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Sample records for danish viking age

  1. Household air pollution from wood burning in two reconstructed houses from the Danish Viking Age.

    PubMed

    Christensen, J M; Ryhl-Svendsen, M

    2015-06-01

    During 13 winter weeks, an experimental archeology project was undertaken in two Danish reconstructed Viking Age houses with indoor open fireplaces. Volunteers inhabited the houses under living conditions similar to those of the Viking Age, including cooking and heating by wood fire. Carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM2.5 ) were measured at varying distances to the fireplace. Near the fireplaces CO (mean) was 16 ppm. PM2.5 (mean) was 3.40 mg/m(3) , however, measured in one house only. The CO:PM mass ratio was found to increase from 6.4 to 22 when increasing the distance to the fire. Two persons carried CO sensors. Average personal exposure was 6.9 ppm, and from this, a personal PM2.5 exposure of 0.41 mg/m(3) was estimated. The levels found here were higher than reported from modern studies conducted in dwellings using biomass for cooking and heating. While this may be due to the Viking house design, the volunteer's lack of training in attending a fire maybe also played a role. Even so, when comparing to today's issues arising from the use of open fires, it must be assumed that also during the Viking Age, the exposure to woodsmoke was a contributing factor to health problems.

  2. Evidence of Authentic DNA from Danish Viking Age Skeletons Untouched by Humans for 1,000 Years

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, Linea; Kivisild, Toomas; Lynnerup, Niels; Dissing, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Background Given the relative abundance of modern human DNA and the inherent impossibility for incontestable proof of authenticity, results obtained on ancient human DNA have often been questioned. The widely accepted rules regarding ancient DNA work mainly affect laboratory procedures, however, pre-laboratory contamination occurring during excavation and archaeological-/anthropological handling of human remains as well as rapid degradation of authentic DNA after excavation are major obstacles. Methodology/Principal Findings We avoided some of these obstacles by analyzing DNA from ten Viking Age subjects that at the time of sampling were untouched by humans for 1,000 years. We removed teeth from the subjects prior to handling by archaeologists and anthropologists using protective equipment. An additional tooth was removed after standard archaeological and anthropological handling. All pre-PCR work was carried out in a “clean- laboratory” dedicated solely to ancient DNA work. Mitochondrial DNA was extracted and overlapping fragments spanning the HVR-1 region as well as diagnostic sites in the coding region were PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced. Consistent results were obtained with the “unhandled” teeth and there was no indication of contamination, while the latter was the case with half of the “handled” teeth. The results allowed the unequivocal assignment of a specific haplotype to each of the subjects, all haplotypes being compatible in their character states with a phylogenetic tree drawn from present day European populations. Several of the haplotypes are either infrequent or have not been observed in modern Scandinavians. The observation of haplogroup I in the present study (<2% in modern Scandinavians) supports our previous findings of a pronounced frequency of this haplogroup in Viking and Iron Age Danes. Conclusion The present work provides further evidence that retrieval of ancient human DNA is a possible task provided adequate precautions

  3. Viking-Age Sails: Form and Proportion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    Archaeological ship-finds have shed much light on the design and construction of vessels from the Viking Age. However, the exact proportions of their sails remain unknown due to the lack of fully preserved sails, or other definite indicators of their proportions. Key Viking-Age ship-finds from Scandinavia—the Oseberg Ship, the Gokstad Ship and Skuldelev 3—have all revealed traces of rigging. In all three finds, the keelson—with the mast position—is preserved, together with fastenings for the sheets and the tack, indicating the breadth of the sail. The sail area can then be estimated based on practical experience of how large a sail the specific ship can carry, in conjunction with hull form and displacement. This article presents reconstructions of the form and dimensions of rigging and sail based on the archaeological finds, evidence from iconographic and written sources, and ethnographic parallels with traditional Nordic boats. When these sources are analysed, not only do the similarities become apparent, but so too does the relative disparity between the archaeological record and the other sources. Preferential selection in terms of which source is given the greatest merit is therefore required, as it is not possible to afford them all equal value.

  4. Viking-Age Sails: Form and Proportion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Vibeke

    2017-04-01

    Archaeological ship-finds have shed much light on the design and construction of vessels from the Viking Age. However, the exact proportions of their sails remain unknown due to the lack of fully preserved sails, or other definite indicators of their proportions. Key Viking-Age ship-finds from Scandinavia—the Oseberg Ship, the Gokstad Ship and Skuldelev 3—have all revealed traces of rigging. In all three finds, the keelson—with the mast position—is preserved, together with fastenings for the sheets and the tack, indicating the breadth of the sail. The sail area can then be estimated based on practical experience of how large a sail the specific ship can carry, in conjunction with hull form and displacement. This article presents reconstructions of the form and dimensions of rigging and sail based on the archaeological finds, evidence from iconographic and written sources, and ethnographic parallels with traditional Nordic boats. When these sources are analysed, not only do the similarities become apparent, but so too does the relative disparity between the archaeological record and the other sources. Preferential selection in terms of which source is given the greatest merit is therefore required, as it is not possible to afford them all equal value.

  5. Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Viking program, its characteristics, goals, and investigations are described. The program consists of launching two spacecraft to Mars in 1975 to soft-land on the surface and test for signs of life. Topics discussed include the launch, the journey through space, tracking, Mars orbit and landing, experiments on the search for life, imaging systems, lander camera, water detection experiments, thermal mapping, and a possible weather station on Mars.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway.

    PubMed

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-19

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway

    PubMed Central

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-01

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. PMID:25487335

  8. Viking and early Middle Ages northern Scandinavian textiles proven to be made with hemp.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, G; Nockert, M; Holst, B

    2013-10-18

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia.

  9. Viking and Early Middle Ages Northern Scandinavian Textiles Proven to be made with Hemp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoglund, G.; Nockert, M.; Holst, B.

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia.

  10. Ancient DNA reveals the Arctic origin of Viking Age cod from Haithabu, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Boessenkool, Sanne; Gondek, Agata T.; Nikulina, Elena A.; Hufthammer, Anne Karin; Pampoulie, Christophe; Knutsen, Halvor; André, Carl; Nistelberger, Heidi M.; Dierking, Jan; Petereit, Christoph; Heinrich, Dirk; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Jentoft, Sissel

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the range and chronology of historic trade and long-distance transport of natural resources is essential for determining the impacts of past human activities on marine environments. However, the specific biological sources of imported fauna are often difficult to identify, in particular if species have a wide spatial distribution and lack clear osteological or isotopic differentiation between populations. Here, we report that ancient fish-bone remains, despite being porous, brittle, and light, provide an excellent source of endogenous DNA (15–46%) of sufficient quality for whole-genome reconstruction. By comparing ancient sequence data to that of modern specimens, we determine the biological origin of 15 Viking Age (800–1066 CE) and subsequent medieval (1066–1280 CE) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) specimens from excavation sites in Germany, Norway, and the United Kingdom. Archaeological context indicates that one of these sites was a fishing settlement for the procurement of local catches, whereas the other localities were centers of trade. Fish from the trade sites show a mixed ancestry and are statistically differentiated from local fish populations. Moreover, Viking Age samples from Haithabu, Germany, are traced back to the North East Arctic Atlantic cod population that has supported the Lofoten fisheries of Norway for centuries. Our results resolve a long-standing controversial hypothesis and indicate that the marine resources of the North Atlantic Ocean were used to sustain an international demand for protein as far back as the Viking Age. PMID:28784790

  11. Analysis and interpretation of a unique Arabic finger ring from the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Wåhlander, Linda; Saage, Ragnar; Rezakhani, Khodadad; Hamid Hassan, Saied A; Neiß, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this work we used non-destructive SEM imaging and EDS analysis to characterize the material composition of an Arabic finger ring, which was found in a 9(th) c. woman's grave at the Viking Age (A.D. 793-1066) trading center of Birka, Sweden. The ring is set with a violet stone inscribed with Arabic Kufic writing, here interpreted as reading "il-la-lah", i.e. "For/to Allah". The stone was previously thought to be an amethyst, but the current results show it to be coloured glass. The ring has been cast in a high-grade silver alloy (94.5/5.5 Ag/Cu) and retains the post-casting marks from the filing done to remove flash and mold lines. Thus, the ring has rarely been worn, and likely passed from the silversmith to the woman buried at Birka with few owners in between. The ring may therefore constitute material evidence for direct interactions between Viking Age Scandinavia and the Islamic world. Being the only ring with an Arabic inscription found at a Scandinavian archaeological site, it is a unique object among Swedish Viking Age material. The technical analysis presented here provides a better understanding of the properties and background of this intriguing piece of jewelry. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Annie; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Christensen, Jannie Marie; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Sigsgaard, Torben; Glasius, Marianne; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to particles from combustion of wood is associated with respiratory symptoms, whereas there is limited knowledge about systemic effects. We investigated effects on systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage in humans who lived in a reconstructed Viking Age house, with indoor combustion of wood for heating and cooking. The subjects were exposed to high indoor concentrations of PM2.5 (700-3,600 µg/m(3)), CO (10.7-15.3 ppm) and NO2 (140-154 µg/m(3)) during a 1-week stay. Nevertheless, there were unaltered levels of genotoxicity, determined as DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase and oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. There were also unaltered expression levels of OGG1, HMOX1, CCL2, IL8, and TNF levels in leukocytes. In serum, there were unaltered levels of C-reactive protein, IL6, IL8, TNF, lactate dehydrogenase, cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins. The wood smoke exposure was associated with decreased serum levels of sICAM-1, and a tendency to decreased sVCAM-1 levels. There was a minor increase in the levels of circulating monocytes expressing CD31, whereas there were unaltered expression levels of CD11b, CD49d, and CD62L on monocytes after the stay in the house. In conclusion, even a high inhalation exposure to wood smoke was associated with limited systemic effects on markers of oxidative stress, DNA damage, inflammation, and monocyte activation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The mystery of the missing Viking helmets.

    PubMed

    Wester, K

    2000-11-01

    Based on archaeological finds and old Norse literature, this study describes the Scandinavian helmet tradition from the Bronze Age to the Viking Age, as well as the Viking culture, with special emphasis on weaponry and head protection. Contrary to what is commonly believed, the study shows that metal helmets must have been used very infrequently by the Vikings. In fact, only one Viking helmet has been retrieved in Scandinavia. Possible reasons for the widespread misconception that the Vikings wore helmets are discussed, and the responsibility for not correcting this misunderstanding is placed with the archaeological profession.

  14. [Where are all the Viking helmets?].

    PubMed

    Wester, K

    2001-06-30

    Based on archaeological finds and old Norse literature, this article describes the Scandinavian helmet tradition from the Bronze Age to the Viking Age, as well as the Viking culture, with special emphasis on weaponry, burial customs, and head protection. Contrary to what is commonly believed, metal helmets must have been used very infrequently by the Vikings. Only one Viking helmet has been retrieved in Scandinavia. Possible reasons for the wide-spread misunderstanding that the Vikings wore helmets are discussed. The archaeological profession must partly bear the responsibility for not correcting this misunderstanding.

  15. Viking navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneil, W. J.; Rudd, R. P.; Farless, D. L.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Mitchell, R. T.; Rourke, K. H.; Euler, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the navigation of the Viking spacecraft throughout their flight from Earth launch to Mars landing is given. The flight path design, actual inflight control, and postflight reconstruction are discussed in detail. The preflight analyses upon which the operational strategies and performance predictions were based are discussed. The inflight results are then discussed and compared with the preflight predictions and, finally, the results of any postflight analyses are presented.

  16. Viking extended mission support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillette, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) support of Viking spacecraft activities and the DSN Viking command and tracking support are reported. The status of DSN Mark 3 data (MDS) subsystem implementation project related Viking testing is included.

  17. LIDAR-based coastal landscape reconstruction and harbour location: The Viking-age royal burial site of Borre (Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, Erich; Doneus, Michael; Gansum, Terje

    2013-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) has found wide application in archaeological research for the detection and documentation of archaeological and palaeo-environmental features. In this study we demonstrate the analysis of an LIDAR derived 1x1 m digital elevation model (DTM) combined with geoarchaeological research of the coastal Viking-age burial site in Borre, Olso Fjord (Norway). Borre is an exceptional burial site in Scandinavia, containing burial mounds up to 40 m in diameter and 6 m height, mentioned in Nordic Sagas, especially in the skaldic poem Ynglingatal, as the burial place of one or two kings of the Ynglinga dynasty. Archaeological findings and radiocarbon ages indicate that the Borre burial ground had been in use broadly between 600-1000 AD. Despite the reasonable expectation that a coastal site connected with the Viking kings of Vestfold, with hall buildings and ship graves demands a harbour, up to now no harbour has not been found with traditional archaeological surveys. Since the area of Borre is affected by a continuous land uplift related to glacial rebound of Scandinavia, any former harbour site is expected to be exposed to the land surface today. The present day vertical crustal uplift is calculated around 2.5 mm/yr in the area of Borre. Burial mounds and surrounding borrow pits as well as geomorphological features of the uplifted coast of Borre have been analysed by the 1x1 m LIDAR-DTM, using hillshade, slope and local relief model for visualisation. Altogether, 41 burial mounds and further 6 potential mounds are visible in the high-resolution DTM. A succession of more than 14 beach ridges, cross-cut by the burial mounds, is visible from the present shore line up to 18 m asl. They are more or less parallel and similar in size, except between at ca. 4-6 m asl, where the most prominent ridge is located, which probably has been enforced artificially. Using published shoreline displacement curves from nearby areas, the shore-line at

  18. Vikers Viking Amphibian - biplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    Vikers Viking Amphibian - biplane: Initially procured in 1921 by the U.S. Navy during their studies of foreign designs, the Vickers Viking IV became NACA 17 during its short period of study at Langley.

  19. Mars: The Viking discoveries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, B. M.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the Viking Mars probe is presented. The Viking spacecraft is described and a brief history of the earlier observations and exploration of Mars is provided. A number of the Viking photographs of the Martian surface are presented and a discussion of the experiments Viking performed including a confirmation of the general theory of relativity are reported. Martian surface chemistry is discussed and experiments to study the weather on Mars are reported.

  20. Vikings converge on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The scientific goals of the Viking mission are described. The science investigations to be carried out are explained and a timetable of planetary operations is outlined. Descriptions of the Viking orbiter and lander systems are presented including explanations of the Viking experimental instrument subsystems.

  1. Viking Mars encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Various phases of planetary operations related to the Viking mission to Mars are described. Topics discussed include: approach phase, Mars orbit insertion, prelanding orbital activities, separation, descent and landing, surface operations, surface sampling and operations starting, orbiter science and radio science, Viking 2, Deep Space Network and data handling.

  2. Viking survey paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews Viking injection into Mars orbit, the landing, and the Orbiter. The following Viking investigations are discussed: the search for life (photosynthetic analysis, metabolic analysis, and respiration), molecular analysis, inorganic chemistry, water detection, thermal mapping, radio science, and physical and seismic characteristics. Also considered are the imaging system, the lander camera, entry science, and Mars weather.

  3. Mars: The Viking Discoveries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Bevan M.

    This booklet describes the results of NASA's Viking spacecraft on Mars. It is intended to be useful for the teacher of basic courses in earth science, space science, astronomy, physics, or geology, but is also of interest to the well-informed layman. Topics include why we should study Mars, how the Viking spacecraft works, the winds of Mars, the…

  4. Marine Climate Archives across the Medieval Climate Anomaly-Little Ice Age Transition from Viking and Medieval Age Shells, Orkney, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surge, D. M.; Barrett, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Proxy records reconstructing marine climatic conditions across the transition between the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; ~900-1350 AD) and Little Ice Age (LIA; ~1350-1850) are strongly biased towards decadal to annual resolution and summer/growing seasons. Here we present new archives of seasonal variability in North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) from shells of the European limpet, Patella vulgata, which accumulated in Viking and medieval shell and fish middens at Quoygrew on Westray, Orkney. SST was reconstructed at submonthly resolution using oxygen isotope ratios preserved in shells from the 12th and mid 15th centuries (MCA and LIA, respectively). MCA shells recorded warmer summers and colder winters by ~2 degrees C relative to the late 20th Century (1961-1990). Therefore, seasonality was higher during the MCA relative to the late 20th century. Without the benefit of seasonal resolution, SST averaged from shell time series would be weighted toward the fast-growing summer season, resulting in the conclusion that the early MCA was warmer than the late 20th century by ~1°C. This conclusion is broadly true for the summer season, but not true for the winter season. Higher seasonality and cooler winters during early medieval times may result from a weakened North Atlantic Oscillation index. In contrast, the LIA shells have a more a variable inter-annual pattern. Some years record cooler summers and winters relative to the MCA shells and late 20th century, whereas other years record warmer summers and cooler winters similar to the MCA shells. Our findings provide a new test for the accuracy of seasonal amplitudes resulting from paleoclimate model experiments.

  5. Deciphering diet and monitoring movement: Multiple stable isotope analysis of the viking age settlement at Hofstaðir, Lake Mývatn, Iceland.

    PubMed

    Sayle, Kerry L; Hamilton, W Derek; Cook, Gordon T; Ascough, Philippa L; Gestsdóttir, Hildur; McGovern, Thomas H

    2016-05-01

    A previous multi-isotope study of archaeological faunal samples from Skútustaðir, an early Viking age settlement on the southern shores of Lake Mývatn in north-east Iceland, demonstrated that there are clear differences in δ(34)S stable isotope values between animals deriving their dietary protein from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine reservoirs. The aim of this study was to use this information to more accurately determine the diet of humans excavated from a nearby late Viking age churchyard. δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(34)S analyses were undertaken on terrestrial animal (n = 39) and human (n = 46) bone collagen from Hofstaðir, a high-status Viking-period farmstead ∼10 km north-west of Skútustaðir. δ(34)S values for Hofstaðir herbivores were ∼6‰ higher relative to those from Skútustaðir (δ(34)S: 11.4 ± 2.3‰ versus 5.6 ± 2.8‰), while human δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(34)S values were broad ranging (-20.2‰ to -17.3‰, 7.4‰ to 12.3‰, and 5.5‰ to 14.9‰, respectively). Results suggest that the baseline δ(34)S value for the Mývatn region is higher than previously predicted due to a possible sea-spray effect, but the massive deposition of Tanytarsus gracilentus (midges) (δ(34)S: -3.9‰) in the soil in the immediate vicinity of the lake is potentially lowering this value. Several terrestrial herbivores displayed higher bone collagen δ(34)S values than their contemporaries, suggesting trade and/or movement of animals to the region from coastal areas. Broad ranging δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(34)S values for humans suggest the population were consuming varied diets, while outliers within the dataset could conceivably have been migrants to the area. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The Vikings Are Coming!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeller, Terry

    1981-01-01

    The author describes how advance planning of tours, inservice, and teaching materials by school and museum educators ensured that Minneapolis teachers and students learned a great deal when the traveling museum exhibit "The Vikings" came to their city. (SJL)

  7. Viking Lander Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Viking Project found a place in history when it became the first mission to land a spacecraft successfully on the surface of another planet and return both imaging and non-imaging data over an extended time period. Two identical spacecraft, each consisting of a lander and an orbiter, were built. Each orbiter-lander pair flew together and entered Mars orbit; the landers then separated and descended to the planet's surface.

    The Viking 1 Lander touched down on the western slope of Chryse Planitia (the Plains of Gold) on July 20, 1976, while the Viking 2 lander settled down at Utopia Planitia on September 3, 1976.

    Besides taking photographs and collecting other science data on the Martian surface, the two landers conducted three biology experiments designed to look for possible signs of life. These experiments discovered unexpected and enigmatic chemical activity in the Martian soil, but provided no clear evidence for the presence of living microorganisms in soil near the landing sites. According to scientists, Mars is self-sterilizing. They believe the combination of solar ultraviolet radiation that saturates the surface, the extreme dryness of the soil and the oxidizing nature of the soil chemistry prevent the formation of living organisms in the Martian soil.

    The Viking mission was planned to continue for 90 days after landing. Each orbiter and lander operated far beyond its design lifetime. Viking Orbiter 1 functioned until July 25, 1978, while Viking Orbiter 2 continued for four years and 1,489 orbits of Mars, concluding its mission August 7, 1980. Because of the variations in available sunlight, both landers were powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators -- devices that create electricity from heat given off by the natural decay of plutonium. That power source allowed long-term science investigations that otherwise would not have been possible. The last data from Viking Lander 2 arrived at Earth on April 11, 1980. Viking Lander

  8. Social Origin and Graduation Age: A Cohort Comparison of Danish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausen, Trond Beldo

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates whether social origin has an impact on graduation age among university students. A large number of social background factors are applied on a large data set of 4 successive cohorts of Danish university graduates born 1960-1975. These are cohorts for whom university attendance increased steeply. Contrary to recent findings…

  9. Social Origin and Graduation Age: A Cohort Comparison of Danish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausen, Trond Beldo

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates whether social origin has an impact on graduation age among university students. A large number of social background factors are applied on a large data set of 4 successive cohorts of Danish university graduates born 1960-1975. These are cohorts for whom university attendance increased steeply. Contrary to recent findings…

  10. The Viking biology results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Harold P.

    1989-01-01

    A brief review of the purposes and the results from the Viking Biology experiments is presented, in the expectation that the lessons learned from this mission will be useful in planning future approaches to the biological exploration of Mars. Since so little was then known about potential micro-environments on Mars, three different experiments were included in the Viking mission, each one based on different assumptions about what Martian organisms might be like. In addition to the Viking Biology Instrument (VBI), important corollary information was obtained from the Viking lander imaging system and from the molecular analysis experiments that were conducted using the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GCMS) instrument. No biological objects were noted by the lander imaging instrument. The GCMS did not detect any organic compounds. A description of the tests conducted by the Gas Exchange Experiment, the Labeled Release experiment, and the Pyrolytic Release experiment is given. Results are discussed. Taken as a whole, the Viking data yielded no unequivocal evidence for a Martian biota at either landing site. The results also revealed the presence of one or more reactive oxidants in the surface material and these need to be further characterized, as does the range of micro-environments, before embarking upon future searches for extant life on Mars.

  11. Viking Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    VIKING PHASE III - With the incredible success of the Viking missions on Mars, mission operations have progressed though a series of phases - each being funded as mission success dictated its potential. The Viking Primary Mission phase was concluded in November, 1976, when the reins were passed on to the second phase - the Viking Extended Mission. The Extended Mission successfully carried spacecraft operations through the desired period of time needed to provided a profile of a full Martian year, but would have fallen a little short of connecting and overlapping a full Martian year of Viking operations which scientists desired as a means of determining the degree of duplicity in the red planet's seasons - at least for the summer period. Without this continuation of spacecraft data acquisitions to and beyond the seasonal points when the spacecraft actually began their Mars observations, there would be no way of knowing whether the changing environmental values - such as temperatures and winds atmospheric dynamics and water vapor, surface thermal dynamics, etc. - would match up with those acquired as the spacecraft began investigations during the summer and fall of 1976. This same broad interest can be specifically pursued at the surface - where hundreds of rocks, soil drifts and other features have become extremely familiar during long-term analysis. This picture was acquired on the 690th Martian day of Lander 1 operations - 4009th picture sequence commanded of the two Viking Landers. As such, it became the first picture acquired as the third phase of Viking operations got under way - the Viking Continuation Mission. Between the start of the Continuation Mission in April, 1978, until spacecraft operations are concluded in November, the landers will acquire an additional 200 pictures. These will be used to monitor the two landscaped for the surface changes. All four cameras, two on Lander 1 and two on Lander 2, continue to operate perfectly. Both landers will also

  12. The Viking Relativity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Reasenberg, R. D.; Macneil, P. E.; Goldstein, R. B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Komarek, T.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Cuddihy, W. F.; Michael, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the round-trip time of flight of radio signals transmitted from the earth to the Viking spacecraft are being analyzed to test the predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity. According to this theory the signals will be delayed by up to approximately 250 microsec owing to the direct effect of solar gravity on the propagation. A very preliminary qualitative analysis of the Viking data obtained near the 1976 superior conjunction of Mars indicates agreement with the predictions to within the estimated uncertainty of 0.5%.

  13. The Viking Relativity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Reasenberg, R. D.; Macneil, P. E.; Goldstein, R. B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Komarek, T.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Cuddihy, W. F.; Michael, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the round-trip time of flight of radio signals transmitted from the earth to the Viking spacecraft are being analyzed to test the predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity. According to this theory the signals will be delayed by up to approximately 250 microsec owing to the direct effect of solar gravity on the propagation. A very preliminary qualitative analysis of the Viking data obtained near the 1976 superior conjunction of Mars indicates agreement with the predictions to within the estimated uncertainty of 0.5%.

  14. Viking Lander reliability program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilny, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Viking Lander reliability program is reviewed with attention given to the development of the reliability program requirements, reliability program management, documents evaluation, failure modes evaluation, production variation control, failure reporting and correction, and the parts program. Lander hardware failures which have occurred during the mission are listed.

  15. The Viking seismometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarewicz, A. R.; Anderson, D. L.; Anderson, K.; Daonty, A. M.; Duennebier, F. K.; Gains, N. R.; Knight, T. C. D.; Kovach, R. L.; Latham, G. V.; Miller, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    Efforts were made to determine the seismicity of Mars as well as define its internal structure by detecting vibrations generated by marsquakes and meteoroid impacts. The lack of marsquakes recognized in the Viking data made it impossible to make any direct inferences about the interior of Mars and only allowed the setting of upper bounds on the seismic activity of the planet. After obtaining more than 2100 hours worth of data during the quite periods at rates of one sample per second or higher, the Viking 2 seismometer was turned off as a consequence of a landing system failure. During the periods when adequate data were obtained, one event of possible seismic or meteoroid impact origin was recognized; however, there is a significant probability that this event was generated by a wind gust.

  16. MARS: The Viking discoveries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, B. M.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking spacecraft are described as well as the instruments carried to accomplish the combined goal of studying the atmosphere and geology of the entire planet, and to analyze the Martian soil and search for life in two specific locations. Imagery received from the spacecraft illustrate discussions of the planetary surface, composition, and winds. Suggestions for further reading are included along with a list of available NASA film. Experiments and activities for classroom use are described.

  17. Viking landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagakos, N.

    1973-01-01

    A valley near the mouth of the 20,000-foot-deep Martian Grand Canyon has been chosen by NASA as the site of its first automated landing on the planet Mars. The landing site for the second mission of the 1975-76 Viking spacecraft will probably be an area about 1,000 miles northeast of the first site, where the likelihood of water increases the chances of finding evidence of life.

  18. Viking lander spacecraft battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking Lander was the first spacecraft to fly a sterilized nickel-cadmium battery on a mission to explore the surface of a planet. The significant results of the battery development program from its inception through the design, manufacture, and test of the flight batteries which were flown on the two Lander spacecraft are documented. The flight performance during the early phase of the mission is also presented.

  19. Unlimbering Viking's scoop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    A number of difficulties which were encountered in deploying the Viking 1 lander's surface-sampler arm are discussed. When the surface sampler jammed during its initial operation, the problem was studied with the aid of tests on a full-scale lander mock-up. It was found that the difficulty was caused by a boom latch pin which had failed to fall clear. The surface-sampler arm could subsequently be freed by modifying the original command sequence. Another difficulty could be overcome by a similar approach.

  20. Viking orbiter stereo imaging catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Vertrone, A. V.; Lewis, B. H.; Martin, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    The extremely long mission of the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft produced a wealth of photos of surface features. Many of these photos can be used to form stereo images allowing the student of Mars to examine a subject in three dimensional. This catalog is a technical guide to the use of stereo coverage within the complex Viking imaging data set.

  1. Catalog of Viking mission data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    This catalog announces the present/expected availability of scientific data acquired by the Viking missions and contains descriptions of the Viking spacecraft, experiments, and data sets. An index is included listing the team leaders and team members for the experiments. Information on NSSDC facilities and ordering procedures, and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are included in the appendices.

  2. Heritability of the Number of Teeth in Middle-Aged and Older Danish Twins.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, Y; Silventoinen, K; Dokkedal, U; Skytthe, A; Mucci, L A; Christensen, K; Hjelmborg, J V B

    2017-08-01

    Tooth loss is a common health concern in older adults. We aimed to estimate the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the variation in the number of teeth in middle-aged and older populations using a population-based cohort of Danish twins. The study included 5,269 Danish middle-aged or older twins who provided data on the number of teeth at baseline by structured interviews. The data were analyzed using univariate liability threshold modeling, stratified by sex and age, to estimate familial risk of tooth loss as well as estimates of heritability. In the whole cohorts, 23% of participants were edentate and 53% had retained 20 or more teeth. A statistical model including additive genetic factors and environmental factors partly shared by co-twins and partly unique to each individual twin gave the best statistical fit for the number of teeth in both age categories as well as in men and women. Overall, additive genetic factors explained 36% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23% to 49%), common environmental factors 20% (95% CI: 9% to 31%), and unique environmental factors 44% (95% CI: 40% to 48%) of the total variation of the number of teeth. This study indicates that a substantial part of the variation in tooth loss is explained by genetic as well as environmental factors shared by co-twins. Our results implied that family background importantly affects tooth loss in both the middle-aged and the older populations. Family history is thus an important factor to take into account in dental health care.

  3. The Viking project. [summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking project launched two unmanned spacecraft to Mars in 1975 for scientific exploration with special emphasis on the search for life. Each spacecraft consisted of an orbiter and a lander. The landing sites were finally selected after the spacecraft were in orbit. Thirteen investigations were performed: three mapping experiments from the orbiter, one atmospheric investigation during the lander entry phase, eight experiments on the surface of the planet, and one using the spacecraft radio and radar systems. The experiments on the surface dealt principally with biology, chemistry, geology, and meteorology. Seventy-eight scientists have participated in the 13 teams performing these experiments. This paper is a summary of the project and an introduction to the articles that follow.

  4. The Viking project. [summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking project launched two unmanned spacecraft to Mars in 1975 for scientific exploration with special emphasis on the search for life. Each spacecraft consisted of an orbiter and a lander. The landing sites were finally selected after the spacecraft were in orbit. Thirteen investigations were performed: three mapping experiments from the orbiter, one atmospheric investigation during the lander entry phase, eight experiments on the surface of the planet, and one using the spacecraft radio and radar systems. The experiments on the surface dealt principally with biology, chemistry, geology, and meteorology. Seventy-eight scientists have participated in the 13 teams performing these experiments. This paper is a summary of the project and an introduction to the articles that follow.

  5. Viking I Spacecraft in Cleanroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The planetary landing spacecraft Viking, which includes stereo cameras, a weather station, an automated stereo analysis laboratory and a biology instrument that can detect life, is under assembly at Martin Marietta Aerospace near Denver, Colorado. This Viking spacecraft will travel more than 460 million miles from Earth to a soft landing on Mars in 1976 to explore the surface and atmosphere of the red planet. Martin Marietta is prime and integration contractor for the Viking mission to NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The lander will be powered by two nuclear generators.

  6. [Sleep and sleep difficulties in Danish children aged 6-11 years].

    PubMed

    Hvolby, Allan; Jørgensen, Jan; Bilenberg, Niels

    2008-02-04

    Sleeping difficulties in children can affect learning and behaviour. Parental understanding of sleep can differ from what clinicians define as a sleep problem. It is therefore important to have information on sleep in Danish children in order to be able to advice parents on normal and deviant sleep. The purpose of this article is to describe the sleep in Danish healthy children. We examined 211 healthy children aged 6-11 years, recruited in a public school. Their sleep was evaluated objectively with actigraphy. Sleep patterns and sleep problems were examined by means of a questionnaire completed by parents. The objective and subjective measurements were compared. The most frequently reported sleep problem was fear of falling asleep in the dark, which 19.4% reported. Unwillingness to go to bed was reported in 7.1% and 7.5% had difficulties falling asleep. Actigraphic-measured sleep onset latency was on average 13.5 minutes, while parents reported an average of 21.5 minutes. The results comply with other findings. As in other sleep studies we found that parents estimate the child's sleep to be poorer than it actually is, although the discrepancy is less than seen in clinical populations. Detailed sleep history, possibly in combination with a sleep diary, can usually identify sleep problems and might be the first step in an effective treatment. Furthermore, actigraphy can be an effective supplement in the unravelling of sleep difficulties.

  7. Viking Lander 2 Anniversary

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-13

    This portion of NASA Mars Odyssey image covers NASA Viking 2 landing site shown with the X. The second landing on Mars took place September 3, 1976 in Utopia Planitia. The exact location of Lander 2 is not as well established as Lander 1 because there were no clearly identifiable features in the lander images as there were for the site of Lander 1. The Utopia landing site region contains pedestal craters, shallow swales and gentle ridges. The crater Goldstone was named in honor of the Tracking Station in the desert of California. The two Viking Landers operated for over 6 years (nearly four martian years) after landing. This one band IR (band 9 at 12.6 microns) image shows bright and dark textures, which are primarily due to differences in the abundance of rocks on the surface. The relatively cool (dark) regions during the day are rocky or indurated materials, fine sand and dust are warmer (bright). Many of the temperature variations are due to slope effects, with sun-facing slopes warmer than shaded slopes. The dark rings around several of the craters are due to the presence of rocky (cool) material ejected from the crater. These rocks are well below the resolution of any existing Mars camera, but THEMIS can detect the temperature variations they produce. Daytime temperature variations are produced by a combination of topographic (solar heating) and thermophysical (thermal inertia and albedo) effects. Due to topographic heating the surface morphologies seen in THEMIS daytime IR images are similar to those seen in previous imagery and MOLA topography. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04023

  8. Viking 75 project: Viking lander system primary mission performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Viking Lander hardware performance during launch, interplanetary cruise, Mars orbit insertion, preseparation, separation through landing, and the primary landed mission, with primary emphasis on Lander engineering and science hardware operations, the as-flown mission are described with respect to Lander system performance and anomalies during the various mission phases. The extended mission and predicted Lander performance is discussed along with a summary of Viking goals, mission plans, and description of the Lander, and its subsystem definitions.

  9. Risk factors that predicted problem drinking in Danish men at age thirty.

    PubMed

    Knop, Joachim; Penick, Elizabeth C; Jensen, Per; Nickel, Elizabeth J; Gabrielli, William F; Mednick, Sarnoff A; Schulsinger, Fini

    2003-11-01

    The Danish Longitudinal Study of Alcoholism utilized a prospective, high-risk research paradigm to identify putative markers of adult male alcoholism from a comprehensive database that began with the birth of the subject and extended over three decades. This article focuses on measures antedating abusive drinking that predicted lifetime alcohol abuse/dependence at age 30 years. The original 330 subjects of this study were drawn from a large Danish birth cohort (N = 9,125) born between 1959 and 1961. The sample included 223 sons of treated alcoholic fathers (high-risk group) and 107 matched sons whose biological fathers had no record of treatment for alcoholism (low-risk group). This sample has been thoroughly investigated with a variety of methods representing multiple domains that included perinatal records, pediatric records, school records, teacher ratings, school physician records and a series of structured interviews and psychometric tests at ages 19-20 and 30 years. The present analysis focuses on the degree to which premorbid differences between the high- and low-risk groups later predicted lifetime drinking problems at age 30 (n = 241). As expected lifetime alcohol abuse/dependence by age 30 was reported significantly more often in the high-risk group. Of the 394 premorbid variables tested, 68 were found to distinguish the high- from the low-risk group before any subjects had developed a drinking problem. Of these 68 variables, 28 (41%) were also associated with DSM-III-R alcohol abuse/dependence at age 30. These 28 putative markers were reduced to 12 that were entered into a multiple regression analysis to search for the most powerful unique predictors of alcoholism. Four of the 28 putative markers were independently associated with problem drinking at age 30: low birth weight, number of life crises in childhood, ratings of childhood unhappiness and antisocial personality disorder. The regression model accounted for 46% of the drinking outcome variance. A

  10. The Viking mission to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This monograph describes the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's program to explore the planet that most nearly resembles the earth and the search for life on the surface of Mars that the Vikings are scheduled to begin in 1976.

  11. Reorganization and creation of Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The cancellation of Voyager caused NASA to rethink its slate of proposed planetary missions. A set of alternatives was developed for planetary investigations among which was the Viking program. The problems of management assignments and budgets are discussed.

  12. FCC in Viking articulated boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, E. S.

    1972-01-01

    The application requirements and manufacturing techniques for the flat conductor cable used in the Viking Lander Articulated Boom Unit are described. The Viking Boom is a 3-axis device utilized to position a soil sampler and provide digging forces. This application imposed severe restrictions on size, weight, materials, and choice of manufacturing processes. The final cable assembly design resulted in a combination of collated cable and flexible circuits assembled by resistance welding techniques.

  13. Viking Lander 2 Anniversary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This portion of a daytime IR image covers the Viking 2 landing site (shown with the X). The second landing on Mars took place September 3, 1976 in Utopia Planitia. The exact location of Lander 2 is not as well established as Lander 1 because there were no clearly identifiable features in the lander images as there were for the site of Lander 1. The Utopia landing site region contains pedestal craters, shallow swales and gentle ridges. The crater Goldstone was named in honor of the Tracking Station in the desert of California. The two Viking Landers operated for over 6 years (nearly four martian years) after landing. This one band IR (band 9 at 12.6 microns) image shows bright and dark textures, which are primarily due to differences in the abundance of rocks on the surface. The relatively cool (dark) regions during the day are rocky or indurated materials, fine sand and dust are warmer (bright). Many of the temperature variations are due to slope effects, with sun-facing slopes warmer than shaded slopes. The dark rings around several of the craters are due to the presence of rocky (cool) material ejected from the crater. These rocks are well below the resolution of any existing Mars camera, but THEMIS can detect the temperature variations they produce. Daytime temperature variations are produced by a combination of topographic (solar heating) and thermophysical (thermal inertia and albedo) effects. Due to topographic heating the surface morphologies seen in THEMIS daytime IR images are similar to those seen in previous imagery and MOLA topography.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected

  14. Viking Lander 2 Anniversary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This portion of a daytime IR image covers the Viking 2 landing site (shown with the X). The second landing on Mars took place September 3, 1976 in Utopia Planitia. The exact location of Lander 2 is not as well established as Lander 1 because there were no clearly identifiable features in the lander images as there were for the site of Lander 1. The Utopia landing site region contains pedestal craters, shallow swales and gentle ridges. The crater Goldstone was named in honor of the Tracking Station in the desert of California. The two Viking Landers operated for over 6 years (nearly four martian years) after landing. This one band IR (band 9 at 12.6 microns) image shows bright and dark textures, which are primarily due to differences in the abundance of rocks on the surface. The relatively cool (dark) regions during the day are rocky or indurated materials, fine sand and dust are warmer (bright). Many of the temperature variations are due to slope effects, with sun-facing slopes warmer than shaded slopes. The dark rings around several of the craters are due to the presence of rocky (cool) material ejected from the crater. These rocks are well below the resolution of any existing Mars camera, but THEMIS can detect the temperature variations they produce. Daytime temperature variations are produced by a combination of topographic (solar heating) and thermophysical (thermal inertia and albedo) effects. Due to topographic heating the surface morphologies seen in THEMIS daytime IR images are similar to those seen in previous imagery and MOLA topography.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected

  15. Marital Status and Twins’ Health and Behavior: An Analysis of Middle-Aged Danish Twins

    PubMed Central

    Osler, Merete; McGue, Matt; Lund, Rikke; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    Objective To disentangle the influences on health of selection processes related to genetic and rearing environmental factors from factors related to marriage benefits. We compared health status among same-sex male and female twin pairs who lived together during childhood and were discordant or concordant on adult marital status. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a random sample of middle-aged Danish twins was conducted in 1998 to 1999. This study included 1175 same-sex twin pairs (52.5% monozygotic (MZ) and 47.5% dizygotic (DZ)). Data were obtained on adult marital status and on height, body mass index (BMI), depression symptoms, self-rated health, cognitive function, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol intake. Results Among all 2350 individual twins, men who were divorced/widowed or never married had higher depression scores, lower cognitive test scores, lower physical activity scores, and were also less often moderate drinkers and nonsmokers compared with married men. Divorced/widowed women had higher depression scores and those divorced/widowed or never married were more often smokers than married women. Within twin pairs discordant on marital status, the divorced/widowed twin had higher average depression scores and was more likely to be a smoker. Never married twins had lower physical activity scores and never married male twins had higher BMI and higher depression scores than their married co-twin. Conclusion This study suggests that the relationships of adult divorce with depression and smoking in Danish twins are due to the stressful effects of marital dissolution, but that marital differences in other health and behavioral outcomes are most consistent with selection effects related to genetic or rearing environmental factors. PMID:18480194

  16. The Relationship between Age at First Birth and Mother's Lifetime Earnings: Evidence from Danish Data.

    PubMed

    Leung, Man Yee Mallory; Groes, Fane; Santaeulalia-Llopis, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Having children creates career interruptions and reductions in labor income for women. This study documents the relation between the age at first birth (AFB) and women's labor income. We study these dynamics in the short run (i.e. ratio between labor income at AFB and two years prior to AFB) and long run (i.e., positive/negative differences in total lifetime labor income). Using unique Danish administrative register data for the entire Danish population, we estimate the age-income profiles separately for college and non-college women conditional on marital status, and mothers' age at first birth (AFB). We compute the lifetime labor income differentials by taking the differences between the labor income of women with and without children at each AFB. The short-run loss in labor income, defined as the difference in percentages between the income earned two years prior to AFB and income earned at AFB, ranges from 37% to 65% for college women and from 40% to 53% for non-college women. These losses decrease monotonically with respect to AFB for both education groups. Our results on the lifetime labor income differentials between mothers and women without children also show a net effect that is monotonic (from negative to positive) in AFB. With AFB<25, the lifetime labor income loss for college women is -204% of their average annual labor income and this figure is -252% for non-college women. There are lifetime labor income gains with AFB>31. The largest gains for college women are 13% of their average annual income and this figure is 50% for non-college women. Women have a large and unambiguous short-run reduction in labor income at their AFB. In terms of lifetime labor income, both college and non-college women, compared to childless women, are associated with lower income of more than twice their respective average annual income when bearing a child at AFB<25. In other words, women with AFB<25 are associated with a lower lifetime income of more than two years of

  17. The Relationship between Age at First Birth and Mother's Lifetime Earnings: Evidence from Danish Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Having children creates career interruptions and reductions in labor income for women. This study documents the relation between the age at first birth (AFB) and women’s labor income. We study these dynamics in the short run (i.e. ratio between labor income at AFB and two years prior to AFB) and long run (i.e., positive/negative differences in total lifetime labor income). Methods Using unique Danish administrative register data for the entire Danish population, we estimate the age-income profiles separately for college and non-college women conditional on marital status, and mothers’ age at first birth (AFB). We compute the lifetime labor income differentials by taking the differences between the labor income of women with and without children at each AFB. Results The short-run loss in labor income, defined as the difference in percentages between the income earned two years prior to AFB and income earned at AFB, ranges from 37% to 65% for college women and from 40% to 53% for non-college women. These losses decrease monotonically with respect to AFB for both education groups. Our results on the lifetime labor income differentials between mothers and women without children also show a net effect that is monotonic (from negative to positive) in AFB. With AFB<25, the lifetime labor income loss for college women is -204% of their average annual labor income and this figure is -252% for non-college women. There are lifetime labor income gains with AFB>31. The largest gains for college women are 13% of their average annual income and this figure is 50% for non-college women. Conclusion Women have a large and unambiguous short-run reduction in labor income at their AFB. In terms of lifetime labor income, both college and non-college women, compared to childless women, are associated with lower income of more than twice their respective average annual income when bearing a child at AFB<25. In other words, women with AFB<25 are associated with a lower

  18. Exposure to multiple chemicals in a cohort of reproductive-aged Danish women.

    PubMed

    Rosofsky, Anna; Janulewicz, Patricia; Thayer, Kristina A; McClean, Michael; Wise, Lauren A; Calafat, Antonia M; Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Taylor, Kyla W; Hatch, Elizabeth E

    2017-04-01

    Current exposure assessment research does not sufficiently address multi-pollutant exposure and their correlations in human media. Understanding the extent of chemical exposure in reproductive-aged women is of particular concern due to the potential for in utero exposure and fetal susceptibility. The objectives of this study were to characterize concentrations of chemical biomarkers during preconception and examine correlations between and within chemical classes. We examined concentrations of 135 biomarkers from 16 chemical classes in blood and urine from 73 women aged 18-40 enrolled in Snart Foraeldre/Milieu, a prospective cohort study of pregnancy planners in Denmark (2011-2014). We compared biomarker concentrations with United States similarly-aged, non-pregnant women who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Environmental Survey (NHANES) and with other international biomonitoring studies. We performed principal component analysis to examine biomarker correlations. The mean number of biomarkers detected in the population was 92 (range: 60-108). The most commonly detected chemical classes were phthalates, metals, phytoestrogens and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Except blood mercury, urinary barium and enterolactone, geometric means were higher in women from NHANES. Chemical classes measured in urine generally did not load on a single component, suggesting high between-class correlation among urinary biomarkers, while there is high within-class correlation for biomarkers measured in serum and blood. We identified ubiquitous exposure to multiple chemical classes in reproductive-aged Danish women, supporting the need for more research on chemical mixtures during preconception and early pregnancy. Inter- and intra-class correlation between measured biomarkers may reflect common exposure sources, specific lifestyle factors or shared metabolism pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Viking orbiter stereo imaging catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Vetrone, A. V.; Martin, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The extremely long missions of the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft produced a wealth of photos of surface features. Many of which can be used to form stereo images allowing the earth-bound student of Mars to examine the subject in 3-D. This catalog is a technical guide to the use of stereo coverage within the complex Viking imaging data set. Since that data set is still growing (January, 1980, about 3 1/2 years after the mission began), a second edition of this catalog is planned with completion expected about November, 1980.

  20. Viking Lander Atlas of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebes, S., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Half size reproductions are presented of the extensive set of systematic map products generated for the two Mars Viking landing sites from stereo pairs of images radioed back to Earth. The maps span from the immediate foreground to the remote limits of ranging capability, several hundred meters from the spacecraft. The maps are of two kinds - elevation contour and vertical profile. Background and explanatory material important for understanding and utilizing the map collection included covers the Viking Mission, lander locations, lander cameras, the stereo mapping system and input images to this system.

  1. Viking orbiter views of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Baum, W. A.; Blasius, K. R.; Briggs, G. A.; Cutts, J. A.; Duxbury, T. C.; Greeley, R.; Guest, J.; Masursky, H.; Smith, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    Images acquired by the Viking orbiters, beginning in 1976 are presented. The pictures represent only a small fraction of the many thousands taken, and were chosen to illustrate the diverse geology of Mars and its atmospheric phenomena. Specific topics discussed include the Viking mission and its objectives, a brief comparison of Earth and Mars, and surface features of Mars including the great equatorial canyons, channels, volcanic and deformational features, and craters. Martian moons, surface processes, polar regions, and the Martian atmosphere are also covered.

  2. The heritability of level and rate-of-change in cognitive functioning in Danish twins aged 70 years and older.

    PubMed

    McGue, Matt; Christensen, Kaare

    2002-01-01

    To investigate heritable influences on overall level and rate-of-change in cognitive ability, biometric growth models were fit to cognitive data from nearly 1000 Danish twins age 70 years and older. Twins are participants in the ongoing Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins, a cohort-sequential study of twins assessed every 2 years for up to four waves. Cognitive ability was assessed by five brief cognitive tasks: a fluency measure, forward and backward digit span, and immediate and delayed list recall. Model-fitting results indicated that although the overall level of cognitive functioning was highly heritable (h(2) = .76, 95% confidence interval of .68 to .82), the rate of linear change was not (h(2) = .06, 95% confidence interval of .00 to .57). These findings suggest that the search for specific genes might reasonably focus on average level of cognitive performance, whereas specific environmental influences might account for cognitive change.

  3. NASA Facts, The Viking Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    Presented is one of a series of publications of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facts about the exploration of Mars. The Viking mission to Mars, consisting of two unmanned NASA spacecraft launched in August and September, 1975, is described. A description of the spacecraft and their paths is given. A diagram identifying the…

  4. Viking: The exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Photographs of the planet Mars generated by the Viking Mars program are presented and discussed. The Martian surface and its volcanoes receive particular attention. In addition, the atmosphere, temperature, surface craters, polar regions, and composition of Mars are briefly reviewed. Planetary evolution is considered. The highlights of the Mariner program for Mars are given.

  5. NASA S-3 Viking Aircraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-07

    This photo shows NASA Glenn’s S-3 Viking Aircraft flying over downtown Cleveland, Ohio. The S-3 continues to conduct important research including regular flights over Lake Erie and other waterways to image algal blooms that have plagued the area’s waters.

  6. Dutch Viking TROS Aktua Special

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Footage shows the night vertical takeoff of the Viking Hollan hot air balloon. The crew is shown participating in survival technique training, boarding the plane to depart to Canada, and preparing for the vertical takeoff in the hot air balloon across the Atlantic Ocean. Scenes also include the making of the capsule for the balloon, some flight activities, and the landing of the balloon.

  7. Viking orbiter attitude control analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two Viking orbiters are currently in Mars orbit. In the nearly two years since they were launched, the orbiters have successfully performed many functions including transportation of the Viking landers to Mars. The orbiters have for the last year provided relay links for lander-earth communications, and they have carried out from orbit their own scientific exploration of the planet. Crucial to the success of the orbiters has been the performance of the on-board attitude control system, which has provided the required orbiter stabilization and orientation throughout the missions. A comprehensive spacecraft and attitude control system dynamic analysis was necessary to certify the control system before launch and to evaluate its flight performance. This paper contains an outline of the analysis and of some of its results.

  8. Viking orbiter system primary mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudy, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of Viking Orbiter (VO) system and subsystem performances during the primary mission (the time period from VO-1 launch on August 20, 1975, through November 15, 1976) is presented. Brief descriptions, key design requirements, pertinent historical information, unique applications or situations, and predicted versus actual performances are included for all VO-1 and VO-2 subsystems, both individually and as an integrated system.

  9. Viking Seismometer PDS Archive Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Viking Lander 2 seismometer operated successfully for over 500 Sols on the Martian surface, recording at least one likely candidate Marsquake. The Viking mission, in an era when data handling hardware (both on board and on the ground) was limited in capability, predated modern planetary data archiving, and ad-hoc repositories of the data, and the very low-level record at NSSDC, were neither convenient to process nor well-known. In an effort supported by the NASA Mars Data Analysis Program, we have converted the bulk of the Viking dataset (namely the 49,000 and 270,000 records made in High- and Event- modes at 20 and 1 Hz respectively) into a simple ASCII table format. Additionally, since wind-generated lander motion is a major component of the signal, contemporaneous meteorological data are included in summary records to facilitate correlation. These datasets are being archived at the PDS Geosciences Node. In addition to brief instrument and dataset descriptions, the archive includes code snippets in the freely-available language 'R' to demonstrate plotting and analysis. Further, we present examples of lander-generated noise, associated with the sampler arm, instrument dumps and other mechanical operations.

  10. The environs of viking 2 lander.

    PubMed

    Shorthill, R W; Moore, H J; Hutton, R E; Scott, R F; Spitzer, C R

    1976-12-11

    Forty-six days after Viking 1 landed, Viking 2 landed in Utopia Planitia, about 6500 kilometers away from the landing site of Viking 1. Images show that in the immediate vicinity of the Viking 2 landing site the surface is covered with rocks, some of which are partially buried, and fine-grained materials. The surface sampler, the lander cameras, engineering sensors, and some data from the other lander experiments were used to investigate the properties of the surface. Lander 2 has a more homogeneous surface, more coarse-grained material, an extensive crust, small rocks or clods which seem to be difficult to collect, and more extensive erosion by the retro-engine exhaust gases than lander 1. A report on the physical properties of the martian surface based on data obtained through sol 58 on Viking 2 and a brief description of activities on Viking 1 after sol 36 are given.

  11. The Viking landing sites: A cartographic perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Stephen Paul

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a brief guide to the maps of Mars which contain the Viking 1 and Viking 2 landing sites. Included are maps and photomosaics originally produced at the following scales: 1:25 million, 1:15 million, 1:5 million, 1:2 million, 1:1 million, and 1:250,000. In each case the Viking locations are indicated on the maps and photomosaics.

