothy L. King; James B. Layzer; Teresa J. Newton; S. Jerrine Nichols

    2004-01-01

    Pearly mussels (Unionacea) are widespread, abundant, and important in freshwater ecosystems around the world. Catastrophic declines in pearly mussel populations in North America and other parts of the world have led to a flurry of research on mussel biology, ecology, and conservation. Recent research on mussel feeding, life history, spatial...

  8. Research continues on zebra mussel control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Researchers are working on many fronts to learn methods for controlling and combatting zebra mussels, a species of mussel that can attach to the inside of water intakes at hydroelectric and thermal power plants, and can reduce or block water flow. Biologists at the University of Toledo in Ohio report that compounds from the African soapberry plant called lemmatoxins are lethal to zebra mussels. In laboratory tests, researchers have determined 1 to 2 milligrams of purified lemmatoxins per liter will kill the mussels. In field tests, biologist Harold Lee flushed water through a mussel-infested pipe. He found that the berry extract killed mussels in four to eight hours, making continuous treatment of water intake pipes unnecessary, according to a report in New Scientists. The University of Toledo participated in another project, funded by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation. That project team included the cities of Toledo and Cleveland, Ohio, Finkbeiner, Pettis Strout, Ltd. consulting engineers, and researchers from Ohio's Case Western Reserve University. The team identified a chemical oxidant, sodium hypochlorite, as a cost-effective agent for controlling zebra mussels at water treatment plant intakes. Toledo has used the sodium hypochlorite and reports the chemical has cleared colonies of zebra mussels that had attached to the intake of its water treatment plant.

  9. New Concerns Emerge as Zebra Mussel Spreads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Martha L., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Reports on the Zebra Mussel invasion of North American inland waterways. Discusses United States Army Corps of Engineers operations that may facilitate or be affected by the spread of Zebra Mussels, the threat to native clams, chemical and mechanical control methods, natural solutions, and ongoing research. (MCO)

  10. New Concerns Emerge as Zebra Mussel Spreads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Martha L., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Reports on the Zebra Mussel invasion of North American inland waterways. Discusses United States Army Corps of Engineers operations that may facilitate or be affected by the spread of Zebra Mussels, the threat to native clams, chemical and mechanical control methods, natural solutions, and ongoing research. (MCO)

  11. Bioaccumulation and detoxication of nodularin in tissues of flounder (Platichthys flesus), mussels (Mytilus edulis, Dreissena polymorpha), and clams (Macoma balthica) from the northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Sipiä, V O; Kankaanpää, H T; Pflugmacher, S; Flinkman, J; Furey, A; James, K J

    2002-10-01

    Cyanobacterial hepatotoxin accumulation in mussels (Mytilus edulis, Dreissena polymorpha), clam (Macoma balthica), and flounder (Platichthys flesus) tissues was measured. Flounder were caught with gillnets from the western Gulf of Finland on 21 August 1999, 25 July 2000, and 25 August 2000. Blue mussels were collected from: (1) a steel cage at a depth of 3 m on 20 August 1999, (2) an enclosure at depths of 3-5 m, and (3) an artificial reef (wreck at 25-30 m) in the western Gulf of Finland between June and September 2000. Furthermore, blue mussels were collected from two sites between August and October 2000: south of the town of Hanko at depths of 5 and 20 m in the western Gulf of Finland and south of the city of Helsinki at a depth of 7 m in the central Gulf of Finland. M. balthica and D. polymorpha were collected at a depth of 12 m from Russian waters in the eastern Gulf of Finland on 1-4 August 2000. The samples were analyzed for the cyanobacterial hepatotoxins nodularin (NODLN) and microcystins (MCs) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). ELISA indicated a time-dependent accumulation of hepatotoxins in flounder liver up to 400 +/- 10 (SD) microg/kg on 25 August 2000. No hepatotoxins were detected in flounder muscle samples. In blue mussels, collected from an enclosure 3-5 m deep in the western Gulf of Finland on 23 August 2000, ELISA indicated cyanobacterial hepatotoxins up to 1490 +/- 60 microg/kg dry wt. Blue mussels collected from the other sites contained less cyanobacterial hepatotoxins (40-130 microg/kg dry wt). Clams and mussels from Russian waters contained cyanobacterial hepatotoxin at about 100-130 microg/kg dry wt. Total hepatotoxin levels in mussels from enclosures decreased from August to September, indicating at least partial detoxication/depuration of the toxins. LC-MS verified the presence of

  12. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices and caged mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in relation to water column phase distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Axelman, J.; Naes, K.; Naef, C.; Broman, D.

    1999-11-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) were deployed at a site contaminated by discharges of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an aluminium reduction plant, and at a reference site. The accumulation of PAHs in SPMDs versus mussels, along with the ability of the two matrices to predict contaminant concentrations in the ambient environment, were evaluated through concurrent measurements of particulate, dissolved, and colloidal PAHs in the water column. Analysis of the results showed that blue mussels were more efficient at sequestering PAHs than were SPMDs. The PAH profile (i.e,, the relative abundance of individual PAHs) in the two matrices were similar, but differed significantly from the profile in the dissolved phase. Further, back-calculation of the ambient dissolved concentrations from SPMDs indicated systematic overtrapping with increasing hydrophobicity. Calculation of in situ bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for the blue mussels at the smelter site indicated that uptake via particles or from colloids dominated over direct uptake from the dissolved phase, as opposed to the reference site. The in situ BCFs differed markedly from literature values, which implies that the use of mussels to predict ambient concentrations would require that site-specific BCFs be applied.

  13. Simulated mussel mortality thresholds as a function of mussel biomass and nutrient loading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bril, Jeremy S.; Langenfeld, Kathryn; Just, Craig L.; Spak, Scott N.; Newton, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    A freshwater “mussel mortality threshold” was explored as a function of porewater ammonium (NH4+) concentration, mussel biomass, and total nitrogen (N) utilizing a numerical model calibrated with data from mesocosms with and without mussels. A mortality threshold of 2 mg-N L−1 porewater NH4+ was selected based on a study that estimated 100% mortality of juvenile Lampsilis mussels exposed to 1.9 mg-N L−1NH4+ in equilibrium with 0.18 mg-N L−1 NH3. At the highest simulated mussel biomass (560 g m−2) and the lowest simulated influent water “food” concentration (0.1 mg-N L−1), the porewater NH4+ concentration after a 2,160 h timespan without mussels was 0.5 mg-N L−1 compared to 2.25 mg-N L−1 with mussels. Continuing these simulations while varying mussel biomass and N content yielded a mortality threshold contour that was essentially linear which contradicted the non-linear and non-monotonic relationship suggested by Strayer (2014). Our model suggests that mussels spatially focus nutrients from the overlying water to the sediments as evidenced by elevated porewater NH4+ in mesocosms with mussels. However, our previous work and the model utilized here show elevated concentrations of nitrite and nitrate in overlying waters as an indirect consequence of mussel activity. Even when the simulated overlying water food availability was quite low, the mortality threshold was reached at a mussel biomass of about 480 g m−2. At a food concentration of 10 mg-N L−1, the mortality threshold was reached at a biomass of about 250 g m−2. Our model suggests the mortality threshold for juvenile Lampsilis species could be exceeded at low mussel biomass if exposed for even a short time to the highly elevated total N loadings endemic to the agricultural Midwest.

  14. Simulated mussel mortality thresholds as a function of mussel biomass and nutrient loading

    PubMed Central

    Bril, Jeremy S.; Langenfeld, Kathryn; Spak, Scott N.; Newton, Teresa J.

    2017-01-01

    A freshwater “mussel mortality threshold” was explored as a function of porewater ammonium (NH4+) concentration, mussel biomass, and total nitrogen (N) utilizing a numerical model calibrated with data from mesocosms with and without mussels. A mortality threshold of 2 mg-N L−1 porewater NH4+ was selected based on a study that estimated 100% mortality of juvenile Lampsilis mussels exposed to 1.9 mg-N L−1 NH4+ in equilibrium with 0.18 mg-N L−1 NH3. At the highest simulated mussel biomass (560 g m−2) and the lowest simulated influent water “food” concentration (0.1 mg-N L−1), the porewater NH4+ concentration after a 2,160 h timespan without mussels was 0.5 mg-N L−1 compared to 2.25 mg-N L−1 with mussels. Continuing these simulations while varying mussel biomass and N content yielded a mortality threshold contour that was essentially linear which contradicted the non-linear and non-monotonic relationship suggested by Strayer (2014). Our model suggests that mussels spatially focus nutrients from the overlying water to the sediments as evidenced by elevated porewater NH4+ in mesocosms with mussels. However, our previous work and the model utilized here show elevated concentrations of nitrite and nitrate in overlying waters as an indirect consequence of mussel activity. Even when the simulated overlying water food availability was quite low, the mortality threshold was reached at a mussel biomass of about 480 g m−2. At a food concentration of 10 mg-N L−1, the mortality threshold was reached at a biomass of about 250 g m−2. Our model suggests the mortality threshold for juvenile Lampsilis species could be exceeded at low mussel biomass if exposed for even a short time to the highly elevated total N loadings endemic to the agricultural Midwest. PMID:28070462

  15. Zebra mussels anchor byssal threads faster and tighter than quagga mussels in flow.

    PubMed

    Peyer, Suzanne M; McCarthy, Alice J; Lee, Carol Eunmi

    2009-07-01

    While the invasive zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha has rapidly spread throughout the Great Lakes and inland waterways, it is being displaced by the quagga mussel Dreissena bugensis in shallow water habitats. However, zebra mussels remain dominant in areas with higher water velocity. We hypothesized that the persistence of zebra over quagga mussels in habitats with higher water velocity might result from greater rate and strength of byssal thread attachment. We examined whether zebra mussels relative to quagga mussels have: (1) higher byssal thread synthesis rate, (2) lower dislodgment in flow and (3) greater mechanical force required for detachment from substrate. Specifically, we examined byssal thread synthesis rate and dislodgment of both species in response to water velocities of 0, 50, 100 and 180 cm s(-1). Byssal thread synthesis rate was significantly higher for zebra than for quagga mussels at all velocities. Dislodgment from the substrate increased for both species with increasing velocity but was significantly lower for zebra than for quagga mussels. We also tested the mechanical force to detach mussels after short (32 h) and long (two and three months) periods of attachment on hard substrate. Detachment force was significantly higher for zebra than for quagga mussels only after short-term attachment. Higher byssal thread synthesis rate in zebra mussels was a likely factor that minimized their dislodgment in flow and increased short-term attachment strength. Differences in byssal thread synthesis rate between the two species might partly account for the ability of zebra mussels to maintain dominance over quagga mussels in habitats with high velocities.

  16. Blue Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  17. Consequences of acclimation on the resistance to acute thermal stress: Proteomic focus on mussels from pristine site.

    PubMed

    Péden, Romain; Rocher, Béatrice; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; Poret, Agnès; Olivier, Stéphanie; Le Foll, Frank; Bultelle, Florence

    2016-10-01

    Climate change constitutes an additional threat for intertidal species that already have to cope with a challenging environment. The present study focuses on the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and aims at investigating the importance of thermal acclimation in heat stress response. Microcosm exposures were performed with mussels submitted to an identical acute thermal stress following two thermal summer acclimations standing for present or future temperature conditions. Gill proteomes were analyzed by 2DE and 96 differentially expressed proteoforms were identified. Our results show that cell integrity appears to be maintained by the rise in molecular protective systems (i.e. Heat Shock Proteins), and by the reallocation of energy production via a switch to anaerobic metabolism and the setting up of alternative energy pathways. Finally, our results indicate that the response of mussels to acute thermal stress is conditioned by the acclimation temperature with an improved response in organisms acclimated to higher temperatures.

  18. Danish Gynecological Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Sarah Mejer; Bjørn, Signe Frahm; Jochumsen, Kirsten Marie; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Thranov, Ingrid Regitze; Hare-Bruun, Helle; Seibæk, Lene; Høgdall, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD) is a nationwide clinical cancer database and its aim is to monitor the treatment quality of Danish gynecological cancer patients, and to generate data for scientific purposes. DGCD also records detailed data on the diagnostic measures for gynecological cancer. Study population DGCD was initiated January 1, 2005, and includes all patients treated at Danish hospitals for cancer of the ovaries, peritoneum, fallopian tubes, cervix, vulva, vagina, and uterus, including rare histological types. Main variables DGCD data are organized within separate data forms as follows: clinical data, surgery, pathology, pre- and postoperative care, complications, follow-up visits, and final quality check. DGCD is linked with additional data from the Danish “Pathology Registry”, the “National Patient Registry”, and the “Cause of Death Registry” using the unique Danish personal identification number (CPR number). Descriptive data Data from DGCD and registers are available online in the Statistical Analysis Software portal. The DGCD forms cover almost all possible clinical variables used to describe gynecological cancer courses. The only limitation is the registration of oncological treatment data, which is incomplete for a large number of patients. Conclusion The very complete collection of available data from more registries form one of the unique strengths of DGCD compared to many other clinical databases, and provides unique possibilities for validation and completeness of data. The success of the DGCD is illustrated through annual reports, high coverage, and several peer-reviewed DGCD-based publications. PMID:27822089

  19. Environmentally Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Molloy

    2008-02-29

    The two primary objectives of this USDOE-NETL contract were successfully achieved during the project: (1) to accelerate research on the development of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A) as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis)--two invasive freshwater bivalve species that are infesting water pipes in power plants; and (2) to identify a private-sector company that would move forward to commercialize Pf-CL145A as a substitute for the current polluting use of biocide chemicals for control of these dreissenid mussels in power plant pipes.

  20. The Danish Melanoma Database

    PubMed Central

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Klausen, Siri; Spaun, Eva; Schmidt, Grethe; Gad, Dorte; Svane, Inge Marie; Schmidt, Henrik; Lorentzen, Henrik Frank; Ibfelt, Else Helene

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the database is to monitor and improve the treatment and survival of melanoma patients. Study population All Danish patients with cutaneous melanoma and in situ melanomas must be registered in the Danish Melanoma Database (DMD). In 2014, 2,525 patients with invasive melanoma and 780 with in situ tumors were registered. The coverage is currently 93% compared with the Danish Pathology Register. Main variables The main variables include demographic, clinical, and pathological characteristics, including Breslow’s tumor thickness, ± ulceration, mitoses, and tumor–node–metastasis stage. Information about the date of diagnosis, treatment, type of surgery, including safety margins, results of lymphoscintigraphy in patients for whom this was indicated (tumors > T1a), results of sentinel node biopsy, pathological evaluation hereof, and follow-up information, including recurrence, nature, and treatment hereof is registered. In case of death, the cause and date are included. Currently, all data are entered manually; however, data catchment from the existing registries is planned to be included shortly. Descriptive data The DMD is an old research database, but new as a clinical quality register. The coverage is high, and the performance in the five Danish regions is quite similar due to strong adherence to guidelines provided by the Danish Melanoma Group. The list of monitored indicators is constantly expanding, and annual quality reports are issued. Several important scientific studies are based on DMD data. Conclusion DMD holds unique detailed information about tumor characteristics, the surgical treatment, and follow-up of Danish melanoma patients. Registration and monitoring is currently expanding to encompass even more clinical parameters to benefit both patient treatment and research. PMID:27822097

  1. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today.

  2. Absence of histophatological response to cadmium in gill and digestive diverticula of the mussel, Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Giraud, A.S.; Webster, L.K.; Fabris, J.G.; Collett, L.C.; Yeomans, N.D.

    1986-01-01

    The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) has been proposed for use as a sentinel organism to monitor the effects of marine pollution (Goldberg et al., 1978). Recently, there has been interest in quantifying histopathological changes in mussel tissues, as one indicator of pollution-induced stress. Cadmium is a common and toxic aquatic pollutant. Gill and digestive diverticula have been shown to be major sites of cadmium detoxification. In these same tissues, histopathological changes have been demonstrated after exposure to crude oil and to an oil dispersant. However, whether similar morphological changes are induced by heavy metals, such as cadmium, is not known. In this study, the authors have assessed the cellular effects of sublethal concentrations of cadmium on the gill and digestive diverticula of Mytilus.

  3. Antifouling bastadin congeners target mussel phenoloxidase and complex copper(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Mirko; Hellio, Claire; Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Frank, Walter; Lin, Wenhan; Weber, Horst; Proksch, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Synthetically prepared congeners of sponge-derived bastadin derivatives such as 5,5'-dibromohemibastadin-1 (DBHB) that suppress the settling of barnacle larvae were identified in this study as strong inhibitors of blue mussel phenoloxidase that is involved in the firm attachment of mussels to a given substrate. The IC₅₀ value of DBHB as the most active enzyme inhibitor encountered in this study amounts to 0.84 μM. Inhibition of phenoloxidase by DBHB is likely due to complexation of copper(II) ions from the catalytic centre of the enzyme by the α-oxo-oxime moiety of the compound as shown here for the first time by structure activity studies and by X-ray structure determination of a copper(II) complex of DBHB.

  4. Bioaccumulation of trace metals in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from Mali Ston Bay during DSP toxicity episodes.

    PubMed

    Ujević, Ivana; Vuletić, Nenad; Lušić, Jelena; Nazlić, Nikša; Kušpilić, Grozdan

    2015-07-17

    The Croatian National Monitoring Program revealed the presence of Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxicity in Mediterranean blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from breeding farms in southern Adriatic Sea through January to June 2011. The mouse bioassay tests (MBA; at the time the official method for DSP toxins) were accompanied by atypical symptomatology in the animals and this caused doubts about the assay results. Consequently, in parallel studies reported here, the concentration of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in soft tissue of DSP positive and negative mussels samples was determined. Cd, Cr, Zn and Ni show higher values in approximately 75% of the DSP positive samples, whereas for Pb and Cr the values were 26% and 34%, respectively. This trend was unchanged during the whole observation period.

  5. Transcriptomic responses to heat stress and nickel in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Banni; Hajer, Attig; Susanna, Sforzini; Caterina, Oliveri; Flavio, Mignone; Hamadi, Boussetta; Aldo, Viarengo

    2014-03-01

    The exposure of marine organisms to stressing agents may affect the level and pattern of gene expression. Although many studies have examined the ecological effects of heat stress on mussels, little is known about the physiological mechanisms that maybe affected by co-exposure to heat stress and environmental contaminants such as nickel (Ni). In the present work, we investigated the effects of simultaneous changes in temperature and Ni supply on lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) and malondialdehyde accumulation (MDA) in the digestive gland (DG) of the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lam.). To elucidate how the molecular response to environmental stressors is modulated, we employed a cDNA microarray with 1673 sequences to measure relative transcript abundances in the DG of mussels exposed to Ni along with a temperature increase. A two-way ANOVA revealed that temperature and Ni rendered additive effects on LMS and MDA accumulation, increasing the toxic effects of metal cations. Ni loads in the DG were also affected by co-exposure to 26°C. In animals exposed only to heat stress, functional genomics analysis of the microarray data (171 differentially expressed genes (DEGs)) highlighted seven biological processes, largely dominated by the up-regulation of folding protein-related genes and the down-regulation of genes involved in cell migration and cellular component assembly. Exposure to Ni at 18°C and 26°C yielded 188 and 262 DEGs, respectively, exhibiting distinct patterns in terms of biological processes. In particular, the response of mussels exposed to Ni at 26°C was characterized by the up-regulation of proteolysis, ribosome biogenesis, response to unfolded proteins, and catabolic-related genes, as well as the down-regulation of genes encoding cellular metabolic processes. Our data provide new insights into the transcriptomic response in mussels experiencing temperature increases and Ni exposure; these data should be carefully considered in view of the

  6. Geographical distribution of non-PBDE-brominated flame retardants in mussels from Asian coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei P; Ramu, Karri; Sudaryanto, Agus; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-09-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) used as alternatives for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are also persistent in the environment as PBDEs. Limited information on these non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is available; in particular, there are only few publications on environmental pollution by these contaminants in the coastal waters of Asia. In this regard, we investigated the contamination status of HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE in the coastal waters of Asia using mussels as a bioindicator. Concentrations of HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE were determined in green (Perna viridis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) collected from the coastal areas in Cambodia, China (mainland), SAR China (Hong Kong), India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam on 2003-2008. BTBPE and DBDPE were analyzed using GC-MS, whereas HBCDs were determined by LC-MS/MS. HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE were found in mussels at levels ranging from <0.01 to 1,400, <0.1 to 13, and <0.3 to 22 ng/g lipid wt, respectively. Among the three HBCD diastereoisomers, α-HBCD was the dominant isomer followed by γ- and β-HBCDs. Concentrations of HBCDs and DBDPE in mussels from Japan and Korea were higher compared to those from the other Asian countries, indicating extensive usage of these non-PBDE BFRs in Japan and Korea. Higher levels of HBCDs and DBDPE than PBDEs were detected in some mussel samples from Japan. The results suggest that environmental pollution by non-PBDE BFRs, especially HBCDs in Japan, is ubiquitous. This study provides baseline information on the contamination status of these non-PBDE BFRs in the coastal waters of Asia.

  7. Temporal consistency of spatial pattern in growth of the mussel, Mytilus edulis: Implications for predictive modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Per; Lindegarth, Susanne; Lindegarth, Mats

    2013-10-01

    Human pressures on coastal seas are increasing and methods for sustainable management, including spatial planning and mitigative actions, are therefore needed. In coastal areas worldwide, the development of mussel farming as an economically and ecologically sustainable industry requires geographic information on the growth and potential production capacity. In practice this means that coherent maps of temporally stable spatial patterns of growth need to be available in the planning process and that maps need to be based on mechanistic or empirical models. Therefore, as a first step towards development of models of growth, we assessed empirically the fundamental requirement that there are temporally consistent spatial patterns of growth in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Using a pilot study we designed and dimensioned a transplant experiment, where the spatial consistency in the growth of mussels was evaluated at two resolutions. We found strong temporal and scale-dependent spatial variability in growth but patterns suggested that spatial patterns were uncoupled between growth of shell and that of soft tissue. Spatial patterns of shell growth were complex and largely inconsistent among years. Importantly, however, the growth of soft tissue was qualitatively consistent among years at the scale of km. The results suggest that processes affecting the whole coastal area cause substantial differences in growth of soft tissue among years but that factors varying at the scale of km create strong and persistent spatial patterns of growth, with a potential doubling of productivity by identifying the most suitable locations. We conclude that the observed spatial consistency provides a basis for further development of predictive modelling and mapping of soft tissue growth in these coastal areas. Potential causes of observed patterns, consequences for mussel-farming as a tool for mitigating eutrophication, aspects of precision of modelling and sampling of mussel growth as well

  8. Controlling zebra mussel infestations at hydroelectric plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sblendorio, R.P.; Malinchock, J.C. ); Claudi, R. )

    1991-07-01

    U.S. and Canadian utilities in the great lakes area have adopted techniques to temporarily prevent infestation of the zebra mussel in their hydro facilities, but are still looking for more permanent solutions.

  9. Cation-π Interactions: Mimicking mussel mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkedal, Henrik

    2017-05-01

    Gluing materials together underwater is a mighty challenge faced -- and overcome -- by mussels. It requires good adhesion and cohesion. Molecular-level mechanical measurements have now shown that cation-π interactions provide surprisingly strong cohesive abilities.

  10. The Blue Öresund Bridge of Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellström, Åsa; Palmgren, Michael

    2017-04-01

    sustainable way, cook the catch of fish and algae and then the students together eating the food. Students will also examine how blue biomass from the sea (mussels and algae) can be used to produce biogas fuel for the city buses. In parallel with the curriculum, the project also has elements of language development, both in Swedish and Danish. Together we also work for The Sound to become a biosphere area within the UNESCO's Man and the Biosphere Programme and with the support of the new marine science center, which will open later this fall, we build greater knowledge and skills of citizens around the Sound. BÖBK is build on the Öresund region's thoughts of becoming a metropolitan region in the future. Keywords: biodiversity, ecosystem services. education, involvement, sustainable future, youth, citizenship, collaboration, language development, ocean literacy, outdoor learning/education, place based learning, challenge based learning.

  11. Stravation tolerance of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, R.; McMahon, R.F.

    1995-06-01

    Samples of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha (n=30), were held without food at 5{degrees}, 15{degrees}, or 25{degrees}C and examined daily for mortality. Further samples of 210 mussels at each test temperature were periodically subsampled (n=10) throughout the starvation period. Tissues and shells of sampled specimens were dried to a constant weight. Zebra mussels held at 25{degrees}C experienced 100% mortality after 166 days of starvation while mussels at 15{degrees}C experienced 100% mortality after 545 days. A mortality of 60% was recorded in mussels after 524 days at 5{degrees}C. Dry shell weight (DSW) of starving zebra mussels at 25{degrees}C remained constant; at 15{degrees}C, DSW increased, likely due to deposition of new shell without increase in length. At 5{degrees}C DSW decreased possibly due to the high solubility of shell calcium carbonate at this low temperature. Dry tissue weight (DTW) decreased linearly during starvation at all test temperatures with the rate of DTW loss increasing at higher holding temperatures. Estimated percent tissue biomass reductions in a 20 mm long starved individual were 73.8% after 132 days at 25{degrees}C, 68.9% after 545 days at 15{degrees}C and 61.6% after 516 days at 5{degrees}C. When DTW loss rates were converted to O{sub 2} consumption rates (O{sub 2}), the O{sub 2} of a 20 mm long mussel was estimated to be 22.2% of prestarvation O{sub 2} at 25{degrees}C, 11.0% at 15{degrees}C and 10.2% at 5{degrees}C. Major reduction in metabolic demand in starving zebra mussels at low temperatures allows overwintering without appreciable loss of organic energy stores.

  12. Radium-226 accumulation in Florida freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, M.; Smoak, J.M.; Leeper, D.A.; Streubert, M.; Baker, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Selected lakes in Hillsborough County, Florida have been hydrologically augmented with groundwater to offset stage declines caused by excessive pumping of the Floridan Aquifer. Augmentation water can be relatively rich in 226Ra (>5 decays per minute [dpm] L-1). We measured 226Ra activities in shells and soft tissues of adult bivalve molluscs (Elliptio cf. buckleyi) from groundwater-augmented and nonaugmented lakes to assess bioaccumulation of 226Ra by mussels. Mussels from augmented lakes displayed higher 226Ra in both shells and tissues than did mussels from nonaugmented lakes. Within a sample, 226Ra activity in Elliptio tissues was higher than the value measured in shells. Highest activities were found in a composite mussel sample (n = 6) from an augmented lake; soft tissue activity was 619 ?? 33 dpm g-1 dry weight and shell activity was 147 ?? 7 dpm g-1 g dry weight. Large mussels displayed greater activities in soft tissues and shells than did small mussels. We transplanted animals from a nonaugmented lake into a groundwater-augmented water body. 226Ra activity in dry tissue rose from 32 ?? 1 to 196 ?? 2 dpm g-1 within 2 months. When 226Ra-rich mussels (232 ?? 2 dpm g-1) from the augmented lake were transferred to the nonaugmented lake, they showed no significant 226Ra loss over the 69-d experiment. Large Elliptio mussels concentrated 226Ra in their soft tissues to levels about 1,000 to 25,000 times concentrations in lake water. Pumping of groundwater in Florida for residential, agricultural, and industrial use contributes dissolved 226Ra to some surface water bodies, where it can be bioaccumulated by bivalve molluscs. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  13. The Danish Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager; Schaarup, Susanne Zielke; Gyllenborg, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. Study population All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. Main variables The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients with acute stroke and TIA. Patient outcomes are currently monitored using 30-day mortality, unplanned readmission, and for patients receiving revascularization therapy, also functional level at 3 months poststroke. Descriptive data Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors with potential prognostic impact are registered. Conclusion The Danish Stroke Registry is a well-established clinical registry which plays a key role for monitoring and improving stroke and TIA care in Denmark. In addition, the registry is increasingly used for research. PMID:27843349

  14. Spoken Danish. Book Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearden, Jeannette; Stig-Nielsen, Karin

    This is one of a series of self-teaching textbooks initially prepared for the Armed Forces and now offered to the public. The text is designed to be used with a native speaker of Danish or with the accompanying recordings. The textbook is divided into three major sections, each consisting of five learning units and one unit for review. Each unit…

  15. The Danish System Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, John S.

    The paper is a supplement to an earlier paper in the same series which reviews Danish higher education until 1977. Expansion in higher education in the last 20 years, approaching the scale of mass higher education, culminated in a crisis in 1977. At that time, a trend toward self-government and participatory governing boards was seen as the end of…

  16. Thiaminase activity in native freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Sweet, Stephanie; Galbraith, Heather S.; Honeyfield, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in the Great Lakes has been attributed to elevated levels of thiaminase I enzyme activity in invasive prey species; however, few studies have investigated thiaminase activity in native prey species. Some of the highest levels of thiaminase activity have been measured in invasive dreissenid mussels with little understanding of background levels contributed by native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae). In this study, thiaminase activity was measured in two freshwater mussel species, Elliptio complanata and Strophitus undulatus, from the Delaware and Susquehanna River drainage basins located in north eastern United States. Thiaminase activity was also measured in gravid and non-gravid S. undulatus. Average thiaminase activity differed significantly between species (7.2 and 42.4 μmol/g/min, for E. complanata and S. undulatus respectively) with no differences observed between drainage basins. Gravid S. undulatus had significantly lower thiaminase activity (28.0 μmol/g/min) than non-gravid mussels (42.4 μmol/g/min). Our results suggest that a suite of factors may regulate thiaminase activity in freshwater mussels and that native freshwater mussel thiaminase activity is within the range observed for invasive dreissenids. These results add to our understanding of the complexities in identifying the ecological conditions that set the stage for thiamine deficiency.

  17. Steam treatment of zebra mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.; Rybarik, D.L.; Thiel, J.

    1995-06-01

    Steam injection into intake bays is a nonchemical method to control zebra mussels. This technique was demonstrated at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s J.P. Madgett Station located in Alma, Wisconsin. The project was funded by the EPRI Zebra Mussel Consortium which includes: Dairyland Power Cooperative, Central Illinois Public Service, Duke Power, Illinois Power Company, PSI Energy, Public Service Electric & Gas, and Tennessee Valley Authority. This technique can be used by other power plants with a similar problem. A contract between Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation (Stone & Webster) was initiated in August 1994. The steam treatments were performed at the J.P. Madgett intake in Alma, Wisconsin, on September 14 and 18, 1994. The J.P. Madgett Station has two water intake bays with storage capacities of approximately 295,000 and 265,000 gallons, respectively. Each intake can be isolated, permitting either full or reduced generation depending on river temperature conditions. In addition to the intake bays, the outside fire protection loop and hydrants were also treated with the hot water from one of the bays. This paper presents the process design, piping and steam educator configurations, portable industrial boiler sizing and description, and the thermocouples to monitor the water temperature in the intake bay. The biological mortality and control test protocol and treatment results are also presented. Treatment effectiveness was 100%; however, equipment installation and operation was more problematic than anticipated. A generic computer program is developed and verified using thermal data from the test. The PC program will allow other utilities to size the boiler and estimate the heat losses from an intake bay. The treatment also provided valuable information that simplifies future applications and provides for more realistic design and installation schedules and costs.

  18. Is the body condition of the invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) enhanced through attachment to native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia, Unionidae)?

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Francesca; Sousa, Ronaldo; Aldridge, David C

    2016-05-15

    The invasion of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, into Western Europe and North America has driven widespread ecological change. Attachment of zebra mussels to the shell of native unionoid mussels has resulted in reductions in unionoid abundance and, in extreme cases, their localised extirpations. While the impacts of zebra mussels on infested unionoids are well documented, the possible benefits of the association to the zebra mussel have been little considered. We collected zebra mussels attached to unionoids and to inanimate structures. Zebra mussels attached to unionoids had significantly larger shells, higher standardized body mass and glycogen content than those attached to inanimate substrates, suggesting that D. polymorpha benefits from settling upon unionoids. The body condition of individual zebra mussels was negatively correlated with the number of zebra mussels attached to the unionoid, indicating intraspecific competition. Therefore, zebra mussels seem positively affected through attachment to unionoid mussels, but that these benefits decrease at higher densities of fouling. This association may offer advantages to the spread of zebra mussels within unionoid-rich systems, especially at sites with soft substrates and at the early stages of the invasion process where intraspecific competition is likely to be lower and benefits to the zebra mussels are higher. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Does differential particulate food supply explain the presence of mussels in Wellington Harbour (New Zealand) and their absence on neighbouring Cook Strait shores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helson, Jeremy G.; Pledger, Shirley; Gardner, Jonathan P. A.

    2007-03-01

    Rocky intertidal reef communities in Wellington Harbour, New Zealand, are dominated by mussels (the ribbed mussel Aulacomya maoriana, the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, and the greenshell mussel Perna canaliculus). Only a few kilometres away, outside the Harbour on exposed Cook Strait shores, these mussels are absent. We tested the hypothesis of bottom-up food limitation as the explanation for this distributional difference. The water column at three Harbour sites and five Cook Strait coastal sites was sampled over an 18-month period for temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, total particulate matter (TPM), particulate organic matter (POM), percent organic matter (PCOM), chlorophyll a (Chl a), particle counts (number of particles mL -1 in the range 2.5-63 μm), percent carbon, percent nitrogen, and C:N ratio. Mean values of PCOM and Chl a were significantly higher ( p < 0.05) in the Harbour than in Cook Strait. On two separate occasions mussels were transferred from Wellington Harbour to the Island Bay Marine Laboratory (IBML on Cook Strait) and sampled at regular intervals to permit the determination of body condition index (CI) and mortality rate to measure their response to the coastal seston regime. On both occasions monthly CI values of all three species held at IBML decreased significantly when compared with monthly CI values of mussels collected from Harbour sites. Mortality rates at IBML exhibited consistent taxon-specific responses ( P. canaliculus > M. galloprovincialis > A. maoriana). We interpret these field-based and laboratory-based findings as providing support for the hypothesis that multi-species mussel distributions and hence intertidal community structure at Cook Strait sites are regulated at least in part by particulate food supply.

  20. Quagga and zebra mussels: biology, impacts, and control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nalepa, Thomas F.; Schloesser, Don W.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Schloesser, Don W.

