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Sample records for dark energy eos

  1. A new class of LRS Bianchi type-II dark energy models with variable EoS parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Amirhashchi, Hassan; Jaiswal, Rekha

    2011-08-01

    A new class of dark energy models in a Locally Rotationally Symmetric Bianchi type-II (LRS B-II) space-time with variable equation of state (EoS) parameter and constant deceleration parameter have been investigated in the present paper. The Einstein's field equations have been solved by applying a variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter given by Berman: Nuovo Cimento 74:182 (1983) which generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential-law form. Using these two forms, Einstein's field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The dark energy EoS parameter ω is found to be time dependent and its existing range for both models is in good agreement with the three recent observations of (i) SNe Ia data (Knop et al.: Astrophys. J. 598:102 (2003)), (ii) SNe Ia data collaborated with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al.: Astrophys. J. 606:702 (2004)) and latest (iii) a combination of cosmological datasets coming from CMB anisotropies, luminosity distances of high redshift type Ia supernovae and galaxy clustering (Hinshaw et al.: Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180:225 (2009); Komatsu et al. Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180:330 (2009)). The cosmological constant Λ is found to be a positive decreasing function of time and it approaches a small positive value at late time (i.e. the present epoch) which is corroborated by results from recent supernovae Ia observations. The physical and geometric behaviour of the universe have also been discussed in detail.

  2. Are dark energy models with variable EoS parameter w compatible with the late inhomogeneous Universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Akarsu, Özgür; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Brilenkov, Maxim; Brilenkov, Ruslan; Eingorn, Maxim; Zhuk, Alexander E-mail: mbl@ubi.pt E-mail: ruslan.brilenkov@gmail.com E-mail: ai.zhuk2@gmail.com

    2015-07-01

    We study the late-time evolution of the Universe where dark energy (DE) is presented by a barotropic fluid on top of cold dark matter (CDM) . We also take into account the radiation content of the Universe. Here by the late stage of the evolution we refer to the epoch where CDM is already clustered into inhomogeneously distributed discrete structures (galaxies, groups and clusters of galaxies). Under this condition the mechanical approach is an adequate tool to study the Universe deep inside the cell of uniformity. More precisely, we study scalar perturbations of the FLRW metric due to inhomogeneities of CDM as well as fluctuations of radiation and DE. For an arbitrary equation of state for DE we obtain a system of equations for the scalar perturbations within the mechanical approach. First, in the case of a constant DE equation of state parameter w, we demonstrate that our method singles out the cosmological constant as the only viable dark energy candidate. Then, we apply our approach to variable equation of state parameters in the form of three different linear parametrizations of w, e.g., the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder perfect fluid model. We conclude that all these models are incompatible with the theory of scalar perturbations in the late Universe.

  3. G-corrected holographic dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekjani, M.; Honari-Jafarpour, M.

    2013-08-01

    Here we investigate the holographic dark energy model in the framework of FRW cosmology where the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, is varying with cosmic time. Using the complementary astronomical data which support the time dependency of G, the evolutionary treatment of EoS parameter and energy density of dark energy model are calculated in the presence of time variation of G. It has been shown that in this case, the phantom regime can be achieved at the present time. We also calculate the evolution of G-corrected deceleration parameter for holographic dark energy model and show that the dependency of G on the comic time can influence on the transition epoch from decelerated expansion to the accelerated phase. Finally we perform the statefinder analysis for G-corrected holographic model and show that this model has a shorter distance from the observational point in s- r plane compare with original holographic dark energy model.

  4. Holographic Dark Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    In this article we consider the cosmological model based on the holographic dark energy. We study dark energy density in Universe with arbitrary spatially curvature described by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. We use Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization to specify dark energy density.

  5. Inhomogeneous dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav E-mail: viatcheslav.Mukhanov@lmu.de

    2016-02-01

    We modify Einstein General Relativity by adding non-dynamical scalar fields to account simultaneously for both dark matter and dark energy. The dark energy in this case can be distributed in-homogeneously even within horizon scales. Its inhomogeneities can contribute to the late time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, possibly removing some of the low multipole anomalies in the temperature fluctuations of the CMB spectrum. The presence of the inhomogeneous dark matter also influences structure formation in the universe.

  6. EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrar, Ghassem; Dozier, Jeff

    Market: Students and researchers in geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics. This book reports on the timely Earth Observing System (EOS) Program's wide range of scientific investigations, observational capabilities, vast data and information system, and educational activities. Because its primary goal is to determine the extent, causes, and regional consequences of global climate change, this program provides the scientific knowledge needed by world leaders to formulate sound and equitable environmental policies.

  7. Metastable dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landim, Ricardo G.; Abdalla, Elcio

    2017-01-01

    We build a model of metastable dark energy, in which the observed vacuum energy is the value of the scalar potential at the false vacuum. The scalar potential is given by a sum of even self-interactions up to order six. The deviation from the Minkowski vacuum is due to a term suppressed by the Planck scale. The decay time of the metastable vacuum can easily accommodate a mean life time compatible with the age of the universe. The metastable dark energy is also embedded into a model with SU(2)R symmetry. The dark energy doublet and the dark matter doublet naturally interact with each other. A three-body decay of the dark energy particle into (cold and warm) dark matter can be as long as large fraction of the age of the universe, if the mediator is massive enough, the lower bound being at intermediate energy level some orders below the grand unification scale. Such a decay shows a different form of interaction between dark matter and dark energy, and the model opens a new window to investigate the dark sector from the point-of-view of particle physics.

  8. Elucidating dark energy with future 21 cm observations at the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

    2017-02-01

    We investigate how precisely we can determine the nature of dark energy such as the equation of state (EoS) and its time dependence by using future observations of 21 cm fluctuations at the epoch of reionization (06.8lesssim zlesssim1) such as Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and Omniscope in combination with those from cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillation, type Ia supernovae and direct measurement of the Hubble constant. We consider several parametrizations for the EoS and find that future 21 cm observations will be powerful in constraining models of dark energy, especially when its EoS varies at high redshifts.

  9. Fingerprinting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin

    2009-10-15

    Dark energy perturbations are normally either neglected or else included in a purely numerical way, obscuring their dependence on underlying parameters like the equation of state or the sound speed. However, while many different explanations for the dark energy can have the same equation of state, they usually differ in their perturbations so that these provide a fingerprint for distinguishing between different models with the same equation of state. In this paper we derive simple yet accurate approximations that are able to characterize a specific class of models (encompassing most scalar-field models) which is often generically called 'dark energy'. We then use the approximate solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the dark matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  10. Dark Energy, or Worse

    ScienceCinema

    Professor Sean Carroll

    2016-07-12

    General relativity is inconsistent with cosmological observations unless we invoke components of dark matter and dark energy that dominate the universe. While it seems likely that these exotic substances really do exist, the alternative is worth considering: that Einstein's general relativity breaks down on cosmological scales. I will discuss models of modified gravity, tests in the solar system and elsewhere, and consequences for cosmology.