  12. Association between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol in a middle-aged Danish population.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Kirsten T; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; McLaughlin, Joseph K; Lipworth, Loren; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Sørensen, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are used in a variety of consumer products and have been detected worldwide in human blood. Recent studies mainly of highly exposed populations have indicated that PFOA and PFOS may affect serum cholesterol levels, but the magnitude of the effect may be inconsistent across exposure levels. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between plasma PFOA and PFOS and total cholesterol in a general, middle-aged Danish population. The study population comprised 753 individuals (663 men and 90 women), 50-65 years of age, nested within a Danish cohort of 57,053 participants. Blood samples were taken from all cohort members at enrolment (1993-1997) and stored in a biobank at -150°C. Plasma levels of PFOA and PFOS and serum levels of total cholesterol were measured. The associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol levels were analysed by generalized linear models, both crude and adjusted for potential confounders. We observed statistically significant positive associations between both perfluorinated compounds and total cholesterol, e.g. a 4.4 [95% CI  =  1.1-7.8] higher concentration of total cholesterol (mg/dL) per interquartile range of PFOA plasma level. Sex and prevalent diabetes appeared to modify the association between PFOA and PFOS, respectively, and cholesterol. In conclusion, this study indicated positive associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol in a middle-aged Danish population, although whether the observed pattern of results reflects a causal association is unclear.

  13. Association between Plasma PFOA and PFOS Levels and Total Cholesterol in a Middle-Aged Danish Population

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Kirsten T.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; McLaughlin, Joseph K.; Lipworth, Loren; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Sørensen, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are used in a variety of consumer products and have been detected worldwide in human blood. Recent studies mainly of highly exposed populations have indicated that PFOA and PFOS may affect serum cholesterol levels, but the magnitude of the effect may be inconsistent across exposure levels. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between plasma PFOA and PFOS and total cholesterol in a general, middle-aged Danish population. The study population comprised 753 individuals (663 men and 90 women), 50–65 years of age, nested within a Danish cohort of 57,053 participants. Blood samples were taken from all cohort members at enrolment (1993–1997) and stored in a biobank at -150°C. Plasma levels of PFOA and PFOS and serum levels of total cholesterol were measured. The associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol levels were analysed by generalized linear models, both crude and adjusted for potential confounders. We observed statistically significant positive associations between both perfluorinated compounds and total cholesterol, e.g. a 4.4 [95% CI  =  1.1–7.8] higher concentration of total cholesterol (mg/dL) per interquartile range of PFOA plasma level. Sex and prevalent diabetes appeared to modify the association between PFOA and PFOS, respectively, and cholesterol. In conclusion, this study indicated positive associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol in a middle-aged Danish population, although whether the observed pattern of results reflects a causal association is unclear. PMID:23441227

  14. One Mars year: viking lander imaging observations.

    PubMed

    Jones, K L; Arvidson, R E; Guinness, E A; Bragg, S L; Wall, S D; Carlston, C E; Pidek, D G

    1979-05-25

    Throughout the complete Mars year during which they have been on the planet, the imaging systems aboard the two Viking landers have documented a variety of surface changes. Surface condensates, consisting of both solid H(2)O and CO(2), formed at the Viking 2 lander site during the winter. Additional observations suggest that surface erosion rates due to dust redistribution may be substantially less than those predicted on the basis of pre-Viking observations. The Viking 1 lander will continue to acquire and transmit a predetermined sequence of imaging and meteorology data as long as it is operative.

  15. Historical perspective - Viking Mars Lander propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrisey, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the Viking 1 and 2 missions to Mars in 1975-1976 and describes the design evolution of the Viking Terminal Descent Rocket Engines responsible for decelerating the Viking Mars Landers during the final portion of their descent from orbit. The Viking Terminal Descent Rocket Engines have twice the thrust of the largest monopropellant hydrazine engine developed previously but weigh considerably less. The engine has 18 nozzles, the capability of 10:1 throttling, is totally sealed until fired, employs no organic unsealed materials, is 100 percent germ free, utilized hydrazine STM-20 as the propellant, and starts at a temperature more than 45 F below the propellant's freezing point.

  16. Trends in cell phone use among children in the Danish national birth cohort at ages 7 and 11 years.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Madhuri; Olsen, Jørn; Sigsgaard, Torben; Kheifets, Leeka

    2016-11-01

    We prospectively examined trends in cell phone use among children in the Danish National Birth Cohort. Cell phone use was assessed at ages 7 and 11 years, and we examined use patterns by age, by year of birth, and in relation to specific individual characteristics. There was an increase in cell phone use from age 7 (37%) to 11 years (94%). There was a clear pattern of greater reported cell phone use among children at age 7 years with later birth year, but this trend disappeared at age 11. Girls and those who used phones at age 7 talked more often and for longer durations at age 11 years. Low socio-economic status and later year of birth were associated with voice calls at age 7 but not at age 11 years. At age 11 most used cell phones for texting and gaming more than for voice calls. Further, children who started using cell phones at age 7 years were more likely to be heavy cell phone voice users at age 11 years, making early use a marker for higher cumulative exposure regardless of year of birth. As cell phone technology continues to advance, new use patterns will continue to emerge, and exposure assessment research among children must reflect these trends.

  17. The Vikings bare their filed teeth.

    PubMed

    Arcini, Caroline

    2005-12-01

    Finds of deliberate dental modification have for the first time been found in archaeological human skeletal material from Europe. The type of modification is a horizontally filed furrow on the frontal upper part of the tooth crown. The furrows are single or, more usually, multiple, and are found on the front teeth in the maxilla. The affected individuals are 24 men from the Viking Age (ca. 800-1050 AD), found in present day Sweden and Denmark. The marks are so well-made that it is most likely they were filed by a person of great skill. The reason for, and importance of, the furrows are obscure. The affected individuals may have belonged to a certain occupational group (such as tradesmen), or the furrows could have been pure decoration. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. The Viking Radio Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Tolson, R. H.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Fjeldbo, G.; Stelzried, C. T.; Grossi, M. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Tyler, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking radio science investigations utilize data from the radio tracking and communications systems of the orbiters and landers. The primary areas of research are: (1) dynamical, surface, and internal properties of Mars, (2) atmospheric and ionospheric properties of Mars, and (3) solar system properties. The instrumentation and facilities used are those required for trajectory and orbit determination, spacecraft control, and data transmission. The X-band downlink on the orbiters is also used for communications experiments and for the improvement of radio science capabilities.

  19. Imaging experiment: The Viking Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mutch, T.A.; Binder, A.B.; Huck, F.O.; Levinthal, E.C.; Morris, E.C.; Sagan, C.; Young, A.T.

    1972-01-01

    The Viking Lander Imaging System will consist of two identical facsimile cameras. Each camera has a high-resolution mode with an instantaneous field of view of 0.04??, and survey and color modes with instantaneous fields of view of 0.12??. Cameras are positioned one meter apart to provide stereoscopic coverage of the near-field. The Imaging Experiment will provide important information about the morphology, composition, and origin of the Martian surface and atmospheric features. In addition, lander pictures will provide supporting information for other experiments in biology, organic chemistry, meteorology, and physical properties. ?? 1972.

  20. Viking site selection and certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masursky, H.; Crabill, N. L.

    1981-01-01

    The landing site selection and certification effort for the Viking mission to Mars is reviewed from the premission phase through the acquisition of data and decisions during mission operations and the immediate postlanding evaluation. The utility and limitations of the orbital television and infrared data and ground based radar observation of candidate and actual landing sites are evaluated. Additional instruments and types of observations which would have been useful include higher resolution cameras, radar altimeters, and terrain hazard avoidance capability in the landing system. Suggestions based on this experience that might be applied to future missions are included.

  1. Meteorology experiments - The Viking Mars Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, S. L.; Henry, R. M.; Kuettner, J.; Leovy, C. B.; Ryan, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The purposes, procedures, and nature of the planned meteorology experiment of Viking, 1976 are described. The elements to be measured are pressure, temperature, wind speed, wind direction, and water vapor content of the atmosphere. The interactions with other Viking experiments are outlined and candidate sensors are described.

  2. A Catalog of Selected Viking Orbiter Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. L.; Carroll, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    This collection of Viking Orbiter photomosaics is designed to facilitate identification and location of the various pictures with respect to the surface of Mars. Only a representative set of the nearly 50,000 images taken by the two Viking Orbiters, and computer-processed prior to December 1978, are contained in the mosaics and in the picture listings.

  3. The Viking Mars lander camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Taylor, G. R.; Mccall, H. F.; Patterson, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The 7.3 kg cameras for the 1976 Viking Mars expedition feature an array of 12 silicon photodiodes, including six spectral bands for color and near-infrared imaging with an angular resolution of 0.12 deg and four focus steps for broadband imaging, with an improved angular resolution of 0.04 deg. The field of view in elevation ranges from 40 deg above to 60 deg below the horizon, and in azimuth ranges to 342.5 deg. The cameras are mounted 0.8 m apart to provide a stereo view of the area accessible to a surface sampler for biological and chemical investigations. The scanning rates are synchronized to the lander data transmission rates of 16000 bits per sec to the Viking orbiters as relay stations and 250 bits per sec directly to earth. However, image data can also be stored on a lander tape recorder. About 10 million bits of image data will be transmitted during most days of the 60-day-long mission planned for each lander.

  4. Viking and Mars Rover exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Ohara, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    Other than Earth, Mars is the planet generating the greatest interest among those researching and contemplating the origin and distribution of life throughout the universe. The similarity of the early environments of Earth and Mars, and the biological evolution on early Earth provides the motivation to seriously consider the possibility of a primordial Martian biosphere. In 1975 the Viking project launched two unmanned spacecraft to Mars with the intent of finding evidence of the existence of present or past life on this planet. Three Viking Biology experiments were employed: the Labeled Release experiment, the Gas Exchange Experiment, and the Pyrolytic Release experiment. Each of these three experiments tested for microbial existence and utilization of a substrate by examining the gases evolved from specific chemical reactions. Although the results of these experiments were inconclusive, they inferred that there are no traces of extant life on Mars. However, the experiments did not specifically look for indication of extinct life. Therefore, most of the exobiologic strategies and experiments suggested for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission involve searching for signature of extinct life. The most significant biological signatures and chemical traces to detect include: isotopic and chemical signatures of metabolic activity, anomalous concentrations of certain metals, trace and microfossils, organically preserved materials, carbonates, nitrates, and evaporites.

  5. Martian seismicity. [from Viking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goins, N. R.; Lazarewicz, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    During the Viking mission to Mars, the seismometer on Lander II collected approximately 0.24 earth years of observational data, excluding periods of time dominated by wind-induced Lander vibration. The 'quiet-time' data set contains no confirmed seismic events. A proper assessment of the significance of this fact requires quantitative estimates of the expected detection rate of the Viking seismometer. The first step is to calculate the minimum magnitude event detectable at a given distance, including the effects of geometric spreading, anelastic attenuation, seismic signal duration, seismometer frequency response, and possible poor ground coupling. Assuming various numerical quantities and a Martian seismic activity comparable to that of intraplate earthquakes, the appropriate integral gives an expected annual detection rate of 10 events, nearly all of which are local. Thus only two to three events would be expected in the observational period presently on hand and the lack of observed events is not in gross contradiction to reasonable expectations. Given the same assumptions, a seismometer 20 times more sensitive than the present instrument would be expected to detect about 120 events annually.

  6. Martian seismicity. [from Viking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goins, N. R.; Lazarewicz, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    During the Viking mission to Mars, the seismometer on Lander II collected approximately 0.24 earth years of observational data, excluding periods of time dominated by wind-induced Lander vibration. The 'quiet-time' data set contains no confirmed seismic events. A proper assessment of the significance of this fact requires quantitative estimates of the expected detection rate of the Viking seismometer. The first step is to calculate the minimum magnitude event detectable at a given distance, including the effects of geometric spreading, anelastic attenuation, seismic signal duration, seismometer frequency response, and possible poor ground coupling. Assuming various numerical quantities and a Martian seismic activity comparable to that of intraplate earthquakes, the appropriate integral gives an expected annual detection rate of 10 events, nearly all of which are local. Thus only two to three events would be expected in the observational period presently on hand and the lack of observed events is not in gross contradiction to reasonable expectations. Given the same assumptions, a seismometer 20 times more sensitive than the present instrument would be expected to detect about 120 events annually.

  7. Age at Menarche and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis: A Prospective Cohort Study Based on the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Harpsøe, Maria; Simonsen, Jacob; Stenager, Egon; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Baker, Jennifer L; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Frisch, Morten; Bager, Peter

    2017-03-25

    Few studies have addressed the possible association between age at menarche and multiple sclerosis (MS), and results are conflicting. We studied this issue in a large prospective cohort study. The study cohort comprised 77,330 women included in the Danish National Birth Cohort (1996-2002). Information on menarcheal age was ascertained at the first interview, which took place in the 16th week of pregnancy. Women were followed for MS from the first interview to December 31, 2011. Associations between age at menarche and risk of MS were evaluated with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Overall, 226 women developed MS during an average follow-up period of 11.7 years. Age at menarche among women with MS was generally lower than that among women without MS (Wilcoxon rank-sum test; P = 0.002). We observed an inverse association between age at menarche and MS risk. For each 1-year increase in age at menarche, risk of MS was reduced by 13% (hazard ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.96). Early age at menarche appears to be associated with an increased risk of MS. The mechanisms behind this association remain to be established.

  8. Viking Lander Mosaics of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Viking Lander 1 and 2 cameras acquired many high-resolution pictures of the Chryse Planitia and Utopia Planitia landing sites. Based on computer-processed data of a selected number of these pictures, eight high-resolution mosaics were published by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the Atlas of Mars, Miscellaneous Investigation Series. The mosaics are composites of the best picture elements (pixels) of all the Lander pictures used. Each complete mosaic extends 342.5 deg in azimuth, from approximately 5 deg above the horizon to 60 deg below, and incorporates approximately 15 million pixels. Each mosaic is shown in a set of five sheets. One sheet contains the full panorama from one camera taken in either morning or evening. The other four sheets show sectors of the panorama at an enlarged scale; when joined together they make a panorama approximately 2' X 9'.

  9. Viking Mars launch set for August 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagakos, N.

    1975-01-01

    The 1975-1976 Viking Mars Mission is described in detail, from launch phase through landing and communications relay phase. The mission's scientific goals are outlined and the various Martian investigations are discussed. These investigations include: geological photomapping and seismology; high-resolution, stereoscopic horizon scanning; water vapor and thermal mapping; entry science; meteorology; atmospheric composition and atmospheric density; and, search for biological products. The configurations of the Titan 3/Centaur combined launch vehicles, the Viking orbiters, and the Viking landers are described; their subsystems and performance characteristics are discussed. Preflight operations, launch window, mission control, and the deep space tracking network are also presented.

  10. Photogrammetric application of viking orbital photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, S.S.C.; Elassal, A.A.; Jordan, R.; Schafer, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    Special techniques are described for the photogrammetric compilation of topographic maps and profiles from stereoscopic photographs taken by the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft. These techniques were developed because the extremely narrow field of view of the Viking cameras precludes compilation by conventional photogrammetric methods. The techniques adjust for internal consistency the Supplementary Experiment Data Record (SEDR-the record of spacecraft orientation when photographs were taken) and the computation of geometric orientation parameters of the stereo models. A series of contour maps of Mars is being compiled by these new methods using a wide variety of Viking Orbiter photographs, to provide the planetary research community with topographic information. ?? 1982.

  11. Mars Surface near Viking Lander 1 Footpad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, which has been flipped horizontally, was taken by Viking Lander 1 on August 1, 1976, 12 sols after landing. Much like images that have returned from Phoenix, the soil beneath Viking 1 has been exposed due to exhaust from thruster engines during descent. This is visible to the right of the struts of Viking's surface-sampler arm housing, seen on the left.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. General constraints on the Viking biology investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses some of the constraints pertaining to the Viking mission for detection of life on Mars, within which the Viking experiments were conceived, designed, and developed. The most important limitation to the entire study is the complete information about the nature of Mars, such as the chemical composition of the surface material of Mars and the exact identification of the constituents of that planet. Ways in which celestial mechanics places severe limitations on the Viking biology investigation are discussed. Major engineering constraints are examined relative to the accomodation of biology instrument inside the Viking lander and to the design of the instrument itself. Other constraints discussed concern the operational aspects of the mission and the testing program.

  13. Search for the viking 2 landing site.

    PubMed

    Masursky, H; Crabill, N L

    1976-10-01

    The search for the landing site of Viking 2 was more extensive than the search for the Viking 1 site. Seven times as much area (4.5 million square kilometers) was examined as for Viking 1. Cydonia (B1) and Capri (C1) sites were examined with the Viking 1 orbiter. The B latitude band (40 degrees to 50 degrees N) was selected before the final midcourse maneuver of Viking 2 because of its high scientific interest (that is, high atmospheric water content, surface temperature, possible near-surface permafrost, and a different geological domain). The Viking 1 orbiter continued photographing the Cydonia (B1) site to search for an area large and smooth enough on which to land (three-sigma ellipse; 100 by 260 kilometers); such an area was not found. The second spacecraft photographed and made infrared measurements in large areas in Arcadia (B2) and Utopia Planitia (B3). Both areas are highly textured, mottled cratered plains with abundant impact craters like Cydonia (B1), but smaller sectors in each area are partially mantled by wind-formed deposits. The thermal inertia, from which the grain size of surface material can be computed, and atmospheric water content were determined from the infrared observations. A region in Utopia Planitia, west of the crater Mie, was selected: the landing took place successfully on 3 September 1976 at 3:58:20 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time, earth received time.

  14. Search for the Viking 2 landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masursky, H.; Crabill, N.L.

    1976-01-01

    The search for the landing site of Viking 2 was more extensive than the search for the Viking 1 site. Seven times as much area (4.5 million square kilometers) was examined as for Viking 1. Cydonia (B1) and Capri (C1) sites were examined with the Viking 1 orbiter. The B latitude band (40?? to 50??N) was selected before the final midcourse maneuver of Viking 2 because of its high scientific interest (that is, high atmospheric water content, surface temperature, possible near-surface permafrost, and a different geological domain). The Viking 1 orbiter continued photographing the Cydonia (B1) site to search for an area large and smooth enough on which to land (three-sigma ellipse; 100 by 260 kilometers); such an area was not found. The second spacecraft photographed and made infrared measurements in large areas in Arcadia (B2) and Utopia Planitia (B3). Both areas are highly textured, mottled cratered plains with abundant impact craters like Cydonia (B1), but smaller sectors in each area are partially mantled by wind-formed deposits. The thermal inertia, from which the grain size of surface material can be computed, and atmospheric water content were determined from the infrared observations. A region in Utopia Planitia, west of the crater Mie, was selected: the landing took place successfully on 3 September 1976 at 3:58:20 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time, earth received time.

  15. SNC Meteorites, Organic Matter and a New Look at Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmflash, David M.; Clemett, Simon J.; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, evidence has begun to grow supporting the possibility that the Viking GC-MS would not have detected certain carboxylate salts that could have been present as metastable oxidation products of high molecular weight organic species. Additionally, despite the instrument's high sensitivity, the possibility had remained that very low levels of organic matter, below the instrument's detection limit, could have been present. In fact, a recent study indicates that the degradation products of several million microorganisms per gram of soil on Mars would not have been detected by the Viking GC-MS. Since the strength of the GC-MS findings was considered enough to dismiss the biology packet, particularly the LR results, any subsequent evidence suggesting that organic molecules may in fact be present on the Martian surface necessitates a re-evaluation of the Viking LR data. In addition to an advanced mass spectrometer to look for isotopic signatures of biogenic processes, future lander missions will include the ability to detect methane produced by methanogenic bacteria, as well as techniques based on biotechnology. Meanwhile, the identification of Mars samples already present on Earth in the form of the SNC meteorites has provided us with the ability to study samples of the Martian upper crust a decade or more in advance of any planned sample return missions. While contamination issues are of serious concern, the presence of indigenous organic matter in the form of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has been detected in the Martian meteorites ALH84001 and Nakhla, while there is circumstantial evidence for carbonaceous material in Chassigny. The radiochronological ages of these meteorites are 4.5 Ga, 1.3 Ga, and 165 Ma respectively representing a span of time in Earth history from the earliest single-celled organisms to the present day. Given this perspective on organic material, a biological interpretation to the Viking LR results can no longer be ruled out. In the LR

  16. SNC Meteorites, Organic Matter and a New Look at Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmflash, David M.; Clemett, Simon J.; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, evidence has begun to grow supporting the possibility that the Viking GC-MS would not have detected certain carboxylate salts that could have been present as metastable oxidation products of high molecular weight organic species. Additionally, despite the instrument's high sensitivity, the possibility had remained that very low levels of organic matter, below the instrument's detection limit, could have been present. In fact, a recent study indicates that the degradation products of several million microorganisms per gram of soil on Mars would not have been detected by the Viking GC-MS. Since the strength of the GC-MS findings was considered enough to dismiss the biology packet, particularly the LR results, any subsequent evidence suggesting that organic molecules may in fact be present on the Martian surface necessitates a re-evaluation of the Viking LR data. In addition to an advanced mass spectrometer to look for isotopic signatures of biogenic processes, future lander missions will include the ability to detect methane produced by methanogenic bacteria, as well as techniques based on biotechnology. Meanwhile, the identification of Mars samples already present on Earth in the form of the SNC meteorites has provided us with the ability to study samples of the Martian upper crust a decade or more in advance of any planned sample return missions. While contamination issues are of serious concern, the presence of indigenous organic matter in the form of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has been detected in the Martian meteorites ALH84001 and Nakhla, while there is circumstantial evidence for carbonaceous material in Chassigny. The radiochronological ages of these meteorites are 4.5 Ga, 1.3 Ga, and 165 Ma respectively representing a span of time in Earth history from the earliest single-celled organisms to the present day. Given this perspective on organic material, a biological interpretation to the Viking LR results can no longer be ruled out. In the LR

  17. Stressing out in medieval Denmark: An investigation of dental enamel defects and age at death in two medieval Danish cemeteries.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Julia A; Boldsen, Jesper L; Hoppa, Robert D

    2017-06-01

    The influence of early life stress on later life experiences has become a major focus of research in medicine and more recently in bioarchaeology. Dental enamel, which preserves a record of childhood stress events, represents an important resource for this investigation when paired with the information from adult skeletal remains, such as age at death. The purpose of this research was to use a life history approach to the exploration of sex differences in the relationship between childhood stress and adult longevity by examining accentuated striae of Retzius (AS). A medieval Danish sample (n=70) drawn from the rural cemetery of Sejet and the urban cemetery of Ole Wormsgade was considered for AS and age at death. The results suggest sex differences in survivorship, with more stress being associated with reduced survivorship in males and increased survivorship in females. A consideration of AS formation time also suggests a difference in the impact of developmental timing between males and females. These results are interpreted in terms of differential frailty and selective mortality, drawing in both biomedical and cultural perspectives. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in different age groups of Danish cattle and pigs--occurrence and management associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Maddox-Hyttel, Charlotte; Langkjaer, Rikke B; Enemark, Heidi L; Vigre, Håkan

    2006-10-10

    To obtain information both about the prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in Danish cattle and pigs as well as the possible influence of different management systems on the occurrence and intensity of infection, we conducted an epidemiological survey comprising 50 randomly selected dairy and sow herds, respectively. Each herd was visited once for the collection of faecal samples and registration of basic management parameters. Faecal samples were collected from three different age groups of animals, i.e. 5 sows/cows, 10 nursing piglets/calves less than 1 month, and 10 weaner pigs 8-45 kg/calves 1-12 months. The faecal samples were purified and the number of (oo)cysts quantified. The study revealed an age-specific herd prevalence of Cryptosporidium of 16, 31 and 100% for sows, piglets and weaners, respectively, and of 14, 96 and 84% for cows, young calves and older calves, respectively. For Giardia the age-specific herd prevalence was 18, 22 and 84% for the sows, piglets and weaners, while for cattle herds the prevalence was 60, 82 and 100% for cows, young calves and older calves, correspondingly. The (oo)cyst excretion levels varied considerably both within and between herds for all age groups. Risk factors were evaluated by using proportional odds models with (oo)cyst excretion levels divided into four categories as response. Among the numerous risk factors examined, only a few were demonstrated to have a statistically significant influence, e.g. the use of an empty period in the calf pen between introduction of calves for both parasites had a protective effect in young calves. For weaners, use of straw in the pen and high pressure cleaning between batches of weaners had a preventive effect against higher Cryptosporidium oocyst excretion levels.

  19. The Viking landing sites: Selection and certification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masursky, H.; Crabill, N.L.

    1976-01-01

    During the past several years the Viking project developed plans to use Viking orbiter instruments and Earth-based radar to certify the suitability of the landing sites selected as the safest and most scientifically rewarding using Mariner 9 data. During June and July 1976, the Earth-based radar and orbital spacecraft observations of some of the prime and backup sites were completed. The results of these combined observations indicated that the Viking 1 prime landing area in the Chryse region of Mars is geologically varied and possibly more hazardous than expected, and was not certifiable as a site for the Viking 1 landing. Consequently, the site certification effort had to be drastically modified and lengthened to search for a site that might be safe enough to attempt to land. The selected site considered at 47.5??W,22.4??N represented a compromise between desirable characteristics observed with visual images and those inferred from Earth-based radar. It lies in the Chryse region about 900 kilometers northwest of the original site. Viking 1 landed successfully at this site on 20 July 1976.

  20. Proinflammatory cytokines, antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae and age-associated diseases in Danish centenarians: is there a link?

    PubMed

    Bruunsgaard, Helle; Østergaard, Lars; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Jeune, Bernard; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2002-01-01

    Plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels increase with age. High levels are associated with dementia and atherosclerosis in centenarians. Chlamydia pneumoniae induces the production of proinflammatory cytokines and has been related to the pathogeneses of Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that circulating levels of TNF-alpha represent a link between C. pneumoniae, high prevalences of dementia and cardiovascular diseases in 126 Danish centenarians. IgA antibody titres against C. pneumoniae were linearly correlated with high plasma levels of TNF-alpha in centenarians. However, both parameters were also correlated with total IgA in the blood and the association between C. pneumoniae IgA and TNF-alpha was not significant when total IgA was included in a multiple linear regression model. Accordingly, the association between C. pneumoniae-specific IgA and TNF-alpha may reflect immune activation rather than a specific antibody response. No associations were found between antibodies to C. pneumoniae and dementia or cardiovascular diseases. Although TNF-alpha is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and dementia, the present study does not support the hypothesis that TNF-alpha represents a link between chronic C. pneumoniae infection and these disorders.

  1. Viking 2 Image of Mars Utopian Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The boulder-strewn field of red rocks reaches to the horizon nearly two miles from Viking 2 on Mars' Utopian Plain. Scientists believe the colors of the Martian surface and sky in this photo represent their true colors. Fine particles of red dust have settled on spacecraft surfaces. The salmon color of the sky is caused by dust particles suspended in the atmosphere. Color calibration charts for the cameras are mounted at three locations on the spacecraft. Note the blue star field and red stripes of the flag. The circular structure at top is the high-gain antenna, pointed toward Earth. Viking 2 landed September 3,1976, some 4600 miles from its twin, Viking 1, which touched down on July 20.

  2. Viking 2 Image of Mars Utopian Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The boulder-strewn field of red rocks reaches to the horizon nearly two miles from Viking 2 on Mars' Utopian Plain. Scientists believe the colors of the Martian surface and sky in this photo represent their true colors. Fine particles of red dust have settled on spacecraft surfaces. The salmon color of the sky is caused by dust particles suspended in the atmosphere. Color calibration charts for the cameras are mounted at three locations on the spacecraft. Note the blue starfield and red stripes of the flag. The circular structure at top is the high-gain antenna, pointed toward Earth. Viking 2 landed September 3, 1976, some 4600 miles from its twin, Viking 1, which touched down on July 20.

  3. Balloon launched Viking decelerator test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moog, R. D.; Michel, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    Four BLDT flights were conducted during the summer of 1972. The purpose of these tests was to qualify the Viking parachute system behind the full-scale Viking entry vehicle over the maximum range of entry conditions anticipated in the Viking '75 soft landing on Mars. A summary of the test series is presented. Test conditions ranged from a Mach number of 2.0 to 0.5 and dynamic pressure from 11.7 to 4.4 psf. This range of conditions covers the uncertainty in entry conditions at Mars due to atmospheric and entry performance uncertainties. Emphasis is placed on parachute performance and simulated Mars entry vehicle motions as influenced by the parachute performance. Conclusions are presented regarding the ability of the parachute to perform within the operational parameters required for a successful soft Martian landing. A list of references which covers all reports in the qualification test program is included.

  4. Scientific results of the Viking missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    The two Viking missions to Mars have been extraordinarily successful. Thirteen scientific investigations yielded information about the atmosphere and surface. Two orbiters and landers operating for several months photographed the surface extensively from 1500 kilometers and directly on the surface. Measurements were made of the atmospheric composition, the surface elemental abundance, the atmospheric water vapor, temperature of the surface, and meteorological conditions; direct tests were made for organic material and living organisms. The question of life on Mars remains unanswered. The Viking spacecraft are designed to continue the investigations for at least one Mars year.

  5. Biological experiments - The Viking Mars Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.; Lederberg, J.; Rich, A.

    1972-01-01

    From the biological point of view, the Viking 1975 mission might be regarded as a test of the Oparin-Haldane hypothesis concerning the chemical evolution of living systems. Mars is a planet whose early history was probably similar to that of the earth and whose present environmental conditions may be compatible with the maintenance of living organisms. Thus, the biological experiments aboard the Viking I spacecraft are primarily concerned with the question of whether chemical evolution on Mars took place, and, if so, whether the process reached a level of complexity characteristic of replicating systems.

  6. Biological experiments - The Viking Mars Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.; Lederberg, J.; Rich, A.

    1972-01-01

    From the biological point of view, the Viking 1975 mission might be regarded as a test of the Oparin-Haldane hypothesis concerning the chemical evolution of living systems. Mars is a planet whose early history was probably similar to that of the earth and whose present environmental conditions may be compatible with the maintenance of living organisms. Thus, the biological experiments aboard the Viking I spacecraft are primarily concerned with the question of whether chemical evolution on Mars took place, and, if so, whether the process reached a level of complexity characteristic of replicating systems.

  7. Errors in Viking Lander Atmospheric Profiles Discovered Using MOLA Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, Paul; Lorenz, R. D.; Neumann, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    Each Viking lander measured a topographic profile during entry. Comparing to MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter), we find a vertical error of 1-2 km in the Viking trajectory. This introduces a systematic error of 10-20% in the Viking densities and pressures at a given altitude. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Genetic contribution to rate of change in functional abilities among Danish twins aged 75 years or more.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kaare; Gaist, David; Vaupel, James W; McGue, Matt

    2002-01-15

    In a previous cross-sectional study of twins, the authors found evidence of a substantial genetic influence on functional abilities among elderly women. It has been suggested that rate of change in functional abilities over time could underlie such findings and that rate-of-change phenotypes may have an even larger genetic component than "level" phenotypes (e.g., functional abilities per se). If so, rate-of-change phenotypes could be more powerful than level phenotypes in studies aimed at identifying specific polymorphisms of importance for aging. In 1995, the authors assessed a population-based sample of 2,401 Danish twins aged 75 years or more. The survivors were recontacted after 2 years and again after 4 years. Consistent mean-level declines, high within-person correlations over time, and substantial heritability in the female sample were observed for functional abilities. Nonetheless, structural-equation analyses revealed only a very modest and nonsignificant heritability for rate of change in functional abilities: 16% (95% confidence interval: 0, 35) for women and 9% (95% confidence interval: 0, 44) for men. This study had a large initial sample size, high participation rates, and a valid and reliable measure of rate of change in a phenotype that had previously shown substantial heritability in cross-sectional analyses in the same twin population. Still, the present study revealed only a modest and nonsignificant genetic influence on rate of change, which suggests that detection of polymorphisms influencing rate of change in functional abilities among the elderly may prove to be difficult.

  9. Association study of FOXO3ASNPs and aging phenotypes in Danish oldest-old individuals

    PubMed Central

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Dato, Serena; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    FOXO3Avariation has repeatedly been reported to associate with human longevity, yet only few studies have investigated whether FOXO3Avariation also associates with aging-related traits. Here, we investigate the association of 15 FOXO3Atagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1088 oldest-old Danes (age 92–93) with 4 phenotypes known to predict their survival: cognitive function, hand grip strength, activity of daily living (ADL), and self-rated health. Based on previous studies in humans and foxo animal models, we also explore self-reported diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and bone (femur/spine/hip/wrist) fracture. Gene-based testing revealed significant associations of FOXO3Avariation with ADL (P = 0.044) and bone fracture (P = 0.006). The single-SNP statistics behind the gene-based analysis indicated increased ADL (decreased disability) and reduced bone fracture risk for carriers of the minor alleles of 8 and 10 SNPs, respectively. These positive directions of effects are in agreement with the positive effects on longevity previously reported for these SNPs. However, when correcting for the test of 9 phenotypes by Bonferroni correction, bone fracture showed borderline significance (P = 0.054), while ADL did not (P = 0.396). Although the single-SNP associations did not formally replicate in another study population of oldest-old Danes (n = 1279, age 94–100), the estimates were of similar direction of effect as observed in the Discovery sample. A pooled analysis of both study populations displayed similar or decreased sized P-values for most associations, hereby supporting the initial findings. Nevertheless, confirmation in additional study populations is needed. PMID:25470651

  10. Mars gravity field derived from Viking-1 and Viking-2 - The navigation result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, E. J.; Williams, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Viking-1 and Viking-2 Doppler tracking data taken during orbit phases characterized by 1500 km subperiapse altitudes have provided a basis for a determination of the Martian gravity field. Navigation results show that the linear combination of short-arc gravity estimates is an acceptable technique for obtaining gravity models over multiple data arcs. An ensemble field composed of Viking data and Mariner-9 a priori retains the inherent local accuracy of its constituent fields. At the same time, the model can be made to be valid globally by careful weighting of a priori Mariner-9 data. The sixth degree and order model presented reduces the error concerning the change in period by more than an order of magnitude during the high altitude (1500 km) phases of the Viking mission. The resulting areoid deviates by no more than 150 m from the areoid produced by the a priori Mariner-9 field.

  11. Indicators of dietary patterns in Danish infants at 9 months of age.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Louise B B; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F; Carlsen, Emma M; Bro, Rasmus; Pipper, Christian B

    2015-01-01

    It is important to increase the awareness of indicators associated with adverse infant dietary patterns to be able to prevent or to improve dietary patterns early on. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between a wide range of possible family and child indicators and adherence to dietary patterns for infants aged 9 months. The two dietary patterns 'Family Food' and 'Health-Conscious Food' were displayed by principal component analysis, and associations with possible indicators were analysed by multiple linear regressions in a pooled sample (n=374) of two comparable observational cohorts, SKOT I and SKOT II. These cohorts comprised infants with mainly non-obese mothers versus infants with obese mothers, respectively. A lower Family Food score indicates a higher intake of liquid baby food, as this pattern shows transition from baby food towards the family's food. Infants, who were younger at diet registration and had higher body mass index (BMI) z-scores at 9 months, had lower Family Food pattern scores. A lower Family Food pattern score was also observed for infants with immigrant/descendant parents, parents who shared cooking responsibilities and fathers in the labour market compared to being a student, A lower Health-Conscious Food pattern score indicates a less healthy diet. A lower infant Health-Conscious Food pattern score was associated with a higher maternal BMI, a greater number of children in the household, a higher BMI z-score at 9 months, and a higher infant age at diet registration. Associations between infant dietary patterns and maternal, paternal, household, and child characteristics were identified. This may improve the possibility of identifying infants with an increased risk of developing unfavourable dietary patterns and potentially enable an early targeted preventive support.

  12. Indicators of dietary patterns in Danish infants at 9 months of age

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Louise B.B.; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Carlsen, Emma M.; Bro, Rasmus; Pipper, Christian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is important to increase the awareness of indicators associated with adverse infant dietary patterns to be able to prevent or to improve dietary patterns early on. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association between a wide range of possible family and child indicators and adherence to dietary patterns for infants aged 9 months. Design The two dietary patterns ‘Family Food’ and ‘Health-Conscious Food’ were displayed by principal component analysis, and associations with possible indicators were analysed by multiple linear regressions in a pooled sample (n=374) of two comparable observational cohorts, SKOT I and SKOT II. These cohorts comprised infants with mainly non-obese mothers versus infants with obese mothers, respectively. Results A lower Family Food score indicates a higher intake of liquid baby food, as this pattern shows transition from baby food towards the family's food. Infants, who were younger at diet registration and had higher body mass index (BMI) z-scores at 9 months, had lower Family Food pattern scores. A lower Family Food pattern score was also observed for infants with immigrant/descendant parents, parents who shared cooking responsibilities and fathers in the labour market compared to being a student, A lower Health-Conscious Food pattern score indicates a less healthy diet. A lower infant Health-Conscious Food pattern score was associated with a higher maternal BMI, a greater number of children in the household, a higher BMI z-score at 9 months, and a higher infant age at diet registration. Conclusions Associations between infant dietary patterns and maternal, paternal, household, and child characteristics were identified. This may improve the possibility of identifying infants with an increased risk of developing unfavourable dietary patterns and potentially enable an early targeted preventive support. PMID:26111966

  13. The Viking Mosaic catalog, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N.

    1982-01-01

    Martian geographic location information for Viking Orbiter mosaic images is provided. The photographic sequences were chosen based upon image content. The footprinting task was carried out, post factor, in order to facilitate research activities. Early activities were centered around the examination of candidate landing sites.

  14. Post Viking planetary protection requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    Past planetary quarantine requirements were reviewed in the light of present Viking data to determine the steps necessary to prevent contamination of the Martian surface on future missions. The currently used term planetary protection reflects a broader scope of understanding of the problems involved. Various methods of preventing contamination are discussed in relation to proposed projects, specifically the 1984 Rover Mission.

  15. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.

    1999-01-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible.

  16. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guaita, Cesare

    2017-08-01

    The last analytical results of SAM laboratory onboard of Curiosity offer a new insight on the interpretation of the Label Release (LR) experiment performed on Mars by the two Viking landers about 40 years ago. The fundamental action of perchlorate salt, able to decompose all organic compounds at high temperature ( > 300°C) is discussed.

  17. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    PubMed

    Klein, H P

    1999-12-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible.

  18. Disputing Viking navigation by polarized skylight.

    PubMed

    Roslund, C; Beckman, C

    1994-07-20

    The widely held notion that the Vikings utilized polarization of skylight on overcast days for navigational purposes is demonstrated to have no scientific basis. The use of polarized skylight for navigation under partly cloudfree skies should be treated with caution and skepticism.

  19. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.

    1999-01-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible.

  20. Impaired sleep and allostatic load: cross-sectional results from the Danish Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis; Jennum, Poul; Hansen, Ase Marie; Lund, Rikke; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms linking sleep impairment to morbidity and mortality is important for future prevention, but these mechanisms are far from elucidated. We aimed to determine the relation between impaired sleep, both in terms of duration and disturbed sleep, and allostatic load (AL), which is a measure of systemic wear and tear of multiple body systems, as well as with individual risk markers within the cardiac, metabolic, anthropometric, and immune system. A cross-sectional population-based study of 5226 men and women from the Danish Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank with comprehensive information on sleep duration, disturbed sleep, objective measures of an extensive range of biological risk markers, and physical conditions. Long sleep (mean difference 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13, 0.32) and disturbed sleep (0.14; 0.06, 0.22) were associated with higher AL as well as with high-risk levels of risk markers from the anthropometric, metabolic, and immune system. Sub-analyses suggested that the association between disturbed sleep and AL might be explained by underlying disorders. Whereas there was no association between short sleep and AL, the combination of short and disturbed sleep was associated with higher AL (0.19; 0.08, 0.30) and high-risk levels of immune system markers. Our study suggests small but significant differences in the distribution of allostatic load, a pre-clinical indicator of disease risk and premature death, for people with impaired relative to normal sleep. Impaired sleep may be a risk factor for developing disease and be a risk marker for underlying illness or sleep disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fetal growth and blood pressure in a Danish population aged 31-51 years.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, H T; Thulstrup, A M; Nørgdård, B; Engberg, M; Madsen, K M; Johnsen, S P; Olsen, J; Lauritzen, T

    2000-08-01

    During the past decade, studies have shown an inverse association between birth weight and blood pressure and risk of coronary heart disease in adult life. From old public archives we were able to trace the birth records of 545 out of 905 persons (60.2%) aged 31-51 years who participated in the Ebeltoft Health Promotion Project in Denmark. We examined the associations between birth weight, length at birth, Ponderal Index and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. No associations were found for women. For men, the mean systolic blood pressure fell from 131.1 mmHg with a birth weight of less than 3300 g to 129.6 mmHg with a birth weight of more than 4000 g, and for diastolic blood pressure 81.6 mmHg to 80.3 mmHg, respectively. For men, the mean systolic blood pressure fell from 135.7 mm Hg with a birth length of 30-51 cm to 131.6 with a birth length of 55-62 cm, and for diastolic blood pressure 83.0 mmHg to 78.8 mmHg, respectively. The associations may reflect organ programming in fetal life.

  2. Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) surgery among Danish women hysterectomized for benign conditions: age at hysterectomy, age at subsequent POP operation, and risk of POP after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Lykke, Rune; Blaakær, Jan; Ottesen, Bent; Gimbel, Helga

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) surgery after hysterectomy from 1977 to 2009, the time interval from hysterectomy to POP surgery, and age characteristics of women undergoing POP surgery after hysterectomy and to estimate the risk of undergoing POP surgery after hysterectomy. The study was a population-based registry study. Patient data from 154,882 women hysterectomized for benign conditions in the period from 1977 to 2009 were extracted from the Danish National Patient Registry. Patients were followed up from hysterectomy to POP surgery, death/emigration, or end of study period. An estimate of the hazard of undergoing POP surgery following hysterectomy was calculated. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method. The frequency of POP surgery on hysterectomized women was high the first 2 years of the follow-up period with almost 800 women operated yearly. More than one third (n = 2,872) of all women operated for POP were operated less than 5 years after the hysterectomy with a median of 8.6 years. The cumulated incidence of POP surgery after hysterectomy with follow-up of up to 32 years was 12 %; 50 % (n = 5,451) of all POP surgeries were in the posterior compartment. The mean age of women undergoing a first POP surgery after hysterectomy was 60 years. POP after hysterectomy occurs as a long-term complication of hysterectomy; 12 % of hysterectomized women were operated for POP. They were operated at younger age than non-hysterectomized women and half the POP operations were performed in the posterior compartment.

  3. Final Viking NiCd battery conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Britting, A.

    1983-08-01

    The Viking Lander Monitor Mission (VLMM) is well beyond its planned 90-day landed Mars mission. It has been an established NASA goal to maintain an American presence on Mars for as long as possible. With healthy subsystems, the mission could conceivably last until December 5, 1994. At that time the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power source output power would be marginal for support of the system electrical loads and for battery maintenance. The antenna pointing coefficients will also expire at that time, resulting in telecommunication system shutdown. Recently three of the four, 8 ampere-hour (AH) nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries onboard Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) have indicated signs of significant loss of energy storage capacity. An intensive program of deep-discharge battery reconditioning was begun in January 1982 in an attempt to return the batteries to levels of capacity approaching early mission values.

  4. The 'soil' of Mars /Viking 1/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shorthill, R. W.; Moore, H. J., II; Scott, R. F.; Hutton, R. E.; Liebes, S., Jr.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The immediate environs of the Viking 1 lander are described, and the techniques employed to deduce the properties of the two different 'soil' types there are summarized. It is shown that the surface in the immediate vicinity of the lander consists of an area with fine-grained materials ('Sandy Flats') and a rocky area set in a matrix of finer-grained material ('Rocky Flats'). Estimates are given for the bulk density, particle density, particle size distribution, cohesion, angle of internal friction, and penetration resistance of the surface layer in each area. Footpad penetration into the surface layer is discussed, and wind removal of particles is examined. It is concluded that the surface layer of the Viking 1 landing site contains loess, dune sand, lunar nominal soil, lag gravel, and bare rock.

  5. Imaging experiment - The Viking Mars Orbiter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Baum, W. A.; Briggs, G. A.; Masursky, H.; Wise, D. W.; Montgomery, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The general objectives of the imaging experiment on the Viking Orbiter are to aid the selection of Viking Lander sites, to map and monitor the chosen sites during lander operations, to aid in the selection of future landing sites, and to extend our knowledge of the planet. The imaging system consists of two identical vidicon cameras each attached to a 1026-mm T/8 telescope giving approximately 1-deg square field of view. From an altitude of 1500 km, the picture elements will be approximately 24 m apart. The vidicon is coupled with an image intensifier which provides increased sensitivity and permits electronic shuttering and image motion compensation. The camera differs from those previously flown to Mars by providing contiguous coverage at high resolution on a single orbital pass, by having sufficient sensitivity to use narrow band color filters at maximum resolution, and by having response in the ultraviolet.

  6. The Viking biology experiments: epilogue and prologue.

    PubMed

    Klein, H P

    1992-01-01

    In looking ahead to possible new attempts to search for extant life on Mars, the history of the Viking biological investigations is reviewed here. Scientific considerations that led to the selection of specific experimental approaches for life detection are discussed, as well as the overall results obtained from that mission. Despite extensive preflight testing of the concepts that were to be used, unanticipated artefacts arose in the actual mission. These almost certainly reflect the fact that, at that time, there were many gaps in our understanding of the physical and chemical characteristics of the Martian environment. After Viking, many of these issues still remain unresolved, and future attempts to search for extant biology should be restrained until adequate new information about potential habitable microenvironments is obtained.

  7. Analysis of data from Viking RPA's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the martian ionosphere performed by Viking Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) are reported. Viking RPA measurements of low energy electron fluxes out to 16,000 km above the Mars surface are discussed including both energy spectra and periods of continuous monitoring of the total flux above 15 ev. The mean electron current at energies greater than ev increases montonically by nearly two orders of magnitude from about 9000 km down to 700 km, but no clear signature of the bow shock is seen. The total wave power in the 2 sec measurement intervals for this current does, however, show a broad peak near 1700 km altitude. These variations in the low energy electron fluxes are related to whistler mode oscillations in the solar wind plasma. It is concluded that there may be a highly turbulent shock structure that masks a clear signature of the bow shock in the time averaged data.

  8. The Viking Mosaic Catalog, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N.

    1982-01-01

    A collection of more than 500 mosaics prepared from Viking Orbiter images is given. Accompanying each mosaic is a footprint plot, which identifies by location, picture number, and order number, each frame in the mosaic. Corner coordinates and pertinent imaging information are also included. A short text provides the camera characteristics, image format, and data processing information necessary for using the mosaic plates as a research aide. Procedures for ordering mosaic enlargements and individual images are also provided.

  9. Viking lander battery performance, degradation, and reconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Britting, A.O. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    On July 20 and September 3, 1976, Viking Landers 1 and 2 touched down on the surface of Mars. Prior to launch each lander, including its batteries was subjected to a sterilization temperature of 233 F for 54 hours. The results of battery performance, degradation and reconditioning are presented, including charge/discharge cycles, reconditioning technique, temperature history, early and current capacity. A brief description of the power system operation is also included.

  10. The "soil" of Mars (viking 1).

    PubMed

    Shorthill, R W; Moore, H J; Scott, R F; Hutton, R E; Liebes, S; Spitzer, C R

    1976-10-01

    The location of the Viking 1 lander is most ideal for the study of soil properties because it has one footpad in soft material and one on hard material. As each soil sample was acquired, information on soil properties was obtained. Although analysis is still under way, early results on bulk density, particle size, angle of internal friction, cohesion, adhesion, and penetration resistance of the soil of Mars are presented.

  11. New results from the Viking relativity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, R. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Goldstein, R. B.; Macneil, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    The predicted general relativistic effect of solar gravity on the round-trip times of electromagnetic signals traveling between earth and Mars has been verified by means of radio ranging to the Viking spacecraft. The ranging measurements were found to be consistent with the predicted increases of up to 200 microsec in the travel times of the signals to within the estimated uncertainty of 0.2%.

  12. Viking Biology Experiments and the Martian soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, Amos

    1989-01-01

    The Viking Biology Experiments (VBE) are the most informative database on the wet chemistry and reactivity of the Martian soil available today. The simulation and chemical interpretation of the results have given valuable hints towards the characterization of the soils' mineralogy, adsorption properties, pH and redox. The characterization of Mars' soil on the basis of ten years of labelled release (LR) and other VBE simulations are reviewed.

  13. New results from the Viking relativity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, R. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Goldstein, R. B.; Macneil, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    The predicted general relativistic effect of solar gravity on the round-trip times of electromagnetic signals traveling between earth and Mars has been verified by means of radio ranging to the Viking spacecraft. The ranging measurements were found to be consistent with the predicted increases of up to 200 microsec in the travel times of the signals to within the estimated uncertainty of 0.2%.

  14. Phobos and Deimos astrometric observations from Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, T. C.; Callahan, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    This article describes the reduced astrometric observations of Phobos and Deimos derived from Viking Orbiter 1 and 2 imaging data. This data set spans four years from 1976 to 1980, contains 275 sets of spacecraft-centered, right ascension and declination observations, and has a limiting accuracy of a few km (1 sigma). The details of observation formulation and use for ephemeris improvement are given.

  15. Winter frost at Viking Lander 2 site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svitek, Thomas; Murray, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents quantitative evidence for cold trapping (frost redeposition) at the Viking Lander 2 site. This evidence consists of the frost surface coverage and color transition, the timing of this transition, and the limited vertical mixing and horizontal water transport. It is argued that cold trapping must be a general property of seasonal frost and, therefore, must be considered in order to understand the evolution of the surface environment of Mars.

  16. Viking mission support. [Deep Space Network activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Statistics listing the Deep Space Network tracking and command support and the discrepancy report status for 1 January through 28 February 1977 are presented in tables. The initial Viking extended mission period of normal DSN support, following the nonstandard operations during the solar conjunction period is included. Operational testing subsequent to the MK III data system installations at DSS 12, 44, and 62 during this period are also discussed.

  17. The "Soil" of mars (viking 1)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shorthill, R.W.; Moore, H.J.; Scott, R.F.; Hutton, R.E.; Liebes, S.; Spitzer, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    The location of the Viking 1 lander is most ideal for the study of soil properties because it has one footpad in soft material and one on hard material. As each soil sample was acquired, information on soil properties was obtained. Although analysis is still under way, early results on bulk density, particle size, angle of internal friction, cohesion, adhesion, and penetration resistance of the soil of Mars are presented.

  18. Radar characteristics of Viking 1 landing sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tyler, G.L.; Campbell, D.B.; Downs, G.S.; Green, R.R.; Moore, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    Radar observations of Mars at centimeter wavelengths in May, June, and July 1976 provided estimates of surface roughness and reflectivity in three potential landing areas for Viking 1. Surface roughness is characterized by the distribution of surface landing slopes or tilts on lateral scales of the order of 1 to 10 meters; measurements of surface reflectivity are indicators of bulk surface density in the uppermost few centimeters. By these measures, the Viking 1 landing site at 47.5??W, 22.4??N is rougher than the martian average, although it may be near the martian average for elevations accessible to Viking, and is estimated to be near the Mars average in reflectivity. The AINW site at the center of Chryse Planitia, 43.5??W, 23.4??N, may be an area of anomalous radar characteristics, indicative of extreme, small-scale roughness, very low surface density, or a combination of these two characteristics. Low signal-to-noise ratio observations of the original Chryse site at 34??W, 19.5??N indicate that that area is at least twice as rough as the Mars average.

  19. Surface tension propellant control for Viking 75 Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Hise, R. E.; Peterson, R. G.; Debrock, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the selection, development and qualification of the surface tension system and includes results of low-g drop tower tests of scale models, 1-g simulation tests of low-g large ullage settling and liquid withdrawal, structural qualification tests, and propellant surface tension/contact angle studies. Subscale testing and analyses were used to evaluate the ability of the system to maintain or recover the desired propellant orientation following possible disturbances during the Viking mission. This effort included drop tower tests to demonstrate that valid wick paths exist for moving any displaced propellant back over the tank outlet. Variations in surface tension resulting from aging, temperature, and lubricant contamination were studied and the effects of surface finish, referee fluid exposure, aging, and lubricant contamination on contact angle were assessed. Results of movies of typical subscale drop tower tests and full scale slosh tests are discussed.

  20. Surface tension propellant control for Viking 75 Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Hise, R. E.; Peterson, R. G.; Debrock, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the selection, development and qualification of the surface tension system and includes results of low-g drop tower tests of scale models, 1-g simulation tests of low-g large ullage settling and liquid withdrawal, structural qualification tests, and propellant surface tension/contact angle studies. Subscale testing and analyses were used to evaluate the ability of the system to maintain or recover the desired propellant orientation following possible disturbances during the Viking mission. This effort included drop tower tests to demonstrate that valid wick paths exist for moving any displaced propellant back over the tank outlet. Variations in surface tension resulting from aging, temperature, and lubricant contamination were studied and the effects of surface finish, referee fluid exposure, aging, and lubricant contamination on contact angle were assessed. Results of movies of typical subscale drop tower tests and full scale slosh tests are discussed.