    2013-01-01

    Quagga and Zebra Mussels: Biology, Impacts, and Control, Second Edition provides a broad view of the zebra/quagga mussel issue, offering a historic perspective and up-to-date information on mussel research. Comprising 48 chapters, this second edition includes reviews of mussel morphology, physiology, and behavior. It details mussel distribution and spread in Europe and across North America, and examines policy and regulatory responses, management strategies, and mitigation efforts. In addition, this book provides extensive coverage of the impact of invasive mussel species on freshwater ecosystems, including effects on water clarity, phytoplankton, water quality, food web changes, and consequences to other aquatic fauna. It also reviews and offers new insights on how zebra and quagga mussels respond and adapt to varying environmental conditions. This new edition includes seven video clips that complement chapter text and, through visual documentation, provide a greater understanding of mussel behavior and distribution.

  1. Bibliography of Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussels) and Dreissena rostriformis Bugensis (QUAGGA mussels): 1989 to 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Don W.; Schmuckal, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Dreissenid mussels invaded and colonized waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes during the late 1980s. Their colonization and resulting impact have been characterized as one of the most important ecological changes in freshwater systems in North America. The need for information on dreissenid mussels has grown during the past 2 decades, which has prompted the compilation of this bibliography. Two previous bibliographies of dreissenid mussels indicate average publication rates were 6 publications/year between 1771 and 1964 (1,180 in 194 y) and 30 publications/year between 1964 and 1993 (885 in 30 y). In the current bibliography, the average rate of publication doubled during the past 23 y (1989 to 2011) to 66 publications/year based on a total of 1,502 publications. These rates may be biased by increased numbers of researchers and journals over time but, at a minimum, these rates indicate continued interest and concern by humans about the impact of dreissenid mussels on water availability and the expanding range of dreissenids throughout the world. The current bibliography has a 94% efficiency rate for subject and 100% efficiency for title search criteria when compared with references in published studies of dreissenid mussels in 2011. In addition to publications, we included 206 student theses and 225 chapters in 26 books including 6 books devoted solely to dreissenid mussels. A vast majority of student theses were about dreissenid mussels in North America, especially in the Laurentian Great Lakes. The 6 books devoted to dreissenid mussels contained a variety of chapters that described biology, impact, control, and ecology of dreissenid mussels in both Europe (published in 1992 and 2010) and North America (1993, 1994, 1997, and 2000). In addition, there is a 7th book devoted solely to dreissenid mussels that is near completion.

  2. Cheating the Locals: Invasive Mussels Steal and Benefit from the Cooling Effect of Indigenous Mussels.

    PubMed

    Lathlean, Justin A; Seuront, Laurent; McQuaid, Christopher D; Ng, Terence P T; Zardi, Gerardo I; Nicastro, Katy R

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous South African mussel Perna perna gapes during periods of aerial exposure to maintain aerobic respiration. This behaviour has no effect on the body temperatures of isolated individuals, but when surrounded by conspecifics, beneficial cooling effects of gaping emerge. It is uncertain, however, whether the presence of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis limits the ability of P. perna for collective thermoregulation. We investigated whether varying densities of P. perna and M. galloprovincialis influences the thermal properties of both natural and artificial mussel beds during periods of emersion. Using infrared thermography, body temperatures of P. perna within mixed artificial beds were shown to increase faster and reach higher temperatures than individuals in conspecific beds, indicating that the presence of M. galloprovincialis limits the group cooling effects of gaping. In contrast, body temperatures of M. galloprovincialis within mixed artificial mussel beds increased slower and exhibited lower temperatures than for individuals in beds comprised entirely of M. galloprovincialis. Interestingly, differences in bed temperatures and heating rates were largely dependent on the size of mussels, with beds comprised of larger individuals experiencing less thermal stress irrespective of species composition. The small-scale patterns of thermal stress detected within manipulated beds were not observed within naturally occurring mixed mussel beds. We propose that small-scale differences in topography, size-structure, mussel bed size and the presence of organisms encrusting the mussel shells mask the effects of gaping behaviour within natural mussel beds. Nevertheless, the results from our manipulative experiment indicate that the invasive species M. galloprovincialis steals thermal properties as well as resources from the indigenous mussel P. perna. This may have significant implications for predicting how the co-existence of these two species may

  3. Cheating the Locals: Invasive Mussels Steal and Benefit from the Cooling Effect of Indigenous Mussels

    PubMed Central

    Lathlean, Justin A.; Seuront, Laurent; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Ng, Terence P. T.; Zardi, Gerardo I.; Nicastro, Katy R.

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous South African mussel Perna perna gapes during periods of aerial exposure to maintain aerobic respiration. This behaviour has no effect on the body temperatures of isolated individuals, but when surrounded by conspecifics, beneficial cooling effects of gaping emerge. It is uncertain, however, whether the presence of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis limits the ability of P. perna for collective thermoregulation. We investigated whether varying densities of P. perna and M. galloprovincialis influences the thermal properties of both natural and artificial mussel beds during periods of emersion. Using infrared thermography, body temperatures of P. perna within mixed artificial beds were shown to increase faster and reach higher temperatures than individuals in conspecific beds, indicating that the presence of M. galloprovincialis limits the group cooling effects of gaping. In contrast, body temperatures of M. galloprovincialis within mixed artificial mussel beds increased slower and exhibited lower temperatures than for individuals in beds comprised entirely of M. galloprovincialis. Interestingly, differences in bed temperatures and heating rates were largely dependent on the size of mussels, with beds comprised of larger individuals experiencing less thermal stress irrespective of species composition. The small-scale patterns of thermal stress detected within manipulated beds were not observed within naturally occurring mixed mussel beds. We propose that small-scale differences in topography, size-structure, mussel bed size and the presence of organisms encrusting the mussel shells mask the effects of gaping behaviour within natural mussel beds. Nevertheless, the results from our manipulative experiment indicate that the invasive species M. galloprovincialis steals thermal properties as well as resources from the indigenous mussel P. perna. This may have significant implications for predicting how the co-existence of these two species may

  4. Molecular mechanics of mussel adhesion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussel foot protein (mfp), a natural glue produced by marine mussel, is an intriguing material because of its superior ability for adhesion in various environments. For example, a very small amount of this material is sufficient to affix a mussel to a substrate in water, providing structural support under extreme forces caused by the dynamic effects of waves. Towards a more complete understanding of its strength and underwater workability, it is necessary to understand the microscropic mechanisms by which the protein structure interacts with various substrates. However, none of the mussel proteins' structure is known, preventing us from directly using atomistic modeling to probe their structural and mechanical properties. Here we use an advanced molecular sampling technique to identify the molecular structures of two mussel foot proteins (mfp-3 and mfp-5) and use those structures to study their mechanics of adhesion, which is then incorporated into a continuum model. We calculate the adhesion energy of the mussel foot protein on a silica substrate, compute the adhesion strength based on results obtained from molecular modeling, and compare with experimental data. Our results show good agreement with experimental measurements, which validates the multiscale model. We find that the molecular structure of the folded mussel foot protein (ultimately defined by its genetic sequence) favors strong adhesion to substrates, where L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (or DOPA) protein subunits work in a cooperative manner to enhance adhesion. Our experimental data suggests a peak attachment force of 0.4±0.1 N, which compares favorably with the prediction from the multiscale model of Fc=0.21-0.33 N. The principles learnt from those results could guide the fabrication of new interfacial materials (e.g. composites) to integrate organic with inorganic surfaces in an effective manner.

  5. The Danish Adoption Register.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Liselotte; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2011-07-01

    The Danish Adoption Register was established in 1963-1964 to explore the genetic and environmental contribution to familial aggregation of schizophrenia. The register encompass information on all 14,425 non-familial adoptions of Danish children legally granted in Denmark 1924-1947. It includes name and date of birth of each adoptee and his or her biological and adoptive parents, date of transfer to adoptive parents and date of formal adoption. The linkage to biological and adoptive parents is close to complete, even biological fathers are registered for 91.4% of the adoptees. Adoption registers are a unique source allowing disentangling of genetic and familial environmental influences on traits, risk of diseases, and mortality.

  6. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Southwest) California Sea Mussel and Bay Mussel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    FishesS and Invertebrates (Pacific Southwest) CALIFORNIA SEA MUSSEL AND BAY MUSSEL Cn Coastal Ecology Group * Fish and Wildlife Service Waterways...September 1988 Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Southwest) CALIFORNIA SEA MUSSEL...AND BAY MUSSEL by William N. Shaw Fred Telonicher Marine Laboratory Humboldt State University Trinidad, CA 95570 Thomas J. Hassler U.S. Fish anu

  7. Review of techniques to prevent introduction of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) during native mussel (Unionoidea) conservation activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Newton, T.J.; Gatenby, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Because of the declines in diversity and abundance of native freshwater mussels (superfamily Unionoidea), and the potential decimation of populations of native mussels resulting from the rapid spread of the exotic zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, management options to eliminate or reduce the threat of the zebra mussel are needed. Relocating native mussels to refugia (artificial and natural) has been proposed to mitigate the threat of zebra mussels to native species. Relocation of native mussels to refugia such as fish hatchery facilities or natural habitats within their historic range. Which are unlikely to be infested by zebra mussels, necessitates that protocols be developed to prevent the inadvertent introduction of zebra mussels. Several recent studies have developed Such protocols, and have assessed their effectiveness on the health and survival of native mussels during subsequent relocation to various refugia. The purpose of this project is to synthesize and evaluate the current protocols and to develop a set of procedures that resource managers and researchers should consider before conducting conservation activities in zebra mussel infested waters. We found that the existing protocols have many common points of concern, such as facility modification and suitability, zebra mussel risk assessment and management procedures, and health and disease management procedures. These conservation protocols may have broad applicability to other situations and locations. A summary and evaluation of the information in these main areas, along with recommended guidelines, are presented in this article.

  8. Blue Saturn

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-19

    Bands and spots in Saturn's atmosphere, including a dark band south of the equator with a scalloped border, are visible in this image from the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft. The narrow angle camera took the image in blue light on Feb. 29, 2004. The distance to Saturn was 59.9 million kilometers (37.2 million miles). The image scale is 359 kilometers (223 miles) per pixel. Three of Saturn's moons are seen in the image: Enceladus (499 kilometers, or 310 miles across) at left; Mimas (398 kilometers, or 247 miles across) left of Saturn's south pole; and Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across) at lower right. The imaging team enhanced the brightness of the moons to aid visibility. The BL1 broadband spectral filter (centered at 451 nanometers) allows Cassini to "see" light in a part of the spectrum visible as the color blue to human eyes. Scientist can combine images made with this filter with those taken with red and green filters to create full-color composites. Scientists can also assess cloud heights by combining images from the blue filter with images taken in other spectral regions. For example, the bright clouds that form the equatorial zone are the highest in altitude and have pressures at their tops of about one quarter of Earth's atmospheric pressure at sea level. The cloud tops at middle latitudes are lower in altitude and have higher pressures of about half that found at sea level. Analysis of Saturn images like this one will be extremely useful to researchers assessing cloud altitudes during the Cassini-Huygens mission. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05383

  9. Danish auroral science history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2011-01-01

    Danish auroral science history begins with the early auroral observations made by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe during the years from 1582 to 1601 preceding the Maunder minimum in solar activity. Included are also the brilliant observations made by another astronomer, Ole Rømer, from Copenhagen in 1707, as well as the early auroral observations made from Greenland by missionaries during the 18th and 19th centuries. The relations between auroras and geomagnetic variations were analysed by H. C. Ørsted, who also played a vital role in the development of Danish meteorology that came to include comprehensive auroral observations from Denmark, Iceland and Greenland as well as auroral and geomagnetic research. The very important auroral investigations made by Sophus Tromholt are outlined. His analysis from 1880 of auroral observations from Greenland prepared for the significant contributions from the Danish Meteorological Institute, DMI, (founded in 1872) to the first International Polar Year 1882/83, where an expedition headed by Adam Paulsen was sent to Greenland to conduct auroral and geomagnetic observations. Paulsen's analyses of the collected data gave many important results but also raised many new questions that gave rise to auroral expeditions to Iceland in 1899 to 1900 and to Finland in 1900 to 1901. Among the results from these expeditions were 26 unique paintings of the auroras made by the artist painter, Harald Moltke. The expedition to Finland was headed by Dan la Cour, who later as director of the DMI came to be in charge of the comprehensive international geomagnetic and auroral observations made during the Second International Polar Year in 1932/33. Finally, the article describes the important investigations made by Knud Lassen during, among others, the International Geophysical Year 1957/58 and during the International Quiet Sun Year (IQSY) in 1964/65. With his leadership the auroral and geomagnetic research at DMI reached a high international

  10. Crayfish (Orconectes virilis) predation on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Joy; Savino, Jacqueline F.

    1993-01-01

    In laboratory studies, we quantified predation rates and handling time of crayfish (Orconectes virilis) on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and rainbow trout (Oncorhhynchus mykiss) eggs. In single prey species tests, crayfish ate zebra mussels at similar rates as they ate rainbow trout eggs. When both prey were present, crayfish preferred rainbow trout eggs. Handling time of mussels was about twice that of rainbow trout eggs, and energetic content of mussels was lower. Therefore, net benefit for foraging on rainbow trout eggs was about three times that of foraging on zebra mussels.

  11. Immunological responses in the mussel Mytilus trossulus transplanted at the coastline of the northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Höher, N; Turja, R; Köhler, A; Lehtonen, K K; Broeg, K

    2015-12-01

    The applicability of immune responses in transplanted Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus) as biomarkers of immunotoxic effects was studied at differently contaminated locations in the Gulf of Bothnia (northern Baltic Sea). Here, we present a detailed report on the immune responses measured as complementary part of transplantation study by Turja et al. (2014).Various immunological endpoints such as total and differential cell count, morphological alterations,phagocytic activity, and caspase 3/7 activity of mussel haemocytes as well as haemolytic activity of the haemolymph were used. Mussels collected at a reference site at a Finnish coastal site (Hanko, H) were transplanted at the Swedish coast near industrial and urban regions of the cities Sundsvall (S1, S2) and Gävle (G1, G2), respectively. Based on the measured immunological responses, multivariate statistical analysis (PCA biplot) showed a clear separation of the most polluted site S1, indicating immunotoxic impacts of the mixture of contaminants present at this location. Based on these observations and results from Turja et al. (2014), we suggest the implementation of immunotoxic biomarkers for the evaluation of ecosystem health. However, these should be accompanied by complementary endpoints of biological effects encompassing i.e., physiological, antioxidant and bioenergetic markers.

  12. Disruption of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA in hybrid mussels (Mytilus edulis x M. galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Wood, A R; Turner, G; Skibinski, D O F; Beaumont, A R

    2003-10-01

    Blue mussels of the genus Mytilus have an unusual mode of mitochondrial DNA inheritance termed doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). Females are homoplasmic for the F mitotype which is inherited maternally, whereas males are heteroplasmic for this and the paternally inherited M mitotype. In areas where species distributions overlap a varying degree of hybridization occurs; yet genetic differences between allopatric populations are maintained. Observations from natural populations and previous laboratory experiments suggest that DUI may be disrupted by hybridization, giving rise to heteroplasmic females and homoplasmic males. We carried out controlled laboratory crosses between Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis to produce pure species and hybrid larvae of known parentage. DNA markers were used to follow the fate of the F and M mitotypes through larval development. Disruption of the mechanism which determines whether the M mitotype is retained or eliminated occurred in an estimated 38% of M. edulis x M. galloprovincialis hybrid larvae, a level double that previously observed in adult mussels from a natural M. edulis x M. galloprovincialis hybrid population. Furthermore, reciprocal hybrid crosses exhibited contrasting types of DUI disruption. The results indicate that disruption of DUI in hybrid mussels may be associated with increased mortality and hence could be a factor in the maintenance of genetic integrity for each species.

  13. Danish Cultural Identity and the Teaching of Danish to Foreigners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Hedwig

    2006-01-01

    Danish as a second language textbooks published over the last 15 years have presented the Danish cultural identity as a homogenous and purely national phenomenon. Research into teaching theory, on the other hand, has been more broad-minded, and is based on interactivity. The aim of this paper is to explain this divergence. (Contains 2 notes.)

  14. Mussel-Inspired Adhesives and Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce P.; Messersmith, P.B.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Waite, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Mussels attach to solid surfaces in the sea. Their adhesion must be rapid, strong, and tough, or else they will be dislodged and dashed to pieces by the next incoming wave. Given the dearth of synthetic adhesives for wet polar surfaces, much effort has been directed to characterizing and mimicking essential features of the adhesive chemistry practiced by mussels. Studies of these organisms have uncovered important adaptive strategies that help to circumvent the high dielectric and solvation properties of water that typically frustrate adhesion. In a chemical vein, the adhesive proteins of mussels are heavily decorated with Dopa, a catecholic functionality. Various synthetic polymers have been functionalized with catechols to provide diverse adhesive, sealant, coating, and anchoring properties, particularly for critical biomedical applications. PMID:22058660

  15. Mussel-Inspired Adhesives and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bruce P.; Messersmith, P. B.; Israelachvili, J. N.; Waite, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    Mussels attach to solid surfaces in the sea. Their adhesion must be rapid, strong, and tough, or else they will be dislodged and dashed to pieces by the next incoming wave. Given the dearth of synthetic adhesives for wet polar surfaces, much effort has been directed to characterizing and mimicking essential features of the adhesive chemistry practiced by mussels. Studies of these organisms have uncovered important adaptive strategies that help to circumvent the high dielectric and solvation properties of water that typically frustrate adhesion. In a chemical vein, the adhesive proteins of mussels are heavily decorated with Dopa, a catecholic functionality. Various synthetic polymers have been functionalized with catechols to provide diverse adhesive, sealant, coating, and anchoring properties, particularly for critical biomedical applications.

  16. Asia-Pacific mussel watch for emerging pollutants: Distribution of synthetic musks and benzotriazole UV stabilizers in Asian and US coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Haruhiko; Shinohara, Ryu-Ichi; Nakazawa, Yusuke; Isobe, Tomohiko; Sudaryanto, Agus; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Zheng, Gene J; Lam, Paul K S; Kim, Eun Young; Min, Byung-Yoon; We, Sung-Ug; Viet, Pham Hung; Tana, Touch Seang; Prudente, Maricar; Frank, Donnell; Lauenstein, Gunnar; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2012-10-01

    We analyzed 68 green and blue mussels collected from Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam and the USA during 2003 and 2007, to elucidate the occurrence and widespread distributions of emerging pollutants, synthetic musks and benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BUVSs) in Asia-Pacific coastal waters. Synthetic musks and BUVSs were detected in mussels from all countries, suggesting their ubiquitous contamination and widespread distribution. High concentrations of musks and BUVSs were detected in mussels from Japan and Korea, where the levels were comparable or greater than those of PCBs, DDTs and PBDEs. Significant correlations were found between the concentrations of HHCB and AHTN, and also between the concentrations of UV-327 and UV-328, which suggest similar sources and compositions of these compounds in commercial and industrial products. To our knowledge, this is the first study of large-scale monitoring of synthetic musks and BUVSs in Asia-Pacific coastal waters.

  17. Changing perspectives on pearly mussels, North America's most imperiled animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strayer, David L.; Downing, John A.; Haag, Wendell R.; King, Timothy L.; Layzer, James B.; Newton, Teresa J.; Nichols, S. Jerrine

    2004-01-01

    Pearly mussels (Unionacea) are widespread, abundant, and important in freshwater ecosystems around the world. Catastrophic declines in pearly mussel populations in North America and other parts of the world have led to a flurry of research on mussel biology, ecology, and conservation. Recent research on mussel feeding, life history, spatial patterning, and declines has augmented, modified, or overturned long-held ideas about the ecology of these animals. Pearly mussel research has begun to benefit from and contribute to current ideas about suspension feeding, life-history theory, metapopulations, flow refuges, spatial patterning and its effects, and management of endangered species. At the same time, significant gaps in understanding and apparent paradoxes in pearly mussel ecology have been exposed. To conserve remaining mussel populations, scientists and managers must simultaneously and aggressively pursue both rigorous research and conservation actions.

  18. Sediment, land use, and freshwater mussels: Prospects and problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brim-Box, J.; Mossa, J.

    1999-01-01

    The decline in freshwater mussel populations in many river basins throughout North America has been attributed, in part, to land-use modifications that cause changes in sediment regimes. However, the specific associations that mussels have with stream sediments are poorly understood, making it difficult to assess the impacts of changes in sedimentation rates on unionid mussels. Both bed and suspended materials, and concomitant changes in channel form associated with changes in sediment supply, may affect mussels in numerous ways at various stages in their life cycle. Considerable debate and uncertainty remains regarding the strength of associations between sediments and mussels, including whether increased sedimentation is a cause of recent mussel declines. It is important to be aware of appropriate procedures for sampling and analyzing fluvial sediments, and the nature of sediment sources, to adequately assess relationships between unionid mussels and fluvial sediments.

  19. Chlorine dioxide treatment for zebra mussel control

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarik, D.; Byron, J.; Germer, M.

    1995-06-01

    Chlorine is recognized and commonly used biocide for power plant cooling water and service water treatment programs, including the control of zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide has recently become a popular method of zebra mussel control because of its economy, safety, environmental acceptability, and effectiveness when compared to other mussel control methods. This control technique was recently demonstrated at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s Alma Generating Station on the east bank of the upper Mississippi River in Alma, Wisconsin. The project was assisted with EPRI Tailored Collaboration Program funds. The Dairyland Power Alam Generating Station consists of five generating units that utilize raw, untreated Mississippi River water for condenser, circulating, and service water supplies. The first units were built in 1947, with the final and largest unit being completed in 1960. Total station generating capacity is 200 MW. Because of recent increases in the zebra mussel density at the station intake, Dairyland Power selected the team of Nalco and Rio Linda to perform a chlorine dioxide treatment of the station`s new water systems to eradicate and control the mussels before their presence created operational difficulties. This paper will present the results of the treatment including treatment theory, design and construction of the treatment system, the method of chlorine dioxide generation, treatment concentration, analytical methods o monitoring chlorine dioxide generation, residuals and trihalomethane (THM) concentrations, protocol for monitoring treatment mortality, and the effects of chlorine dioxide and detoxification on other water chemistry parameters and equipment materials. The goal of this paper is to inform and assist users with establishing consistent and uniform practices for safely utilizing and monitoring chlorine dioxide in the eradication and control of zebra mussels.

  20. Distribution of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in cultured mussels from the Croatian coast of the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Herceg-Romanić, Snježana; Kljaković-Gašpić, Zorana; Klinčić, Darija; Ujević, Ivana

    2014-11-01

    In this study we investigated the distribution of 7 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 17 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) congeners in the edible tissue of the blue mussels (Mytilusgalloprovincialis) collected at 15 shellfish breeding farms and 1 harvesting area along the Croatian Adriatic coast. All analyzed OCPs were found in all samples (0.011-1.47 ng g(-)(1) w.wt.). Concentrations of PCB congeners in positive samples ranged between 0.007 and 7.66 ng g(-)(1) w.wt. The most abundant compounds were γ-HCH, PCB-138 and PCB-153. Overall levels of PCBs and OCPs were in the lower end of the concentration ranges reported in literature. Significant differences of all contaminants were recorded between seasons, with higher values in the warmer part of the year. Results of the evaluation of the risks to human health associated with consumption of the mussels containing organic contaminants suggest that the levels of these compounds in mussels do not pose any threat for consumers of cultivated mussels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Zebra mussels enter the compost pile

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Zebra mussels, introduced accidentally into the Great Lakes, are overpopulating at phenomenal rates, especially in Lake Erie, where they damage oyster beds, foster excessive algae growth and cling to boats. They also clog the intake pipes of city water systems and power generating plants. The expense of cleaning intake screens is considerable, since they have to be physically removed and cleaned. Then the mussels must be disposed of, costing some power plants as much as $50,000 a year to landfill, says Wayne Koser of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

  2. Marine bioinorganic materials: mussels pumping iron.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Jonathan J

    2010-04-01

    The oceans are filled with an amazing variety of biological materials including the glues and cements of mussels, barnacles, tube worms, algae, and starfish. Recent studies on mussel adhesive are providing increasing evidence for a unique mechanism of material generation involving iron-induced protein oxidation and cross-linking chemistry. Insights are also being gathered on many of the other marine creatures producing adhesives. Beyond understanding biology, this growing knowledge is inspiring application development. New classes of biomimetic polymers are poised to provide the next generation of surgical adhesives and orthopedic cements.

  3. Evaluation of several chemical disinfectants for removing zebra mussels from unionid mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Fisher, S.W.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of chemical treatments for killing veliger and juvenile stages of the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha attached to unionid mussels. Static toxicity tests were conducted on eight unionid mussel species with common aquaculture chemicals (benzalkonium chloride, formalin, hydrogen peroxide, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, and sodium chloride). The concentration and duration of each chemical treatment tested had previously been found to kill zebra mussel veligers and juveniles. Several species (e.g., Elliptio dilatata, Lampsilis cardium, and Lasmigona complanata) incurred less than 10% mortality in chloride salt treatments, while in other species (e.g., Obliquaria reflexa and Leptodea fragilis) mortality varied greatly among treatment regimes. Treatments with benzalkonium chloride, formalin, and hydrogen peroxide were less than 90% effective on juvenile stages of zebra mussels and, therefore, were ruled out after preliminary trials. Limited application of specific chemical treatments may be feasible for more tolerant species; however, effective disinfection of unionid shells will require the use of chemical treatment followed by a quarantine period to completely remove zebra mussel larvae and juveniles.

  4. A modeling study on the hydrodynamics of a coastal embayment occupied by mussel farms (Ria de Ares-Betanzos, NW Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Pedro; Alvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón; Fernández-Reiriz, Maria José; Piedracoba, Silvia; Labarta, Uxío

    2014-06-01

    The present study suggests that both under upwelling and downwelling winds, the residual circulation of Ria de Ares-Betanzos remains positive with a strong influence from river discharge and a positive feedback from wind, unlike what is generally accepted for Galician rias. Furthermore, mussel cultivation areas may reduce residual velocities by almost 40%, suggesting their potential feedbacks on food replenishment for cultivated mussels. The Ria de Ares-Betanzos is a partially stratified estuary in the NW Iberian upwelling system where blue mussels are extensively cultured on hanging ropes. This type of culture depends to a large extent on water circulation and residence times, since mussels feed on suspended particles. Therefore, understanding the role of tides, continental runoff, and winds on the circulation of this embayment has important practical applications. Furthermore, previous works have emphasized the potential importance of aquaculture leases on water circulation within coastal ecosystems, with potential negative feedbacks on production carrying capacity. Here we implemented and validated a 3D hydrodynamic numerical model for the Ria de Ares-Betanzos to (i) evaluate the relative importance of the forcing agents on the circulation within the ria and (ii) estimate the importance of culture leases on circulation patterns at the scale of the mussel farms from model simulations. The model was successfully validated with empirical current velocity data collected during July and October 2007 using an assortment of efficiency criteria. Model simulations were carried out to isolate the effects of wind and river flows on circulation patterns.

  5. The Blue Bottle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandaveer, Walter R., IV; Mosher, Mel

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modification of the classic Blue Bottle demonstration that involves the alkaline glucose reduction of methylene blue. Uses other indicators in the classic Blue Bottle to produce a rainbow of colors. (JRH)

  6. The Blue Bottle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandaveer, Walter R., IV; Mosher, Mel

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modification of the classic Blue Bottle demonstration that involves the alkaline glucose reduction of methylene blue. Uses other indicators in the classic Blue Bottle to produce a rainbow of colors. (JRH)

  7. Zebra mussel-directed foodchain transfer of environmental contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S.W.; Bruner, K.A.; Landrum, P.F.

    1994-12-31

    Zebra mussel densities in some near-shore areas of Lake Erie exceed 500,000 individuals m{sup 3}. Because of their large biomass, the zebra mussels can collectively filter the entire volume of Lake Erie`s western basin in approximately 7 days. In so doing, the mussels remove a significant fraction of suspended particles, including algae and sediment. If those particles are contaminated with PCBs, the mussels could potentially redirect contaminant cycling in Lake Erie. Their data show that contaminated particles are a significant source of contaminants for the zebra mussel with sediment being more significant source than algae. When particles are the source of contamination for the zebra mussel, significant foodchain contamination may result from direct consumption of contaminated mussels or via an indirect route in which unassimilated contaminants are shunted into zebra mussel feces and the latter are consumed by benthic invertebrates. Trophic transfer of PCBs from zebra mussel feces to gammarids was measured. Importantly, biomagnification of some PCB congeners occurred during foodchain transfer from particles to mussels to feces such that the indirect route of transfer through ingestion of contaminated feces is more significant ecologically. Implications for Lake Erie foodchains will be discussed.

  8. Processes limiting mussel bed restoration in the Wadden-Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paoli, Hélène; van de Koppel, Johan; van der Zee, Els; Kangeri, Arno; van Belzen, Jim; Holthuijsen, Sander; van den Berg, Aniek; Herman, Peter; Olff, Han; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on experimental restoration of mussel beds in the Wadden Sea and the processes that might limit successful restoration of this foundation species (i.e. substrate, predation, hydrodynamics). The importance of substrate, predation, hydrodynamic conditions and location on mussel restoration success was studied using artificially created mussel beds. Experimental beds established on a stable substrate (coir net) were compared with control beds established on sand, at three locations in the Wadden Sea. Their persistence was followed over time. The results revealed a near disappearance of all experimental beds in just over 7 months. Providing a stable substrate did not improve mussel survival. Predation could not explain the disappearance of the beds, as the maximal predation rate by birds was found to be insufficient to have a significant effect on mussel cover. Differences in wave conditions alone could also not explain the variation in decline of mussel cover between the locations. However, the gradual disappearance of mussels from the seaward side of the bed strongly suggested that hydrodynamic conditions (i.e. combined effects of waves and current) played an important role in the poor persistence of the artificial beds. Our results highlight the fact that restoration of mussel beds in dynamic areas cannot simply be implemented by mussel transplantation, particularly if additional measures to prevent wave losses are not taken, even when artificial substrate is provided to facilitate mussel adhesion.

  9. Zebra Mussel Monitoring and Control Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Monitoring and Control Guide is a comprehensive compilation of US and European practices as reported in the open literature as of the end of 1992. EPRI considers the guide to be a living' document and will update it periodically in order to provide results of current research on chemical and nonchemical control technologies and utility experiences. The zebra mussel has infested all of the Great Lakes and other major rivers and waterways and is positioned to spread even more to the adjoining river basins. The impact of the zebra mussel on industrial power plantsis as a biofouler that clogs water systems and heat exchangers. This EPRI guideline identifies the zebra mussel, discusses its distribution in the United States, presents the potential threats to power plants, and presents the methods to initiate monitoring and control programs. Both preventive and corrective measures are presented. Preventive measures include various monitoring methods to initiate control techniques. The control techniques include both chemical and nonchemical together with combining techniques. Corrective methods include operational considerations, chemical cleaning, and mechanical/physical cleaning. It also may be possible to incorporate design changes, such as open to closed-loop backfit, backflushing, or pretreatment for closed systems. Various appendices are included that contain specifications to aid utilities in implementing several of the monitoring and control technologies, results of chemical evaluations at Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company plants, and data on the fate of various commercial molluscicides.

  10. Unique alloys prevent zebra mussel attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Ranschaert, B.; Maxson, D.

    1995-10-01

    This article describes cooperative research and application by a utility and an intake screen manufacturer of materials that are resistive to fouling by mussels. The article describes the intake structure, the screen manufacturer`s efforts to identify resistive materials, manufacture and installation of screens using the resistive copper alloys and the results achieved.

  11. Immune Response in Mussels To Environmental Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Stephen C.; Facher, Evan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of mussels in measuring the extent of chemical contamination and its variation in different coastal regions. Presents an experiment to introduce students to immune response and the effects of environmental pollution on marine organisms. Contains 14 references. (JRH)

  12. Zebra mussel control using acoustic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.W.; Gaucher, T.A.; Menezes, J.K.; Dolat, S.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A practical and economical device or method that reduces zebra mussel colonization without detrimental side effects is highly desirable. An ideal method is one that could be installed near, on, or in existing raw water intakes and conduits. It must have a known effect that is limited to a defined area, should have maximum effects on a targeted species, and preferably have a low life cycle cost than the current alternative methods of control and maintenance. Underwater sound could be such a desirable solution, if found to be an effective control measure for zebra mussels. Although sound most often applies specifically to acoustic energy that is audible to humans, 20 Hertz (Hz) to 20 kiloHertz (kHz), in this report we will use the terms sound and acoustic to include acoustic energy between 100 Hz and 100 MegaHertz (MHz). This research on zebra mussel biofouling is designed to effect the early developmental stages in the life cycle of Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas). Vulnerable stages in the development of D. polymorpha that might yield to site-specific acoustic deterrence measures include the free-swimming larval veliger stage, the postveliger pre-attachment demersal stage, and the immediate post-attachment stage. The proposed applications include surface treatment to prevent, reduce or eliminate colonization on underwater structures, and the stream treatment to reduce or eliminate (destroy) mussel larvae entrained in a moving volume of water.

  13. Control of zebra mussels with ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.P.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the effects of low and medium pressure ultraviolet (UV) radiation on zebra mussel mortality carried out between 1992 and 1995. An initial 1992 study, carried out by Aquatic Sciences (ASI), showed that flow-through UV systems have the ability to kill zebra mussels and prevent them from attaching to downstream surfaces. However, this work did not include expanded testing to determine the limitations of UV radiation at higher flow rates or to further define effective working parameters. The 1994 study was carried out at the Lennox Thermal Generating Station (TGS) of Ontario Hydro in Kingston, Ontario. This study involved the testing of two open channel UV systems (medium and low pressure) in an effort to determine flow rates and volumes for which UV disinfection would be effective and practical for the prevention of zebra mussel infestation. It was recommended that medium pressure (MP) and low pressure (LP) UV systems be tested for their ability to control downstream settlement of zebra mussels, in flow-through trials.