  11. Dark Energy in the Dark Ages

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2006-04-11

    Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts would indicate dark energy physics distinct from a cosmological constant or"reasonable'" canonical scalar fields. Such dark energy can be constrained tightly through investigation of the growth of structure, with limits of<~;;2percent of total energy density at z>> 1 for many models. Intermediate dark energy can have effects distinct from its energy density; the dark ages acceleration can be constrained to last less than 5percent of a Hubble e-fold time, exacerbating the coincidence problem. Both the total linear growth, or equivalently sigma 8, and the shape and evolution of the nonlinear mass power spectrum for z<2 (using the Linder-White nonlinear mapping prescription) provide important windows. Probes of growth, such as weak gravitational lensing, can interact with supernovae and CMB distance measurements to scan dark energy behavior over the entire range z=0-1100.

  12. Is dark energy evolving?

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Remya; Jhingan, Sanjay E-mail: sanjay.jhingan@gmail.com

    2013-02-01

    We look for evidence for the evolution in dark energy density by employing Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Distance redshift data from supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) along with WMAP7 distance priors are used to put constraints on curvature parameter Ω{sub k} and dark energy parameters. The data sets are consistent with a flat Universe. The constraints on the dark energy evolution parameters obtained from supernovae (including CMB distance priors) are consistent with a flat ΛCDM Universe. On the other hand, in the parameter estimates obtained from the addition of BAO data the second principal component, which characterize a non-constant contribution from dark energy, is non-zero at 1σ. This could be a systematic effect and future BAO data holds key to making more robust claims.

  13. Cosmological study in loop quantum cosmology through dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila; Salako, Ines G.; Gulshan, Faiza

    The interacting generalized ghost version of pilgrim dark energy (GGPDE) is discussed in the framework of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We analyze the behavior of cosmological parameters (Hubble, equation of state (EoS), deceleration) and cosmological planes (ωD ‑ ωD‧ and r-s) in the present scenario (ωD represents the EoS parameter and ωD‧ indicates the evolution of the EoS parameter, r,s are statefinder parameters). It is observed that the deceleration parameter corresponds to the accelerated expansion of the universe. The EoS parameter lies in vacuum and phantom regions for all cases of u (pilgrim dark energy (PDE) parameter). The ωD ‑ ωD‧ plane lies in thawing region for all cases of u. The r ‑ s plane corresponds to Λ cold dark matter (CDM) and Chaplygin gas model. We have also mentioned the constraints on calculated cosmological parameters and found that all the trajectories of cosmological parameters and planes show the consistence behavior with the observational schemes.

  14. Is Dark Energy Falsifiable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, C. H.; Schild, R. E.

    2011-11-01

    Is the accelerating expansion of the Universe true, inferred through observations of distant supernovae, and is the implied existence of an enormous amount of anti- gravitational dark energy material driving the accelerating expansion of the universe also true? To be physically useful these propositions must be falsifiable; that is, subject to observational tests that could render them false, and both fail when viscous, diffusive, astro-biological and turbulence effects are included in the interpretation of observations. A more plausible explanation of negative stresses producing the big bang is turbulence at Planck temperatures. Inflation results from gluon viscous stresses at the strong force transition. Anti-gravitational (dark energy) turbulence stresses are powerful but only temporary. No permanent dark energy is needed. At the plasma-gas transition, viscous stresses cause fragmentation of plasma proto-galaxies into dark matter clumps of primordial gas planets, each of which falsifies dark-energy cold-dark-matter cosmologies. Clumps of these planets form all stars, and explain the alleged accelerating expansion of the universe as a systematic dimming error of Supernovae Ia by light scattered in the hot turbulent atmospheres of evaporated planets surrounding central white dwarf stars.

  15. Big Mysteries: Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-04-15

    Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up! That observation is just mind blowing, and yet it is true. In order to explain the data, physicists had to resurrect an abandoned idea of Einstein's now called dark energy. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us a little about the observations that led to the hypothesis of dark energy and what is the status of current research on the subject.

  16. Big Mysteries: Dark Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up! That observation is just mind blowing, and yet it is true. In order to explain the data, physicists had to resurrect an abandoned idea of Einstein's now called dark energy. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us a little about the observations that led to the hypothesis of dark energy and what is the status of current research on the subject.

  17. The Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, Brenna; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Dark Energy is the dominant constituent of the universe and they have little understanding of it. They describe a new project aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, to a statistical precision of {approx} 5%, with four separate techniques. The survey will image 5000 deg{sup 2} in the southern sky and collect 300 million galaxies, 30,000 galaxy clusters, and 2000 Type Ia supernovae. The survey will be carried out using a new 3 deg{sup 2} mosaic camera mounted at the prime focus of the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO.

  18. Improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deng; Meng, Xin-He

    2017-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of the dark energy equation of state (EoS) utilizing the model-independent Gaussian processes (GP). Using a combination of the Union 2.1 data set, the 30 newly added H(z) cosmic chronometer data points and Planck's shift parameter, we modify the usual GaPP code and provide a tighter constraint on the dark energy EoS than the previous literature about GP reconstructions. Subsequently, we take the "controlling variable method " to investigate directly the effects of the variable matter density parameter Ωm 0, variable cosmic curvature Ωk 0, and variable Hubble constant H0 on the dark energy EoS. We find that too small or large Ωm 0, Ωk 0, and H0 are all disfavored by our GP reconstructions based on current cosmological observations. Subsequently, we find that variables Ωm 0 and Ωk 0 affect the reconstructions of the dark energy EoS but hardly affect the reconstructions of the normalized comoving distance D (z ) and its derivatives D'(z ) and D''(z ). However, variable H0 affects the reconstructions of the dark energy EoS by affecting obviously those of D (z ) , D'(z ) , and D''(z ). Furthermore, we find that the results of our reconstructions support substantially the recent local measurement of H0 reported by Riess et al.

  19. Dark-energy thermodynamic models

    SciTech Connect

    Besprosvany, Jaime; Izquierdo, German

    2010-12-07

    We study cosmological consequences of dark-energy thermodynamic models. The assumption that dark energy is conformed of quanta, and an extensivity argument generalize its equation of state. This implies that dark energy and another key component exchange energy. The energy densities of dark energy and the other component then tend asymptotically to a constant, thus explaining the coincidence of dark matter and dark energy today. On the other hand, a model of non-relativistic particles in a Bose-Einstein condensate, with a short-range attractive interaction, produces acceleration. It is shown that the phantom-acceleration regime, at the beginning of the universe, solves the horizon problem.