  1. Description of OPRA: A Danish database designed for the analyses of risk factors associated with 30-day hospital readmission of people aged 65+ years.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mona K; Nielsen, Gunnar L; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Rasmussen, Ole S; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2017-08-01

    To describe the construction of the Older Person at Risk Assessment (OPRA) database, the ability to link this database with existing data sources obtained from Danish nationwide population-based registries and to discuss its research potential for the analyses of risk factors associated with 30-day hospital readmission. We reviewed Danish nationwide registries to obtain information on demographic and social determinants as well as information on health and health care use in a population of hospitalised older people. The sample included all people aged 65+ years discharged from Danish public hospitals in the period from 1 January 2007 to 30 September 2010. We used personal identifiers to link and integrate the data from all events of interest with the outcome measures in the OPRA database. The database contained records of the patients, admissions and variables of interest. The cohort included 1,267,752 admissions for 479,854 unique people. The rate of 30-day all-cause acute readmission was 18.9% ( n=239,077) and the overall 30-day mortality was 5.0% ( n=63,116). The OPRA database provides the possibility of linking data on health and life events in a population of people moving into retirement and ageing. Construction of the database makes it possible to outline individual life and health trajectories over time, transcending organisational boundaries within health care systems. The OPRA database is multi-component and multi-disciplinary in orientation and has been prepared to be used in a wide range of subgroup analyses, including different outcome measures and statistical methods.

  2. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutton, R.E.; Moore, H.J.; Scott, R.F.; Shorthill, R.W.; Spitzer, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift material, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  3. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, R. E.; Moore, H. J.; Scott, R. F.; Shorthill, R. W.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift materials, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock.

  4. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, R. E.; Moore, H. J.; Scott, R. F.; Shorthill, R. W.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift materials, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock.

  5. The maternal age-related first trimester risks for trisomy 21, 18 and 13 based on Danish first trimester data from 2005 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Tanja Schlaikjaer; Sørensen, Steen; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2016-07-01

    Most currently used age-related risks of T21, T18 and T13 are based on estimates of the live-birth prevalence, and describe an exponential increase of risk by increased maternal age. We investigated the first trimester prevalence of T21, T18 and T13 in a large population of Danish women. From the Danish Cytogenetic Central Registry we got the information of all pre- and postnatally diagnosed fetuses with T21, T18 or T13 between 2005 and 2014 in Denmark. Information on the total number of births and maternal age at birth were gathered from StatBank Denmark. The total number of included women was 605 853. The total number of T21 cases was 1564, T18 cases was 401 and T13 cases was 157. The overall first trimester prevalence per 10 000 pregnancies was 25.8 for T21, 6.6 for T18 and 2.6 for T13. Boltzmann sigmoidal model (Y = Bottom + (top-bottom / (1 - exp (V50 - X) / slope)) was found to best describe the age-related risk of T21, T18 and T13. We found that the age-related risks are better described by sigmoidal functions, contrary to the widely assumed exponential functions. Our results indicate a lower age-related a priori risk of T21, T18 and T13 compared to widely used risk models. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Development and installation of an advanced beam guidance system on Viking`s 2.4 megawatt EB furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Motchenbacher, C.A.; Grosse, I.A.

    1994-12-31

    Viking Metallurgical is a manufacturer of titanium alloy and superalloy seamless ring forgings for the aerospace industry. For more than 20 years Viking has used electron beam cold hearth melting to recover titanium alloy scrap and to produce commercially pure titanium ingot for direct forging. In the 1970`s Viking pioneered electron beam cold hearth melting and in 1983 added a two-gun, 2.4 MW furnace. As part of Vikings efforts to improve process control we have commissioned and installed a new electron beam guidance system. The system is capable of generating virtually unlimited EB patterns resulting in improved melt control.

  7. Photogrammetry of the Viking-Lander imagery.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, S.S.C.; Schafer, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    We have solved the problem of photogrammetric mapping from the Viking Lander photography in two ways: 1) by converting the azimuth and elevation scanning imagery to the equivalent of a frame picture by means of computerized rectification; and 2) by interfacing a high-speed, general-purpose computer to the AS-11A analytical plotter so that all computations of corrections can be performed in real time during the process of model orientation and map compilation. Examples are presented of photographs and maps of Earth and Mars. -from Authors

  8. Entry science experiments for Viking 1975.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Hanson, W. B.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Seiff, A.; Spencer, N. W.

    1972-01-01

    A review is given of our present knowledge of the Martian atmosphere with special emphasis on the results obtained by the Mariner 4, 6 and 7 fly-bys. The Viking Project offers the first opportunity for in situ measurements which should resolve many questions left open by previous work. A description is given of the neutral gas mass spectrometer and retarding potential analyzer experiments to be performed as the lander enters the upper atmosphere and the experiments planned for determining atmospheric structure as the lander approaches the surface of the planet.

  9. Seismic investigations - The Viking Mars Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Kovach, R. L.; Latham, G.; Press, F.; Nafi Toksoz, M.; Sutton, G.

    1972-01-01

    A lightweight three-component short period seismometer has been developed for preliminary seismic investigations of Mars. Because of weight and data-rate constraints the Viking seismic experiment is far from optimal but it should, at a minimum, provide information about the microseismic level and an upper bound on the seismicity of the planet. If Mars is tectonically active a start can be made on the problem of the internal structure, dynamics, and composition of the planet. A good distribution of modest sized Marsquakes will make it possible to determine if Mars has a core. The size of the core is related to the conditions of planetary formation.

  10. Viking 1 electron observations at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Francis S.; Hanson, William B.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the electron mode sweeps made by Viking 1 above the Martian ionosphere is presented. The initial electron concentrations near 15,000 km were slightly less than 1/cu cm and were characterized by a temperature of about 40,000 K and by what is interpreted as a backstreaming component from the planetary shock of about 0.1/cu cm at about 250,000 K. The shock appeared to be quasi-parallel. The hottest region was near 850 km, and is assumed to be characterized by energies of about 200 eV.

  11. Martian Morning Clouds Seen by Viking Orbiter 1 in 1976

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-12

    No NASA Mars orbiter has been in a position to observe morning daylight on Mars since the twin Viking orbiters of the 1970s. This image, taken by Viking Orbiter 1 on Aug. 17, 1976, shows water-ice clouds in the Valles Marineris area of equatorial Mars.

  12. Viking to Mars - Profile of a space expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. S., Jr.; Young, A. T.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking spacecraft, operations, and findings are reviewed and numerous pictures are presented in an attempt to capture the atmosphere of the Viking expedition. The details of the two Viking spacecraft, each consisting of an orbiter and lander combination launched a Titan III/Centaur are described and illustrated, along with the Viking ground-data and communications system. The principal conclusions of the Viking mission to date are: detection of nitrogen, argon, krypton, and xenon; determination of isotopic ratios of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon; uniform diurnal meteorological conditions; determination of major elemental abundances; complex surface chemistry; no ubiquitous organic material; 4 to 7% of the sampled surface material is magnetic; discovery of ancient extensive fluvial activity; north permanent polar cap made of water ice; and significant variations of the atmospheric water vapor, the summer hemisphere being much more humid than the winter hemisphere.

  13. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status and cancer family history of Danish women affected with multifocal or bilateral breast cancer at a young age

    PubMed Central

    Bergthorsson, J; Ejlertsen, B; Olsen, J; Borg, A; Nielsen, K; Barkardottir, R; Klausen, S; Mouridsen, H; Winther, K; Fenger, K; Niebuhr, A; Harboe, T; Niebuhr, E

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—A small fraction of breast cancer is the result of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 cancer susceptibility genes. Mutation carriers frequently have a positive family history of breast and ovarian cancer, are often diagnosed at a young age, and may have a higher incidence of double or multiple primary breast tumours than breast cancer patients in general.
OBJECTIVES—To estimate the prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in young Danish patients affected with bilateral or multifocal breast cancer and to determine the relationship of mutation status to family history of cancer.
SUBJECTS—From the files of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), we selected 119 breast cancer patients diagnosed before the age of 46 years with either bilateral (n=59) or multifocal (n=61) disease.
METHODS—DNA from the subjects was screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations using single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and the protein truncation test (PTT). Observed and expected cancer incidence in first degree relatives of the patients was estimated using data from the Danish Cancer Registry.
RESULTS—Twenty four mutation carriers were identified (20%), of whom 13 had a BRCA1 mutation and 11 carried a BRCA2 mutation. Two mutations in BRCA1 were found repeatedly in the material and accounted for seven of the 24 (29%) mutation carriers. The mutation frequency was about equal in patients with bilateral (22%) and multifocal breast cancer (18%). The incidence of breast and ovarian cancer was greatly increased in first degree relatives of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, but to a much lesser degree in relatives of non-carriers. An increased risk of cancer was also noted in brothers of non-carriers.
CONCLUSIONS—A relatively broad spectrum of germline mutations was observed in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and most of the mutations are present in other populations. Our results indicate that a diagnosis of bilateral and multifocal breast

  14. Microbiological profiles of the Viking spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puleo, J. R.; Fields, N. D.; Bergstrom, S. L.; Oxborrow, G. S.; Stabekis, P. D.; Koukol, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Planetary quarantine requirements associated with the launch of two Viking spacecraft necessitated microbiological assessment during assembly and testing at Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center. Samples were collected from the Viking Lander Capsules (VLC), Orbiters (VO), and Shrouds at predetermined intervals during assembly and testing. Levels of bacterial spores per square meter on the VLC-1 and VLC-2 were 1.6 x 10 squared and 9.7, respectively, prior to dry-heat sterilization. The ranges of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms detected on the VO-1 and VO-2 were 4.2 x 10 squared to 4.3 x 10 cubed and 2.3 x 10 squared to 8.9 x 10 cubed/sq m, respectively. Approximately 1300 colonies were picked from culture plates, identified, lyophilized, and stored for future reference. About 75% of all isolates were microorganisms considered indigenous to humans; the remaining isolates were associated with soil and dust. The percentage of microorganisms of human origin was consistent with results obtained with previous automated spacecraft but slightly lower than those observed for manned (Apollo) spacecraft.

  15. Imaging experiment: The Viking Mars orbiter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Baum, W.A.; Briggs, G.A.; Masursky, H.; Wise, D.W.; Montgomery, D.R.

    1972-01-01

    The general objectives of the Imaging Experiment on the Viking Orbiter are to aid the selection of Viking Lander sites, to map and monitor the chosen sites during lander operations, to aid in the selection of future landing sites, and to extend our knowledge of the planet. The imaging system consists of two identical vidicon cameras each attached to a 1026 mm T/8 telescope giving approximately 1?? square field of view. From an altitude of 1500 km the picture elements will be approximately 24m apart. The vidicon is coupled with an image intensifier which provides increased sensitivity and permits electronic shuttering and image motion compensation. A vidicon readout time of 2.24 sec enables pictures to be taken in rapid sequence for contiguous coverage at high resolution. The camera differs from those previously flown to Mars by providing contiguous coverage at high resolution on a single orbital pass, by having sufficient sensitivity to use narrow band color filters at maximum resolution, and by having response in the ultraviolet. These capabilities will be utelized to supplement lander observations and to extend our knowledge particularly of volcanic, erosional, and atmospheric phenomena on Mars. ?? 1972.

  16. Microbiological profiles of the Viking spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Puleo, J R; Fields, N D; Bergstrom, S L; Oxborrow, G S; Stabekis, P D; Koukol, R

    1977-02-01

    Planetary quarantine requirements associated with the launch of two Viking spacecraft necessitated microbiological assessment during assembly and testing at Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center. Samples were collected from selected surface of the Viking Lander Capsules (VLC), Orbiters, (VO), and Shrouds at predetermined intervals during assembly and testing. Approximately 7,000 samples were assayed. Levels of bacterial spores per square meter on the VLC-1 and VLC-2 were 1.6 x 10(2) and 9.7 x 10(1), respectively, prior to dry-heat sterilization. The ranges of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms detected on the VO-1 and VO-2 at various sampling events were 4.2 x 10(2) to 4.3 x 10(3) and 2.3 x 10(2) to 8.9 x 10(3)/m2, respectively. Approximately 1,300 colonies were picked from culture plates, identified, lypholipized, and stored for future reference. About 75% of all isolates were microorganisms considered indigenous to humans; the remaining isolates were associated with soil and dust in the environment. The percentage of microorganisms of human origin was consistent with results obtained with previous automated spacecraft but slightly lower than those observed for manned (Apollo) spacecraft.

  17. Dust adhesion on Viking lander camera window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of dust impingement on a duplicate Viking Lander camera window indicated the possibility of window obscuration after several days of exposure even at low dust concentration levels. As a result the following corrective measures were recommended: (1) The clearance between the housing surface and the camera post should be eliminated by using an appropriately designed plastic skirt: (2) The three horizontal ledges below the window inside the cavity act as bases for pile-up of dust that slides down the window surface; they should be replaced by a single inclined plane down which the dust will slide and fall out on the ground: (3) Adhered dust on the window surface can be removed by high pressure CO2 jets directed down against the window; the amount of CO2 gas needed for the entire mission can be carried in a 3 1/2-inch diameter sphere equipped with a remotely programable valve. These measures were incorporated in the design of the lander camera system. The continued high quality of photographs transmitted from the Viking spacecraft several months after landing attests to their effectiveness.

  18. First Color Image From Viking Lander 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This color picture of Mars was taken July 21--the day following Viking l's successful landing on the planet. The local time on Mars is approximately noon. The view is southeast from the Viking. Orange-red surface materials cover most of the surface, apparently forming a thin veneer over darker bedrock exposed in patches, as in the lower right. The reddish surface materials may be limonite (hydrated ferric oxide). Such weathering products form on Earth in the presence of water and an oxidizing atmosphere. The sky has a reddish cast, probably due to scattering and reflection from reddish sediment suspended in the lower atmosphere. The scene was scanned three times by the spacecraft's camera number 2, through a different color filter each time. To assist in balancing the colors, a second picture was taken of z test chart mounted on the rear of the spacecraft. Color data for these patches were adjusted until the patches were an appropriate color of gray. The same calibration was then used for the entire scene.

  19. Viking 2 electron observations at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Francis S.; Hanson, William B.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the electron mode sweeps made in Viking 2 above the ionosphere is presented. An observation of the electron energy spectrum over the range 0 to 78 eV was recorded in 1 s and observations were made at intervals of 4 or 8 s. The concentrations and temperatures were highly variable in the altitude range 14,000 to 9000 km. Evidence for two Maxwellian components were present in most of the records. The general trend of concentration and temperature for the predominant component was from 2/cu cm and 100,000 K at 15,600 km to 5/cu cm at 220,000 K and 900 km, in good agreement with the Mars 3 observations of Gringauz et al. (1974). The higher-temperature component was generally characterized by a temperature near 400,000 K and concentrations near 0.1/cu cm. The electron plasma pressures near 800 km were about a factor of 20 lower than those obtained from Viking 1, the difference being much greater than expected from the normal distribution around the stagnation point in the shocked solar wind.

  20. Microbiological profiles of the Viking spacecraft.

    PubMed Central

    Puleo, J R; Fields, N D; Bergstrom, S L; Oxborrow, G S; Stabekis, P D; Koukol, R

    1977-01-01

    Planetary quarantine requirements associated with the launch of two Viking spacecraft necessitated microbiological assessment during assembly and testing at Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center. Samples were collected from selected surface of the Viking Lander Capsules (VLC), Orbiters, (VO), and Shrouds at predetermined intervals during assembly and testing. Approximately 7,000 samples were assayed. Levels of bacterial spores per square meter on the VLC-1 and VLC-2 were 1.6 x 10(2) and 9.7 x 10(1), respectively, prior to dry-heat sterilization. The ranges of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms detected on the VO-1 and VO-2 at various sampling events were 4.2 x 10(2) to 4.3 x 10(3) and 2.3 x 10(2) to 8.9 x 10(3)/m2, respectively. Approximately 1,300 colonies were picked from culture plates, identified, lypholipized, and stored for future reference. About 75% of all isolates were microorganisms considered indigenous to humans; the remaining isolates were associated with soil and dust in the environment. The percentage of microorganisms of human origin was consistent with results obtained with previous automated spacecraft but slightly lower than those observed for manned (Apollo) spacecraft. PMID:848957

  1. ‘FIFA 11 for Health’ for Europe. II: effect on health markers and physical fitness in Danish schoolchildren aged 10–12 years

    PubMed Central

    Ørntoft, Christina; Fuller, Colin W; Larsen, Malte Nejst; Bangsbo, Jens; Dvorak, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate whether a modified ‘FIFA 11 for Health’ programme for non-communicable diseases had effects on body composition, blood pressure and physical fitness of Danish schoolchildren aged 10–12 years. Design A cluster-randomised controlled study with 7 intervention and 2 control schools. Participants 546 Danish 5th grade municipal schoolchildren allocated to an intervention group (IG; n=402: 11.1±0.4 (±SD) years, 150.1±7.0 cm, 41.3±8.4 kg) and a control group (CG; n=144: 11.0±0.5 years, 151.2±7.8 cm, 41.3±9.0 kg). Intervention As part of the physical education (PE) curriculum, IG carried out 2 weekly 45 min ‘FIFA 11 for Health’ sessions focusing on health issues, football skills and 3v3 games. CG continued regular school PE activities. Measurements of body composition, blood pressure at rest, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's test (YYIR1C), balance, jump and sprint performance were performed before and after the 11-week study period. Results During the 11-week study period, systolic blood pressure (−3.5 vs 0.9 mm Hg), mean arterial blood pressure (−1.9 vs 0.4 mm Hg), body mass index (−0.02 vs 0.13 kg/m2) and body fat percentage (−0.83% vs −0.04%) decreased more (p<0.05) in IG than in CG. Within-group improvements (p<0.05) were observed in IG for 20 m sprint (4.09±0.29 to 4.06±0.28 s) and YYIR1C performance (852±464 to 896±517 m), but these changes were not significantly different from CG, and balance or jump performance remained unchanged in both groups. Conclusions The modified ‘FIFA 11 for Health’ programme has beneficial effects on body composition and blood pressure for Danish schoolchildren aged 10–12 years, thereby providing evidence that this football-based health education programme can directly impact participants' cardiovascular health profile. PMID:27130927

  2. Optimistic and pessimistic self-assessment of own diets is associated with age, self-rated health and weight status in Danish adults.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Mette Rosenlund; Matthiessen, Jeppe; Holm, Lotte; Knudsen, Vibeke Kildegaard; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford; Tetens, Inge

    2017-03-16

    The aim of this study was to analyse concordance between Danish adults' recorded diet quality and their own assessment of the healthiness and to examine socio-demographic, health and behavioural characteristics associated with an optimistic or pessimistic self-assessment. Data were derived from The Danish National Survey of Diet and Physical Activity 2011-2013 and included a random sample of 3014 adults (18-75 y). Diet quality was evaluated on the basis of seven-day pre-coded food diaries and categorised 'unhealthy', 'somewhat healthy' and 'healthy'. Self-assessment of the healthiness of own diets was registered via personal interviews and categorised healthy enough 'to a high degree', 'to some degree' or 'not at all/only partly'. Highly and somewhat optimistic self-assessment, respectively, were defined as assessing own diets as healthy enough to a high degree or to some degree while having unhealthy diets. Highly and somewhat pessimistic self-assessment, respectively, were defined as assessing own diets as not healthy enough or healthy enough to some degree while having healthy diets. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine characteristics associated with optimistic and pessimistic self-assessments, respectively. Among individuals with unhealthy diets, 13% were highly optimistic and 42% somewhat optimistic about the healthiness of their diets. Among individuals with healthy diets, 14% were highly pessimistic and 51% somewhat pessimistic about the healthiness of their diets. Highly optimistic self-assessment was associated with increasing age, excellent self-rated health, normal weight and a moderate activity level. Highly pessimistic self-assessment was associated with decreasing age, good self-rated health and being obese. The findings indicate that people seem to use personal health characteristics as important references when assessing the healthiness of their diets.

  3. Navigation analysis for Viking 1979, option B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    A parametric study performed for 48 trans-Mars reference missions in support of the Viking program is reported. The launch dates cover several months in the year 1979, and each launch date has multiple arrival dates in 1980. A plot of launch versus arrival dates with case numbers designated for reference purposes is included. The analysis consists of the computation of statistical covariance matrices based on certain assumptions about the ground-based tracking systems. The error model statistics are listed in tables. Tracking systems were assumed at three sites: Goldstone, California; Canberra, Australia; and Madrid, Spain. The tracking data consisted of range and Doppler measurements taken during the tracking intervals starting at E-30(d) and ending at E-10(d) for the control data and ending at E-18(h) for the knowledge data. The control and knowledge covariance matrices were delivered to the Planetary Mission Analysis Branch for inputs into a delta V dispersion analysis.

  4. Viking magnetic properties experiment - Extended mission results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargraves, R. B.; Collinson, D. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Cates, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The backhoe magnets on Viking Lander (VL) 2 were successfully cleaned, followed by a test involving successive insertions of the cleaned backhoe into the surface. Rapid saturation of the magnets confirmed evidence from primary mission results that the magnetic mineral in the Martian surface is widely distributed, most probably in the form of composite particles of magnetic and nonmagnetic minerals. An image of the VL 2 backhoe taken via the X4 magnifying mirror demonstrates the fine-grained nature of the attracted magnetic material. The presence of maghemite and its occurrence as a pigment in, or a thin coating on, all mineral particles or as discrete, finely divided and widely distributed crystallites, are consistent with data from the inorganic analysis experiments and with laboratory simulations of results of the biology experiments on Mars.

  5. Northeast View from Viking Landing Site

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-12-12

    This Mars view looks northeast from Nasa's Viking 1 and completes the 360 panorama of the landing site begun earlier with the spacecraft's other camera. A layer of haze can be seen in the Martian sky. Large dark boulders dominate the scene. The largest boulder (center) is about 3 meters (10 feet) wide and one meter (3 feet) high. Rocks in the foreground are lighter and appear mottled. The rocks may have been derived from lava flows or stream deposits which are visible on orbiter images. These deposits may have been redistributed by impact craters. The fine material visible between the rocks has dune morphology and appears to have been deposited by wind. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00387

  6. High Resolution Image From Viking Lander 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-12-12

    NASA's Viking 1 took this high-resolution picture today, its third day on Mars. Distance from the camera to the nearfield (bottom) is about 4 meters (13 feet); to the horizon, about 3 kilometers (1.8 miles). The photo shows numerous angular blocks ranging in size from a few centimeters to several meters. The surface between the blocks is composed of fine-grained material. Accumulation of some fine-grained material behind blocks indicates wind deposition of dust and sand downwind of obstacles. The large block on the horizon is about 4 meters (13 feet) wide. Distance across the horizon is about 34 meters (110 feet). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00385

  7. Opportunity's View of 'Viking' Crater, Sol 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On the 421st martian day, or sol, of its time on Mars (March 31,2005), NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove to within about 10 meters (33 feet) of a small crater called 'Viking.' After completing the day's 71-meter (233-foot) drive across flatland of the Meridiani Planum region, the rover used its navigation camera to take images combined into this view of its new surroundings, including the crater. That day was the last of Opportunity's second extended mission. On April 1, both Opportunity and its twin, Spirit, began third extensions approved by NASA for up to 18 more months of exploring Mars. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  8. Intelligence in early adulthood and mortality from natural and unnatural causes in middle-aged Danish men.

    PubMed

    Meincke, Rikke Hodal; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Avlund, Kirsten; Rosthøj, Susanne; Sørensen, Holger Jelling; Osler, Merete

    2014-02-01

    High intelligence early in life has consistently been associated with decreased mortality, but the mechanisms are still not fully understood. In this cohort study, we examined the association between intelligence in early adulthood and later mortality from natural and unnatural causes taking birth weight, parental socioeconomic position, participants' own education and body mass index into account. 13 536 Danish men born in 1953 and 1959-1961 with data from birth certificates and intelligence test scores from conscription were followed until 2009. Information on vital status was obtained from the Civil Registration System. Mortality risks were analysed by the multiple Cox proportional hazards model. The risk of mortality from natural as well as unnatural causes was more than twice as high among men in the lowest scoring intelligence tertile (HRnatural deaths=2.24; 1.90-2.65 and HRunnatural deaths=2.67; 2.03-3.53). Adjusting for all covariates attenuated the estimates, but the association remained (HRnatural deaths=1.82; 1.48-2.25 and HRunnatural deaths=2.30; 1.63-3.25). In men, intelligence in early adulthood was inversely associated with midlife mortality from natural and unnatural causes. The associations remained after adjustments for a range of covariates.

  9. Are negative aspects of social relations predictive of angina pectoris? A 6-year follow-up study of middle-aged Danish women and men.

    PubMed

    Lund, Rikke; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Christensen, Ulla

    2012-04-01

    Social relations have been shown to be protective against ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but little is known about the impact of negative aspects of the social relations on IHD. During a 6-year follow-up, the authors aimed to assess if negative aspects of social relations were associated with angina pectoris among 4573 middle-aged Danish men and women free of heart disease at baseline in 2000. Nine per cent experienced onset of symptoms of angina pectoris. A higher degree of excessive demands or worries from the social relations was associated with increased risk of angina after adjustment for age, gender, social class, cohabitation status and depression in a dose-response manner. For example, experiencing excessive demands or worries always/often from different roles in the social relations was associated with an increased risk: partner OR=3.53 (1.68 to 7.43), children OR=2.19 (1.04 to 4.61), other family OR=1.91 (1.24 to 2.96). Except for frequent conflicts with the partner and neighbours, conflicts with the social relations was not a risk factor for angina. The authors found no interaction of negative aspects of social relations with gender, age, social class, cohabitation status or depression in terms of angina. Excessive demands and serious worries from significant others seem to be important risk factors for development of angina pectoris.

  10. Viking lander camera radiometry calibration report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M. R.; Atwood, D. L.; Morrill, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    The test methods and data reduction techniques used to determine and remove instrumental signatures from Viking Lander camera radiometry data are described. Gain, offset, and calibration constants are presented in tables.

  11. The viking biological investigation: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Klein, H P; Horowitz, N H; Levin, G V; Oyama, V I; Lederberg, J; Rich, A; Hubbard, J S; Hobby, G L; Straat, P A; Berdahl, B J; Carle, G C; Brown, F S; Johnson, R D

    1976-10-01

    Three different types of biological experiments on samples of martian surface material ("soil") were conducted inside the Viking lander. In the carbon assimilation or pyrolytic release experiment, (14)CO(2) and (14)CO were exposed to soil in the presence of light. A small amount of gas was found to be converted into organic material. Heat treatment of a duplicate sample prevented such conversion. In the gas exchange experiment, soil was first humidified (exposed to water vapor) for 6 sols and then wet with a complex aqueous solution of metabolites. The gas above the soil was monitored by gas chromatography. A substantial amount of O(2) was detected in the first chromatogram taken 2.8 hours after humidification. Subsequent analyses revealed that significant increases in CO(2) and only small changes in N(2) had also occurred. In the labeled release experiment, soil was moistened with a solution containing several (14)C-labeled organic compounds. A substantial evolution of radioactive gas was registered but did not occur with a duplicate heat-treated sample. Alternative chemical and biological interpretations are possible for these preliminary data. The experiments are still in process, and these results so far do not allow a decision regarding the existence of life on the plonet Mars.

  12. Viking-1 meteorological measurements - First impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, S. L.; Henry, R. M.; Leovy, C. B.; Tillman, J. E.; Ryan, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation is given of in situ meteorological measurements made by Viking 1 on Mars. The data reported show that: (1) the atmosphere has approximate volume mixing ratios of 1.5% argon, 3% nitrogen, and 95% carbon dioxide; (2) the diurnal temperature range is large and regular, with a sunrise minimum of about 188 K and a midafternoon maximum near 244 K; (3) air and ground temperatures coincide quite closely during the night, but ground temperature exceeds air temperature near midday by as much as 25 C; (4) the winds exhibit a marked diurnal cycle; and (5) a large diurnal pressure variation with an afternoon minimum and an early-morning maximum parallels the wind pattern. The variations are explained in terms of familiar meteorological processes. It is suggested that latent heat is unlikely to play an important role on Mars because no evidence has been observed for traveling synoptic-scale disturbances such as those that occur in the terrestrial tropics.

  13. Trench Excavated By Viking 1 Surface Sampler

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-12-12

    This image, received today, shows the trench excavated by NASA's Viking 1 surface sampler. The trench was dug by extending the surface sampler collection head in a direction from lower right toward the upper left and then withdrawing the surface sampler collector head. Lumpy piles of material at end of trench at lower right was pulled by plowing from trench by the backhoe which will be used to dig trenches later in the mission. Area around trench has ripple marks produced by Martian wind. The trench which was dug early on Sol 8, is about 3 inches wide, 2 inches deep and 6 inches long. Steep dark crater walls show the grains of the Martian surface material stick together (have adhesion). The doming of the surface at far end of the trench show the granular material is dense. The Martian surface material behaves somewhat like moist sand on Earth. Evidence from the trench indicate a sample was collected and delivered to the experiments after repeated tries. The biology experiment level full indicator indicates a sample was received for analysis. The X-Ray fluorescence experiment has no indication to show it received a sample. The GCMS experiment level full indicator suggests no sample was received but this matter is being investigated. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00389

  14. Clouds above the Martin Limb: Viking observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, L. J.; Baum, W. A.; Wasserman, L. H.; Kreidl, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Whenever Viking Orbiter images included the limb of Mars, they recorded one or more layers of clouds above the limb. The height above the limb and the brightness (reflectivity) of these clouds were determined in a selected group of these images. Normalized individual brightness profiles of three separate traverses across the limb of each image are shown. The most notable finding is that some of these clouds can be very high. Many reach heights of over 60 km, and several are over 70 km above the limb. Statistically, the reflectivity of the clouds increases with phase angle. Reflectivity and height both appear to vary with season, but the selected images spanned only one Martian year, so the role of seasons cannot be isolated. Limb clouds in red-filter images tend to be brighter than violet-filter images, but both season and phase appear to be more dominant factors. Due to the limited sample available, the possible influences of latitude and longitude are less clear. The layering of these clouds ranges from a single layer to five or more layers. Reflectivity gradients range from smooth and gentle to steep and irregular.

  15. Wind reconstruction algorithm for Viking Lander 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kynkäänniemi, Tuomas; Kemppinen, Osku; Harri, Ari-Matti; Schmidt, Walter

    2017-06-01

    The wind measurement sensors of Viking Lander 1 (VL1) were only fully operational for the first 45 sols of the mission. We have developed an algorithm for reconstructing the wind measurement data after the wind measurement sensor failures. The algorithm for wind reconstruction enables the processing of wind data during the complete VL1 mission. The heater element of the quadrant sensor, which provided auxiliary measurement for wind direction, failed during the 45th sol of the VL1 mission. Additionally, one of the wind sensors of VL1 broke down during sol 378. Regardless of the failures, it was still possible to reconstruct the wind measurement data, because the failed components of the sensors did not prevent the determination of the wind direction and speed, as some of the components of the wind measurement setup remained intact for the complete mission. This article concentrates on presenting the wind reconstruction algorithm and methods for validating the operation of the algorithm. The algorithm enables the reconstruction of wind measurements for the complete VL1 mission. The amount of available sols is extended from 350 to 2245 sols.

  16. Wind Drifts at Viking 1 Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image is of so-called wind drifts seen at the Viking 1 landing site. These are somewhat different from the features seen at the Pathfinder site in two important ways. 1) These landforms have no apparent slip-or avalanche-face as do both terrestrial dunes and the Pathfinder features, and may represent deposits of sediment falling from the air, as opposed to dune sand, which 'hops' or saltates along the ground; 2) these features may indicate erosion on one side, because of the layering and apparent scouring on their right sides. They may, therefore have been deposited by a wind moving left to right, partly or weakly cemented or solidified by surface processes at some later time, then eroded by a second wind (right to left), exposing their internal structure.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Psychiatric disorders in Danish children aged 5-7 years: A general population study of prevalence and risk factors from the Copenhagen Child Cohort (CCC 2000).

    PubMed

    Elberling, Hanne; Linneberg, Allan; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka; Houman, Tine; Goodman, Robert; Mette Skovgaard, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the presentation of psychopathology in preschool age and associated risk factors is fundamental to preventive intervention before schooling. To investigate the full spectrum of psychiatric diagnoses in general population children at the period of transition from preschool to school. A sample of 1585 children from the Copenhagen Child Cohort, CCC2000 aged 5-7 years was assessed using the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) with diagnostic classification by experienced clinicians. Perinatal, sociodemographic and socio-economic data was obtained from Danish national registries. The prevalence of any ICD-10 psychiatric disorder was 5.7% (95%CI: 4.4-7.1). Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) were found in 1.3% (95%CI: 0.8-1.8) and behavioural and hyperkinetic disorders were found in 1.5% (95%CI: 0.9-2.1) and 1.0% (95%CI: 0.4-1.6), respectively. Emotional disorders were found in 2.9% (95%CI: 1.9-40). More boys were diagnosed with PDD, behavioural disorders and tics. No gender differences were found in hyperactivity disorders (HD) and emotional disorders. Co-morbidity was frequent, in particular between HD and PDD, but also between HD and emotional disorder and behavioural disorder. Teenage mothers, single parents and low household income the first two years after the child's birth were associated with a three-to fourfold increased risk of psychiatric disorder in the child at age 5-7 years. The study results point to two "windows of opportunity" for prevention. In the earliest postnatal years, prevention should target families at socio-economic risk; and in the years before schooling, intervention should focus on children with symptoms of PDD, HD, and behavioural disorders.

  18. Changes in hospitalisation and surgical procedures among the oldest-old: a follow-up study of the entire Danish 1895 and 1905 cohorts from ages 85 to 99 years

    PubMed Central

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Jeune, Bernard; Juel, Knud; Vaupel, James W.; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to examine whether the Danish 1905 cohort members had more active hospital treatment than the 1895 cohort members from ages 85 to 99 years and whether it results in higher in-hospital and post-operative mortality. Methods: in the present register-based follow-up study the complete Danish birth cohorts born in 1895 (n = 12,326) and 1905 (n = 15,477) alive and residing in Denmark at the age of 85 were followed from ages 85 to 99 years with regard to hospitalisations and all-cause and cause-specific surgical procedures, as well as in-hospital and post-operative mortality. Results: the 1905 cohort members had more frequent hospital admissions and operations, but they had a shorter length of hospital stay than the 1895 cohort at all ages from 85 to 99 years. The increase in primary prosthetic replacements of hip joint was observed even within the 1895 cohort: no patients were operated at ages 85–89 years versus 2.2–3.6% at ages 95–99 years. Despite increased hospitalisation and operation rates, there was no increase in post-operative and in-hospital mortality rates in the 1905 cohort. These patterns were similar among men and women. Conclusions: the observed patterns are compatible with more active treatment of the recent cohorts of old-aged persons and reduced age inequalities in the Danish healthcare system. No increase in post-operative mortality suggests that the selection of older patients eligible for a surgical treatment is likely to be based on the health status of old-aged persons and the safety of surgical procedures rather than chronological age. PMID:23531440

  19. Changes in hospitalisation and surgical procedures among the oldest-old: a follow-up study of the entire Danish 1895 and 1905 cohorts from ages 85 to 99 years.

    PubMed

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Jeune, Bernard; Juel, Knud; Vaupel, James W; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-07-01

    to examine whether the Danish 1905 cohort members had more active hospital treatment than the 1895 cohort members from ages 85 to 99 years and whether it results in higher in-hospital and post-operative mortality. in the present register-based follow-up study the complete Danish birth cohorts born in 1895 (n = 12,326) and 1905 (n = 15,477) alive and residing in Denmark at the age of 85 were followed from ages 85 to 99 years with regard to hospitalisations and all-cause and cause-specific surgical procedures, as well as in-hospital and post-operative mortality. the 1905 cohort members had more frequent hospital admissions and operations, but they had a shorter length of hospital stay than the 1895 cohort at all ages from 85 to 99 years. The increase in primary prosthetic replacements of hip joint was observed even within the 1895 cohort: no patients were operated at ages 85-89 years versus 2.2-3.6% at ages 95-99 years. Despite increased hospitalisation and operation rates, there was no increase in post-operative and in-hospital mortality rates in the 1905 cohort. These patterns were similar among men and women. the observed patterns are compatible with more active treatment of the recent cohorts of old-aged persons and reduced age inequalities in the Danish healthcare system. No increase in post-operative mortality suggests that the selection of older patients eligible for a surgical treatment is likely to be based on the health status of old-aged persons and the safety of surgical procedures rather than chronological age.

  20. Measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in serum and its relation to sunshine, age and vitamin D intake in the Danish population.

    PubMed

    Lund, B; Sørensen, O H

    1979-02-01

    A competitive protein-binding assay for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) based upon a specific binding protein in the cytosol from rachitic rat kidneys is described. A diethyl ether extraction followed by separation by freezing was used. The extracts were chromatographed on short silicic acid columns, which separated 25-hydroxycholecalciferol from cholecalciferol, 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol. A small aliquot of the 25-OHD fraction was used in the assay and free and bound vitamin were separated by dextran coated charcoal. The lower detection limit was 0.8 ng/ml (2.0 nmol/l). The levels of 25-OHD were measured in 596 healthy subjects and a seasonal variation was demonstrated. This variation, however, was only found in those without regular vitamin D intake, whereas the level of 25-OHD remained constant throughout the year in subjects with regular vitamin D supplement. The levels of 25-OHD were lower in the elderly subjects compared to younger ones, but seasonal variation was observed in both groups. In the summer months there was a significant correlation between age and the 25-OHD level. The mean levels of 25-OHD in Denmark are within the range of means found in the United States and Sweden but are higher than those reported from England, Belgium and France. This indicates a relatively high vitamin D intake in the Danish population and a low risk of nutritional vitamin D deficiency.

  1. Late midlife C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in middle aged danish men in relation to body size history within and across generations.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jolene Masters; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Osler, Merete; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Lund, Rikke

    2016-02-01

    The aim was to estimate the effects of ponderal index at birth and body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood on C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and to quantify the effects through subsequent measures of body size. In a subanalysis, the contributions of maternal BMI to the inflammatory status of offspring were investigated. The study was based on 2,986 Danish males from the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank. Path analysis was employed to estimate direct and indirect effects. A 10% higher maternal BMI was associated with 7% higher CRP and 3% higher IL-6 among offspring. A 10% higher ponderal index at birth was associated with 4% lower CRP in late midlife; this effect was only partially mediated by later growth. A 10% higher BMI in early adulthood was associated with 8% higher CRP and 4% higher IL-6 in late midlife. The findings suggest that weight gain in adulthood is associated with low-grade inflammation in late midlife. Ponderal index at birth is associated with CRP in later life independently of adult BMI. The findings additionally suggest that preventing weight gain in early adulthood would be beneficial for inflammatory status in later life. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  2. Socioeconomic disparities in birth weight and body mass index during infancy through age 7 years: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Howe, Laura D; Rasmussen, Mette; Due, Pernille; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2017-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic inequalities in birth weight and in body mass index (BMI) later in childhood are in opposite directions, which raises questions about when during childhood the change in direction happens. We examined how maternal and paternal education and household income were associated with birthweight z-scores and with BMI z-scores at age 5 and 12 months and 7 years, and we examined the socioeconomic differences in the tracking of these z-scores across infancy and childhood. Methods The associations were studied in a cohort of children in the Danish National Birth Cohort, single born between 1997 and 2003, for whom information on body size from at least 1 of 4 time points (n=85 062) was recorded. We examined the associations using linear mixed-effects modelling. Results Children from families with a low maternal and paternal educational level changed their body size z-scores upwards between birth and age 7 years. At age 5 and 12 months, there were no educational gradient. A low maternal educational level was associated with lower birth weight for gestational age z-scores at birth for boys (−0.199; 95% CI −0.230 to −0.169) and girls (−0.198; 95% CI −0.229 to −0.167) and higher BMI z-scores at age 7 for boys (0.198; 95% CI 0.154 to 0.242) and girls (0.218; 95% CI 0.173 to 0.264). There was not a similarly clear pattern in the tracking between different household income groups. However, a low household income level was associated with higher z-scores of both birth weight and BMI at age 7 years, but with a much weaker gradient at 5 and 12 months. Conclusions The educational gradient shifts from positive with birth weight, to none during infancy to inverse with BMI at age 7 years. In contrast, the income gradient was positive at birth and at 7 years and much weaker during infancy. PMID:28110282

  3. Construction of a Danish CDI Short Form for Language Screening at the Age of 36 Months: Methodological Considerations and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vach, Werner; Bleses, Dorthe; Jorgensen, Rune

    2010-01-01

    Several research groups have previously constructed short forms of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI) for different languages. We consider the specific aim of constructing such a short form to be used for language screening in a specific age group. We present a novel strategy for the construction, which is applicable…

  4. Deep Space Network to Viking Orbiter telecommunication link effects during 1976 superior conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, F. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Planning of the Viking superior conjunction by the Viking Project and the Deep Space Network is reviewed. Spacecraft and ground station activities and configuration during the three month superior conjunction period are presented and observations made are described.

  5. Viking '79 Rover study. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The results of a study to define a roving vehicle suitable for inclusion in a 1979 Viking mission to Mars are presented. The study focused exclusively on the 1979 mission incorporating a rover that would be stowed on and deployed from a modified Viking lander. The overall objective of the study was to define a baseline rover, the lander/rover interfaces, a mission operations concept, and a rover development program compatible with the 1979 launch opportunity. During the study, numerous options at the rover system and subsystem levels were examined and a baseline configuration was selected. Launch vehicle, orbiter, and lander performance capabilities were examined to ensure that the baseline rover could be transported to Mars using minimum-modified Viking '75 hardware and designs.

  6. Mars landscape - Utopian plain with Viking Lander 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Caption: 'This boulder strewn field reaches to the horizon, nearly 2 miles distant from Viking Lander 2's position on Mars' Utopian Plain.' Scientists believe the colors of the Martian surface and sky in this photo represent their true colors. Fine particles of red dust have settled on spacecraft surfaces. The salmon color of the sky is caused by dust particles suspended in the atmosphere. Color calibration charts for the cameras are mounted at three locations on the spacecraft. Note the blue starfield and red stripes of the flag. The circular structure at top is the high-gain antenna, pointed toward Earth. Viking 2 landed September 3, 1976, some 4600 miles from its twin, Viking 1, which touched down on July 20. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (pages 107), by James Schultz.

  7. Mars Gravity Field: Combined Viking and Mariner 9 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gapcynski, J. P.; Tolson, R. H.; Michael, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A Martian gravity field of sixth degree and order has been determined from an analysis of a combination of Viking and Mariner 9 spacecraft Doppler tracking data. A short-arc technique utilizing approximately 4 hours of data centered at periapsis was used, and the data covered 16 arcs from Mariner 9 and 17 arcs from the Viking orbiters. The data were selected so as to obtain a uniform distribution of periapsis longitudes over the surface of Mars, and both S band and X band data were used where possible to eliminate charged particle effects. Inclusion of the Viking data arcs altered the Martian geoid features, as defined by previous short-arc analysis techniques of Mariner 9 data, by about 80 m in the southern hemisphere and about 140 m in the northern hemisphere.

  8. Evaluation of Viking Lander barometric pressure sensor. [performance related to Viking mission environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M.

    1977-01-01

    Variable reluctance type pressure sensors were evaluated to determine their performance characteristics related to Viking Mission environment levels. Static calibrations were performed throughout the evaluation over the full range of the sensors using two point contact manometer standards. From the beginning of the evaluation to the end of the evaluation, the zero shift in the two sensors was within 0.5 percent, and the sensitivity shift was 0.05 percent. The maximum thermal zero coefficient exhibited by the sensors was 0.032 percent over the temperature range of -28.89 C to 71.11 C. The evaluation results indicated that the sensors are capable of making high accuracy pressure measurements while being exposed to the conditions mentioned.

  9. Possible surface reactions on Mars - Implications for Viking biology results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponnamperuma, C.; Shimoyama, A.; Yamada, M.; Hobo, T.; Pal, R.

    1977-01-01

    The results of two of the three biology experiments carried out on the Viking Mars landers have been simulated. The mixture of organic compounds labeled with carbon-14 used on Mars released carbon dioxide containing carbon-14 when reacted with a simulated Martian surface and atmosphere exposed to ultraviolet light (labeled release experiment). Oxygen was released when metal peroxides or superoxides were treated with water (gas exchange experiment). The simulations suggest that the results of these two Viking experiments can be explained on the basis of reactions of the Martian surface and atmosphere.

  10. Computer image processing - The Viking experience. [digital enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing of digital imagery from the Viking mission to Mars is discussed, with attention given to subjective enhancement and quantitative processing. Contrast stretching and high-pass filtering techniques of subjective enhancement are described; algorithms developed to determine optimal stretch and filtering parameters are also mentioned. In addition, geometric transformations to rectify the distortion of shapes in the field of view and to alter the apparent viewpoint of the image are considered. Perhaps the most difficult problem in quantitative processing of Viking imagery was the production of accurate color representations of Orbiter and Lander camera images.

  11. The geology of the Viking Lander 1 site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, A. B.; Arvidson, R. E.; Guinness, E. A.; Jones, K. L.; Mutch, T. A.; Morris, E. C.; Pieri, D. C.; Sagan, C.

    1977-01-01

    Stereo pictures show that Viking Lander 1 landed on volcanic terrain of undulating topography in the plains of Chryse. The bedrock is exposed along several ridge crests, and blocks are more numerous than can be attributed to impact ejecta. The presence of a variety of rock types suggests in situ weathering of extrusive and near-surface basaltic igneous rocks along a linear volcanic vent. Fine-grained sediment is present in drift complexes and isolated drifts. A small patch of fine-grained sediment slumped down one of the drift faces during the course of the Viking mission. Otherwise, no other morphological changes unrelated to spacecraft activity have been observed.

  12. Communication system for the Viking mission to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I.

    1974-01-01

    The Viking communications system discussed comprises a UHF relay link and an S-band communication link. The design of both links was guided by the design of the mission itself and its constraints. The most important of these are: the available launch opportunities; the effect of interplanetary distances on the power and bandwidth of the S-band link; weight; reliability and survival in the Martian environment; the up-link command philosophy; the landing problem; and the requirements for planetary quarantine and cleanliness. The Viking mission, with its orbits and trajectories, launch and landing sequences is described and illustrated.

  13. Surface composition of Mars: A Viking multispectral view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, John B.; Smith, Milton O.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Dale-Bannister, Mary; Guinness, Edward A.; Singer, Robert; Adams, John B.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of analyzing multispectral images takes advantage of the spectral variation from pixel to pixel that is typical for natural planetary surfaces, and treats all pixels as potential mixtures of spectrally distinct materials. For Viking Lander images, mixtures of only three spectral end members (rock, soil, and shade) are sufficient to explain the observed spectral variation to the level of instrumental noise. It was concluded that a large portion of the Martian surface consists of only two spectrally distinct materials, basalt and palgonitic soil. It is emphasized, however, that as viewed through the three broad bandpasses of Viking Orbiter, other materials cannot be distinguished from the mixtures.

  14. Location of Viking 1 Lander on the surface of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, E.C.; Jones, K.L.; Berger, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A location of the Viking 1 Lander on the surface of Mars has been determined by correlating topographic features in the lander pictures with similar features in the Viking orbiter pictures. Radio tracking data narrowed the area of search for correlating orbiter and lander features and an area was found on the orbiter pictures in which there is good agreement with topographic features on the lander pictures. This location, when plotted on the 1:250,000 scale photomosaic of the Yorktown Region of Mars (U.S. Geological Survey, 1977) is at 22.487??N latitude and 48.041??W longitude. ?? 1978.

  15. Atmospheric measurements on Mars - The Viking meteorology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, T. E.; Cole, H. L.; Dutton, R. G.; Greene, G. C.; Tillman, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking meteorology experiment is one of nine experiments to be carried out on the surface of Mars by each of two Viking Landers positioned at different latitudes and longitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The meteorology experiment will measure pressure, temperature, wind speed, and wind direction at 1.5-hr intervals throughout the Martian day. The duration of each measurement period, the interval between data samples for a measurement period, and the time at which the measurement period is started will be varied throughout the mission. The scientific investigation and the sensors and electronics used for making the atmospheric measurement are discussed.

  16. The Viking mortar - Design, development, and flight qualification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecht, J. P.; Pleasants, J. E.; Mehring, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Approximately 25,400 ft above the local surface of Mars, a radar height sensor fires the Viking mortar, which ejects a 53-ft D sub o disk-gap-band (DGB) parachute. The parachute decelerates and stabilizes the Viking lander sufficiently for the terminal engine system to take over and effect a soft landing. The general design and environmental requirements for the mortar system are presented; various illustrations of the mortar components and how the mortar system functions also are presented. Primary emphasis is placed on manufacturing, developing, and qualification testing of the mortar system.

  17. Atmospheric measurements on Mars - The Viking meteorology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, T. E.; Cole, H. L.; Dutton, R. G.; Greene, G. C.; Tillman, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking meteorology experiment is one of nine experiments to be carried out on the surface of Mars by each of two Viking Landers positioned at different latitudes and longitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The meteorology experiment will measure pressure, temperature, wind speed, and wind direction at 1.5-hr intervals throughout the Martian day. The duration of each measurement period, the interval between data samples for a measurement period, and the time at which the measurement period is started will be varied throughout the mission. The scientific investigation and the sensors and electronics used for making the atmospheric measurement are discussed.

  18. Surface composition of Mars: A Viking multispectral view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, John B.; Smith, Milton O.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Dale-Bannister, Mary; Guinness, Edward A.; Singer, Robert; Adams, John B.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of analyzing multispectral images takes advantage of the spectral variation from pixel to pixel that is typical for natural planetary surfaces, and treats all pixels as potential mixtures of spectrally distinct materials. For Viking Lander images, mixtures of only three spectral end members (rock, soil, and shade) are sufficient to explain the observed spectral variation to the level of instrumental noise. It was concluded that a large portion of the Martian surface consists of only two spectrally distinct materials, basalt and palgonitic soil. It is emphasized, however, that as viewed through the three broad bandpasses of Viking Orbiter, other materials cannot be distinguished from the mixtures.

  19. Computer image processing - The Viking experience. [digital enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing of digital imagery from the Viking mission to Mars is discussed, with attention given to subjective enhancement and quantitative processing. Contrast stretching and high-pass filtering techniques of subjective enhancement are described; algorithms developed to determine optimal stretch and filtering parameters are also mentioned. In addition, geometric transformations to rectify the distortion of shapes in the field of view and to alter the apparent viewpoint of the image are considered. Perhaps the most difficult problem in quantitative processing of Viking imagery was the production of accurate color representations of Orbiter and Lander camera images.

  20. Viking 1: early results. [Mars atmosphere and surface examinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A brief outline of the Viking 1 mission to Mars is followed by descriptions of the Martian landing site and the scientific instrumentation aboard Viking 1 orbiter and lander. Measurements of the Martian atmosphere provided data on its molecular composition, temperature and pressure. The detection of nitrogen in the Martian atmosphere indicates the existence of life. Panoramic photographs of the Martian surface were also obtained and are shown. Preliminary chemical and biological investigations on samples of Martian soil indicated the presence of the elements iron, calcium, silicon, titanium and aluminum as major constituents. Observed biochemical reactions were judged conducive of biological activity.

  1. The Viking mortar - Design, development, and flight qualification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecht, J. P.; Pleasants, J. E.; Mehring, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Approximately 25,400 ft above the local surface of Mars, a radar height sensor fires the Viking mortar, which ejects a 53-ft D sub o disk-gap-band (DGB) parachute. The parachute decelerates and stabilizes the Viking lander sufficiently for the terminal engine system to take over and effect a soft landing. The general design and environmental requirements for the mortar system are presented; various illustrations of the mortar components and how the mortar system functions also are presented. Primary emphasis is placed on manufacturing, developing, and qualification testing of the mortar system.

  2. Viking lander camera geometry calibration report. Volume 1: Test methods and data reduction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    The determination and removal of instrument signature from Viking Lander camera geometric data are described. All tests conducted as well as a listing of the final database (calibration constants) used to remove instrument signature from Viking Lander flight images are included. The theory of the geometric aberrations inherent in the Viking Lander camera is explored.