  14. Single-molecule mechanics of mussel adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haeshin; Scherer, Norbert F.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2006-08-01

    The glue proteins secreted by marine mussels bind strongly to virtually all inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments in which most adhesives function poorly. Studies of these functionally unique proteins have revealed the presence of the unusual amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa), which is formed by posttranslational modification of tyrosine. However, the detailed binding mechanisms of dopa remain unknown, and the chemical basis for mussels' ability to adhere to both inorganic and organic surfaces has never been fully explained. Herein, we report a single-molecule study of the substrate and oxidation-dependent adhesive properties of dopa. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of a single dopa residue contacting a wet metal oxide surface reveal a surprisingly high strength yet fully reversible, noncovalent interaction. The magnitude of the bond dissociation energy as well as the inability to observe this interaction with tyrosine suggests that dopa is critical to adhesion and that the binding mechanism is not hydrogen bond formation. Oxidation of dopa, as occurs during curing of the secreted mussel glue, dramatically reduces the strength of the interaction to metal oxide but results in high strength irreversible covalent bond formation to an organic surface. A new picture of the interfacial adhesive role of dopa emerges from these studies, in which dopa exploits a remarkable combination of high strength and chemical multifunctionality to accomplish adhesion to substrates of widely varying composition from organic to metallic. 3,4-dihydroxylphenylalanine | atomic force microscopy | mussel adhesive protein

  15. Heart Rate Sensor for Freshwater Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, C. L.; Vial, D. P.; Kruger, A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Lee, H. W.; Schroer, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have long been interested the cardiac activity of mollusks. First, it is important as a basic measure of the animal's metabolism. Further, activities such as feeding and burrowing affect heart rate, as do environmental factors such as water salinity, water temperature, exposure, and predation. We have developed a small, noninvasive sensor for measuring freshwater mussel heart rate. Its working principle is as follows. An infrared (IR) light-emitting diode is placed in contact with the mussel shell. Some of the IR penetrates through the shell, reflects off internal organs, and traverses back. A photodetector detects this IR, and electronics condition the signal. The heartbeat of the animal modulates the IR, allowing one to measure the heart rate. The technique is widely-used in finger heart-rate monitors in humans. The sensors do not have to be positioned above the heart and several locations on the mussel shell work well. The sensor is small (8 mm × 10 mm) and consumes less than 1 mA, and has a simple one-wire interface that allows for easy integration into data acquisition hardware. We present heart rate measurements for the common pocketbook (lampsilis cardium) freshwater mussel.

  16. Immune Response in Mussels To Environmental Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Stephen C.; Facher, Evan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of mussels in measuring the extent of chemical contamination and its variation in different coastal regions. Presents an experiment to introduce students to immune response and the effects of environmental pollution on marine organisms. Contains 14 references. (JRH)

  17. Enzymatically degradable mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Carrie E; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2011-12-12

    Mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogels represent innovative candidate medical sealants or glues. In the present work, we describe an enzyme-degradable mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogel formulation, achieved by incorporating minimal elastase substrate peptide Ala-Ala into the branched poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromonomer structure. The system takes advantage of neutrophil elastase expression upregulation and secretion from neutrophils upon recruitment to wounded or inflamed tissue. By integrating adhesive degradation behaviors that respond to cellular cues, we expand the functional range of our mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogel platforms. Rapid (<1 min) and simultaneous gelation and adhesion of the proteolytically active, catechol-terminated precursor macromonomer was achieved by addition of sodium periodate oxidant. Rheological analysis and equilibrium swelling studies demonstrated that the hydrogel is appropriate for soft tissue-contacting applications. Notably, hydrogel storage modulus (G') achieved values on the order of 10 kPa, and strain at failure exceeded 200% strain. Lap shear testing confirmed the material's adhesive behavior (shear strength: 30.4 ± 3.39 kPa). Although adhesive hydrogel degradation was not observed during short-term (27 h) in vitro treatment with neutrophil elastase, in vivo degradation proceeded over several months following dorsal subcutaneous implantation in mice. This work represents the first example of an enzymatically degradable mussel-inspired adhesive and expands the potential biomedical applications of this family of materials.

  18. Enzymatically Degradable Mussel-Inspired Adhesive Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogels represent innovative candidate medical sealants or glues. In the present work, we describe an enzyme-degradable mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogel formulation, achieved by incorporating minimal elastase substrate peptide Ala-Ala into the branched poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromonomer structure. The system takes advantage of neutrophil elastase expression upregulation and secretion from neutrophils upon recruitment to wounded or inflamed tissue. By integrating adhesive degradation behaviors that respond to cellular cues, we expand the functional range of our mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogel platforms. Rapid (<1 min) and simultaneous gelation and adhesion of the proteolytically active, catechol-terminated precursor macromonomer was achieved by addition of sodium periodate oxidant. Rheological analysis and equilibrium swelling studies demonstrated that the hydrogel is appropriate for soft tissue-contacting applications. Notably, hydrogel storage modulus (G′) achieved values on the order of 10 kPa, and strain at failure exceeded 200% strain. Lap shear testing confirmed the material’s adhesive behavior (shear strength: 30.4 ± 3.39 kPa). Although adhesive hydrogel degradation was not observed during short-term (27 h) in vitro treatment with neutrophil elastase, in vivo degradation proceeded over several months following dorsal subcutaneous implantation in mice. This work represents the first example of an enzymatically degradable mussel-inspired adhesive and expands the potential biomedical applications of this family of materials. PMID:22059927

  19. Quantifying habitat interactions: sediment transport and freshwater mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarek, J. L.; MacGregor, K. R.; Hornbach, D.; Hove, M.

    2016-12-01

    Freshwater mussel abundance and distribution are integrally linked with their habitat through sediment transport processes in moving waters, including suspended sediment loads and bed mobility. This research seeks to quantify these complex interactions using a combination of field data collection in the intensively agricultural Minnesota River Basin, and laboratory experiments in the Outdoor StreamLab (OSL) and flumes at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota. The OSL is a field-scale sand-bed meandering stream channel with independent control over sediment feed (recirculated) and water flow (diverted from the Mississippi River). Experiments in the OSL focused on the interactions between moving bedload and freshwater mussel behavior. Flooding experiments were used to quantify the movement during and post flood for three mussel species with different shell sculptures: threeridge (Amblema plicata), plain pockebook (Lampsilus cardium), and white heelsplitter (Lasmigona complanata). Flow fields, bed shear stress, bedform migration, and bar topography were measured during each flooding event with and without mussels present (density = 4/m2) to examine the influence of flooding on mussel movement, and to quantify the influence of mussels on channel morphology under steady state bedload transport. Additional experiments were conducted with threeridge at low flow (no bedload), under aggrading and degrading bed conditions, and doubled mussel density (8/m2). Mussel response to suspended sediment loads was examined in a complementary series of experiments in an indoor flume with Mississippi River water. Mussels outfitted with gape sensors were utilized in paired control/treatment experiments to examine the influence of moderate term (48 hours) exposure to elevated suspended sediment loads on mussel filtering activity. Together, these experiments provide multiple measures of mussel stress under high sediment loads and reveal how freshwater mussels

  20. Thermal criteria for early life stage development of the winged mapleleaf mussel (Quadrilla fragosa)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steingraeber, M.T.; Bartsch, M.R.; Kalas, J.E.; Newton, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    The winged mapleleaf mussel [Quadrula fragosa (Conrad)] is a Federal endangered species. Controlled propagation to aid in recovering this species has been delayed because host fishes for its parasitic glochidia (larvae) are unknown. This study identified blue catfish [Ictaluris furcatus (Lesueur)] and confirmed channel catfish [Ictaluris punctatus (Rafinesque)] as suitable hosts. The time required for glochidia to metamorphose and for peak juvenile excystment to begin was water temperature dependent and ranged from 28 to 37 d in a constant thermal regime (19 C); totaled 70 d in a varied thermal regime (12-19 C); and ranged 260 to 262 d in simulated natural thermal regimes (0-21 C). We developed a quantitative model that describes the thermal-temporal relation and used it to empirically estimate the species-specific low-temperature threshold for development of glochidia into juveniles on channel catfish (9.26 C) and the cumulative temperature units of development required to achieve peak excystment of juveniles from blue catfish (383 C???d) and channel catfish (395 C???d). Long-term tests simulated the development of glochidia into juveniles in natural thermal regimes and consistently affirmed the validity of these estimates, as well as provided evidence for a thermal cue (17-20 C) that presumably is needed to trigger peak juvenile excystment. These findings substantiate our model and provide an approach that could be used to determine corresponding thermal criteria for early life development of other mussel species. These data can be used to improve juvenile mussel production in propagation programs designed to help recover imperiled species and may also be useful in detecting temporal climatic changes within a watershed.

  1. Establishing mussel behavior as a biomarker in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jason T; Beggel, Sebastian; Auerswald, Karl; Stoeckle, Bernhard C; Geist, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Most freshwater mussel species of the Unionoida are endangered, presenting a conservation issue as they are keystone species providing essential services for aquatic ecosystems. As filter feeders with limited mobility, mussels are highly susceptible to water pollution. Despite their exposure risk, mussels are underrepresented in standard ecotoxicological methods. This study aimed to demonstrate that mussel behavioral response to a chemical stressor is a suitable biomarker for the advancement of ecotoxicology methods that aids mussel conservation. Modern software and Hall sensor technology enabled mussel filtration behavior to be monitored real-time at very high resolution. With this technology, we present our method using Anodonta anatina and record their response to de-icing salt pollution. The experiment involved an environmentally relevant 'pulse-exposure' design simulating three subsequent inflow events. Three sublethal endpoints were investigated, Filtration Activity, Transition Frequency (number of changes from opened to closed, or vice versa) and Avoidance Behavior. The mussels presented a high variation in filtration behavior, behaving asynchronously. At environmentally relevant de-icing salt exposure scenarios, A. anatina behavior patterns were significantly affected. Treated mussels' Filtration Activity decreased during periods of very high and long de-icing salt exposure (p<0.001), however, increased during short de-icing salt exposure. Treated mussels' Transition Frequency increased during periods of very high and long de-icing salt exposure (p<0.001), which mirrored the Avoidance Behavior endpoint observed only by mussels under chemical stress. Characteristics of Avoidance Behavior were tighter shell closures with repeated and irregular shell movements which was significantly different to their undisturbed resting behavior (p<0.001). Additionally, we found that mussels were sensitive to a chemical stressor even when the mussel's valves were closed. Due

  2. The Danish Nephrology Registry

    PubMed Central

    Heaf, James

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Nephrology Registry’s (DNR) primary function is to support the Danish public health authorities’ quality control program for patients with end-stage renal disease in order to improve patient care. DNR also supplies epidemiological data to several international organizations and supports epidemiological and clinical research. Study population The study population included patients treated with dialysis or transplantation in Denmark from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2016, with retrospective data since 1964. Main variables DNR registers patient data (eg, age, sex, renal diagnosis, and comorbidity), predialysis specialist treatment, details of eight dialysis modalities (three hemodialysis and five peritoneal dialysis), all transplantation courses, dialysis access at first dialysis, treatment complications, and biochemical variables. The database is complete (<1% missing data). Patients are followed until death or emigration. Descriptive data DNR now contains 18,120 patients, and an average of 678 is added annually. Data for each transplantation course include donor details, tissue type, time to onset of graft function, and cause of graft loss. Registered complications include peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients, causes of peritoneal dialysis technique failure, and transplant rejections. Fifteen biochemical variables are registered, mainly describing anemia control, mineral and bone disease, nutritional and uremia status. Date and cause of death are also included. Six quality indicators are published annually, and have been associated with improvements in patient results, eg, a reduction in dialysis patient mortality, improved graft survival, and earlier referral to specialist care. Approximately, ten articles, mainly epidemiological, are published each year. Conclusion DNR contains a complete description of end-stage renal disease patients in Denmark, their treatment, and prognosis. The stated aims are fulfilled. PMID:27843345

  3. The Danish Heart Registry

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Flensted Lassen, Jens; von Kappelgaard, Lene Mia; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Gislason, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Aim The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. Study population All adult (≥15 years) patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. Main variables The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR and WDHR). For each type of procedure, up to 70 variables are registered in the DHR. Since 2010, the data quality protocol encompasses fulfillment of web-based validation rules of daily-submitted records and yearly approval of the data by the EDHR and WDHR. Descriptive data The data collection on procedure has been complete for PCI and surgery since 2000, and for CAG as of 2006. From 2000 to 2014, the number of CAG, PCI, and surgical procedures changed by 231%, 193%, and 99%, respectively. Until the end of 2014, a total of 357,476 CAG, 131,309 PCI, and 60,831 surgical procedures had been performed, corresponding to 249,445, 100,609, and 55,539 first-time patients, respectively. The DHR generally has a high level of completeness (1–missing) of each procedure (>90%) when compared to the National Patient Registry. Variables important for assessing the quality of care have a high level of completeness for surgery since 2000, and for CAG and PCI since 2010. Conclusion The DHR contains valuable data on cardiac invasive procedures, which makes it an important national monitoring and quality system and at the same time serves as a platform for research projects in the cardiovascular field. PMID:27822091

  4. Control Strategies for Zebra Mussel Infestations at Public Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    facilities. It was decided that sites where zebra mussel infestations would be most apparent were components of (1) navigation locks (walls, miter gates, fill... components likely to be negatively affected by zebra mussels. In addition, attendees prepared a preliminary list of strategies to deal with zebra mussel...struc- tural components , and suitable control strategies. The matrix was developed prior to the meeting by WES personnel and was based on an approach

  5. Mussel beds — amensalism or amelioration for intertidal fauna?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Sabine

    1990-09-01

    The faunal assemblages of a mussel bed ( Mytilus edulis L.) and ambient sandflat were compared to study how a bioherm of suspension feeding organisms affects benthic communities in a tidal flat. During a survey of mussel beds in the Wadden Sea at the island of Sylt (North Sea), a total of 52 macrofaunal species and 44 meiobenthic plathelminth species were detected. They occupied different microhabitats in the mussel bed. 56% of the macrofauna species were dwelling in the sediment beneath the mussels and 42% were epibenthic or epiphytic. The latter were restricted in their occurrence to the mussel bed. Along a transect from the sandflat to the mussel bed the mean species densities of macrofauna did not differ significantly, while abundances were significantly lower in the mussel bed than in the sandflat. The composition of the assemblages shifted from a dominance of Polychaeta in the sandflat to Oligochaeta in the mussel bed. Surface filter-feeding polychaetes of the sandflat ( Tharyx marioni) were displaced by deposit feeding polychaetes under the mussel cover ( Capitella capitata, Heteromastus filiformis). The total meiobenthic density was lower and single taxa (Ostracoda, Plathelminthes, Nematoda) were significantly less abundant in the mud of the mussel bed. The plathelminth assemblage was dominated by grazing species ( Archaphanostoma agile), and differed in community structure from a sandflat aseemblage. An amensalistic relationship was found between the suspension-feeding mussels and suspension-feeding infauna, while deposit-feeders were enhanced. The presence of epibenthic microhabitats results in a variety of trophic groups co-occurring in a mussel bed. This is hypothesized as trophic group amelioration and described as an attribute of heterotrophic reefs.

  6. Comprehensive Study of the Influence of Altered Gravity on the Oxidative Burst of Mussel ( Mytilus edulis) Hemocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, E.; Brungs, S.; Langer, S.; Bornemann, G.; Frett, T.; Hansen, P.-D.

    2016-06-01

    Microgravity induces alterations in the functioning of immune cell; however, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been identified. In this study, hemocytes (blood cells) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis were investigated under altered gravity conditions. The study was conducted on the ground in preparation for the BIOLAB TripleLux-B experiment, which will be performed on the International Space Station (ISS). On-line kinetic measurements of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during the oxidative burst and thus cellular activity of isolated hemocytes were performed in a photomultiplier (PMT)-clinostat (simulated microgravity) and in the 1 g operation mode of the clinostat in hypergravity on the Short-Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC) as well as during parabolic flights. In addition to studies with isolated hemocytes, the effect of altered gravity conditions on whole animals was investigated. For this purpose, whole mussels were exposed to hypergravity (1.8 g) on a multi-sample incubator centrifuge (MuSIC) or to simulated microgravity in a submersed clinostat. After exposure for 48 h, hemocytes were taken from the mussels and ROS production was measured under 1 g conditions. The results from the parabolic flights and clinostat studies indicate that mussel hemocytes respond to altered gravity in a fast and reversible manner. Hemocytes (after cryo-conservation) exposed to simulated microgravity ( μ g), as well as fresh hemocytes from clinorotated animals, showed a decrease in ROS production. Measurements during a permanent exposure of hemocytes to hypergravity (SAHC) show a decrease in ROS production. Hemocytes of mussels measured after the centrifugation of whole mussels did not show an influence to the ROS response at all. Hypergravity during parabolic flights led to a decrease but also to an increase in ROS production in isolated hemocytes, whereas the centrifugation of whole mussels did not influence the ROS response at all. This study is a good example how

  7. Preliminary characterization of digestive enzymes in freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauey, Blake W.; Amberg, Jon J.; Cooper, Scott T.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Newton, Teresa J.; Haro, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Resource managers lack an effective chemical tool to control the invasive zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. Zebra mussels clog water intakes for hydroelectric companies, harm unionid mussel species, and are believed to be a reservoir of avian botulism. Little is known about the digestive physiology of zebra mussels and unionid mussels. The enzymatic profile of the digestive glands of zebra mussels and native threeridge (Amblema plicata) and plain pocketbook mussels (Lampsilis cardium) are characterized using a commercial enzyme kit, api ZYM, and validated the kit with reagent-grade enzymes. A linear correlation was shown for only one of nineteen enzymes, tested between the api ZYM kit and a specific enzyme kit. Thus, the api ZYM kit should only be used to make general comparisons of enzyme presence and to observe trends in enzyme activities. Enzymatic trends were seen in the unionid mussel species, but not in zebra mussels sampled 32 days apart from the same location. Enzymatic classes, based on substrate, showed different trends, with proteolytic and phospholytic enzymes having the most change in relative enzyme activity.

  8. A sampling method for conducting relocation studies with freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Rach, J.J.; Cope, W.G.; Luoma, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Low recovery of transplanted mussels often prevents accurate estimates of survival. We developed a method that provided a high recovery of transplanted mussels and allowed for a reliable assessment of mortality. A 3 x 3 m polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe grid was secured to the sediment with iron reinforcing bars. The grid was divided into nine 1-m super(2) segments and each treatment segment, was stocked with 100 marked mussels. The recovery of mussels after six months exceeded 80% in all but one treatment group.

  9. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  10. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N; Patil, Navinkumar J; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-28

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  11. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  12. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  13. Ocean acidification impacts mussel control on biomineralisation

    PubMed Central

    Fitzer, Susan C.; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Cusack, Maggie; Kamenos, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is altering the oceanic carbonate saturation state and threatening the survival of marine calcifying organisms. Production of their calcium carbonate exoskeletons is dependent not only on the environmental seawater carbonate chemistry but also the ability to produce biominerals through proteins. We present shell growth and structural responses by the economically important marine calcifier Mytilus edulis to ocean acidification scenarios (380, 550, 750, 1000 µatm pCO2). After six months of incubation at 750 µatm pCO2, reduced carbonic anhydrase protein activity and shell growth occurs in M. edulis. Beyond that, at 1000 µatm pCO2, biomineralisation continued but with compensated metabolism of proteins and increased calcite growth. Mussel growth occurs at a cost to the structural integrity of the shell due to structural disorientation of calcite crystals. This loss of structural integrity could impact mussel shell strength and reduce protection from predators and changing environments. PMID:25163895

  14. Environmental history told by mussel shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, Ulf; Mutvei, Harry; Sunde, Torbjörn; Westermark, Torbjörn

    1988-03-01

    Each year a mussel produces an incremental layer of its shell composed mainly of calcium carbonate and a small fraction of organic substance. Many other elements are simultaneously deposited in these annual layers and are assumed to be essentially immobile. Although use of shells of bivalves has been suggested for monitoring metals in natural waters, little is known of the relationship of environmental conditions and age of molluscs with the concentration and distribution of elements in the shell. The nuclear microprobe was used to determine the temporal history of concentrations of elements in a shell of the freshwater mussel Anodonta. The high spatial (3 μm) resolution allowed analyses within parts of single years.

  15. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  16. Zebra mussel infestation of unionid bivalves (Unionidae) in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Don W.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Mackie, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, zebra mussels received national attention in North America when they reached densities exceeding 750,000/m2 in a water withdrawal facility along the shore of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Although water withdrawal problems caused by zebra mussels have been of immediate concern, ecological impacts attributed to mussels are likely to be the more important long-term issue for surface waters in North America. To date, the epizoic colonization (i.e., infestation) of unionid bivalve mollusks by zebra mussels has caused the most direct and severe ecological impact. Infestation of and resulting impacts caused by zebra mussels on unionids in the Great Lakes began in 1988. By 1990, mortality of unionids was occurring at some locations; by 1991, extant populations of unionids in western Lake Erie were nearly extirpated; by 1992, unionid populations in the southern half of Lake St. Clair were extirpated; by 1993, unionids in widely separated geographic areas of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River showed high mortality due to mussel infestation. All infested unionid species in the Great Lakes (23) have become infested and exhibited mortality within two to four years after heavy infestation began. Data indicate that mean zebra mussel densities >5,000–6,000/m2 and infestation intensities >100-200/unionid in the presence of heavy zebra mussel recruitment results in near total mortality of unionids. At present, all unionid species in rivers, streams, and akes that sympatrically occur with zebra mussels have been infested and, in many locations, negatively impacted by zebra mussels. We do not know the potential consequences of infestation on the 297 unionid species found in North America, but believe zebra mussels pose an immediate threat to the abundance and diversity of unionids.

  17. Fluoranthene transport in mussel blood plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lazinsky, D.; Robinson, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    The role of mussel (Mytilus edulis) blood plasma in fluoranthene transport was investigated using in vitro binding studies and invivo exposure studies. In vitro binding studies on fluoranthene-spiked plasma utilized dialysis, ultrafiltration and fluorescence quenching. A significant degree of fluoranthene binding was observed with all the methods; as much 99.7% of the fluoranthene was bound to plasma proteins. Conditional affinity constants (log K{sub a}), calculated using a single component complexation model, averaged 6.8 M{sup {minus}1} suggesting a moderate affinity interaction between fluoranthene and plasma proteins. Mussels were exposed in vivo to {sup 3}H-fluoranthene and blood and tissues were sampled at 0.5, 3.5, 7, 24, 72 h post exposure. The mussels removed an average of 90% of the fluoranthene from the seawater within the first 0.5 h of exposure. Body tissues rapidly accumulated fluoranthene. Approximately 50% of the absorbed dose was present in the tissues by 0.5 h and this increased to 96% by 3.5 h of exposure. Within the blood, fluoranthene was mainly partitioned in the plasma. Plasma fluoranthene decreased to 50% within 3.5 h. The fluoranthene distribution remained relatively constant throughout the remainder of the 72 h exposure. Ultrafiltration of plasma exposed in vivo indicated that fluoranthene was not free, but bound to plasma proteins. The plasma protein concentrations fluctuated during exposure, but were virtually the same at 0.5 h and 72 h post exposure.

  18. Mussel byssus attachment weakened by ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Michael J.; George, Matthew N.; Carrington, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Biomaterials connect organisms to their environments. Their function depends on biological, chemical and environmental factors, both at the time of creation and throughout the life of the material. Shifts in the chemistry of the oceans driven by anthropogenic CO2 (termed ocean acidification) have profound implications for the function of critical materials formed under these altered conditions. Most ocean acidification studies have focused on one biomaterial (secreted calcium carbonate), frequently using a single assay (net rate of calcification) to quantify whether reductions in environmental pH alter how organisms create biomaterials. Here, we examine biological structures critical for the success of ecologically and economically important bivalve molluscs. One non-calcified material, the proteinaceous byssal threads that anchor mytilid mussels to hard substrates, exhibited reduced mechanical performance when secreted under elevated pCO2 conditions, whereas shell and tissue growth were unaffected. Threads made under high pCO2 (>1,200μatm) were weaker and less extensible owing to compromised attachment to the substratum. According to a mathematical model, this reduced byssal fibre performance, decreasing individual tenacity by 40%. In the face of ocean acidification, weakened attachment presents a potential challenge for suspension-culture mussel farms and for intertidal communities anchored by mussel beds.

  19. Subjectless sentences in child Danish.

    PubMed

    Hamann, C; Plunkett, K

    1998-11-01

    Three alternative accounts of subject omission, pragmatic, processing and grammatical, are considered from the perspective of child Danish. Longitudinal data for two Danish children are analyzed for subject omission, finite and infinitival verb usage and discourse anchorage of sentence subjects (overt and missing). The data exhibit a well-defined phase of subject omission which coincides with a well-defined phase of infinitival verbal utterances. No evidence is found for input driven accounts of subject omission. Danish adults rarely omit subjects from utterance initial position. Neither is there any evidence to support the claim that omitted subjects are anchored in previous discourse. Evidence supporting a processing constraint explanation of missing subjects is equivocal. The pattern of subject omission, infinitival usage and third person pronoun and past tense usage points to a grammatical explanation of the phenomenon. However, current grammatical accounts have difficulty accommodating several aspects of the data reported. Contrary to structure building theories, the Danish children do not exhibit a phase of development where only uninflected verb forms are used. Danish children also omit subjects from finite utterances. Furthermore, the decline of subject omissions in finite utterances coincides with decline in usage of infinitival utterances. These findings challenge tense-based accounts of children's subject omission. Finally, Danish children exhibit an asymmetry in subject omission according to verb type; subjects are omitted from main verb utterances more frequently than from copula utterances. Given the language typology associated with Danish, this asymmetry is difficult to accommodate within truncation and tense or number-based accounts of subject omission. We suggest that a proper treatment of child subject omission will involve an integration of grammatical and discourse-based approaches.

  20. Changes of gill and hemocyte-related bio-indicators during long term maintenance of the vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus held in aquaria at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Raul; Dando, Paul; Rosa, Domitília; Riou, Virginie; Colaço, Ana; Sarrazin, Jozée; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Santos, Ricardo Serrão

    2008-05-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus has been the subject of several studies aimed at understanding the physiological adaptations that vent animals have developed in order to cope with the particular physical and chemical conditions of hydrothermal environments. In spite of reports describing successful procedures to maintain vent mussels under laboratory conditions at atmospheric pressure, few studies have described the mussel's physiological state after a long period in aquaria. In the present study, we investigate changes in mucocytes and hemocytes in B. azoricus over the course of several months after deep-sea retrieval. The visualization of granules of mucopolysaccharide or glycoprotein was made possible through their inherent auto-fluorescent property and the Alcian blue-Periodic Acid Schiff staining method. The density and distribution of droplets of mucus-like granules was observed at the ventral end of lamellae during acclimatization period. The mucus-like granules were greatly reduced after 3 months and nearly absent after 6 months of aquarium conditions. Additionally, we examined the depletion of endosymbiont bacteria from gill tissues, which typically occurs within a few weeks in sea water under laboratory conditions. The physiological state of B. azoricus after 6 months of acclimatization was also examined by means of phagocytosis assays using hemocytes. Hemocytes from mussels held in aquaria up to 6 months were still capable of phagocytosis but to a lesser extent when compared to the number of ingested yeast particles per phagocytic hemocytes from freshly collected vent mussels. We suggest that the changes in gill mucopolysaccharides and hemocyte glycoproteins, the endosymbiont abundance in gill tissues and phagocytosis are useful health criteria to assess long term maintenance of B. azoricus in aquaria. Furthermore, the laboratory set up to which vent mussels were acclimatized is an applicable system to study physiological

  1. Danish Urogynaecological Database

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ulla Darling; Gradel, Kim Oren; Larsen, Michael Due

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Urogynaecological Database is established in order to ensure high quality of treatment for patients undergoing urogynecological surgery. The database contains details of all women in Denmark undergoing incontinence surgery or pelvic organ prolapse surgery amounting to ~5,200 procedures per year. The variables are collected along the course of treatment of the patient from the referral to a postoperative control. Main variables are prior obstetrical and gynecological history, symptoms, symptom-related quality of life, objective urogynecological findings, type of operation, complications if relevant, implants used if relevant, 3–6-month postoperative recording of symptoms, if any. A set of clinical quality indicators is being maintained by the steering committee for the database and is published in an annual report which also contains extensive descriptive statistics. The database has a completeness of over 90% of all urogynecological surgeries performed in Denmark. Some of the main variables have been validated using medical records as gold standard. The positive predictive value was above 90%. The data are used as a quality monitoring tool by the hospitals and in a number of scientific studies of specific urogynecological topics, broader epidemiological topics, and the use of patient reported outcome measures. PMID:27826217

  2. Relationships between community structure of freshwater mussels and host fishes in a central Ohio watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The diversity of freshwater mussel communities has declined over the past several decades within watersheds in the Midwestern United States. Host fishes play an important role in the life cycle of freshwater mussels because they serve as hosts for parasitic mussel larvae to ensure successful mussel ...

  3. Effects of ammonia on freshwater mussels in the St. Croix River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, Teresa J.

    2004-01-01

    The St. Croix River contains a diverse and abundant group of freshwater mussels. The St. Croix is one of the few rivers in the Midwest not substantially affected by the invasion of the exotic zebra mussel, which encrusts and kills native freshwater mussels. Increased concentrations of ammonia in river sediments, however, poses a significant threat to mussels.

  4. Reducing costly zebra mussel infestations at power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, G.

    1994-10-01

    The fast-spreading-zebra mussel has significant potential to foul intakes and other water systems at North American hydro projects. Chemical controls can be effective in reducing infestations, but most have environmental and other drawbacks. Several non-chemical methods promise to help project operators reduce problems associated with the mussels.

  5. PIT tags increase effectiveness of freshwater mussel recaptures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurth, J.; Loftin, C.; Zydlewski, J.; Rhymer, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Translocations are used increasingly to conserve populations of rare freshwater mussels. Recovery of translocated mussels is essential to accurate assessment of translocation success. We designed an experiment to evaluate the use of passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags to mark and track individual freshwater mussels. We used eastern lampmussels (Lampsilis radiata radiata) as a surrogate for 2 rare mussel species. We assessed internal and external PIT-tag retention in the laboratory and field. Internal tag retention was high (75-100%), and tag rejection occurred primarily during the first 3 wk after tagging. A thin layer of nacre coated internal tags 3 to 4 mo after insertion, suggesting that long-term retention is likely. We released mussels with external PIT tags at 3 field study sites and recaptured them with a PIT pack (mobile interrogation unit) 8 to 10 mo and 21 to 23 mo after release. Numbers of recaptured mussels differed among study sites; however, we found more tagged mussels with the PIT-pack searches with visual confirmation (72-80%) than with visual searches alone (30-47%) at all sites. PIT tags offer improved recapture of translocated mussels and increased accuracy of posttranslocation monitoring. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  6. Variation in fecundity and other reproductive traits in freshwater mussels

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag; J. Leann Staton

    2003-01-01

    1. Life histories of the highly diverse and endangered North American freshwater mussel fauna are poorly known. We investigated reproductive traits of eight riverine mussel species in Alabama and Mississippi, U.S.A.: Amblema plicata, Elliptio arca, Fusconaia cerina, Lampsilis ornata, Obliquaria reflexa, Pleurobema decisum, Quadrula asperata and

  7. Invasion of the Zebra Mussels: A Mock Trial Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Judy A.; Czerniak, Charlene M.

    2005-01-01

    In this activity, students learn about the important topic of invasive species, specifically Zebra Mussels. Students role-play different characters in a real-life situation: the trial of the Zebra Mussel for unlawful disruption of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Students will also learn about jurisprudential inquiry by examining the trial process. This…

  8. In situ assessment of genotoxicity using caged freshwater mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Black, M.C.; Westerfield, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years a decline in mussel populations has been documented in many areas, particularly in contaminated environments. Mussels are particularly vulnerable to exposure to xenobiotics in sediment and/or water because of their modes of feeding and respiration and close association with sediments. Because of this potential for exposure, their apparent sensitivity to xenobiotics, and their ease in collection and handling, mussels are an excellent species for in situ biomonitoring. Recently the authors have adapted an electrophoretic assay for detecting DNA strand breakage in freshwater mussels. Using this assay DNA damage was quantified in selected tissues in two mussel species, Quadrula quadrula and Anodonta grandis, following subchronic laboratory exposures to lead and benzo[a]pyrene. Current experiments involve exposing mussels in situ in polyethylene cages and exposure racks in several environments containing genotoxic agents, including a fly ash settling pond and a site contaminated with mercury. Mussels will be exposed for 1 week to 3 months and sampled at 2 to 4week intervals. Upon removal mussels will be dissected, and mantle, adductor muscle, and foot tissue will be analyzed for DNA strand breakage and xenobiotic residues. These data will be compared with laboratory exposures to single compounds conducted over the same exposure durations.

  9. Invasion of the Zebra Mussels: A Mock Trial Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Judy A.; Czerniak, Charlene M.

    2005-01-01

    In this activity, students learn about the important topic of invasive species, specifically Zebra Mussels. Students role-play different characters in a real-life situation: the trial of the Zebra Mussel for unlawful disruption of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Students will also learn about jurisprudential inquiry by examining the trial process. This…

  10. North American freshwater mussels: natural history, ecology, and conservation

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag

    2012-01-01

    Interest in freshwater mussels is growing for two important reasons. First, freshwater mussels are among the most endangered organisms on Earth, and many species are already extinct or face imminent extinction. Their desperate conservation plight has gained intense interest from natural resource agencies, nongovernmental conservation organizations, academia, and...

  11. Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 1: mussel distribution surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstedt, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of Cumberlandian mollusks in the Tennessee Valley is one of nine research activities developed as part of TVA's Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program (CMCP). The name Cumberlandian refers to an endemic faunal assemblage that encompasses portions of 7 states bordering the southern Appalachian Mountains and the Cumberland Plateau Region. This geographic region is known as one of the major centers for mussel speciation and is considered the most prolific areas of the world for this particular group of organisms. Nine Tennessee Valley streams were selected for intensive qualitative and quantitative mussel surveys under Activity I of the CMCP. The surveys were designed to gather information on the present distribution of Cumberlandian mollusks. The streams chosen for surveys were based on the documented presence of diverse mussel fauna, endangered mussels, and/or sufficient information (diverse fish fauna, good water quality, etc.) to suggest potential for occurrence of diverse mussel fauna or endangered species.

  12. Evaluation of the mussel fishery in Wheeler Reservoir, Tennessee River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zack H.; Malvestuto, S. P.; Davies, W. D.; Crance, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the freshwater mussel fishery on Wheeler Reservoir, a 27,155-hectare mainstream impoundment of the Tennessee River in Alabama. During July 1991 through June 1992, we used a roving creel survey to conduct 285 interviews over 57 weekdays and 12 weekend days. Total harvest during the 12-month survey period was estimated to be 570 metric tons, and included 15 mussel species. The most frequently harvested species were the washboard Megalonaias nervosa. Ohio pigtoe Pleurobema cordatum, and butterfly Ellipsaria lineolata. Harvest peaked in June at 290,414 mussels. Among collection techniques, total estimated effort was highest for divers (71,160 musseler-hours). The total estimated value of the 12-month mussel harvest (in terms of money paid to harvesters) from Wheeler Reservoir was US$2,119,921.