  20. Effects of EoS in viscous hydro + cascade model for the RHIC Beam Energy Scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu.; Bleicher, M.; Huovinen, P.; Petersen, H.

    2016-12-01

    A state-of-the-art 3+1 dimensional cascade + viscous hydro + cascade model vHLLE+UrQMD has been applied to heavy ion collisions in RHIC Beam Energy Scan range √{sNN} = 7.7 , … , 200 GeV. Based on comparison to available experimental data it was estimated that an effective value of shear viscosity over entropy density ratio η / s in hydrodynamic stage has to decrease from η / s = 0.2 to 0.08 as collision energy increases from √{sNN} = 7.7 to 39 GeV, and to stay at η / s = 0.08 for 39 ≤√{ s} ≤ 200 GeV. In this work we show how an equation of state with first order phase transition affects the hydrodynamic evolution at those collision energies and changes the results of the model as compared to "default scenario" with a crossover type EoS from chiral model.

  1. Dark Energy. What the ...?

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, Risa

    2007-10-30

    What is the Universe made of? This question has been asked as long as humans have been questioning, and astronomers and physicists are finally converging on an answer. The picture which has emerged from numerous complementary observations over the past decade is a surprising one: most of the matter in the Universe isn't visible, and most of the Universe isn't even made of matter. In this talk, I will explain what the rest of this stuff, known as 'Dark Energy' is, how it is related to the so-called 'Dark Matter', how it impacts the evolution of the Universe, and how we can study the dark universe using observations of light from current and future telescopes.

  2. Unparticle dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, D.-C.; Stojkovic, Dejan; Dutta, Sourish

    2009-09-15

    We examine a dark energy model where a scalar unparticle degree of freedom plays the role of quintessence. In particular, we study a model where the unparticle degree of freedom has a standard kinetic term and a simple mass potential, the evolution is slowly rolling and the field value is of the order of the unparticle energy scale ({lambda}{sub u}). We study how the evolution of w depends on the parameters B (a function of unparticle scaling dimension d{sub u}), the initial value of the field {phi}{sub i} (or equivalently, {lambda}{sub u}) and the present matter density {omega}{sub m0}. We use observational data from type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and the cosmic microwave background to constrain the model parameters and find that these models are not ruled out by the observational data. From a theoretical point of view, unparticle dark energy model is very attractive, since unparticles (being bound states of fundamental fermions) are protected from radiative corrections. Further, coupling of unparticles to the standard model fields can be arbitrarily suppressed by raising the fundamental energy scale M{sub F}, making the unparticle dark energy model free of most of the problems that plague conventional scalar field quintessence models.

  3. Dynamics of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Edmund J.

    2007-11-20

    I briefly review attempts that have been made to model dark energy. These include models of a cosmological constant, dynamical models where a scalar field may be responsible for the observed late time acceleration through to the possibility that we are not fully in control of the gravity sector and the acceleration may be some manifestation of modified gravity. In all cases we will see some degree of fine tuning is required with the current models.

  4. Natural Neutrino Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwich, Ilya

    2010-06-23

    1 construct a general description for neutrino dark energy models, that do not require exotic particles or strange couplings. With the help of the above, this class of models is reduced to a single function with several constraints. It is shown that these models lead to some concrete predictions that can be verified (or disproved) within the next decade, using results from PLANK, EUCLID and JDEM.

  5. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-06

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales.

  6. Constraining Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Augusta

    2010-12-01

    Future advances in cosmology will depend on the next generation of cosmological observations and how they shape our theoretical understanding of the universe. Current theoretical ideas, however, have an important role to play in guiding the design of such observational programs. The work presented in this thesis concerns the intersection of observation and theory, particularly as it relates to advancing our understanding of the accelerated expansion of the universe (or the dark energy). Chapters 2 - 4 make use of the simulated data sets developed by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) for a number of cosmological observations currently in the experimental pipeline. We use these forecast data in the analysis of four quintessence models of dark energy: the PNGB, Exponential, Albrecht-Skordis and Inverse Power Law (IPL) models. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling techniques we examine the ability of each simulated data set to constrain the parameter space of these models. We examine the potential of the data for differentiating time-varying models from a pure cosmological constant. Additionally, we introduce an abstract parameter space to facilitate comparison between models and investigate the ability of future data to distinguish between these quintessence models. In Chapter 5 we present work towards understanding the effects of systematic errors associated with photometric redshift estimates. Due to the need to sample a vast number of deep and faint galaxies, photometric redshifts will be used in a wide range of future cosmological observations including gravitational weak lensing, baryon accoustic oscillations and type 1A supernovae observations. The uncertainty in the redshift distributions of galaxies has a significant potential impact on the cosmological parameter values inferred from such observations. We introduce a method for parameterizing uncertainties in modeling assumptions affecting photometric redshift calculations and for propagating these

  7. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  8. THE DARK ENERGY CAMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Bonati, M.; Antonik, M.; Brooks, D.; Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Boprie, D.; Campa, J.; Castander, F. J.; Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-15

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel{sup −1}. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6–9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  9. The Dark Energy Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.

    2015-04-11

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.2-degree diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a CCD focal plane of 250-μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 Mpixel focal plane comprises 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15μm x 15μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.263" per pixel. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 seconds with 6-9 electrons readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  10. The Dark Energy Camera

    DOE PAGES

    Flaugher, B.

    2015-04-11

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.2-degree diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a CCD focal plane of 250-μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar.more » The 570 Mpixel focal plane comprises 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15μm x 15μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.263" per pixel. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 seconds with 6-9 electrons readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.« less