  3. 76 FR 62605 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited Model DHC-3 (Otter) Airplanes With Supplemental Type...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... 2011-CE-018-AD; Amendment 39-16709; AD 2011-12-02] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air... airworthiness directive (AD) that published in the Federal Register. That AD applies to Viking Air Limited Model... for Viking Air Limited Model DHC-3 (Otter) airplanes equipped with a Honeywell TPE331-10 or -12JR...

  4. 75 FR 70106 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited (Type Certificate Previously Held by Bombardier, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... 2009-NM-236-AD; Amendment 39-16510; AD 2010-23-21] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air...: Viking Air Limited has completed a system safety review of the aircraft fuel system against fuel tank... correct an unsafe condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: Viking Air Limited has completed...

  5. Tracking and data system support for the Viking 1975 mission to Mars. Volume 2: Launch through landing of Viking 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgway, D. J.; Traxler, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    Problems inherent in the deployment and management of a worldwide tracking and data acquisition network to support the two Viking Orbiters and two Viking Landers simultaneously over 320 million kilometers (200 million miles) of deep space are discussed. Activities described include tracking coverage of the launch phase, the deep space operations during the long cruise phase that occupied approximately 11 months, and the implementation of the a vast worldwide network of tracking sttions and global communications systems. The performance of the personnel, hardware, and software involved in this vast undertaking are evaluated.

  6. UCP3 polymorphisms, hand grip performance and survival at old age: Association analysis in two Danish middle aged and elderly cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Dato, Serena; Soerensen, Mette; Montesanto, Alberto; Lagani, Vincenzo; Passarino, Giuseppe; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2013-01-01

    An efficient uncoupling process is generally considered to have a protective effect on the aging muscle by slowing down its age-related decay. Genetic polymorphisms in the Uncoupling Protein 3 (UCP3) gene, whose product is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, were suggested to be associated with hand grip (HG) performances in elderly populations. Considering the population specificity of the quality of aging, we aimed to add further support to this evidence by analyzing the association between four SNPs in the UCP3 gene and relative haplotypes in two large cohorts of middle aged (N = 708) and oldest old Danes (N = 908). We found that the variability at rs1685354 and rs11235972 was associated with HG levels both at single and haplotypic level in both cohorts. Furthermore, taking advantage of large cohort and period survival data of the oldest cohort, we tested the association of each SNP with survival at 10 years from the baseline visit. Interestingly, we found that allele A at rs11235972, associated in this cohort with lowest HG scores, influences also the survival patterns, with people carrying this allele showing higher mortality rates. On the whole, our work supports the role of UCP3 gene in functional status and survival at old age. PMID:22743239

  7. Tectonic analysis of a Viking graben border fault

    SciTech Connect

    Fayerland, M.S.

    1983-11-01

    The Viking graben has been proven to be an aulacogen on a passive continental margin. The rifting started in the Late Permian and had numerous episodes throughout the Mesozoic. The strongest tectonic events occurred in the late Cimmerian phases. Toward the end of the Cretaceous, the taphrogeny ceased and the graben became part of a rigid continental margin. A Laramian phase, however, did occur. The Tertiary basins had their depocenters close to the Viking and the Central graben axes, but the outline of these smooth and rounded basins were independent of the graben border faults. However, in one area, in the central part of the North Sea, a Viking graben border fault was reactivated in the Paleocene-Eocene. This rejuvenation has resulted in such structural features as ''flower'' structures and normal faults along the old Cimmerian Viking graben border fault. the tensional features are found along one border fault dogleg trend, and the compressive features are found along another. This is explained as a response to strike-slip reactivation of the old fault. The transient movements coincide with the incipient seafloor spreading in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea area and may be related to consequent rotation of the Shetland platform relative to the Fennoscandian shield.

  8. Deployment and release mechanisms on the Swedish satellite, VIKING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, S.

    1983-01-01

    Two mechanism types are presented, a rigid boom system and a 'hold and release' mechanism for spherical sensors. Both mechanisms have been designed, developed and tested by Saab-Space AB, Linkoping, Sweden for the VIKING project under a contract from the Swedish Space Corporation.

  9. Trajectory description. [for Viking 1 and 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farless, D. L.; Dicken, L. H.; Diehl, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The launch, interplanetary, encounter, and Mars orbit phases of the Viking 1 and 2 spacecraft trajectories are described. Time history plots of several parameters relative to the trajectories are presented along with tables of the geocentric, heliocentric, aerocentric, and injection orbital elements appropriate to each of the spacecraft trajectories.

  10. Soil and surface temperatures at the Viking landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    The annual temperature range for the Martian surface at the Viking lander sites is computed on the basis of thermal parameters derived from observations made with the infrared thermal mappers. The Viking lander 1 (VL1) site has small annual variations in temperature, whereas the Viking lander 2 (VL2) site has large annual changes. With the Viking lander images used to estimate the rock component of the thermal emission, the daily temperature behavior of the soil alone is computed over the range of depths accessible to the lander; when the VL1 and VL2 sites were sampled, the daily temperature ranges at the top of the soil were 183 to 263 K and 183 to 268 K, respectively. The diurnal variation decreases with depth with an exponential scale of about 5 centimeters. The maximum temperature of the soil sampled from beneath rocks at the VL2 site is calculated to be 230 K. These temperature calculations should provide a reference for study of the active chemistry reported for the Martian soil.

  11. Viking lander camera radiometry calibration report, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M. R.; Atwood, D. L.; Morrill, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    The requirements the performance validation, and interfaces for the RADCAM program, to convert Viking lander camera image data to radiometric units were established. A proposed algorithm is described, and an appendix summarizing the planned reduction of camera test data was included.

  12. Restoration and Recalibration of the Viking MAWD Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuno, R. G.; Paige, D. A.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution HIRISE images of transient albedo dark features, called Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL), have been interpreted to be evidence for current hydrological activity [1]. If there are surface sources of water, then localized plumes of atmospheric water may be observable from orbit. The Viking MAWD column water vapor data are uniquely valuable for this purpose because they cover the full range of Martian local times, and include data sampled at high spatial resolution [2]. They also are accompanied by simultaneously acquired surface and atmospheric temperatures acquired by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) instruments. We searched the raster-averaged Viking Orbiter 1 and 2 MAWD column water vapor dataset for regions of localized elevated column water vapor abundances and found mid-latitude regions with transient water observations [3]. The raster averaged Viking Orbiter 1 and 2 MAWD column water vapor data available in the Planetary Data System (PDS), were calculated from radiance measurements using seasonally and topographically varying surface pressures which, at the time, had high uncertainties [4]. Due to recent interest in transient hydrological activity on Mars [2], we decoded the non-raster averaged Viking MAWD dataset, which are sampled at 15 times higher spatial resolution than the data that are currently available from PDS. This new dataset is being used to recalculate column water vapor abundances using current topographical data, as well as dust and pressure measurements from the Mars Global Circulation Model.References: [1] McEwen, A. S., et al. (2011). Seasonal flows on warm Martian slopes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 333(6043), 740-3. [2] Farmer, C. B., & Laporte, D. D. (1972). The Detection and Mapping of Water Vapor in the Martian Atmosphere. Icarus. [3] Nuno, R. G., et al. (2013). Searching for Localized Water Vapor Sources on Mars Utilizing Viking MAWD Data. 44th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. [4] Farmer, C. B., et al. (1977

  13. Rocket Exhaust Cratering: Lessons Learned from Viking and Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2004-01-01

    During the Apollo and Viking programs NASA expended considerable effort to study the cratering of the regolith when a rocket launches or lands on it. That research ensured the success of those programs but also demonstrated that cratering will be a serious challenge for other mission scenarios. Unfortunately, because three decades have elapsed since NASA last performed a successful retro-rocket landing on a large planetary body - and ironically because Apollo and Viking were successful at minimizing the cratering effects - the space agency has a minimized sense of the seriousness of the issue. The most violent phase of a cratering event is when the static overpressure of the rocket exhaust exceeds the bearing capacity of the soil. This bearing capacity failure (BCF) punches a small and highly concave cup into the surface. The shape of the cup then redirects the supersonic jet - along with a large flux of high-velocity debris - directly toward the spacecraft. This has been observed in terrestrial experiments but never quantified analytically. The blast from such an event will be more than just quantitatively greater than the cratering that occurred in the Apollo and Viking programs. It will be qualitatively different, because BCF had been successfully avoided in all those missions. In fact, the Viking program undertook a significant research and development effort and redesigned the spacecraft specifically for the purpose of avoiding BCF [1]. (See Figure 1.) Because the Apollo and Viking spacecraft were successful at avoiding those cratering effects, it was unnecessary to understand them. As a result, the physics of a BCF-driven cratering event have never been well understood. This is a critical gap in our knowledge because BCF is unavoidable in the Martian environment with the large landers necessary for human exploration, and in Lunar landings it must also be addressed because it may occur depending upon the design specifics of the spacecraft and the weakening of

  14. A New Look at the Viking IRTM Cloud Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Paige, D. A.; Zurek, R. W.

    1997-07-01

    Recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of Mars has suggested (Clancy et al., 1996) that Mars is cloudier now than during the Viking era. This increased cloudiness, during Mars northern spring/summer seasons, is consistent with ground-based microwave measurements (op cit.) showing a colder Mars atmosphere during these seasons than during the Viking era. Our ongoing analysis of Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data, however, indicates that clouds were present, though perhaps at higher altitudes, during the Viking northern spring/summer periods. The Viking IRTM 11 and 20 mu m brightness temperatures have been differenced, as done by Christensen and Zurek (1984), to identify the spatial and temporal extent of Martian atmospheric water ice clouds. Preliminary cloud distributions will be presented. A delta-Eddington radiation algorithm has been used to identify cloud opacity and temperature combinations that give the appropriate signature. Resulting cloud characteristics will be discussed. Viking era cloud cover for the Mars Pathfinder landing site (19N/33W) will also be shown. Our analysis will provide a baseline for comparison with upcoming Earth-based and spacecraft data. In particular, the spectral differencing technique can be applied to observations by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Mars Surveyor 1998 Pressure Modulator IR Radiometer (PMIRR). The frequency and distribution of Martain clouds during these different missions will augment the Earth- based monitoring and provide a detailed characterization of the Martian interannual climate variation. References Christensen, P. R. and R. W. Zurek, J. Geophys. Res., June 1984. Clancy, R. T., et. al., Icarus, July 1996.

  15. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Danish organic pig farms: Seasonal and age-related variation in prevalence, infection intensity and species/genotypes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi H; Jianmin, Wang; Katakam, Kiran K; Mejer, Helena; Thamsborg, Stig M; Dalsgaard, Anders; Olsen, Annette; Enemark, Heidi L

    2015-11-30

    Although pigs are commonly infected with Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis, including potentially zoonotic species or genotypes, little is known about age-related infection levels, seasonal differences and genetic variation in naturally infected pigs raised in organic management systems. Therefore, the current study was conducted to assess seasonal and age-related variations in prevalence and infection intensity of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, evaluate zoonotic potential and uncover correlations between species/genotypes, infection intensity and faecal consistency. Shedding of oocysts and cysts ((oo-)cysts) was monitored at quarterly intervals (September 2011-June 2012) in piglets (n = 152), starter pigs (n = 234), fatteners (n = 230) and sows (n = 240) from three organic farms in Denmark. (oo-)Cysts were quantified by immunofluorescence microscopy; and 56/75 subsamples from Cryptosporidium infected pigs were successfully analysed by PCR amplification and partial sequencing of the small subunit (SSU) 18S rRNA and hsp70genes, while 13/67 Giardia subsamples were successfully analysed by amplification and partial sequencing of the 18S rRNA and the gdh genes. Altogether, Cryptosporidium or Giardia infections were observed in 40.9% (350/856) and 14.0% (120/856) of the pigs, respectively, including 8.2% (70/856) infected with both parasites. Prevalence, intensity of infections and presence of Cryptosporidium species varied significantly between age-groups; 53.3% piglets, 72.2% starter pigs, 40.4% fatteners and 2.9% sows were infected with Cryptosporidium, whereas 2.0% piglets, 27.4% starter pigs, 17.8% fatteners and 5.0% sows were infected with Giardia. The overall prevalence was stable throughout the year, except for dual-infections that were more prevalent in September and December (p < 0.05). The infection intensity was age-related for both parasites, and dual-infected pigs tended to excrete lower levels of oocysts compared to pigs harbouring only

  16. The Danish Nephrology Registry

    PubMed Central

    Heaf, James

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Nephrology Registry’s (DNR) primary function is to support the Danish public health authorities’ quality control program for patients with end-stage renal disease in order to improve patient care. DNR also supplies epidemiological data to several international organizations and supports epidemiological and clinical research. Study population The study population included patients treated with dialysis or transplantation in Denmark from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2016, with retrospective data since 1964. Main variables DNR registers patient data (eg, age, sex, renal diagnosis, and comorbidity), predialysis specialist treatment, details of eight dialysis modalities (three hemodialysis and five peritoneal dialysis), all transplantation courses, dialysis access at first dialysis, treatment complications, and biochemical variables. The database is complete (<1% missing data). Patients are followed until death or emigration. Descriptive data DNR now contains 18,120 patients, and an average of 678 is added annually. Data for each transplantation course include donor details, tissue type, time to onset of graft function, and cause of graft loss. Registered complications include peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients, causes of peritoneal dialysis technique failure, and transplant rejections. Fifteen biochemical variables are registered, mainly describing anemia control, mineral and bone disease, nutritional and uremia status. Date and cause of death are also included. Six quality indicators are published annually, and have been associated with improvements in patient results, eg, a reduction in dialysis patient mortality, improved graft survival, and earlier referral to specialist care. Approximately, ten articles, mainly epidemiological, are published each year. Conclusion DNR contains a complete description of end-stage renal disease patients in Denmark, their treatment, and prognosis. The stated aims are fulfilled. PMID:27843345

  17. Viking voyages: the origin of multiple sclerosis? An essay in medical history.

    PubMed

    Poser, C M

    1995-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is most frequently found in Scandinavia, Iceland, the British Isles and the countries settled by their inhabitants and their descendants, i.e. the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. This suggests that the Vikings may have been instrumental in disseminating genetic susceptibility to the disease in those areas, as well as in other parts of the world. The Vikings raided most European countries and settled in Normandy and in Sicily and southern Italy. They engaged in trade with the Arabs along the river routes to the Caucasus, to the Black and Caspian Seas, and penetrated Persia, India and probably China. They also migrated to the East and established the Russian state. Under the name Varangians, they became part of the Byzantine army and were active in all the military activities of the Byzantine Empire. They participated in the Crusades. Russians, many of Scandinavian origin also constituted a regiment of the Mongol army and roamed throughout that Empire as well. The custom of capturing and keeping or selling women and children, which was widespread in the early Middle Ages, as well as the flourishing slave trade in men, were important factors in this genetic dissemination.

  18. The dissemination of multiple sclerosis: a Viking saga? A historical essay.

    PubMed

    Poser, C M

    1994-12-01

    The highest prevalence rates for multiple sclerosis are found in Iceland, Scandinavia, the British Isles, and the countries settled by their inhabitants and their descendants, that is, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. This suggests that the Vikings may have been instrumental in disseminating the genetic susceptibility to the disease in those areas as well as in other parts of the world. The Vikings raided in most European countries and settled in Normandy and in Sicily and southern Italy. They engaged in trade with the Arabs along the river routes to the Caucasus and to the Black and Caspian Seas and penetrated into Persia, India, and probably China. They also migrated to the East and established the Russian state. Under the name Varangians, they became part of the Byzantine army and were active in all of the military activities of the Byzantine Empire. They participated in the Crusades. Russians, many of Scandinavian origin, also constituted a regiment of the Mongol army and roamed throughout that empire as well. The custom of capturing and keeping or selling women and children, which was widespread in the early Middle Ages, as well as the flourishing slave trade in men, were important factors in this genetic dissemination.

  19. Of mice and (Viking?) men: phylogeography of British and Irish house mice

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Jeremy B.; Jones, Catherine S.; Gündüz, İslam; Scascitelli, Moira; Jones, Eleanor P.; Herman, Jeremy S.; Rambau, R. Victor; Noble, Leslie R.; Berry, R.J.; Giménez, Mabel D.; Jóhannesdóttir, Fríða

    2008-01-01

    The west European subspecies of house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) has gained much of its current widespread distribution through commensalism with humans. This means that the phylogeography of M. m. domesticus should reflect patterns of human movements. We studied restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequence variations in mouse mitochondrial (mt) DNA throughout the British Isles (328 mice from 105 localities, including previously published data). There is a major mtDNA lineage revealed by both RFLP and sequence analyses, which is restricted to the northern and western peripheries of the British Isles, and also occurs in Norway. This distribution of the ‘Orkney’ lineage fits well with the sphere of influence of the Norwegian Vikings and was probably generated through inadvertent transport by them. To form viable populations, house mice would have required large human settlements such as the Norwegian Vikings founded. The other parts of the British Isles (essentially most of mainland Britain) are characterized by house mice with different mtDNA sequences, some of which are also found in Germany, and which probably reflect both Iron Age movements of people and mice and earlier development of large human settlements. MtDNA studies on house mice have the potential to reveal novel aspects of human history. PMID:18826939

  20. Of mice and (Viking?) men: phylogeography of British and Irish house mice.

    PubMed

    Searle, Jeremy B; Jones, Catherine S; Gündüz, Islam; Scascitelli, Moira; Jones, Eleanor P; Herman, Jeremy S; Rambau, R Victor; Noble, Leslie R; Berry, R J; Giménez, Mabel D; Jóhannesdóttir, Fríoa

    2009-01-22

    The west European subspecies of house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) has gained much of its current widespread distribution through commensalism with humans. This means that the phylogeography of M. m. domesticus should reflect patterns of human movements. We studied restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequence variations in mouse mitochondrial (mt) DNA throughout the British Isles (328 mice from 105 localities, including previously published data). There is a major mtDNA lineage revealed by both RFLP and sequence analyses, which is restricted to the northern and western peripheries of the British Isles, and also occurs in Norway. This distribution of the 'Orkney' lineage fits well with the sphere of influence of the Norwegian Vikings and was probably generated through inadvertent transport by them. To form viable populations, house mice would have required large human settlements such as the Norwegian Vikings founded. The other parts of the British Isles (essentially most of mainland Britain) are characterized by house mice with different mtDNA sequences, some of which are also found in Germany, and which probably reflect both Iron Age movements of people and mice and earlier development of large human settlements. MtDNA studies on house mice have the potential to reveal novel aspects of human history.

  1. Radio science experiments - The Viking Mars Orbiter and Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Cain, D. L.; Fjeldbo, G.; Levy, G. S.; Davies, J. G.; Grossi, M. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Tyler, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    The objective of the radio science investigations is to extract the maximum scientific information from the data provided by the radio and radar systems on the Viking Orbiters and Landers. Unique features of the Viking missions include tracking of the landers on the surface of Mars, dual-frequency S- and X-band tracking data from the orbiters, lander-to-orbiter communications system data, and lander radar data, all of which provide sources of information for a number of scientific investigations. Post-flight analyses will provide both new and improved scientific information on physical and surface properties of Mars, on atmospheric and ionospheric properties of Mars, and on solar system properties.

  2. Automated microbial metabolism laboratory. [Viking 75 entry vehicle and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The labeled release concept was advanced to accommodate a post- Viking mission designed to extend the search, to confirm the presence of, and to characterize any Martian life found, and to obtain preliminary information on control of the life detected. The advanced labeled release concept utilizes four test chambers, each of which contains either an active or heat sterilized sample of the Martian soil. A variety of C-14 labeled organic substrates can be added sequentially to each soil sample and the resulting evolved radioactive gas monitored. The concept can also test effects of various inhibitors and environmental parameters on the experimental response. The current Viking '75 labeled release hardware is readily adaptable to the advanced labeled release concept.

  3. Radio science experiments - The Viking Mars Orbiter and Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Cain, D. L.; Fjeldbo, G.; Levy, G. S.; Davies, J. G.; Grossi, M. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Tyler, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    The objective of the radio science investigations is to extract the maximum scientific information from the data provided by the radio and radar systems on the Viking Orbiters and Landers. Unique features of the Viking missions include tracking of the landers on the surface of Mars, dual-frequency S- and X-band tracking data from the orbiters, lander-to-orbiter communications system data, and lander radar data, all of which provide sources of information for a number of scientific investigations. Post-flight analyses will provide both new and improved scientific information on physical and surface properties of Mars, on atmospheric and ionospheric properties of Mars, and on solar system properties.

  4. Generation of VLF saucer emissions observed by the Viking satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Loennqvist, H.; Andre, M.; Matson, L.; Bahnsen, A.; Blomberg, L.G.; Erlandson, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The authors report observations of V shaped saucer emissions by the Viking satellite. This V shaped saucer emission refers to the observational feature of the VLF or ELF emissions which shows a v shaped appearance on a plot of frequency as a function of time. Viking provided not only wave, but electric and magnetic field measurements, as well as charged particle measurements. These measurements show electrons flowing upwards with enegies of up to a few hundred eV in conjunction with the saucer emissions. Other wave structures observed in this same region may originate from the electron flows. The satellite observations also find such events at altitudes from 4000 to 13000km, where the generation region is found to be much more spread out in space.

  5. Simulation of the Viking biology experiments: an overview.

    PubMed

    Klein, H P

    1979-12-01

    Several ground-based investigations have been carried out since the Viking biology results were received from Mars. Many of these have resulted in reasonable simulations of the Martian data, using as analogues of Mars either strong oxidants, UV-treated materials, iron-containing clays, or iron salts. The ambiguity between the GCMS experiment, in which no organic compounds were found on Mars, and the Labeled Release experiment, in which added organics were decomposed, may well be accounted for by these simulations.

  6. Viking orbital colorimetric images of mars: Preliminary results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    Color reconstruction and ratios of orbital images of Mars confirm Earth-based measurements showing red/violet ratios for bright areas to be roughly 1.5 times greater than dark areas. The new results show complex variation among dark materials; dark streaks emanating from craters in southern cratered terrains are much bluer than dark materials of the north equatorial plains on which Viking 1 landed.

  7. New dust opacity mapping from Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Terry Z.; Richardson, Mark I.

    1993-01-01

    Global dust opacity mapping for Mars has been carried forward using the approach described by Martin (1986) for Viking IR Thermal Mapper data. New maps are presented for the period from the beginning of Viking observations, until Ls 210 deg in 1979 (1.36 Mars years). This range includes the second and more extensive planet-encircling dust storm observed by Viking, known as storm 1977b. Improvements in approach result in greater time resolution and smaller noise than in the earlier work. A strong local storm event filled the Hellas basin at Ls 170 deg, prior to the 1977a storm. Dust is retained in equatorial regions following the 1977b storm far longer than in mid-latitudes. Minor dust events appear to raise the opacity in northern high latitudes during northern spring. Additional mapping with high time resolution has been done for the periods of time near the major storm origins in order to search for clues to the mechanism of storm initiation. The first evidence of the start of the 1977b storm is pushed back to Ls 274.2 deg, preceding signs of the storm in images by about 15 hours.

  8. Maternal protein intake in pregnancy and offspring metabolic health at age 9-16 y: results from a Danish cohort of gestational diabetes mellitus pregnancies and controls.

    PubMed

    Maslova, Ekaterina; Hansen, Susanne; Grunnet, Louise Groth; Strøm, Marin; Bjerregaard, Anne Ahrendt; Hjort, Line; Kampmann, Freja Bach; Madsen, Camilla Møller; Baun Thuesen, A C; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Vaag, Allan A; Olsen, Sjurdur F

    2017-08-01

    Background: Recent years have seen strong tendencies toward high-protein diets. However, the implications of higher protein intake, especially during developmentally sensitive periods, are poorly understood. Conversely, evidence on the long-term developmental consequences of low protein intake in free-living populations remains limited.Objective: We examined the association of protein intake in pregnancy with offspring metabolic health at age 9-16 y in a longitudinal cohort that oversampled pregnancies with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).Design: Six hundred eight women with an index pregnancy affected by gestational diabetes mellitus and 626 controls enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were used for the analysis. Protein (total, animal, vegetable) intake was assessed by using a food-frequency questionnaire in gestational week 25. The offspring underwent a clinical examination including fasting blood samples and a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan (subset of 650) from which metabolic outcomes were derived. Multivariable analyses were conducted applying a 1:1 substitution of carbohydrates for protein.Results: The mean ± SD protein intake in pregnancy was 93 ± 15 g/d (16% ± 3% of energy) in GDM-exposed women and 90 ± 14 g/d (16% ± 2% of energy) in control women. There were overall no associations between maternal protein intake and offspring fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). We found that maternal total protein intake was associated with a tendency for a higher abdominal fat mass percentage (quartile 4 compared with quartile 1: 0.40 SD; 95% CI: -0.03, 0.83 SD; P = 0.07) in GDM-exposed offspring and a tendency for a higher total fat mass percentage among male offspring (quartile 4 compared with quartile 1: 0.33 SD; 95% CI: -0.01, 0.66 SD; P = 0.06), but a small sample size may have compromised the precision of the effect estimates. GDM-exposed offspring of mothers with a protein intake in the lowest

  9. 75 FR 43092 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited (Type Certificate Previously Held by Bombardier, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... explosion. Viking Air Limited has revised Chapter 5 of the DHC-7 Maintenance Manual, PSM 1-7-2, to introduce..., and 5-113, all dated December 15, 2008, to the Viking DHC-7 Dash 7 Maintenance Manual, PSM-1-7-2... of this AD, to Chapter 5 of the Viking DHC-7 Dash 7 Maintenance Manual (MM), PSM 1- 7-2;...

  10. An optimal smoothing algorithm for Viking spacecraft attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1977-01-01

    A fundamental requirement for ground analysis of onboard attitude control systems is the determination of the time evolution of spacecraft angular orientation and velocity, and of external torques acting on the spacecraft. However, at times, there are limitations on the data received on the ground, and essential but missing variables must be estimated. This paper contains a description of the design and implementation of an algorithm for angular position, velocity, and torque estimation. The algorithm has been used to analyze the performance of the Viking Orbiter attitude control system. Typical results of this analysis are presented.

  11. Martian physical properties experiments: The Viking Mars Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shorthill, R.W.; Hutton, R.E.; Moore, H.J.; Scott, R.F.

    1972-01-01

    Current data indicate that Mars, like the Earth and Moon, will have a soil-like layer. An understanding of this soil-like layer is an essential ingredient in understanding the Martian ecology. The Viking Lander and its subsystems will be used in a manner similar to that used by Sue Surveyor program to define properties of the Martian "soil". Data for estimates of bearing strength, cohesion, angle of internal friction, porosity, grain size, adhesion, thermal inertia, dielectric constants, and homogeneity of the Martian surface materials will be collected. ?? 1972.

  12. Preliminary meteorological results on Mars from the viking 1 lander.

    PubMed

    Hess, S L; Henry, R M; Leovy, C B; Ryan, J A; Tillman, J E; Chamberlain, T E; Cole, H L; Dutton, R G; Greene, G C; Simon, W E; Mitchell, J L

    1976-08-27

    The results from the meteorology instruments on the Viking 1 lander are presented for the first 4 sols of operation. The instruments are working satisfactorily. Temperatures fluctuated from a low of 188 degrees K to an estimated maximum of 244 degrees K. The mean pressure is 7.65 millibars with a diurnal variation of amplitude 0.1 millibar. Wind speeds averaged over several minutes have ranged from essentially calm to 9 meters per second. Wind directions have exhibited a remarkable regularity which may be associated with nocturnal downslope winds and gravitational oscillations, or to tidal effects of the diurnal pressure wave, or to both.

  13. Reflectance characteristics of the Viking lander camera reference test charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Burcher, E. E.; Jabson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Reference test charts provide radiometric, colorimetric, and spatial resolution references for the Viking lander cameras on Mars. Reflectance measurements of these references are described, including the absolute bidirectional reflectance of the radiometric references and the relative spectral reflectance of both radiometric and colorimetric references. Results show that the bidirection reflectance of the radiometric references is Lambertian to within + or - 7% for incidence angles between 20 deg and 60 deg, and that their spectral reflectance is constant with wavelength to within + or - 5% over the spectral range of the cameras. Estimated accuracy of the measurements is + or - 0.05 in relative spectral reflectance.

  14. Update: Viking Lander NiCd batteries. Year six

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britting, A. O., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of NiCd batteries on the Viking Mars landers is discussed. During evaluation, three of the four batteries were maintained in the discharged state. Battery charge regimes and close-together, deep-discharge, reconditioning cycles to retard degradation of batteries are discussed. The effect of elevated temperatures during Martian summer on battery performance were also considered. Tabulated data for average battery capacity as a function of time are given. A design uplink to allow more frequent, greater depth of discharge reconditioning cycles was proposed.

  15. Phobos transit of Mars as viewed by the viking cameras.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, T C

    1978-03-17

    A Viking orbiting spacecraft successfully obtained pictures of the martian satellite Phobos with Mars in the background. This is the first time that a single picture was obtained from a spacecraft which contained both a planet and a moon and had significant surface detail visible on both. The region of Mars below Phobos included volcanoes in the Tharsis Montes region. These pictures showed Phobos to be smaller than previously thought. The image of Phobos can be used as a control point to determine the map coordinates of surface features on Mars.

  16. Viking relativity experiment - Verification of signal retardation by solar gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, R. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Macneil, P. E.; Goldstein, R. B.; Breidenthal, J. C.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Kaufman, T. M.; Komarek, T. A.; Zygielbaum, A. I.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of 14 months of data obtained from radio ranging to the Viking spacecraft verified, to an estimated accuracy of 0.1%, the prediction of the general theory of relativity that the round-trip times of light signals traveling between the earth and Mars are increased by the direct effect of solar gravity. The corresponding value for the metric parameter gamma is 1.000 plus or minus 0.002, where the quoted uncertainty, twice the formal standard deviation, allows for possible systematic errors.

  17. IPL Processing of the Viking Orbiter Images of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, R. M.; Elliott, D. A.; Yagi, G. M.; Pomphrey, R. B.; Power, M. A.; Farrell, W., Jr.; Lorre, J. J.; Benton, W. D.; Dewar, R. E.; Cullen, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking orbiter cameras returned over 9000 images of Mars during the 6-month nominal mission. Digital image processing was required to produce products suitable for quantitative and qualitative scientific interpretation. Processing included the production of surface elevation data using computer stereophotogrammetric techniques, crater classification based on geomorphological characteristics, and the generation of color products using multiple black-and-white images recorded through spectral filters. The Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was responsible for the design, development, and application of the software required to produce these 'second-order' products.

  18. IPL Processing of the Viking Orbiter Images of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, R. M.; Elliott, D. A.; Yagi, G. M.; Pomphrey, R. B.; Power, M. A.; Farrell, W., Jr.; Lorre, J. J.; Benton, W. D.; Dewar, R. E.; Cullen, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking orbiter cameras returned over 9000 images of Mars during the 6-month nominal mission. Digital image processing was required to produce products suitable for quantitative and qualitative scientific interpretation. Processing included the production of surface elevation data using computer stereophotogrammetric techniques, crater classification based on geomorphological characteristics, and the generation of color products using multiple black-and-white images recorded through spectral filters. The Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was responsible for the design, development, and application of the software required to produce these 'second-order' products.

  19. Update: Viking Lander NiCd batteries. Year six

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britting, A. O., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of NiCd batteries on the Viking Mars landers is discussed. During evaluation, three of the four batteries were maintained in the discharged state. Battery charge regimes and close-together, deep-discharge, reconditioning cycles to retard degradation of batteries are discussed. The effect of elevated temperatures during Martian summer on battery performance were also considered. Tabulated data for average battery capacity as a function of time are given. A design uplink to allow more frequent, greater depth of discharge reconditioning cycles was proposed.

  20. The Collector Head Of Viking Lander 1's Surface Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The collector head of Viking l's surface sampler is full of Martian soil destined for the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, the instrument which analyzes the surface material for the presence of organic molecules. The material was scooped out of the surface on August 3, but the sampler arm stopped operating while transporting it to the instrument. The Martian soil will be deposited into the instrument's processor today. The surface sampler is operating properly, but the cause of last week's problem is not yet known. This picture, taken Monday (August 9), was made for operational purposes, focusing on the collector head. Hence, the out-of-focus view of the Martian surface.

  1. Viking relativity experiment - Verification of signal retardation by solar gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, R. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Macneil, P. E.; Goldstein, R. B.; Breidenthal, J. C.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Kaufman, T. M.; Komarek, T. A.; Zygielbaum, A. I.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of 14 months of data obtained from radio ranging to the Viking spacecraft verified, to an estimated accuracy of 0.1%, the prediction of the general theory of relativity that the round-trip times of light signals traveling between the earth and Mars are increased by the direct effect of solar gravity. The corresponding value for the metric parameter gamma is 1.000 plus or minus 0.002, where the quoted uncertainty, twice the formal standard deviation, allows for possible systematic errors.

  2. Spectral mixture modeling: Further analysis of rock and soil types at the Viking Lander sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, John B.; Smith, Milton O.

    1987-01-01

    A new image processing technique was applied to Viking Lander multispectral images. Spectral endmembers were defined that included soil, rock and shade. Mixtures of these endmembers were found to account for nearly all the spectral variance in a Viking Lander image.

  3. TAGS 85/2N RTG Power for Viking Lander Capsule

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1969-08-01

    Results of studies performed by Isotopes, Inc., Nuclear Systems Division, to optimize and baseline a TAGS 85/2N RTG for the Viking Lander Capsule prime electrical power source are presented. These studies generally encompassed identifying the Viking RTG mission profile and design requirements, and establishing a baseline RTG design consistent with these requirements.

  4. Calibration of Viking imaging system pointing, image extraction, and optical navigation measure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, W. G.; Fowler, J. W.; Morgan, E. M.

    1977-01-01

    Pointing control and knowledge accuracy of Viking Orbiter science instruments is controlled by the scan platform. Calibration of the scan platform and the imaging system was accomplished through mathematical models. The calibration procedure and results obtained for the two Viking spacecraft are described. Included are both ground and in-flight scan platform calibrations, and the additional calibrations unique to optical navigation.

  5. 76 FR 37793 - Viking Range Corporation, Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... inch, side-by- side refrigerators and 36 inch refrigerators with bottom freezers under the Viking brand name (the ``Refrigerators''). The Refrigerators were sold nationwide through retailers and authorized Viking distributors for between $4,700 and $6,400. 5. The Refrigerators are ``consumer products'' and,...

  6. Wayward Warriors: The Viking Motif in Swedish and English Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundmark, Björn

    2014-01-01

    In this article the Viking motif in children's literature is explored--from its roots in (adult) nationalist and antiquarian discourse, over pedagogical and historical texts for children, to the eventual diversification (or dissolution) of the motif into different genres and forms. The focus is on Swedish Viking narratives, but points of…

  7. Wayward Warriors: The Viking Motif in Swedish and English Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundmark, Björn

    2014-01-01

    In this article the Viking motif in children's literature is explored--from its roots in (adult) nationalist and antiquarian discourse, over pedagogical and historical texts for children, to the eventual diversification (or dissolution) of the motif into different genres and forms. The focus is on Swedish Viking narratives, but points of…

  8. Thirty Years After: The Science of the Viking Program and the Discovery of a 'New Mars'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2006-01-01

    Viking discovered a Mars that was very different from the Mars found by Mariner 4, 6 and 7. The new, exciting, more Earth-like Mars was hinted at by the Mariner 9 orbiter and confirmed by Viking. Viking discovered some very fundamental things about Mars. Viking discovered the presence of nitrogen in the atmosphere. A key ingredient needed for life. Viking made the first measurements of the isotopic composition of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and the noble gases in the atmosphere of Mars. The ratio of 15N to 14N suggested that Mars may have lost more than 99% of the total mass of its atmosphere. The denser atmosphere in the past may explain the presence of flowing water earlier in the history of Mars first discovered by Mariner 9 with additional and higher spatial resolution examples provided by the Viking Orbiters. Viking did not measure organics or life at the surface of Mars. But, Viking did discover a surface unlike any other on the Solar System--a surface exhibiting very high chemical reactivity, most probably formed by the deposition of chemically active atmospheric gases, like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ozone (O3), onto the surface of Mars.

  9. The Danish Collaborative Bacteraemia Network (DACOBAN) database.

    PubMed

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Arpi, Magnus; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Ostergaard, Christian; Søgaard, Mette

    2014-01-01

    The Danish Collaborative Bacteraemia Network (DACOBAN) research database includes microbiological data obtained from positive blood cultures from a geographically and demographically well-defined population serviced by three clinical microbiology departments (1.7 million residents, 32% of the Danish population). The database also includes data on comorbidity from the Danish National Patient Registry, vital status from the Danish Civil Registration System, and clinical data on 31% of nonselected records in the database. Use of the unique civil registration number given to all Danish residents enables linkage to additional registries for specific research projects. The DACOBAN database is continuously updated, and it currently comprises 39,292 patients with 49,951 bacteremic episodes from 2000 through 2011. The database is part of an international network of population-based bacteremia registries from five developed countries on three continents. The main purpose of the DACOBAN database is to study surveillance, risk, and prognosis. Sex- and age-specific data on background populations enables the computation of incidence rates. In addition, the high number of patients facilitates studies of rare microorganisms. Thus far, studies on Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, computer algorithms for the classification of bacteremic episodes, and prognosis and risk in relation to socioeconomic factors have been published.

  10. On the trail of Vikings with polarized skylight: experimental study of the atmospheric optical prerequisites allowing polarimetric navigation by Viking seafarers

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Gábor; Barta, András; Pomozi, István; Suhai, Bence; Hegedüs, Ramón; Åkesson, Susanne; Meyer-Rochow, Benno; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Between AD 900 and AD 1200 Vikings, being able to navigate skillfully across the open sea, were the dominant seafarers of the North Atlantic. When the Sun was shining, geographical north could be determined with a special sundial. However, how the Vikings could have navigated in cloudy or foggy situations, when the Sun's disc was unusable, is still not fully known. A hypothesis was formulated in 1967, which suggested that under foggy or cloudy conditions, Vikings might have been able to determine the azimuth direction of the Sun with the help of skylight polarization, just like some insects. This hypothesis has been widely accepted and is regularly cited by researchers, even though an experimental basis, so far, has not been forthcoming. According to this theory, the Vikings could have determined the direction of the skylight polarization with the help of an enigmatic birefringent crystal, functioning as a linearly polarizing filter. Such a crystal is referred to as ‘sunstone’ in one of the Viking's sagas, but its exact nature is unknown. Although accepted by many, the hypothesis of polarimetric navigation by Vikings also has numerous sceptics. In this paper, we summarize the results of our own celestial polarization measurements and psychophysical laboratory experiments, in which we studied the atmospheric optical prerequisites of possible sky-polarimetric navigation in Tunisia, Finland, Hungary and the high Arctic. PMID:21282181

  11. On the trail of Vikings with polarized skylight: experimental study of the atmospheric optical prerequisites allowing polarimetric navigation by Viking seafarers.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Gábor; Barta, András; Pomozi, István; Suhai, Bence; Hegedüs, Ramón; Akesson, Susanne; Meyer-Rochow, Benno; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2011-03-12

    Between AD 900 and AD 1200 Vikings, being able to navigate skillfully across the open sea, were the dominant seafarers of the North Atlantic. When the Sun was shining, geographical north could be determined with a special sundial. However, how the Vikings could have navigated in cloudy or foggy situations, when the Sun's disc was unusable, is still not fully known. A hypothesis was formulated in 1967, which suggested that under foggy or cloudy conditions, Vikings might have been able to determine the azimuth direction of the Sun with the help of skylight polarization, just like some insects. This hypothesis has been widely accepted and is regularly cited by researchers, even though an experimental basis, so far, has not been forthcoming. According to this theory, the Vikings could have determined the direction of the skylight polarization with the help of an enigmatic birefringent crystal, functioning as a linearly polarizing filter. Such a crystal is referred to as 'sunstone' in one of the Viking's sagas, but its exact nature is unknown. Although accepted by many, the hypothesis of polarimetric navigation by Vikings also has numerous sceptics. In this paper, we summarize the results of our own celestial polarization measurements and psychophysical laboratory experiments, in which we studied the atmospheric optical prerequisites of possible sky-polarimetric navigation in Tunisia, Finland, Hungary and the high Arctic.

  12. Comparison of property between two Viking Seismic tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yamada, R.

    2016-12-01

    Tthe restoration work of the seismometer data onboard Viking Lander 2 is still continuing. Originally, the data were processed and archived both in MIT and UTIG separately, and each data is accessible via the Internet today. Their file formats to store the data are different, but both of them are currently readable due to the continuous investigation. However, there is some inconsistency between their data although most of their data are highly consistent. To understand the differences, the knowledge of archiving and off-line processing of spacecraft is required because these differences are caused by the off-line processing.The data processing of spacecraft often requires merge and sort processing of raw data. The merge processing is normally performed to eliminate duplicated data, and the sort processing is performed to fix data order. UTIG did not seem to perform these merge and sort processing. Therefore, the UTIG processed data remain duplication. The MIT processed data did these merge and sort processing, but the raw data sometimes include wrong time tags, and it cannot be fixed strictly after sort processing. Also, the MIT processed data has enough documents to understand metadata, while UTIG data has a brief instruction. Therefore, both of MIT and UTIG data are treated complementary. A better data set can be established using both of them. In this presentation, we would show the method to build a better data set of Viking Lander 2 seismic data.

  13. Analysis and interpretation of Viking labeled release experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, G. V.

    1979-01-01

    The Viking Labeled Release (LR) life detection experiment on the surface of Mars produced data consistent with a biological interpretation. In considering the plausibility of this interpretation, terrestrial life forms were identified which could serve as models for Martian microbial life. Prominent among these models are lichens which are known to survive for years in a state of cryptobiosis, to grow in hostile polar environments, to exist on atmospheric nitrogen as sole nitrogen source, and to survive without liquid water by absorbing water directly from the atmosphere. Another model is derived from the endolithic bacteria found in the dry Antarctic valleys; preliminary experiments conducted with samples of these bacteria indicate that they produce positive LR responses approximating the Mars results. However, because of the hositility of the Martian environment to life, and the failure to find organics on the surface of Mars, a number of nonbiological explanations were advanced to account for the Viking LR data. A reaction of the LR nutrient with putative surface hydrogen peroxide is the leading candidate. Other possibilities raised include reactions caused by or with ultraviolet irradiation, gamma-Fe2O3, metalloperoxides or superoxides.

  14. The Martian ionosphere in light of the Viking observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. H.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical model has been constructed in which the ion density and the ion and electron temperature distributions are calculated by solving the coupled continuity-momentum equations and the coupled energy equations. The latest experimental results from the Viking 1 and 2 landers are used to vary some of the parameters in the model in order to obtain agreement between the theoretical and experimental results. It is found that solar EUV radiation alone is not able to maintain the observed high ion temperatures. It was also established that the energy coupling between the electron and ion gas is insufficient to account for the measured ion temperatures even in the presence of very large electron temperatures. Direct heat input to the ion gas, probably due to solar wind-ionosphere interactions, can result in ion temperature values in reasonable agreement with the observations. The ion densities calculated with the present model agree well with the Viking observations in the chemically controlled region, but at higher altitudes, dynamic transport processes need to be invoked to achieve consistency among the observed and calculated temperature and density values.

  15. Danish Gynecological Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Sarah Mejer; Bjørn, Signe Frahm; Jochumsen, Kirsten Marie; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Thranov, Ingrid Regitze; Hare-Bruun, Helle; Seibæk, Lene; Høgdall, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD) is a nationwide clinical cancer database and its aim is to monitor the treatment quality of Danish gynecological cancer patients, and to generate data for scientific purposes. DGCD also records detailed data on the diagnostic measures for gynecological cancer. Study population DGCD was initiated January 1, 2005, and includes all patients treated at Danish hospitals for cancer of the ovaries, peritoneum, fallopian tubes, cervix, vulva, vagina, and uterus, including rare histological types. Main variables DGCD data are organized within separate data forms as follows: clinical data, surgery, pathology, pre- and postoperative care, complications, follow-up visits, and final quality check. DGCD is linked with additional data from the Danish “Pathology Registry”, the “National Patient Registry”, and the “Cause of Death Registry” using the unique Danish personal identification number (CPR number). Descriptive data Data from DGCD and registers are available online in the Statistical Analysis Software portal. The DGCD forms cover almost all possible clinical variables used to describe gynecological cancer courses. The only limitation is the registration of oncological treatment data, which is incomplete for a large number of patients. Conclusion The very complete collection of available data from more registries form one of the unique strengths of DGCD compared to many other clinical databases, and provides unique possibilities for validation and completeness of data. The success of the DGCD is illustrated through annual reports, high coverage, and several peer-reviewed DGCD-based publications. PMID:27822089

  16. The Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    Gundtoft, Per Hviid; Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register (DHR) is to continuously monitor and improve the quality of treatment of primary and revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) in Denmark. Study population The DHR is a Danish nationwide arthroplasty register established in January 1995. All Danish orthopedic departments – both public and private – report to the register, and registration is compulsory. Main variables The main variables in the register include civil registration number, indication for primary and revision surgery, operation date and side, and postoperative complications. Completeness of primary and revision surgery is evaluated annually and validation of a number of variables has been carried out. Descriptive data A total of 139,525 primary THAs and 22,118 revisions have been registered in the DHR between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2014. Since 1995, completeness of procedure registration has been high, being 97.8% and 92.0% in 2014 for primary THAs and revisions, respectively. Several risk factors, such as comorbidity, age, specific primary diagnosis and fixation types for failure of primary THAs, and postoperative complications, have been identified through the DHR. Approximately 9,000 primary THAs and 1,500 revisions are reported to the register annually. Conclusion The DHR is important for monitoring and improvement of treatment with THA and is a valuable tool for research in THA surgery due to the high quality of prospective collected data with long-term follow-up and high completeness. The register can be used for population-based epidemiology studies of THA surgery and can be linked to a range of other national databases. PMID:27822092

  17. Reducing abortion: the Danish experience.

    PubMed

    Risor, H

    1989-01-01

    In 1987, 20,830 legal abortions were performed in Denmark. 2,845 involved women below the age of 20, and 532 involved women terminating pregnancy after the 12th week. Danish law permits all of its female citizens to have an abortion free-of-charge before the 12th week of pregnancy. After the 12th week, the abortion must be applied for through a committee of 3 members, and all counties in Denmark have a committee. It is felt in Denmark that a woman has a right to an abortion if she decides to have one. It she makes that choice, doctors and nurses are supportive. Since 1970, sex education has been mandatory in Danish schools. Teachers often collaborate closely with school doctors and nurses in this education. All counties are required to have at least 1 clinic that provides contraceptive counselling. It was recently found that the lowest number of pregnancies among teenaged girls was found in a county in Jutland where all 9th grade students visit the county clinic to learn about contraceptives, pregnancy, and abortion. Within 1 year after Copenhagen had adopted this practice, the number of abortions among teenagers declined by 20%. One fourth of all pharmacies also collaborate with schools to promote sex education, instructing students about contraceptives and pregnancy tests. The Danish Family Planning Association has produced a film on abortion, and plans to produce videos on abortion for use in schools. The organization also holds training programs for health care personnel on contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. By means of the practices described above, it is hoped that the number of abortions and unwanted pregnancies in Denmark will be reduced.

  18. The Danish Melanoma Database

    PubMed Central

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Klausen, Siri; Spaun, Eva; Schmidt, Grethe; Gad, Dorte; Svane, Inge Marie; Schmidt, Henrik; Lorentzen, Henrik Frank; Ibfelt, Else Helene

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the database is to monitor and improve the treatment and survival of melanoma patients. Study population All Danish patients with cutaneous melanoma and in situ melanomas must be registered in the Danish Melanoma Database (DMD). In 2014, 2,525 patients with invasive melanoma and 780 with in situ tumors were registered. The coverage is currently 93% compared with the Danish Pathology Register. Main variables The main variables include demographic, clinical, and pathological characteristics, including Breslow’s tumor thickness, ± ulceration, mitoses, and tumor–node–metastasis stage. Information about the date of diagnosis, treatment, type of surgery, including safety margins, results of lymphoscintigraphy in patients for whom this was indicated (tumors > T1a), results of sentinel node biopsy, pathological evaluation hereof, and follow-up information, including recurrence, nature, and treatment hereof is registered. In case of death, the cause and date are included. Currently, all data are entered manually; however, data catchment from the existing registries is planned to be included shortly. Descriptive data The DMD is an old research database, but new as a clinical quality register. The coverage is high, and the performance in the five Danish regions is quite similar due to strong adherence to guidelines provided by the Danish Melanoma Group. The list of monitored indicators is constantly expanding, and annual quality reports are issued. Several important scientific studies are based on DMD data. Conclusion DMD holds unique detailed information about tumor characteristics, the surgical treatment, and follow-up of Danish melanoma patients. Registration and monitoring is currently expanding to encompass even more clinical parameters to benefit both patient treatment and research. PMID:27822097

  19. DE 1 and Viking observations associated with electron conical distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Weimer, D. R.; Andre, M.; Eliasson, L.

    1994-12-01

    Data from the electron detectors on board the Swedish Viking satellite launched during a period of low solar activity and from the Dynamic Explorer (DE) 1 satellite launched during active solar coditions have been examined for the occurrence and location of electron conical distributions and several conclusions can be drawn. First, we note that most of the best examples of electron conics observed by the V-3 experiment onboard Viking occurred in the afternoon sector in the range of magneitc local time 14 hours less than Magnetic Local Time (MLT) less than 18 hours, at midaltitudes in the range 10,000 km less than h less than 13,500 km, with few occurring in the nightside auroral region, a region poorly sampled at altitudes greater than 5000 km. For the Viking data there is an association of electron conics with upper hybrid waves. DE 1 observations made by the high-altitude plasma instrument (HAPI) indicate that electron conics were observed in the midmorning sector and the late evening sector, and as has been reported earlier, the correlation with upper hybird waves was good. The HAPI did not sample the afternoon sector. The electon conics observed on both satellites occurred in the presence of at least a modest (several kilovolts) potential difference beneath the satellite with a maximum energy that was usually, but not always, equal to or greater than the maximum energy of the electron conics. Two independent sets of observations by DE 1 suggest two distinct production mechanisms for electron conics. Examiniation of DE 1 electric field measurements from the plasma wave instrument during the observation of electron conics show simultaneous parallel oscillations in the frequency range of 0.2 Hz less than f less than 0.5 Hz during one and perhaps two of four events examined, and upper hybrid waves were observed on all four events. In addition, recent observations of '90-deg' electron conics associated with auroral kilometric radiation source regions suggest a

  20. The geology of the Viking Lander 2 site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutch, T. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Guinness, E. A.; Binder, A. B.; Morris, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    Models are discussed of several competitive geologic histories that can be hypothesized for the Viking Lander 2 site, none of which is uniquely persuasive. The craft landed on a flat plain of fine-grained sediment overlain by dispersed evenly distributed boulders. The fine-grain material appears to be part of a high-latitude mantle comprising material swept south of the pole regions. The boulders, which are covered by distinctive deep pits, or vesicles, may be the residue of an ejecta deposit from the crater Mie. Alternatively, they may be the remnants of lava flows which formerly covered the region. Polygonal sediment-filled cracks may have been formed by ice wedging, similar to the process that occurs in terrestrial permafrost regions. The possibility that they are desiccation polygons may not be excluded.

  1. Mars gravity - Additional resolution from Viking Orbiter I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Wimberly, R. N.; Cain, D. L.; Brenkle, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Doppler radio tracking data taken from Viking Orbiter I at a 300 km periapsis altitude are now capable of resolving shorter wavelength features such as Olympus Mons and Alba Patera. The number of data is limited as is the area of high resolution which forms a narrow band near 35 deg N latitude. The masses of 71 disks, placed in a geometric pattern on the surface, were estimated. Location of each disk, the mass estimate, and the corresponding uncertainty are given for each disk mass included in the estimator. The new gravity results are compared with previous gravity reductions. The corresponding acceleration surface at 350 km altitude is displayed. It is concluded that systematic postfit residuals imply that further information can be extracted with more detailed modeling.