  13. IMPACT OF WATER PH ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-10-15

    The experiments conducted this past quarter have suggested that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels throughout the entire range of pH values tested (7.2 to 8.6). Highest mortality was achieved at pH values characteristic of preferred zebra mussel waterbodies, i.e., hard waters with a range of 7.8 to 8.6. In all water types tested, however, ranging from very soft to very hard, considerable mussel kill was achieved (83 to 99% mean mortality), suggesting that regardless of the pH or hardness of the treated water, significant mussel kill can be achieved upon treatment with P. fluorescens strain CL0145A. These results further support the concept that this bacterium has significant potential for use as a zebra mussel control agent in power plant pipes receiving waters with a wide range of physical and chemical characteristics.

  14. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mussels from a South American Estuary.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Ana L; Arias, Andrés H; Quintas, Pamela Y; Buzzi, Natalia S; Marcovecchio, Jorge E

    2017-03-18

    Bivalves, especially mussels, have been pointed as putative species to monitor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in marine environment. After several environmental PAHs baseline reports, the present study was conducted to assess for the first time the levels of PAHs in native mussels (Brachidontes rodriguezii) collected from a critical industrialized estuary of Argentina. Under this objective, after an 18-month sampling period, 34 pools of mussels were assessed for 17 PAHs, including the 16 compounds prioritized by United States Environmental Protection Agency. By means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, results showed total PAHs concentrations in mussel's tissue ranged from under laboratory detection limits to 482.4 ng/g dry weight. Mussel body burdens were dominated by lower molecular weight PAHs, such as phenanthrene, naphthalene, and pyrene, whereas the overall PAHs profile suggested the predominance of petrogenic sources. Finally, the potential ecotoxicological impact was evaluated by applying Environmental Assessment Criteria and benzo[a]pyrene toxic equivalent factors.

  15. Spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in mussel sampled around the Icelandic coastline.

    PubMed

    Sturludottir, Erla; Gunnlaugsdottir, Helga; Jorundsdottir, Hronn O; Magnusdottir, Elin V; Olafsdottir, Kristin; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2013-06-01

    Contaminants have been determined in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) at 11 locations around the Icelandic coastline from 1990 to 2010. The aim of the present study was to investigate if there has been a change in concentration of contaminants around the Icelandic coastline for the last two decades and if the concentrations and changes, if present, were consistent between locations. Concentrations of the persistent organic pollutants, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB-153) and trans-nonachlor, have decreased at most of the sampling locations in Iceland in recent years. However, an increasing trend was found at a few locations that could be explained by anthropogenic activity. The concentration levels of the persistent organics were much lower than found at the Norwegian, USA and Chinese coasts, especially levels of p,p'-DDE. The concentration of copper and selenium had a consistent pattern of change and concentration between locations over the period which showed a decreasing trend in recent years. The trace elements arsenic, cadmium, mercury and zinc showed more variation in concentration between locations, the concentration of arsenic, mercury and zinc was fairly stable over the period, whereas there were fluctuations in cadmium concentrations. The concentrations of cadmium and zinc were observed to be somewhat higher than found in mussels from Norway, USA and China but values of mercury and lead were much lower in the mussel sampled in Iceland. The higher concentrations of cadmium and zinc can be explained by the volcanic activity in Iceland but no major anthropogenic sources of trace elements are known in Iceland.

  16. Danish Palliative Care Database

    PubMed Central

    Groenvold, Mogens; Adsersen, Mathilde; Hansen, Maiken Bang

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD) is to monitor, evaluate, and improve the clinical quality of specialized palliative care (SPC) (ie, the activity of hospital-based palliative care teams/departments and hospices) in Denmark. Study population The study population is all patients in Denmark referred to and/or in contact with SPC after January 1, 2010. Main variables The main variables in DPD are data about referral for patients admitted and not admitted to SPC, type of the first SPC contact, clinical and sociodemographic factors, multidisciplinary conference, and the patient-reported European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care questionnaire, assessing health-related quality of life. The data support the estimation of currently five quality of care indicators, ie, the proportions of 1) referred and eligible patients who were actually admitted to SPC, 2) patients who waited <10 days before admission to SPC, 3) patients who died from cancer and who obtained contact with SPC, 4) patients who were screened with European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care at admission to SPC, and 5) patients who were discussed at a multidisciplinary conference. Descriptive data In 2014, all 43 SPC units in Denmark reported their data to DPD, and all 9,434 cancer patients (100%) referred to SPC were registered in DPD. In total, 41,104 unique cancer patients were registered in DPD during the 5 years 2010–2014. Of those registered, 96% had cancer. Conclusion DPD is a national clinical quality database for SPC having clinically relevant variables and high data and patient completeness. PMID:27822111

  17. California sea mussel and bay mussel: Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.N.; Hassler, T.J.; Moran, D.P.

    1988-09-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are prepared to assist in environmental impact assessment. The California sea mussel, Mytilus californianus, and the bay mussel, M. edulis, are commonly collected for bait. Some commercial landing and aquaculture occurs at a very low level of production. Both species are distributed along the California coast; the sea mussel is more commonly found on intertidal coastal rocks and the bay mussel on pilings and other hard substrates in bays and estuaries. The eggs of both species develop into a trochophore stage in 12--24 hours after fertilization, and the planktonic larval stage lasts 3--4 weeks. Sexual maturity can occur in one year. Spawning of the sea mussel occurs sporadically throughout the year; the bay mussel spawns in central California in late fall and winter. Maximum length is 120--150 mm for the bay mussel and 200--250 mm for the sea mussel. Both species are regarded as unsafe to eat from May 1 to October 31 due to the possible presence of paralytic shellfish poisoning. 55 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Methylene blue test

    MedlinePlus

    ... determine the type or to treat methemoglobinemia , a blood disorder. ... Methemoglobinemia - methylene blue test ... Normally, methylene blue quickly lowers the level of ... Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. ...

  19. The Blue Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, J. Joel

    1973-01-01

    Describes some of the advantages of an elementary science activity in which students discover that blowing through a straw into a bromthymol blue solution changes the color to yellow. Directions are provided for preparing the bromthymol blue solution. (JR)

  20. Heavy metal contamination along the China coastline: A comprehensive study using Artificial Mussels and native mussels.

    PubMed

    Degger, Natalie; Chiu, Jill M Y; Po, Beverly H K; Tse, Anna C K; Zheng, Gene J; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Xu, Di; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Wang, Xin-Hong; Liu, Wen-Hua; Lau, T C; Wu, Rudolf S S

    2016-09-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out to assess metal contamination in five cities spanning from temperate to tropical environment along the coastal line of China with different hydrographical conditions. At each of the five cities, Artificial Mussels (AM) were deployed together with a native species of mussel at a control site and a polluted site. High levels of Cr, Cu and Hg were found in Qingdao, high level of Cd, Hg and Pb was found in Shanghai, and high level of Zn was found in Dalian. Furthermore, level of Cu contamination in all the five cities was consistently much higher than those reported in similar studies in other countries (e.g., Australia, Portugal, Scotland, Iceland, Korea, South Africa and Bangladesh). Levels of individual metal species in the AM showed a highly significant correlation with that in the native mussels (except for Zn in Mytilus edulis and Cd in Perna viridis), while no significant difference can be found between the regression relationships of metal in the AM and each of the two native mussel species. The results demonstrated that AM can provide a reliable time-integrated estimate of metal concentration in contrasting environments over large biogeographic areas and different hydrographic conditions, and overcome the shortcomings of monitoring metals in water, sediment and the use of biomonitors.

  1. Blue Origin testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-20

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (r) discusses the upcoming testing of Blue Origin's BE-3 engine thrust chamber assembly with Steve Knowles, Blue Origin project manager, at the E-1 Test Stand during an April 20, 2012, visit to Stennis Space Center. Blue Origin is one of NASA's partners developing innovative systems to reach low-Earth orbit.

  2. Procedures for conducting underwater searches for invasive mussels (Dreissena sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Noah

    2010-01-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were first detected in the Great Lakes in 1988. They were likely transported as larvae or young adults inside the ballast tanks of large ocean-going ships originating from Europe. Since their introduction, they have spread throughout the Eastern, Midwestern, and Southern United States. In 2007, Quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) were found in the Western United States in Lake Mead, Nevada; part of the Lower Colorado River Basin. State and Federal managers are concerned that the mussels (hereafter referred to as dreissenid mussels or mussels) will continue to spread to the Columbia River Basin and have a major impact on the region?s ecosystem, water delivery infrastructure, hydroelectric projects, and the economy. The transport and use of recreational watercraft throughout the Western United States could easily result in spreading mussels to the Columbia River Basin. The number of recreational watercraft using Lake Mead can range from 350 to 3,500 a day (Bryan Moore, National Park Service, oral commun., June 21, 2008). Because recreational watercrafts are readily moved around and mussels may survive for a period of time when they are out of the water, there is a high potential to spread mussels from Lake Mead to other waterways in the Western United States. Efforts are being made to prevent the spread of mussels; however, there is great concern that these efforts will not be 100 percent successful. When prevention efforts fail, early detection of mussels may provide an opportunity to implement rapid response management actions to minimize the impact. Control and eradication efforts are more likely to be successful if they are implemented when the density of mussels is low and the area of infestation is small. Once the population grows and becomes established, the mussels are extremely difficult, if not impossible, to control. Although chemicals may be used to kill the mussels, the chemicals that are currently

  3. Phylogenetic and morphological characterization of the green alga infesting the horse mussel Modiolus modiolus from Vityaz Bay (Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan).

    PubMed

    Syasina, I G; Kukhlevsky, A D; Kovaleva, A L; Vaschenko, M A

    2012-10-01

    In this work, the ultrastructural features and taxonomic position of the green microalga infesting the horse mussel Modiolus modiolus from the north-western Pacific (Vityaz Bay, Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan) are reported. Mussels were collected monthly from May to September of 2009. In different months, the prevalence of mussels with green tissues was 16.6-62.5% (mean 43%). The most affected organs were the mantle, digestive gland and gonad. Histological analysis revealed severe infiltration of the connective tissue by hemocytes containing the alga cells. Electron microscopy showed that the alga was morphologically similar to the green algae from the genus Coccomyxa (Chlorophyta: Chlorococcales). Two new primers were designed to generate partial small subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences of the green alga from M. modiolus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the comparison of the SSU rRNA sequences of the trebouxiophyceans confirmed an affiliation of the green alga with the genus Coccomyxa. The sequence (1296 bases) of the green alga from M. modiolus was most closely related to the sequence CPCC 508 (AM981206) (identity 100%), obtained from an acid-tolerant, free-living chlorophyte microalga Coccomyxa sp. and to the sequences EU127470 (identity 99.3%) and EU127471 (identity 99.7%) of the green alga, presumably the true Coccomyxa parasitica, infecting the blue mussel Mytilus edulis from the Flensburg Fjord (North Atlantic). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomarker responses and accumulation of hazardous substances in mussels (Mytilus trossulus) transplanted along a pollution gradient close to an oil terminal in the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea).

    PubMed

    Turja, Raisa; Soirinsuo, Anna; Budzinski, Hélène; Devier, Marie Hélène; Lehtonen, Kari K

    2013-01-01

    Baltic Sea blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus) were used as sentinel organisms to detect the biological effects of chemical contamination in the low salinity environment. Mussels naturally adapted to a salinity of ca. 6.0 PSU were caged for 30 days at four sites along an assumed pollution gradient (salinity ca. 4.5 PSU) in the vicinity of Finland's largest oil refinery and harbor Kilpilahti in the Gulf of Finland. Tissue concentrations and accumulation rates of especially organic contaminants (PAHs, PCBs and organotins) were clearly elevated at the innermost coastal stations near the harbor area. Biological effects of contaminant exposure on caged mussels were evaluated by measuring a suite of biomarkers including catalase, glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, lipid peroxidation, acetylcholinesterase activity and lysosomal membrane stability. Mussels transplanted near the harbor area were able to elevate their antioxidant defense in response to environmental contamination. Reduced morphometric condition index and soft tissue growth rate together with increased lipid peroxidation and low lysosomal membrane stability were also observed at the most contaminated site. The results suggest that caging of M. trossulus for four weeks at lower salinity is a feasible method for the detection of environmental pollution also in low salinity areas of the Baltic Sea.

  5. Maintained larval growth in mussel larvae exposed to acidified under-saturated seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Alexander; Schulz, Sabrina; Dupont, Sam

    2016-03-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is known to affect bivalve early life-stages. We tested responses of blue mussel larvae to a wide range of pH in order to identify their tolerance threshold. Our results confirmed that decreasing seawater pH and decreasing saturation state increases larval mortality rate and the percentage of abnormally developing larvae. Virtually no larvae reared at average pHT 7.16 were able to feed or reach the D-shell stage and their development appeared to be arrested at the trochophore stage. However larvae were capable of reaching the D-shell stage under milder acidification (pHT ≈ 7.35, 7.6, 7.85) including in under-saturated seawater with Ωa as low as 0.54 ± 0.01 (mean ± s. e. m.), with a tipping point for normal development identified at pHT 7.765. Additionally growth rate of normally developing larvae was not affected by lower pHT despite potential increased energy costs associated with compensatory calcification in response to increased shell dissolution. Overall, our results on OA impacts on mussel larvae suggest an average pHT of 7.16 is beyond their physiological tolerance threshold and indicate a shift in energy allocation towards growth in some individuals revealing potential OA resilience.

  6. Radioprotection against DNA damage by an extract of Indian green mussel, Perna viridis (L).

    PubMed

    Kumaran, Sreekumar P; Kutty, Binoj C; Chatterji, Anil; Subrayan, Parameswaran P; Mishra, Kaushala Prasad

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the radioprotective ability of a hydrolysate prepared using an enzyme-acid hydrolysis method from the green mussel Perna viridis in terms of its ability to prevent radiation-induced damage in plasmid DNA, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and DNA damage in mice lymphocytes. The mussel hydrolysate (MH) present during irradiation showed significant protection from gamma-radiation-induced strand breaks in plasmid DNA as evaluated by gel electrophoresis. Viability studies by trypan blue dye exclusion and MTT assay showed that preincubation of mice splenic lymphocytes with MH protected them from gamma-radiation-mediated killing. Moreover, the presence of MH during irradiation of isolated mice lymphocytes significantly decreased the DNA damage, as measured by comet assay. Measurement of intracellular ROS by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence revealed that the presence of MH effectively reduced the ROS generated in lymphocytes by both chemical method and gamma-irradiation. Prevention of DNA damage both in plasmid and lymphocytes and cell death in lymphocytes appears correlated with reduction of oxidatively generated free radicals. It is concluded that protection against radiation-induced cell death and DNA damage by MH was attributable to reduction of reactive free radical species generated by gamma-radiation.

  7. Microplastics are taken up by mussels (Mytilus edulis) and lugworms (Arenicola marina) living in natural habitats.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Claessens, Michiel; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-04-01

    We studied the uptake of microplastics under field conditions. At six locations along the French-Belgian-Dutch coastline we collected two species of marine invertebrates representing different feeding strategies: the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (filter feeder) and the lugworm Arenicola marina (deposit feeder). Additional laboratory experiments were performed to assess possible (adverse) effects of ingestion and translocation of microplastics on the energy metabolism (cellular energy allocation) of these species. Microplastics were present in all organisms collected in the field: on average 0.2 ± 0.3 microplastics g(-1) (M. edulis) and 1.2 ± 2.8 particles g(-1) (A. marina). In a proof of principle laboratory experiment, mussels and lugworms exposed to high concentrations of polystyrene microspheres (110 particles mL(-1) seawater and 110 particles g(-1) sediment, respectively) showed no significant adverse effect on the organisms' overall energy budget. The results are discussed in the context of possible risks as a result of the possible transfer of adsorbed contaminants.

  8. Maintained larval growth in mussel larvae exposed to acidified under-saturated seawater

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Alexander; Schulz, Sabrina; Dupont, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is known to affect bivalve early life-stages. We tested responses of blue mussel larvae to a wide range of pH in order to identify their tolerance threshold. Our results confirmed that decreasing seawater pH and decreasing saturation state increases larval mortality rate and the percentage of abnormally developing larvae. Virtually no larvae reared at average pHT 7.16 were able to feed or reach the D-shell stage and their development appeared to be arrested at the trochophore stage. However larvae were capable of reaching the D-shell stage under milder acidification (pHT ≈ 7.35, 7.6, 7.85) including in under-saturated seawater with Ωa as low as 0.54 ± 0.01 (mean ± s. e. m.), with a tipping point for normal development identified at pHT 7.765. Additionally growth rate of normally developing larvae was not affected by lower pHT despite potential increased energy costs associated with compensatory calcification in response to increased shell dissolution. Overall, our results on OA impacts on mussel larvae suggest an average pHT of 7.16 is beyond their physiological tolerance threshold and indicate a shift in energy allocation towards growth in some individuals revealing potential OA resilience. PMID:27020613

  9. Maintained larval growth in mussel larvae exposed to acidified under-saturated seawater.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Alexander; Schulz, Sabrina; Dupont, Sam

    2016-03-29

    Ocean acidification (OA) is known to affect bivalve early life-stages. We tested responses of blue mussel larvae to a wide range of pH in order to identify their tolerance threshold. Our results confirmed that decreasing seawater pH and decreasing saturation state increases larval mortality rate and the percentage of abnormally developing larvae. Virtually no larvae reared at average pHT 7.16 were able to feed or reach the D-shell stage and their development appeared to be arrested at the trochophore stage. However larvae were capable of reaching the D-shell stage under milder acidification (pHT ≈ 7.35, 7.6, 7.85) including in under-saturated seawater with Ωa as low as 0.54 ± 0.01 (mean ± s. e. m.), with a tipping point for normal development identified at pHT 7.765. Additionally growth rate of normally developing larvae was not affected by lower pHT despite potential increased energy costs associated with compensatory calcification in response to increased shell dissolution. Overall, our results on OA impacts on mussel larvae suggest an average pHT of 7.16 is beyond their physiological tolerance threshold and indicate a shift in energy allocation towards growth in some individuals revealing potential OA resilience.

  10. Molecular ecology of zebra mussel invasions.

    PubMed

    May, Gemma E; Gelembiuk, Gregory W; Panov, Vadim E; Orlova, Marina I; Lee, Carol Eunmi

    2006-04-01

    The invasion of the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, into North American waters has resulted in profound ecological disturbances and large monetary losses. This study examined the invasion history and patterns of genetic diversity among endemic and invading populations of zebra mussels using DNA sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene. Patterns of haplotype frequency indicate that all invasive populations of zebra mussels from North America and Europe originated from the Ponto-Caspian Sea region. The distribution of haplotypes was consistent with invasive populations arising from the Black Sea drainage, but could not exclude the possibility of an origin from the Caspian Sea drainage. Similar haplotype frequencies among North American populations of D. polymorpha suggest colonization by a single founding population. There was no evidence of invasive populations arising from tectonic lakes in Turkey, while lakes in Greece and Macedonia contained only Dreissena stankovici. Populations in Turkey might be members of a sibling species complex of D. polymorpha. Ponto-Caspian derived populations of D. polymorpha (theta = 0.0011) and Dreissena bugensis (one haplotype) exhibited low levels of genetic diversity at the COI gene, perhaps as a result of repeated population bottlenecks. In contrast, geographically isolated tectonic lake populations exhibited relatively high levels of genetic diversity (theta = 0.0032 to 0.0134). It is possible that the fluctuating environment of the Ponto-Caspian basin facilitated the colonizing habit of invasive populations of D. polymorpha and D. bugensis. Our findings were concordant with the general trend of destructive freshwater invaders in the Great Lakes arising from the Ponto-Caspian Sea basin.

  11. Biomonitoring of trace metals using transplanted mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, in coastal areas around Ulsan and Onsan Bays, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan-Kook; Choi, Man Sik

    2017-03-01

    Mediterranean (blue) mussels ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected from a reference site were transplanted to 15 stations in coastal areas around Ulsan and Onsan Bays, an extensively metal polluted area in Korean coastal waters, to assess metal contamination in the coastal oceans of Korea. During the biomonitoring periods (June 30 to July 20, 2003; 21 days), transplanted mussels, seawater, and particulate materials were collected for analysis of 15 metals (Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn). Transplanted mussels showed metal enrichment compared to initial concentrations and spatial gradients consistent with dissolved and/or particulate metal concentrations in seawaters. Based on Q mode factor analysis, stations were clustered into three groups. The first group, located on Onsan Bay, showed high Ag, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn enrichment, presumably arising from non-ferrous metal refineries and chemical industries in this area. The second group was located near the mouth of the Oehwang River and was enriched in Co from petrochemical industries. The third group comprised a site intermediate between Group 1 and Group 2, an isolated station with independent metal sources located in Jangsaengpo harbor, where a number of ship repairing and building companies operate, and a less contaminated station near a small fishing village. Metal accumulation rates (%·day-1) in mussels were estimated to be between 8% (Cr) and 281% (Pb), based on accumulated metal concentrations over 21 days. The active biomonitoring technique using M. galloprovincialis demonstrated here is a useful monitoring method because it reflects the present status of seawaters; furthermore, physiological factors can be standardized, and bioavailable and time-integrated metal concentrations can be obtained. Furthermore, this method can be applied even in coastal seawaters so heavily contaminated that living organisms would not normally survive.

  12. Purification of adhesive proteins from mussels.

    PubMed

    Pardo, J; Gutierrez, E; Sáez, C; Brito, M; Burzio, L O

    1990-11-01

    The adhesive polyphenolic proteins from the mussels Mytilus chilensis and Choromytilus chorus have been purified based on their solubility in dilute perchloric acid and on differential precipitation with acetone containing about 0.3 N HCl. The specific activity of the proteins obtained was 0.16 mg of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine per milligram of protein, or higher. The proteins have an apparent molecular weight of about 100,000 and they contain a high proportion of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, lysine, and proline.

  13. Retrospective environmental biomonitoring - Mussel Watch expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, Bernd R.; Krause, Richard A.

    2016-09-01

    Monitoring bioavailable contaminants and determining baseline conditions in aquatic environments has become an important aspect of ecology and ecotoxicology. Since the mid-1970s and the initiation of the Mussel Watch program, this has been successfully accomplished with bivalve mollusks. These (mostly) sessile organisms reliably and proportionately record changes of a range of organic and inorganic pollutants occurring in the water, food or sediment. The great majority of studies have measured the concentration of pollutants in soft tissues and, to a much lesser extent, in whole shells or fractions thereof. Both approaches come with several drawbacks. Neither soft tissues nor whole shells can resolve temporal changes of the pollution history, except through the analysis of multiple specimens collected at different times. Soft tissues and shell fractions provide time-averaged data spanning months or years, and whole shells time-averaged data over the entire lifespan of the animal. Even with regular sampling of multiple specimens over long intervals of time, the resulting chronology may not faithfully resolve short-term changes of water quality. Compounding the problem, whole shell averages tend to be non-arithmetic and non-linear, because shell growth rate varies through seasons and lifetime, and different shell layers often vary ultrastructurally and can thus be chemically different from each other. Mussel Watch could greatly benefit from the potential of bivalve shells in providing high-resolution, temporally aligned archives of environmental variability. So far, only circa a dozen studies have demonstrated that the sclerochronological approach - i.e., combined growth pattern and high-resolution chemical analyses - can provide sub-seasonally to annually resolved time-series documenting the history of pollution over centuries and even millennia. On the other hand, the sclerochronological community has failed to fully appreciate that the formation of the shell and

  14. A model of clearance rate regulation in mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fréchette, Marcel

    2012-10-01

    Clearance rate regulation has been modelled as an instantaneous response to food availability, independent of the internal state of the animals. This view is incompatible with latent effects during ontogeny and phenotypic flexibility in clearance rate. Internal-state regulation of clearance rate is required to account for these patterns. Here I develop a model of internal-state based regulation of clearance rate. External factors such as suspended sediments are included in the model. To assess the relative merits of instantaneous regulation and internal-state regulation, I modelled blue mussel clearance rate and growth using a DEB model. In the usual standard feeding module, feeding is governed by a Holling's Type II response to food concentration. In the internal-state feeding module, gill ciliary activity and thus clearance rate are driven by internal reserve level. Factors such as suspended sediments were not included in the simulations. The two feeding modules were compared on the basis of their ability to capture the impact of latent effects, of environmental heterogeneity in food abundance and of physiological flexibility on clearance rate and individual growth. The Holling feeding module was unable to capture the effect of any of these sources of variability. In contrast, the internal-state feeding module did so without any modification or ad hoc calibration. Latent effects, however, appeared transient. With simple annual variability in temperature and food concentration, the relationship between clearance rate and food availability predicted by the internal-state feeding module was quite similar to that observed in Norwegian fjords. I conclude that in contrast with the usual Holling feeding module, internal-state regulation of clearance rate is consistent with well-documented growth and clearance rate patterns.

  15. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  16. Biochemical composition of three species of unionid mussels after emersion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greseth, Shari L.; Cope, W.G.; Rada, R.G.; Waller, D.L.; Bartsch, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Freshwater mussels are emersed (exposed to air) during conservation activities such as surveys and relocations. Success of these activities depends upon the ability of mussels to survive emersion and to re-burrow in the substratum. We evaluated the acute sublethal effects of emersion on three species of unionid mussels [pocketbook, Lampsilis cardium (Rafinesque, 1820); pimpleback, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa (I. Lea, 1831); spike, Elliptio dilatata (Rafinesque, 1820)] by measuring three biochemicals (carbohydrate, lipid, protein) indicative of biochemical function and energy storage. Mussels were acclimated in water at 25??C and exposed to five air temperatures (15, 20, 25, 35 and 45??C) for 15, 30 and 60 min. After emersion, mussels were returned to water at 25??C and observed for 14 days. Samples of mantle tissue were taken after the 14-day postexposure period and analysed for carbohydrate, lipid and protein. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) did not reveal consistent trends in carbohydrate, lipid or protein concentrations due to sex of mussels, duration of emersion, air temperature or their interaction terms that indicated biological compensation to stress. Overall mean carbohydrate concentrations were greatest (range 447-615 mg/g dry wt) among the species, followed by protein (179-289 mg/g dry wt) and lipids (26.7-38.1 mg/g dry wt). These results have positive implications for conducting conservation activities, because emersion over the range of temperatures (15-35??C) and durations (15-60 min) examined did not appear acutely harmful to mussels.

  17. Dreissenid mussels from the Great Lakes contain elevated thiaminase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, D.E.; Riley, S.C.; Evans, A.N.; Nichols, S.J.; Zajicek, J.L.; Rinchard, J.; Richter, C.A.; Krueger, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We examined thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels collected at different depths and seasons, and from various locations in Lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Huron. Here we present evidence that two dreissenid mussel species (Dreissena bugensis and D. polymorpha) contain thiaminase activity that is 5-100 fold greater than observed in Great Lakes fishes. Thiaminase activity in zebra mussels ranged from 10,600 to 47,900??pmol g- 1??min- 1 and activities in quagga mussels ranged from 19,500 to 223,800??pmol g- 1??min- 1. Activity in the mussels was greatest in spring, less in summer, and least in fall. Additionally, we observed greater thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels collected at shallow depths compared to mussels collected at deeper depths. Dreissenids constitute a significant and previously unknown pool of thiaminase in the Great Lakes food web compared to other known sources of this thiamine (vitamin B1)-degrading enzyme. Thiaminase in forage fish of the Great Lakes has been causally linked to thiamine deficiency in salmonines. We currently do not know whether linkages exist between thiaminase activities observed in dreissenids and the thiaminase activities in higher trophic levels of the Great Lakes food web. However, the extreme thiaminase activities observed in dreissenids from the Great Lakes may represent a serious unanticipated negative effect of these exotic species on Great Lakes ecosystems.

  18. Using zebra mussels to monitor Escherichia coli in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Selegean, J P; Kusserow, R; Patel, R; Heidtke, T M; Ram, J L

    2001-01-01

    Use of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) as an indicator of previously elevated bacteria concentrations in a watershed was examined. The ability of the zebra mussel to accumulate and purge Escherichia coli over several days was investigated in both laboratory and field experiments. In laboratory experiments, periodic enumeration of E. coli in mussels that had been exposed to a dilute solution of raw sewage demonstrated that (i) maximum concentrations of E. coli are reached within a few hours of exposure to sewage, (ii) the tissue concentration attained is higher than the concentration in the ambient water, and (iii) the E. coli concentrations take several days to return to preexposure concentrations when mussels are subsequently placed in sterile water. In field experiments conducted in southeast Michigan in the Clinton River watershed, brief increases in E. coli concentrations in the water were accompanied by increases in mussel concentrations of E. coli that lasted 2 or 3 d. The ability of mussels to retain and to concentrate E. coli made it possible to detect E. coli in the environment under conditions that conventional monitoring may often miss. Sampling caged mussels in a river and its tributaries may enable watershed managers to reduce the sampling frequency normally required to identify critical E. coli sources, thereby providing a more cost-effective river monitoring strategy for bacterial contamination.

  19. Mortality of zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, veligers during downstream transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horvath, T.G.; Lamberti, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    1. Streams flowing from lakes which contain zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, provide apparently suitable habitats for mussel colonization and downstream range expansion, yet most such streams contain few adult mussels. We postulated that mussel veligers experience high mortality during dispersal via downstream transport. They tested this hypothesis in Christiana Creek, a lake-outlet stream in south-western Michigan, U.S.A., in which adult mussel density declined exponentially with distance downstream. 2. A staining technique using neutral red was developed and tested to distinguish quickly live and dead veligers. Live and dead veligers were distinguishable after an exposure of fresh samples to 13.3 mg L-1 of neutral red for 3 h. 3. Neutral red was used to determine the proportion of live veligers in samples taken longitudinally along Christiana Creek. The proportion of live veligers (mean ?? SE) declined from 90 ?? 3% at the lake outlet to 40 ?? 8% 18 km downstream. 4. Veligers appear to be highly susceptible to damage by physical forces (e.g. shear), and therefore, mortality in turbulent streams could be an important mechanism limiting zebra mussel dispersal to downstream reaches. Predictions of zebra mussel spread and population growth should consider lake-stream linkages and high mortality in running waters.

  20. Structural and functional features of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Michael H; Gertz, Melanie; Steegborn, Clemens; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-02-26

    Blue mussels adhere to surfaces by the byssus, a holdfast structure composed of individual threads representing a collagen fibre reinforced composite. Here, we present the crystal structure and function of one of its matrix proteins, the proximal thread matrix protein 1, which is present in the proximal section of the byssus. The structure reveals two von Willebrand factor type A domains linked by a two-β-stranded linker yielding a novel structural arrangement. In vitro, the protein binds heterologous collagens with high affinity and affects collagen assembly, morphology and arrangement of its fibrils. By providing charged surface clusters as well as insufficiently coordinated metal ions, the proximal thread matrix protein 1 might interconnect other byssal proteins and thereby contribute to the integrity of the byssal threads in vivo. Moreover, the protein could be used for adjusting the mechanical properties of collagen materials, a function likely important in the natural byssus.

  1. Evaluation of relocation of unionid mussels into artificial ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, T.J.; Monroe, E.M.; Kenyon, R.; Gutreuter, S.; Welke, K.I.; Thiel, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    Relocation of unionid mussels into refuges (e.g., hatchery ponds) has been suggested as a management tool to protect these animals from the threat of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) invasion. To evaluate the efficacy of relocation, we experimentally relocated 768 mussels, representing 5 species (Leptodea fragilis, Obliquaria reflexa, Fusconaia flava, Amblema plicata, and Quadrula quadrula) into an earthen pond at a National Fish Hatchery or back into the river. In both locations, mussels were placed into 1 of 4 treatments (mesh bags, corrals, and buried or suspended substrate-filled trays). Mussels were examined annually for survival, growth (shell length and wet mass), and physiological condition (glycogen concentration in foot and mantle and tissue condition index) for 36 mo in the pond or 40 mo in the river. We observed significant differences in mortality rates between locations (mortality was 4 times greater in the pond than in the river), among treatments (lowest mortality in the suspended trays), and among species (lower mortality in the amblemines than lamp-silines). Overall survival in both locations averaged 80% the 1st year; survival in the pond decreased dramatically after that. Although length and weight varied between locations and over time, these changes were small, suggesting that their utility as short-term measures of well being in long-lived unionids is questionable. Mussels relocated to the pond were in poor physiological condition relative to those in the river, but the magnitude of these differences was small compared to the inherent variability in physiological condition of reference mussels. These data suggest that relocation of unionids into artificial ponds is a high-risk conservation strategy; alternatives such as introduction of infected host fish, identification of mussel beds at greatest risk from zebra mussels, and a critical, large-scale assessment of the factors contributing to their decline should be explored.

  2. What makes a healthy environment for native freshwater mussels?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Freshwater mussels are sensitive to contamination of sediment that they inhabit and to the water that they filter, making the presence of live, adult mussels an excellent indicator of ecosystem health and stability. Freshwater mussels are relatively immobile, imbedded in the streambed with part of the shell sticking up into the water so that they can filter water to obtain oxygen and food. This lack of mobility makes them particularly vulnerable to water and sediment contamination, changes in sedimentation, or prolonged drought. Thus, ecosystem health and stability are critical for their reproduction and survival.

  3. The mussel thread cuticle, a biological granular composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Birkedal, Henrik; Lee, Kaa Yee C.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-03-01

    The cuticle of mussel byssal threads is a peculiar natural granular composite coating that combines high extensibility with high stiffness and hardness. In this study fluorescence microscopy and elemental analysis were exploited to show that the 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) residues of mussel foot protein-1 co-localize with Fe and Ca distributions in the cuticle of Mytilus galloprovincials mussel byssal threads. Removal of Fe and Ca from the cuticle by chelation results in a 50% reduction in hardness. Dopa-metal complexes may be a significant source of stability as cross-links in the composite cuticles.

  4. IMPACT OF WATER TEMPERATURE ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-08-07

    These tests conducted this past quarter have indicated that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels at water temperatures ranging from 7 to 23 C. Percent kill will likely be somewhat lower at very low temperatures, e.g., 7 C, but even at such low temperatures high mussel kill can still be achieved (>70% kill). This is significant because the development of a zebra mussel control method that is efficacious in such a wide range of temperatures broadens its usefulness as a potential commercial product.

  5. Effects of Fucus vesiculosus covering intertidal mussel beds in the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, A.; Reise, K.