  11. Dark energy and extended dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological mean matter (dark and baryonic) density measured in the units of the critical density is Ωm = 0.27. Independently, the local mean density is estimated to be Ωloc = 0.08-0.23 from recent data on galaxy groups at redshifts up to z = 0.01-0.03 (as published by Crook et al. 2007, ApJ, 655, 790 and Makarov & Karachentsev 2011, MNRAS, 412, 2498). If the lower values of Ωloc are reliable, as Makarov & Karachentsev and some other observers prefer, does this mean that the Local Universe of 100-300 Mpc across is an underdensity in the cosmic matter distribution? Or could it nevertheless be representative of the mean cosmic density or even be an overdensity due to the Local Supercluster therein. We focus on dark matter halos of groups of galaxies and check how much dark mass the invisible outer layers of the halos are able to host. The outer layers are usually devoid of bright galaxies and cannot be seen at large distances. The key factor which bounds the size of an isolated halo is the local antigravity produced by the omnipresent background of dark energy. A gravitationally bound halo does not extend beyond the zero-gravity surface where the gravity of matter and the antigravity of dark energy balance, thus defining a natural upper size of a system. We use our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy to estimate the maximal sizes and masses of the extended dark halos. Using data from three recent catalogs of galaxy groups, we show that the calculated mass bounds conform with the assumption that a significant amount of dark matter is located in the invisible outer parts of the extended halos, sufficient to fill the gap between the observed and expected local matter density. Nearby groups of galaxies and the Virgo cluster have dark halos which seem to extend up to their zero-gravity surfaces. If the extended halo is a common feature of gravitationally bound systems on scales of galaxy groups and clusters, the Local Universe could be typical or even

  12. Light thoughts on dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-04-01

    The physical process leading to the acceleration of the expansion of the universe is unknown. It may involve new high energy physics or extensions to gravitation. Calling this generically dark energy, we examine the consistencies and relations between these two approaches, showing that an effective equation of state function w(z) is broadly useful in describing the properties of the dark energy. A variety of cosmological observations can provide important information on the dynamics of dark energy and the future looks bright for constraining dark energy, though both the measurements and the interpretation will be challenging. We also discuss a more direct relation between the spacetime geometry and acceleration, via ''geometric dark energy'' from the Ricci scalar, and superacceleration or phantom energy where the fate of the universe may be more gentle than the Big Rip.

  13. New holographic dark energy model inspired by the DGP braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, A.; Dehghani, M. H.; Ghaffari, S.

    2016-11-01

    The energy density of the holographic dark energy (HDE) is based on the area law of entropy, and thus any modification of the area law leads to a modified holographic energy density. Inspired by the entropy expression associated with the apparent horizon of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe in DGP braneworld, we propose a new model for the HDE in the framework of DGP brane cosmology. We investigate the cosmological consequences of this new model and calculate the equation of state (EoS) parameter by choosing the Hubble radius, L = H-1, as the system’s IR cutoff. Our study show that, due to the effects of the extra dimension (bulk), the identification of IR cutoff with Hubble radius, can reproduce the present acceleration of the universe expansion. This is in contrast to the ordinary HDE in standard cosmology which leads to the zero EoS parameter in the case of choosing the Hubble radius as system’s IR cutoff in the absence of interaction between dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE).

  14. Reconstructing and deconstructing dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-06-07

    The acceleration of the expansion of the universe, ascribed to a dark energy, is one of the most intriguing discoveries in science. In addition to precise, systematics controlled data, clear, robust interpretation of the observations is required to reveal the nature of dark energy. Even for the simplest question: is the data consistent with the cosmological constant? there are important subtleties in the reconstruction of the dark energy properties. We discuss the roles of analysis both in terms of the Hubble expansion rate or dark energy density {rho}DE(z) and in terms of the dark energy equation of state w(z), arguing that each has its carefully defined place. Fitting the density is best for learning about the density, but using it to probe the equation of state can lead to instability and bias.

  15. Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, J. Anthony

    2013-08-26

    Next generation “Stage IV” dark energy experiments under design during this grant, and now under construction, will enable the determination of the properties of dark energy and dark matter to unprecedented precision using multiple complementary probes. The most pressing challenge in these experiments is the characterization and understanding of the systematic errors present within any given experimental configuration and the resulting impact on the accuracy of our constraints on dark energy physics. The DETF and the P5 panel in their reports recommended “Expanded support for ancillary measurements required for the long-term program and for projects that will improve our understanding and reduction of the dominant systematic measurement errors.” Looking forward to the next generation Stage IV experiments we have developed a program to address the most important potential systematic errors within these experiments. Using data from current facilities it has been feasible and timely to undertake a detailed investigation of the systematic errors. In this DOE grant we studied of the source and impact of the dominant systematic effects in dark energy measurements, and developed new analysis tools and techniques to minimize their impact. Progress under this grant is briefly reviewed in this technical report. This work was a necessary precursor to the coming generations of wide-deep probes of the nature of dark energy and dark matter. The research has already had an impact on improving the efficiencies of all Stage III and IV dark energy experiments.

  16. Dark matter and dark energy: The critical questions

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Turner

    2002-11-19

    Stars account for only about 0.5% of the content of the Universe; the bulk of the Universe is optically dark. The dark side of the Universe is comprised of: at least 0.1% light neutrinos; 3.5% {+-} 1% baryons; 29% {+-} 4% cold dark matter; and 66% {+-} 6% dark energy. Now that we have characterized the dark side of the Universe, the challenge is to understand it. The critical questions are: (1) What form do the dark baryons take? (2) What is (are) the constituent(s) of the cold dark matter? (3) What is the nature of the mysterious dark energy that is causing the Universe to speed up.

  17. Beyond two dark energy parameters.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Devdeep; Sullivan, Scott; Joudaki, Shahab; Amblard, Alexandre; Holz, Daniel E; Cooray, Asantha

    2008-06-20

    Our ignorance of dark energy is generally described by a two-parameter equation of state. In these approaches, a particular ad hoc functional form is assumed, and only two independent parameters are incorporated. We propose a model-independent, multiparameter approach to fitting dark energy and show that next-generation surveys will constrain the equation of state in three or more independent redshift bins to better than 10%. Future knowledge of dark energy will surpass two numbers (e.g., [w{0},w{1}] or [w{0},w{a}]), and we propose a more flexible approach to the analysis of present and future data.

  18. Entropy corrected holographic dark energy models in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Azhar, Nadeem; Rani, Shamaila

    We consider the power law and the entropy corrected holographic dark energy (HDE) models with Hubble horizon in the dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity. We explore various cosmological parameters and planes in this framework. The Hubble parameter lies within the consistent range at the present and later epoch for both entropy corrected models. The deceleration parameter explains the accelerated expansion of the universe. The equation of state (EoS) parameter corresponds to quintessence and cold dark matter (ΛCDM) limit. The ωΛ‑ωΛ‧ approaches to ΛCDM limit and freezing region in both entropy corrected models. The statefinder parameters are consistent with ΛCDM limit and dark energy (DE) models. The generalized second law of thermodynamics remain valid in all cases of interacting parameter. It is interesting to mention here that our results of Hubble, EoS parameter and ωΛ‑ωΛ‧ plane show consistency with the present observations like Planck, WP, BAO, H0, SNLS and nine-year WMAP.