  2. Mars climatology from viking 1 after 20 sols.

    PubMed

    Hess, S L; Henry, R M; Leovy, C B; Ryan, J A; Tillman, J E; Chamberlain, T E; Cole, H L; Dutton, R G; Greene, G C; Simon, W E; Mitchell, J L

    1976-10-01

    The results from the meteorology instruments on the Viking 1 lander are presented for the first 20 sols of operation. The daily patterns of temperature, wind, and pressure have been highly consistent during the period. Hence, these have been assembled into 20-sol composites and analyzed harmonically. Maximum temperature was 241.8 degrees K and minimum 187.2 degrees K. The composite wind vector has a mean diurnal magnitude of 2.4 meters per second with prevailing wind from the south and counterclockwise diurnal rotation. Pressure exhibits diurnal and semidiurnal oscillations. The diurnal is ascribed to a combination of effects, and the semidiurnal appears to be the solar semidiurnal tide. Similarities to Earth are discussed. A major finding is a continual secular decrease in diurnal mean pressure. This is ascribed to carbon dioxide deposition at the south polar cap.

  3. Viking 1975 Mars lander interactive computerized video stereophotogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebes, S., Jr.; Schwartz, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A novel computerized interactive video stereophotogrammetry system has been developed for analysis of Viking 1975 lander imaging data. Prompt, accurate, and versatile performance is achieved. Earth-returned digital imagery data are driven from a computer to a pair of video monitors. Powerful computer support enables a photogrammetrist, stereoscopically viewing the video displays, to create diverse topographic products. Profiles, representing the intersection of any definable surface with the Martian relief, are readily generated. Vertical profiles and elevation contour maps, including stereo versions, are produced. Computer overlays of map products on stereo images aid map interpretation and permit independent quality evaluation. Slaved monitors enable parallel viewing. Maps span from the immediate foreground to the remote limits of ranging capability. Surface sampler arm specific vertical profiles enable direct reading of arm commands required for sample acquisition, rock rolling, and trenching. The ranging accuracy of plus or minus 2 cm throughout the sample area degrades to plus or minus 20 m at 100-m range.

  4. Radiometric performance of the Viking Mars lander cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Burcher, E. E.; Taylor, E. J.; Wall, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Viking lander cameras feature an array of 12 silicon photodiodes for electronic focus selection and multispectral imaging. Comparisons of absolute radiometric calibrations of the four cameras selected for the mission to Mars with performance predictions based on their design data revealed minor discrepancies. These discrepancies were caused primarily by the method used to calibrate the photosensor array and apparently also from light reflections internal to the array. The sensitivity and dynamic range of all camera channels are found to be sufficient for high quality pictures, providing that the commandable gains and offsets can be optimized for the scene radiance; otherwise, the quantization noise may be too high or the dynamic range too low for an adequate characterization of the scene.

  5. Development of the Viking Mars lander thermal control subsystem design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, T. F.; Gorman, D. N.

    1974-01-01

    Two Viking spacecraft, each consisting of a lander capsule coupled to an orbiter, will be launched toward Mars during the summer of 1975. About a year later, the orbiters will go into orbit around Mars and the landers will descend to the surface for 90-day landed missions. The lander must withstand a wide variety of environmental and operational conditions during all phases of the mission, including prelaunch sterilization. On the surface of Mars, the lander internal temperatures must be controlled under widely varying thermal environments and atmospheric conditions. The lander thermal design is based on the maximum use of passive techniques and is integrated into the overall vehicle design and operation. The solutions to the unusual combinations of design problems and a summary of the results of full scale model testing under simulated mission conditions are presented.

  6. Spectral response of the Viking lander camera: Preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L., IV; Huck, F. O.; Arvidson, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Viking lander imaging investigation is to obtain color and near-infrared multispectral panoramas of the Martian surface using six spectral channels in the 0.4 to 1.1 microns wavelength range. This data can be compared with data obtained by imaging a reference test chart to construct approximate spectral reflectance curves that can then be matched to laboratory standards to aid in identifying surface materials. Some channels exhibit appreciable out-of-band spectral responses, making data reduction and interpretation difficult. A preliminary evaluation of predicted multispectral data for eight geological materials reveals that fairly good reflectance estimates can be made for those materials which have monotonically increasing or decreasing reflectances. Reflectance estimates for materials with more complex reflectances often do not reveal important spectral features and sometimes provide misleading results.

  7. Mars gravity - Additional resolution from Viking Orbiter I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Wimberly, R. N.; Cain, D. L.; Brenkle, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Doppler radio tracking data taken from Viking Orbiter I at a 300 km periapsis altitude are now capable of resolving shorter wavelength features such as Olympus Mons and Alba Patera. The number of data is limited as is the area of high resolution which forms a narrow band near 35 deg N latitude. The masses of 71 disks, placed in a geometric pattern on the surface, were estimated. Location of each disk, the mass estimate, and the corresponding uncertainty are given for each disk mass included in the estimator. The new gravity results are compared with previous gravity reductions. The corresponding acceleration surface at 350 km altitude is displayed. It is concluded that systematic postfit residuals imply that further information can be extracted with more detailed modeling.

  8. Viking 1975 Mars lander interactive computerized video stereophotogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebes, S., Jr.; Schwartz, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A novel computerized interactive video stereophotogrammetry system has been developed for analysis of Viking 1975 lander imaging data. Prompt, accurate, and versatile performance is achieved. Earth-returned digital imagery data are driven from a computer to a pair of video monitors. Powerful computer support enables a photogrammetrist, stereoscopically viewing the video displays, to create diverse topographic products. Profiles, representing the intersection of any definable surface with the Martian relief, are readily generated. Vertical profiles and elevation contour maps, including stereo versions, are produced. Computer overlays of map products on stereo images aid map interpretation and permit independent quality evaluation. Slaved monitors enable parallel viewing. Maps span from the immediate foreground to the remote limits of ranging capability. Surface sampler arm specific vertical profiles enable direct reading of arm commands required for sample acquisition, rock rolling, and trenching. The ranging accuracy of plus or minus 2 cm throughout the sample area degrades to plus or minus 20 m at 100-m range.

  9. The Viking Orbiter 1975 beryllium INTEREGEN rocket engine assembly.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, R. S.; Mcfarland, B. L.; Fischler, S.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the conversion of the Mariner 9 rocket engine for Viking Orbiter use. Engine conversion consists of replacing the 40:1 expansion area ratio nozzle with a 60:1 nozzle of the internal regeneratively (INTEREGEN) cooled rocket engine. Five converted engines using nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine demonstrated thermal stability during the nominal 2730-sec burn, but experienced difficulty at operating extremes. The thermal stability characteristic was treated in two ways. The first treatment consisted of mapping the operating regime of the engine to determine its safest operating boundaries as regards thermal equilibrium. Six engines were used for this purpose. Two of the six engines were then modified to effect the second approach - i.e., extend the operating regime. The engines were modified by permitting fuel injection into the acoustic cavity.

  10. Three Mars years: viking lander 1 imaging observations.

    PubMed

    Arvidson, R E; Guinness, E A; Moore, H J; Tillman, J; Wall, S D

    1983-11-04

    The Mutch Memorial Station (Viking Lander 1) on Mars acquired imaging and meteorological data over a period of 2245 martian days (3:3 martian years). This article discusses the deposition and erosion of thin deposits (ten to hundreds of micrometers) of bright red dust associated with global dust storms, and the removal of centimeter amounts of material in selected areas during a dust storm late in the third winter. Atmospheric pressure data acquired during the period of intense erosion imply that baroclinic disturbances and strong diurnal solar tidal heating combined to produce strong winds. Erosion occurred principally in areas where soil cohesion was reduced by earlier surface sampler activities. Except for redistribution of thin layers of materials, the surface appears to be remarkably stable, perhaps because of cohesion of the undisturbed surface material.

  11. The biology instrument for the Viking Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, F. S.; Adelson, H. E.; Chapman, M. C.; Clausen, O. W.; Cole, A. J.; Cragin, J. T.; Day, R. J.; Debenham, C. H.; Fortney, R. E.; Gilje, R. I.

    1978-01-01

    Two Viking spacecraft have successfully soft landed on the surface of Mars. Each carries one biology laboratory with three different experiments designed to search for evidence of living microorganisms in material sampled from the Martian surface. This 15.5-kg biology instrument which occupies a volume of almost 28.3 dm is the first to carry out an in situ search for extraterrestrial life on a planet. The three experiments are called the pyrolytic release, labeled release, and gas exchange. The pyrolytic release experiment has the capability to measure the fixation of carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide into organic matter. The labeled release experiment detects metabolic processes by monitoring the production of volatile carbon compounds from a radioactively labeled nutrient mixture. The gas exchange experiment monitors the gas changes in the head space above a soil sample which is either incubated in a humid environment or supplied with a rich organic nutrient solution.

  12. Development of the Viking Mars lander thermal control subsystem design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, T. F.; Gorman, D. N.

    1974-01-01

    Two Viking spacecraft, each consisting of a lander capsule coupled to an orbiter, will be launched toward Mars during the summer of 1975. About a year later, the orbiters will go into orbit around Mars and the landers will descend to the surface for 90-day landed missions. The lander must withstand a wide variety of environmental and operational conditions during all phases of the mission, including prelaunch sterilization. On the surface of Mars, the lander internal temperatures must be controlled under widely varying thermal environments and atmospheric conditions. The lander thermal design is based on the maximum use of passive techniques and is integrated into the overall vehicle design and operation. The solutions to the unusual combinations of design problems and a summary of the results of full scale model testing under simulated mission conditions are presented.

  13. The Search for Igneous Materials at the Viking Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Dale-Bannister, M.; Guinnes, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of Viking Lander 6 channel (0.4 to 1.1 microns) images to identify igneous materials is discussed. Movies of synthetic image cubes demonstrate that there are a number of contrast reversals between soils and certain rocks. Typically, large, angular rocks are brighter than the surrounding soils in the shortest wavelengths, and much darker than the soils at longest wavelengths. These results, which seem difficult to explain solely on the basis of photometric effects related to local lighting and viewing, are consistent with the presence of Fe+2 bearing silicates at the rock surfaces, producing relatively moderate absorptions in the blue and green parts of the spectrum, but more significant absorptions near about 1.0 micrometer (e.g., Fe+2 bearing pyroxenes). The soils, on the other hand, have signatures consistent with strong Fe+3 related absorptions at shorter wavelengths (e.g., Fe+3 bearing oxides or hydroxides).

  14. Viking Orbiter 1975 thrust vector control system accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcglinchey, L. F.

    1974-01-01

    The thrust vector control (TVC) system of the Viking Orbiter 1975 is discussed. The purpose of the TVC system is to point the engine thrust at the vehicle center of mass and to maintain attitude stability during propulsive maneuvers. This is accomplished by mounting the engine in a two-axis gimbal system. The TVC system then controls the pointing of the engine by closed loop control of two linear actuators which extend or retract and rotate the engine in its gimbal system. The effect of the TVC on the velocity vector pointing error incurred during a propulsive maneuver is analyzed. Models for predicting the magnitude of the error for various propulsive maneuvers are developed.

  15. Three mars years: Viking lander 1 imaging observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arvidson, R. E.; Guinness, E.A.; Moore, H.J.; Tillman, J.; Wall, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Mutch Memorial Station (Viking Lander 1) on Mars acquired imaging and meteorological data over a period of 2245 martian days (3:3 martian years). This article discusses the deposition and erosion of thin deposits (ten to hundreds of micrometers) of bright red dust associated with global dust storms, and the removal of centimeter amounts of material in selected areas during a dust storm late in the third winter. Atmospheric pressure data acquired during the period of intense erosion imply that baroclinic disturbances and strong diurnal solar tidal heating combined to produce strong winds. Erosion occurred principally in areas where soil cohesion was reduced by earlier surface sampler activities. Except for redistribution of thin layers of materials, the surface appears to be remarkably stable, perhaps because of cohesion of the undisturbed surface material.

  16. Mars climatology from Viking 1 after 20 sols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, S. L.; Henry, R. M.; Greene, G. C.; Leovy, C. B.; Tillman, J. E.; Ryan, J. A.; Chamberlain, T. E.; Cole, H. L.; Dutton, R. G.; Simon, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results from the meteorology instruments on the Viking 1 lander are presented for the first 20 sols of operation. The daily patterns of temperature, wind, and pressure have been highly consistent during the period. Hence, these have been assembled into 20-sol composistes and analyzed harmonically. Maximum temperature was 241.8 K and minimum was 187.2 K. The composite wind vector has a mean diurnal magnitude of 2.4 meters per second with prevailing wind from the south and counterclockwise diurnal rotation. Pressure exhibits diurnal and semidiurnal oscillations. The diurnal is ascribed to a combination of effects, and the semidiurnal appears to be the solar semidiurnal tide. Similarities to earth are discussed. A major finding is a continual secular decrease in diurnal mean pressure. This is ascribed to carbon dioxide deposition at the south polar cap.

  17. Preliminary results from the Viking orbiter imaging experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Baum, W.A.; Blasius, K.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Cutts, J.A.; Duxbury, T.; Greeley, R.; Guest, J.E.; Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Veverka, J.; Wellman, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    During its first 30 orbits around Mars, the Viking orbiter took approximately 1000 photographic frames of the surface of Mars with resolutions that ranged from 100 meters to a little more than 1 kilometer. Most were of potential landing sites in Chryse Planitia and Cydonia and near Capri Chasma. Contiguous high-resolution coverage in these areas has led to an increased understanding of surface processes, particularly cratering, fluvial, and mass-wasting phenomena. Most of the surfaces examined appear relatively old, channel features abound, and a variety of features suggestive of permafrost have been identified. The ejecta patterns around large craters imply that fluid flow of ejecta occurred after ballistic deposition. Variable features in the photographed area appear to have changed little since observed 5 years ago from Mariner 9. A variety of atmospheric phenomena were observed, including diffuse morning hazes, both stationary and moving discrete white clouds, and wave clouds covering extensive areas.

  18. Improved coordinates of features in the vicinity of the Viking lander site on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Dole, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The measurement of longitude of the Viking 1 landing site and the accuracy of the coordinates of features in the area around the landing site are discussed. The longitude must be measured photogrammatically from the small crater, Airy 0, which defines the 0 deg meridian on Mars. The computer program, GIANT, which was used to perform the analytical triangulations, and the photogrammetric computation of the longitude of the Viking 1 lander site are described. Improved coordinates of features in the vicinity of the Viking 1 lander site are presented.

  19. Viking satellite program - preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Erlandson, R.E.; Gustafsson, G.; Acuna, M.H.

    1986-12-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  20. The Viking satellite program - Preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemra, Thomas A.; Zanetti, Lawrence J.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Gustafsson, Georg; Acuna, Mario H.

    1986-12-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  1. The Viking satellite program - Preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potemra, Thomas A.; Zanetti, Lawrence J.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Gustafsson, Georg; Acuna, Mario H.

    1986-01-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  2. Improved coordinates of features in the vicinity of the Viking lander site on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, M. E.; Dole, S. H.

    1980-03-01

    The measurement of longitude of the Viking 1 landing site and the accuracy of the coordinates of features in the area around the landing site are discussed. The longitude must be measured photogrammatically from the small crater, Airy 0, which defines the 0 deg meridian on Mars. The computer program, GIANT, which was used to perform the analytical triangulations, and the photogrammetric computation of the longitude of the Viking 1 lander site are described. Improved coordinates of features in the vicinity of the Viking 1 lander site are presented.

  3. Martian precession and rotation from Viking lander range data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, C. F.; Standish, E. M.

    The spatial orientation of the Martian pole of rotation and axial rotation parameters have been determined at a midpoint in the Viking epoch (January 1, 1980). The mean obliquity ɛ and node ψ angles are ɛ=25.1894°+/-0.0001, ψ=35.4796°+/-0.0002(2σ). The mean precession rate is ψ0=-7.83+/-0.30 arc sec yr-1. The corresponding moment estimate is C/MRe2=0.355+/-0.015 and covers two extreme theoretical estimates. Seasonal (annual and semiannual) variations in Mars' rotation angle have also been observed and are 279+/-100 and 311+/-100 milliarc-second of angle (mas) respectively, after correcting for a general relativity effect. A simple model has been constructed for the main contribution involving seasonal mass exchange between the ice caps and atmosphere where the air pressure at the Viking 1 lander site is a proxy for the global ice cap/air pressure histories. The annual term is about 190 mas smaller and differs in phase by ~30° compared to the model prediction. The semiannual term is 100 mas larger and also differs in phase by ~30° compared to the model. A combination of tidally driven rotation changes, zonal winds, polar motion and ice cap model deficiencies may account for any discrepancy. The upcoming Pathfinder lander and Mars Global Surveyor missions carry ranging transponders which can dramatically improve our knowledge of Mars' interior through precise determination of the precession rate and detection of core and tidal effects. We advocate that plans be developed for a coordinated campaign of simultaneous ranging and Doppler tracking to each transponder.

  4. Geology of central Chryse Planitia and the Viking 1 landing site: Implications for the Mars Pathfinder mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Robert A.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Aubele, Jayne C.; Zimbelman, James R.

    1:500,000-scale geologic mapping in the central Chryse Planitia region of Mars was correlated with ``ground-truth'' data gathered by the Viking 1 lander. Materials within the Chryse basin can be subdivided into plains and channel units that are typically separated from one another by gradational contacts. Hesperian Ridged plains materials, unit 1 (Hr1) are the oldest materials mapped. Typically, these materials contain numerous fresh impact craters and have sharply defined, mare-like wrinkle ridges similar to those appearing on the lunar maria. These materials grade into Hesperian Ridged plains materials, unit 2 (Hr2), which are characterized by buried and eroded impact craters and subdued wrinkle ridges. From analyses of crater age dates and their associated geologic contacts, channel materials appear to have formed at the same time as Hr2 materials, and it is likely both units represent fluvial sediments. Measurements of buried craters contained in Hr2 materials suggest that in places this unit may be ~50m thick, but crater size-frequency distribution curves suggest that the areal average may be closer to ~170m. Based on these observations, our interpretation is that Hr2 materials were deposited into a standing body of water during channel formation. This interpretation implies that many of the rocks visible in the Viking 1 lander images were emplaced by fluvial processes. Possibly, finer-grained sediments remained in suspension and were subsequently transported out of Chryse Planitia and into the northern plains during draining of the ponded water. East-west trending surface undulations, visible in lander views toward the south, may represent aeolian dunes, lava flow fronts, or sediment waves formed at the bottom of the standing body of water. Broad physiographic units seen at the surface are not clearly visible in Viking orbiter images; however, they can be projected at the resolution of the orbiter images. These units show that concentrations of drift

  5. The Danish Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager; Schaarup, Susanne Zielke; Gyllenborg, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. Study population All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. Main variables The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients with acute stroke and TIA. Patient outcomes are currently monitored using 30-day mortality, unplanned readmission, and for patients receiving revascularization therapy, also functional level at 3 months poststroke. Descriptive data Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors with potential prognostic impact are registered. Conclusion The Danish Stroke Registry is a well-established clinical registry which plays a key role for monitoring and improving stroke and TIA care in Denmark. In addition, the registry is increasingly used for research. PMID:27843349

  6. Spoken Danish. Book Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearden, Jeannette; Stig-Nielsen, Karin

    This is one of a series of self-teaching textbooks initially prepared for the Armed Forces and now offered to the public. The text is designed to be used with a native speaker of Danish or with the accompanying recordings. The textbook is divided into three major sections, each consisting of five learning units and one unit for review. Each unit…

  7. The Danish System Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, John S.

    The paper is a supplement to an earlier paper in the same series which reviews Danish higher education until 1977. Expansion in higher education in the last 20 years, approaching the scale of mass higher education, culminated in a crisis in 1977. At that time, a trend toward self-government and participatory governing boards was seen as the end of…

  8. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  9. SNAP 19 Viking Program. Bimonthly technical progress report, April-May 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation of Viking Lander 1 power system data continued. The RTG series power range as measured at the PCDA was 65 to 67 watts at finroot temperatures between 280/sup 0/F and 310/sup 0/F. The Mars Lander performance history of Viking 1 include both the minimum and maximum data for each of the SOL days. Final available power system data for Viking Lander 2 are shown. Typical SOL day cycles for mission day 1193 are presented. The RTG series power ranged from 69 to 70 watts at finroot temperatures between 270/sup 0/F and 300/sup 0/F. The Mars Lander performance history for Viking 2 is shown. Power system performance data for Pioneer 10 and Pioneer Saturn (initially designated Pioneer 11) were monitored through the reporting period. After adjusting for the telemetry characteristics, the estimated RTG system net power was 114 watts for both Pioneer 10 and Pioneer Saturn.

  10. The development of sine vibration test requirements for Viking lander capsule components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, S.

    1974-01-01

    In connection with the Viking project for exploring the planet Mars, two identical spacecraft, each consisting of an orbiter and a lander, will be launched in the third quarter of 1975. Upon arrival at the planet, the Viking lander will separate from the Viking orbiter and descend to a soft landing at a selected site on the Mars surface. It was decided to perform a sine vibration test on the Viking spacecraft, in its launch configuration, to qualify it for the booster-induced transient-dynamic environment. It is shown that component-level testing is a cost- and schedule-effective prerequisite to the system-level, sine-vibration test sequences.

  11. Mars dynamics, atmospheric and surface properties - Determination from Viking tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Mayo, A. P.; Blackshear, W. T.; Tolson, R. H.; Kelly, G. M.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Fjeldbo, G.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Goldstein, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Approximately three months of radio tracking data from the Viking landers have been analyzed to determine the lander locations, the orientation of the spin axis of Mars, and a first estimate from Viking data of the planet's spin rate. Preliminary results have also been obtained for atmospheric parameters and radii at occultation points and for properties of the surface in the vicinity of lander 1.

  12. Smectites versus palagonites in Mars soil: Evidence from simulations of Viking biology labeled release experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Margulies, L.

    1983-01-01

    The results of an experimental comparison between palagonites and a smectite (montmorillonite) in the simulation of the Viking Biology Labeled Release (LR) experiment and conclusions regarding their suitability as MarSAMs are reproved. It was found that palagonites do not cause formate decomposition and C-14 release in their natural form or after acidification and thus cannot be a completely satisfactory analog to the Mars soil studied by Viking.

  13. Conclusion of Viking Lander Imaging Investigation: Picture catalog of experiment data record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Ashmore, T. C.

    1985-01-01

    The images returned by the two Viking landers during the Viking Survey Mission are presented in this report. Listing of supplemental information which describe the conditions under which the images were acquired are included. Subsets of the images are listed in a variety of sequences to aid in locating images of interest. The format and organization of the digital magnetic tape storage of the images are described. A brief description of the mission and the camera system is also included.

  14. Saltation on Mars and expected lifetime of Viking 75 wind sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    With the use of the wind-tunnel measurements of Bagnold and Zingg, a model is developed for estimating the parameters that describe the flux of sand on Mars. Application of this model to the sensor-breakage problem indicates that the expected lifetime on Mars of the wind sensors of the Viking 75 Meteorology Instrument System is about 40 earth years. This expected lifetime is adequate for both the primary Viking 75 mission and for a proposed extended mission.

  15. Viking Imaging of Phobos and Deimos: An Overview of the Primary Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, T. C.; Veverka, J.

    1977-01-01

    During the Viking primary mission the cameras on the two orbiters acquired about 50 pictures of the two Martian moons. The Viking images of the satellites have a higher surface resolution than those obtained by Mariner 9. The typical surface resolution achieved was 100-200 m, although detail as small as 40 m was imaged on Phobos during a particularly close passage. Attention is given to color sequences obtained for each satellite, aspects of phase angle coverage, and pictures for ephemeris improvement.

  16. Smectite clays in Mars soil - Evidence for their presence and role in Viking biology experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Rishpon, J.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of smectite clays in Martian soils is reviewed and results of experiments with certain active clays simulating the Viking biology experiments are reported. Analyses of Martian soil composition by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and dust storm spectroscopy and Martian geological history strongly suggest the presence of a mixture of weathered ferro-silicate minerals, mainly nontronite and montmorillonite, accompanied by soluble sulphate salts, as major constituents. Samples of montmorillonite and nontronite incubated with (C-14)-formate or the radioactive nutrient medium solution used in the Viking Labeled Release experiment, were found to produce patterns of release of radioactive gas very similar to those observed in the Viking experiments, indicating the iron-catalyzed decomposition of formate as the reaction responsible for the Viking results. The experimental results of Hubbard (1979) simulating the results of the Viking Pyrolytic Release experiment using iron montmorillonites are pointed out, and it is concluded that many of the results of the Viking biology experiments can be explained in terms of the surface activity of smectite clays in catalysis and adsorption.

  17. The Danish Adoption Register.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Liselotte; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2011-07-01

    The Danish Adoption Register was established in 1963-1964 to explore the genetic and environmental contribution to familial aggregation of schizophrenia. The register encompass information on all 14,425 non-familial adoptions of Danish children legally granted in Denmark 1924-1947. It includes name and date of birth of each adoptee and his or her biological and adoptive parents, date of transfer to adoptive parents and date of formal adoption. The linkage to biological and adoptive parents is close to complete, even biological fathers are registered for 91.4% of the adoptees. Adoption registers are a unique source allowing disentangling of genetic and familial environmental influences on traits, risk of diseases, and mortality.

  18. Danish auroral science history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2011-01-01

    Danish auroral science history begins with the early auroral observations made by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe during the years from 1582 to 1601 preceding the Maunder minimum in solar activity. Included are also the brilliant observations made by another astronomer, Ole Rømer, from Copenhagen in 1707, as well as the early auroral observations made from Greenland by missionaries during the 18th and 19th centuries. The relations between auroras and geomagnetic variations were analysed by H. C. Ørsted, who also played a vital role in the development of Danish meteorology that came to include comprehensive auroral observations from Denmark, Iceland and Greenland as well as auroral and geomagnetic research. The very important auroral investigations made by Sophus Tromholt are outlined. His analysis from 1880 of auroral observations from Greenland prepared for the significant contributions from the Danish Meteorological Institute, DMI, (founded in 1872) to the first International Polar Year 1882/83, where an expedition headed by Adam Paulsen was sent to Greenland to conduct auroral and geomagnetic observations. Paulsen's analyses of the collected data gave many important results but also raised many new questions that gave rise to auroral expeditions to Iceland in 1899 to 1900 and to Finland in 1900 to 1901. Among the results from these expeditions were 26 unique paintings of the auroras made by the artist painter, Harald Moltke. The expedition to Finland was headed by Dan la Cour, who later as director of the DMI came to be in charge of the comprehensive international geomagnetic and auroral observations made during the Second International Polar Year in 1932/33. Finally, the article describes the important investigations made by Knud Lassen during, among others, the International Geophysical Year 1957/58 and during the International Quiet Sun Year (IQSY) in 1964/65. With his leadership the auroral and geomagnetic research at DMI reached a high international

  19. Post-Viking microbiology: new approaches, new data, new insights.

    PubMed

    Nealson, K H

    1999-01-01

    In the 20 years since the Viking experiments, major advances have been made in the areas of microbial systematics, microbial metabolism, microbial survival capacity, and the definition of environments on earth, suggesting that life is more versatile and tenacious than was previously appreciated. Almost all niches on earth which have available energy, and which are compatible with the chemistry of carbon-carbon bonds, are known to be inhabited by bacteria. The oldest known bacteria on earth apparently evolved soon after the formation of the planet, and are heat loving, hydrogen and/or sulfur metabolizing forms. Among the two microbial domains (kingdoms) is a great deal of metabolic diversity, with members of these forms being able to grow on almost any known energy source, organic or inorganic, and to utilize an impressive array of electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. Both hydrothermal environments and the deep subsurface environments have been shown to support large populations of bacteria, growing on energy supplied by geothermal energy, thus isolating these ecosystems from the rest of the global biogeochemical cycles. This knowledge, coupled with new insights into the history of the solar system, allow one to speculate on possible evolution and survival of life forms on Mars.

  20. Completion of the Viking labeled release experiment on Mars.

    PubMed

    Levin, G V; Straat, P A

    1979-12-01

    The final Labeled Release (LR) cycle on each Viking lander tested a surface sample that had been stored for several months at approximately 10 degrees C prior to the onset of the active sequence. At each lander site, activity was strongly diminished. This thermal sensitivity of the active agent on the surface of Mars is consistent with a biological explanation of the LR experiment. At the end of one of these cycles, the incubation mixture was heated to 50 degrees C to release any radioactive gas trapped in the sample matrix. The results suggest that more than one carbon substrate is involved in the LR reaction on Mars. The thermal data from the stored samples, coupled with data from previous cycles, have formed the basis for evaluation of the thermal decomposition of the Mars active agent. The slope of the resulting Arrhenius plot has been used to test the fit of other flight data and to calculate the activation energy for thermal decomposition of the Mars agent. The results and their interpretation still leave unresolved the question of whether the Mars LR data were generated by biological or chemical activity.

  1. Post-Viking microbiology: new approaches, new data, new insights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    In the 20 years since the Viking experiments, major advances have been made in the areas of microbial systematics, microbial metabolism, microbial survival capacity, and the definition of environments on earth, suggesting that life is more versatile and tenacious than was previously appreciated. Almost all niches on earth which have available energy, and which are compatible with the chemistry of carbon-carbon bonds, are known to be inhabited by bacteria. The oldest known bacteria on earth apparently evolved soon after the formation of the planet, and are heat loving, hydrogen and/or sulfur metabolizing forms. Among the two microbial domains (kingdoms) is a great deal of metabolic diversity, with members of these forms being able to grow on almost any known energy source, organic or inorganic, and to utilize an impressive array of electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. Both hydrothermal environments and the deep subsurface environments have been shown to support large populations of bacteria, growing on energy supplied by geothermal energy, thus isolating these ecosystems from the rest of the global biogeochemical cycles. This knowledge, coupled with new insights into the history of the solar system, allow one to speculate on possible evolution and survival of life forms on Mars.

  2. Viking Mars hydrazine terminal descent engine thermal design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, C. R.; Morrisey, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of some of the more significant thermal design considerations employed in the development and qualification of the monopropellant hydrazine terminal descent engines on the Viking Mars lander spacecraft. The terminal descent engine operates in a blowdown and throttling mode, which results in an operating thrust range of 638 to 90 lbf. Martian entry thermal design boundary conditions are described, along with resulting radiative and conductive engine thermal isolation hardware. Test results are presented, showing engine thermal design performance as compared with specified requirements. General engine materials of construction are described, along with Hastelloy B shell structural characteristics, which were extended to 2000 F by test and are compared with limited existing MIL-HDBK-5 data. Subscale test results are presented, showing the maximum catalyst bed cylinder design temperature of 1970 F. Test results also are presented, showing local reactor internal convective heat-transfer coefficients. Such data are unique, since the engine employs a completely radial flow catalyst bed design. This design approach is the first of its kind in the monopropellant hydrazine gas generator field to be flight qualified.

  3. Post-Viking microbiology: new approaches, new data, new insights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    In the 20 years since the Viking experiments, major advances have been made in the areas of microbial systematics, microbial metabolism, microbial survival capacity, and the definition of environments on earth, suggesting that life is more versatile and tenacious than was previously appreciated. Almost all niches on earth which have available energy, and which are compatible with the chemistry of carbon-carbon bonds, are known to be inhabited by bacteria. The oldest known bacteria on earth apparently evolved soon after the formation of the planet, and are heat loving, hydrogen and/or sulfur metabolizing forms. Among the two microbial domains (kingdoms) is a great deal of metabolic diversity, with members of these forms being able to grow on almost any known energy source, organic or inorganic, and to utilize an impressive array of electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. Both hydrothermal environments and the deep subsurface environments have been shown to support large populations of bacteria, growing on energy supplied by geothermal energy, thus isolating these ecosystems from the rest of the global biogeochemical cycles. This knowledge, coupled with new insights into the history of the solar system, allow one to speculate on possible evolution and survival of life forms on Mars.

  4. Viking Afterbody Heating Computations and Comparisons to Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Wright, Michael J.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics predictions of Viking Lander 1 entry vehicle afterbody heating are compared to flight data. The analysis includes a derivation of heat flux from temperature data at two base cover locations, as well as a discussion of available reconstructed entry trajectories. Based on the raw temperature-time history data, convective heat flux is derived to be 0.63-1.10 W/sq cm for the aluminum base cover at the time of thermocouple failure. Peak heat flux at the fiberglass base cover thermocouple is estimated to be 0.54-0.76 W/sq cm, occurring 16 seconds after peak stagnation point heat flux. Navier-Stokes computational solutions are obtained with two separate codes using an 8-species Mars gas model in chemical and thermal non-equilibrium. Flowfield solutions using local time-stepping did not result in converged heating at either thermocouple location. A global time-stepping approach improved the computational stability, but steady state heat flux was not reached for either base cover location. Both thermocouple locations lie within a separated flow region of the base cover that is likely unsteady. Heat flux computations averaged over the solution history are generally below the flight data and do not vary smoothly over time for both base cover locations. Possible reasons for the mismatch between flight data and flowfield solutions include underestimated conduction effects and limitations of the computational methods.

  5. Viking Afterbody Heating Computations and Comparisons to Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Wright, Michael J.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics predictions of Viking Lander 1 entry vehicle afterbody heating are compared to flight data. The analysis includes a derivation of heat flux from temperature data at two base cover locations, as well as a discussion of available reconstructed entry trajectories. Based on the raw temperature-time history data, convective heat flux is derived to be 0.63-1.10 W/cm2 for the aluminum base cover at the time of thermocouple failure. Peak heat flux at the fiberglass base cover thermocouple is estimated to be 0.54-0.76 W/cm2, occurring 16 seconds after peak stagnation point heat flux. Navier-Stokes computational solutions are obtained with two separate codes using an 8- species Mars gas model in chemical and thermal non-equilibrium. Flowfield solutions using local time-stepping did not result in converged heating at either thermocouple location. A global time-stepping approach improved the computational stability, but steady state heat flux was not reached for either base cover location. Both thermocouple locations lie within a separated flow region of the base cover that is likely unsteady. Heat flux computations averaged over the solution history are generally below the flight data and do not vary smoothly over time for both base cover locations. Possible reasons for the mismatch between flight data and flowfield solutions include underestimated conduction effects and limitations of the computational methods.

  6. The Viking mission search for life on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.; Lederberg, J.; Rich, A.; Horowitz, N. H.; Oyama, V. I.; Levin, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    The scientific payload on the Viking Mars landers is described. Shortly after landing, two facsimile cameras capable of stereoscopic imaging will scan the landing site area in black and white, color, and infrared to reveal gross evidence of past or present living systems. A wide range mass spectrometer will record a complete mass spectrum for soil samples from mass 12 to mass 200 every 10.3 sec. Three experiments based on different assumptions on the nature of life on Mars, if it exists, will be carried out by the bio-lab. A pyrolytic release experiment is designed to measure photosynthetic or dark fixation of carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide into organic compounds. A labelled release experiment will test for metabolic activity during incubation of a surface sample moistened with a solution of radioactively labelled simple organic compounds. A gas exchange experiment will detect changes in the gaseous medium surrounding a soil sample as the result of metabolic activity. The hardware, function, and terrestrial test results of the bio-lab experiments are discussed.

  7. Spectrophotometric and color estimates of the Viking lander sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Jobson, D. J.; Park, S. K.; Wall, S. D.; Arvidson, R. E.; Patterson, W. R.; Benton, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral radiance and color of the Martian sky and soil and the spectral reflectance of soil features are estimated from six-channel (0.4-1.0 micron) spectral data obtained with the Viking lander cameras. Images taken near local noon from the two landers reveal a sky that is brighter near the horizon than the soil but with a similar spectral radiance shape and color. The scenes are predominantly moderate yellowish brown in color with only subtle variations except for some dark grey rocks. Most spectral reflectance estimates are similar: they rise rapidly with increasing wavelength between 0.4 and 0.8 micron and with only a few exceptions exhibit a pronounced minimum centered about 0.93 micron. These characteristics are consistent with an abundance of Fe(3+)-rich weathering products, notably nontronite. However, the delineation of the number and abundances of total mineral phases requires further analyses and laboratory comparisons. Reflectance estimates for rocks have not been repeatable, probably because most rocks have irregular pitted surfaces that introduce significant shadowing components.

  8. Post-Viking Microbiology: New Approaches, New Data, New Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In the 20 years since the Viking experiments, major advances have been made in the areas of microbial systematics, microbial metabolism, microbial survival capacity, and the definition of environments on earth, suggesting that life is more versatile and tenacious than was previously appreciated. Almost all niches on earth which have available energy, and which are compatible with the chemistry of carbon-carbon bonds, are known to be inhabited by bacteria. The oldest known bacteria on earth apparently evolved soon after the formation of the planet, and are heat loving, hydrogen and/or sulfur metabolizing forms. Among the two microbial domains (kingdoms) is a great deal of metabolic diversity, with members of these forms being able to grow on almost any known energy source, organic or inorganic, and to utilize an impressive array of electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. Both hydrothermal environments and the deep subsurface environments have been shown to support large populations of bacteria, growing on energy supplied by geothermal energy, thus isolating these ecosystems from the rest of the global biogeochemical cycles. This knowledge, coupled with new insights into the history of the solar system, allow one to speculate on possible evolution and survival of life forms on Mars.

  9. Danish Cultural Identity and the Teaching of Danish to Foreigners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Hedwig

    2006-01-01

    Danish as a second language textbooks published over the last 15 years have presented the Danish cultural identity as a homogenous and purely national phenomenon. Research into teaching theory, on the other hand, has been more broad-minded, and is based on interactivity. The aim of this paper is to explain this divergence. (Contains 2 notes.)

  10. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi; Nørgaard, Mette; Thind, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. Study population All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results presented in this paper are predominantly from the 2013 population. Main variables In 2013, 970 patients were diagnosed with BC in Denmark and were included in a preliminary report from the database. A total of 458 (47%) patients were diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive BC (non-MIBC) and 512 (53%) were diagnosed with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC). A total of 300 (31%) patients underwent cystectomy. Among the 135 patients diagnosed with MIBC, who were 75 years of age or younger, 67 (50%) received neoadjuvent chemotherapy prior to cystectomy. In 2013, a total of 147 patients were treated with curative-intended radiation therapy. Descriptive data One-year mortality was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15–21). One-year cancer-specific mortality was 25% (95% CI: 22–27%). One-year mortality after cystectomy was 14% (95% CI: 10–18). Ninety-day mortality after cystectomy was 3% (95% CI: 1–5) in 2013. One-year mortality following curative-intended radiation therapy was 32% (95% CI: 24–39) and 1-year cancer-specific mortality was 23% (95% CI: 16–31) in 2013. Conclusion This preliminary DaBlaCa-data report showed that the treatment of MIBC in Denmark overall meet high international academic standards. The database is able to identify Danish BC patients and monitor treatment and mortality. In the future, DaBlaCa-data will be a valuable data source and expansive observational studies on BC will be available. PMID:27822081

  11. [Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Danish children and young people 10 to 19 years of age. Should young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia be treated in the same way as children?].

    PubMed

    Schrøder, Henrik; Kjeldstad, Marthe; Boesen, Anne Marie; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Schmidt, Kai Gjerløff; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Gregersen, Henrik; Gustafsson, Göran

    2006-06-26

    Data seem to indicate that young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a better survival rate when treated with paediatric protocols than with adult ALL protocols. The purpose of this study was to report the clinical characteristics and outcome of all children and young adults 10-19 years of age diagnosed with ALL in Denmark between 1992 and 2001. The study included 99 patients 10-19 years of age with ALL in Denmark during a 10-year period found in the complete NOPHO (Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology) registry and through the Danish Cancer Registry and local pathology databases. Data were retrieved by reviewing patients' medical charts. 61 children (10-14 years) were treated on paediatric protocols, and 38 young adults (15-19 years) were diagnosed with ALL. Data were reported as of 1 January 2005. There were no differences between the two groups with respect to the distribution of T-ALL, CNS leukemia, total WBC and high-risk chromosomal abnormalities. There was a statistically significant lower event-free survival rate (EFS) (p < 0.01) and lower overall survival rate (p < 0.01) in young adults than in 10-14-year-old children (0.38 vs. 0.60 and 0.47 vs. 0.67). There were more transplant-related deaths in the young adults. The higher treatment intensity in children may be an explanatory factor. Children were given more prednisone, vincristine and high-dose methotrexate than were the young adults. Young adult patients with ALL might benefit from therapy with paediatric NOPHO ALL protocols.

  12. Does physical activity moderate the relationship between depression symptomatology and low back pain? Cohort and co-twin control analyses nested in the longitudinal study of aging Danish twins (LSADT).

    PubMed

    Hübscher, Markus; Hartvigsen, Jan; Fernandez, Matthew; Christensen, Kaare; Ferreira, Paulo

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether depression symptomatology is associated with low back pain (LBP) in twins aged 70+ and whether this effect depends on a person's physical activity (PA) status. This prospective cohort and nested case-control study used a nationally representative sample of twins. Data on depression symptomatology (modified Cambridge Mental Disorders Examination) and self-reported PA were obtained from the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins using twins without LBP at baseline. Associations between depression symptomatology (highest quartile) at baseline and LBP two years later were investigated using logistic regression analyses adjusted for sex. To examine the moderating effect of PA, we tested its interaction with depression. Associations were analysed using the complete sample of 2446 twins and a matched case-control analysis of 97 twin pairs discordant for LBP at follow-up. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Using the whole sample, high depression scores were associated with an increased probability of LBP (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.22-1.99, P ≤ 0.01). There was no statistically significant interaction of light PA and depression symptomatology (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.46-1.35, P = 0.39) and strenuous PA and depression symptomatology (0.84, 95% CI 0.50-1.41, P = 0.51). The case-control analysis showed similar ORs, although statistically insignificant. High depression symptomatology predicted incident LBP. This effect is supposedly not attributable to genetic or shared environmental factors. Physical activity did not moderate the effect of depression symptomatology on LBP.

  13. Learning Strategies in Two Danish Children's Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Kim

    1985-01-01

    A longitudinal study, intended to produce a profile of the relationship between cognitive, social, and linguistic development in Danish children, had as subjects a boy and a girl aged 11 and 8 months, who were observed until they reached age 3. Naturalistic language used by the children and their parents, videotaped during regular visits, was…

  14. Smectite clays in Mars soil: evidence for their presence and role in Viking biology experimental results.

    PubMed

    Banin, A; Rishpon, J

    1979-12-01

    Various chemical, physical and geological observations indicate that smectite clays are probably the major components of the Martian soil. Satisfactory ground-based chemical simulation of the Viking biology experimental results was obtained with the smectite clays nontronite and montmorillonite when they contained iron and hydrogen as adsorbed ions. Radioactive gas was released from the medium solution used in the Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment when interacted with the clays, at rates and quantities similar to those measured by Viking on Mars. Heating of the active clay (mixed with soluble salts) to 160 degrees C in CO2 atmosphere reduced the decomposition activity considerably, again, as was observed on Mars. The decomposition reaction in LR experiment is postulated to be iron-catalyzed formate decomposition on the clay surface. The main features of the Viking Pyrolytic Release (PR) experiment were also simulated recently (Hubbard, 1979) which the iron clays, including a relatively low '1st peak' and significant '2nd peak'. The accumulated observations on various Martian soil properties and the results of simulation experiments, thus indicate that smectite clays are major and active components of the Martian soil. It now appears that many of the results of the Viking biology experiments can be explained on the basis of their surface activity in catalysis and adsorption.

  15. Snapshots of high-latitude electrodynamics using Viking and DMSP F7 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G.; Stasiewicz, K.; Murphree, J.S.; Pottelette, R.; Zanetti, L.J.; Potemra, T.A.; Hardy, D.A.; Rich, F.J.

    1988-12-01

    Simultandeous observations by the Viking an the DMSP F7 satellites have been used as input to a new method to obtain snapshot pictures of the auroral electrodynamics. In particular, an ''instantaneous'' global equipotential (or convection) pattern is calculated from distributions of field-aligned current and conductivity which are qualitatively consistent with the Viking auroral imager data and quantitatively consistent with magnetic field and particle data from the two satellites. This convection pattern, which is of the normal two-cell type, with a weak dusk cell and a strong, elongated crescent-shape dawn cell (consistent with positive interplanetary magnetic field B/sub y/), agrees well with the Viking electric field data. The model and the observed potential profiles agree nicely along the entire Viking orbit except for two intervals above acceleration regions where deviations are to be expected (due to parallel electric fields). These regions are characterized by U-shaped potential minima, upward field-aligned currents, upgoing ion beams, and relatively intense auroral kilometric radiation. Thus, the model results are consistent with the Viking observations not only on a global scale but also on the scale of the auroral acceleration regions. The corresponding convection in the magnetosphere is obtained from a simple projection to the equatorial plane of the deduced two-cell convection pattern. From this location of the plasmapause is inferred. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  16. Snapshots of high-latitude electrodynamics using Viking and DMSP f7 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G.; Stasiewicz, K.; Murphree, J.S.; Pottelette, R.

    1988-12-01

    Simultaneous observations by the Viking and the DMSP F7 satellites were used as input to a new method to obtain snapshot pictures of the auroral electrodynamics. In particular, an instantaneous global equipotential (or convection) pattern is calculated from distributions of field-aligned current and conductivity which are qualitatively consistent with the Viking auroral imager data and quantitatively consistent with magnetic field and particle data from the two satellites. This convection pattern, which is of the normal two-cell type, with a weak dusk cell and a strong, elongated crescent-shaped dawn cell (consistent with positive interplanetary magnetic field By), agrees well with the Viking electric-field data. The model and the observed potential profiles agree nicely along the entire Viking orbit except for two intervals above acceleration regions where deviations are to be expected (due to parallel electric fields). These regions are characterized by U-shaped potential minima, upward field-aligned currents, upgoing ion beams, and relatively intense auroral kilometric radiation. Thus, the model results are consistent with the Viking observations not only on a global scale but also on the scale of the auroral acceleration regions. The corresponding convection in the magnetosphere is obtained from a simple projection to the equatorial plane of the deduced two-cell convection pattern. From this the location of the plasmapause is inferred.

  17. Types of rocks exposed at the Viking landing sites

    SciTech Connect

    Guinness, E.; Arvidson, R.; Dale-Bannister, M.; Slavney, S.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral estimates derived from Viking Lander multispectral images have been used to investigate the types of rocks exposed at both landing sites, and to infer whether the rocks are primary igneous rocks or weathering products. These analyses should aid interpretations of spectra to be returned from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the upcoming Mars Observer Mission. A series of gray surfaces on the Landers were used to check the accuracy of the camera preflight calibrations. Results indicate that the pre-flight calibrations for the three color channels are probably correct for all cameras but camera 2 on Lander 1. The calibration for the infrared channels appears to have changed, although the cause is not known. For this paper, only the color channels were used to derive data for rocks. Rocks at both sites exhibit a variety of reflectance values. For example, reflectance estimates for two rocks in the blue (0.4-0.5 microns), green (0.5-0.6 microns), and red (0.6-0.75 microns) channels are 0.16, 0.23, and 0.33 and 0.12, 0.19, 0.37 at a phase angle of 20 degrees. These values have been compared with laboratory reflectance spectra of analog materials and telescopic spectra of Mars, both convolved to the Lander bandpasses. Lander values for some rocks are similar to earth based observations of martian dark regions and with certain mafic igneous rocks thinly coated with amorphous ferric-oxide rich weathering products. These results are consistent with previous interpretations.

  18. Lower Cretaceous Viking Barrier island, southwestern Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Amajor, L.C.

    1984-04-01

    A subsurface study of cores and electric well logs from the lower Cretaceous (Albian) Viking reservoir sandstone near Calgary, Alberta, reveals its deposition as a regressive barrier island along the shores of the Haplophragmoides gigas sea. The barrier island trends northwest-southeast parallel to the paleostrandline for more than 120 km (75 mi) and attained a maximum thickness of more than 30 m (100 ft). Swales characterized by isopach thinning suggest that the island was probably breached by two tidal channels. Bentonite chronostratigraphy indicates that the barrier island prograded in a northeasterly and/or easterly direction for up to 24 km (15 mi). This seaward growth was briefly interrupted by an isostatic transgression. Thus, sandstone depositional pattern is of the imbricate type with younger units successively displaced seaward in the direction of progradation. The barrier-island facies sequence comprises eleven intergradational facies, i.e., ebb-tidal delta, marginal (spillover) channel, middle shoreface, marine shales, upper shoreface beach, dune, back-barrier mud flat, marshy lagoon and overwash, mixed tidal creek channel, and overbank. This sequence differs slightly from that of the Recent classic regressive Galveston Island, Texas, and the ancient Muddy barrier island, Montana, in the presence of an ebb-tidal delta and marine shelf shales beneath and above the middle shorefacies, respectively. On this basis the South Carolina Recent barrier islands are considered closer modern analogs. The writer suggests that this sand body be explored further for oil and/or gas accumulations because of its excellent reservoir properties and the generally low well density.

  19. Viking observations at the source region of auroral kilometric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bahnsen, A.; Jespersen, M.; Ungstrup, E. ); Pedersen, B.M. ); Eliasson, L. ); Murphree, J.S.; Elphinstone, R.D. ); Blomberg, L. ); Holmgren, G. ); Zanetti, L.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The orbit of the Swedish satellite Viking was optimized for in situ observations of auroral particle acceleration and related phenomena. In a large number of the orbits, auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) was observed, and in approximately 35 orbits the satellite passed through AKR source regions as evidenced by very strong signals at the local electron cyclotron frequency f{sub ce}. These sources were found at the poleward edge of the auroral oval at altitudes, from 5,000 to 8,000 km, predominantly in the evening sector. The strong AKR signal has a sharp low-frequency cutoff at or very close to f{sub ce} in the source. In addition to AKR, strong broadband electrostatic noise is measured during the source crossings. Energetic (1-15 keV) electrons are always present at and around the AKR sources. Upward directed ion beams of several keV are closely correlated with the source as are strong and variable electric fields, indicating that a region of upward pointing electric field below the observation point is a necessary condition for AKR generation. The plasma density is measured by three independent experiments and it is generally found that the density is low across the whole auroral oval. For some source crossings the three methods agree and show a density depletion (but not always confined to the source region itself), but in many cases the three measurements do not yield consistent results. The magnetic projection of the satellite passes through auroral forms during the source crossings, and the strongest AKR events seem to be connected with kinks in an arc or more complicated structures.

  20. Viking Lander image analysis of Martian atmospheric dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Ockert-Bell, Maureen E.; Shepard, Michael K.

    1995-01-01

    We have reanalyzed three sets of Viking Lander 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2) images of the Martian atmosphere to better evaluate the radiative properties of the atmospheric dust particles. The properties of interest are the first two moments of the size distribution, the single-scattering albedo, the dust single-scattering phase function, and the imaginary index of refraction. These properties provide a good definition of the influence that the atmospheric dust has on heating of the atmosphere. Our analysis represents a significant improvement over past analyses (Pollack et al. 1977, 1979) by deriving more accurate brightness closer to the sun, by carrying out more precise analyses of the data to acquire the quantities of interest, and by using a better representation of scattering by nonspherical particles. The improvements allow us to better define the diffraction peak and hence the size distribution of the particles. For a lognormal particle size distribution, the first two moments of the size distribution, weighted by the geometric cross section, are found. The geometric cross-section weighted mean radius r(sub eff) is found to be 1.85 +/- 0.3 micrometers at VL2 during northern summer when dust loading was low and 1.52 +/- 0.3 micrometers at VL1 during the first dust storm. In both cases the best cross-section weighted mean variance nu(sub eff) of the size distribution is equal to 0.5 +/- 0.2 micrometers. The changes in size distribution, and thus radiative properties, do not represent a substantial change in solar energy deposition in the atmosphere over the Pollak et al. (1977, 1979) estimates.

  1. Viking Lander image analysis of Martian atmospheric dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Ockert-Bell, Maureen E.; Shepard, Michael K.

    1995-01-01

    We have reanalyzed three sets of Viking Lander 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2) images of the Martian atmosphere to better evaluate the radiative properties of the atmospheric dust particles. The properties of interest are the first two moments of the size distribution, the single-scattering albedo, the dust single-scattering phase function, and the imaginary index of refraction. These properties provide a good definition of the influence that the atmospheric dust has on heating of the atmosphere. Our analysis represents a significant improvement over past analyses (Pollack et al. 1977,1979) by deriving more accurate brightnesses closer to the sun, by carrying out more precise analyses of the data to acquire the quantities of interest, and by using a better representation of scattering by nonspherical particles. The improvements allow us to better define the diffraction peak and hence the size distribution of the particles. For a lognormal particle size distribution, the first two moments of the size distribution, weighted by the geometric cross section, are found. The geometric cross-section weighted mean radius (r(sub eff)) is found to be 1.85 +/- 0.3 microns at VL2 during northern summer when dust loading was low and 1.52 +/- 0.3 microns at VL1 during the first dust storm. In both cases the best cross-section weighted mean variance (nu(eff)) of the size distribution is equal to 0.5 +/- 0.2 microns. The changes in size distribution, and thus radiative properties, do not represent a substantial change in solar energy deposition in the atmosphere over the Pollack et al. (1977,1979) estimates.