    1994-06-01

    The brown alga Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili (Nienburg) Nienhuis covered about 70% of mussel bed ( Mytilus edulis) surface area in the lower intertidal zone of Königshafen, a sheltered sandy bay near the island of Sylt in the North Sea. Mean biomass in dense patches was 584 g ash-free dry weight m-2 in summer. On experimental mussel beds, fucoid cover enhanced mud accumulation and decreased mussel density. The position of mussels underneath algal canopy was mainly endobenthic (87% of mussels with >1/3 of shell sunk into mud). In the absence of fucoids, mussels generated epibenthic garlands (81% of mussels with <1/3 of shell buried in mud). Mussel density underneath fucoid cover was 40 to 73% of mussel density without algae. On natural beds, barnacles (Balanidae), periwinkles ( Littorina littorea) and crabs (particularly juveniles of Carcinus maenas) were significantly less abundant in the presence of fucoids, presumably because most of the mussels were covered with sediment, whereas in the absence of fucoids, epibenthic mussel clumps provided substratum as well as interstitial hiding places. The endobenthic macrofauna showed little difference between covered and uncovered mussel beds. On the other hand, grazing herbivores — the flat periwinkle Littorina mariae, the isopod Jaera albifrons and the amphipods Gammarus spp. — were more abundant at equivalent sites with fucoid cover. The patchy growth of Fucus vesiculosus on mussel beds in the intertidal Wadden Sea affects mussels and their epibionts negatively, but supports various herbivores and increases overall benthic diversity.

  6. Comparison of organic contaminant accumulation by semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and the caged mussel species Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Hofelt, C.; Shea, D.

    1995-12-31

    The accumulation of anthropogenic contaminants by sentinel species such as the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is common in many monitoring programs such as the National Status and Trends Mussel Watch Program. Bivalves are used because they are filter-feeding organisms with a high lipid content and therefore accumulate pollutants readily, and they do not appear to metabolize contaminants to a large extent. There are difficulties associated with this approach however, such as mortality, changing lipid mass and respiration rates, and interspecies differences; therefore the use of a non-living substrate may be more practical. The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) consists of a length of thin-walled polyethylene tubing with a film of high molecular weight neutral lipid (triolein) sealed inside. The SPMD, when suspended in the water column, will concentrate lipophilic organic contaminants from the surrounding environment. The authors deployed SPMDs and caged Mytilus edulis side-by-side at five sites near New Bedford Harbor, MA; an area highly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A good correlation was observed between the SPMDs and the caged blue mussels, with R{sup 2} ranging from 0.57 to 0.85 (N = 16) for chlorinated pesticides and from 0.81 to 0.96 (N = 20) for PCBs. Bioconcentration factors (BCF) based on water column concentrations were also calculated and a good correlation was obtained between the SPMD BCFs and corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients. Unlike previous investigations, the authors found good agreement even with the highest chlorinated PCBs suggesting that there was no steric hindrance of uptake through the SPMD membrane.

  7. Effects of temperature change on mussel, Mytilus.

    PubMed

    Zippay, Mackenzie L; Helmuth, Brian

    2012-09-01

    An increasing body of research has demonstrated the often idiosyncratic responses of organisms to climate-related factors, such as increases in air, sea and land surface temperatures, especially when coupled with non-climatic stressors. This argues that sweeping generalizations about the likely impacts of climate change on organisms and ecosystems are likely less valuable than process-based explorations that focus on key species and ecosystems. Mussels in the genus Mytilus have been studied for centuries, and much is known of their physiology and ecology. Like other intertidal organisms, these animals may serve as early indicators of climate change impacts. As structuring species, their survival has cascading impacts on many other species, making them ecologically important, in addition to their economic value as a food source. Here, we briefly review the categories of information available on the effects of temperature change on mussels within this genus. Although a considerable body of information exists about the genus in general, knowledge gaps still exist, specifically in our ability to predict how specific populations are likely to respond to the effects of multiple stressors, both climate and non-climate related, and how these changes are likely to result in ecosystem-level responses. Whereas this genus provides an excellent model for exploring the effects of climate change on natural and human-managed ecosystems, much work remains if we are to make predictions of likely impacts of environmental change on scales that are relevant to climate adaptation.

  8. Involvement of mytilins in mussel antimicrobial defense.

    PubMed

    Mitta, G; Vandenbulcke, F; Hubert, F; Salzet, M; Roch, P

    2000-04-28

    Four cationic peptides were purified from mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) hemocytes. A combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry of plasma revealed (i) a previously characterized molecule, mytilin B (Charlet, M., Chernysh, S., Philippe, H., Hetrut, C., Hoffmann, J., and Bulet, P. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 21808-21813) and (ii) three new isoforms, mytilin C, D, and G1. The four molecules exhibited complementary antimicrobial properties. The cDNA sequence coding for the mytilin B precursor was obtained from a hemocyte cDNA library. This precursor contains a putative signal peptide of 22 residues, a processing peptide sequence of 34 amino acids, and a C-terminal extension of 48 residues rich in acidic residues. Distribution of mytilin B mRNA and of the corresponding peptide in various mussel tissues revealed that mytilins are synthesized and stored in a specific hemocyte subtype. Furthermore, in an experimental model of infection, we showed (i) a recruitment of hemocytes containing mytilins toward the injection site within hours following bacterial challenge, (ii) that mytilins probably play a prominent role in killing intracellular bacteria after phagocytosis, and (ii) later an increase of mytilin-like material occurred in the plasma suggesting a secondary systemic role.

  9. Development of a molecular diagnostic system to discriminate Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussel) and Dreissena bugensis (quagga mussel)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, M.S.; Kelly, K.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-primer PCR system was developed to discriminate invasive zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga (Dreissena bugensis) mussel. The system is based on: 1) universal primers that amplifies a region of the nuclear 28s rDNA gene from both species and 2) a species-specific primer complementary to either zebra or quagga mussel. The species-specific primers bind to sequences between the binding sites for the universal primers resulting in the amplification of two products from the target species and one product from the nontarget species. Therefore, nontarget products are positive amplification controls. The 3-primer system accurately discriminated zebra and quagga mussels from seven geographically distinct populations.

  10. Will the Displacement of Zebra Mussels by Quagga Mussels Increase Water Clarity in Shallow Lakes during Summer? Results from a Mesocosm Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xueying; Zhang, Xiufeng; Kassam, Sinan-Saleh; Rudstam, Lars G

    2016-01-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are known to increase water clarity and affect ecosystem processes in invaded lakes. During the last decade, the conspecific quagga mussels (D. rostriformis bugensis) have displaced zebra mussels in many ecosystems including shallow lakes such as Oneida Lake, New York. In this study, an eight-week mesocosm experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the displacement of zebra mussels by quagga mussels leads to further decreases in phytoplankton and increases in water clarity resulting in increases in benthic algae. We found that the presence of zebra mussels alone (ZM), quagga mussels alone (QM), or an equal number of both species (ZQ) reduced total phosphorus (TP) and phytoplankton Chl a. Total suspended solids (TSS) was reduced in ZM and ZQ treatments. Light intensity at the sediment surface was higher in all three mussel treatments than in the no-mussel controls but there was no difference among the mussel treatments. There was no increase in benthic algae biomass in the mussel treatments compared with the no-mussel controls. Importantly, there was no significant difference in nutrient (TP, soluble reactive phosphorus and NO3-) levels, TSS, phytoplankton Chl a, benthic algal Chl a, or light intensity on the sediment surface between ZM, QM and ZQ treatments. These results confirm the strong effect of both mussel species on water clarity and indicate that the displacement of zebra mussel by an equivalent biomass of quagga mussel is not likely to lead to further increases in water clarity, at least for the limnological conditions, including summer temperature, tested in this experiment.

  11. Will the Displacement of Zebra Mussels by Quagga Mussels Increase Water Clarity in Shallow Lakes during Summer? Results from a Mesocosm Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, Sinan-Saleh; Rudstam, Lars G.

    2016-01-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are known to increase water clarity and affect ecosystem processes in invaded lakes. During the last decade, the conspecific quagga mussels (D. rostriformis bugensis) have displaced zebra mussels in many ecosystems including shallow lakes such as Oneida Lake, New York. In this study, an eight-week mesocosm experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the displacement of zebra mussels by quagga mussels leads to further decreases in phytoplankton and increases in water clarity resulting in increases in benthic algae. We found that the presence of zebra mussels alone (ZM), quagga mussels alone (QM), or an equal number of both species (ZQ) reduced total phosphorus (TP) and phytoplankton Chl a. Total suspended solids (TSS) was reduced in ZM and ZQ treatments. Light intensity at the sediment surface was higher in all three mussel treatments than in the no-mussel controls but there was no difference among the mussel treatments. There was no increase in benthic algae biomass in the mussel treatments compared with the no-mussel controls. Importantly, there was no significant difference in nutrient (TP, soluble reactive phosphorus and NO3-) levels, TSS, phytoplankton Chl a, benthic algal Chl a, or light intensity on the sediment surface between ZM, QM and ZQ treatments. These results confirm the strong effect of both mussel species on water clarity and indicate that the displacement of zebra mussel by an equivalent biomass of quagga mussel is not likely to lead to further increases in water clarity, at least for the limnological conditions, including summer temperature, tested in this experiment. PMID:28005940

  12. Mussel-inspired dendritic polymers as universal multifunctional coatings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Achazi, Katharina; Liebe, Hendrik; Schulz, Andrea; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Grunwald, Ingo; Haag, Rainer

    2014-10-20

    A rapid and universal approach for multifunctional material coatings was developed based on a mussel-inspired dendritic polymer. This new kind of polymer mimics not only the functional groups of mussel foot proteins (mfps) but also their molecular weight and molecular structure. The large number of catechol and amine groups set the basis for heteromultivalent anchoring and crosslinking. The molecular weight reaches 10 kDa, which is similar to the most adhesive mussel foot protein mfp-5. Also, the dendritic structure exposes its functional groups on the surface like the folded proteins. As a result, a very stable coating can be prepared on virtually any type of material surface within 10 min by a simple dip-coating method, which is as fast as the formation of mussel byssal threads in nature. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Status of fresh water mussel research in Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In addition to the previously described mussel research projects in Virginia, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has undertaken a wide-ranging Cumberlandian Mollusc Conservation Program to (a) accumulate information on the present distribution, life histories, and ecological requirements of the Cumberlandian mussel fauna and (b) conserve or increase populations of these species in the Tennessee River drainage. This TVA program has contributed greatly toward a better understanding of species status, water quality problems, and research needs for this unique faunal group. The attention currently being given to fresh water mussels in the upper Tennessee River system is unprecedented, and participating State and Federal agencies are to be commended for supporting conservation activities far beyond what is legally required. The success of a mollusk conservation effort will depend on public awareness, not of mussels in and for themselves but as indicators of riverine degradation and its effect on environmental health and recreational opportunities for man.

  14. Mussels as a model system for integrative ecomechanics.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Emily; Waite, J Herbert; Sarà, Gianluca; Sebens, Kenneth P

    2015-01-01

    Mussels form dense aggregations that dominate temperate rocky shores, and they are key aquaculture species worldwide. Coastal environments are dynamic across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales, and their changing abiotic conditions affect mussel populations in a variety of ways, including altering their investments in structures, physiological processes, growth, and reproduction. Here, we describe four categories of ecomechanical models (biochemical, mechanical, energetic, and population) that we have developed to describe specific aspects of mussel biology, ranging from byssal attachment to energetics, population growth, and fitness. This review highlights how recent advances in these mechanistic models now allow us to link them together across molecular, material, organismal, and population scales of organization. This integrated ecomechanical approach provides explicit and sometimes novel predictions about how natural and farmed mussel populations will fare in changing climatic conditions.

  15. Impact tolerance in mussel thread networks by heterogeneous material distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-07-01

    The Mytilidae, generally known as marine mussels, are known to attach to most substrates including stone, wood, concrete and iron by using a network of byssus threads. Mussels are subjected to severe mechanical impacts caused by waves. However, how the network of byssus threads keeps the mussel attached in this challenging mechanical environment is puzzling, as the dynamical forces far exceed the measured strength of byssus threads and their attachment to the environment. Here we combine experiment and simulation, and show that the heterogeneous material distribution in byssus threads has a critical role in decreasing the effect of impact loading. We find that a combination of stiff and soft materials at an 80:20 ratio enables mussels to rapidly and effectively dissipate impact energy. Notably, this facilitates a significantly enhanced strength under dynamical loading over 900% that of the strength under static loading.

  16. Impact tolerance in mussel thread networks by heterogeneous material distribution.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    The Mytilidae, generally known as marine mussels, are known to attach to most substrates including stone, wood, concrete and iron by using a network of byssus threads. Mussels are subjected to severe mechanical impacts caused by waves. However, how the network of byssus threads keeps the mussel attached in this challenging mechanical environment is puzzling, as the dynamical forces far exceed the measured strength of byssus threads and their attachment to the environment. Here we combine experiment and simulation, and show that the heterogeneous material distribution in byssus threads has a critical role in decreasing the effect of impact loading. We find that a combination of stiff and soft materials at an 80:20 ratio enables mussels to rapidly and effectively dissipate impact energy. Notably, this facilitates a significantly enhanced strength under dynamical loading over 900% that of the strength under static loading.

  17. Mussels as bioindicators of diclofenac contamination in coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Pena, A; Fernandes, J O

    2017-06-01

    Diclofenac a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) has been confirmed as an emerging contaminant in the aquatic environment. Toxicology studies have revealed that harmful effects may emerge from diclofenac presence not only for human health, but also for marine organisms, which implies its monitoring. To overcome the demanding challenges of diclofenac quantification in biotic aquatic species, a novel method for the determination of diclofenac in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Mytilus edulis) and macroalgae (Laminaria digitata) using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated according to the EC Decision 2002/657/EC. Additionally, a study was done about diclofenac contamination in mussels collected from 8 sites along the 1115 miles of coastline in Portugal in 2015. The results suggested that levels in mussels are closely related to the environmental contamination. Therefore, mussels can be a potential bioindicator of diclofenac contamination in the coastal environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. USGS Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchill, Christopher J.; Baldys, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas provides early detection and monitoring of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) by using a holistic suite of detection methods. The program is designed to assess zebra mussel occurrence, distribution, and densities in north Texas waters by using four approaches: (1) SCUBA diving, (2) water-sample collection with plankton tow nets (followed by laboratory analyses), (3) artificial substrates, and (4) water-quality sampling. Data collected during this type of monitoring can assist rapid response efforts and can be used to quantify the economic and ecological effects of zebra mussels in the north Texas area. Monitoring under this program began in April 2010. The presence of large zebra mussel populations often causes undesirable economic and ecological effects, including damage to water-processing infrastructure and hydroelectric powerplants (with an estimated 10-year cost of $3.1 billion), displacement of native mussels, increases in concentrations of certain species of cyanobacteria, and increases in concentrations of geosmin (an organic compound that results in taste and odor issues in water). Since no large-scale, environmentally safe eradication method has been developed for zebra mussels, it is difficult to remove established populations. Broad physicochemical adaptability, prolific reproductive capacity, and rapid dispersal methods have enabled zebra mussels, within a period of about 20 years, to establish populations under differing environmental conditions across much of the eastern part of the United States. In Texas, the presence of zebra mussels was first confirmed in April 2009 in Lake Texoma in the Red River Basin along the Texas-Oklahoma border. They were most likely introduced into Lake Texoma through overland transport from an infested water body. Since then, the presence of zebra mussels has been reported in both the Red River and Washita River arms of Lake Texoma, in

  19. The effect of sodium chlorite solutions on zebra mussel mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, J.; Richer, Y.; Messer, R.

    1995-06-01

    The effect of four dilutions, 8 ppm, 40 ppm, 120 ppm and 473 ppm of the stock solution of a first product, Z-8, on zebra mussel mortality was investigated in static continuous exposure systems and compared to controls. The entire size class spectrum of the mussel population present at the sampling site was tested by leaving mussels attached to their original rock substrata. Two size class grouping of mussels, 13 mm and less and more than 13 mm in length, were exposed in the same test chambers but were analyzed separately. No mortality occurred in the controls. Concentration 8 ppm had no effect after 166 hours on both size class groupings. Concentrations 40, 120 and 473 ppm had observable killing effect within the 331 hours of experiment for both size groupings. The smaller mussels died faster than the larger ones. Another product, Z-11, was similarly tested during fall 1994 with dilutions 8, 40, 80 and 120 ppm. At 8 ppm dilution, Z-11 had induced only little mortality on both size class groupings after 739 hours. At 40, 80 and 120 ppm dilutions, Z-11 had interesting killing effect for both mussel size groupings within the 739 hours of experiment considering the somehow intermittent treatment used. The results already appear to show that sodium chlorite solutions have the potential for eventually becoming a surrogate to the use of chlorine for the control of zebra mussels. That is because they already show a good killing efficiency without being involved in the formation of undesired by-products such as the use of chlorine is. On this purpose, the product is engaged in the process of homologation by Agriculture Canada for it use as treatment against zebra mussels.

  20. Prevention of zebra mussel infestation and dispersal during aquaculture operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Fisher, S.W.; Dabrowska, H.

    1996-01-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, an exotic invasive species, poses a major threat to North American fish management programs and the aquaculture industry. Fish hatcheries may become infected with zebra mussels from a variety of sources, including the water supply, fish shipments, boats, and equipment. The hatcheries could then serve as agents for the overland dispersal of zebra mussels into stocked waters and to other fish hatcheries. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of aquaculture chemicals for use in controlling zebra mussels in fish hatcheries and preventing dispersal of veligers during fish transport. Chemicals were evaluated for use in fish transport and as disinfectants for ponds and equipment. Standardized static toxicity tests were conducted with representative species of warmwater, coolwater, and coldwater fishes and with larval (3-d-old veligers), early juvenile (settling larvae), and adult zebra mussels. Chemical concentrations and exposure durations were based on recommended treatment levels for fish, eggs, and ponds. Recommended treatment levels were also exceeded, if necessary, to establish lethal levels for zebra mussels of different developmental stages. Our results indicate that some chemicals currently in use in hatcheries may be effective for controlling zebra mussels in various operations. Chloride salts were the safest and most effective therapeutants tested for use in fish transport. The toxicity of chloride salts to fish varied among species and with temperature; only one treatment regime (sodium chloride at 10,000 mg/L) was safe to all fish species that we tested, but it was only effective on veliger and settler stages of the zebra mussel. Effective disinfectants were benzalkonium chloride for use on equipment and rotenone for use in ponds after fish are harvested. The regulatory status of the identified chemicals is discussed as well as several nonchemical control alternatives.

  1. Zebra Mussel Chemical Control Guide, Version 2.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    applications are not likely to adversely impact any listed species (threatened or endangered ) in the treatment area. References Aldridge, D. C...ER D C/ EL T R- 15 -9 Aquatic Nuisance Species Program Zebra Mussel Chemical Control Guide Version 2.0 En vi ro nm en ta l L ab or at...http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Aquatic Nuisance Species Program ERDC/EL TR-15-9 July 2015 Zebra Mussel Chemical Control Guide Version

  2. An Early Danish Computer Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    This paper reports on the development of Nimbi, which is an early computer game implemented at the Danish Computer Company Regnecentralen in 1962-63. Nimbi is a variant of the ancient game Nim. The paper traces the primary origins of the development of Nimbi. These include a mathematical analysis from 1901 of Nim that “killed the game” as the outcome could be predicted quite easily; the desire of the Danish inventor Piet Hein to make a game that eluded such analyses; and the desire of Piet Hein to have computers play games against humans. The development of Nimbi was successful in spite of considerable technical obstacles. However, it seems that the game was not used for publicizing the capabilities of computers - at least not widely - as was the case with earlier Nim implementations, such as the British Nim-playing computer Nimrod in 1951.

  3. How does tidal flow affect pattern formation in mussel beds?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Mackenzie, Julia J

    2016-10-07

    In the Wadden Sea, mussel beds self-organise into spatial patterns consisting of bands parallel to the shore. A leading explanation for this phenomenon is that mussel aggregation reduces losses from dislodgement and predation, because of the adherence of mussels to one another. Previous mathematical modelling has shown that this can lead to spatial patterning when it is coupled to the advection from the open sea of algae-the main food source for mussels in the Wadden Sea. A complicating factor in this process is that the advection of algae will actually oscillate with the tidal flow. This has been excluded from previous modelling studies, and the present paper concerns the implications of this oscillation for pattern formation. The authors initially consider piecewise constant ("square-tooth") oscillations in advection, which enables analytical investigation of the conditions for pattern formation. They then build on this to study the more realistic case of sinusoidal oscillations. Their analysis shows that future research on the details of pattern formation in mussel beds will require an in-depth understanding of how the tides affect long-range inhibition among mussels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Danish Testicular Cancer database.

    PubMed

    Daugaard, Gedske; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel; Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Toft, Birgitte Groenkaer; Engvad, Birte; Agerbæk, Mads; Holm, Niels Vilstrup; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database) and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database). The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC) in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data collection has been performed from 1984 to 2007 and from 2013 onward, respectively. The retrospective DaTeCa database contains detailed information with more than 300 variables related to histology, stage, treatment, relapses, pathology, tumor markers, kidney function, lung function, etc. A questionnaire related to late effects has been conducted, which includes questions regarding social relationships, life situation, general health status, family background, diseases, symptoms, use of medication, marital status, psychosocial issues, fertility, and sexuality. TC survivors alive on October 2014 were invited to fill in this questionnaire including 160 validated questions. Collection of questionnaires is still ongoing. A biobank including blood/sputum samples for future genetic analyses has been established. Both samples related to DaTeCa and DMCG DaTeCa database are included. The prospective DMCG DaTeCa database includes variables regarding histology, stage, prognostic group, and treatment. The DMCG DaTeCa database has existed since 2013 and is a young clinical database. It is necessary to extend the data collection in the prospective database in order to answer quality-related questions. Data from the retrospective database will be added to the prospective data. This will result in a large and very comprehensive database for future studies on TC patients.

  5. Occurence of the Quagga Mussel Dreissena bugensis and the Zebra Mussel Dreissena polymorha in the Upper Mississippi River System

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript reports on a range expansion of the invasive quagga mussel in the Great Rivers of the Upper Missippi River Basin. This research will be of interest to great river ecologists and to invasive species specialists.

  6. Occurence of the Quagga Mussel Dreissena bugensis and the Zebra Mussel Dreissena polymorha in the Upper Mississippi River System

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript reports on a range expansion of the invasive quagga mussel in the Great Rivers of the Upper Missippi River Basin. This research will be of interest to great river ecologists and to invasive species specialists.

  7. Redox proteomics in the mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, B; Tyther, R; Sheehan, D

    2006-07-01

    Pollutants (e.g. PAHs, metals) cause oxidative stress (OS) by forming reactive oxygen species. Redox proteomics provides a means for identifying protein-specific OS effects in Mytilus edulis. Groups of mussels were sampled from a clean site in Cork Harbour, Ireland and exposed to 1 mM H2O2 in holding tanks. Protein extracts of gill and digestive gland were separated by two dimensional electrophoresis and similar protein expression profiles were found. Effects of OS on disulphide bridge patterns were investigated in diagonal gels by separating proteins in non-reducing conditions followed by a second reducing dimension. Immunoprecipitation selected carbonylated and glutathionylated proteins. These methodologies can contribute to redox proteomic studies of pollutant responses in marine organisms.

  8. Blue Ocean Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  9. Introducing the Blues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of the blues and presents a list of resources that are designed to introduce the blues, both as a feeling and as an influential part of American music and culture. Includes picture books and nonfiction for young readers, nonfiction for older readers, Web sites, and compact disks. (LRW)

  10. Blue Ocean Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  11. Templated blue phases.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Miha; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-21

    Cholesteric blue phases of a chiral liquid crystal are interesting examples of self-organised three-dimensional nanostructures formed by soft matter. Recently it was demonstrated that a polymer matrix introduced by photopolymerization inside a bulk blue phase not only stabilises the host blue phase significantly, but also serves as a template for blue phase ordering. We show with numerical modelling that the transfer of the orientational order of the blue phase to the surfaces of the polymer matrix, together with the resulting surface anchoring, can account for the templating behaviour of the polymer matrix inducing the blue phase ordering of an achiral nematic liquid crystal. Furthermore, tailoring the anchoring conditions of the polymer matrix surfaces can bring about orientational ordering different from those of bulk blue phases, including an intertwined complex of the polymer matrix and topological line defects of orientational order. Optical Kerr response of templated blue phases is explored, finding large Kerr constants in the range of K = 2-10 × 10(-9) m V(-2) and notable dependence on the surface anchoring strength. More generally, the presented numerical approach is aimed to clarify the role and actions of templating polymer matrices in complex chiral nematic fluids, and further to help design novel template-based materials from chiral liquid crystals.

  12. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  13. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  14. List 47: blue honeysuckle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This summary presents the descriptions of a newly released blue honeysuckle (Lonicera cerulea L.) cultivar for the List of New Fruit and Nut Cultivars. This blue honeysuckle cultivar was released in Canada in 2012 and has pending Plant Breeder’s Rights Certification with Agriculture Canada. The cult...

  15. After Stroke, 'Blue' Light May Help Beat the Blues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Light May Help Beat the Blues Akin to sunlight, it could ward off depression during rehab, study ... facility used "blue" light in its lighting system. Sunlight is humans' largest source of blue-spectrum light, ...

  16. Assessing the Exposure and Relative Sensitivity of Native Freshwater Mussels to Environmental Stressors and Laboratory Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Expands the database for pesticide toxicity on native freshwater mussels. 2. Aids in determining any potential differences in toxic sensitivity of gravid female mussel attributed to age and laboratory holding times. 3. Aids in determining potential differences in juvenile ...

  17. Assessing the Exposure and Relative Sensitivity of Native Freshwater Mussels to Environmental Stressors and Laboratory Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Expands the database for pesticide toxicity on native freshwater mussels. 2. Aids in determining any potential differences in toxic sensitivity of gravid female mussel attributed to age and laboratory holding times. 3. Aids in determining potential differences in juvenile ...

  18. From blue jeans to blue genes.

    PubMed

    Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2009-03-01

    Cutaneous venous anomalies are common. They are blue and vary in size, number, and location and account for most consultations at specialized interdisciplinary clinics for vascular anomalies. Venous lesions are clinically important because they cause pain, dysfunction, destruction of adjacent tissues, and esthetic concern. Only resection and sclerotherapy are helpful, although not always curative. Understanding etiopathogenesis could help design animal models and develop novel therapeutic approaches. John B. Mulliken, MD, envisioned a project to uncover the genetic basis of an inherited form of venous malformation in a large New England family. Recruitment of 2 young fellows resulted in a collaborative project that unraveled the searched-for gene and its mutation. This was an opening for a new era in vascular anomalies. Two blue genes' mutations were discovered, which account for most, if not all, of the inherited forms of venous anomalies, but other genes as well, for rheologically diverse lesions. Differential diagnosis and management has improved, and animal models are being made. This was achieved through the help of Dr Mulliken, who inspired 2 young investigators in blue jeans to find 2 blue genes.

  19. FROM BLUE JEANS TO BLUE GENES

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Laurence M.; Vikkula, Miikka

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous venous anomalies are common. They are blue in color and vary in size, number and location, and account for the majority of consultations at specialized interdisciplinary clinics for vascular anomalies. Venous lesions are clinically important as they cause pain, dysfunction, destruction of adjacent tissues and esthetic concern. Only resection and sclerotherapy are helpful, although not always curative. Understanding etiopathogenesis could help design animal models and develop novel therapeutic approaches. Dr Mulliken envisioned a project to uncover the genetic basis of an inherited form of venous malformation in a large New England family. Recruitment of two young fellows resulted in a collaborative project that unraveled the searched-for-gene and its mutation. This was an opening for a new era in the field of vascular anomalies. Two blue genes’ mutations were discovered, which account for the majority, if not all, of the inherited forms of venous anomalies, but other genes as well, for rheologically diverse lesions. Differential diagnosis and management has improved, and animal models are being made. This was achieved thanks to Dr Mulliken, who inspired two young investigators in blue jeans to find two blue genes. PMID:19190503

  20. Biochemical composition of three species of unionid mussels after emersion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greseth, Shari L.; Cope, W.G.; Rada, R.G.; Waller, D.L.; Bartsch, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Freshwater mussels are emersed (exposed to air) during conservation activities such as surveys and relocations. Success of these activities depends upon the ability of mussels to survive emersion and to re-burrow in the substratum. We evaluated the acute sublethal effects of emersion on three species of unionid mussels [pocketbook, Lampsilis cardium (Rafinesque, 1820); pimpleback, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa (I. Lea, 1831); spike, Elliptio dilatata (Rafinesque, 1820)] by measuring three biochemicals (carbohydrate, lipid, protein) indicative of biochemical function and energy storage. Mussels were acclimated in water at 25A?C and exposed to five air temperatures (15, 20, 25, 35 and 45A?C) for 15, 30 and 60 min. After emersion, mussels were returned to water at 25A?C and observed for 14 days. Samples of mantle tissue were taken after the 14-day postexposure period and analysed for carbohydrate, lipid and protein. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) did not reveal consistent trends in carbohydrate, lipid or protein concentrations due to sex of mussels, duration of emersion, air temperature or their interaction terms that indicated biological compensation to stress. Overall mean carbohydrate concentrations were greatest (range 447a??615 mg/g dry wt) among the species, followed by protein (179a??289 mg/g dry wt) and lipids (26.7a??38.1 mg/g dry wt). These results have positive implications for conducting conservation activities, because emersion over the range of temperatures (15a??35A?C) and durations (15a??60 min) examined did not appear acutely harmful to mussels.

  1. Cellular biomarkers for monitoring estuarine environments: transplanted versus native mussels.

    PubMed

    Nigro, M; Falleni, A; Barga, I Del; Scarcelli, V; Lucchesi, P; Regoli, F; Frenzilli, G

    2006-05-25

    In developed countries, estuarine environments are often subjected to chemical pollution, whose biological impact is profitably evaluated by the use of multi-biomarker approaches on sentinel species. In this paper, we investigate genotoxicity and lysosomal alterations in the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), from the estuary of the River Cecina (Tuscany, Italy), selected as "pilot basin" within the Water Frame Directive (2000/60 European Community). Both native and 1 month transplanted mussels were used in order to compare these two approaches in terms of sensitiveness of specific biomarker responses. Genotoxic effects were evaluated as strand breaks, by single cell gel electrophoresis (or Comet assay), and as chromosomal alterations, by the micronucleus test in gill cells. Lysosomal alterations were assessed by the neutral red retention time (in haemocytes), lipofuscin accumulation and ultrastructure (in digestive cells). Heavy metal bioaccumulation was also analysed. Mussels from the River Cecina showed a general alteration of all the biomarkers investigated, accompanied by an elevation of tissue metal levels. However, some differences in specific responses occurred between transplanted and native mussels. Early biomarkers, such as those based on DNA and lysosomal membrane integrity, were induced at similar degree in native and transplanted mussels; while alterations resulting from cumulative events, as the increase of micronuclei frequency were much more elevated in native specimens (23.1+/-7.6) than in transplanted (9.3+/-4.7) and reference ones (5.8+/-5.2). Similarly, the comparison between lipofuscin accumulation and mean lysosomal diameter in impacted and control sites, gave significant differences exclusively with transplanted mussels. These results suggest that the parallel use of caged and native mussels in environmental biomonitoring can improve the characterization of the study area.

  2. Evaluation of relocation of unionid mussels to in situ refugia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Hove, M.C.; Waller, D.L.; Hornbach, D.J.; Bartsch, M.R.; Cunningham, L.A.; Dunn, H.L.; Kapuscinski, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the recovery and survival of four species of unionid mussles [pimpleback, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa (I. Lea, 1831); spike, Elliptio dilatata (Rafinesque, 1820); Higgins eye, Lampsilis higginsii (I. Lea, 1857); and pocketbook, Lampsilis cardium (Rafinesque, 1820)] that were experimentally relocated to in situ refugia in the St Croix River of Minnesota and Wisconsin, USA. In 1996, 150 mussels of each of the first three species (450 total) were relocated to three 5 ?? 5 m study grids (Site A), one near Lakeland, Minnesota, which served as a source-site control, and two in the experimental refuge 48 km upstream, near Franconia, Minnesota. In a second relocation in 1997, L. cardium was substituted for L. higginsii and 150 mussels of this and each of the other two species (450 total), were relocated to two study grids (Site B). The source site control was near Sunrise, Minnesota and the experimental refuge was 14 km downstream near Almelund, Minnesota. Mussel recovery, survival and substratum characteristics were evaluated annually at Site A for 2 years and for 3 years at Site B. Mean annual recovery of all three species ranged from 90 to 100% at Site A, and from 34 to 70% at site B. The mean annual survival of recaptured mussels ranged from 85 to 100% at Site A, and from 88 to 100% at Site B. The textural characteristics of the substratum differed significantly between the control and the two refuge locations at the beginning of the study, but did not differ from this initial status among subsequent years at Site A. At Site B, there was a significant shift in textural characteristics from large to smaller fractions over the four years. The relatively high survival of mussels during this study demonstrates the importance of proper handling and transport protocols when relocating mussels and the selection of suitable relocation habitat with stable substratum. When established correctly, in situ refugia may be a viable tool for

  3. Evaluation of relocation of unionid mussels to in situ refugia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Hove, M.C.; Waller, D.L.; Hornbach, D.J.; Bartsch, M.R.; Cunningham, L.A.; Dunn, H.L.; Kapuscinski, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the recovery and survival of four species of unionid mussles [pimpleback, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa (I. Lea, 1831); spike, Elliptio dilatata (Rafinesque, 1820); Higgins eye, Lampsilis higginsii (I. Lea, 1857); and pocketbook, Lampsilis cardium (Rafinesque, 1820)] that were experimentally relocated to in situ refugia in the St Croix River of Minnesota and Wisconsin, USA. In 1996, 150 mussels of each of the first three species (450 total) were relocated to three 5 x 5 m study grids (Site A), one near Lakeland, Minnesota, which served as a source-site control, and two in the experimental refuge 48 km upstream, near Franconia, Minnesota. In a second relocation in 1997, L. Cardium was substituted for L. Higginsii and 150 mussels of this and each of the other two species (450 total), were relocated to two study grids (Site B). The source site control was near Sunrise, Minnesota and the experimental refuge was 14 km downstream near Almelund, Minnesota. Mussel recovery, survival and substratum characteristics were evaluated annually at Site A for 2 years and for 3 years at Site B. Mean annual recovery of all three species ranged from 90 to 100% at Site A, and from 34 to 70% at site B. The mean annual survival of recaptured mussels ranged from 85 to 100% at Site A, and from 88 to 100% at Site B. The textural characteristics of the substratum differed significantly between the control and the two refuge locations at the beginning of the study, but did not differ from this initial status among subsequent years at Site A. At Site B, there was a significant shift in textural characteristics from large to smaller fractions over the four years. The relatively high survival of mussels during this study demonstrates the importance of proper handling and transport protocols when relocating mussels and the selection of suitable relocation habitat with stable substratum. When established correctly, in situ refugia may be a viable tool for

  4. Evidence of coprostanol estrogenicity to the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanata.

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Blaise, C; Lachance, B; Sunahara, G I; Sabik, H

    2001-01-01

    Coprostanol (5 beta (H)-cholestan-3 beta ol) is a reduced metabolite of cholesterol produced by micro-organisms found in the intestinal tract of mammals. This substance abounds in urban effluents and is accumulated by organisms living in the vicinity of municipal effluent outfalls. In an earlier study, freshwater mussels exposed to contaminated river water for 62 days accumulated large quantities of coprostanol (Cop) in their soft tissues (16 micrograms/g dry wt.). Moreover, these mussels were found to have elevated levels of vitellin in their hemolymphs, suggesting estrogenic effects. Although municipal wastewaters are known to contain other estrogenic compounds capable of inducing Vn synthesis in mussels, the estrogenic potential of coprostanol was singled out for examination. To this end, mussels were first injected with concentrations of coprostanol via the abductor muscle route, and allowed to stand in aerated water for 72 h at 15 degrees C. The levels of Vn in mussel hemolymph were assayed using the organic alkali-labile phosphate method. A competitive estradiol-binding assay was then devised to measure the ability of coprostanol to compete in the binding of fluorescein-labeled estradiol-albumin to cytosolic proteins. Coprostanol partially reversed the binding of labeled estradiol-albumin to cytosolic proteins with an EC50 of 1 mM. In addition, injections of coprostanol and estradiol-17 beta led to increased levels of vitellins in the hemolymph of treated mussels. Moreover, incubation of cop in gonad homogenate extracts in the presence of NADPH led to the formation of two compounds, as determined by high-performance thin-layer chromatography. One of these compounds appears to be the C17 oxidation product of coprostanol, whose polarity is similar to that of estradiol. The results present evidence that coprostanol is estrogenic to freshwater mussels.