  19. Understanding Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, Howard

    2009-11-01

    By careful analysis of the data from the WMAP satellite, scientists were surprised to determine that about 70% of the matter in our universe is in some unknown form, and labeled it Dark Energy. Earlier, in 1998, two separate international groups of astronomers studying Ia supernovae were even more surprised to be forced to conclude that an amazing smooth transition occurred, from the expected slowing down of the expansion of our universe (due to normal positive gravitation) to an accelerating expansion of the universe that began at at a big bang age of the universe of about nine billion years. In 1918 Albert Einstein stated that his Lambda term in his theory of general relativity was ees,``the energy of empty space,'' and represented a negative pressure and thus a negative gravity force. However my 2004 ``Strong'' Magnetic Field model (SMF) for the origin of magnetic fields at Combination Time (Astro-ph0509223 and 0509222) in our big bang universe produces a unique topology for Superclusters, having almost all the mass, visible and invisible, i.e. from clusters of galaxies down to particles with mass, on the surface of an ellipsoid surrounding a growing very high vacuum. If I hypothesize, with Einstein, that there exists a constant ees force per unit volume, then, gradually, as the universe expands from Combination Time, two effects occur (a) the volume of the central high vacuum region increases, and (b) the density of positive gravity particles in the central region of each Supercluster in our universe decreases dramatically. Thus eventually Einstein's general relativity theory's repulsive gravity of the central very high vacuum region becomes larger than the positive gravitational attraction of all the clusters of galaxies, galaxies, quasars, stars and plasma on the Supercluster shell, and the observed accelerating expansion of our universe occurs. This assumes that our universe is made up mostly of such Superclusters. It is conceivable that the high vacuum

  20. Direct reconstruction of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Chris; Zunckel, Caroline

    2010-05-28

    An important issue in cosmology is reconstructing the effective dark energy equation of state directly from observations. With so few physically motivated models, future dark energy studies cannot only be based on constraining a dark energy parameter space. We present a new nonparametric method which can accurately reconstruct a wide variety of dark energy behavior with no prior assumptions about it. It is simple, quick and relatively accurate, and involves no expensive explorations of parameter space. The technique uses principal component analysis and a combination of information criteria to identify real features in the data, and tailors the fitting functions to pick up trends and smooth over noise. We find that we can constrain a large variety of w(z) models to within 10%-20% at redshifts z≲1 using just SNAP-quality data.

  1. Holographic Ricci Dark Energy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we consider holographic Ricci dark energy model, and by using general relativity equations obtain time-dependent density of the Universe. We show that the resulting density in independent of space curvature.

  2. Dark Energy Rules the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley Lab theoretical physicist Eric Linder previews his Nov. 24, 2008 talk on the mystery of dark energy. Catch his full lecture here: http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/servlets/purl/1007511?format=mp4

  3. Constraints on parameterized dark energy properties from new observations with principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    For dark energy, the equation of state (EoS) is a critical parameter to depict its physical properties. In this paper, we mainly give constraints on the EoS of dark energy w with the latest observations of cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) from Planck satellite, JLA Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) sample, baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) and Hubble parameter measurements. We introduce a kind of parameterized dark energy model called "constant bin - w ", in which the whole redshift range is divided into several bins, and EoS w in each bin is assumed as an independent constant. The results show that EoS in all of the redshift bins are comparable with ΛCDM in the 2σ confidence regions, but some weak deviations from w = - 1 are still indicated. In particular, in the framework of 7 bins, a slight oscillation behavior is shown in the redshift 0 < z < 0.75, especially around the range of 4th bin (0.25 < z < 0.35) and 5th bin (0.35 < z < 0.51). Additionally, we adopt the principal component analysis (PCA) method to do the model-independent analysis, which includes normal PCA and localized PCA methods. By implementing so called normal PCA method, the original oscillation behavior of EoS indicated in the framework of 7 bins becomes more significant after the best reconstruction, but such result still supports ΛCDM within the margin of 2σ errors. To further reduce the errors of constraints on EoS, and confirm such deviations from the cosmological constant scenario, we hope for more precise observational data in the future.

  4. 2-loop quantum Yang Mills condensate as dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, T. Y.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-11-01

    In seeking a model solving the coincidence problem, the effective Yang Mills condensate (YMC) is an alternative candidate for dark energy. A study is made for the model up to the 2-loop order of quantum corrections. It is found that, like in the 1-loop model, for generic initial conditions during the radiation era, there is always a desired tracking solution, yielding the current status Ω≃0.73 and Ω≃0.27. As the time t→∞ the dynamics is a stable attractor. Thus the model naturally solves the coincidence problem of dark energy. Moreover, if YMC decays into matter, its equation of state (EoS) crosses -1 and takes w˜-1.1, as indicated by the recent observations.

  5. Anisotropic Generalized Ghost Pilgrim Dark Energy Model in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhi, M. Vijaya; Rao, V. U. M.; Aditya, Y.

    2017-02-01

    A spatially homogeneous and anisotropic locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type- I Universe filled with matter and generalized ghost pilgrim dark energy (GGPDE) has been studied in general theory of relativity. To obtain determinate solution of the field equations we have used scalar expansion proportional to the shear scalar which leads to a relation between the metric potentials. Some well-known cosmological parameters (equation of state (EoS) parameter ( ω Λ), deceleration parameter ( q) and squared speed of sound {vs2}) and planes (ω _{Λ }-dot {ω }_{Λ } and statefinder) are constructed for obtained model. The discussion and significance of these parameters is totally done through pilgrim dark energy parameter ( β) and cosmic time ( t).

  6. QCD nature of dark energy at finite temperature: Cosmological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Katırcı, N.

    2016-05-01

    The Veneziano ghost field has been proposed as an alternative source of dark energy, whose energy density is consistent with the cosmological observations. In this model, the energy density of the QCD ghost field is expressed in terms of QCD degrees of freedom at zero temperature. We extend this model to finite temperature to search the model predictions from late time to early universe. We depict the variations of QCD parameters entering the calculations, dark energy density, equation of state, Hubble and deceleration parameters on temperature from zero to a critical temperature. We compare our results with the observations and theoretical predictions existing at different eras. It is found that this model safely defines the universe from quark condensation up to now and its predictions are not in tension with those of the standard cosmology. The EoS parameter of dark energy is dynamical and evolves from -1/3 in the presence of radiation to -1 at late time. The finite temperature ghost dark energy predictions on the Hubble parameter well fit to those of Λ CDM and observations at late time.