  2. High Prevalence of Hypertension in a Danish Population Telemedical Home Measurement of Blood Pressure in Citizens Aged 55–64 Years in Holstebro County

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Torsten; Bech, Jesper Nørgaard; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Home blood pressure (HBP) is prognostically superior to office BP (OBP) and similar to ambulatory BP measurements. We determined the prevalence of hypertension using HBP with telemedical data transmission in the municipality of Holstebro, Denmark (57,000 citizens). METHODS Using the Civil Registration System, we invited citizens aged 55–64 years to have their OBP and HBP measured using telemedical data transmission. Elevated OBP was defined as ≥140/90mm Hg. HBP was measured 3 times daily on 3 consecutive days with 3 measurements on each occasion. HBP was the mean of all measurements on day 1 and 3, and hypertension was defined as ≥135/85mm Hg. RESULTS We included 3,102 citizens who had performed at least 12 HBP measurements during day 2 and 3. Group 1: (n = 1,464, 47%) had both normal OBP and HBP. Group 2: (n = 838, 27%) had both elevated OBP and HBP indicating persistent hypertension. Group 3: (n = 560, 18%) had elevated OBP and normal HBP indicating white coat hypertension (WCH). Group 4: (n = 240, 8%) had normal OBP and elevated HBP indicating masked hypertension (MH). Thus, 1,078 (35%, groups 2 and 4) were untreated or insufficiently treated. Awareness of hypertension was registered in 950 patients (31%) and of these 49% had a normal HBP. CONCLUSIONS This is the first large-scale study to eliminate completely reporting bias by using telemedical transmission of BP data. One third of citizens in the age group 55–64 years had an abnormally high HBP, and one fourth either had WCH or MH. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov identification number: NCT02355392 PMID:26208671

  3. Towards an Understanding of "Udeskole:" Education outside the Classroom in a Danish Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentsen, Peter; Mygind, Erik; Randrup, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, an increasing number of Danish public, private and independent schools have introduced regular compulsory education outside the classroom for children aged 7-16 as a weekly or biweekly "outdoor school" day--known in Danish as "udeskole." An analysis of this form of outdoor education, its impacts and…

  4. Towards an Understanding of "Udeskole:" Education outside the Classroom in a Danish Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentsen, Peter; Mygind, Erik; Randrup, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, an increasing number of Danish public, private and independent schools have introduced regular compulsory education outside the classroom for children aged 7-16 as a weekly or biweekly "outdoor school" day--known in Danish as "udeskole." An analysis of this form of outdoor education, its impacts and…

  5. 1st Manned Lunar Landing and 1st Robotic Mars Landing Commemorative Release: Viking 1 Landing Site in Chryse Planitia - Visible Image

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-22

    NASA Viking 1 landing site is shown in this commemorative image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft to celebrate the July 20, 1969 and 1976 anniversaries of NASA Apollo 11 and Viking 1 landings on the Moon and Mars, respectively.

  6. 1st Manned Lunar Landing and 1st Robotic Mars Landing Commemorative Release: Viking 1 Landing Site in Chryse Planitia - Infrared Image

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-22

    This NASA Mars Odyssey image of NASA Viking 1 landing site was taken to commemorate the anniversaries of NASA Apollo 11 landing on the Moon and Viking 1 landing on Mars -- July 20, 1969 and July 20, 1976, respectively.

  7. Instantaneous pictures of the high-latitude electrodynamics using Viking and DMSP/F7 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G.; Hardy, D.A.; Rich, F.J.

    1987-08-01

    Simultaneous observations by the Viking and the DMSP/F7 satellites were applied to a new technique to obtain realistic pictures of the auroral electrodynamics. In particular, an instantaneous global equipotential pattern is calculated using field-aligned current and conductivity distributions that are qualitatively consistent with the Viking auroral imager data and quantitatively consistent with magnetic-field and particle data from the two satellites. This convection pattern agrees with the E x B-drift vectors estimated from Viking electric-field data. Discrepancies consistent with upward parallel electric fields occur in regions of upward currents. The pattern is of the normal two-cell type, with a small dusk cell and a large, elongated crescent-shaped dawn cell. The excellent agreement between the satellite and model data demonstrates the reliability of the results.

  8. The solar wind interaction with Mars as seen by the Viking retarding potential analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragin, B. L.; Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.

    1982-06-01

    Both energy spectra and continuous monitoring periods of the total flux above 15 eV are available, from Viking retarding potential analyzer measurements of electron fluxes not exceeding 75 eV out to 16,000 km above the Mars surface. Although the mean electron current at energies above 15 eV increases monotonically by almost two orders of magnitude from 9000 to 700 km in Viking 1 data, no clear signature of the bow shock is seen. Total current wave power shows a peak near 1700 km altitude. It is suggested that there may be a highly turbulent shock structure masking a clear signature of the bow shock in the time-averaged data, and it is concluded that the interaction model consistent with the bow shock at 1700 km, together with ionosphere measurements, indicates a permanent magnetic field able to stand off the solar wind during the Viking 1 entry.

  9. Flight tests of Viking parachute system in three Mach number regimes. 2: Parachute test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendura, R. J.; Lundstrom, R. R.; Renfroe, P. G.; Lecroy, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    Tests of the Viking 16.15-meter nominal-diameter disk-gap-band parachute were conducted at Mach number and dynamic pressure conditions which bracketed the range postulated for the Viking '75 mission to Mars. Parachutes were deployed at supersonic, transonic, and subsonic speeds behind a simulated Viking entry capsule. All parachutes successfully deployed, inflated, and exhibited sufficient drag and stability for mission requirements. Basic parachute data including loads, drag coefficients, pull-off angles, and canopy area ratios are presented. Trajectory reconstruction and onboard camera data methods were combined to yield continuous histories of both parachute and test-vehicle angular motions which are presented for the period from parachute deployment through steady inflation.

  10. Comparison of enhanced Mariner 9 and Viking imagery of Mars for analysis of short term geological phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trego, K. D.

    1989-02-01

    It is shown that enhanced Mariner 9 A-Frame imagery does not have a resolution which allows geomorphological definition comparable to that in Viking imagery. It is thus concluded that a comparison of enhanced Mariner 9 and Viking imagery is not practical for the study of short-term geological phenomena such as gravitational transport.

  11. Validation of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults in a Danish population.

    PubMed

    Emtekaer Haesum, Lisa Korsbakke; Ehlers, Lars; Hejlesen, Ole K

    2015-09-01

    To describe how the original American full-length version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) was translated and adapted for use in the Danish setting and culture. A reliable Danish version of the TOFHLA was created and pretested using patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as case group. Forty-two patients with COPD completed the Danish TOFHLA and participated in a face-to-face interview concerning their basic demographics. Statistical analyses were conducted to explore the demographic data provided by the participants and to determine the internal consistency and reliability of the Danish TOFHLA. The mean age of sample was 68.7 years (range 34-86). The face validity, internal consistency and item to scale correlations of the Danish TOFHLA were determined and found to fulfil well-established criteria; on this basis, we found the reliability and consistency of the Danish TOFHLA to be satisfying. The Danish TOFHLA is now ready for application in future research projects, which test levels of functional health literacy in an elderly Danish population at risk of chronic diseases. The evolvement in the measurement of health literacy is still ongoing, as there is a need to refine existing methods. Until recently, there has been a total lack of instruments for assessing health literacy in Scandinavia; it is hoped that this development of the Danish TOFHLA will promote further research within the field of health literacy in Scandinavia and other European countries. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Constraints on Martian Soil Composition as Inferred from Viking XRFS and Pathfinder APXS and IMP Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Crisp, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    With the successful operation of the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) during 1997's Mars Pathfinder (MPF) mission, geochemistry data are now available from three sites on Mars. APXS raw spectra for six soils and five rocks have been converted to compositional abundances. The Viking Lander X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRFS) successfully measured elemental abundances of nine soils at Viking 1 and eight soils at Viking 2. Although the three landing sites are located in different parts of Mars, the soils exhibit broad similarities, with an iron-rich chemistry similar to that of palagonite. However, the Pathfinder sods show some significant differences from Viking soils, notably an enrichment in silica and depletion in sulfur. The XRFS samples consisted of near-surface and deep (up to 22 cm) soils acquired by a collector head at the cod of a retractable boom. It was possible to collect and analyze pebbles as large a 2 cm, but only sod, some in the form of consolidated clods, was sampled. In contrast, the APXS measured materials in situ. This resulted in MPF "rock" analyses that probably had a significant dust component and, as explored here, "soil" analyses that may have contained a rocky component We examine several possibilities to explain these differences and other attributes of the APXS and XRFS data sets: 1) The APXS soil measurements actually sampled a mixture of Viking-like soil and small bits of high-silica, low-sulfur rock, 2) The soils were derived from high-silica rocks mixed with a minor component of globally-homogenized dust; these soils are chemically distinct and have a separate geologic history from the Viking soils. 3) The weathering environment was different at the Pathfinder landing site compared to the Viking sites, and 4) Uncertainties in the XRFS and APXS measurements result in reported elemental abundances different than those that are actually present We show that none of the possibilities can be discounted, but that an MPF soil

  13. The Martian surface as imaged, sampled, and analyzed by the Viking landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.; Gooding, James L.; Moore, Henry J.

    1989-01-01

    Data collected by two Viking landers are analyzed. Attention is given to the characteristics of the surface inferred from Lander imaging and meteorology data, physical and magnetic properties experiments, and both inorganic and organic analyses of Martian samples. Viking Lander 1 touched down on Chryse Planitia on July 20, 1976 and continued to operate for 2252 sols, until November 20, 1982. Lander 2 touched down about 6500 km away from Lander 1, on Utopia Planitia on September 3, 1976. The chemical compositions of sediments at the two landing sites are similar, suggesting an aeolian origin. The compositions suggest an iron-rich rock an are matched by various clays and salts.

  14. Suggestion for extended Viking magnetic properties experiment on future Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, M. B.; Knudsen, J. M.; Vistisen, L.; Hargraves, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    A remarkable result from the Viking missions was the discovery that the Martian soil is highly magnetic, in the sense that the soil is attracted by a small magnet. The soil was found to adhere almost equally well to a strong and a weak SmCo magnet in the Viking lander backhoe at both landing sites. An array of permanent magnets, with the purpose of establishing if the magnetic particles on Mars are present as discrete or as composite particles, has been constructed.

  15. The Martian surface as imaged, sampled, and analyzed by the Viking landers

    SciTech Connect

    Arvidson, R.E.; Gooding, J.L.; Moore, H.J.; NASA, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX; USGS, Branch of Astrogeology, Menlo Park, CA )

    1989-02-01

    Data collected by two Viking landers are analyzed. Attention is given to the characteristics of the surface inferred from Lander imaging and meteorology data, physical and magnetic properties experiments, and both inorganic and organic analyses of Martian samples. Viking Lander 1 touched down on Chryse Planitia on July 20, 1976 and continued to operate for 2252 sols, until November 20, 1982. Lander 2 touched down about 6500 km away from Lander 1, on Utopia Planitia on September 3, 1976. The chemical compositions of sediments at the two landing sites are similar, suggesting an aeolian origin. The compositions suggest an iron-rich rock an are matched by various clays and salts. 89 refs.

  16. Viking bistatic radar observations of the hellas basin on Mars: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R A; Tyler, G L; Brenkle, J P; Sue, M

    1979-01-05

    Preliminary reduction of Viking bistatic radar data gives root-mean-square surface slopes in the Hellas basin on Mars of about 4 degrees on horizontal scales averaged over 10 centimeters to 100 meters. This roughness decreases slightly with position along the ground track, south to north. The dielectric constant in this area appears to be approximately 3.1, greater than the martian average. These values are characteristic of lunar maria and are similar to those found near the Viking lander site in Chryse with the use of Earth-based radar.

  17. Titian/Centaur D-1TTC-4 Viking A flight data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Titan/Centaur TC-4 was launched from the Eastern Test Range, Complex 41, at 05:22 PM EDT on Wednesday, August 20, 1975. This was the second operational flight of the newest NASA unmanned launch vehicle. The spacecraft was the Viking A, the first of two orbiting and landing missions to Mars planned for the 1975 Martian launch opportunity. The objective of the launch phase of the mission, to inject the Viking spacecraft onto the planned transfer orbit to Mars, was successfully accomplished. This report presents a review of the launch vehicle system flight data.

  18. Viking Lander imaging investigation: Picture catalog of primary mission experiment data record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    All the images returned by the two Viking Landers during the primary phase of the Viking Mission are presented. Listings of supplemental information which described the conditions under which the images were acquired are included together with skyline drawings which show where the images are positioned in the field of view of the cameras. Subsets of the images are listed in a variety of sequences to aid in locating images of interest. The format and organization of the digital magnetic tape storage of the images are described. The mission and the camera system are briefly described.

  19. Titan/Centaur D1TTC-3 Viking B flight data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Titan/Centaur TC-3 was launched from the Eastern Test Range, Complex 41, at 02:34 PM EDT on Tuesday, September 9, 1975. This was the third operational flight of the newest NASA unmanned launch vehicle. The spacecraft was the Viking B, the second of two orbiting and landing missions to Mars planned for the 1975 Martian launch opportunity. The objective of the launch phase of the mission, to inject the Viking spacecraft onto the planned transfer orbit to Mars, was successfully accomplished. A review of the launch vehicle system flight data is presented.

  20. A Study of Variable Features on Mars During the Viking Primary Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Greeley, R.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking coverage revealed numerous wind streaks on the surface of Mars. The Viking images have provided the first good examples of very distinctive mixed tone streaks which appear to consist of a tapered light streak bordered by two dark side lobes. Attention is given to a general lack of eolian activity, eolian activity on the slopes of the Tharsis volcanos, spectacular albedo changes since 1972, more subtle albedo changes, surface detail and wind flow patterns in Hellas, wind flow in the vicinity of Olympus Mons, and a comparison of the 1972 and 1976 wind streak patterns.

  1. Cost effectiveness as applied to the Viking Lander systems-level thermal development test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buna, T.; Shupert, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The economic aspects of thermal testing at the systems-level as applied to the Viking Lander Capsule thermal development program are reviewed. The unique mission profile and pioneering scientific goals of Viking imposed novel requirements on testing, including the development of a simulation technique for the Martian thermal environment. The selected approach included modifications of an existing conventional thermal vacuum facility, and improved test-operational techniques that are applicable to the simulation of the other mission phases as well, thereby contributing significantly to the cost effectiveness of the overall thermal test program.

  2. Quantification of the S-3 Viking Aircraft Service Period Adjustment (ASPA) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    and ZIP Code) 10 SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK .NIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESS:ON NO _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ CI fQUA IC O OFTE -3 VIKING...surface and subsurface threat to the carrier battle group since 1975. The Viking incorporates both acoustic and non-acoustic sensors to enhance its weapon...continues 23 2"’e 3P- LoJ 4 44 tn~ 0. D 04 z 0 UM F- u 4 -J z ~LL) LJLDJ cv- c-p LL24 Lu a working down the left-hand column until the matrix is

  3. SNAP 19 Viking Program. Bimonthly technical progress report, December 1980-January 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-11

    Monitoring of power systems performance data for Pioneer 10 and Pioneer Saturn spacecrafts continued. Net power output for either system during mid-January of 1981 was 112 watts. Power degradation has, for several years, been stable between 4 and 5 watts per year. Viking 1 Lander data acquisition has been resumed following the conclusion of Saturn encounter activities. Figures show the Mars Lander performance history of Viking 1. These data include both the minimum and maximum data for each of the SOL days plotted to show the range of performance experienced on the Martian surface.

  4. The Martian surface as imaged, sampled, and analyzed by the Viking landers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Gooding, J. L.; Moore, H. J.

    1989-02-01

    Data collected by two Viking landers are analyzed. Attention is given to the characteristics of the surface inferred from Lander imaging and meteorology data, physical and magnetic properties experiments, and both inorganic and organic analyses of Martian samples. Viking Lander 1 touched down on Chryse Planitia on July 20, 1976 and continued to operate for 2252 sols, until November 20, 1982. Lander 2 touched down about 6500 km away from Lander 1, on Utopia Planitia on September 3, 1976. The chemical compositions of sediments at the two landing sites are similar, suggesting an aeolian origin. The compositions suggest an iron-rich rock an are matched by various clays and salts.

  5. Geologic history of central Chryse Planitia and the Viking 1 landing site, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Robert A.; Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, Jayne C.

    1993-03-01

    A 1:500,000 scale geologic mapping was undertaken to synthesize the broad-scale geology of Chryse Planitia with the local geology of the Viking 1 landing site. The geology of Mars Transverse Mercators (MTM's) 20047 and 25047 has been presented previously. As part of the goals for the Mars Geologic Mapping program, the rational and scientific objectives for a return mission to Chryse Planitia and the Viking 1 Lander have also been presented. However, in mapping central Chryse Planitia our principle objective was to determine the depositional and erosional history of the Chryse Planitia basin. These results are presented.

  6. Geologic map of the MTM 25047 and 20047 quadrangles, central Chryse Planitia/Viking 1 Lander site, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crumpler, L.S.; Craddock, R.A.; Aubele, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    This map uses Viking Orbiter image data and Viking 1 Lander image data to evaluate the geologic history of a part of Chryse Planitia, Mars. The map area lies at the termini of the Maja and Kasei Valles outwash channels and includes the site of the Viking 1 Lander. The photomosaic base for these quadrangles was assembled from 98 Viking Orbiter frames comprising 1204 pixels per line and 1056 lines and ranging in resolution from 20 to 200 m/pixel. These orbital image data were supplemented with images of the surface as seen from the Viking 1 Lander, one of only three sites on the martian surface where planetary geologic mapping is assisted by ground truth.

  7. The Danish Heart Registry

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Flensted Lassen, Jens; von Kappelgaard, Lene Mia; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Gislason, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Aim The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. Study population All adult (≥15 years) patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. Main variables The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR and WDHR). For each type of procedure, up to 70 variables are registered in the DHR. Since 2010, the data quality protocol encompasses fulfillment of web-based validation rules of daily-submitted records and yearly approval of the data by the EDHR and WDHR. Descriptive data The data collection on procedure has been complete for PCI and surgery since 2000, and for CAG as of 2006. From 2000 to 2014, the number of CAG, PCI, and surgical procedures changed by 231%, 193%, and 99%, respectively. Until the end of 2014, a total of 357,476 CAG, 131,309 PCI, and 60,831 surgical procedures had been performed, corresponding to 249,445, 100,609, and 55,539 first-time patients, respectively. The DHR generally has a high level of completeness (1–missing) of each procedure (>90%) when compared to the National Patient Registry. Variables important for assessing the quality of care have a high level of completeness for surgery since 2000, and for CAG and PCI since 2010. Conclusion The DHR contains valuable data on cardiac invasive procedures, which makes it an important national monitoring and quality system and at the same time serves as a platform for research projects in the cardiovascular field. PMID:27822091

  8. Development of The Viking Speech Scale to classify the speech of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Lindsay; Virella, Daniel; Mjøen, Tone; da Graça Andrada, Maria; Murray, Janice; Colver, Allan; Himmelmann, Kate; Rackauskaite, Gija; Greitane, Andra; Prasauskiene, Audrone; Andersen, Guro; de la Cruz, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Surveillance registers monitor the prevalence of cerebral palsy and the severity of resulting impairments across time and place. The motor disorders of cerebral palsy can affect children's speech production and limit their intelligibility. We describe the development of a scale to classify children's speech performance for use in cerebral palsy surveillance registers, and its reliability across raters and across time. Speech and language therapists, other healthcare professionals and parents classified the speech of 139 children with cerebral palsy (85 boys, 54 girls; mean age 6.03 years, SD 1.09) from observation and previous knowledge of the children. Another group of health professionals rated children's speech from information in their medical notes. With the exception of parents, raters reclassified children's speech at least four weeks after their initial classification. Raters were asked to rate how easy the scale was to use and how well the scale described the child's speech production using Likert scales. Inter-rater reliability was moderate to substantial (k>.58 for all comparisons). Test-retest reliability was substantial to almost perfect for all groups (k>.68). Over 74% of raters found the scale easy or very easy to use; 66% of parents and over 70% of health care professionals judged the scale to describe children's speech well or very well. We conclude that the Viking Speech Scale is a reliable tool to describe the speech performance of children with cerebral palsy, which can be applied through direct observation of children or through case note review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interactions between 5-Lipoxygenase Polymorphisms and Adipose Tissue Contents of Arachidonic and Eicosapentaenoic Acids Do Not Affect Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Middle-Aged Men and Women in a Danish Case-Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Gammelmark, Anders; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Tjønneland, Anne; Schmidt, Erik B; Overvad, Kim; Nielsen, Michael S

    2017-07-01

    Background: The 5-lipoxygenase pathway has been linked to atherothrombotic disease, and a functional tandem repeat polymorphism in the arachidonate lipoxygenase-5 (ALOX-5) gene has been associated with the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Interestingly, 2 studies have reported an interaction between dietary intakes of the ALOX-5 substrates, arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and genotype.Objective: We investigated whether the interactions between the ALOX-5 tandem repeat polymorphism (rs59439148) and adipose tissue AA and EPA were associated with incident MI.Methods: In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, we conducted a case-cohort study including 3089 participants with incident MI identified from national registries and a randomly selected subcohort of 3000 participants. Participants were men and women with a median age of 56 y at baseline and no previous history of cancer. Adipose tissue and blood samples were collected at baseline along with comprehensive questionnaires on lifestyle and demographic data. The ALOX-5 tandem repeat polymorphism was genotyped by multititer plate sequencing. Associations were analyzed by using Cox proportional hazards models.Results: We observed a higher risk of MI for homozygous carriers of the variant alleles in the fifth quintile of AA content than for the reference group with the lowest quintile of AA and carrying the wild-type allele (HR: 3.02; 95% CI: 1.41, 6.44). In contrast, homozygotes for the variant alleles tended to have a higher risk of MI when comparing the lowest quintile of EPA content with the reference group with the highest quintile of EPA and carrying the wild-type allele (HR: 2.15; 95% CI: 0.91, 5.09; P = 0.08). Although our results suggested interactions between the polymorphism and adipose tissue AA and EPA, a quantitative evaluation of interaction by calculating the relative excess risk due to interactions was not significant.Conclusions: Adipose tissue EPA and AA and the ALOX-5

  10. Comparison of transgressive and regressive clastic reservoirs, late Albian Viking Formation, Alberta basin

    SciTech Connect

    Reinson, G.E.

    1996-06-01

    Detailed stratigraphic analysis of hydrocarbon reservoirs from the Basal Colorado upwards through the Viking/Bow Island and Cardium formations indicates that the distributional trends, overall size and geometry, internal heterogeneity, and hydrocarbon productivity of the sand bodies are related directly to a transgressive-regressive (T-R) sequence stratigraphic model. The Viking Formation (equivalent to the Muddy Sandstone of Wyoming) contains examples of both transgressive and regressive reservoirs. Viking reservoirs can be divided into progradational shoreface bars associated with the regressive systems tract, and bar/sheet sands and estuary/channel deposits associated with the transgressive systems tract. Shoreface bars, usually consisting of fine- to medium-grained sandstones, are tens of kilometers long, kilometers in width, and in the order of five to ten meters thick. Transgressive bar and sheet sandstones range from coarse-grained to conglomeratic, and occur in deposits that are tens of kilometers long, several kilometers wide, and from less than one to four meters in thickness. Estuary and valley-fill reservoir sandstones vary from fine-grained to conglomeratic, occur as isolated bodies that have channel-like geometries, and are usually greater than 10 meters thick. From an exploration viewpoint the most prospective reservoir trends in the Viking Formation are those associated with transgressive systems tracts. In particular, bounding discontinuities between T-R systems tracts are the principal sites of the most productive hydrocarbon-bearing sandstones.

  11. Viking radio science data analysis and synthesis. [rotation of Mars, solar system dynamics, and gravitational laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.

    1984-01-01

    The rotational motion of Mars and its geophysical ramifications were investigated. Solar system dynamics and the laws of gravitation were also studied. The planetary ephemeris program, which was the central element in data analysis for this project, is described in brief. Viking Lander data were used in the investigation.

  12. Viking Lander 2's First Picture On The Surface Of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Viking 2 s first picture on the surface of Mars was taken within minutes after the spacecraft touched down on September 3. The scene reveals a wide variety of rocks littering a surface of fine-grained deposit. Boulders in the 10 to 20-centimeter (4 to 8-inch) size range-- some vesicular (holes) and some apparently fluted by wind--are common. Many of the pebbles have tabular or platy shapes, suggesting that they may be derived from layered strata. The fluted boulder just above the Lander s footpad displays a dust-covered or scraped surface, suggesting it was overturned or altered by the foot at touchdown. Just as occurred with Viking l s first picture on July 20, brightness variations at the beginning of the picture scan (left edge) probably are due to dust settling after landing. A substantial amount of fine-grained material kicked up by the descent engines has accumulated in the concave interior of the footpad. Center of the image is about 1.4 meters (5 feet) from the camera. Field of view extends 70 from left to right and 20 from top to bottom. Viking 2 landed at a region called Utopia in the northern latitudes about 7500 kilometers (4600 miles) northeast of Viking l s landing on the Chryse plain 45 days earlier.

  13. Telecommunications and data acquisition systems support for the Viking 1975 mission to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgway, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The background for the Viking Lander Monitor Mission (VLMM) is given, and the technical and operational aspects of the tracking and data acquisition support that the Network was called upon to provide are described. An overview of the science results obtained from the imaging, meteorological, and radio science data is also given. The intensive efforts that were made to recover the mission are described.

  14. Analysis and interpretation of Viking inorganic chemistry data (Mars data analysis program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.

    1982-01-01

    Soil samples gathered by the Viking Lander from the surface of Mars were analyzed. The Martian fines were lower in aluminum, iron, sulfur, and chlorine than typical terrestrial continental soils or lunar mare fines. Sample variabilities were as great within a few meters as between lander locations (4500 km apart) implying the existence of a universal Martian regolith component of constant average composition.

  15. Free-Flight Test Results of Scale Models Simulating Viking Parachute/Lander Staging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, Robert J.

    1973-01-01

    This report presents the results of Viking Aerothermodynamics Test D4-34.0. Motion picture coverage of a number of Scale model drop tests provides the data from which time-position characteristics as well as canopy shape and model system attitudes are measured. These data are processed to obtain the instantaneous drag during staging of a model simulating the Viking decelerator system during parachute staging at Mars. Through scaling laws derived prior to test (Appendix A and B) these results are used to predict such performance of the Viking decelerator parachute during staging at Mars. The tests were performed at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vertical Assembly Building (VAB). Model assemblies were dropped 300 feet to a platform in High Bay No. 3. The data consist of an edited master film (negative) which is on permanent file in the NASA/LRC Library. Principal results of this investigation indicate that for Viking parachute staging at Mars: 1. Parachute staging separation distance is always positive and continuously increasing generally along the descent path. 2. At staging, the parachute drag coefficient is at least 55% of its prestage equilibrium value. One quarter minute later, it has recovered to its pre-stage value.

  16. Imaging asteroids: Some lessons learned from the Viking investigation of Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.

    1978-01-01

    Specific experiences from the study of Phobos and Deimos during the Viking mission are used to formulate three basic goals for imaging studies of asteroids. These are: (1) the highest possible resolution; (2) complete coverage of the surface; and (3) data over a wide range of phase angles.

  17. Analysis of the Viking Lander 1 surface wind vector for sols 45 to 375

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leovy, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    The Viking Lander 1 wind sensor data during the period between sols 45 and 375 were corrected. During this period, the heating element of the quadrant sensor which provided the primary signal used for determining wind direction had failed, but both hot film wind sensors were functioning normally. The wind speed and direction corrections are explained.

  18. Viking Lander 2's First Picture On The Surface Of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Viking 2 s first picture on the surface of Mars was taken within minutes after the spacecraft touched down on September 3. The scene reveals a wide variety of rocks littering a surface of fine-grained deposit. Boulders in the 10 to 20-centimeter (4 to 8-inch) size range-- some vesicular (holes) and some apparently fluted by wind--are common. Many of the pebbles have tabular or platy shapes, suggesting that they may be derived from layered strata. The fluted boulder just above the Lander s footpad displays a dust-covered or scraped surface, suggesting it was overturned or altered by the foot at touchdown. Just as occurred with Viking l s first picture on July 20, brightness variations at the beginning of the picture scan (left edge) probably are due to dust settling after landing. A substantial amount of fine-grained material kicked up by the descent engines has accumulated in the concave interior of the footpad. Center of the image is about 1.4 meters (5 feet) from the camera. Field of view extends 70 from left to right and 20 from top to bottom. Viking 2 landed at a region called Utopia in the northern latitudes about 7500 kilometers (4600 miles) northeast of Viking l s landing on the Chryse plain 45 days earlier.

  19. Viking and STP P78-2 electrostatic charging designs and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. O., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The design provisions of the Viking and the P78-2 (SCATHA) vehicles and a mathematical analysis of the effect of arcing on typical interface circuits are given. Results of verification testing of the analysis are presented as well as vehicle testing for tolerance to arcing.

  20. Intake of macro- and micronutrients in Danish vegans.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Nadja B; Madsen, Mia L; Hansen, Tue H; Allin, Kristine H; Hoppe, Camilla; Fagt, Sisse; Lausten, Mia S; Gøbel, Rikke J; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf

    2015-10-30

    Since information about macro- and micronutrient intake among vegans is limited we aimed to determine and evaluate their dietary and supplementary intake. Seventy 18-61 years old Danish vegans completed a four-day weighed food record from which their daily intake of macro- and micronutrients was assessed and subsequently compared to an age-range-matched group of 1,257 omnivorous individuals from the general Danish population. Moreover, the vegan dietary and supplementary intake was compared to the 2012 Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR). Dietary intake differed significantly between vegans and the general Danish population in all measured macro- and micronutrients (p < 0.05), except for energy intake among women and intake of carbohydrates among men. For vegans the intake of macro- and micronutrients (including supplements) did not reach the NNR for protein, vitamin D, iodine and selenium. Among vegan women vitamin A intake also failed to reach the recommendations. With reference to the NNR, the dietary content of added sugar, sodium and fatty acids, including the ratio of PUFA to SFA, was more favorable among vegans. At the macronutrient level, the diet of Danish vegans is in better accordance with the NNR than the diet of the general Danish population. At the micronutrient level, considering both diet and supplements, the vegan diet falls short in certain nutrients, suggesting a need for greater attention toward ensuring recommended daily intake of specific vitamins and minerals.

  1. Cumulative risks of foster care placement for Danish children.

    PubMed

    Fallesen, Peter; Emanuel, Natalia; Wildeman, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Although recent research suggests that the cumulative risk of foster care placement is far higher for American children than originally suspected, little is known about the cumulative risk of foster care placement in other countries, which makes it difficult to gauge the degree to which factor foster care placement is salient in other contexts. In this article, we provide companion estimates to those provided in recent work on the US by using Danish registry data and synthetic cohort life tables to show how high and unequally distributed the cumulative risk of foster care placement is for Danish children. Results suggest that at the beginning of the study period (in 1998) the cumulative risk of foster care placement for Danish children was roughly in line with the risk for American children. Yet, by the end of the study period (2010), the risk had declined to half the risk for American children. Our results also show some variations by parental ethnicity and sex, but these differences are small. Indeed, they appear quite muted relative to racial/ethnic differences in these risks in the United States. Last, though cumulative risks are similar between Danish and American children (especially at the beginning of the study period), the age-specific risk profiles are markedly different, with higher risks for older Danish children than for older American children.

  2. Cumulative Risks of Foster Care Placement for Danish Children

    PubMed Central

    Fallesen, Peter; Emanuel, Natalia; Wildeman, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Although recent research suggests that the cumulative risk of foster care placement is far higher for American children than originally suspected, little is known about the cumulative risk of foster care placement in other countries, which makes it difficult to gauge the degree to which factor foster care placement is salient in other contexts. In this article, we provide companion estimates to those provided in recent work on the US by using Danish registry data and synthetic cohort life tables to show how high and unequally distributed the cumulative risk of foster care placement is for Danish children. Results suggest that at the beginning of the study period (in 1998) the cumulative risk of foster care placement for Danish children was roughly in line with the risk for American children. Yet, by the end of the study period (2010), the risk had declined to half the risk for American children. Our results also show some variations by parental ethnicity and sex, but these differences are small. Indeed, they appear quite muted relative to racial/ethnic differences in these risks in the United States. Last, though cumulative risks are similar between Danish and American children (especially at the beginning of the study period), the age-specific risk profiles are markedly different, with higher risks for older Danish children than for older American children. PMID:25299657

  3. Evidence that the Cys282Tyr mutation of the HFE gene originated from a population in Southern Scandinavia and spread with the Vikings.

    PubMed

    Milman, N; Pedersen, P

    2003-07-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis has been recognized as a clinical disorder for more than 100 years. The common form of the disorder is caused by the Cys282Tyr mutation (C282Y) of the HFE gene. Hereditary hemochromatosis affects predominantly people of Northern European origin. The C282Y mutation probably occurred on a single chromosome carrying the ancestral hemochromatosis haplotype, which subsequently was spread by emigration and the founder effect. It has been estimated that the C282Y mutation appeared 60-70 generations ago. It was initially suggested that the ancestral C282Y mutation occurred within the Celtic group of peoples. However, we hypothesize that the distribution of the C282Y mutation in Europe is more consistent with an origin among the Germanic Iron Age population in Southern Scandinavia. From this area, the mutation could later be spread by the migratory activities of the Vikings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the validity of these two hypotheses. Several arguments are in favor of the 'Viking hypothesis': first, the highest frequencies (5.1-9.7%) of the C282Y mutation are observed in populations in the Northern part of Europe, i.e. Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Faeroe Islands, Iceland, Eastern part of England (Danelaw) and the Dublin area, all Viking homelands and settlements. Second, the highest allele frequencies are reported among populations living along the coastlines. Third, the frequencies of the C282Y mutation decline from Northern to Southern Europe. Intermediate allele frequencies (3.1-4.8%) are seen in the populations in Central Europe, which is the original Celtic homeland. Low allele frequencies (0-3.1%) are recognized in populations in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean.

  4. Reanalysis of the Viking results suggests perchlorate and organics at midlatitudes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Vargas, Edgar; de la Rosa, José; Raga, Alejandro C.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2010-12-01

    The most comprehensive search for organics in the Martian soil was performed by the Viking Landers. Martian soil was subjected to a thermal volatilization process to vaporize and break organic molecules, and the resultant gases and volatiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Only water at 0.1-1.0 wt% was detected, with traces of chloromethane at 15 ppb, at Viking landing site 1, and water at 0.05-1.0 wt% and carbon dioxide at 50-700 ppm, with traces of dichloromethane at 0.04-40 ppb, at Viking landing site 2. These chlorohydrocarbons were considered to be terrestrial contaminants, although they had not been detected at those levels in the blank runs. Recently, perchlorate was discovered in the Martian Arctic soil by the Phoenix Lander. Here we show that when Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert containing 32 ± 6 ppm of organic carbon are mixed with 1 wt% magnesium perchlorate and heated, nearly all the organics present are decomposed to water and carbon dioxide, but a small amount is chlorinated, forming 1.6 ppm of chloromethane and 0.02 ppm of dichloromethane at 500°C. A chemical kinetics model was developed to predict the degree of oxidation and chlorination of organics in the Viking oven. Reinterpretation of the Viking results therefore suggests ≤0.1% perchlorate and 1.5-6.5 ppm organic carbon at landing site 1 and ≤0.1% perchlorate and 0.7-2.6 ppm organic carbon at landing site 2. The detection of organics on Mars is important to assess locations for future experiments to detect life itself.

  5. Subjectless sentences in child Danish.

    PubMed

    Hamann, C; Plunkett, K

    1998-11-01

    Three alternative accounts of subject omission, pragmatic, processing and grammatical, are considered from the perspective of child Danish. Longitudinal data for two Danish children are analyzed for subject omission, finite and infinitival verb usage and discourse anchorage of sentence subjects (overt and missing). The data exhibit a well-defined phase of subject omission which coincides with a well-defined phase of infinitival verbal utterances. No evidence is found for input driven accounts of subject omission. Danish adults rarely omit subjects from utterance initial position. Neither is there any evidence to support the claim that omitted subjects are anchored in previous discourse. Evidence supporting a processing constraint explanation of missing subjects is equivocal. The pattern of subject omission, infinitival usage and third person pronoun and past tense usage points to a grammatical explanation of the phenomenon. However, current grammatical accounts have difficulty accommodating several aspects of the data reported. Contrary to structure building theories, the Danish children do not exhibit a phase of development where only uninflected verb forms are used. Danish children also omit subjects from finite utterances. Furthermore, the decline of subject omissions in finite utterances coincides with decline in usage of infinitival utterances. These findings challenge tense-based accounts of children's subject omission. Finally, Danish children exhibit an asymmetry in subject omission according to verb type; subjects are omitted from main verb utterances more frequently than from copula utterances. Given the language typology associated with Danish, this asymmetry is difficult to accommodate within truncation and tense or number-based accounts of subject omission. We suggest that a proper treatment of child subject omission will involve an integration of grammatical and discourse-based approaches.

  6. Danish Urogynaecological Database

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ulla Darling; Gradel, Kim Oren; Larsen, Michael Due

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Urogynaecological Database is established in order to ensure high quality of treatment for patients undergoing urogynecological surgery. The database contains details of all women in Denmark undergoing incontinence surgery or pelvic organ prolapse surgery amounting to ~5,200 procedures per year. The variables are collected along the course of treatment of the patient from the referral to a postoperative control. Main variables are prior obstetrical and gynecological history, symptoms, symptom-related quality of life, objective urogynecological findings, type of operation, complications if relevant, implants used if relevant, 3–6-month postoperative recording of symptoms, if any. A set of clinical quality indicators is being maintained by the steering committee for the database and is published in an annual report which also contains extensive descriptive statistics. The database has a completeness of over 90% of all urogynecological surgeries performed in Denmark. Some of the main variables have been validated using medical records as gold standard. The positive predictive value was above 90%. The data are used as a quality monitoring tool by the hospitals and in a number of scientific studies of specific urogynecological topics, broader epidemiological topics, and the use of patient reported outcome measures. PMID:27826217

  7. Tracking and data system support for the Viking 1975 mission to Mars. Volume 1: Prelaunch planning, implementation, and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgway, D. J.; Traxler, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tracking and data acquisition support for the 1975 Viking Missions to Mars is described. The history of the effort from its inception in late 1968 through the launches of Vikings 1 and 2 from Cape Kennedy in August and September 1975 is given. The Viking mission requirements for tracking and data acquisition support in both the near earth and deep space phases involved multiple radar tracking and telemetry stations, and communications networks together with the global network of tracking stations, communications, and control center. The planning, implementation, testing and management of the program are presented.

  8. Danish Palliative Care Database

    PubMed Central

    Groenvold, Mogens; Adsersen, Mathilde; Hansen, Maiken Bang

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD) is to monitor, evaluate, and improve the clinical quality of specialized palliative care (SPC) (ie, the activity of hospital-based palliative care teams/departments and hospices) in Denmark. Study population The study population is all patients in Denmark referred to and/or in contact with SPC after January 1, 2010. Main variables The main variables in DPD are data about referral for patients admitted and not admitted to SPC, type of the first SPC contact, clinical and sociodemographic factors, multidisciplinary conference, and the patient-reported European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care questionnaire, assessing health-related quality of life. The data support the estimation of currently five quality of care indicators, ie, the proportions of 1) referred and eligible patients who were actually admitted to SPC, 2) patients who waited <10 days before admission to SPC, 3) patients who died from cancer and who obtained contact with SPC, 4) patients who were screened with European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care at admission to SPC, and 5) patients who were discussed at a multidisciplinary conference. Descriptive data In 2014, all 43 SPC units in Denmark reported their data to DPD, and all 9,434 cancer patients (100%) referred to SPC were registered in DPD. In total, 41,104 unique cancer patients were registered in DPD during the 5 years 2010–2014. Of those registered, 96% had cancer. Conclusion DPD is a national clinical quality database for SPC having clinically relevant variables and high data and patient completeness. PMID:27822111

  9. Screening for celiac disease in Danish adults.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Anna; Skaaby, Tea; Kårhus, Line Lund; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Torben; Rumessen, Jüri J; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry is ∼50/100,000 persons. This is much lower than the reported prevalence of CD in other Nordic countries and underdiagnosis is suspected. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of CD in a population-based study of Danish adults. A total of 2297 adults aged 24-76 years living in the southwestern part of Copenhagen were screened for CD by immunoglobulin (Ig)A and IgG antibodies to transglutaminases and deamidated gliadin. IgA/IgG-positive participants were invited to a clinical evaluation, including biopsies, by a gastroenterologist. Of the invited 56 participants, 40 underwent a full clinical evaluation and 8 persons were diagnosed with CD; 2 of the 16 persons, who did not complete the clinical evaluation, were considered by experts to have probable CD. None of the above 56 participants had a known history of CD or a recorded diagnosis of CD in National Patient Registry. By combining cases of biopsy-proven CD (n = 8), probable CD (n = 2), and registry-recorded CD (n = 1), the prevalence of CD was estimated to be 479/100,000 (11/2297) persons (95% CI: 197-761). In this general adult population, the prevalence of CD as estimated by screening and clinical evaluation was 10 times higher than the registry-based prevalence of CD. Of 11 participants diagnosed with CD in our screening study, 10 were unaware of the diagnosis prior to the study. Thus, our study suggests that CD is markedly underdiagnosed in Danish adults.

  10. Correspondence and Least Squares Analyses of Soil and Rock Compositions for the Viking Lander 1 and Pathfinder Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, K. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Clark, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    Correspondence and Least Squares Mixing Analysis techniques are applied to the chemical composition of Viking 1 soils and Pathfinder rocks and soils. Implications for the parent composition of local and global materials are discussed.

  11. Correspondence and Least Squares Analyses of Soil and Rock Compositions for the Viking Lander 1 and Pathfinder Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, K. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Clark, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    Correspondence and Least Squares Mixing Analysis techniques are applied to the chemical composition of Viking 1 soils and Pathfinder rocks and soils. Implications for the parent composition of local and global materials are discussed.

  12. Diurnal variations of the Martian surface layer meteorological parameters during the first 45 sols at two Viking Lander sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. L.; Leovy, C. B.; Tillman, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Wind speed, ambient and surface temperatures from both Viking Landers have been used to compute bulk Richardson numbers and Monin-Obukhov lengths during the earliest phase of the Mars missions. These parameters are used to estimate drag and heat transfer coefficients, friction velocities and surface heat fluxes at the two sites. The principal uncertainty is in the specification of the roughness length. Maximum heat fluxes occur near local noon at both sites, and are estimated to be in the range 15-20 W/sq m at the Viking 1 site and 10-15 W/sq m at the Viking 2 site. Maximum values of friction velocity occur in late morning at Viking 1 and are estimated to be 0.4-0.6 m/s. They occur shortly after dawn at the Viking 2 site where peak values are estimated to be in the range 0.25-0.35 m/s. Extension of these calculations to later times during the mission will require allowance for dust opacity effects in the estimation of surface temperature and in the correction of radiation errors of the Viking 2 temperature sensor.

  13. Development of biological and nonbiological explanations for the Viking label release data. [hydrogen peroxide theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The plausibility that hydrogen peroxide, widely distributed within the Mars surface material, was responsible for the evocative response obtained by the Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment on Mars was investigated. Although a mixture of gamma Fe2O3 and silica sand stimulated the LR nutrient reaction with hydrogen peroxide and reduced the rate of hydrogen decomposition under various storage conditions, the Mars analog soil prepared by the Viking Inorganic Analysis Team to match the Mars analytical data does not cause such effects. Nor is adequate resistance to UV irradiation shown. On the basis of the results and consideration presented while the hydrogen peroxide theory remains the most, if not only, attractive chemical explanation of the LR data, it remains unconvincing on critical points. Until problems concerning the formation and stabilization of hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Mars can be overcome, adhere to the scientific evidence requires serious consideration of the biological theory.

  14. SNAP 19 Viking Program. Bimonthly technical progress report, June-July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation of Viking Lander 1 power system data continued. The RTG series power range as measured at the PCDA was 64 to 66 watts at finroot temperatures between 270/sup 0/F and 310/sup 0/F. Figures show the Mars Lander performance history of Viking 1. These data include both the minimum and maximum data for each of the SOL days plotted to show the range of performance experienced on the Martian surface. Power system performance data for Pioneer 10 and Pioneer Saturn (initially designated Pioneer 11) were monitored through the reporting period and are shown. After adjusting for the telemetry characteristics, the estimated RTG system net power was 114 watts for both, Pioneer 10 and Pioneer Saturn.

  15. Viking gas exchange reaction - Simulation on UV-irradiated manganese dioxide substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, T. R.; Holland, H. D.; Ceasar, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    The exchange of O2 for H2O, analogous to that recorded on Mars by the Viking GEX experiment, has been observed on humidifying powdered beta-MnO2 (pyrolusite) which had been irradiated by UV in a humidified analog of the Martian atmosphere. Pyrolusite irradiated in a dry atmosphere did not release O2 on humidification. The XPS spectra of Mn and O of the reactive pyrolusite were shifted toward higher binding energies during UV irradiation. These shifts are consistent with the creation of a surface layer of a Mn(V) or Mn(VI) compound. The destruction of such a layer on humidification could account for the observed O2 release. Although manganese has not been identified in the Martian regolith, the upper limit of the Mn concentration is sufficiently high that O2 release from pyrolusite could have been responsible for the results of the Viking GEX experiment.

  16. LS-44: An improved deep space network station location set for Viking navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koble, H. M.; Pease, G. E.; Yip, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Improved estimates for the spin axis and longitude components of the Deep Space Network station locations were obtained from post-flight processing of radio metric data received from various Mariner planetary missions. The use of an upgraded set of ionospheric calibrations and the incorporation of near-Venus and near-Mercury radio metric data from the Mariner 10 spacecraft are the principal contributing effects to the improvement. These new estimates, designated Location Set (LS) 44, have supported Viking navigation activities in the vicinity of Mars. As such, the station locations were determined relative to the planetary positions inherent in JPL Development Ephemeris (DE) 84, which was used throughout the Viking mission. The article also presents and discusses a version of LS 44 based upon the latest planetary ephemeris, DE 96.

  17. Inorganic chemical investigation by X-ray fluorescence analysis - The Viking Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toulmin, P., III; Rose, H. J., Jr.; Baird, A. K.; Clark, B. C.; Keil, K.

    1973-01-01

    The inorganic chemical investigation experiment added in August 1972 to the Viking Lander scientific package uses an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in which four sealed, gas-filled proportional counters detect X-rays emitted from samples of the Martian surface materials irradiated by X-rays from radioisotope sources (Fe-55 and Cd-109). The instrument is inside the Lander body, and samples are to be delivered to it by the Viking Lander Surface Sampler. Instrument design is described along with details of the data processing and analysis procedures. The results of the investigation will characterize the surface materials of Mars as to elemental composition with accuracies ranging from a few tens of parts per million (at the trace-element level) to a few per cent (for major elements) depending on the element in question.

  18. LS-44: An improved deep space network station location set for Viking navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koble, H. M.; Pease, G. E.; Yip, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Improved estimates for the spin axis and longitude components of the Deep Space Network station locations were obtained from post-flight processing of radio metric data received from various Mariner planetary missions. The use of an upgraded set of ionospheric calibrations and the incorporation of near-Venus and near-Mercury radio metric data from the Mariner 10 spacecraft are the principal contributing effects to the improvement. These new estimates, designated Location Set (LS) 44, have supported Viking navigation activities in the vicinity of Mars. As such, the station locations were determined relative to the planetary positions inherent in JPL Development Ephemeris (DE) 84, which was used throughout the Viking mission. The article also presents and discusses a version of LS 44 based upon the latest planetary ephemeris, DE 96.

  19. The effect of ring distortions on buckling of blunt conical shells. [Viking mission aeroshell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, W. L., Jr.; Anderson, M. S.; Stephens, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    A rigorous analytical study of cones stiffened by many thin-gage, open-section rings is presented. The results are compared with data previously obtained from uniform pressure tests of the Viking mission flight aeroshell and of the Viking structural prototype aeroshells. A conventional analysis, in which the rings are modeled as discrete rigid cross sections, is shown to lead to large, unconservative strength predictions. A more sophisticated technique of modeling the rings as shell branches leads to much more realistic strength predictions and more accurately predicts the failure modes. It is also shown that if a small initial imperfection proportional to the shape of the buckling mode is assumed, the critical buckling modes from analysis and test are in agreement. However, the reduction in buckling strength from the perfect-shell predictions is small.

  20. EISCAT observation on plasma drifts connected with the Aureld-VIP rocket and the Viking satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Pellinen-Wannberg, A.; Sandahl, I.; Wannberg, G. ); Opgenoorth, H. ); Soeraas, F. ); Murphree, J.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Coordinated simultaneous measurements with the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar, Aureld-VIP sounding rocket, and Viking satellite are described. Background measurements from EISCAT provide us with the development of global plasma convection during the rocket night. The observed convection pattern is very distorted, with the eveningside reversal occurring at unusually low latitudes. On the morningside it withdraws back poleward from the measurement area. Viking particle measurements over the oval indicate a very complicated auroral topology with two sectors of boundary plasma sheet (BPS) and central plasma sheet (CPS) particles. The situation is interpreted as an intrusion of the evening side BPS into the morningside, which is also consistent with the convection pattern measured by EISCAT. Local measurements with the sounding rocket and radar indicate that the rocket flew in the northern part of the evening BPS area, approaching the inner transition region from BPS to CPS in its northward motion, thus confirming the existence of such a boundary.

  1. The prime meridian of Mars and the longitudes of the Viking landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    A planetwide control net of Mars has been computed by a single large-block analytical triangulation derived from 17,224 measurements of 3,037 control points on 928 Mariner 9 pictures. The computation incorporated the Viking-determined direction of the spin axis and rotation rate of Mars. The angle measured from the vernal equinox to the prime meridian (areocentric right ascension) of Mars was determined to be 148.368 deg + 350.891986 deg (JD - 2433282.5), where JD refers to the Julian date. The prime meridian of Mars passes through the center of the small crater Airy-O. The longitudes of the Viking landers are 47.82 + or - 0.1 deg for Lander 1 and 225.59 + or - 0.1 deg for Lander 2.

  2. Photogrammetric analysis of horizon panoramas: The Pathfinder landing site in Viking orbiter images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberst, J.; Jaumann, R.; Zeitler, W.; Hauber, E.; Kuschel, M.; Parker, T.; Golombek, M.; Malin, M.; Soderblom, L.

    1999-01-01

    Tiepoint measurements, block adjustment techniques, and sunrise/sunset pictures were used to obtain precise pointing data with respect to north for a set of 33 IMP horizon images. Azimuth angles for five prominent topographic features seen at the horizon were measured and correlated with locations of these features in Viking orbiter images. Based on this analysis, the Pathfinder line/sample coordinates in two raw Viking images were determined with approximate errors of 1 pixel, or 40 m. Identification of the Pathfinder location in orbit imagery yields geological context for surface studies of the landing site. Furthermore, the precise determination of coordinates in images together with the known planet-fixed coordinates of the lander make the Pathfinder landing site the most important anchor point in current control point networks of Mars. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Specification and correlation of the sine vibration environment for Viking '75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, R. E.; Trummel, M.; Wada, B. K.; Pohlen, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Two Viking spacecraft will be individually launched on a new Titan IIIE/Centaur D-1T launch vehicle in August 1975. The method for the establishment of spacecraft sine vibration test levels prior to availability of any Titan IIIE/Centaur D-1T flight data by use of both computer simulations and data from previous Titan and Atlas Centaur vehicles is described. The specification level is compared with actual flight data obtained from a proof flight launch of the Titan IIIE/Centaur D-1T and a Viking dynamic simulator in January 1974. An objective of the proof flight launch was to obtain estimates of the flight loads and environments. The criteria used to minimize the structural weight that would result from an unmodified application of a sine test environment are described.

  4. Viking lander location and spin axis of Mars - Determination from radio tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Tolson, R. H.; Mayo, A. P.; Blackshear, W. T.; Kelly, G. M.; Cain, D. L.; Brenkle, J. P.; Shapiro, I. I.; Reasenberg, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Radio tracking data from the Viking lander have been used to determine the lander position and the orientation of the spin axis of Mars. The areocentric coordinates of the lander are 22.27 deg N, 48.00 deg W, and 3389.5 kilometers from the center of mass; the spin axis orientation, referred to earth's mean equator and equinox of 1950.0, is 317.35 deg right ascension and 52.71 deg declination.