  5. Status of native freshwater mussels in Copper Creek, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanlon, S.D.; Petty, M.A.; Neves, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous freshwater mussel surveys conducted in Copper Creek showed a decline in the fauna from 1980 to 1998. In 2004 and 2005, we sampled 47 sites acquiring relative abundance estimates (measured in catch-per-unit-effort) to assess the current status of the mussel fauna relative to previous surveys. We also obtained absolute density estimates for 4 select sites for comparison with future and past surveys. Of the 25 mussel species reported from this and previous surveys, 16 were represented by living specimens, 5 are extant but may soon be extirpated, and 8 are likely extirpated from the creek. Presence-absence analysis showed a significant decline in species per site since 1980. Absolute density estimates (at Copper Creek river km 3.1) decreased significantly from 4.07 mussels/m2 in 1981 to 0.63 mussels/m2 in 2005. The cause of this faunal decline is likely due to several factors, including, most notably, the loss of riparian buffers. Nearly half of the stream banks in Copper Creek have inadequate riparian vegetation to provide even minimal sediment control. Precipitous declines of the Clinch River fauna (a likely source population for several species) may be another significant factor influencing the faunal decline in Copper Creek. Despite these declines, populations of several species may be in a state of recovery. Based on 18 comparable sites, average catch-per-unit-effort in 2005 was 25.16 mussels/hr, significantly higher than the 1998 survey (12.92 mussels/hr).

  6. Chemical contaminants and biological indicators of mussel health during gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hellou, Jocelyne; Yeats, Phil; Steller, Sean; Gagné, François

    2003-09-01

    Mytilus edulis were collected intertidally from three locations in Halifax Harbor, Nova Scotia, on five occasions during spring and summer 2000. Bioindicators of health (lipid content), condition and gonad indices (CI and GI), and sex ratio, as well as vitellins, were compared with the bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), coprostanol, and metals. Twice as many male as female mussels were collected from a downtown site (M8) close to numerous raw sewage effluents and a naval dockyard. Males from M8 had a high lipid content, and females had a delayed production of vitellins. These mussels also displayed the highest levels of PACs, coprostanol, Ag, and Sn. Coprostanol and silver are sewage markers in sediments, and their presence in mussels confirms exposure to sewage effluents. Female mussels were more abundant in an area outside the industrialized part of the harbor that had higher marine traffic (M14); displayed higher levels of vitellins in gonads; had similar time trends for CI and GI; and had some similar metals compared with mussels from M8. The lowest variability in biomarkers was observed at a site in a mostly residential arm of the harbor (M12), which was expected to be more pristine based on an earlier investigation. Compared to mussels in M14, the mussels of M12 had the lowest condition indices and PCB concentrations and low but similar levels of lipids, PACs, and coprostanol. They also displayed the highest concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Hg, and females had the highest gonad indices early in the season.

  7. Role of ecological factors and reproductive strategies in structuring freshwater mussel communities

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag; Melvin L. Warren

    1998-01-01

    Freshwater mussel community composition within two drainage basins in Alabama, U.S.A., was better explained by patterns of variability in the fish community and the type of strategy used by mussels for infecting host-fishes than by patterns of variability in microhabitat. Mussel species richness increased in a downstream direction, and large-stream sites were...

  8. Ingestion and potential risks to wildlife from Exxon Valdez oil residues in mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, R.

    1995-12-31

    Mussels are important bioaccumulators of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a toxicologically important fraction of crude oils. In some dense mussel beds in Prince William Sound, oil and PAH residues derived from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS) have persisted. The potential risks to wildlife from the consumption of these mussels are related to the degree of contamination of the mussels, the dietary intake of mussels, and the toxicity of the oils. Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris), Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus), and American Black Oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmanil) were identified as species that consumed significant quantities of mussels. The consumption of mussels was estimated from the percentage of mussels in the diet and the caloric requirements of each species. Caloric requirements were taken either from direct observations or calculated from allometric equations adjusted for nonbasal energy expenditures. Daily intakes of oils were estimated from the percentage of PAHs in oils, PAH levels in mussels from contaminated beds, and mussel consumption by these species. The highest estimated daily oil intake occurred in Black Oystercatchers at 22 mg/kg bodyweight, assuming that these birds consumed mussels at the 95th percentile of oil contamination and that 75% of the caloric requirements are obtained from mussels. These levels of estimated oil ingestion are considerably lower than levels which have been found to produce toxicological effects in extended feeding studies in surrogate species.

  9. Effects of shell morphology on mechanics of zebra and quagga mussel locomotion

    Treesearch

    S. M. Peyer; J. C. Hermanson; C. E. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Although zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) initially colonized shallow habitats within the North American Great Lakes, quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) are becoming dominant in both shallow- and deep-water habitats. Shell morphology differs among zebra, shallow quagga and deep quagga mussels but functional consequences of...

  10. Pervasive hydrologic effects on freshwater mussels and riparian trees in southeastern floodplain ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Andrew L. Rypel; Wendell R. Haag; Robert H. Findlay

    2009-01-01

    We present long-term growth trends for 13 freshwater mussel species from two unregulated rivers and one regulated river in the southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain. We also collected baldcypress (Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.) tree cores adjacent to mussel collection sites in one river and directly compared tree and mussel chronologies in this river. To extend our analysis...

  11. Seasonal and species-specific patterns in abundance of freshwater mussel glochidia in stream drift

    Treesearch

    Jacob J. Culp; Wendell R. Haag; D. Albrey Arrington; Thomas B. Kennedy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. We examined seasonal patterns of abundance of mussel larvae (glochidia) in stream drift in a diverse, large-stream mussel assemblage in the Sipsey River, Alabama, across 1 y. We used recently developed techniques for glochidial identification combined with information about mussel fecundity and benthic assemblages to evaluate how well observed glochidial...

  12. Optically and biologically active mussel protein-coated double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong Chae; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-12-02

    A method of dispersing strongly bundled double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) via a homogeneous coating of mussel protein in an aqueous solution is presented. Optical activity, mechanical strength, as well as electrical conductivity coming from the nanotubes and the versatile biological activity from the mussel protein make mussel-coated DWNTs promising as a multifunctional scaffold and for anti-fouling materials.

  13. Blue ocean strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades.

  14. The Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    Gundtoft, Per Hviid; Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register (DHR) is to continuously monitor and improve the quality of treatment of primary and revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) in Denmark. Study population The DHR is a Danish nationwide arthroplasty register established in January 1995. All Danish orthopedic departments – both public and private – report to the register, and registration is compulsory. Main variables The main variables in the register include civil registration number, indication for primary and revision surgery, operation date and side, and postoperative complications. Completeness of primary and revision surgery is evaluated annually and validation of a number of variables has been carried out. Descriptive data A total of 139,525 primary THAs and 22,118 revisions have been registered in the DHR between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2014. Since 1995, completeness of procedure registration has been high, being 97.8% and 92.0% in 2014 for primary THAs and revisions, respectively. Several risk factors, such as comorbidity, age, specific primary diagnosis and fixation types for failure of primary THAs, and postoperative complications, have been identified through the DHR. Approximately 9,000 primary THAs and 1,500 revisions are reported to the register annually. Conclusion The DHR is important for monitoring and improvement of treatment with THA and is a valuable tool for research in THA surgery due to the high quality of prospective collected data with long-term follow-up and high completeness. The register can be used for population-based epidemiology studies of THA surgery and can be linked to a range of other national databases. PMID:27822092

  15. Reducing abortion: the Danish experience.

    PubMed

    Risor, H

    1989-01-01

    In 1987, 20,830 legal abortions were performed in Denmark. 2,845 involved women below the age of 20, and 532 involved women terminating pregnancy after the 12th week. Danish law permits all of its female citizens to have an abortion free-of-charge before the 12th week of pregnancy. After the 12th week, the abortion must be applied for through a committee of 3 members, and all counties in Denmark have a committee. It is felt in Denmark that a woman has a right to an abortion if she decides to have one. It she makes that choice, doctors and nurses are supportive. Since 1970, sex education has been mandatory in Danish schools. Teachers often collaborate closely with school doctors and nurses in this education. All counties are required to have at least 1 clinic that provides contraceptive counselling. It was recently found that the lowest number of pregnancies among teenaged girls was found in a county in Jutland where all 9th grade students visit the county clinic to learn about contraceptives, pregnancy, and abortion. Within 1 year after Copenhagen had adopted this practice, the number of abortions among teenagers declined by 20%. One fourth of all pharmacies also collaborate with schools to promote sex education, instructing students about contraceptives and pregnancy tests. The Danish Family Planning Association has produced a film on abortion, and plans to produce videos on abortion for use in schools. The organization also holds training programs for health care personnel on contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. By means of the practices described above, it is hoped that the number of abortions and unwanted pregnancies in Denmark will be reduced.

  16. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    PubMed

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to <2% since 2013. The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an

  17. The use of transplanted mussels in the California State Mussel Watch Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, M.D.; Ichikawa, G.S.; Goetzl, J.

    1995-12-31

    Many contaminant programs have been established to study the geographical distributions of potential pollutants, but unfortunately, many have relied solely on resident bivalves. This approach limits the versatility of monitoring programs in that residents are not often found in all the places necessary to sample and there are factors which are inherent in using residents that confound the results. The California State Mussel Watch Program has relied heavily on transplants because they eliminate much of the variation inherent in using residents and they can be transplanted almost anywhere. Examples are given that demonstrate the advantages of using transplants over residents.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of live freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Holliman F.; Davis, D.; Bogan, A.E.; Kwak, T.J.; Gregory, Cope W.; Levine, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the soft tissues of live freshwater mussels, Eastern elliptio Elliptio complanata, via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), acquiring data with a widely available human whole-body MRI system. Anatomical features depicted in the profile images included the foot, stomach, intestine, anterior and posterior adductor muscles, and pericardial cavity. Noteworthy observations on soft tissue morphology included a concentration of lipids at the most posterior aspect of the foot, the presence of hemolymph-filled fissures in the posterior adductor muscle, the presence of a relatively large hemolymph-filled sinus adjacent to the posterior adductor muscle (at the ventral-anterior aspect), and segmentation of the intestine (a diagnostic description not reported previously in Unionidae). Relatively little is known about the basic biology and ecological physiology of freshwater mussels. Traditional approaches for studying anatomy and tissue processes, and for measuring sub-lethal physiological stress, are destructive or invasive. Our study, the first to evaluate freshwater mussel soft tissues by MRI, clarifies the body plan of unionid mussels and demonstrates the efficacy of this technology for in vivo evaluation of the structure, function, and integrity of mussel soft tissues. ?? 2008, The American Microscopical Society, Inc.

  19. Do invasive mussels restrict offshore phosphorus transport in Lake Huron?

    PubMed

    Cha, Yoonkyung; Stow, Craig A; Nalepa, Thomas F; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2011-09-01

    Dreissenid mussels were first documented in the Laurentian Great Lakes in the late 1980s. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) spread quickly into shallow, hard-substrate areas; quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) spread more slowly and are currently colonizing deep, offshore areas. These mussels occur at high densities, filter large water volumes while feeding on suspended materials, and deposit particulate waste on the lake bottom. This filtering activity has been hypothesized to sequester tributary phosphorus in nearshore regions reducing offshore primary productivity. We used a mass balance model to estimate the phosphorus sedimentation rate in Saginaw Bay, a shallow embayment of Lake Huron, before and after the mussel invasion. Our results indicate that the proportion of tributary phosphorus retained in Saginaw Bay increased from approximately 46-70% when dreissenids appeared, reducing phosphorus export to the main body of Lake Huron. The combined effects of increased phosphorus retention and decreased phosphorus loading have caused an approximate 60% decrease in phosphorus export from Saginaw Bay to Lake Huron. Our results support the hypothesis that the ongoing decline of preyfish and secondary producers including diporeia (Diporeia spp.) in Lake Huron is a bottom-up phenomenon associated with decreased phosphorus availability in the offshore to support primary production.

  20. Microplastics in mussels along the coastal waters of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiana; Qu, Xiaoyun; Su, Lei; Zhang, Weiwei; Yang, Dongqi; Kolandhasamy, Prabhu; Li, Daoji; Shi, Huahong

    2016-07-01

    Microplastic has been confirmed as an emerging pollutant in marine environments. One of the primary environmental risks of microplastics is their bioavailability for aquatic organisms. Bivalves are of particular interest because their extensive filter-feeding activity exposes them directly to microplastics present in the water column. In the present study, we investigated microplastic pollution in mussels (Mytilus edulis) from 22 sites along 12,400 mile coastlines of China in 2015. The number of total microplastics varied from 0.9 to 4.6 items/g and from 1.5 to 7.6 items/individual. M. edulis contained more microplastics (2.7 items/g) in wild groups than that (1.6 items/g) in farmed groups. The abundance of microplastics was 3.3 items/g in mussels from the areas with intensive human activities and significantly higher than that (1.6 items/g) with less human activities. The most common microplastics were fibers, followed by fragments. The proportion of microplastics less than 250 μm in size arranged from 17% to 79% of the total microplastics. Diatom was distinguished from microplastics in mussels for the first time using Scanning Electron Microscope. Our results suggested that the numbers of microplastic kept within a relatively narrow range in mussels and were closely related to the contamination of the environments. We proposed that mussels could be used as a potential bioindicator of microplastic pollution of the coastal environment.

  1. Chemical regulation of spawning in the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ram, Jeffrey L.; Nichols, S. Jerrine; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that spawning in bivalves is chemically regulated, both by environmental chemical cues and by internal chemical mediators. In a model proposed for zebra mussels, chemicals from phytoplankton initially trigger spawning, and chemicals associated with gametes provide further stimulus for spawning. The response to environmental chemicals is internally mediated by a pathway utilizing serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, a neurotransmitter), which acts directly on both male and female gonads. The role of serotonin and most other aspects of the model have been tested only on bivalves other than zebra mussels. The effect of serotonin on zebra mussel spawning was tested. Serotonin (10-5 and 10-3 M) injected into ripe males induced spawning, but injection of serotonin into females did not. Gametes were not released by 10-6 serotonin; in most cases, serotonin injection did not release gametes from immature recipients. Serotonin injection provides a reliable means for identifying ripe male zebra mussels and for obtaining zebra mussel sperm without the need for dissection.

  2. Dynamics of submersible mussel rafts in waves and current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-xin; Swift, M. Robinson; Dewhurst, Tobias; Tsukrov, Igor; Celikkol, Barbaros; Newell, Carter

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the dynamics of submersible mussel rafts, the finite element program Aqua-FE™, developed by the University of New Hampshire (UNH), was applied to rafts moored at the surface and submerged. The submerged configuration is used to reduce wave forcing and to avoid contact with floating ice during winters in northern waters. Each raft consists of three pontoons connected by a grid framework. Rafts are intended to support densely spaced mussel ropes hung from the framework. When submerged, the pontoons are flooded, and the raft is held vertically by floats attached by lines. The computer models were developed in Aqua-FE™ to simulate the effects of waves and current. They were validated by comparison with wave tank results by use of a 1/10 scale raft physical model. Comparisons showed good agreement for the important heave (vertical) and pitch (rotational) motions, though there was a tendency towards conservative results for wave and current drag. Full-scale simulations of surface and submerged single raft and two rafts connected in tandem were performed. Submerged raft wave response was found to be reduced relative to that at the surface for both the single and two-raft configurations. In particular, the vertical motion of mussel rope connection points was significantly reduced by submergence, resulting in reduced potential for mussel drop-off. For example, the maximum vertical velocities of mussel rope attachment points in the submerged two raft case were 7%-20% of the corresponding velocities when at the surface.

  3. Zebra mussel effects on benthic invertebrates: physical or biotic?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Botts, P. Silver; Patterson, Benjamin A.; Schloesser, Don W.

    1996-01-01

    In soft sediments, Dreissena spp. create firm substrate in the form of aggregates of living mussels (druses) that roll free on the sediments. Druses provide physical structure which increases habitat heterogeneity, and the mussels increase benthic organic matter through the production of pseudofeces and feces. Descriptive and experimental studies were used to determine: 1) whether the density of benthic invertebrates in soft sediments increased in the presence of druses, and 2) whether the invertebrate assemblage responded to the physical structure provided by a druse or to some biotic effect associated with the presence of living mussels. In core samples collected biweekly during summer in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania, amphipods, chironomids, oligochaetes, turbellarians, and hydrozoans were significantly more abundant in sand with druses than in bare sand. When mesh bags containing either a living druse, non-living druse, or no druse were incubated in the bay for 33 d, we found that chironomids were significantly more abundant in treatments with living druses than with non-living druses, and in treatments with non-living druses than with no druse; turbellarians, amphipods, and hydrozoans were significantly more abundant in treatments with living or non-living druses than with no druse; oligochaetes showed no significant differences among treatments. This study demonstrates that most taxa of benthic invertebrates in soft substrate respond specifically to the physical structure associated with aggregates of mussel shells, but further study is needed to examine chironomid responses to some biotic effect dependent on the presence of living mussels.

  4. Interspecific comparison of the mechanical properties of mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Brazee, Shanna L; Carrington, Emily

    2006-12-01

    Byssally tethered mussels are found in a variety of habitats, including rocky intertidal, salt marsh, subtidal, and hydrothermal vents. One key to the survival of mussels in these communities is a secure attachment, achieved by the production of byssal threads. Although many studies have detailed the unique biomechanical properties of byssal threads, only a few prevalent species have been examined. This study assesses the variation in the mechanical properties of byssus in a broad range of mussel species from diverse environments, including intertidal and subtidal Mytilus edulis, Modiolus modiolus, Geukensia demissa, Bathymodiolus thermophilus, and Dreissena polymorpha. A tensometer was used to measure quasi-static and dynamic mechanical properties of individual threads, and several aspects of morphology were quantified. The results indicate that thread mechanical properties vary among mussel species, and several novel properties were observed. For example, of the species examined, D. polymorpha threads were the strongest, stiffest, least resilient, and fastest to recover after partial deformation. Threads of M. modiolus were characterized by the presence of two distinct yield regions prior to tensile failure. This comparative study not only provides insight into the ecological limitations and evolution of mussels, but also suggests new models for the design of novel biomimetic polymers.

  5. Influence of mussel biological variability on pollution biomarkers.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Carmen; Albentosa, Marina; Campillo, Juan A; Viñas, Lucía; Fumega, José; Franco, Angeles; Besada, Victoria; González-Quijano, Amelia; Bellas, Juan

    2015-02-01

    This study deals with the identification and characterization of biological variables that may affect some of the biological responses used as pollution biomarkers. With this aim, during the 2012 mussel survey of the Spanish Marine Pollution monitoring program (SMP), at the North-Atlantic coast, several quantitative and qualitative biological variables were measured (corporal and shell indices, gonadal development and reserves composition). Studied biomarkers were antioxidant enzymatic activities (CAT, GST, GR), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and the physiological rates integrated in the SFG biomarker (CR, AE, RR). Site pollution was considered as the chemical concentration in the whole tissues of mussels. A great geographical variability was observed for the biological variables, which was mainly linked to the differences in food availability along the studied region. An inverse relationship between antioxidant enzymes and the nutritional status of the organism was evidenced, whereas LPO was positively related to nutritional status and, therefore, with higher metabolic costs, with their associated ROS generation. Mussel condition was also inversely related to CR, and therefore to SFG, suggesting that mussels keep an "ecological memory" from the habitat where they have been collected. No overall relationship was observed between pollution and biomarkers, but a significant overall effect of biological variables on both biochemical and physiological biomarkers was evidenced. It was concluded that when a wide range of certain environmental factors, as food availability, coexist in the same monitoring program, it determines a great variability in mussel populations which mask the effect of contaminants on biomarkers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Foodborne Viruses in Mussels in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Giovanna; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Cioffi, Barbara; Ianiro, Giovanni; Palermo, Pierpaolo; Monini, Marina; Amoroso, Maria Grazia

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the prevalence of various enteric viruses in Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mediterranean mussel) belonging to class A and class B mollusc-harvesting areas in the Campania region in southern Italy was evaluated. One hundred and eight mussels were analysed using real-time reverse transcription PCR during a 2-year collection period (2014-2015) to detect the following viruses: human norovirus (genogroups I and II), rotavirus, astrovirus, sapovirus, aichivirus, hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus. Overall, 50.93% of mussels were contaminated by at least one of the tested viruses. Of these virus-positive mussels, 63.63% were contaminated by two or more viruses. In 2014, only three of the eight investigated viruses were detected: astrovirus, sapovirus and aichivirus, whereas in 2015, seven of the eight viruses were detected (only hepatitis E virus was not identified). Astrovirus was the most frequently detected virus in both sampling periods. In 2014, sapovirus was detected at the same frequency as astrovirus (16.00%), followed by aichivirus (8%). In 2015, astrovirus (32.53%) was most frequently detected, followed by norovirus GII (26.50%), sapovirus (18.07%), hepatitis A virus (16.87%), rotavirus (16.87%), aichivirus (13.25%) and norovirus GI (12.05%).This study describes, for the first time, the presence of aichivirus and sapovirus in mussels in Italy.

  7. Genetic management guidelines for captive propagation of freshwater mussels (unionoidea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Hallerman, E.M.; Neves, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Although the greatest global diversity of freshwater mussels (???300 species) resides in the United States, the superfamily Unionoidea is also the most imperiled taxon of animals in the nation. Thirty-five species are considered extinct, 70 species are listed as endangered or threatened, and approximately 100 more are species of conservation concern. To prevent additional species losses, biologists have developed methods for propagating juvenile mussels for release into the wild to restore or augment populations. Since 1997, mussel propagation facilities in the United States have released over 1 million juveniles of more than a dozen imperiled species, and survival of these juveniles in the wild has been documented. With the expectation of continued growth of these programs, agencies and facilities involved with mussel propagation must seriously consider the genetic implications of releasing captive-reared progeny. We propose 10 guidelines to help maintain the genetic resources of cultured and wild populations. Preservation of genetic diversity will require robust genetic analysis of source populations to define conservation units for valid species, subspecies, and unique populations. Hatchery protocols must be implemented that minimize risks of artificial selection and other genetic hazards affecting adaptive traits of progeny subsequently released to the wild. We advocate a pragmatic, adaptive approach to species recovery that incorporates the principles of conservation genetics into breeding programs, and prioritizes the immediate demographic needs of critically endangered mussel species.

  8. Mongolian blue spots

    MedlinePlus

    ... bruises. This can raise a question about possible child abuse. It is important to recognize that Mongolian blue ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 11. Read More Benign Child abuse - physical Rashes Review Date 4/14/2015 Updated ...

  9. Pale Blue Orb

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-19

    NASA Cassini casts powerful eyes on our home planet, and captures Earth, a pale blue orb, and a faint suggestion of our moon, among the glories of the Saturn system in this image taken Sept. 15, 2006.

  10. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  11. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions, cancer, fatty liver disease, hepatitis C, and arsenic poisoning. Blue-green algae are applied inside the mouth ... people with insulin resistance due to HIV medication. Arsenic poisoning. Early research shows that taking 250 mg of ...

  12. Village Blue Webinar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Village Blue research project provides real-time water quality monitoring data to the Baltimore community and increase public awareness about local water quality in Baltimore Harbor and the Chesapeake Bay.

  13. Mongolian blue spots (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Mongolian blue spots are flat bluish- to bluish-gray skin markings commonly appearing at birth or shortly ... back and also can appear on the shoulders. Mongolian spots are benign and are not associated with ...

  14. Introgression between invasive and native blue mussels (genus Mytilus) in the central California hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Saarman, Norah P; Pogson, Grant H

    2015-09-01

    The ecological and genetic factors determining the extent of introgression between species in secondary contact zones remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the relative importance of isolating barriers and the demographic expansion of invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis on the magnitude and the direction of introgression with the native Mytilus trossulus in a hybrid zone in central California. We use double-digest restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) to genotype 1337 randomly selected single nucleotide polymorphisms and accurately distinguish early and advanced generation hybrids for the first time in the central California Mytilus spp. hybrid zone. Weak levels of introgression were observed in both directions but were slightly more prevalent from the native M. trossulus into the invasive M. galloprovincialis. Few early and advanced backcrossed individuals were observed across the hybrid zone confirming the presence of strong barriers to interbreeding. Heterogeneous patterns of admixture across the zone of contact were consistent with the colonization history of M. galloprovincialis with more extensive introgression in northern localities furthest away from the putative site of introduction in southern California. These observations reinforce the importance of dynamic spatial and demographic expansions in determining patterns of introgression between close congeners, even in those with high dispersal potential and well-developed reproductive barriers. Our results suggest that the threat posed by invasive M. galloprovincialis is more ecological than genetic as it has displaced, and continues to displace the native M. trossulus from much of central and southern California. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Gill Development and its functional and evolutionary implications in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Cannuel, Rozenn; Beninger, Peter G; McCombie, Helen; Boudry, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Study of gill development in bivalve larvae and postlarvae provides information on the evolution of this organ and feeding mechanisms of early stages. Scanning electron microscopy was used to document the development of the filibranch homorhabdic gill in hatchery-reared larval, postlarval, and juvenile Mytilus edulis. Four key stages were identified during gill development: (1) transfer of the particle collection function from velum to gill at metamorphosis, with subsequent elongation of the gill filaments to form a gill basket, with complete frontal ciliation; (2) reflection of the inner demibranchs, and transition to a V-shaped gill; (3) delayed development of the outer demibranchs, occuring simultaneously along the gill axis, with transition to the adult final W-shape; and (4) formation of the ventral particle grooves and concomitant acquisition of dense abfrontal ciliation. These key stages signal shifts in the mechanisms of particle processing during the early development of M. edulis. Gill development in the homorhabdic filibranch M. edulis was similar to that of the early homorhabdic stages of the heterorhabdic filibranchs studied to date (Pectinidae), but different from that of the pseudolamellibranchs (Ostreidae), suggesting divergent evolution of this character. Similarly, the systems responsible for gill cohesion and structural integrity are common to both the homorhabdic and heterorhabdic filibranchs, suggesting evolutionary proximity, but they are patently different from those of the eulamellibranchs and pseudolamellibranchs, suggesting evolutionary divergence.

  16. A Novel Mitochondrial Genome Organization for the Blue Mussel, Mytilus Edulis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, R. J.; Boore, J. L.; Brown, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of 13.9 kilobases (kb) of the 17.1-kb mitochondrial genome of Mytilus edulis has been determined, and the arrangement of all genes has been deduced. Mytilus mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contains 37 genes, all of which are transcribed from the same DNA strand. The gene content of Mytilus is typically metazoan in that it includes genes for large and small ribosomal RNAs, for a complete set of transfer RNAs and for 12 proteins. The protein genes encode the cytochrome b apoenzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (CO) subunits I-III, NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits 1-6 and 4L, and ATP synthetase (ATPase) subunit 6. No gene for ATPase subunit 8 could be found. The reading frames for the ND1, COI, and COIII genes contain long extensions relative to those genes in other metazoan mtDNAs. There are 23 tRNA genes, one more than previously found in any metazoan mtDNA. The additional tRNA appears to specify methionine, making Mytilus mtDNA unique in having two tRNA(Met) genes. Five lengthy unassigned intergenic sequences are present, four of which vary in length from 79 to 119 nucleotides and the largest of which is 1.2 kb. The base compositions of these are unremarkable and do not differ significantly from that of the remainder of the mtDNA. The arrangement of genes in Mytilus mtDNA is remarkably unlike that found in any other known metazoan mtDNA. PMID:1386586

  17. Native Mussels Alter Nutrient Availability and Reduce Blue-Green Algae Abundance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient cycling is a key process that ties all organisms together. This is especially apparent in stream environments in which nutrients are taken up readily and cycled through the system in a downstream trajectory. Ecological stoichiometry predicts that biogeochemical cycles of...

  18. Evidence of Anti-Proliferative Activities in Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis) By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Lucie; Thibodeau, Jacinthe; Bonnet, Claudie; Bryl, Piotr; Carbonneau, Marie-Elise

    2013-01-01

    Shellfish waste components contain significant levels of high quality protein and are therefore a potential source for biofunctional high-value peptides. The feasibility of applying a pilot scale enzymatic hydrolysis process to whole Mytilus edulis and, by fractionation, recover hydrolysates presenting a biological activity of interest, was evaluated. Fractions were tested on four immortalized cancerous cell lines: A549, BT549, HCT15 and PC3. The 50 kDa fraction, enriched in peptides, presented anti-proliferative activity with all cell lines and results suggest a bioactive molecule synergy within the fraction. At a protein concentration of 44 µg/mL, the 50 kDa fraction induced a mortality of 90% for PC3, 89% for A549, 85% for HCT15 and of 81% for BT549 cell lines. At the low protein concentration of only 11 µg/mL the 50 kDa fraction still entails a cell mortality of 76% for A549 and 87% for PC3 cell lines. The 50 kDa fraction contains 56% of proteins, 3% of lipids and 6% of minerals on a dry weight basis and the lowest levels detected of taurine and methionine and highest levels of threonine, proline and glycine amino acids. The enzymatic hydrolysis process suggests that Mytilus edulis by-products should be viewed as high-valued products with strong potential as anti-proliferative agent and promising active ingredients in functional foods. PMID:23535393

  19. Native Mussels Alter Nutrient Availability and Reduce Blue-Green Algae Abundance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient cycling is a key process that ties all organisms together. This is especially apparent in stream environments in which nutrients are taken up readily and cycled through the system in a downstream trajectory. Ecological stoichiometry predicts that biogeochemical cycles of...

  20. Differential segregation patterns of sperm mitochondria in embryos of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liqin; Kenchington, Ellen; Zouros, Eleftherios

    2004-01-01

    In Mytilus, females carry predominantly maternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) but males carry maternal mtDNA in their somatic tissues and paternal mtDNA in their gonads. This phenomenon, known as doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mtDNA, presents a major departure from the uniparental transmission of organelle genomes. Eggs of Mytilus edulis from females that produce exclusively daughters and from females that produce mostly sons were fertilized with sperm stained with MitoTracker Green FM, allowing observation of sperm mitochondria in the embryo by epifluorescent and confocal microscopy. In embryos from females that produce only daughters, sperm mitochondria are randomly dispersed among blastomeres. In embryos from females that produce mostly sons, sperm mitochondria tend to aggregate and end up in one blastomere in the two- and four-cell stages. We postulate that the aggregate eventually ends up in the first germ cells, thus accounting for the presence of paternal mtDNA in the male gonad. This is the first evidence for different behaviors of sperm mitochondria in developing embryos that may explain the tight linkage between gender and inheritance of paternal mitochondrial DNA in species with DUI. PMID:15020473

  1. Free amino acid pattern in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) exposed to crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Soini, J.; Rantamaeki, P.

    1985-12-01

    In this study the authors investigated changes of free amino acid levels in different tissues of Mytilus edulis exposed to low concentrations of crude oil in a short term study. This investigation was accomplished in the northern area of the Baltic Sea, in the Archipelago of Turku. In this area the salinity of the sea water varies between 6-7%. Mytilus edulis lives there in its extreme conditions and it is therefore especially sensitive to disturbances in its environment.

  2. Assessment of PAH pollution in the southern Baltic Sea through the analysis of sediment, mussels and fish bile.

    PubMed

    Ruczyńska, W M; Szlinder-Richert, J; Malesa-Ciećwierz, M; Warzocha, Jan

    2011-09-01

    The concentrations of fifteen PAH compounds in samples of sediment and blue mussel tissue (Mytilus trossulus) were measured. In addition, the biliary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites present in flounder (Platichthys flesus) were analysed. Two methods were used in the analysis of PAH metabolites; high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and fixed wavelength fluorescence (FF). The major PAH metabolite which could be measured using the HPLC method was 1-OH pyrene. It was possible to detect 1-OH Phe and 3-OH B[a]P in 70 and 24 samples respectively, of the 87 samples analysed. However, the concentrations of 1-OH Phe and 3-OH B[a]P were below or near to the LOQ (0.002 μg ml(-1) bile). The bile of flounder samples from the Gulf of Gdańsk had 1-OH Pyr concentrations which ranged from 0.019 to 0.066 μg ml(-1) bile. The high linear correlation observed between the quantity of 1-OH pyrene determined by the HPLC-F method and the content of the sum of pyrene-type PAHs obtained by the FF method indicated the FF method of determination of pyrene-type PAH metabolites can be used as a screening method. The content of ∑(15)PAHs in sediments collected in the Gulf of Gdansk, in 2008, ranged from 29.3 to 103 μg kg(-1) dw. In mussel tissue ∑(15)PAHs concentrations were between 173.2 μg kg(-1) dw and 237.7 μg kg(-1) dw. All concentrations measured in the current study, in mussel tissue, were below the OSPAR toxicity threshold values.