  7. Dark Energy Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G

    2005-03-08

    Event horizons and closed time-like curves cannot exist in the real world for the simple reason that they are inconsistent with quantum mechanics. Following ideas originated by Robert Laughlin, Pawel Mazur, Emil Mottola, David Santiago, and the speaker it is now possible to describe in some detail what happens physically when one approaches and crosses a region of space-time where classical general relativity predicts there should be an infinite red shift surface. This quantum critical physics provides a new perspective on a variety of enigmatic astrophysical phenomena including supernovae explosions, gamma ray bursts, positron emission, and dark matter.

  8. Dark energy and dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlen, Michael; Strigari, Louis E.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Primack, Joel R.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate the effect of dark energy on the density profiles of dark matter haloes with a suite of cosmological N-body simulations and use our results to test analytic models. We consider constant equation of state models, and allow both w>=-1 and w < -1. Using five simulations with w ranging from -1.5 to -0.5, and with more than ~1600 well-resolved haloes each, we show that the halo concentration model of Bullock et al. accurately predicts the median concentrations of haloes over the range of w, halo masses and redshifts that we are capable of probing. We find that the Bullock et al. model works best when halo masses and concentrations are defined relative to an outer radius set by a cosmology-dependent virial overdensity. For a fixed power spectrum normalization and fixed-mass haloes, larger values of w lead to higher concentrations and higher halo central densities, both because collapse occurs earlier and because haloes have higher virial densities. While precise predictions of halo densities are quite sensitive to various uncertainties, we make broad comparisons to galaxy rotation curve data. At fixed power spectrum normalization (fixed σ8), w > -1 quintessence models seem to exacerbate the central density problem relative to the standard w=-1 model. For example, models with w~=- 0.5 seem disfavoured by the data, which can be matched only by allowing extremely low normalizations, σ8<~ 0.6. Meanwhile w < -1 models help to reduce the apparent discrepancy. We confirm that the halo mass function of Jenkins et al. provides an excellent approximation to the abundance of haloes in our simulations and extend its region of validity to include models with w < -1.

  9. Measuring the speed of dark: Detecting dark energy perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Putter, Roland de; Huterer, Dragan; Linder, Eric V.

    2010-05-15

    The nature of dark energy can be probed not only through its equation of state but also through its microphysics, characterized by the sound speed of perturbations to the dark energy density and pressure. As the sound speed drops below the speed of light, dark energy inhomogeneities increase, affecting both cosmic microwave background and matter power spectra. We show that current data can put no significant constraints on the value of the sound speed when dark energy is purely a recent phenomenon, but can begin to show more interesting results for early dark energy models. For example, the best fit model for current data has a slight preference for dynamics [w(a){ne}-1], degrees of freedom distinct from quintessence (c{sub s{ne}}1), and early presence of dark energy [{Omega}{sub de}(a<<1){ne}0]. Future data may open a new window on dark energy by measuring its spatial as well as time variation.

  10. How many dark energy parameters?

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; Huterer, Dragan

    2005-05-16

    For exploring the physics behind the accelerating universe a crucial question is how much we can learn about the dynamics through next generation cosmological experiments. For example, in defining the dark energy behavior through an effective equation of state, how many parameters can we realistically expect to tightly constrain? Through both general and specific examples (including new parametrizations and principal component analysis) we argue that the answer is 42 - no, wait, two. Cosmological parameter analyses involving a measure of the equation of state value at some epoch (e.g., w_0) and a measure of the change in equation of state (e.g., w') are therefore realistic in projecting dark energy parameter constraints. More elaborate parametrizations could have some uses (e.g., testing for bias or comparison with model features), but do not lead to accurately measured dark energy parameters.

  11. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  12. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Vaishali Upadhyaya, G. K.

    2015-07-31

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

  13. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, G. K.

    2015-07-01

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

  14. Generalized ghost pilgrim dark energy in F(T,TG) cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Nazir, Kanwal

    2016-07-01

    This paper is devoted to study the generalized ghost pilgrim dark energy (PDE) model in F(T,TG) gravity with flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe. In this scenario, we reconstruct F(T,TG) models and evaluate the corresponding equation of state (EoS) parameter for different choices of the scale factors. We assume power-law scale factor, scale factor for unification of two phases, intermediate and bouncing scale factor. We study the behavior of reconstructed models and EoS parameters graphically. It is found that all the reconstructed models show decreasing behavior for PDE parameter u = -2. On the other hand, the EoS parameter indicates transition from dust-like matter to phantom era for all choices of the scale factor except intermediate for which this is less than - 1. We conclude that all the results are in agreement with PDE phenomenon.

  15. Observing dark energy with SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; SNAP Collaboration

    2004-06-07

    The nature of dark energy is of such fundamental importance -- yet such a mystery -- that a dedicated dark energy experiment should be as comprehensive and powerfully incisive as possible. The Supernova/Acceleration Probe robustly controls for a wide variety of systematic uncertainties, employing the Type Ia supernova distance method, with high signal to noise light curves and spectra over the full redshift range from z=0.1-1.7, and the weak gravitational lensing method with an accurate and stable point spread function.

  16. Measuring Dark Energy with CHIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Laura; Chime Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a new radio transit interferometer currently being built at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC, Canada. We will use the 21 cm emission line of neutral hydrogen to map baryon acoustic oscillations between 400-800 MHz across 3/4 of the sky. These measurements will yield sensitive constraints on the dark energy equation of state between redshifts 0.8 - 2.5, a fascinating but poorly probed era corresponding to when dark energy began to impact the expansion history of the Universe. I will describe theCHIME instrument, the analysis challenges, the calibration requirements, and current status.

  17. Dark energy survey and camera

    SciTech Connect

    William Wester

    2004-08-16

    The authors describe the Dark Energy Survey and Camera. The survey will image 5000 sq. deg. in the southern sky to collect 300 million galaxies, 30,000 galaxy clusters and 2000 Type Ia supernovae. They expect to derive a value for the dark energy equation of state parameters, w, to a precision of 5% by combining four distinct measurement techniques. They describe the mosaic camera that will consist of CCDs with enhanced sensitivity in the near infrared. The camera will be mounted at the prime focus of the 4m Blanco telescope.

  18. Dark energy from gravitational corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Yugo; Horikoshi, Masaatsu; Kawamura, Yoshiharu

    2017-03-01

    We study physics concerning the cosmological constant problem in the framework of effective field theory and suggest that a dominant part of dark energy can originate from gravitational corrections of vacuum energy, under the assumption that the classical gravitational fields do not couple to a large portion of the vacuum energy effectively, in spite of the coupling between graviton and matters at a microscopic level. Our speculation is excellent with terascale supersymmetry.