  5. Rock Abrasion on Mars: Clues from the Pathfinder and Viking Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Parker, T. J.; Kramer, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    A significant discovery of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) mission was that many rocks exhibit characteristics of ventifacts, rocks that have been sculpted by saltating particles. Diagnostic features identifying the rocks as ventifacts am elongated pits, flutes, and grooves (collectively referred to as "flutes" unless noted otherwise). Faceted rocks or rock portions, circular pits, rills, and possibly polished rock surfaces are also seen and could be due, to aeolian abrasion. Many of these features were initially identified in rover images, where spatial resolution generally exceeded that of the IMP (Imager for Mars Pathfinder) camera. These images had two major limitations: 1) Only a limited number of rocks were viewed by the rover, biasing flute statistics; and 2) The higher resolution obtained by the rover images and the lack of such pictures at the Viking landing sites hampered comparisons of rock morphologies between the Pathfinder and Viking sites. To avoid this problem, rock morphology and ventifact statistics have been examined using new "super-resolution" IMP and Viking Lander images. Analyses of these images show that: 1) Flutes are seen on about 50% or more of the rocks in the near field at the MPF site; 2) The orientation of these flutes is similar to that for flutes identified in rover images; and 3) Ventifacts are significantly more abundant at the Pathfinder landing site than at the two Viking Landing sites, where rocks have undergone only a limited amount of aeolian abrasion. This is most likely due to the ruggedness of the Pathfinder site and a greater supply of abrading particles available shortly after the Arcs and Tiu Valles outflow channel floods.

  6. Viking lander location and spin axis of Mars: determination from radio tracking data.

    PubMed

    Michael, W H; Tolson, R H; Mayo, A P; Blackshear, W T; Kelly, G M; Cain, D L; Brenkle, J P; Shapiro, I I; Reasenberg, R D

    1976-08-27

    Radio tracking data from the Viking lander have been used to determine the lander position and the orientation of the spin axis of Mars. The areocentric coordinates of the lander are 22.27 degrees N, 48.00 degrees W, and 3389.5 kilometers from the center of mass; the spin axis orientation, referred to Earth's mean equator and equinox of 1950.0, is 317.35 degrees right ascension and 52.71 degrees declination.

  7. Interannual, seasonal and diurnal Mars surface environmental cycles observed from Viking to Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, German; Vicente-Retortillo, Álvaro; Kemppinen, Osku; Fischer, Erik; Fairen, Alberto G.; Guzewich, Scott David; Haberle, Robert; Lemmon, Mark T.; Newman, Claire E.; Renno, Nilton O.; Richardson, Mark I.; Smith, Michael D.; De la Torre, Manuel; Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    2016-10-01

    We analyze in-situ environmental data from the Viking landers to the Curiosity rover to estimate atmospheric pressure, near-surface air and ground temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and dust opacity with the highest confidence possible. We study the interannual, seasonal and diurnal variability of these quantities at the various landing sites over a span of more than twenty Martian years to characterize the climate on Mars and its variability. Additionally, we characterize the radiative environment at the various landing sites by estimating the daily UV irradiation (also called insolation and defined as the total amount of solar UV energy received on flat surface during one sol) and by analyzing its interannual and seasonal variability.In this study we use measurements conducted by the Viking Meteorology Instrument System (VMIS) and Viking lander camera onboard the Viking landers (VL); the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology (ASIMET) package and the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) onboard the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander; the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) and Pancam instruments onboard the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER); the Meteorological Station (MET), Thermal Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) and Phoenix Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) onboard the Phoenix (PHX) lander; and the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) and Mastcam instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover.A thorough analysis of in-situ environmental data from past and present missions is important to aid in the selection of the Mars 2020 landing site. We plan to extend our analysis of Mars surface environmental cycles by using upcoming data from the Temperature and Wind sensors (TWINS) instrument onboard the InSight mission and the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA) instrument onboard the Mars 2020 mission.

  8. Cubic spline reflectance estimates using the Viking lander camera multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Huck, F. O.

    1976-01-01

    A technique was formulated for constructing spectral reflectance estimates from multispectral data obtained with the Viking lander cameras. The output of each channel was expressed as a linear function of the unknown spectral reflectance producing a set of linear equations which were used to determine the coefficients in a representation of the spectral reflectance estimate as a natural cubic spline. The technique was used to produce spectral reflectance estimates for a variety of actual and hypothetical spectral reflectances.

  9. A Model for Lower Hybrid Wave Excitation Compared with Observations by Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of lower hybrid wave (LHW) excitation due to the O+ relative drift in a plasma subjected to low-frequency waves (LFWs) is used for analysis of Viking satellite data for events in the cusp/cleft region. In some cases, such a mechanism leads to LHW energy densities and ion distribution functions close to those observed, suggesting the proposed mechanism is a plausible candidate to explain certain classes of LHW generation events in space plasmas.

  10. Inorganic chemical investigation by x-ray fluorescence analysis: The Viking Mars Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toulmin, P.; Baird, A.K.; Clark, B. C.; Keil, Klaus; Rose, H.J.

    1973-01-01

    The inorganic chemical investigation added in August 1972 to the Viking Lander scientific package will utilize an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in which four sealed, gas-filled proportional counters will detect X-rays emitted from samples of the Martian surface materials irradiated by X-rays from radioisotope sources (55Fe and 109Cd). The output of the proportional counters will be subjected to pulse-height analysis by an on-board step-scanning single-channel analyzer with adjustable counting periods. The data will be returned to Earth, via the Viking Orbiter relay system, and the spectra constructed, calibrated, and interpreted here. The instrument is inside the Lander body, and samples are to be delivered to it by the Viking Lander Surface Sampler. Calibration standards are an integral part of the instrument. The results of the investigation will characterize the surface materials of Mars as to elemental composition with accuracies ranging from a few tens of parts per million (at the trace-element level) to a few percent (for major elements) depending on the element in question. Elements of atomic number 11 or less are determined only as a group, though useful estimates of their individual abundances maybe achieved by indirect means. The expected radiation environment will not seriously hamper the measurements. Based on the results, inferences can be drawn regarding (1) the surface mineralogy and lithology; (2) the nature of weathering processes, past and present, and the question of equilibrium between the atmosphere and the surface; and (3) the extent and type of differentiation that the planet has undergone. The Inorganic Chemical Investigation supports and is supported by most other Viking Science investigations. ?? 1973.

  11. Why did Danish women's life expectancy stagnate? The influence of interwar generations' smoking behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Oeppen, Jim; Rizzi, Silvia; Möller, Sören; Zarulli, Virginia; Christensen, Kaare; Vaupel, James W

    2016-12-01

    The general health status of a population changes over time, generally in a positive direction. Some generations experience more unfavourable conditions than others. The health of Danish women in the interwar generations is an example of such a phenomenon. The stagnation in their life expectancy between 1977 and 1995 is thought to be related to their smoking behaviour. So far, no study has measured the absolute effect of smoking on the mortality of the interwar generations of Danish women and thus the stagnation in Danish women's life expectancy. We applied a method to estimate age-specific smoking-attributable number of deaths to examine the effect of smoking on the trends in partial life expectancy of Danish women between age 50 and 85 from 1950 to 2012. We compared these trends to those for women in Sweden, where there was no similar stagnation in life expectancy. When smoking-attributable mortality was excluded, the gap in partial life expectancy at age 50 between Swedish and Danish women diminished substantially. The effect was most pronounced in the interwar generations. The major reason for the stagnation in Danish women's partial life expectancy at age 50 was found to be smoking-related mortality in the interwar generations.

  12. SNAP 19 Viking Program. Bimonthly technical progress report, February 1980-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Viking 1 Lander power system data has not been available during this reporting period, but summary reports indicate no anomalies in performance. Monitoring and evaluation of Viking 2 Lander power system data continued. Temperature data were similar to those 23 months ago, but combined RTG output power was down by 7 watts from the 75 watts recorded in February of 1978. On February 7, 1980, during a scheduled relay transmission the Lander 2 battery voltage dropped below 26.5 volts. With the orbiter attitude control gas supply nearly depleted and the space network stations required for Voyager encounter with Saturn later this year, the final relay from Viking Lander 2 had been scheduled to take place on April 11. The attempt was made but no data were received. Power system performance data for Pioneer 10 and Pioneer Saturn (initially designated Pioneer 11) were monitored. The estimated RTG system net power was 115 watts for both, Pioneer 10 and Pioneer Saturn. The telemetry signal quality from Pioneer Saturn remains excellent. Pioneer 10, for the first time, shows a loss of signal strength.

  13. Structure of Mars' Atmosphere up to 100 Kilometers from the Entry Measurements of Viking 2.

    PubMed

    Seiff, A; Kirk, D B

    1976-12-11

    The Viking 2 entry science data on the structure of Mars' atmosphere up to 100 kilometers define a morning atmosphere with an isothermal region near the surface; a surface pressure 10 percent greater than that recorded simultaneously at the Viking 1 site, which implies a landing site elevation lower by 2.7 kilometers than the reference ellipsoid; and a thermal structure to 100 kilometers at least qualitatively consistent with pre-Viking modeling of thermal tides. The temperature profile exhibits waves whose amplitude grows with altitude, to approximately 25 degrees K at 90 kilometers. These waves are believed to be a consequence of layered vertical oscillations and associated heating and cooling by compression and expansion, excited by the daily thermal cycling of the planet surface. As is necessary for gravity wave propagation, the atmosphere is stable against convection, except possibly in some very local regions. Temperature is everywhere appreciably above the carbon dioxide condensation boundary at both landing sites, precluding the occurrence of carbon dioxide hazes in northern summer at latitudes to at least 50 degrees N. Thus, ground level mists seen in these latitudes would appear to be condensed water vapor.

  14. [Efficacy of dolutegravir in treatment-experienced patients: the SAILING and VIKING trials].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Santiago; Berenguer, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Dolutegravir is an HIV integrase inhibitor with a high genetic barrier to resistance and is active against raltegravir- and/or elvitegravir-resistant strains. The clinical development of dolutegravir for HIV infection rescue therapy is based on 3 clinical trials. In the SAILING trial, dolutegravir (5 mg once daily) in combination with 2 other antiretroviral agents was well tolerated and showed greater virological effect than raltegravir (400 mg twice daily) in the treatment of integrase inhibitor-naïve adults with virological failure infected with HIV strains with at least two-class drug resistance. The VIKING studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy of dolutegravir as rescue therapy in treatment-experienced patients infected with HIV strains with resistance mutations to raltegravir and/or elvitegravir. VIKING-1-2 was a dose-ranging phase IIb trial. VIKING-3 was a phase III trial in which dolutegravir (50 mg twice daily) formed part of an optimized regimen and proved safe and effective in this difficult-to-treat group of patients. Dolutegravir is the integrase inhibitor of choice for rescue therapy in multiresistant HIV infection, both in integrase inhibitor-naïve patients and in those previously treated with raltegravir or elvitegravir.

  15. Martian soil stratigraphy and rock coatings observed in color-enhanced Viking Lander images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, E. L., III

    1979-01-01

    Subtle color variations of martian surface materials were enhanced in eight Viking Lander (VL) color images. Well-defined soil units recognized at each site (six at VL-1 and four at VL-2), are identified on the basis of color, texture, morphology, and contact relations. The soil units at the Viking 2 site form a well-defined stratigraphic sequence, whereas the sequence at the Viking 1 site is only partially defined. The same relative soil colors occur at the two sites, suggesting that similar soil units are widespread on Mars. Several types of rock surface materials can be recognized at the two sites; dark, relatively 'blue' rock surfaces are probably minimally weathered igneous rock, whereas bright rock surfaces, with a green/(blue + red) ratio higher than that of any other surface material, are interpreted as a weathering product formed in situ on the rock. These rock surface types are common at both sites. Soil adhering to rocks is common at VL-2, but rare at VL-1. The mechanism that produces the weathering coating on rocks probably operates planet-wide.

  16. Martian soil stratigraphy and rock coatings observed in color-enhanced Viking Lander images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, E. L., III

    1979-01-01

    Subtle color variations of martian surface materials were enhanced in eight Viking Lander (VL) color images. Well-defined soil units recognized at each site (six at VL-1 and four at VL-2), are identified on the basis of color, texture, morphology, and contact relations. The soil units at the Viking 2 site form a well-defined stratigraphic sequence, whereas the sequence at the Viking 1 site is only partially defined. The same relative soil colors occur at the two sites, suggesting that similar soil units are widespread on Mars. Several types of rock surface materials can be recognized at the two sites; dark, relatively 'blue' rock surfaces are probably minimally weathered igneous rock, whereas bright rock surfaces, with a green/(blue + red) ratio higher than that of any other surface material, are interpreted as a weathering product formed in situ on the rock. These rock surface types are common at both sites. Soil adhering to rocks is common at VL-2, but rare at VL-1. The mechanism that produces the weathering coating on rocks probably operates planet-wide.

  17. Temperatures of the martian surface and atmosphere: viking observation of diurnal and geometric variations.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, H H; Christensen, P R; Martin, T Z; Miner, E D; Palluconi, F D

    1976-12-11

    Selected observations made with the Viking infrared thermal mapper after the first landing are reported. Atmospheric temperatures measured at the latitude of the Viking 2 landing site (48 degrees N) over most of a martian day reveal a diurnal variation of at least 15 K, with peak temperatures occurring near 2.2 hours after noon, implying significant absorption of sunlight in the lower 30 km of the atmosphere by entrained dust. The summit temperature of Arsia Mons varies by a factor of nearly two each day; large diurnal temperature variation is characteristic of the south Tharsis upland and implies the presence of low thermal inertia material. The thermal inertia of material on the floors of several typical large craters is found to be higher than for the surrounding terrain; this suggests that craters are somehow effective in sorting aeolian material. Brightness temperatures of the Viking 1 landing area decrease at large emission angles; the intensity of reflected sunlight shows a more complex dependence on geometry than expected, implying atmospheric as well as surface scattering.

  18. Seasonality recorded in Modern and Viking Limpet Shells ( Patella vulgata), Quoygrew, Orkney, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surge, D.; Barrett, J. H.; Milner, N.

    2007-12-01

    Climate archives contained in shells of the European limpet, Patella vulgata, from Viking shell middens can potentially provide much needed information about seasonality in mid-latitude coastal areas prior to the complicating effects of industrialization. P. vulgata shells are common in the stratified middens accumulated by the Viking inhabitants of Quoygrew, Orkney, and were likely used for baiting fish. Radiocarbon dates and artifacts place these middens between the 9th/10th and 13th centuries. This interval coincides with the Medieval Warm Period. Little is known about the seasonal temperature variation during this time of pre-industrial warming. Before reconstructing climate information from Viking shells, we determined whether P. vulgata preserves environmental and ecological information. Previous work on live-collected specimens from Whitley Bay near Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, confirmed that: (1) oxygen isotope ratios served as a proxy for sea surface temperature after accounting for a uniform +1.01 +/-0.21 ‰ offset; and (2) annual growth lines occurred during the winter given this location is within the cold-temperature biogeographic province. Winter growth lines and increments are common growth patterns found in marine bivalves from the cold-temperate province along the western North Atlantic. Preliminary isotope data from the 9th/10th century reveals similar winter and summer temperature relative to today and annual growth lines formed during winter, typical of a cold-temperate habitat.

  19. The processing of the Viking Orbiter range data and its contribution to Mars gravity solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Rosborough, George W.; Smith, David E.

    1992-01-01

    The processing of Doppler data has been the primary method for deriving models of the Mars gravity field. Since the Mariner 9 and Viking spacecraft were placed in orbit about Mars, many models from degree and order 6 to degree and order 50 have been developed. However, during the Viking mission, some 26,000 range measurements to the two Viking Orbiters were also obtained. These data have not previously been used in the derivation of Mars gravity models. A portion of these range data have been processed simultaneously with the Doppler data. Normal equations were generated for both sets of data and were used to create two solutions complete to degree and order 30: a nominal solution including both the range and the Doppler data (MGM-R100), and another solution including only the Doppler data (MGM-R101). Tests with the covariances of these solutions, as well as with orbit overlap tests indicate that the interplanetary range data can be used to improve the modeling of the Mars gravity field.

  20. The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome admixture analysis.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Brian; Brady, Claire; Moore, Laoise T; Bradley, Daniel G

    2006-12-01

    The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian admixture proportions were explored for both systems using six different admixture estimators, allowing a parallel investigation of the impact of method and marker type in Y-chromosome admixture analysis. Admixture proportion estimates in the putative Norse surname group were highly consistent and detected little trace of Scandinavian ancestry. In addition, there is scant evidence of Scandinavian Y-chromosome introgression in a general Irish population sample. Although conclusions are largely dependent on the accurate identification of Norse surnames, the findings are consistent with a relatively small number of Norse settlers (and descendents) migrating to Ireland during the Viking period (ca. AD 800-1200) suggesting that Norse colonial settlements might have been largely composed of indigenous Irish. This observation adds to previous genetic studies that point to a flexible Viking settlement approach across North Atlantic Europe.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VIKING catalogue data release 2 (Edge+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, A.; Sutherland, W.; Viking Team

    2016-10-01

    The VIKING survey with VISTA (ESO programme ID 179.A-2004) is a wide area (eventually 1500 sq.degrees), intermediate-depth (5-sigma detection limit J=21 on Vega system) near-infrared imaging survey, in the five broadband filters Z, Y, J, H, Ks. The planned sky coverage is at high galactic latitudes, and includes two main stripes 70x10°2 each: one in the South Galactic cap near Dec~-30°, and one near Dec~0° in the North galactic cap; in addition, there are two smaller outrigger patches called GAMA09 and CFHLS-W1. Science goals include z>6.5 quasars, extreme brown dwarfs, and multiwavelength coverage and identifications for a range of other imaging surveys, notably VST-KIDS and Herschel-ATLAS. This second public data release of VIKING data covers all of the highest quality data taken between the start of the survey (12th of November 2009) and the end of Period 92 (30th September 2013). This release supersedes the first release (VIKING and VIKING CAT published 28.06.2013 and 16.12.2013 respectively) as it includes improved CASU processing (V1.3) that gives better tile grouting and zero point corrections This release contains 396 tiles with coverage in all five VIKING filters, 379 of which have a deep co-add in J, and an additional 81 with at least two filters where the second OB has not been executed yet or one filter in an OB was poor quality. These 477 fields cover a total of ~690 square degrees and the resulting catalogues include a total of 46,270,162 sources (including low-reliability single-band detections). The imaging and catalogues (both single-band and band-merged) total 839.3GB. The coverage in each of the five sub-areas is not completely contiguous but any inter-tile gaps are relatively small. More details can be found in the accompanying documentation: vikingcatdr2.pdf (2 data files).

  2. Reanalysis of the Viking results suggests perchlorate and organics at mid-latitudes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Vargas, E.; de La Rosa, J.; Raga, A. C.; McKay, C.

    2010-12-01

    The most comprehensive search for organics in the Martian soil was performed by the Viking Landers. Martian soil was subjected to a thermal volatilization process in order to vaporize and break organic molecules, and the resultant gases and volatiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Only water at 0.1-1.0 wt% was detected with traces of chloromethane at 15 ppb in the Viking Landing site 1, and water at 0.05-1.0 wt% and carbon dioxide at 50-700 ppm with traces of dichloromethane at 0.04-40 ppb in the Viking Landing site 2. The abundance ratio of the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopes in these chlorohydrocarbons was 3:1, corresponding to the terrestrial isotopic abundance. Therefore, these chlorohydrocarbons were considered to be terrestrial contaminants although they had not been detected at those levels in the blank runs. Recently, perchlorate was discovered in the Martian Arctic soil by the Phoenix Lander. Here we show that when Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert with 32±6 ppm of organic carbon are mixed with 1 wt% magnesium perchlorate and heated nearly all the organics present are decomposed to water and carbon dioxide, but a small amount are chlorinated forming 1.6 ppm of chloromethane and 0.02 ppm of dichloromethane at 500○C. A chemical kinetics model was developed to predict the degree of oxidation and chlorination of organics in the Viking oven. The isotopic distribution of 35Cl and 37Cl for Mars is not known. Studies on Earth indicate that there is no isotopic fractionation of chlorine in the mantle or crust, despite the fact that it is significantly depleted on the planet as compare to solar abundances. The 37Cl/35Cl isotopic ratio in carbonaceous chondrites is similar to the Earth’s value, which suggests that the terrestrial planets, including Mars, were all formed from a similar reservoir of chlorine species in the presolar nebulae and that there was no further isotopic fractionation during the Earth’s differentiation or late

  3. Preliminary Global Topographic Model of Mars Based on MOLA Altimetry, Earth-Based Radar, and Viking, Mariner and MGS Occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    The recent altimetry data acquired by MOLA over the northern hemisphere of Mars have been combined with the Earth-based radar data obtained between 1971 and 1982, and occultation measurements of the Viking 1 and 2 Orbiters, Mariner 9, and MGS to derive a global model of the shape and topography of Mars. This preliminary model has a horizontal resolution of about 300 km. Vertical accuracy is on average a few hundred meters in the region of the data. Datasets: The altimetry and radar datasets were individually binned in 1.25 degree grids and merged with the occultation data. The Viking and Mariner occultation data in the northern hemisphere were excluded from the combined dataset where MOLA altimetry were available. The laser altimetry provided extensive and almost complete coverage of the northern hemisphere north of latitude 30 while the radar provided longitudinal coverage at several latitude bands between 23N and 23S. South of this region the only data were occultations. The majority of the occultations were obtained from Mariner 9, and the rest from Viking 1 & 2, and MGS. Earlier studies had shown that the Viking and Mariner occultations were on average only accurate to 500 meters. The recent MGS occultations are accurate to a few tens of meters. However, the highest southern latitude reached by the MGS occultations is only about 64S and data near the target region for the Mars 98 lander is limited to a few Viking and Mariner observations of relatively poor quality. In addition to the above datasets the locations of the Viking 1, Viking 2, and Pathfinder landers, obtained from the radio tracking of their signals, were included.

  4. Sailing Directions of the North Atlantic Viking Age (from about the year 860 to 1400)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirslund, Søren

    As long as man has ventured to go to sea, sailing directions have existed. Man's survival depended upon knowing the best fishing and hunting places and how to find these were secrets, told only to family or friends.Later, sailing directions covered areas in the world where trade or new settlements had begun and, as early as 500 years B.C., some of these sailing directions were written down. They covered the Mediterranean Sea and part of western Europe and they were called PERIPLUS meaning . They contained almost the same information as sailing directions today, namely: harbours, anchorages, currents, possibilities for fresh water, provisions and other supplies.

  5. An Early Danish Computer Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    This paper reports on the development of Nimbi, which is an early computer game implemented at the Danish Computer Company Regnecentralen in 1962-63. Nimbi is a variant of the ancient game Nim. The paper traces the primary origins of the development of Nimbi. These include a mathematical analysis from 1901 of Nim that “killed the game” as the outcome could be predicted quite easily; the desire of the Danish inventor Piet Hein to make a game that eluded such analyses; and the desire of Piet Hein to have computers play games against humans. The development of Nimbi was successful in spite of considerable technical obstacles. However, it seems that the game was not used for publicizing the capabilities of computers - at least not widely - as was the case with earlier Nim implementations, such as the British Nim-playing computer Nimrod in 1951.

  6. The Danish Testicular Cancer database.

    PubMed

    Daugaard, Gedske; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel; Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Toft, Birgitte Groenkaer; Engvad, Birte; Agerbæk, Mads; Holm, Niels Vilstrup; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database) and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database). The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC) in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data collection has been performed from 1984 to 2007 and from 2013 onward, respectively. The retrospective DaTeCa database contains detailed information with more than 300 variables related to histology, stage, treatment, relapses, pathology, tumor markers, kidney function, lung function, etc. A questionnaire related to late effects has been conducted, which includes questions regarding social relationships, life situation, general health status, family background, diseases, symptoms, use of medication, marital status, psychosocial issues, fertility, and sexuality. TC survivors alive on October 2014 were invited to fill in this questionnaire including 160 validated questions. Collection of questionnaires is still ongoing. A biobank including blood/sputum samples for future genetic analyses has been established. Both samples related to DaTeCa and DMCG DaTeCa database are included. The prospective DMCG DaTeCa database includes variables regarding histology, stage, prognostic group, and treatment. The DMCG DaTeCa database has existed since 2013 and is a young clinical database. It is necessary to extend the data collection in the prospective database in order to answer quality-related questions. Data from the retrospective database will be added to the prospective data. This will result in a large and very comprehensive database for future studies on TC patients.

  7. A simultaneous estimation of the mass of Mars and its natural satellites, Phobos and Deimos, from the orbital perturbations on the Mariner 9, Viking 1, and Viking 2 orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Smith, D. E.; Fricke, S. K.; Mccarthy, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The natural satellites of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, caused perturbations on the orbits of the Mariner 9, and the Viking spacecraft that were used to estimate the satellite masses. The Viking spacecraft were specifically targeted to make close flybys (within a few hundred kilometers) of Phobos in February 1977 and of Deimos in October 1977. These close encounters were used to estimate the moon's gravitational constant, GM (the universal constant of gravitation multiplied by the satellite mass). However, the Viking and Mariner 9 spacecraft made numerous flybys of Phobos and Deimos at distances of a few thousand kilometers. The tracking data from these more 'distant' encounters were processed to estimate the masses of Mars, Phobos, and Deimos.

  8. Viking High-Resolution Topography and Mars '01 Site Selection: Application to the White Rock Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Mackinnon, D. J.; Howington-Kraus, E.

    1999-06-01

    Definition of the local topography of the Mars '01 Lander site is crucial for assessment of lander safety and rover trafficability. According to Golombek et al., steep surface slopes may (1) cause retro-rockets to be fired too early or late for a safe landing, (2) the landing site slope needs to be < 1deg to ensure lander stability, and (3) a nearly level site is better for power generation of both the lander and the rover and for rover trafficability. Presently available datasets are largely inadequate to determine surface slope at scales pertinent to landing-site issues. Ideally, a topographic model of the entire landing site at meter-scale resolution would permit the best assessment of the pertinent topographic issues. MOLA data, while providing highly accurate vertical measurements, are inadequate to address slopes along paths of less than several hundred meters, because of along-track data spacings of hundreds of meters and horizontal errors in positioning of 500 to 2000 m. The capability to produce stereotopography from MOC image pairs is not yet in hand, nor can we necessarily expect a suitable number of stereo image pairs to be acquired. However, for a limited number of sites, high-resolution Viking stereo imaging is available at tens of meters horizontal resolution, capable of covering landing-ellipse sized areas. Although we would not necessarily suggest that the chosen Mars '01 Lander site should be located where good Viking stereotopography is available, an assessment of typical surface slopes at these scales for a range of surface types may be quite valuable in landing-site selection. Thus this study has a two-fold application: (1) to support the proposal of White Rock as a candidate Mars '01 Lander site, and (2) to evaluate how Viking high resolution stereotopography may be of value in the overall Mars '01 Lander site selection process.

  9. Selection of a surface tension propellant management system for the Viking 75 Orbiter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Debrock, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the propellant management system requirements derived for the Viking 75 mission, and review of a series of surface tension propellant management system design concepts. The chosen concept is identified and its mission operation described. The ullage bubble and bulk liquid positioning characteristics are presented, along with propellant dynamic considerations entailed by thrust initiation/termination. Pressurization design considerations, required to assure minimum disturbance to the bulk propellant, are introduced as well as those of the tank ullage vent. Design provisions to assure liquid communication between tank ends are discussed. Results of a preliminary design study are presented, including mechanical testing requirements to assure structural integrity, propellant compatibility, and proper installation.

  10. Tracking and data system support for the Viking 1975 mission to Mars. Volume 3: Planetary operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgway, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The support provided by the Deep Space Network to the 1975 Viking Mission from the first landing on Mars July 1976 to the end of the Prime Mission on November 15, 1976 is described and evaluated. Tracking and data acquisition support required the continuous operation of a worldwide network of tracking stations with 64-meter and 26-meter diameter antennas, together with a global communications system for the transfer of commands, telemetry, and radio metric data between the stations and the Network Operations Control Center in Pasadena, California. Performance of the deep-space communications links between Earth and Mars, and innovative new management techniques for operations and data handling are included.

  11. The opacity of some local Martian dust storms observed by the Viking IRTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, G. E.; Mitchell, E. A.; Peterfreund, A. R.

    1980-03-01

    In this paper some Viking infrared thermal mapping (IRTM) measurements of local Martian dust storms observed in the southern tropical region of the planet between solar longitudes of 225 and 262 deg are analyzed. The derived opacities of these storms show that in the most opaque regions of the cloud, the optical thickness may be approximately 6. Away from the individual clouds, the opacity is approximately 2, which is still about four times the background level of dustiness in the Martian atmosphere. Considerable structure in the derived opacity is found which will create corresponding variations in the atmospheric heating, which in turn may have an important feedback upon the local winds.

  12. Viking GC/MS mechanisms design and performance. [for analyzing samples of Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, C. P.; Weilbach, A. O.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking Lander gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer will analyze pyrolyzed samples of the Martian surface for organic content. The surface-sample loader and pyrolyzer assembly (SSPLA) is described, along with the major problems encountered during design and testing. Three mechanisms were developed to implement the required SSLPA functions: (1) a soil loader that forces soil from a filled rotating funnel into each of three ovens located on a carriage, (2) a Geneva drive for rotating and precisely indexing the ovens to receive sample, and (3) a toggle-clamp mechanism for sealing the ovens by forcing circular double knife edges into gold sealing surfaces.

  13. Experimental test of the variability of G using Viking lander ranging data

    SciTech Connect

    Hellings, R.W.; Adams, P.J.; Anderson, J.D.; Keesey, M.S.; Lau, E.L.; Standish, E.M.; Canuto, V.M.; Goldman, I.

    1983-10-31

    Results are presented from the analysis of solar system astrometric data, notably the range data to the Viking landers on Mars. A least-squares fit of the parameters of the solar system model to these data limits a simple time variation in the effective Newtonian gravitational constant to (0.2 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -11/ yr/sup -1/ and a rate of drift of atomic clocks relative to the implicit clock of relativistic dynamics to (0.1 +- 0.8) x 10/sup -11/ yr/sup -1/. The error limits quoted are the result of uncertainties in the masses of the asteroids.

  14. Image quality prediction: an aid to the Viking Lander imaging investigation on Mars.

    PubMed

    Huck, F O; Wall, S D

    1976-07-01

    Two Viking spacecraft scheduled to land on Mars in the summer of 1976 will return multispectral panoramas of the Martian surface with resolutions 4 orders of magnitude higher than have been previously obtained and stereo views with resolutions approaching that of the human eye. Mission constraints and uncertainties require a carefully planned imaging investigation that is supported by a computer model of camera response and surface features to aid in diagnosing camera performance, in establishing a preflight imaging strategy, and in rapidly revising this strategy if pictures returned from Mars reveal unfavorable or unanticipated conditions.

  15. Multicolor observations of phobos with the viking lander cameras: evidence for a carbonaceous chondritic composition.

    PubMed

    Pollack, J B; Veverka, J; Pang, K; Colburn, D; Lane, A L; Ajello, J M

    1978-01-06

    The reflectivity of Phobos has been determined in the spectral region from 0.4 to 1.1 micrometers from images taken with a Viking lander camera. The reflectivity curve is flat in this spectral interval and the geometric albedo equals 0.05 +/- 0.01. These results, together with Phobos's reflectivity spectrum in the ultraviolet, are compared with laboratory spectra of carbonaceous chondrites and basalts. The spectra of carbonaceous chondrites are consistent with the observations, whereas the basalt spectra are not. These findings raise the possibility that Phobos may be a captured object rather than a natural satellite of Mars.

  16. The Gas Exchange Experiment for life detection - The Viking Mars Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.

    1972-01-01

    The Gas Exchange Experiment of the Viking mission accepts a sample of Martian soil, incubates this soil with nutrient medium, and periodically samples the enclosed atmosphere over this soil for the gases H2, N2, O2, Kr, and CO2. These gases are analyzed by an automated gas chromatograph, and the data are transmitted to earth. The design of the experiment and the qualitative and quantitative changes, if any, of gas composition should allow conclusions to be made on the presence of life on Mars. Data and theory substantiating this approach are presented.

  17. Mars - Northern summer ice cap - Water vapor observations from Viking 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, C. B.; Davies, D. W.; Laporte, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the latitude dependence of water vapor made from the Viking 2 orbiter show peak abundances in the latitude band 70 to 80 deg N in the northern midsummer season (planetocentric longitude about 108 deg). Total column abundances in the polar regions require near-surface atmospheric temperatures in excess of 200 K and are incompatible with the survival of a frozen carbon dioxide cap at Martian pressures. The remnant (or residual) north polar cap and the outlying patches of ice at lower latitudes are thus predominantly water ice, whose thickness can be estimated to be between 1 meter and 1 kilometer.

  18. Structural analyses for the modification and verification of the Viking aeroshell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, W. B.; Anderson, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking aeroshell is an extremely lightweight flexible shell structure that has undergone thorough buckling analyses in the course of its development. The analytical tools and modeling technique required to reveal the structural behavior are presented. Significant results are given which illustrate the complex failure modes not usually observed in simple models and analyses. Both shell-of-revolution analysis for the pressure loads and thermal loads during entry and a general shell analysis for concentrated tank loads during launch were used. In many cases fixes or alterations to the structure were required, and the role of the analytical results in determining these modifications is indicated.

  19. The mosaics of Mars: As seen by the Viking Lander cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinthal, E. C.; Jones, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    The mosaics and derivative products produced from many individual high resolution images acquired by the Viking Lander Camera Systems are described: A morning and afternoon mosaic for both cameras at the Lander 1 Chryse Planitia site, and a morning, noon, and afternoon camera pair at Utopia Planitia, the Lander 11 site. The derived products include special geometric projections of the mosaic data sets, polar stereographic (donut), stereoscopic, and orthographic. Contour maps and vertical profiles of the topography were overlaid on the mosaics from which they were derived. Sets of stereo pairs were extracted and enlarged from stereoscopic projections of the mosaics.

  20. Selection of a surface tension propellant management system for the Viking 75 Orbiter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Debrock, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the propellant management system requirements derived for the Viking 75 mission, and review of a series of surface tension propellant management system design concepts. The chosen concept is identified and its mission operation described. The ullage bubble and bulk liquid positioning characteristics are presented, along with propellant dynamic considerations entailed by thrust initiation/termination. Pressurization design considerations, required to assure minimum disturbance to the bulk propellant, are introduced as well as those of the tank ullage vent. Design provisions to assure liquid communication between tank ends are discussed. Results of a preliminary design study are presented, including mechanical testing requirements to assure structural integrity, propellant compatibility, and proper installation.

  1. Preliminary findings of the Viking gas exchange experiment and a model for Martian surface chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Berdahl, B. J.; Carle, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Earlier results reported from the Viking Lander-1 experiment are reexamined and interpreted in terms of a model of the Martian soil surface morphology and chemistry. Major events in the gas exchange experiment (GEX) first cycle are tabulated and data are presented on the sample processing and transport environments experienced by the soil samples. Oxygen and CO2 evolved from humidified Martian soil in GEX and slight changes in N2 present are investigated. A soil model involving iron oxide coating on silicate material is entertained to yield a mechanistic explanation of the experimental findings, and invocation of biotic processes is eschewed.

  2. Innovations in Delta Differential One-Way Range: from Viking to Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Border, James S.

    2009-01-01

    The Deep Space Network has provided the capability for very-long-baseline interferometry measurements in support of spacecraft navigation since the late 1970s. Both system implementation and the importance of such measurements to flight projects have evolved significantly over the past three decades. Innovations introduced through research and development programs have led to much better performance. This paper provides an overview of the development and use of interferometric tracking techniques in the DSN starting with the Viking era and continuing with a description of the current system and its planned use to support Mars Science Laboratory.

  3. Solar plasma: Viking 1975 interplanetary spacecraft dual-frequency Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. C.; Winn, F. B.

    1977-01-01

    Viking 1975 interplanetary S- and X-band Doppler data are surveyed. These data show consistency with differenced range versus integrated Doppler (DRVID) data when there is solar plasma and with Faraday rotation data otherwise. An increase of solar plasma effects with decreasing sun-earth-probe (SEP) angle (approaching Mars orbit insertion) is demonstrated. The 2-way/3-way data indicate a homogeneous solar plasma structure over a 8,000-km spread. Occasional cycle slips in the data are pinpointed and tabulated.

  4. The implications and limitations of the findings of the Viking organic analysis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biemann, K.

    1979-01-01

    The gas chromatograph mass spectrometer instrument of the Viking mission has demonstrated the absence of organic compounds in the immediate surface layer of the two landing sites. The demonstration of the successful operation of the instrument (comparison of ground-based test data with those obtained during interplanetary flight and the data from the surface of the planet) and its limitations (e.g., the detection of highly cross-linked polymers or polymeric carbon suboxide) are reviewed. The measurements for bound water are based on indirect data, the detectability of evolved carbon dioxide and ammonia is poor, and oxygen, liberated from the soil samples, can not be detected.

  5. Experimental test of the variability of G using Viking lander ranging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.; Adams, P. J.; Anderson, J. D.; Keesey, M. S.; Lau, E. L.; Standish, E. M.; Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented from the analysis of solar-system astrometric data, notably the range data to the Viking landers on Mars. A least-squares fit of the parameters of the solar system model to these data limits a simple time variation in the effective Newtonian gravitational constant to (2 + or - 4) x 10 to the -12th/yr and a rate of drift of atomic clocks relative to the implicit clock of relativistic dynamics to (1 + or - 8) x 10 to the -12th/yr. The error limits quoted are the result of uncertainties in the masses of the asteroids.

  6. Innovations in Delta Differential One-Way Range: from Viking to Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Border, James S.

    2009-01-01

    The Deep Space Network has provided the capability for very-long-baseline interferometry measurements in support of spacecraft navigation since the late 1970s. Both system implementation and the importance of such measurements to flight projects have evolved significantly over the past three decades. Innovations introduced through research and development programs have led to much better performance. This paper provides an overview of the development and use of interferometric tracking techniques in the DSN starting with the Viking era and continuing with a description of the current system and its planned use to support Mars Science Laboratory.

  7. Mars: northern summer ice cap--water vapor observations from viking 2.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C B; Davies, D W; Laporte, D D

    1976-12-11

    Observations of the latitude dependence of water vapor made from the Viking 2 orbiter show peak abundances in the latitude band 70 degrees to 80 degrees north in the northern midsummer season (planetocentric longitude approximately 108 degrees ). Total column abundances in the polar regions require near-surface atmospheric temperatures in excess of 200 degrees K, and are incompatible with the survival of a frozen carbon dioxide cap at martian pressures. The remnant (or residual) north polar cap, and the outlying patches of ice at lower latitudes, are thus predominantly water ice, whose thickness can be estimated to be between 1 meter and 1 kilometer.

  8. In-flight performance of the Viking 75 Orbiter propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, D. D.; Leeds, M. W.; Vote, F. C.

    1977-01-01

    The configuration of the Viking 75 Spacecraft, which was used in two missions related to the exploration of the planet Mars, is examined and a description of the orbiter propulsion subsystem is provided. The propellants utilized were nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine. Gaseous helium was used for pressurization. Orbiter maneuver durations ranged from the 39.4 minute Mars orbit insertion on VO-2, the longest engine firing in space to date, to the 1.7-second station keeping trim on VO-1. Total engine operating time was 2748.2 seconds for VO-1 and 2814.5 seconds for VO-2.

  9. Postflight simulation of parachute deployment dynamics of Viking qualification flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Poole, L. R.; Talay, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Simulation calculations of the Viking qualification flight tests are conducted by use of analytical models of the parachute deployment dynamics process. Results from the study indicate that good simulations of event times and trajectory are obtained. If the full-scale parachute drag coefficient is used, a good simulation of first opening load is obtained and the overall nature of the load history is calculated. For longitudinal motions, the two-degree-of-freedom models give good agreement with a six-degree-of-freedom model. It is believed that the analytical models used are tools which will aid in the analysis of future flight systems.

  10. Parachute-deployment-parameter identification based on an analytical simulation of Viking BLDT AV-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom analytical simulation of parachute deployment dynamics developed at the Langley Research Center is presented. A comparison study was made using flight results from the Viking Balloon Launched Decelerator Test (BLDT) AV-4. Since there are significant voids in the knowledge of vehicle and decelerator aerodynamics and suspension system physical properties, a set of deployment-parameter input has been defined which may be used as a basis for future studies of parachute deployment dynamics. The study indicates the analytical model is sufficiently sophisticated to investigate parachute deployment dynamics with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Plate motions, Gondwana dinosaurs, Noah's arks, beached Viking funeral ships, ghost ships, and landspans.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Louis L; Strganac, Christopher; Scotese, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    Gondwana landmasses have served as large-scale biogeographic Noah's Arks and Beached Viking Funeral Ships, as defined by McKenna. The latitudinal trajectories of selected Gondwana dinosaur localities were traced through time in order to evaluate their movement through climate zones relative to those in which they originally formed. The dispersal of fauna during the breakup of Gondwana may have been facilitated by the presence of offshelf islands forming landspans (sensu Iturralde-Vinent and MacPhee) in the Equatorial Atlantic Gateway and elsewhere.

  12. Mars - Northern summer ice cap - Water vapor observations from Viking 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, C. B.; Davies, D. W.; Laporte, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the latitude dependence of water vapor made from the Viking 2 orbiter show peak abundances in the latitude band 70 to 80 deg N in the northern midsummer season (planetocentric longitude about 108 deg). Total column abundances in the polar regions require near-surface atmospheric temperatures in excess of 200 K and are incompatible with the survival of a frozen carbon dioxide cap at Martian pressures. The remnant (or residual) north polar cap and the outlying patches of ice at lower latitudes are thus predominantly water ice, whose thickness can be estimated to be between 1 meter and 1 kilometer.

  13. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  14. The Danish National Penile Cancer Quality database

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kristian; Öztürk, Buket; Søgaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish National Penile Cancer Quality database (DaPeCa-data) aims to improve the quality of cancer care and monitor the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of all incident penile cancer cases in Denmark. The aim is to assure referral practice, guideline adherence, and treatment and development of the database in order to enhance research opportunities and increase knowledge and survival outcomes of penile cancer. Study population The DaPeCa-data registers all patients with newly diagnosed invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in Denmark since June 2011. Main variables Data are systematically registered at the time of diagnosis by a combination of automated data-linkage to the central registries as well as online registration by treating clinicians. The main variables registered relate to disease prognosis and treatment morbidity and include the presence of risk factors (phimosis, lichen sclerosus, and human papillomavirus), date of diagnosis, date of treatment decision, date of beginning of treatment, type of treatment, treating hospital, type and time of complications, date of recurrence, date of death, and cause of death. Descriptive data Registration of these variables correlated to the unique Danish ten-digit civil registration number enables characterization of the cohort, individual patients, and patient groups with respect to age; 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-specific and overall survival; recurrence patterns; and morbidity profile related to treatment modality. As of August 2015, more than 200 patients are registered with ∼65 new entries per year. Conclusion The DaPeCa-data has potential to provide meaningful, timely, and clinically relevant quality data for quality maintenance, development, and research purposes. PMID:27822104

  15. The Danish National Penile Cancer Quality database.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kristian; Öztürk, Buket; Søgaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The Danish National Penile Cancer Quality database (DaPeCa-data) aims to improve the quality of cancer care and monitor the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of all incident penile cancer cases in Denmark. The aim is to assure referral practice, guideline adherence, and treatment and development of the database in order to enhance research opportunities and increase knowledge and survival outcomes of penile cancer. The DaPeCa-data registers all patients with newly diagnosed invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in Denmark since June 2011. Data are systematically registered at the time of diagnosis by a combination of automated data-linkage to the central registries as well as online registration by treating clinicians. The main variables registered relate to disease prognosis and treatment morbidity and include the presence of risk factors (phimosis, lichen sclerosus, and human papillomavirus), date of diagnosis, date of treatment decision, date of beginning of treatment, type of treatment, treating hospital, type and time of complications, date of recurrence, date of death, and cause of death. Registration of these variables correlated to the unique Danish ten-digit civil registration number enables characterization of the cohort, individual patients, and patient groups with respect to age; 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-specific and overall survival; recurrence patterns; and morbidity profile related to treatment modality. As of August 2015, more than 200 patients are registered with ∼65 new entries per year. The DaPeCa-data has potential to provide meaningful, timely, and clinically relevant quality data for quality maintenance, development, and research purposes.

  16. Orientation with a Viking sun-compass, a shadow-stick, and two calcite sunstones under various weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Bernáth, Balázs; Blahó, Miklós; Egri, Adám; Barta, András; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2013-09-01

    It is widely accepted that Vikings used sun-compasses to derive true directions from the cast shadow of a gnomon. It has been hypothesized that when a cast shadow was not formed, Viking navigators relied on crude skylight polarimetry with the aid of dichroic or birefringent crystals, called "sunstones." We demonstrate here that a simple tool, that we call "shadow-stick," could have allowed orientation by a sun-compass with satisfying accuracy when shadows were not formed, but the sun position could have reliably been estimated. In field tests, we performed orientation trials with a set composed of a sun-compass, two calcite sunstones, and a shadow-stick. We show here that such a set could have been an effective orientation tool for Vikings only when clear, blue patches of the sky were visible.

  17. Herschel-ATLAS: VISTA VIKING near-infrared counterparts in the Phase 1 GAMA 9-h data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleuren, S.; Sutherland, W.; Dunne, L.; Smith, D. J. B.; Maddox, S. J.; González-Nuevo, J.; Findlay, J.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bond, N. A.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Driver, S. P.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kelvin, L.; Lapi, A.; Liske, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Negrello, M.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Prescott, M.; Rigby, E. E.; Robotham, A.; Scott, D.; Temi, P.; Thompson, M. A.; Valiante, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2012-07-01

    We identify near-infrared Ks-band counterparts to Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) submillimetre (submm) sources, using a preliminary object catalogue from the VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) survey. The submm sources are selected from the H-ATLAS Phase 1 catalogue of the Galaxy and Mass Assembly 9-h field, which includes all objects detected at 250, 350 or ? with the instrument. We apply and discuss a likelihood ratio method for VIKING candidates within a search radius of 10 arcsec of the 22 000 SPIRE sources with a 5σ detection at ?. We estimate the fraction of SPIRE sources with a counterpart above the magnitude limit of the VIKING survey to be Q0≈ 0.73. We find that 11 294 (51 per cent) of the SPIRE sources have a best VIKING counterpart with a reliability R≥ 0.8, and the false identification rate of these is estimated to be 4.2 per cent. We expect to miss ˜5 per cent of true VIKING counterparts. There is evidence from Z-J and J-Ks colours that the reliable counterparts to SPIRE galaxies are marginally redder than the field population. We obtain photometric redshifts for ˜68 per cent of all (non-stellar) VIKING candidates with a median redshift of ?. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 3147 (˜28 per cent) of the reliable counterparts from existing redshift surveys. Comparing to the results of the optical identifications supplied with the Phase 1 catalogue, we find that the use of medium-deep near-infrared data improves the identification rate of reliable counterparts from 36 to 51 per cent. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. VISTA is an ESO near-infrared telescope in Chile.

  18. Viking lander imaging investigation during extended and continuation automatic missions. Volume 2: Lander 2 picture catalog of experiment data record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, K. L.; Henshaw, M.; Mcmenomy, C.; Robles, A.; Scribner, P. C.; Wall, S. D.; Wilson, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Images returned by the two Viking landers during the extended and continuation automatic phases of the Viking Mission are presented. Information describing the conditions under which the images were acquired is included with skyline drawings showing the images positioned in the field of view of the cameras. Subsets of the images are listed in a variety of sequences to aid in locating images of interest. The format and organization of the digital magnetic tape storage of the images are described. A brief description of the mission and the camera system is also included.

  19. Viking lander imaging investigation during extended and continuation automatic missions. Volume 1: Lander 1 picture catalog of experiment data record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, K. L.; Henshaw, M.; Mcmenomy, C.; Robles, A.; Scribner, P. C.; Wall, S. D.; Wilson, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    All images returned by Viking Lander 1 during the extended and continuation automatic phases of the Viking Mission are presented. Listings of supplemental information which describe the conditions under which the images were acquired are included together with skyline drawings which show where the images are positioned in the field of view of the cameras. Subsets of the images are listed in a variety of sequences to aid in locating images of interest. The format and organization of the digital magnetic tape storage of the images are described as well as the mission and the camera system.

  20. Telecommunications and data acquisition systems support for the Viking 1975 mission to Mars, volume 5. [Deep Space Network support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    The support provided by the Deep Space Network to the Viking Project from 1 June 1978 to 30 April 1980 is described. The project was supported by the worldwide network of Deep Space Stations with 26- and 64-meter-diameter antennas, together with a ground communications system, for the transmission of commands, telemetry, radio metric data, and operational instructions between the stations and the network operation control center in Pasadena, California. Assistance was substantially less than in the previous phases of the Viking Project in order to provide adequate support to the Pioneer and Voyager Projects.

  1. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    PubMed

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to <2% since 2013. The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an

  2. Observations of Martian surface winds at the Viking Lander 1 site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.R.; Leovy, C.B.; Tillman, J.E. )

    1990-08-30

    Partial failure of the wind instrumentation on the Viking Lander 1 (VL1) in the Martian subtropics (22.5{degree}N) has limited previous analyses of meteorological data for this site. The authors describe a method for reconstructing surface winds using data from the partially failed sensor and present and analyze a time series of wind, pressure, and temperature at the site covering 350 Mars days (sols). At the beginning of the mission during early summer, winds were controlled by regional topography, but they soon underwent a transition to a regime controlled by the Hadley circulation. Diurnal and semidiurnal wind oscillations and synoptic variations have been analyzed and compared with the corresponding variations at the Viking Lander 2 middle latitude site (48{degree}N). Diurnal wind oscillations were controlled primarily by regional topography and boundary layer forcing, although a global mode may have been influencing them during two brief episodes. Semidiurnal wind oscillations were controlled by the westward propagating semidiurnal tide from sol 210 onward. Comparison of the synoptic variations at the two sites suggests that the same eastward propagating wave trains were present at both sites, at least following the first 1977 great dust storm, but discordant inferred zonal wave numbers and phase speeds at the two sites cast doubt on the zonal wave numbers deduced from analyses of combined wind and pressure data, particularly at the VL1 site where the signal to noise ratio of the dominant synoptic waves is relatively small.

  3. Viking bistatic radar experiment - Summary of first-order results emphasizing north polar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Initial results of bistatic radar observations of Mars made by the Viking Orbiter spacecraft are presented with particular emphasis on the previously unstudied polar regions. Bistatic radar scattering experiments were performed in near-equatorial regions by the Viking Orbiter 1, while other regions of the planet were observed by the polar-orbiting Orbiter 2, with scattered signals received by stations of the NASA Deep Space Network. In the equatorial region, the bistatic radar estimates of rms surface slope are found to be in qualitative agreement with results obtained using earth-based transmitter-receivers, showing a nearly 2:1 decrease in rms surface roughness between 20 and 22 deg N with no appreciable change in dielectric constant. Data in the north polar region reveal variations in surface roughness from 1 to 6 deg, with areas of smooth material generally located within rougher environs, surface roughness decreasing along Vastitas Borealis in the direction of the north pole, and north polar cap rms roughnesses on the order of 2.5-3.0 deg. Trends in radar reflectivity suggest a decreasing surface density with increasing latitude, consistent with a layer of seasonal CO2 or H2O snow increasing in depth as the pole is approached.

  4. Pitted and fluted rocks in the Western Desert of Egypt - Viking comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Grolier, M. J.; El-Baz, F.; Whitney, M. I.; Ward, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Western Desert of Egypt is one of the most arid regions on earth and is probably the closest terrestrial analog to the surface of Mars. An expedition to the area in 1978 revealed an abundance of quartzite and basalt rocks that have been pitted and fluted by wind erosion and deflation of the desert surface. These pitted rocks are internally homogeneous, show no internal holes or vesicles, and are considered an important but neglected type of ventifact. They bear a striking resemblance to the pitted and fluted rocks seen by the Viking Landers, rocks that have generally been interpreted as vesicular basalts only slightly modified by wind erosion. Wind tunnel studies of the air flow over and around nonstreamlined hand specimens from the Western Desert show that windward abrasion coupled with negative flow, secondary flow, and vorticity in a unidirectional wind can explain the complex arrays of pits and flutes. These field and laboratory observations suggest that the pitted rocks at the Viking Lander sites are also ventifacts, and thus the Martian surface may be far more wind eroded than previously thought.