  3. Recruit/algal interaction prevents recovery of overexploited mussel beds: Indirect evidence that post-settlement mortality structures mussel populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsson, Johan; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Stanczak, Sara

    2011-03-01

    The mechanisms maintaining community structure following an ecosystem shift are poorly understood and we propose that they must inherently be biological. Over-exploitation can provide a "natural experiment" with man as a predator driving a change in community structure, possibly an ecosystem shift. We examined a possible mechanism that maintains algal beds as an alternative state on the east coast of South Africa where the mussel Perna perna has been overexploited. Even on unexploited shores, about 50% of mussel larvae settle onto algae, but it is unclear whether they later recruit into adult beds. On such shores we used two indirect field approaches to understand the fate of recruits, testing whether inhibition of mussel recruitment by macroalgae could constitute a biological mechanism preventing reversion from the algal to the pre-disturbance mussel-dominated state. First, we examined possible ontogenetic migration of recruits from algae to adult mussels, testing the prediction that the ratio large:small recruits in adult beds is greater where algae are liberally interspersed with mussels. Second, we examined whether, like adults, recruits show spatial structure that is related to the distribution of topographic depressions, testing the hypothesis that large and small recruits show different co-variation with depressions, microhabitats where algae commonly occur. We found no evidence that recruits on algae actively move to nearby mussel beds as neither the ratio large:small recruits nor the abundances of small or large recruits showed any relationship with algal cover/variability. Small and large recruits showed different co-variation with topographic depressions on spatially structured transects. Like adults, large recruits commonly exhibited negative relationships with depressions. Thus, large recruits neither occur on algae nor migrate from algae to the primary substratum or onto adult beds. Consequently our results (a) highlight the importance of post

  4. Sublethal effects of a chlorinated and heated effluent on the physiology of the mussel, Mytilus edulis L.: a reduction in fitness for survival?

    PubMed

    Mazik, Krysia; Hitchman, Natasha; Quintino, Victor; Taylor, Colin J L; Butterfield, Jonathan; Elliott, Michael

    2013-12-15

    Coastal power stations entrain large volumes of cooling water, requiring biocidal treatment to prevent biological fouling. Discharged effluent is both heated and contaminated with residual traces of biocide and so it is necessary to quantify the impacts of this discharge. Cooling water from Heysham 2 nuclear power station, NW England, UK, is discharged to the intertidal area, via a culvert (to minimise erosion and maximise dilution and dispersion by directing the effluent into the receiving water at all states of the tide) within which the effluent is contained at low water. The culvert and surrounding coastal area support a population of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Mussel health was determined along a gradient of exposure, using three physiological indices: Scope for Growth, Gonad Mantle Index and Somatic Condition Index (K Factor). The Mussels within the culvert exhibited reduced physiological index values compared to an external site. A trend was identified down the length of the culvert, representing a gradient of exposure and indicating a potential negative effect on growth and reproductive output. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effect of copper ions on spatial density of NO-synthase-positive cells in the intestine of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Mytilidae) a histochemical study].

    PubMed

    Pimenova, E A

    2010-01-01

    By the histochemical method of detection of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) (EC 1.6.99.1) the state of nitroxidergic enteric nervous system of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus was studied under conditions of an increased copper concentration in water. Under the action of copper ions the density of distribution of NADPH-d-positive cells has been established to be changed as compared with control throughout 28 days. A sharp rise of proportion of the labeled cells and their enzyme activity was noted after one day of the experiment. The labeled bipolar cells were of dark blue color and were located within the epithelium. There were revealed numerous nerve fibers penetrating the intestinal epithelium throughout its entire length as well as bipolar nerve cells in epithelium of the minor typhlosole and of crystalline style sac; in control molluscs the NADPH-d-positive cells in these parts were absent. After 7 days the difference between control and experimental decreased and remained at this level after 14 days, while after 21 days of exposition the proportion of labeled cells in the experimental mussels was lower than in control, but increased again after 28 days. It is suggested that nitric oxide is an important protective factor of the intestinal epithelium of the mussel C. grayanus and participates in adaptation of this mollusc to action of the elevated concentration of copper ions in water.

  6. Evaluation of a recirculating pond system for rearing juvenile freshwater mussels at White Sulphur Springs National Fish Hatchery, West Virginia, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mummert, A.; Newcomb, T.J.; Neves, R.J.; Parker, B.

    2006-01-01

    A recirculating double-pond system at White Sulphur Springs National Fish Hatchery in West Virginia, U.S.A., was evaluated for suitability for culturing juvenile freshwater mussels. Newly metamorphosed juveniles of Villosa iris and Lampsilis fasciola were placed in the system, and their growth and survival were evaluated for 94 days. Throughout the study, parameters of water quality remained within ranges suitable for mussel survival. Planktonic algal densities in the pond system ranged from 2850 to 6892 cells/ml. Thirty-seven algal taxa were identified, primarily green algae (Chlorophyta), diatoms (Bacillariophyceae), and blue-green algae (Cyanoprokaryota). Over the culture period, juveniles of L. fasciola experienced significantly lower (p < 0.001) survival (6.3% ?? 4.5) than those of V. iris (49.8% ?? 14.5). The very low survival rate of L. fasciola may indicate a failure of the flow-through pond environment to meet its habitat requirements or that variable microhabitat conditions within culture containers existed. Growth did not differ significantly between the species (p = 0.13). Survival of V. iris and growth of both species were similar to previous trials to culture juvenile mussels. Survival rates as high as 66.4% at 93 days for V. iris suggest that juveniles of some riverine species can be successfully cultured in a recirculating pond environment.

  7. Mussel dynamics model: A hydroinformatics tool for analyzing the effects of different stressors on the dynamics of freshwater mussel communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morales, Y.; Weber, L.J.; Mynett, A.E.; Newton, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    A model for simulating freshwater mussel population dynamics is presented. The model is a hydroinformatics tool that integrates principles from ecology, river hydraulics, fluid mechanics and sediment transport, and applies the individual-based modelling approach for simulating population dynamics. The general model layout, data requirements, and steps of the simulation process are discussed. As an illustration, simulation results from an application in a 10 km reach of the Upper Mississippi River are presented. The model was used to investigate the spatial distribution of mussels and the effects of food competition in native unionid mussel communities, and communities infested by Dreissena polymorpha, the zebra mussel. Simulation results were found to be realistic and coincided with data obtained from the literature. These results indicate that the model can be a useful tool for assessing the potential effects of different stressors on long-term population dynamics, and consequently, may improve the current understanding of cause and effect relationships in freshwater mussel communities. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Are Predators Limiting Zebra Mussel Colonization of Unionid Mussels in Great Lake Coastal Wetlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Szalay, F. A.; Bowers, R.

    2005-05-01

    Although many native mollusc populations have been eliminated in the Laurentian Great Lakes by the exotic zebra mussel, recent surveys have found abundant unionid (Bivalvia: Unionidae) populations in some coastal wetlands. Unionid burrowing in soft sediments and predation by fish have been shown to reduce numbers of attached zebra mussels, and we tested these factors in a Lake Erie coastal wetland. In 2002, we held live unionids (Leptodea fragilis, Quadrula quadrula) and Pyganodon grandis shells in exclosures with wire mesh bottoms that were buried to sediment depths of either 5, 10, or 20 cm. After 2 months, numbers of attached dreissenids on unionids were significantly higher inside all exclosure treatments than outside exclosures. This indicated that either unionid burrowing was prevented in all sediment depth treatments or molluscivores were excluded by exclosures. In 2004, we measured dreissenid colonization on Q. quadrula and PVC plates in bottomless exclosures with different mesh sizes. After 6 months, dreissenid numbers on PVC plates and on Q. quadrula in 2.5 cm X 2.5 cm and 5 cm X 10 cm mesh exclosures were significantly higher than in open exclosures. These data suggest that molluscivores are important in limiting dreissenids in Great Lake coastal wetlands.

  9. Preventing mussel adhesion using lubricant-infused materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Shahrouz; Kolle, Stefan; Petrone, Luigi; Ahanotu, Onyemaechi; Sunny, Steffi; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Hoon, Shawn; Cohen, Lucas; Weaver, James C.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Vogel, Nicolas; Miserez, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Mussels are opportunistic macrofouling organisms that can attach to most immersed solid surfaces, leading to serious economic and ecological consequences for the maritime and aquaculture industries. We demonstrate that lubricant-infused coatings exhibit very low preferential mussel attachment and ultralow adhesive strengths under both controlled laboratory conditions and in marine field studies. Detailed investigations across multiple length scales—from the molecular-scale characterization of deposited adhesive proteins to nanoscale contact mechanics to macroscale live observations—suggest that lubricant infusion considerably reduces fouling by deceiving the mechanosensing ability of mussels, deterring secretion of adhesive threads, and decreasing the molecular work of adhesion. Our study demonstrates that lubricant infusion represents an effective strategy to mitigate marine biofouling and provides insights into the physical mechanisms underlying adhesion prevention.

  10. IMPACT OF OXYGEN CONCENTRATION ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2003-01-27

    These tests have indicated that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels in environments having dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations ranging from very low to very high. The results suggest that the highest mussel kill can be achieved in moderately to highly aerated environments, while kill may be 0-20% lower under conditions of very low oxygen. For example, under highly oxygenated conditions 97% kill was achieved while conditions having low DO produced 79% mussel kill. Service water measured in a local power plant indicated that DO concentrations were in the range of 8-9 ppm (e.g., highly aerated) within their pipes. Therefore, we will not expect to see decreases in the efficacy of CL0145A treatments due to oxygen levels within such power plant pipes.

  11. IMPACT OF FIVE TREATMENT FACTORS ON MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2003-12-08

    Under this USDOE-NETL contract, the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens is being developed as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels. The specific purpose of the contract is to identify factors that affect mussel kill. Test results reported herein indicate that mussel kill should not be affected by: (1) air bubbles being carried by currents through power plant pipes; (2) pipe orientation (e.g., vertical or horizontal); (3) whether the bacterial cell concentration during a treatment is constant or slightly varying; (4) whether a treatment is between 3 hr and 12 hr in duration, given that the total quantity of bacteria being applied to the pipe is a constant; and (5) whether the water temperature is between 13 C and 23 C.

  12. Mussel remains from prehistoric salt works, clarke county, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGregor, S.W.; Dumas, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Archaeological research at salt springs in Clarke County, AL (Tombigbee River drainage), documented bivalve mollusk exploitation by late prehistoric American Indians. A total of 582 valves representing 19 species of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) and an estuarine clam (Mactridae) from the Lower Salt Works Site (ca. A.D. 900-1550) and 41 valve fragments representing 6 mussel species from the Stimpson Site (ca. A.D. 1200-1550) were documented. The Lower Salt Works fauna was dominated numerically by Fusconaia ebena and Quadrula asperata, the dominant species reported during recent local surveys. The mussel species represented are known from medium to large streams in sand and gravel habitats and include four federally protected species and other species of conservation concern in Alabama. Results offer comparative data for other archaeological and ecological studies in the region.

  13. Dreissenid mussels are not a "dead end" in Great Lakes food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenijan, Charles P.; Pothoven, Steven A.; Schneeberger, Philip J.; Ebener, Mark P.; Mohr, Lloyd C.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Bence, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Dreissenid mussels have been regarded as a “dead end” in Great Lakes food webs because the degree of predation on dreissenid mussels, on a lakewide basis, is believed to be low. Waterfowl predation on dreissenid mussels in the Great Lakes has primarily been confined to bays, and therefore its effects on the dreissenid mussel population have been localized rather than operating on a lakewide level. Based on results from a previous study, annual consumption of dreissenid mussels by the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) population in central Lake Erie averaged only 6 kilotonnes (kt; 1 kt = one thousand metric tons) during 1995–2002. In contrast, our coupling of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) population models with a lake whitefish bioenergetics model revealed that lake whitefish populations in Lakes Michigan and Huron consumed 109 and 820 kt, respectively, of dreissenid mussels each year. Our results indicated that lake whitefish can be an important predator on dreissenid mussels in the Great Lakes, and that dreissenid mussels do not represent a “dead end” in Great Lakes food webs. The Lake Michigan dreissenid mussel population has been estimated to be growing more than three times faster than the Lake Huron dreissenid mussel population during the 2000s. One plausible explanation for the higher population growth rate in Lake Michigan would be the substantially higher predation rate by lake whitefish on dreissenid mussels in Lake Huron.

  14. The peculiar collagens of mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Waite, J H; Qin, X X; Coyne, K J

    1998-06-01

    The byssal collagens of marine mussels are extracorporeal collagens that function in byssal threads under tension. Each byssal thread resembles a shock absorber in its mechanical design: it is strong and stiff at one end and pliably elastic at the other. Primary structures of three of these collagens (preCols), deduced from cDNAs, reveal signal peptide sequences, but no N-glycosylation sites or propeptides typical of procollagens. The collagen domain (40-50 kDa) represents roughly half the mass of the mature molecules and is distinguished by its central location, abundant Gly-Gly-X repeats, and "flaws" (usually Gly deletions). Flanking the collagen domains on both sides are structural domains that resemble elastin in preCol-P, spider drag-line silk in preCol-D, and Gly-rich cell wall proteins in preCol-NG. Not surprisingly, studies of preCol distribution in byssal threads suggest preCol-P enhancement in the elastic proximal portion, while preCol-D predominates in the stiffer distal portion. PreCol-NG, in contrast, is evenly distributed. Although no data are yet available on the fibrillogenesis and cross-linking of the preCols, the quarter-stagger assembly of fibrillar interstitial collagens does not pertain since preCols lack the terminal peptides of tropocollagen. Metal-binding by histidines may mediate the initial inter- and intramolecular stabilization of preCols in the byssus.

  15. Optimization of thermal processing of canned mussels.

    PubMed

    Ansorena, M R; Salvadori, V O

    2011-10-01

    The design and optimization of thermal processing of solid-liquid food mixtures, such as canned mussels, requires the knowledge of the thermal history at the slowest heating point. In general, this point does not coincide with the geometrical center of the can, and the results show that it is located along the axial axis at a height that depends on the brine content. In this study, a mathematical model for the prediction of the temperature at this point was developed using the discrete transfer function approach. Transfer function coefficients were experimentally obtained, and prediction equations fitted to consider other can dimensions and sampling interval. This model was coupled with an optimization routine in order to search for different retort temperature profiles to maximize a quality index. Both constant retort temperature (CRT) and variable retort temperature (VRT; discrete step-wise and exponential) were considered. In the CRT process, the optimal retort temperature was always between 134 °C and 137 °C, and high values of thiamine retention were achieved. A significant improvement in surface quality index was obtained for optimal VRT profiles compared to optimal CRT. The optimization procedure shown in this study produces results that justify its utilization in the industry.

  16. World mussel watch database. National status and trends program for marine environmental quality: Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Cantillo, A.Y.

    1997-04-01

    The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) is an internationally cooordinated system for systematic operational data collection and analysis. This contribution to GOOS is an attempt to determine the levels of contaminants in mussels and oysters collected worldwide and to compare the results with the long-term Mussel Watch programs of the United States and France. A comprehensive literature search of studies using any species of mussels and/or oysters worldwide to monitor the levels of trace metals and organic contaminants was conducted and the data compiled into the World Mussel Watch database. Data sources and statistics of the database are included. Results of the World Mussel Watch and the US and France Mussel Watch programs were compared and typical levels of some trace metals in uncontaminated mussels and oysters were calculated.

  17. Differential metabolic responses in three life stages of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huifeng; Xu, Lanlan; Yu, Deliang; Ji, Chenglong

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most important metal contaminants in the Bohai Sea. In this work, NMR-based metabolomics was used to investigate the toxicological effects of Cd at an environmentally relevant concentration (50 µg L(-1)) in three different life stages (D-shape larval, juvenile and adult) of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Results indicated that the D-shape larval mussel was the most sensitive life stage to Cd. The significantly different metabolic profiles meant that Cd induced differential toxicological effects in three life stages of mussels. Basically, Cd caused osmotic stress in all the three life stages via different metabolic pathways. Cd exposure reduced the anaerobiosis in D-shape larval mussels and disturbed lipid metabolism in juvenile mussels, respectively. Compared with the D-shape larval and juvenile mussels, the adult mussels reduced energy consumption to deal with Cd stress.

  18. The effect of zebra mussel consumption on growth of freshwater drum in Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P.; Bur, Michael T.

    1996-01-01

    We examined food habits and scale annuli of freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) from western Lake Erie to determine whether increasing predation on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) had affected growth of freshwater drum. The volume of zebra mussels in drum guts was greater in older fish. Growth of age classes 3–4, which consumed few zebra mussels, was greater in the most productive year for zebra mussels, July 1990–August 1991, than in three prior years. The total lengths of 5-year-old drum changed little. The mean total length of 6-year-old females has declined since the zebra mussel invaded Lake Erie, even through mussels comprised more than two-thirds of gut samples in these fish. These studies suggest that zebra mussels may not benefit freshwater drum when serving as a staple in the diet. PDF

  19. Effect of intertidal compared to subtidal exposure on the uptake, loss and oxidative toxicity of water-born benzo[a]pyrene in the mantle and whole tissues of the mussel, Mytilus edulis L.

    PubMed

    Durand, Fabrice; Peters, Laurence D; Livingstone, David R

    2002-01-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis, L.) were exposed to a single dose of 1 ppb benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) under subtidal (SC) or tidal conditions (TC; 6 h immersion, 6 h emersion) in order to follow its bioaccumulation in whole mussel and mantle tissue, and to compare BaP-mediated toxicity on lipids (malonaldehyde formation, MDA) in the mantle. Rapid uptake of BaP (70-80% of BaP initially introduced in tanks) was observed in both conditions after 12 h, but subsequent depuration in clean water was slower in TC mussels. BaP levels decreased in whole tissue in both conditions between 12 and 24 h, but increased in mantle. The mantle BaP levels were similar during the first 4 days in SC and TC, but whereas they decreased in SC after 7 days. BaP was retained at high levels in mantle in TC until the end of the study (14 days). In both conditions, significant increases (P < 0.05) in lipid peroxidation were observed after 4 days, but MDA levels were approximately 3 times higher in the mantle of TC than SC mussels, although BaP tissue concentrations were similar. These observations suggested that increased BaP-mediated toxicity in mantle lipid was due to the interactive effect of the tidal cycle of immersion/emersion on BaP-mediated oxidative damage.

  20. Experimental trials on the feasibility of offshore seed production of the mussel Mytilus edulis in the German Bight: installation, technical requirements and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Bela Hieronymus

    2007-06-01

    This study summarizes the activities and findings during a 2 year investigation on the grow-out of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis) and the technical requirements to withstand harsh weather conditions at an offshore location. The experimental sites were two different test areas, each 5 ha in size, 12-15 m in depth, in the vicinity of the offshore lighthouse “Roter Sand” located 15-17 nautical miles northwest of the city of Bremerhaven (Germany). Two versions of submerged longline systems were deployed: a conventional polypropylene longline in 2002 as well as a steel hawser longline in 2003, both featuring different versions of buoyancy modes. The spat collectors and grow-out ropes were suspended perpendicular from the horizontal longline for several months beginning in March of each respective year. The test sites were visited and sampled on a monthly basis using research vessels. Larval abundances in the surrounding water column reached numbers of up to 1,467 individuals m-3. Post-larval settlement success varied through the entire experimental period, ranging from 29 to 796 individuals of spat per meter of collector. Settled mussels reached a shell length of up to 28 mm 6 months after settlement. Based on the growth rates observed for the seed, it is projected that mussels would reach market size (50 mm) in 12-15 months post settlement, and at the observed densities, each meter of collector rope could yield 10.9 kg of harvestable mussels. The polypropylene line resisted storm conditions with wind waves of up to 6.4 m and current velocities of 1.52 m s-1 and was retrieved in autumn of 2002. In contrast, the steel hawser-based line did not withstand the harsh weather conditions. The steel-based line consisted of six twisted strands that were untwisted by the strong currents and turbulences and consequently the individual strands were torn. Additionally, the line was accidentally cut by a yacht in July 2003. The biological study revealed that the tested location

  1. Biomarker responses in flounder (Platichthys flesus) and mussel (Mytilus edulis) in the Klaipeda-Būtinge area (Baltic Sea).

    PubMed

    Barsiene, Janina; Lehtonen, Kari K; Koehler, Angela; Broeg, Katja; Vuorinen, Pekka J; Lang, Thomas; Pempkowiak, Janusz; Syvokiene, Janina; Dedonyte, Veronika; Rybakovas, Aleksandras; Repecka, Rimantas; Vuontisjärvi, Heta; Kopecka, Justyna

    2006-01-01

    During the EU project BEEP a battery of biomarkers was applied in flounder (Platichthys flesus) and the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) collected at three locations off the Lithuanian coast (Baltic Sea) in June and September 2001 and 2002. The elevated biomarker responses in specimens sampled in September 2001 were apparently related to the extensive dredging activities in the Klaipeda port area and subsequent dumping of contaminated sediments. High concentrations of organic pollutants (organochlorines and PBDEs) were also measured in the tissues of both indicator species. In addition, response levels of genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity as well as concentrations of PAH metabolites in the bile of flounder showed elevations in 2002 after an oil spill in the Būtinge oil terminal in November 2001. In flounder, biomarker measurements 10 months after the spill indicated recovery processes but in mussels a high level of genotoxicity could still be observed 22 months later. The present study illustrates the usefulness of the multi-biomarker approach in the detection of biological effects of pollution in this region of the Baltic Sea.

  2. Cytotoxicity assessment of four pharmaceutical compounds on the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) haemocytes, gill and digestive gland primary cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Quinn, Brian; Binelli, Andrea; Provini, Alfredo

    2011-06-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds are considered the new environmental pollutants but at present few studies have evaluated their ecotoxicity on aquatic invertebrates. This study was aimed to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity of four common drugs, namely atenolol (ATL), carbamazepine (CBZ), diclofenac (DCF) and gemfibrozil (GEM), on three different cell typologies from the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha): haemocytes, gill and digestive gland cells. Results obtained by the Trypan blue exclusion test revealed that exposure to increasing concentrations (0.001; 0.01; 0.1; 1 and 10 mg L(-1)) of CBZ, DCF and GEM were able to significantly decrease the viability of each cell type, while the MTT (3(4,5-dimethyl-2thiazholyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) reduction assay highlighted only a slight reduction of mitochondrial activity of gill and digestive gland cells. Overall, DCF was the most cytotoxic drug for zebra mussel cells, followed by GEM, CBZ, while ATL has not a noteworthy toxic potential. Our preliminary results lay the groundwork for further in vitro evaluations, which will allow a better definition of the potential toxicity of these drugs.

  3. Host-Fish Identification and Early Life Thermal Requisites of the Federal Endangered Winged Mapleleaf Mussel (Quadrula fragosa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steingraeber, M. T.; Hove, M. C.; Bartsch, M. R.; Kalas, J. A.; Newton, T. J.

    2005-05-01

    The winged mapleleaf mussel (Quadrula fragosa) is a federal endangered species with only one known reproducing population. Controlled propagation is needed to aid in recovering this species, but little is known of its specific early life-history requirements, including the identity of host-fish that facilitate transformation of its parasitic glochidia (larvae) into free-living juveniles. In autumn 2003, we initiated three winged mapleleaf host-fish identification tests that were each conducted in different thermal regimes. Results of the two shorter-term tests at warmer temperatures identified blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) and channel catfish (I. punctatus) as suitable host-fish species. Close examination of these test data allowed us to empirically estimate: the minimum daily mean water temperature (9.24°C) required for glochidia to grow and develop into juveniles; and the cumulative water temperature units of net daily growth (395°C•d)needed to initiate peak juvenile recovery. We applied these findings to the longer-term third test and predicted with great accuracy (±7 d) the initial date of peak juvenile mussel recovery after >8 months development in a colder, more natural thermal regime. Our final results also indicated a consistent daily temperature >17°C is needed to trigger the large-scale release of winged mapleleaf juveniles from the gills of host-fish.

  4. Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardi, G. I.; Nicastro, K. R.; McQuaid, C. D.; Ng, T. P. T.; Lathlean, J.; Seuront, L.

    2016-08-01

    Positive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation.

  5. Seasonal variations of arsenic in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klarić, Sanja; Pavičić-Hamer, Dijana; Lucu, Čedomil

    2004-10-01

    Total arsenic concentration in the edible part of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis was evaluated seasonally in the coastal area of Rijeka Bay (North Adriatic Sea, Croatia). Sampling stations were located close to the City of Bakar with no industrial facilities (site 1), in the vicinity of the oil refinery and oil thermoelectric power plant (Urinj, site 2), and 4 miles away from the Plomin coal thermoelectric power plant (Brseč village, site 3). Additionally, the concentration of arsenic in the tail muscle of the lobster Nephrops norvegicus, collected in Rijeka Bay, was studied. During winter at sites 2 and 3, the total arsenic in the edible part of the mussels was 16.4 mg As/kg FW (FW=fresh weight) and 4.38 mg As/kg FW, respectively, and increased during springtime at site 2 (6.5 mg As/kg FW) compared to the rest of the year, when individual total arsenic concentration at all sites ranged from 1.7 to 3.7 mg As/kg FW. In the winter (sites 2 and 3) and springtime (site 2) there was no correlation between the length of the mussel shell and the arsenic concentration in the edible part of the mussels. In the other seasons, at sites 1, 2 and 3, there was a correlation between arsenic in the edible part of mussels and shell length in most cases (correlation coefficients r varied from 0.64 to 0.85; P <0.05 to P <0.01). Correlation between shell length (in the narrow range of shell lengths from 3.4 to 5.0 cm) and arsenic in the edible part of the mussels shows linearity with a high regression coefficient (r =0.914; P <0.001). The increase of arsenic in the mussels during winter and spring was suggested at least partially as a result of a low nutritional status, i.e. reduced weight of the mussels' edible part during winter. In addition, a linear relationship was found between body length and arsenic concentration in the tail muscle (mean 17.11±4.48 mg As/kg FW) of the Norway lobster.

  6. Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Zardi, G. I.; Nicastro, K. R.; McQuaid, C. D.; Ng, T. P. T.; Lathlean, J.; Seuront, L.

    2016-01-01

    Positive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation. PMID:27506855

  7. Impact of the invasive mussel Limnoperna fortunei on glyphosate concentration in water.

    PubMed

    Di Fiori, Eugenia; Pizarro, Haydée; dos Santos Afonso, María; Cataldo, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The use of glyphosate has increased dramatically during the past years around the world. Microbial communities are altered when glyphosate reaches water bodies. The freshwater golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei is an invasive species that has rapidly dispersed since it was introduced in Argentina two decades ago. Mussels alter aquatic conditions through their filtrating activity by increasing water clarity and nutrient recycling. We aim to evaluate the potential capacity of the golden mussel to reduce glyphosate concentration in water, in laboratory conditions. Firstly, the evasive response of mussels to glyphosate (10, 20, and 40 mg l⁻¹) was evaluated and a toxicity test was carried out for these concentrations. A three-week experiment was then performed to assess glyphosate variation under mussel presence for two mussel sizes. Finally, mussels' role on glyphosate concentration was evaluated considering different mussel parts (living organisms and empty shells) through another three-week experiment. Laboratory experiments were performed in triplicate using 2-l microcosms. An initial glyphosate concentration between 16 and 19 mg l⁻¹ was used, and when mussels or valvae were added, 20 organisms per aquaria were used. Samples were obtained at days 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, and 21. Glyphosate decreased by 40% under large mussel presence in both experiments, and was reduced by 25% in empty shell treatments. We believe that part of the herbicide that disappears from the water column is adsorbed in valvae surface, while another proportion is being mineralized by microbial communities in shells' biofilm. The mechanisms by which living mussels increase glyphosate dissipation would be degradation, possibly mediated by bacteria associated to mussel's metabolism. Glyphosate half-life depended on mussel and valvae presence and varied with mussel size. L. fortunei presence (either alive or as empty valvae) alters glyphosate concentration in water. We provide preliminary

  8. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    PubMed Central

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish

  9. Agility - The Danish Way (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Agility - The Danish Way Dr. William Mitchell Dept. for Joint Operations | C2 & Intelligence | Royal Danish Defence College Ryvangs Allé 1...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Royal Danish Defence College,Dept...Establish presence in Mogadishu and expand with main effort in Southern Somalia. •MD2- Establish small military presence in Somaliland. • P/SD1-ID Clan

  10. Atypical cellular blue nevus or malignant blue nevus?*

    PubMed Central

    Daltro, Luise Ribeiro; Yaegashi, Lygia Bertalha; Freitas, Rodrigo Abdalah; Fantini, Bruno de Carvalho; Souza, Cacilda da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Blue nevus is a benign melanocytic lesion whose most frequent variants are dendritic (common) blue nevus and cellular blue nevus. Atypical cellular blue nevus presents an intermediate histopathology between the typical and a rare variant of malignant blue nevus/melanoma arising in a cellular blue nevus. An 8-year-old child presented a pigmented lesion in the buttock since birth, but with progressive growth in the last two years. After surgical excision, histopathological examination revealed atypical cellular blue nevus. Presence of mitoses, ulceration, infiltration, cytological atypia or necrosis may occur in atypical cellular blue nevus, making it difficult to differentiate it from melanoma. The growth of blue nevus is unusual and considered of high-risk for malignancy, being an indicator for complete resection and periodic follow-up of these patients. PMID:28225968

  11. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi; Nørgaard, Mette; Thind, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. Study population All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results presented in this paper are predominantly from the 2013 population. Main variables In 2013, 970 patients were diagnosed with BC in Denmark and were included in a preliminary report from the database. A total of 458 (47%) patients were diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive BC (non-MIBC) and 512 (53%) were diagnosed with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC). A total of 300 (31%) patients underwent cystectomy. Among the 135 patients diagnosed with MIBC, who were 75 years of age or younger, 67 (50%) received neoadjuvent chemotherapy prior to cystectomy. In 2013, a total of 147 patients were treated with curative-intended radiation therapy. Descriptive data One-year mortality was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15–21). One-year cancer-specific mortality was 25% (95% CI: 22–27%). One-year mortality after cystectomy was 14% (95% CI: 10–18). Ninety-day mortality after cystectomy was 3% (95% CI: 1–5) in 2013. One-year mortality following curative-intended radiation therapy was 32% (95% CI: 24–39) and 1-year cancer-specific mortality was 23% (95% CI: 16–31) in 2013. Conclusion This preliminary DaBlaCa-data report showed that the treatment of MIBC in Denmark overall meet high international academic standards. The database is able to identify Danish BC patients and monitor treatment and mortality. In the future, DaBlaCa-data will be a valuable data source and expansive observational studies on BC will be available. PMID:27822081

  12. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Brasso, Klaus; Jakobsen, Erik Breth; Moe, Mette; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Nakano, Anne; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. Study population All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. Main variables The DAPROCAdata registers clinical data and selected characteristics for patients with prostate cancer at diagnosis. Data are collected from the linkage of nationwide health registries and supplemented with online registration of key clinical variables by treating physicians at urological and oncological departments. Main variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). Descriptive data In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015. A key feature of DAPROCAdata is the routine collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), including data on quality-of-life (pain levels, physical activity, sexual function, depression, urine and fecal incontinence) and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and body mass index). PROM data are derived from questionnaires distributed at diagnosis and at 1-year and 3-year follow-up. Hitherto, the PROM data have been limited by low completeness (26% among newly diagnosed patients in 2014). Conclusion DAPROCAdata is a comprehensive, yet still young clinical database. Efforts to improve data collection, data validity, and completeness are ongoing and of high priority. PMID:27843346

  13. The Effect on Selenium Concentrations of a Randomized Intervention with Fish and Mussels in a Population with Relatively Low Habitual Dietary Selenium Intake

    PubMed Central

    Outzen, Malene; Tjønneland, Anne; Larsen, Erik H.; Andersen, Klaus K.; Christensen, Jane; Overvad, Kim; Olsen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Selenium status of the Danish population is below that assumed optimal for the suggested protective effects against chronic diseases, including certain cancers. Fish and shellfish are important dietary sources of selenium in Denmark. We investigated the effect of increased fish and mussel intake on selenium blood concentrations in a population with relatively low habitual dietary selenium intake. We randomly assigned 102 healthy men and women (all non-smokers) aged 48–76 years to an intervention group (n = 51) or a control group (n = 51). Intervention participants received 1000 g fish and mussels/week for 26 weeks (~50 μg selenium/day). Controls received no intervention. Non-fasting blood samples were taken and whole blood selenium was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and plasma selenoprotein P (SelP) was determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS. All available observations were included in linear multiple regression analysis to evaluate the effect of the intervention. The difference in mean change for intervention compared with control persons was 14.9 ng/mL (95% CI: 10.2, 19.7) for whole blood selenium, and 7.0 ng/mL (95% CI: 3.1, 10.9) for plasma SelP (Weeks 0–26). Selenium concentrations were significantly increased after 26 weeks of intervention, albeit to a lower degree than expected. PMID:25599275

  14. The Future of the Danish Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    as a natural consequence of being a co-founder of the United Nations, focused on promoting peace and stability in the world, as a relatively large...Soviet invasion to a more expeditionary course of deploying forces to promote peace and stability around the globe. As a result, Danish defense policy...Danish government including the armed forces. As a consequence Defense Agreement 2010 – 2014 was replaced by Defense Agreement 2013 – 2017 including

  15. Alternative mechanisms alter the emergent properties of self-organization in mussel beds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan-Xing; Weerman, Ellen J; Herman, Peter M J; Olff, Han; van de Koppel, Johan

    2012-07-22

    Theoretical models predict that spatial self-organization can have important, unexpected implications by affecting the functioning of ecosystems in terms of resilience and productivity. Whether and how these emergent effects depend on specific formulations of the underlying mechanisms are questions that are often ignored. Here, we compare two alternative models of regular spatial pattern formation in mussel beds that have different mechanistic descriptions of the facilitative interactions between mussels. The first mechanism involves a reduced mussel loss rate at high density owing to mutual protection between the mussels, which is the basis of prior studies on the pattern formation in mussels. The second mechanism assumes, based on novel experimental evidence, that mussels feed more efficiently on top of mussel-generated hummocks. Model simulations point out that the second mechanism produces very similar types of spatial patterns in mussel beds. Yet the mechanisms predict a strikingly contrasting effect of these spatial patterns on ecosystem functioning, in terms of productivity and resilience. In the first model, where high mussel densities reduce mussel loss rates, patterns are predicted to strongly increase productivity and decrease the recovery time of the bed following a disturbance. When pattern formation is generated by increased feeding efficiency on hummocks, only minor emergent effects of pattern formation on ecosystem functioning are predicted. Our results provide a warning against predictions of the implications and emergent properties of spatial self-organization, when the mechanisms that underlie self-organization are incompletely understood and not based on the experimental study.