  19. Dynamics of dark energy with a coupling to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2008-07-15

    Dark energy and dark matter are the dominant sources in the evolution of the late universe. They are currently only indirectly detected via their gravitational effects, and there could be a coupling between them without violating observational constraints. We investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is modeled as exponential quintessence and is coupled to dark matter via simple models of energy exchange. We introduce a new form of dark sector coupling, which leads to a more complicated dynamical phase space and has a better physical motivation than previous mathematically similar couplings.

  20. Dark Energy Coupled with Dark Matter in the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang

    2004-06-01

    To model the observed Universe containing both dark energy and dark matter, we study the effective Yang Mills condensate model of dark energy and add a non-relativistic matter component as the dark matter, which is generated out of the decaying dark energy at a constant rate Gamma, a parameter of our model. For the Universe driven by these two components, the dynamic evolution still has asymptotic behaviour: the expansion of the Universe is accelerating with an asymptotically constant rate H, and the densities of both components approach to finite constant values. Moreover, OmegaLambdasimeq0.7 for dark energy and Omegamsimeq0.3 for dark matter are achieved if the decay rate Gamma is chosen such that Gamma/H~1.

  1. Unified dark energy-dark matter model with inverse quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Guendelman, Eduardo I. E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il

    2013-05-01

    We consider a model where both dark energy and dark matter originate from the coupling of a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term to, both, a metric measure and a non-metric measure. An interacting dark energy/dark matter scenario can be obtained by introducing an additional scalar that can produce non constant vacuum energy and associated variations in dark matter. The phenomenology is most interesting when the kinetic term of the additional scalar field is ghost-type, since in this case the dark energy vanishes in the early universe and then grows with time. This constitutes an ''inverse quintessence scenario'', where the universe starts from a zero vacuum energy density state, instead of approaching it in the future.

  2. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy. Science

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Heitmann, Katrin; Hirata, Chris; Honscheid, Klaus; Roodman, Aaron; Seljak, Uroš; Slosar, Anže; Trodden, Mark

    2016-04-26

    Cosmic surveys provide crucial information about high energy physics including strong evidence for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation. Ongoing and upcoming surveys will start to identify the underlying physics of these new phenomena, including tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, the viability of modified gravity, the existence of extra light species, the masses of the neutrinos, and the potential of the field that drove inflation. Even after the Stage IV experiments, DESI and LSST, complete their surveys, there will still be much information left in the sky. This additional information will enable us to understand the physics underlying the dark universe at an even deeper level and, in case Stage IV surveys find hints for physics beyond the current Standard Model of Cosmology, to revolutionize our current view of the universe. There are many ideas for how best to supplement and aid DESI and LSST in order to access some of this remaining information and how surveys beyond Stage IV can fully exploit this regime. These ideas flow to potential projects that could start construction in the 2020's.

  3. σCDM coupled to radiation: Dark energy and Universe acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbyazov, Renat R.; Chervon, Sergey V.; Müller, Volker

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the Chiral Cosmological Model (CCM) coupled to cold dark matter (CDM) has been investigated as σCDM model to study the observed accelerated expansion of the Universe. Dark sector fields (as Dark Energy content) coupled to cosmic dust were considered as the source of Einstein gravity in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. Such model had a beginning at the matter-dominated era. The purposes of our present investigation are two-fold: To extend “life” of the σCDM for earlier times to radiation-dominated era and to take into account variation of the exponential potential V = V0exp -λ φ MP + V0exp -λ χ MP via variation of the interaction parameter λ. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedure to investigate possible values of initial conditions constrained by the measured amount of the dark matter, dark energy and radiation component today. Our analysis includes dark energy contribution to critical density, the ratio of the kinetic and potential energies, deceleration parameter, effective equation of state (EoS) and evolution of DE EoS with variation of coupling constant λ. A comparison with the ΛCDM model was performed. A new feature of the model is the existence of some values of potential coupling constant, leading to a σCDM solution without transition into accelerated expansion epoch.

  4. Dark Energy from Discrete Spacetime

    PubMed Central

    Trout, Aaron D.

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies. PMID:24312502

  5. Dark energy from discrete spacetime.

    PubMed

    Trout, Aaron D

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, [Formula: see text] in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies.

  6. Foreword: Dark energy and CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Huterer, Dragan

    2015-03-01

    Maps of the Universe when it was 400,000 years old from observations of the cosmic microwave background and over the last ten billion years from galaxy surveys point to a compelling cosmological model. This model requires a very early epoch of accelerated expansion, inflation, during which the seeds of structure were planted via quantum mechanical fluctuations. These seeds began to grow via gravitational instability during the epoch in which dark matter dominated the energy density of the universe, transforming small perturbations laid down during inflation into nonlinear structures such as million light-year sized clusters, galaxies, stars, planets, and people. Over the past few billion years, we have entered a new phase, during which the expansion of the Universe is accelerating presumably driven by yet another substance, dark energy.

  7. Dark energy view of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilic, Stephane; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Frieman, Joshua A.

    2010-05-15

    Traditionally, inflationary models are analyzed in terms of parameters such as the scalar spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor to scalar ratio r, while dark energy models are studied in terms of the equation of state parameter w. Motivated by the fact that both deal with periods of accelerated expansion, we study the evolution of w during inflation, in order to derive observational constraints on its value during an earlier epoch likely dominated by a dynamic form of dark energy. We find that the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure data is consistent with w{sub inflation}=-1 and provides an upper limit of 1+w < or approx. 0.02. Nonetheless, an exact de Sitter expansion with a constant w=-1 is disfavored since this would result in n{sub s}=1.

  8. Holographic Dark Energy Density and JBP Parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan; Mousavi, S. N.; Saadat, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    In this article we consider the holographic dark energy density. We study dark energy density in Universe with arbitrary spatially curvature described by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. We use Jassal-Bagla-Padmanabhan parametrization to specify dark energy density.

  9. Tracing dark energy with quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šredzińska, Justyna; Czerny, Bożena; Bilicki, M.; Hryniewicz, K.; Krupa, M.; Kurcz, A.; Marziani, P.; Pollo, A.; Pych, W.; Udalski, A.

    2016-06-01

    The nature of dark energy, driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe, is one of the most important issues in modern astrophysics. In order to understand this phenomenon, we need precise astrophysical probes of the universal expansion spanning wide redshift ranges. Quasars have recently emerged as such a probe, thanks to their high intrinsic luminosities and, most importantly, our ability to measure their luminosity distances independently of redshifts. Here we report our ongoing work on observational reverberation mapping using the time delay of the Mg II line, performed with the South African Large Telescope (SALT). The concept of dark energy was introduced in the process of understanding the evolution of the Universe. This is one of the most interesting topic in modern astronomy followed by the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Precise measurement of this effect is a key to understand the nature of this medium, and we need good probes to do that. Quasars appears as an ideal candidate for this purpose as these objects are highly luminous and detected in wide range of redshift. From Big Bang to present time a lot of things happened and we are able to see amazing structures of galaxies and stars. In the beginning of Universe everything was blurred in space and the concept of dark energy was introduced in the process of understanding its evolution. The discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe gives us possibility to define new interesting topics in modern astronomy. Although there are some theoretical explanation for the existence of dark energy, yet it has remained the biggest puzzle among the astronomers and physicist.