  5. Pitted and fluted rocks in the Western Desert of Egypt - Viking comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Grolier, M. J.; El-Baz, F.; Whitney, M. I.; Ward, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Western Desert of Egypt is one of the most arid regions on earth and is probably the closest terrestrial analog to the surface of Mars. An expedition to the area in 1978 revealed an abundance of quartzite and basalt rocks that have been pitted and fluted by wind erosion and deflation of the desert surface. These pitted rocks are internally homogeneous, show no internal holes or vesicles, and are considered an important but neglected type of ventifact. They bear a striking resemblance to the pitted and fluted rocks seen by the Viking Landers, rocks that have generally been interpreted as vesicular basalts only slightly modified by wind erosion. Wind tunnel studies of the air flow over and around nonstreamlined hand specimens from the Western Desert show that windward abrasion coupled with negative flow, secondary flow, and vorticity in a unidirectional wind can explain the complex arrays of pits and flutes. These field and laboratory observations suggest that the pitted rocks at the Viking Lander sites are also ventifacts, and thus the Martian surface may be far more wind eroded than previously thought.

  6. Was the C282Y mutation an Irish Gaelic mutation that the Vikings help disseminate?

    PubMed

    Whittington, C A

    2006-01-01

    The C282Y mutation is held to have arisen in either a Celtic or a Viking ancestor some 60 generations ago. While the Scandinavians have a high frequency of C282Y, the Irish have the highest frequency of the C282Y mutation in the world. However testing of the Irish people for C282Y has been patchy. The true frequency of the C282Y mutation in Ireland and specifically in the relatively isolated western province of Connaught is unknown. Establishment of the C282Y frequency in the Irish male population of Connaught with traditional Irish surnames, a group which has a virtual fixation for Y chromosome R1b3, could help establish C282Y as an Irish mutation. Elucidation of greater C282Y haplotype diversity for the Irish as opposed to the Scandinavians would indicate the Irish as the likely source population for C282Y. Taken together, linking of C282Y to the Irish Gaelic male population of Connaught and establishment of an Irish origin of the C282Y mutation would point to dissemination of the C282Y mutation by Viking raiders and colonizers.

  7. Vitamin D Deficiency in Europeans Today and in Viking Settlers of Greenland.

    PubMed

    Göring, H; Koshuchowa, S

    2016-12-01

    The vast majority of the Earth's population lives between the 20th and 40th parallel north and south. It seems that right here humans have found the best living conditions relating not only to temperature and food recourses, but also to UV radiation necessary for the production of vitamin D by human skin. An exception to this general rule is Europe. Nearly half a billion people live between the 40th and 60th parallel north of the equator despite the fact that the amounts of UV radiation there are much lower. Moreover, since the time of the Vikings, there has always been a part of the European population that lived even further north than the 60th parallel (the northern parts of Europe, including Greenland). In this work, we present the potential role that vitamin D deficiency might have played in the extinction of the Vikings of Greenland. We analyze factors that contribute to the discrepancy between the theoretical distribution of areas with vitamin D deficiency and today's reality, like the impact of civilization, religious traditions, as well as vitamin D supplementation in food products and as a biologically active dietary additive. The global migration of people on a scale and speed never seen before is now even more important for this discrepancy.

  8. Mars Orbiter Camera Views the 'Face on Mars' - Comparison with Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after midnight Sunday morning (5 April 1998 12:39 AM PST), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft successfully acquired a high resolution image of the 'Face on Mars' feature in the Cydonia region. The image was transmitted to Earth on Sunday, and retrieved from the mission computer data base Monday morning (6 April 1998). The image was processed at the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) facility 9:15 AM and the raw image immediately transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for release to the Internet. The images shown here were subsequently processed at MSSS.

    The picture was acquired 375 seconds after the spacecraft's 220th close approach to Mars. At that time, the 'Face', located at approximately 40.8o N, 9.6o W, was 275 miles (444 km) from the spacecraft. The 'morning' sun was 25o above the horizon. The picture has a resolution of 14.1 feet (4.3 meters) per pixel, making it ten times higher resolution than the best previous image of the feature, which was taken by the Viking Mission in the mid-1970's. The full image covers an area 2.7 miles (4.4 km) wide and 25.7 miles (41.5 km) long.

    In this comparison, the best Viking image has been enlarged to 3.3 times its original resolution, and the MOC image has been decreased by a similar 3.3 times, creating images of roughly the same size. In addition, the MOC images have been geometrically transformed to a more overhead projection (different from the mercator map projection of PIA01440 & 1441) for ease of comparison with the Viking image. The left image is a portion of Viking Orbiter 1 frame 070A13, the middle image is a portion of MOC frame shown normally, and the right image is the same MOC frame but with the brightness inverted to simulate the approximate lighting conditions of the Viking image.

    Processing Image processing has been applied to the images in order to improve the visibility of features. This processing included the following steps:

    The

  9. Mars Orbiter Camera Views the 'Face on Mars' - Comparison with Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after midnight Sunday morning (5 April 1998 12:39 AM PST), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft successfully acquired a high resolution image of the 'Face on Mars' feature in the Cydonia region. The image was transmitted to Earth on Sunday, and retrieved from the mission computer data base Monday morning (6 April 1998). The image was processed at the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) facility 9:15 AM and the raw image immediately transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for release to the Internet. The images shown here were subsequently processed at MSSS.

    The picture was acquired 375 seconds after the spacecraft's 220th close approach to Mars. At that time, the 'Face', located at approximately 40.8o N, 9.6o W, was 275 miles (444 km) from the spacecraft. The 'morning' sun was 25o above the horizon. The picture has a resolution of 14.1 feet (4.3 meters) per pixel, making it ten times higher resolution than the best previous image of the feature, which was taken by the Viking Mission in the mid-1970's. The full image covers an area 2.7 miles (4.4 km) wide and 25.7 miles (41.5 km) long.

    In this comparison, the best Viking image has been enlarged to 3.3 times its original resolution, and the MOC image has been decreased by a similar 3.3 times, creating images of roughly the same size. In addition, the MOC images have been geometrically transformed to a more overhead projection (different from the mercator map projection of PIA01440 & 1441) for ease of comparison with the Viking image. The left image is a portion of Viking Orbiter 1 frame 070A13, the middle image is a portion of MOC frame shown normally, and the right image is the same MOC frame but with the brightness inverted to simulate the approximate lighting conditions of the Viking image.

    Processing Image processing has been applied to the images in order to improve the visibility of features. This processing included the following steps:

    The

  10. Project Viking.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    NASA will launch two spacecraft to Mars in 1975 to soft-land on the surface and test for signs of life. After confirming the site data from orbit, each of the spacecraft will separate into two parts, an orbiter and a lander. Together they will conduct scientific studies of the Martian atmosphere and surface. The lander's instruments will collect data for transmission to earth, direct or via the orbiter, including panoramic, stereo color pictures of its immediate surroundings, molecular organic and inorganic analyses of the soil, and atmospheric, meteorological, magnetic, and seismic characteristics. It will also make measurements of the atmosphere as it descends to the surface.

  11. Hospitalizations among employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry.

    PubMed

    Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn; Kristensen, Tage S

    2002-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide a broad picture of the morbidity among employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry. Cohorts of all 20-59-year-old employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry in the years 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1994 were formed to calculate age-standardized hospitalization ratios (SHR) and time trends (1981-1997) for many different diagnoses. Both for women and men, significantly higher SHRs were found for infectious and parasitic diseases, neoplasms, diseases in the nervous system and sense organs, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases of the respiratory system, diseases of the digestive system and diseases of the musculoskeletal system among employees in hotels and restaurants than in the digestive system and diseases of the musculoskeletal system among employees in hotels and restaurants than in the working population at large. Furthermore, among women a significantly elevated risk was found for injuries in the lower extremities, injuries in the upper extremities and head injuries, and among men a high risk was found for head injuries and a low risk for ruptures in ligaments and muscles. The trend assessments did not detect any significant changes in SHRs over time. Employment in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry is associated with an elevated hospitalization risk due to many diseases, which may be related to occupation and lifestyle. In line with the official policy of reducing inequality in health, focus should be placed on the health problems in this group.

  12. Organic Matter in SNC Meteorites: Is It Time to Re-Evaluate the Viking Biology Experimental Data?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmflash, D.; Clemett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    New data from SNC meteorites suggests that organic material may be present in the martian upper crust. This adds to possibility that the Viking biology experiments may have plausible biological interpretations as well as inorganic chemical interpretations Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  13. The Case for Extant Life on Mars and Its Possible Detection by the Viking Labeled Release Experiment.

    PubMed

    Levin, Gilbert V; Straat, Patricia Ann

    2016-10-01

    The 1976 Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment was positive for extant microbial life on the surface of Mars. Experiments on both Viking landers, 4000 miles apart, yielded similar, repeatable, positive responses. While the authors eventually concluded that the experiment detected martian life, this was and remains a highly controversial conclusion. Many believe that the martian environment is inimical to life and the LR responses were nonbiological, attributed to an as-yet-unidentified oxidant (or oxidants) in the martian soil. Unfortunately, no further metabolic experiments have been conducted on Mars. Instead, follow-on missions have sought to define the martian environment, mostly searching for signs of water. These missions have collected considerable data regarding Mars as a habitat, both past and present. The purpose of this article is to consider recent findings about martian water, methane, and organics that impact the case for extant life on Mars. Further, the biological explanation of the LR and recent nonbiological hypotheses are evaluated. It is concluded that extant life is a strong possibility, that abiotic interpretations of the LR data are not conclusive, and that, even setting our conclusion aside, biology should still be considered as an explanation for the LR experiment. Because of possible contamination of Mars by terrestrial microbes after Viking, we note that the LR data are the only data we will ever have on biologically pristine martian samples. Key Words: Extant life on Mars-Viking Labeled Release experiment-Astrobiology-Extraterrestrial life-Mars. Astrobiology 16, 798-810.

  14. Tech Talk for Social Studies Teachers: Exploring the Viking Invasion of Anglo-Saxon England (AD 1008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Chris

    2008-01-01

    It was 1,000 years ago that King Ethelred ordered the building of a large fleet of ships to blockade England from Viking invaders in a last-ditch effort to stop a series of invasions that had plagued England for decades. Although teachers may already have a personal and professional fascination with this and other events surrounding the Viking…

  15. Organic Matter in SNC Meteorites: Is It Time to Re-Evaluate the Viking Biology Experimental Data?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmflash, D.; Clemett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    New data from SNC meteorites suggests that organic material may be present in the martian upper crust. This adds to possibility that the Viking biology experiments may have plausible biological interpretations as well as inorganic chemical interpretations Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  16. The Topography and Basin Deposits of the Equatorial Highlands: A MGS-Viking Synergistic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P. M.

    1999-09-01

    We are using Digital Terrain Models (DTM) to evaluate the sequence and extent of various landform-modifying processes that have shaped the martian equatorial highlands using models that simulates these processes on a three-dimensional synthetic landscape. This modeling emulates the following processes: (1) cratering; (2) fluvial erosion and sedimentation; (3) weathering and mass wasting; (4) aeolian erosion and deposition; (5) groundwater flow and groundwater sapping; and (6) volcanic deposition of different emplacement modes. The models have been successfully used to predict the evolution of terrestrial landscapes. The models provide explicit simulations of landform development and thusly predict the topographic evolution of the surface and final landscape form. We generate combined Viking-MOLA DTMs, so that we have absolute regional and high resolution topographic information. With our DTMs we are able to much more realistically evaluate the evolution of specific locations within the cratered uplands of Mars than would be possible from either data set alone. Results of this analysis have direct import to Mars Surveyor Program landing site selection and science. We have selected three areas for our initial studies: (1) the south edge of the "hematite" deposit detected by TES and observed to be bordered by scarps and knobs exhibiting layers in Viking and MOC SPO images located at 2 degS, 4 degW; (2) a typical example of equatorial cratered highlands at 2 degN, 240.5 degW; and (3) a site at 5 degS and 264 degW just south of the Isidis rim that is heavily dissected by channels. These regions were optimally imaged by Viking for the generation of DTMs, lie within the Mars 2001 landing constraints, and are potential locations for fluvial or lacustrine deposits. Our initial analysis of the later sites indicates that fluvial erosion for large solitary channels probably took the form of sapping, whereas denser networks of small channels may have formed at least in part

  17. Particle sizes and composition of Mars atmospheric dust based upon Viking and Mariner 9 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Mars atmospheric dust can play an important role in the thermal structure of the Mars atmosphere during periods of high dust loading. However, the radiative properties of Mars atmospheric dust remain uncertain due to uncertain definitions of the dust composition and size distribution. The analysis by Toon et al., of Mariner 9 IRIS spectra during the 1971-1972 global dust storm indicated a reasonable match between the modeled 9-micron absorption of montmorillinite and the observed 9-micron absorption. Toon et al. also determined that an effective (cross-section weighted) mean radius of 2.5 microns (R(sub mode) = 0.4 microns) provided a consistent fit of montmorillinite to the IRIS dust spectra at 9 microns. Pollack et al. analyzed Viking lander observations of atmospheric extinction and scattering at visible-near IR wavelengths (0.5-1.0 microns), and obtained consistency with the Toon et al. dust size distribution when the effects of nonspherical particle shapes were included. An additional, minor (1 percent) component of visible-ultraviolet absorbing material was required to model the derived visible (0.86) and ultraviolet (0.4-0.6) single-scattering albedos of the dust, since montmorillinite does not absorb sufficiently in this wavelength region. A combined analysis of the Viking IRTM and Mariner 9 observations was conducted to reassess the model of Mars atmospheric ultraviolet-to-infrared measurements of dust absorption and scattering. The optical constants for palagonite are incorporated in a doubling-adding radiative transfer model of the Mars atmosphere to simulate Mariner 9 IRIS spectra as well as the Viking IRTM IR band observations. Visible and ultraviolet single-scattering albedos based on the Hansen and Travis Mie scattering code were also derived. A tentative conclusion is that smaller dust particles (R(sub mode) = 0.15 microns, cross-section weighted mean R = 1.2 microns) composed of palagonite provide a much improved fit to the Mariner 9 IRIS spectra

  18. Mars Orbiter Camera Views the 'Face on Mars' - Best View from Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after midnight Sunday morning (5 April 1998 12:39 AM PST), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft successfully acquired a high resolution image of the 'Face on Mars' feature in the Cydonia region. The image was transmitted to Earth on Sunday, and retrieved from the mission computer data base Monday morning (6 April 1998). The image was processed at the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) facility 9:15 AM and the raw image immediately transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for release to the Internet. The images shown here were subsequently processed at MSSS.

    The picture was acquired 375 seconds after the spacecraft's 220th close approach to Mars. At that time, the 'Face', located at approximately 40.8o N, 9.6o W, was 275 miles (444 km) from the spacecraft. The 'morning' sun was 25o above the horizon. The picture has a resolution of 14.1 feet (4.3 meters) per pixel, making it ten times higher resolution than the best previous image of the feature, which was taken by the Viking Mission in the mid-1970's. The full image covers an area 2.7 miles (4.4 km) wide and 25.7 miles (41.5 km) long.

    This Viking Orbiter image is one of the best Viking pictures of the area Cydonia where the 'Face' is located. Marked on the image are the 'footprint' of the high resolution (narrow angle) Mars Orbiter Camera image and the area seen in enlarged views (dashed box). See PIA01440-1442 for these images in raw and processed form.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  19. Mars Orbiter Camera Views the 'Face on Mars' - Best View from Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after midnight Sunday morning (5 April 1998 12:39 AM PST), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft successfully acquired a high resolution image of the 'Face on Mars' feature in the Cydonia region. The image was transmitted to Earth on Sunday, and retrieved from the mission computer data base Monday morning (6 April 1998). The image was processed at the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) facility 9:15 AM and the raw image immediately transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for release to the Internet. The images shown here were subsequently processed at MSSS.

    The picture was acquired 375 seconds after the spacecraft's 220th close approach to Mars. At that time, the 'Face', located at approximately 40.8o N, 9.6o W, was 275 miles (444 km) from the spacecraft. The 'morning' sun was 25o above the horizon. The picture has a resolution of 14.1 feet (4.3 meters) per pixel, making it ten times higher resolution than the best previous image of the feature, which was taken by the Viking Mission in the mid-1970's. The full image covers an area 2.7 miles (4.4 km) wide and 25.7 miles (41.5 km) long.

    This Viking Orbiter image is one of the best Viking pictures of the area Cydonia where the 'Face' is located. Marked on the image are the 'footprint' of the high resolution (narrow angle) Mars Orbiter Camera image and the area seen in enlarged views (dashed box). See PIA01440-1442 for these images in raw and processed form.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  20. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    PubMed Central

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish

  1. Agility - The Danish Way (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Agility - The Danish Way Dr. William Mitchell Dept. for Joint Operations | C2 & Intelligence | Royal Danish Defence College Ryvangs Allé 1...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Royal Danish Defence College,Dept...Establish presence in Mogadishu and expand with main effort in Southern Somalia. •MD2- Establish small military presence in Somaliland. • P/SD1-ID Clan

  2. Fine particles on Mars - Observations with the Viking 1 lander cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutch, T. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Binder, A. B.; Huck, F. O.; Levinthal, E. C.; Liebes, S., Jr.; Morris, E. C.; Nummedal, D.; Pollack, J. B.; Sagan, C.

    1976-01-01

    Drifts of fine-grained sediment are present in the vicinity of the Viking 1 lander. Many drifts occur in the lees of large boulders. Morphologic analysis indicates that the last dynamic event was one of general deflation for at least some drifts. Particle cohesion implies that there is a distinct small-particle upturn in the threshold velocity-particle size curve; the apparent absence of the most easily moved particles (150 micrometers in diameter) may be due to their preferential transport to other regions or their preferential collisional destruction. A twilight rescan with lander cameras indicates a substantial amount of red dust with mean radius on the order of 1 micrometer in the atmosphere.

  3. Fine particles on mars: Observations with the viking 1 lander cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mutch, T.A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Binder, A.B.; Huck, F.O.; Levinthal, E.C.; Liebes, S.; Morris, E.C.; Nummedal, D.; Pollack, James B.; Sagan, C.

    1976-01-01

    Drifts of fine-grained sediment are present in the vicinity of the Viking 1 lander. Many drifts occur in the lees of large boulders. Morphologic analysis indicates that the last dynamic event was one of general deflation for at least some drifts. Particle cohesion implies that there is a distinct small-particle upturn in the threshold velocity-particle size curve; the apparent absence of the most easily moved particles (150 micrometers in diameter) may be due to their preferential transport to other regions or their preferential collisional destruction. A twilight rescan with lander cameras indicates a substantial amount of red dust with mean radius on the order of 1 micrometer in the atmosphere.

  4. The surface of Mars: The view from the Viking 1 lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mutch, T.A.; Binder, A.B.; Huck, F.O.; Levinthal, E.C.; Liebes, S.; Morris, E.C.; Patterson, W.R.; Pollack, James B.; Sagan, C.; Taylor, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    The first photographs ever returned from the surface of Mars were obtained by two facsimile cameras aboard the Viking 1 lander, including black-and-white and color, 0.12?? and 0.04?? resolution, and monoscopic and stereoscopic images. The surface, on the western slopes of Chryse Planitia, is a boulder-strewn deeply reddish desert, with distant eminences - some of which may be the rims of impact craters - surmounted by a pink sky. Both impact and aeolian processes are evident. After dissipation of a small dust cloud stirred by the landing maneuvers, no subsequent signs of movement were detected on the landscape, and nothing has been observed that is indicative of macroscopic biology at this time and place.

  5. Simulation of Viking biology experiments suggests smectites not palagonites, as martian soil analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Margulies, L.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental comparison of palagonites and a smectite (montmorillonite) was performed in a simulation of the Viking Biology Labelled Release (LR) experiment in order to judge which mineral is a better Mars soil analog material (MarSAM). Samples of palagonite were obtained from cold weathering environments and volcanic soil, and the smectite was extracted from Wyoming Bentonite and converted to H or Fe types. Decomposition reaction kinetics were examined in the LR simulation, which on the Lander involved interaction of the martian soil with organic compounds. Reflectance spectroscopy indicated that smectites bearing Fe(III) in well-crystallized sites are not good MarSAMS. The palagonites did not cause the formate decomposition and C-14 emission detected in the LR, indicating that palagonites are also not good MarSAMS. Smectites, however, may be responsible for ion exchange, molecular adsorption, and catalysis in martian soil.

  6. Meteorological results from the surface of Mars - Viking 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, S. L.; Henry, R. M.; Leovy, C. B.; Tillman, J. E.; Ryan, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The meteorology equipment carried by the Viking landers was intended to measure atmospheric temperature, wind speed, wind direction, and pressure. During the summer months, the winds were a few meters per second, with a complex hodograph and the Lander-1 site, dominated by counterclockwise turning of the wind, and a simpler hodograph at the Lander-2 site, marked by clockwise turning of the wind. With advancing season, the repetitive wind pattern began to break down, and protracted northeasterly winds were recorded on several occasions (some of which are associated with lower than normal temperatures). Examples are given of wind and temperature traces over short periods, illustrating the effects of convection, static stability, and lander interference. A theoretical argument, based on the horizontal scale dictated by heating of slopes and on vertical mixing of momentum, is presented to explain the different sense of wind rotation at the two lander sites.

  7. Viking Mars lander 1975 dynamic test model/orbiter developmental test model forced vibration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, J.; Brownlee, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Viking Mars Lander 1975 dynamic test model and orbiter developmental test model were subjected to forced vibration sine tests. Flight acceptance (FA) and type approval (TA) test levels were applied to the spacecraft structure in a longitudinal test configuration using a 133,440-N (30,000-lb) force shaker. Testing in the two lateral axes (X, Y) was performed at lower levels using four 667-N (150-lb) force shakers. Forced vibration qualification (TA) test levels were successfully imposed on the spacecraft at frequencies down to 10 Hz. Measured responses showed the same character as analytical predictions, and correlation was reasonably good. Because of control system test tolerances, orbiter primary structure generally did not reach the design load limits attained in earlier static testing. A post-test examination of critical orbiter structure disclosed no apparent damage to the structure as a result of the test environment.

  8. Pyrolysis of organic compounds in the presence of ammonia The Viking Mars lander site alteration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, G.; Oro, J.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of ammonia on the pyrolysis pattern of selected organic substances sorbed on an inorganic phase was investigated. The thermal degradation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The feasibility of this technique was tested on a meteoritic sample. All substances examined react with ammonia at the pyrolysis temperature of 500 C, the major products being nitriles and heterocyclic compounds in which nitrogen was incorporated. Based on these results, a model for the non-equilibrium production of organic compounds on Jupiter is discussed. The investigation was performed in connection with the Viking lander molecular analysis. The results obtained indicate that the concentrations of ammonia in the retrorocket fuel exhaust would have been probably too small to produce significant changes in the Martian soil organic compounds if any were found.

  9. The surface of Mars: there view from the viking 1 lander.

    PubMed

    Mutch, T A; Binder, A B; Huck, F O; Levinthal, E C; Liebes, S; Morris, E C; Patterson, W R; Pollack, J B; Sagan, C; Taylor, G R

    1976-08-27

    The first photographs ever returned from the surface of Mars were obtained by two facsimile cameras aboard the Viking 1 lander, including black-and-white and color, 0.12 degrees and 0.04 degrees resolution, and monoscopic and stereoscopic images. The surface, on the western slopes of Chtyse Planitia, is a boulder-strewn deeply reddish desert, with distant eminences-some of which may be the rims of impact craters-surmounted by a pink sky. Both impact and aeolian processes are evident. After dissipation of a small dust cloud stirred by the landing maneuvers, no subsequent signs of movement were detected on the landscape, and nothing has been observed that is indicative of macroscopic biology at this time and place.

  10. Fine particles on Mars: observations with the viking 1 lander cameras.

    PubMed

    Mutch, T A; Arvidson, R E; Binder, A B; Huck, F O; Levinthal, E C; Liebes, S; Morris, E C; Nummedal, D; Pollack, J B; Sagan, C

    1976-10-01

    Drifts of fine-grained sediment are present in the vicinity of the Viking 1 lander. Many drifts occur in the lees of large boulders. Morphologic analysis indicates that the last dynamic event was one of general deflation for at least some drifts. Particle cohesion implies that there is a distinct small-particle upturn in the threshold velocity-particle size curve; the apparent absence of the most easily moved particles (150 micrometers in diameter) may be due to their preferential transport to other regions or their preferential collisional destruction. A twilight rescan with lander cameras indicates a substantial amount of red dust with mean radius on the order of 1 micrometer in the atmosphere.

  11. Image quality prediction - An aid to the Viking lander imaging investigation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Wall, S. D.

    1976-01-01

    Image quality criteria and image quality predictions are formulated for the multispectral panoramic cameras carried by the Viking Mars landers. Image quality predictions are based on expected camera performance, Mars surface radiance, and lighting and viewing geometry (fields of view, Mars lander shadows, solar day-night alternation), and are needed in diagnosis of camera performance, in arriving at a preflight imaging strategy, and revision of that strategy should the need arise. Landing considerations, camera control instructions, camera control logic, aspects of the imaging process (spectral response, spatial response, sensitivity), and likely problems are discussed. Major concerns include: degradation of camera response by isotope radiation, uncertainties in lighting and viewing geometry and in landing site local topography, contamination of camera window by dust abrasion, and initial errors in assigning camera dynamic ranges (gains and offsets).

  12. The search for life on Mars - Viking 1976 gas changes as indicators of biological activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Berdahl, B. J.; Carle, G. C.; Lehwalt, M. E.; Ginoza, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of the gas exchange experiment (GEX) in the Viking lander biology instrument package is to determine whether life exists in a 1-cc Martian soil sample delivered to it. The GEX is capable of maximum flexibility while protecting the indigenous organisms from exposure to physiologically incompatible medium. The discussion covers the biological premises implemented in the GEX, the requirements for the GEX M4 medium, the operational aspects of the incubation chamber, nonbiological and biological changes, and Antarctica soil experiment. Sources of biological gas changes are examined along with ways of differentiating biological gas changes from nonbiological ones. From cold incubation of low-frequency soils, it is concluded that decisive negative tests of GEX may require extended incubations beyond the nominal mission plan of 60 days, barring any outright information that negates the presence of life on Mars.

  13. The surface of Mars - The view from the Viking 1 lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutch, T. A.; Patterson, W. R.; Binder, A. B.; Huck, F. O.; Taylor, G. R.; Levinthal, E. C.; Liebes, S., Jr.; Morris, E. C.; Pollack, J. B.; Sagan, C.

    1976-01-01

    Imagery of the surface of Mars obtained by Viking 1 is analyzed. The lander is situated on the western slopes of the 5-km deep Chryse Planitia depression, about 2 km higher than the floor. The topography is gently rolling. Angular rocks and small sand dunes are visible. There are very few craters; initial evaluations indicate that crater area densities are several orders of magnitude below saturation for crater sizes less than about 50 m. The presence of scour marks and of fine-grained deposits in some boulders indicates that some aeolian activity has occurred. Almost all the sky brightness can be attributed to scattering by particles present in the atmosphere. No signs of movement have been detected, consistent with the low seasonal winds recorded by meteorological instruments.

  14. Solar wind electron densities from Viking dual-frequency radio measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Anderson, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Simultaneous phase coherent, two-frequency measurements of the time delay between the earth station and the Viking spacecraft have been analyzed in terms of the electron density profiles from 4 solar radii to 200 solar radii. The measurements were made during a period of solar activity minimum (1976-1977) and show a strong solar latitude effect. The data were analyzed with both a model independent, direct numerical inversion technique and with model fitting, yielding essentially the same results. It is shown that the solar wind density can be represented by two power laws near the solar equator proportional to r exp -2.7 and r exp -2.04. However, the more rapidly falling term quickly disappears at moderate latitudes (approximately 20 deg) leaving only the inverse-square behavior.

  15. Debris Kicked Up By Impact of A Protective Cover from Viking Lander 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-12-12

    The patch of dark material toward the top of this picture (arrow) taken by NASA's Viking 1 Lander is the debris kicked up by the impact of a protective cover ejected from the spacecraft at 1 a.m. today. The cylindrical cover, which bounced out of view of the camera, protects the scoop at the end of the soil sampler arm. (The scoop will dig into the Martian surface for the first time on July 28). Dust and debris atop the footpad remains as it was seen in the Lander's first picture taken immediately after landing two days ago. No wind modification is apparent. On the surface, a variety of block sizes, shapes and tones are seen, and some rocks are Partially buried. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00384

  16. Mars gravity field model from Mariner 9, Viking 1 and 2 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balmino, G.; Moynot, B.; Christensen, E. J.; Roucher, P.; Vales, N.

    1979-01-01

    Earth artificial satellite methods are extended by means of two way Doppler data, to the computation of very accurate orbiter trajectories around another planet, and to the determination of its gravity field. It is reported that in the case of Mars, all observations collected by 10 Deep Space Network stations located at three different sites during the Mariner 9 and Viking 1 and 2 missions have been processed and used to compute a full twelfth degree and order spherical harmonic model of the gravitational potential. It is concluded that the aeroid derived from the model shows very large correlations with the Martian topography, raising questions as to the deep structure of the planet which cannot be interpreted on the basis of topographic and isostatic considerations alone.

  17. Dynamic Wind-Tunnel Testing of a Sub-Scale Iced S-3B Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sam; Barnhart, Billy; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ice accretion on a 1/12-scale complete aircraft model of S-3B Viking was studied in a rotary-balance wind tunnel. Two types of ice accretions were considered: ice protection system failure shape and runback shapes that form downstream of the thermal ice protection system. The results showed that the ice shapes altered the stall characteristics of the aircraft. The ice shapes also reduced the control surface effectiveness, but mostly near the stall angle of attack. There were some discrepancies with the data with the flaps deflected that were attributed to the low Reynolds number of the test. Rotational and forced-oscillation studies showed that the effects of ice were mostly in the longitudinal forces, and the effects on the lateral forces were relatively minor.

  18. Implications of Curiosity's findings for the Viking labeled-release experiment and life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Gilbert V.

    2013-09-01

    Curiosity's latest reported findings, or lack thereof, are interpreted from the standpoint of their implications for the Viking Labeled Release experiment, and for life on Mars in general. As of the writing of this abstract, Curiosity has reported no findings related to those anticipated by the author's last year's paper, "Stealth Life Detection Experiments Aboard Curiosity." However, Curiosity scientists have stated that soil and rock samples have been taken and analyzed, and abundant images have been downloaded. The only (indirectly) relevant reports issued by Curiosity scientists concern small-molecule organics found in a soil sample, which simple compounds they suggest might be terrestrial contamination, and images of rocks with colored (green) patches, the latter not of sufficient resolution (of which the cameras are capable) to detect possible evidence of biology. Hopefully, by the time of preparation of the body of this paper, more information will be available.

  19. Mineralogic and petrologic implications of Viking geochemical results from Mars - Interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, A. K.; Toulmin, P., III; Rose, H. J., Jr.; Christian, R. P.; Clark, B. C.; Keil, K.; Gooding, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical results from four samples of Martian fines delivered to Viking landers 1 and 2 are remarkably similar in that they all have high iron; moderate magnesium, calcium, and sulfur; low aluminum; and apparently very low alkalies and trace elements. This composition is best interpreted as representing the weathering products of mafic igneous rocks. A mineralogic model, derived from computer mixing studies and laboratory analog preparations, suggests that Mars fines could be an intimate mixture of about 80% iron-rich clay, about 10% magnesium sulfate (kieserite), about 5% carbonate (calcite), and about 5% iron oxides (hematite, magnetite, maghemite, goethite). The mafic nature of the present fines (distributed globally) and their probable source rocks seems to preclude large-scale planetary differentiation of a terrestrial nature.

  20. Orbital trim by velocity factoring with applications to the Viking mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, J. F.; Green, R. N.; Young, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    An orbital trim technique has been developed to satisfy terminal rendezvous and intermediate timing constraints for planetary missions involving orbital operations. The technique utilizes a time-open two-impulse transfer from a specified initial orbit to a final orbit which satisfies all geometrical constraints. Each of the two impulses may then be factored, or split, into two or more vectorially equivalent impulses. The periods of the resulting intermediate orbits may be varied along with the number of revolutions in each orbit to satisfy the intermediate and final timing constraints. Factors in the range 0 to 1 result in rendezvous at the same cost as that of the two-impulse transfer. The technique is applied to the Viking mission to Mars although a similar procedure could be utilized for rendezvous operations about any planet.

  1. The control net of Mars - May 1977. [from Viking lander spacecraft radio tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    The development of planet-wide control nets of Mars is reviewed, and the May 1977 update is described. This updated control net was computed by means of a large single-block analytical triangulation incorporating the new direction of the spin axis and the new rotation rate of Mars, as determined from radio tracking data provided by the Viking lander spacecraft. The analytical triangulation adjusts for planimetric control only (areocentric latitude and longitude) and for the camera orientation angles. Most of the areocentric radii at the control points were interpolated from radio occultation measurements, but a few were determined photogrammetically, and a substantial number were derived from elevation contours on the 1976 USGS topographic series of Mars maps. A value of V, measured from Mars' vernal equinox along the equator to the prime meridian (Airy-0) is presented.

  2. Simulation of Viking biology experiments suggests smectites not palagonites, as martian soil analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Margulies, L.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental comparison of palagonites and a smectite (montmorillonite) was performed in a simulation of the Viking Biology Labelled Release (LR) experiment in order to judge which mineral is a better Mars soil analog material (MarSAM). Samples of palagonite were obtained from cold weathering environments and volcanic soil, and the smectite was extracted from Wyoming Bentonite and converted to H or Fe types. Decomposition reaction kinetics were examined in the LR simulation, which on the Lander involved interaction of the martian soil with organic compounds. Reflectance spectroscopy indicated that smectites bearing Fe(III) in well-crystallized sites are not good MarSAMS. The palagonites did not cause the formate decomposition and C-14 emission detected in the LR, indicating that palagonites are also not good MarSAMS. Smectites, however, may be responsible for ion exchange, molecular adsorption, and catalysis in martian soil.

  3. The Viking gas exchange experiment results from Chryse and Utopia surface samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Berdahl, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Immediate gas changes occurred when untreated Martian surface samples were humidified and/or wet by an aqueous nutrient medium in the Viking lander gas exchange experiment. The evolutions of N2, CO2, and Ar are mainly associated with soil surface desorption caused by water vapor, while O2 evolution is primarily associated with decomposition of superoxides inferred to be present on Mars. On recharges with fresh nutrient and test gas, only CO2 was given off, and its rate of evolution decreased with each recharge. This CO2 evolution is thought to come from the oxidation of organics present in the nutrient by gamma Fe2O3 in the surface samples. Atmospheric analyses were also performed at both sites. The mean atmospheric composition from four analyses is N2, 2.3%; O2, not greater than 0.15%; Ar, 1.5% and CO2, 96.2%.

  4. Analysis of condensates formed at the Viking 2 lander site - The first winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    Relative surface albedo, spectral reflectance estimates and a limited photometric function are reduced from Viking 2 lander data obtained during a 249 Mars day period, in the lander's first year, when a light ground covering appeared on the surface. During the deposition, surface broadband albedo more than doubled and blue reflectance increased by a factor of 4.0. Comparison of lander data with earlier laboratory measurements of CO2 and H2O frosts and snows shows that reflectance estimates do not resemble either of those solids. The condensate reflectance resembles that of the surface after the covering disappeared. The covering may have been colored by dust which fell before it, by dust mixed with it, or by dust on top of it; but the data strongly support a mixture of dust with H2O and CO2 solids. The covering thickness is estimated to be between 0.5 and a few millimeters.

  5. A boundary-layer model for Mars - Comparison with Viking lander and entry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Houben, H. C.; Hertenstein, R.; Herdtle, T.

    1993-06-01

    A 1D boundary-layer model of Mars based on a momentum equation that describes friction, pressure gradient, and Coriolis forces is presented. Frictional forces and convective heating are computed using the level-2 turbulence closure theory of Mellor and Yamada (1974). The model takes into account the radiative effects of CO2 gas and suspended dust particles. Both radiation and convection depend on surface temperatures which are computed from a surface heat budget. Model predictions are compared with available observations from Viking landers. It is concluded that, in general, the model reproduces the basic features of the temperature data. The agreement is particularly good at entry time for the V L-2 site, where the model and observations are within several degrees at all levels for which data are available.

  6. Ground water for irrigation in the Viking Basin, west-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    The Viking Basin consists of six glacial outwash areas in Douglas, Ottertail, and Todd Counties, west-central Minnesota. Total area is 340 square miles (880 square kilometres). Soils are sandy and excessively well-drained. Crops grown on the outwash would benefit from supplemental irrigation. Irrigation supplies can be obtained from wells in the surface outwash aquifer in significant parts of the large outwash areas near Carlos and Parkers Prairie and the small outwash area near Clotho. Irrigation supplies are unlikely in the outwash areas near Alexandria, Urbank, and Rose City. Major use of ground water for irrigation may lower ground-water levels sufficiently to affect lake and marsh levels and streamflow out of the irrigation areas. Water from the outwash is of excellent chemical quality for irrigation.

  7. The control net of Mars - May 1977. [from Viking lander spacecraft radio tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    The development of planet-wide control nets of Mars is reviewed, and the May 1977 update is described. This updated control net was computed by means of a large single-block analytical triangulation incorporating the new direction of the spin axis and the new rotation rate of Mars, as determined from radio tracking data provided by the Viking lander spacecraft. The analytical triangulation adjusts for planimetric control only (areocentric latitude and longitude) and for the camera orientation angles. Most of the areocentric radii at the control points were interpolated from radio occultation measurements, but a few were determined photogrammetically, and a substantial number were derived from elevation contours on the 1976 USGS topographic series of Mars maps. A value of V, measured from Mars' vernal equinox along the equator to the prime meridian (Airy-0) is presented.

  8. On the spectral reflectance properties of materials exposed at the Viking landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, Edward A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Dale-Bannister, Mary A.; Singer, Robert B.; Bruckenthal, Eileen A.

    1987-01-01

    Bidirectional reflectances for the blue, green, and red channels were determined for 31 block and soil exposures imaged by the two Viking Lander Cameras on Mars and were calibrated to within 10 percent uncertainties. The observed variations in bidirectional reflectance in the visible and relative brightness in the IR could be best explained by varying degrees of oxidation and ferric iron crystallinity, while most block surfaces had reflectances consistent with thin to optically thick covers of palagonitic material. These results are consistent with the conclusion that blocks seen at both sites are mafic rocks coated to varying thicknesses with amorphous oxidized material. The differences observed in reflectance properties for common block surfaces and common soils imply that local weathering of blocks has not contributed significantly to the soil exposed at the landing sites.

  9. Dry-heat resistance of selected psychrophiles. [Viking lander in spacecraft sterilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winans, L.; Pflug, I. J.; Foster, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The dry-heat resistance characteristics of spores of psychrophilic organisms isolated from soil samples from the Viking spacecraft assembly areas at Cape Kennedy Space Flight Center, Cape Canaveral, Fla., were studied. Spore suspensions were produced, and dry-heat D values were determined for the microorganisms that demonstrated growth or survival under a simulated Martian environment. The dry-heat tests were carried out by using the planchet-boat-hot plate system at 110 and 125 C with an ambient relative humidity of 50% at 22 C. The spores evaluated had a relatively low resistance to dry heat. D (110 C) values ranged from 7.5 to 122 min, whereas the D (125 C) values ranged from less than 1.0 to 9.8 min.

  10. A boundary-layer model for Mars - Comparison with Viking lander and entry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Houben, Howard C.; Hertenstein, Rolf; Herdtle, Tomas

    1993-01-01

    A 1D boundary-layer model of Mars based on a momentum equation that describes friction, pressure gradient, and Coriolis forces is presented. Frictional forces and convective heating are computed using the level-2 turbulence closure theory of Mellor and Yamada (1974). The model takes into account the radiative effects of CO2 gas and suspended dust particles. Both radiation and convection depend on surface temperatures which are computed from a surface heat budget. Model predictions are compared with available observations from Viking landers. It is concluded that, in general, the model reproduces the basic features of the temperature data. The agreement is particularly good at entry time for the V L-2 site, where the model and observations are within several degrees at all levels for which data are available.

  11. Studies related to the development of the Viking 1975 labeled release experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L.; Deal, P. H.

    1976-01-01

    The labeled release life detection experiment on the Viking 1975 Mars mission is based on the concept that microorganisms will metabolize radioactive organic substrates in a nutrient medium and release radioactive carbon dioxide. Several experiments, using laboratory equipment, were carried out to evaluate various aspects of the concept. Results indicate: (1) label is released by sterilization-treated soil, (2) substantial quantities of label are retained in solution under basic conditions, (3) the substrate used, as well as position of label in the molecule, affect release of label, (4) label release is depressed by radiolytic decomposition of substrates, and (5) About 100,000 organisms are required to produce a detectable response. These results, suggest additional areas for testing, add to the data base for interpretation of flight results, and have significance for broader application of this technique for assessing microbial activity.

  12. Pyrolysis of organic compounds in the presence of ammonia The Viking Mars lander site alteration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, G.; Oro, J.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of ammonia on the pyrolysis pattern of selected organic substances sorbed on an inorganic phase was investigated. The thermal degradation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The feasibility of this technique was tested on a meteoritic sample. All substances examined react with ammonia at the pyrolysis temperature of 500 C, the major products being nitriles and heterocyclic compounds in which nitrogen was incorporated. Based on these results, a model for the non-equilibrium production of organic compounds on Jupiter is discussed. The investigation was performed in connection with the Viking lander molecular analysis. The results obtained indicate that the concentrations of ammonia in the retrorocket fuel exhaust would have been probably too small to produce significant changes in the Martian soil organic compounds if any were found.

  13. Determinants of sunbed use in a population of Danish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bentzen, Joan; Krarup, Anne F; Castberg, Ida-Marie; Jensen, Poul D; Philip, Anja

    2013-03-01

    In Denmark, melanoma is the most common type of cancer in individuals aged 15-34 years. Ultraviolet radiation from sunbeds is a risk factor for melanoma. Knowledge of the characteristics of sunbed users is important in the development and implementation of prevention strategies of sunbed use. The objective of this study was to examine sunbed use and its association with smoking, parental socioeconomic status (SES), friends' attitudes towards artificial tanning, and school environment among adolescents aged 14-18 years at continuation schools in Denmark. We conducted a survey among adolescents in Danish continuation schools in 2011. We examined sunbed use and its association with age, smoking, friends' attitudes towards artificial tanning, parental SES, and shared environment of the continuation school, using logistic regression. Within the past 12 months, 38% of the pupils had used a sunbed (70% girls and 28% boys). There was no difference in sunbed use according to age. Smoking and friends' positive attitudes towards, and higher use of sunbeds were associated with increased use of sunbeds. High SES of mothers' was associated with lower odds for sunbed use among girls. The association of school environment with sunbed use was modest compared with the other variables. Adolescents in continuation schools report a higher use of sunbeds than Danish adolescents as such. Educational interventions should be targeted at preteens, as sunbed use is common in 14-year-olds. Special educational tools are tested in the continuation school environment and may prove effective in this population.

  14. Ninth grade school performance in Danish childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Frederiksen, Marie Hoffmann; Winther, Jeanette Falck

    2017-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors can experience learning problems resulting in lower-than-expected attained education as adults. It is unclear whether learning problems manifest already during adolescence. We analysed nationwide Danish registries on school grades for Danish children during 2001-2014. Applying a matched design we compared grades of childhood cancer survivors to children without cancer at ninth grade. We estimated grade differences by subject and its correlation to cancer site and age at diagnosis. The available statistical precision allowed for an analysis of more rare cancer sites. The total study population was 793 332 children (mean age 15.24 years and 49.7% girls), of whom 1320 were childhood cancer survivors. Lower rank grades were seen in children with cancer in all school subjects but differed substantially according to cancer site. Most affected were survivors of central nervous system (CNS) tumours, neuroblastoma, lymphoma, leukaemia, other malignant neoplasm and germ-cell tumours. Survivors from other cancer types did not obtain lower grades. Lower rank grades were associated with young age at diagnosis. The effect of childhood cancer differed substantially between cancer sites. The largest effect was among survivors of CNS tumours and leukaemia diagnosed at a young age, suggesting an association with radiation therapy. However, the majority of cancer survivors fare well. Increasing awareness on children affected by cancer and special accommodations may help maximise the learning potential of those most affected.

  15. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Brasso, Klaus; Jakobsen, Erik Breth; Moe, Mette; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Nakano, Anne; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. Study population All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. Main variables The DAPROCAdata registers clinical data and selected characteristics for patients with prostate cancer at diagnosis. Data are collected from the linkage of nationwide health registries and supplemented with online registration of key clinical variables by treating physicians at urological and oncological departments. Main variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). Descriptive data In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015. A key feature of DAPROCAdata is the routine collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), including data on quality-of-life (pain levels, physical activity, sexual function, depression, urine and fecal incontinence) and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and body mass index). PROM data are derived from questionnaires distributed at diagnosis and at 1-year and 3-year follow-up. Hitherto, the PROM data have been limited by low completeness (26% among newly diagnosed patients in 2014). Conclusion DAPROCAdata is a comprehensive, yet still young clinical database. Efforts to improve data collection, data validity, and completeness are ongoing and of high priority. PMID:27843346

  16. Physical properties of the martian surface from the viking 1 lander: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Shorthill, R W; Hutton, R E; Moore, H J; Scott, R F; Spitzer, C R

    1976-08-27

    The purpose of the physical properties experiment is to determine the characteristics of the martian "soil" based on the use of the Viking lander imaging system, the surface sampler, and engineering sensors. Viking 1 lander made physical contact with the surface of Mars at 11:53:07.1 hours on 20 July 1976 G.M.T. Twenty-five seconds later a high-resolution image sequence of the area around a footpad was started which contained the first information about surface conditions on Mars. The next image is a survey of the martian landscape in front of the lander, including a view of the top support of two of the landing legs. Each leg has a stroke gauge which extends from the top of the leg support an amount equal to the crushing experienced by the shock absorbers during touchdown. Subsequent images provided views of all three stroke gauges which, together with the knowledge of the impact velocity, allow determination of "soil" properties. In the images there is evidence of surface erosion from the engines. Several laboratory tests were carried out prior to the mission with a descent engine to determine what surface alterations might occur during a Mars landing. On sol 2 the shroud, which protected the surface sampler collector head from biological contamination, was ejected onto the surface. Later a cylindrical pin which dropped from the boom housing of the surface sampler during the modified unlatching sequence produced a crater (the second Mars penetrometer experiment). These two experiments provided further insight into the physical properties of the martian surface.

  17. Comparison of Phoenix Meteorological Data with Viking Data Using Model MLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Walter; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kauhanen, Janne; Merikallio, Sini; Savijärvi, Hannu

    2010-05-01

    During 151 Martian days in 2008 the Canadian Meteorology experiment (MET) [1] on board NASA's Phoenix '07 Lander was providing for the first time surface based observations of atmospheric pressure, temperature and wind as well as dust and ice particles in the Martian Northern polar regions, 20 degrees north of the location of Viking Lander 2, the until then northernmost meteorological observatory on Mars. Using the Mars Limited Area Model (MLAM), jointly developed by the Helsinki University and the Finnish Meteorological Institute to study mesoscale phenomena in the Martian Atmosphere [2], the observations can be put into a larger context suitable for comparison with long term measurements at the Viking landing site three decades earlier. The seasonal variations observed at both latitudes are very similar though the onset of winter dominated climate is faster at higher latitudes. In case the re-activation efforts of Phoenix should be successful, first results for the Martian Spring at high latitudes will be shown, too. The meteorological observations over a long period of time and at different latitudes are important for the preparation of the planned future Martian landing missions Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) 2011, the ESA - NASA ExoMars program 2016-2018 and the Finnish-Russian-Spanish MetNet mission after 2011, where different meteorological stations will be deployed at low and high latitudes and low and high altitudes. Mission optimization makes reliable climate estimates mandatory. References [1] Taylor, P. A., D. C. Catling, M. Daly, C. S. Dickinson, H. P. Gunnlaugsson, A.-M. Harri, and C. F. Lange (2008), J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A10 [2] Kauhanen, J., Siili, T., Järvenoja, S. and Savijärvi, H. (2008), J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A14

  18. Martian North Polar Water-Ice Clouds During the Viking Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Bass, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The Viking Orbiters determined that the surface of Mars' northern residual cap consists of water ice. Observed atmospheric water vapor abundances in the equatorial regions have been related to seasonal exchange between reservoirs such as the polar caps, the regolith and between different phases in the atmosphere. Kahn modeled the physical characteristics of ice hazes seen in Viking Orbiter imaging limb data, hypothesizing that ice hazes provide a method for scavenging water vapor from the atmosphere and accumulating it into ice particles. Given that Jakosky found that these particles had sizes such that fallout times were of order one Martian sol, these water-ice hazes provided a method for returning more water to the regolith than that provided by adsorption alone. These hazes could also explain the rapid hemispheric decrease in atmospheric water in late northern summer as well as the increase during the following early spring. A similar comparison of water vapor abundance versus polar cap brightness has been done for the north polar region. They have shown that water vapor decreases steadily between L(sub s) = 100-150 deg while polar cap albedo increases during the same time frame. As a result, they suggested that late summer water-ice deposition onto the ice cap may be the cause of the cap brightening. This deposition could be due to adsorption directly onto the cap surface or to snowfall. Thus, an examination of north polar waterice clouds could lend insight into the fate of the water vapor during this time period. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VIKING catalogue data release 1 (Edge+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, A.; Sutherland, W.; VIKING Team

    2014-09-01

    The VIKING survey with VISTA (ESO programme ID 179.A-2004) is a wide area (eventually 1500 sq.degrees), intermediate-depth (5-sigma detection limit J=21 on Vega system) near-infrared imaging survey, in the five broadband filters Z, Y, J, H, Ks. The planned sky coverage is at high galactic latitudes, and includes two main stripes 70x10°2 each: one in the South Galactic cap near Dec~-30°, and one near Dec~0° in the North galactic cap; in addition, there are two smaller outrigger patches called GAMA09 and CFHLS-W1. Science goals include z>6.5 quasars, extreme brown dwarfs, and multiwavelength coverage and identifications for a range of other imaging surveys, notably VST-KIDS and Herschel-ATLAS. This first public data release of data taken between the 12th of November 2009 and the 13th of February 2011 includes 151 tiles with complete coverage in all five VIKING filters (55 in GAMA09/12/14, 91 in SGP and 5 in CFHLS-W1) i.e. 226 square degrees, and includes approximately 14,773,385 total sources (including low-reliability single-band detections) and the imaging and source lists total 314.4GB. The coverage in each of the five sub-areas is not completely contiguous but any inter-tile gaps are relatively small. More details can be found in the accompanying documentation: vikingcatdr1.pdf (3 data files).

  20. Decadal Variations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation as simulated by the VIKING20 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handmann, Patricia; Fischer, Jürgen; Visbeck, Martin; Behrens, Erik; Patara, Lavinia

    2015-04-01

    Time series of observed deep circulation transports and water mass properties in the subpolar North Atlantic are beginning to be long enough to investigate multiannual to decadal variability of the deep water. At the same time high resolution ocean circulation models (1/20° resolution VIKING20 model) can be used to compare observations with model simulation. The models also allow to diagnose the deep water circulation processes more completely and to relate local to basin scale signals. North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is a complex combination of water masses from different origins and pathways that meet at the exit of the Labrador Sea. The lower part of NADW is formed by water masses entering the subpolar basin over the Greenland-Scotland ridge. Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) from the eastern sills has the longest pathway and joins the densest deep water component from Denmark Strait (DSOW) after crossing the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge through Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ); together, they form the Lower NADW. The upper component of the NADW is composed of Labrador Sea Water (LSW), which is formed and modified through deep convection in the Labrador Sea. Using 60 year long time series of North Atlantic water masses and currents produced by the Viking20 model driven by observed monthly winds, a comparison of transport variability of observed and modeled data will be presented at three locations: Deep flow at the exit of the Labrador Sea at 53°N; upper layer transports between New Jersey and Bermuda (OLEANDER section) and between the southern tip of Greenland and Portugal (OVIDE section). Is the model reproducing the observed long-term behavior of the different components in phase and amplitude? Do the results permit identification of the processes leading to these variations in transport variability? Finally, is it possible to extend the observed variability pattern over the observed time span (15 years) to the total time range of the model simulations (60