  16. Differential recruitment of introduced Pacific oysters and native mussels at the North Sea coast: coexistence possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Susanne

    2005-04-01

    Pacific oysters ( Crassostrea gigas Thunberg 1793) have been introduced into the Wadden Sea (North Sea), where they settle on native mussel beds ( Mytilus edulis L.), which represent the only extensive insular hard substrata in this soft-sediment environment. As abundances of C. gigas rose, some mussel beds became increasingly overgrown with oysters, whereas others did not. Field experiments revealed that recruitment of C. gigas was higher in the lower intertidal than in the upper subtidal zone, that it was higher on conspecifics than on mussels, and that it was not affected by barnacle epigrowth except when settling on mussels. Mussel recruitment is known from inter- and subtidal zones. It occurred equally on oyster and mussel shells but showed a clear preference for barnacle epigrowth over clean shells. Assuming that settlement and recruitment are key processes for species abundances on the North Sea coast, it is predicted that the positive feedback in oyster settlement will lead to rapid reef formation of this invader at the expense of mussel beds. Mussels, however, may escape competitive exclusion by settling between or on the larger oysters especially when barnacles are abundant. Experimental patches with mussels were more often covered by fucoid algae ( Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili Nienburg) than patches with oysters, and oyster recruitment was poor underneath such algal canopies. Thus, fucoids may provide the native mussels with a refuge from the invading oysters and the two bivalves may coexist, provided food is not limiting.

  17. Influences of water and sediment quality and hydrologic processes on mussels in the Clinch River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Gregory C.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Ostby, Brett J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Segments of the Clinch River in Virginia have experienced declining freshwater mussel populations during the past 40 years, while other segments of the river continue to support some of the richest mussel communities in the country. The close proximity of these contrasting reaches provides a study area where differences in climate, hydrology, and historic mussel distribution are minimal. The USGS conducted a study between 2009 and 2011 to evaluate possible causes of the mussel declines. Evaluation of mussel habitat showed no differences in physical habitat quality, leaving water and sediment quality as possible causes for declines. Three years of continuous water-quality data showed higher turbidity and specific conductance in the reaches with low-quality mussel assemblages compared to reaches with high-quality mussel assemblages. Discrete water-quality samples showed higher major ions and metals concentrations in the low-quality reach. Base-flow samples contained high major ion and metal concentrations coincident to low-quality mussel populations. These results support a conceptual model of dilution and augmentation where increased concentrations of major ions and other dissolved constituents from mined tributaries result in reaches with declining mussel populations. Tributaries from unmined basins provide water with low concentrations of dissolved constituents, diluting reaches of the Clinch River where high-quality mussel populations occur.

  18. Biokinetics and biotransformation of DDTs in the marine green mussels Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Yu, Peter K N; Lam, Paul K S; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2009-07-26

    The biokinetics of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, p,p'-dichlorodiphenydichloroethylene (DDE) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), in the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis were characterized in this study. We exposed the mussels to DDT in aqueous or dietary sources and then compared and evaluated the absorption, accumulation, distribution and elimination of DDT and its metabolites (DDD and DDE) in the mussels. In addition, a dynamic model was employed to quantify the depuration kinetics of each DDT compound in various organs of the mussels. The potential biotransformation pathway in the mussels after dietary exposure to DDT was also analyzed. Differing accumulation and elimination patterns of each DDT compound (DDT, DDD and DDE) in various organs were observed. Most of the DDT was confined to the hepatopancreas following either aqueous or dietary exposure, although the biological fate and biokinetics of DDT were differed significantly between routes of exposure. In addition, the elimination of dietary DDT was markedly slower than that following aqueous uptake. The biotransformation of DDT to DDE was rare in the mussels, suggesting that any DDE in the mussels came primarily from the ambient environment instead of through biotransformation process. Nevertheless, DDE may be retained in the mussels because of its exceptionally low elimination rate. In contrast, DDT was biotransformed to DDD in the mussels following dietary uptake, and this biotransformation may facilitate DDT elimination from the mussels.

  19. Alternative mechanisms alter the emergent properties of self-organization in mussel beds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quan-Xing; Weerman, Ellen J.; Herman, Peter M. J.; Olff, Han; van de Koppel, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models predict that spatial self-organization can have important, unexpected implications by affecting the functioning of ecosystems in terms of resilience and productivity. Whether and how these emergent effects depend on specific formulations of the underlying mechanisms are questions that are often ignored. Here, we compare two alternative models of regular spatial pattern formation in mussel beds that have different mechanistic descriptions of the facilitative interactions between mussels. The first mechanism involves a reduced mussel loss rate at high density owing to mutual protection between the mussels, which is the basis of prior studies on the pattern formation in mussels. The second mechanism assumes, based on novel experimental evidence, that mussels feed more efficiently on top of mussel-generated hummocks. Model simulations point out that the second mechanism produces very similar types of spatial patterns in mussel beds. Yet the mechanisms predict a strikingly contrasting effect of these spatial patterns on ecosystem functioning, in terms of productivity and resilience. In the first model, where high mussel densities reduce mussel loss rates, patterns are predicted to strongly increase productivity and decrease the recovery time of the bed following a disturbance. When pattern formation is generated by increased feeding efficiency on hummocks, only minor emergent effects of pattern formation on ecosystem functioning are predicted. Our results provide a warning against predictions of the implications and emergent properties of spatial self-organization, when the mechanisms that underlie self-organization are incompletely understood and not based on the experimental study. PMID:22418256

  20. Zebra mussel control using periodic chlorine dioxide treatments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mussalli, Y.G.; Martin, P.D.

    1995-11-01

    Chlorine dioxide was injected into the water intakes at two power plants in Illinois and one in Indiana in an effort to eradicate the existing population of zebra mussels and mitigate further settlement in station river water cooling systems. Results of the treatments at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station on the Mississippi River, Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station on the Illinois River, and SI Energy`s Gallagher Station on the Ohio River are reported. Treatments were performed on a turnkey basis, with three treatments performed at Meredosia Station in 1994, six treatments performed at Wood River Station between July 1993 and September 1994, and 2 treatments performed at Gallagher Station in 1994. For each treatment, a contractor installed and operated a portable chlorine dioxide generator, monitored water quality and oxidant levels, and provided and monitored bioboxes containing test mussels. Results of the treatments were very favorable, indicating a good potential for periodic treatments with chlorine dioxide to control zebra mussel infestations in the raw water systems of power plants and other industrial facilities. Some difficulties with the chlorine dioxide generation system and cold temperature effects reduced the treatment effectiveness, particularly the second treatment at Gallagher Station. Average induced mortalities ranged from 70 to 100% at Wood River, 87 to 92% at Meredosia, and 30 to 100% at Gallagher for native mussels. Dechlorination successfully kept total oxidant residual levels at or below 0.05 ppM during all treatments at all stations.

  1. The Quagga mussel invades the Lake Superior basin - journal article

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior studies recognized the presence of a single dreissenid species in Lake Superior--the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. However, taxonomic keys based on traditional shell morphology are not always able to differentiate dreissenid species with confidence. We thus employed ge...

  2. Zebra Mussel Monitoring and Control Guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Monitoring and Control Guide is a comprehensive compilation of US and European practices as reported in the open literature as of the end of 1992. EPRI considers the guide to be a living` document and will update it periodically in order to provide results of current research on chemical and nonchemical control technologies and utility experiences. The zebra mussel has infested all of the Great Lakes and other major rivers and waterways and is positioned to spread even more to the adjoining river basins. The impact of the zebra mussel on industrial power plantsis as a biofouler that clogs water systems and heat exchangers. This EPRI guideline identifies the zebra mussel, discusses its distribution in the United States, presents the potential threats to power plants, and presents the methods to initiate monitoring and control programs. Both preventive and corrective measures are presented. Preventive measures include various monitoring methods to initiate control techniques. The control techniques include both chemical and nonchemical together with combining techniques. Corrective methods include operational considerations, chemical cleaning, and mechanical/physical cleaning. It also may be possible to incorporate design changes, such as open to closed-loop backfit, backflushing, or pretreatment for closed systems. Various appendices are included that contain specifications to aid utilities in implementing several of the monitoring and control technologies, results of chemical evaluations at Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company plants, and data on the fate of various commercial molluscicides.

  3. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  4. Optimizing efficiency of zebra mussel monitoring at TVA power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, B.L.

    1995-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) began monitoring for zebra mussels in spring 1992 and first detected veligers entering plant intake at Shawnee, Allen and Cumberland Fossil Plans in summer 1993. Existing information indicated that densities of zebra mussel veligers at plant intakes did not always correspond to densities in critical pipe units; however, a more accurate predictive technique was unavailable. The two sites chosen for this project were Shawnee Fossil Plant on the Ohio River and Allen Fossil Plant on the Mississippi River. The project involved a coordinated series of experiments to determine how densities of zebra mussel veligers varied throughout the day, how veliger densities estimated outside the plants related to estimates at different internal locations, and how growth rate of adult zebra mussels compared using measurements taken inside and outside the plants and from the two different rivers. The data indicated no significant difference in veliger densities from samples collected at the intakes and samples collected inside the plants. There was also no significant difference in densities between samples collected inside the plants. There was also no significant difference in densities between samples taken at different times of the day. The data did indicate a significant difference in density estimates between samples collected on different days and between densities in the rivers compared to densities being drawn into the plant. The results will be used to assist plant staff in evaluating future data and in planning a more effective and cost efficient monitoring program.

  5. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8.

  6. Freshwater mussels of the Delta National Forest, Mississippi Final Report

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag; Melvin L. Warren

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-three species of freshwater mussels were collected during a survey of aquatic habitats in the Delta National Forest, Mississippi. An additional 6 species not encountered in this survey were reported by an earlier study in the Big Sunflower River near the northern proclamation boundary of the Forest. These species are included here, bringing the total species...

  7. A biomarker study using mussels deployed in San Diego Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Steinert, S.; Montee, R.S.; Chadwick, B.; Leather, J.; Sanders, B. Salazar, M.; Salazar, S.; Anderson, J.

    1995-12-31

    In the summer of 1995 a comprehensive assessment of the extent and consequences of marine environmental contamination in the area of Naval Station San diego was conducted. The study addressed contamination sources, distributions, concentrations, transport, sediment-water exchange, biological effects, and degradation. The biological effects portion of the study included contaminant bioaccumulation, growth, and biomarker measurements, in mussels deployed at six stations around the Naval Station. The mussels were deployed for {approximately} 30 days in plastic mesh bags, placed 1 meter above the bottom. To reduce variability the mussels for the study were initially sorted within an extremely narrow size range, 37.8 {+-} 0.6 mm. DNA damage as measured using the comet assay, and tissue levels of stress proteins hsp 60 and hsp 70, were the biomarkers measured. In addition, mussel tissue extracts were applied to the P450 (CYP1A1) reporter gene system. Stress related biological effects increased in relation to sediment contaminants at all but one station. Evidence from this study and an earlier 1993 study suggests that the non-sediment associated effects observed at one station may be the result of PAH photoactivation of accumulated PAHs.

  8. Mussel beds are biological power stations on intertidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Friederike G.; Alegria, Javier; Andriana, Rosyta; Donadi, Serena; Gusmao, Joao B.; van Leeuwe, Maria A.; Matthiessen, Birte; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2017-05-01

    Intertidal flats are highly productive areas that support large numbers of invertebrates, fish, and birds. Benthic diatoms are essential for the function of tidal flats. They fuel the benthic food web by forming a thin photosynthesizing compartment in the top-layer of the sediment that stretches over the vast sediment flats during low tide. However, the abundance and function of the diatom film is not homogenously distributed. Recently, we have realized the importance of bivalve reefs for structuring intertidal ecosystems; by creating structures on the intertidal flats they provide habitat, reduce hydrodynamic stress and modify the surrounding sediment conditions, which promote the abundance of associated organisms. Accordingly, field studies show that high chlorophyll a concentration in the sediment co-vary with the presence of mussel beds. Here we present conclusive evidence by a manipulative experiment that mussels increase the local biomass of benthic microalgae; and relate this to increasing biomass of microalgae as well as productivity of the biofilm across a nearby mussel bed. Our results show that the ecosystem engineering properties of mussel beds transform them into hot spots for primary production on tidal flats, highlighting the importance of biological control of sedimentary systems.

  9. Mussel-inspired antifouling coatings bearing polymer loops.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Ling; Tian, Yu; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-11-11

    This work reports the preparation of antifouling coatings bearing polymer loops using a mussel-inspired ABA triblock copolymer using a simple drop coating method. With similar end graft density, the loop-bearing surfaces show a more enhanced protein-reduction performance than the brush-bearing surfaces.

  10. Mantle displays of freshwater mussels elicit attacks from fish

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag; Melvin L. Warren

    1999-01-01

    Gravid females of some North American freshwater mussel species (Bivalvia: Unionidae) display highly modified mantle margins and other reproductive structures which mimic small fish, terrestrial insects, or aquatic macro-invertebrates. The authors report the responses of fish to these lures, based on the results of laboratory encounters between the following pairs of...

  11. Assessment of toxicity test endpoints for freshwater mussel larvae (glochidia).

    PubMed

    Fritts, Andrea K; Barnhart, M Christopher; Bradley, Megan; Liu, Na; Cope, W Gregory; Hammer, Edward; Bringolf, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine if the viability of freshwater mussel larvae (glochidia) is an ecologically relevant endpoint for toxicity tests and to define the appropriate duration of those tests. The authors assessed 1) how viability (the shell closure response to sodium chloride) compares with infectivity (ability to attach to a host fish and successfully metamorphose to the juvenile stage), and 2) the decline of viability and infectivity over time after glochidia were released from female mussels. Glochidia of 7 mussel species were isolated from females, placed in water, and subsampled daily for 2 d to 5 d. Viability, when ≥90%, was generally a good predictor of infectivity; however, when viability was <90%, infectivity was often disproportionately low, especially for glochidia collected near the end of the brooding period. Viability and infectivity declined more rapidly in natural water and sediment compared to reconstituted water. Following 24-h exposure to a toxicant (sodium chloride or copper), infectivity of the viable glochidia did not differ among concentrations of toxicants. The results indicate that viability is a valid proxy for infectivity and an ecologically relevant endpoint for standard toxicity tests with freshwater mussels for any test duration with control viability >90%.

  12. Evidence of Bald Eagles feeding on freshwater mussels

    Treesearch

    Teryl G. Grubb; Michael A. Coffey

    1982-01-01

    A 1978 study of the winter habitat of the Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the Coconino National Forest, Arizona, indicated repeated and potentially heavy use of a freshwater mussel (Anodonta corpulenta) in the eagles’ diet. As many as 10 eagles (five adults and five immatures) were observed at Upper Lake Mary near...

  13. A hierarchical classification of freshwater mussel diversity in North America

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag

    2010-01-01

    Aim North America harbours the most diverse freshwater mussel fauna on Earth. This fauna has high endemism at the continental scale and within individual river systems. Previous faunal classifications for North America were based on intuitive, subjective assessments of species distributions, primarily the occurrence of endemic species, and do not portray continent-wide...

  14. Effects of severe drought on freshwater mussel assemblages

    Treesearch

    Wendell Hagg; Jr. Warren Melvin L.

    2008-01-01

    We examined changes in freshwater mussel abundance and species composition at eight sites in Alabama and Mississippi in response to a severe drought in 2000. Five small-stream sites in Bankhead National Forest were heavily impacted by drought; one site dried almost completely, and four sites experienced total or near cessation of flow but retained water in their...

  15. The Quagga mussel invades the Lake Superior basin - journal article

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior studies recognized the presence of a single dreissenid species in Lake Superior--the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. However, taxonomic keys based on traditional shell morphology are not always able to differentiate dreissenid species with confidence. We thus employed ge...

  16. Standardization of the juvenile mussel bioassay: Dietary requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, L.W.; Klaine, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    Optimizing a feeding regime is essential for establishing juvenile mussels (Utterbackia imbecillus) as a standard toxicity test organism. Although very little is known about their dietary requirements, these juveniles appear to derive adequate nourishment for survival and growth in batch culture from a diet of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris and Ankistrodesmus falcatus. However, results of previous studies have suggested that mussel diet in culture prior to exposure influences the sensitivity of these organisms to aqueous copper and cadmium exposure. Dietary components included three species of live algae (A. falcatus, C. vulgaris, and Scenedesmus quadricauda) and a suspension of rehydrated, dried Spirulina sp. Less than 24-hr laboratory cultured juveniles were fed all four components or combinations of three algal species daily to determine which mixtures promoted maximal growth. Preliminary data showed growth of control mussels receiving no food was comparable to those organisms fed all four algal species in combination. The greatest increase in shell length of juvenile mussels over 6 days was obtained with the tri-algal combination of A. falcatus, C. vulgaris, and S. quadricauda. The mixture resulting in the least growth included A. falcatus, S. quadricauda, and dried Spirulina sp.

  17. The zebra mussel: US utility implications. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, R.F. )

    1990-11-01

    Dreissena polymorpha, the freshwater macrofouling zebra mussel, was introduced to Lake St. Clair, near Detroit, Michigan, in 1985. It has since spread throughout Lake Erie. Its planktonic veliger larval stage disperses on water currents and adults are transported by human and natural vectors, making it likely to spread throughout most of the United States and southern Canada except for the southwestern and southern United State, where summer water temperatures are above tolerated levels. Veligers enter raw water systems on intake currents to settle and grow to adults attached by secreted byssal threads to hard surfaces. Accumulations of adults impede flow, aggravate sedimentation and corrosion, and foul small-diameter components. Settlement occurs at flow velocities less than 1.5--2.0 m/sec. Mussels can reduce effective pipe diameters and foul intake structures, steam condensers, heat exchangers, fire protection systems, and cooling tower basins. Establishment of mussels in raw water systems should be prevented because subsequent removal is difficult and expensive. Mitigation procedures include manual removal, robotic cleaning, thermal backwashing, water jetting, application of molluscicides, and possibly line pigging and acidic chemical cleaning. Control technologies include oxidizing and non-oxidizing molluscicides, robotic cleaning, shell strainers, exposure of veligers to high voltage electrical fields, thermal backwashing and sand-filtration. The United States power industry can utilize extensive European experience with this species and domestic experience with the Asian clam in its development of effective controls for zebra mussel fouling.

  18. Growth and longevity in freshwater mussels: evolutionary and conservation implications

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag; Andrew L.. Rypel

    2010-01-01

    The amount of energy allocated to growth versus other functions is a fundamental feature of an organism’s life history. Constraints on energy availability result in characteristic trade-offs among life-history traits and reflect strategies by which organisms adapt to their environments. Freshwater mussels are a diverse and imperiled component of aquatic ecosystems but...

  19. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    PubMed

    Nilas, L; Løkkegaard, E C; Laursen, J B; Kling, J; Cortes, D

    2016-08-27

    From 2012-2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, "Internationalization at Home ", offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in English. The majority self-assessed their English proficiency between seven and eight on a 10 unit visual analogue scale, with 10 equivalent to working in Danish, while 15 % rated five or less. However, one-fourth found teaching and writing in English to be twice as difficult than in Danish, and 12 % rated all teaching tasks in English at four or less compared to Danish. The self-assessed need for additional English skills was perceived low. Teaching in English was rated as 30 % more difficult than in Danish, and a significant subgroup of doctors had difficulties in all forms of communication in English, resulting in challenges when introducing international students in non-native English speaking medical departments.

  20. Response of fouling brown mussel, Perna perna (L.), to chlorine.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, S; Venugopalan, V P; van der Velde, G; Jenner, H A

    2003-04-01

    Perna perna (L.), the edible brown mussel, is very widely distributed in the tropical and subtropical regions and is commonly found in rocky shores. Apart from being a candidate for commercial cultivation, P. perna is also a common pest organism in cooling water systems of coastal power stations. Therefore, a lethal and sublethal response of this mussel to commonly used antifouling biocides is of considerable interest to the industry. Mortality pattern (LT(50) and LT(100)) and physiological activities (oxygen consumption, filtration rate, foot activity index, and byssus thread production) of different size groups (9-34 mm shell lengths) of P. perna were studied in the laboratory under different residual chlorine concentrations (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 mg/L for sublethal responses and 1, 2, 3, and 5 mg/L for mortality). Results showed that exposure time for 100% mortality of mussels significantly decreased with increasing residual chlorine concentration. For example, mussels of 9 mm size group exposed to 1 mg/L chlorine residual took 384 h (16 days) to reach 100% mortality, whereas those exposed to 5 mg/L chlorine took 84 h (4 days). The effect of mussel size on mortality was significant between 1 mg/L and 5 mg/L residual chlorine, with larger mussels showing greater resistance than smaller ones. For example, at 2 mg/L residual chlorine, 9 mm and 34 mm size group mussels took 228 h (10 days) and 304 h (13 days), respectively, to achieve 100% mortality. All size groups of P. perna showed progressive reduction in physiological activities, when chlorine residuals were gradually increased from 0 to 1 mg/L. Reduction in physiological activities was strongly correlated with the residual level. A comparison of present data with data available for other common fouling organisms suggests that P. perna is relatively less tolerant to chlorine than Perna viridis (L.) and Brachidontes striatulus (Hanley), which also cause fouling problems in tropical coastal waters.

  1. Upper thermal tolerances of early life stages of freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pandolfo, Tamara J.; Cope, W. Gregory; Arellano, Consuelo; Bringolf, Robert B.; Barnhart, M. Christopher; Hammer, E

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater mussels (order Unioniformes) fulfill an essential role in benthic aquatic communities, but also are among the most sensitive and rapidly declining faunal groups in North America. Rising water temperatures, caused by global climate change, industrial discharges, drought, or land development, could further challenge imperiled unionid communities. The aim of our study was to determine the upper thermal tolerances of the larval (glochidia) and juvenile life stages of freshwater mussels. Glochidia of 8 species of mussels were tested: Lampsilis siliquoidea, Potamilus alatus, Ligumia recta, Ellipsaria lineolata,Lasmigona complanata, Megalonaias nervosa, Alasmidonta varicosa, and Villosa delumbis. Seven of these species also were tested as juveniles. Survival trends were monitored while mussels held at 3 acclimation temperatures (17, 22, and 27°C) were exposed to a range of common and extreme water temperatures (20–42°C) in standard acute laboratory tests. The average median lethal temperature (LT50) among species in 24-h tests with glochidia was 31.6°C and ranged from 21.4 to 42.7°C. The mean LT50 in 96-h juvenile tests was 34.7°C and ranged from 32.5 to 38.8°C. Based on comparisons of LT50s, thermal tolerances differed among species for glochidia, but not for juveniles. Acclimation temperature did not affect thermal tolerance for either life stage. Our results indicate that freshwater mussels already might be living close to their upper thermal tolerances in some systems and, thus, might be at risk from rising environmental temperatures.

  2. A small outbreak of listeriosis associated with smoked mussels.

    PubMed

    Brett, M S; Short, P; McLauchlin, J

    1998-09-08

    Two perinatal listeriosis cases in Auckland, New Zealand, which were diagnosed during November and December 1992 gave histories of consuming Brand X smoked mussels. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from an unopened packet of mussels collected from the refrigerator of one of the cases. Cultures of L. monocytogenes from the two patients were indistinguishable from those recovered from the mussels by serogrouping and DNA macrorestriction analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE analysis of isolates of an additional fifteen clinical cases caused by L. monocytogenes serogroup 1/2 which occurred in New Zealand during 1991 and 1992, revealed two more isolates with indistinguishable PFGE patterns. PFGE analysis of a further 222 L. monocytogenes serogroup 1/2 isolated in New Zealand from food and the environment did not reveal any more cultures with the Brand X PFGE type. A combination of serotyping, phage typing, DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP), cadmium and arsenic sensitivity testing, and PFGE analysis was used to subtype 38 isolates of L. monocytogenes. The isolates comprised: (a) the isolates from four patients; (b) 26 isolates from 15 packets of Brand X mussel products from retail sale, the processing factory, and the refrigerator of one of the patients; (c) seven isolates from environmental swabs taken in the processing factory; and (d) an isolate from Brand X mussel product from a wholesaler in the United Kingdom. The isolates from three of the clinical cases, 26 of the products and four from the factory environment were indistinguishable using all the subtyping systems. This is the first description from New Zealand of a link between cases of listeriosis, a contaminated food, and the food production environment which was microbiologically confirmed using a combination of subtyping methods for L. monocytogenes.

  3. New environmentally friendly MSPD solid support based on golden mussel shell: characterization and application for extraction of organic contaminants from mussel tissue.

    PubMed

    Rombaldi, Caroline; de Oliveira Arias, Jean Lucas; Hertzog, Gabriel Ianzer; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Vieira, João P; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2015-06-01

    The use of golden mussel shells as a solid support in vortex-assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) was evaluated for the first time for extraction of residues of 11 pesticides and nine pharmaceutical and personal care products from mussel tissue samples. After they had been washed, dried, and milled, the mussel shells were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. The MSPD procedure with analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry allowed the determination of target analytes at trace concentrations (nanograms per gram), with mean recoveries ranging from 61 to 107 % and relative standard deviations lower than 18 %. The optimized method consisted of dispersion of 0.5 g of mussel tissue, 0.5 g of NaSO4, and 0.5 g of golden mussel shell for 5 min, and subsequent extraction with 5 mL of ethyl acetate. The matrix effect was evaluated, and a low effect was found for all compounds. The results showed that mussel shell is an effective material and a less expensive material than materials that have traditionally been used, i.e., it may be used in the MSPD dispersion step during the extraction of pesticides and pharmaceutical and personal care products from golden mussel tissues. Graphical Abstract Vortex-assited matrix solid-phase dispersion for extraction of 11 pesticides and 9 PPCPs care products from mussel tissue samples.

  4. Accumulation, elimination, and speciation of cadmium and zinc in mussels, Mytilus edulis, in the natural environment

    SciTech Connect

    Luten, J.B.; Bouquet, W.; Burggraaf, M.M.; Rus, J.

    1986-10-01

    Accumulation of trace metals like cadmium and zinc by the common mussel (Mytilus edulis) has been often studied. Most of these studies have been carried out under laboratory conditions. It has been shown that the accumulation of cadmium by the common mussel is affected by abiotic factors like salinity, temperature and the presence of complexing agents and biotic factors like animal size, sex and maturity. Elimination studies of cadmium from the common mussel are scarce. Detoxification of cadmium by the common mussel takes place by binding to low (metallothionein) and high molecular weight proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate accumulation and elimination of cadmium and zinc by the common mussel in the natural environment in combination with a study about the speciation of cadmium and zinc in the common mussel.

  5. Discrimination of Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) feces in deposited materials by fecal morphology.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yoshihiro B; Iseri, Erina; Kataoka, Tomoya; Tanaka, Makiko; Katsukoshi, Kiyonori; Moki, Hirotada; Naito, Ryoji; Hem, Ramrav; Okada, Tomonari

    2017-02-15

    In the present study, we determined the common morphological characteristics of the feces of Mytilus galloprovincialis to develop a method for visually discriminating the feces of this mussel in deposited materials. This method can be used to assess the effect of mussel feces on benthic environments. The accuracy of visual morphology-based discrimination of mussel feces in deposited materials was confirmed by DNA analysis. Eighty-nine percent of mussel feces shared five common morphological characteristics. Of the 372 animal species investigated, only four species shared all five of these characteristics. More than 96% of the samples were visually identified as M. galloprovincialis feces on the basis of morphology of the particles containing the appropriate mitochondrial DNA. These results suggest that mussel feces can be discriminated with high accuracy on the basis of their morphological characteristics. Thus, our method can be used to quantitatively assess the effect of mussel feces on local benthic environments.

  6. Bioaccumulation of pathogenic bacteria and amoeba by zebra mussels and their presence in watercourses.

    PubMed

    Mosteo, R; Goñi, P; Miguel, N; Abadías, J; Valero, P; Ormad, M P

    2016-01-01

    Dreissena polymorpha (the zebra mussel) has been invading freshwater bodies in Europe since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Filter-feeding organisms can accumulate and concentrate both chemical and biological contaminants in their tissues. Therefore, zebra mussels are recognized as indicators of freshwater quality. In this work, the capacity of the zebra mussel to accumulate human pathogenic bacteria and protozoa has been evaluated and the sanitary risk associated with their presence in surface water has also been assessed. The results show a good correlation between the pathogenic bacteria concentration in zebra mussels and in watercourses. Zebra mussels could therefore be used as an indicator of biological contamination. The bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp.) and parasites (Cryptosporidium oocysts and free-living amoebae) detected in these mussels reflect a potential sanitary risk in water.

  7. Estimating the carrying capacity of green mussel cultivation by using net nutrient removal model.

    PubMed

    Srisunont, Chayarat; Babel, Sandhya

    2016-11-15

    This study aims to evaluate the nutrient removal potential and carrying capacity of green mussel cultivation by using the mass balance model. The developed model takes into consideration the green mussel growth rate, density and chlorophyll a concentration. The data employed in this study were based on culture conditions at Sriracha Fisheries Research Station, Thailand. Results show that net nutrient removal by green mussel is 3302, 380, and 124mg/year/indv for carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus respectively. The carrying capacity of green mussel cultivation was found to be 300indv/m(2) based on chlorophyll a concentration which will not release phosphorus in the water environment beyond the standard (45μg-PO4(-3)-P/L). Higher chlorophyll a concentration results in lowered green mussel carrying capacity. This model can assist farm operators with possible management strategies for a sustainable mussel cultivation and protection of the marine environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of larvae: The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha), quagga mussel (Dreissena rosteriformis bugensis), and Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Black, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    There are presently four freshwater bivalves in the United States that produce larvae or veligers commonly found in the water column: two forms of Asian clams and two species of dreissenids. Portions of the geographic range of three of these bivalves, one species of Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), and quagga mussels (Dreissena rosteriformis bugensis), overlap, causing problems with larval identification. To determine which characteristics can be used to separate larval forms, adult Asian clams, quaggas, and zebra mussels were brought into the laboratory and induced to spawn, and the resulting larvae were reared. Hybrids between quaggas and zebra mussels were also produced, but not reared to maturity. Characteristics allowing for the most rapid and accurate separation of larvae were hinge length, shell length/height, shell shape, shell size, and the presence or absence of a foot and velum. These characteristics were observed in laboratory-reared larvae of known parentage and field-caught larvae of unknown parentage. In most cases, larvae of the Asian clam can be readily separated from those produced by either type of dreissenid on the basis of shell size and presence of a foot. Separating the gametes and embryos of the two types of dreissenids is not possible, but after shell formation, most of the larval stages can be distinguished. Hinge length, shell length/height, and the similarity in size of the shell valves can be used to separate straight-hinged, umbonal, pediveliger, and plantigrade larvae. Quagga × zebra mussel hybrids show characteristics of both parents and are difficult to identify.

  9. Municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent-induced effects on freshwater mussel populations and the role of mussel refugia in recolonizing an extirpated reach.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Patricia L; McInnis, Rodney; Salerno, Joseph; de Solla, Shane R; Servos, Mark R; Leonard, Erin M

    2017-06-01

    Global human population and urbanization continually increase the volume of wastewater entering aquatic environments. Despite efforts to treat these effluents, they contribute a diverse suite of substances that enter watersheds at concentrations that have the potential to elicit adverse effects on aquatic organisms. The relationship between wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent exposure and biological responses within aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood, especially at the population level. To examine the effect of WWTP effluents on sentinel invertebrates, freshwater mussels were assessed in the Grand River, Ontario, in populations associated with the outfall of a major WWTP. This watershed, within the Laurentian Great Lakes basin, has a diverse community of twenty-five species of mussels, including nine Species at Risk, and is representative of many habitats that receive WWTP effluents regionally as well as globally. Surveys were conducted to assess the presence and species richness of freshwater mussels. In total, 55 sites downstream of the WWTP were examined using timed visual searches with one or 2 h of effort spent searching 100 m segments. Although seven species of mussels were found in moderate abundance (mean of 8 mussels per hour of searching across 2 sites) upstream of the WWTP outfall, no live mussels were observed for 7.0 km downstream of the WWTP. Long-term water quality monitoring data indicate that ammonia and nitrite concentrations along with large seasonal declines in diel dissolved oxygen were associated with the extirpation of mussels downstream of the WWTP. The first live mussels found downstream were below the confluence with a major tributary indicating that in addition to an improvement in water quality to a state that enables mussels (and/or their fish hosts) to survive, a nearby mussel refuge may have facilitated the recolonization of the depauperate WWTP-impacted zone. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Fatty acids as tracers of trophic interactions between seston, mussels and biodeposits in a coastal embayment of mussel rafts in the proximity of fish cages.

    PubMed

    Irisarri, Jade; Fernández-Reiriz, María-José; De Troch, Marleen; Labarta, Uxio

    2014-01-01

    We traced the food sources of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis cultured in suspension in Ría Ares-Betanzos (N.W. Spain) by means of fatty acid (FA) biomarkers. The FA profile of seston, mussels' mantle, digestive gland and feces was analyzed during five seasons. Due to the proximity of a fish farm to the bivalve aquaculture site, we also tested if mussels and seston situated 170 m distant from the fish cages incorporated fish feed FA markers compared with samples obtained 550 m away. The principal FA in the mussels' organs were 16:0, 16:1ω7, EPA (20:5ω3) and DHA (22:6ω3), while 16:0 predominated in the feces. Seasonal fluctuations in the seston composition were mirrored in the FA signature of mussels' organs and feces, although the digestive gland had the closest resemblance to the seston FA profile. In general, diatom and bacteria derived-biomarkers predominated in <