  10. The Dark Energy Survey: More than dark energy - An overview

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, T.

    2016-03-21

    This overview article describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. In addition, a time-domain survey search over 27 sq deg is expected to yield a sample of thousands of Type Ia supernovae andmore » other transients. The main goals of DES are to characterise dark energy and dark matter, and to test alternative models of gravity; these goals will be pursued by studying large scale structure, cluster counts, weak gravitational lensing and Type Ia supernovae. However, DES also provides a rich data set which allows us to study many other aspects of astrophysics. In this paper we focus on additional science with DES, emphasizing areas where the survey makes a difference with respect to other current surveys. The paper illustrates, using early data (from `Science Verification', and from the first, second and third seasons of observations), what DES can tell us about the solar system, the Milky Way, galaxy evolution, quasars, and other topics. In addition, we show that if the cosmological model is assumed to be Lambda+ Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) then important astrophysics can be deduced from the primary DES probes. Lastly, highlights from DES early data include the discovery of 34 Trans Neptunian Objects, 17 dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, one published z > 6 quasar (and more confirmed) and two published superluminous supernovae (and more confirmed).« less

  11. The Dark Energy Survey: More than dark energy - An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, T.

    2016-03-21

    This overview article describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. In addition, a time-domain survey search over 27 sq deg is expected to yield a sample of thousands of Type Ia supernovae and other transients. The main goals of DES are to characterise dark energy and dark matter, and to test alternative models of gravity; these goals will be pursued by studying large scale structure, cluster counts, weak gravitational lensing and Type Ia supernovae. However, DES also provides a rich data set which allows us to study many other aspects of astrophysics. In this paper we focus on additional science with DES, emphasizing areas where the survey makes a difference with respect to other current surveys. The paper illustrates, using early data (from `Science Verification', and from the first, second and third seasons of observations), what DES can tell us about the solar system, the Milky Way, galaxy evolution, quasars, and other topics. In addition, we show that if the cosmological model is assumed to be Lambda+ Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) then important astrophysics can be deduced from the primary DES probes. Lastly, highlights from DES early data include the discovery of 34 Trans Neptunian Objects, 17 dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, one published z > 6 quasar (and more confirmed) and two published superluminous supernovae (and more confirmed).

  12. The Dark Energy Survey: more than dark energy - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dark Energy Survey Collaboration; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Aleksić, J.; Allam, S.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S.; Brooks, D.; Brunner, R. J.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Caminha, G. B.; Capozzi, D.; Carlsen, J.; Carnero-Rosell, A.; Carollo, M.; Carrasco-Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clerkin, L.; Collett, T.; Conselice, C.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, T. M.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Estrada, J.; Etherington, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fabbri, J.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Guarnieri, P.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Jouvel, S.; Kessler, R.; King, A.; Kirk, D.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Manera, M.; Maraston, C.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Melchior, P.; Merson, A.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Morice-Atkinson, X.; Naidoo, K.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Ostrovski, F.; Palmese, A.; Papadopoulos, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Peoples, J.; Percival, W. J.; Plazas, A. A.; Reed, S. L.; Refregier, A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ross, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sako, M.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Soumagnac, M.; Suchyta, E.; Sullivan, M.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Whiteway, L.; Wilcox, H.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2016-08-01

    This overview paper describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4 m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion, the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. In addition, a time-domain survey search over 27 sq deg is expected to yield a sample of thousands of Type Ia supernovae and other transients. The main goals of DES are to characterize dark energy and dark matter, and to test alternative models of gravity; these goals will be pursued by studying large-scale structure, cluster counts, weak gravitational lensing and Type Ia supernovae. However, DES also provides a rich data set which allows us to study many other aspects of astrophysics. In this paper, we focus on additional science with DES, emphasizing areas where the survey makes a difference with respect to other current surveys. The paper illustrates, using early data (from `Science Verification', and from the first, second and third seasons of observations), what DES can tell us about the Solar system, the Milky Way, galaxy evolution, quasars and other topics. In addition, we show that if the cosmological model is assumed to be Λ+cold dark matter, then important astrophysics can be deduced from the primary DES probes. Highlights from DES early data include the discovery of 34 trans-Neptunian objects, 17 dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, one published z > 6 quasar (and more confirmed) and two published superluminous supernovae (and more confirmed).

  13. Dark Energy Coupled with Relativistic Dark Matter in Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang

    2003-10-01

    Recent observations favour an accelerating Universe dominated by the dark energy. We take the effective Yang-Mills condensate as the dark energy and couple it to a relativistic matter which is created by the decaying condensate. The dynamic evolution has asymptotic behaviour with finite constant energy densities, and the fractional densities OmegaLambda~0.7 for dark energy and Omegam~0.3 for relativistic matter are achieved at proper values of the decay rate. The resulting expansion of the Universe is in the de Sitter acceleration.

  14. Dark Energy: fiction or reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triay, Roland

    2010-06-01

    Is Dark Energy justified as an alternative to the cosmological constant Λ in order to explain the acceleration of the cosmic expansion? It turns out that a straightforward dimensional analysis of Einstein equation provides us with clear evidences that the geometrical nature of Λ is the only viable source to this phenomenon, in addition of the application of Ockham's razor principle. This contribution is primarily a review of the main stream in the interpretation of Λ because it is at the origin of such a research program.

  15. Space Based Dark Energy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Dark energy, the name given to the cause of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, is one of the most tantalizing mystery in modern physics. Current cosmological models hold that dark energy is currently the dominant component of the Universe, but the exact nature of DE remains poorly understood. There are ambitious ground-based surveys underway that seek to understand DE and NASA is participating in the development of significantly more ambitious space-based surveys planned for the next decade. NASA has provided mission enabling technology to the European Space Agency's (ESA) Euclid mission in exchange for US scientists to participate in the Euclid mission. NASA is also developing the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset (WFIRST) mission for possible launch in 2024. WFIRST was the highest ranked space mission in the Astro2010 Decadal Survey and the current design uses a 2.4m space telescope to go beyond what was then envisioned. Understanding DE is one of the primary science goals of WFIRST-AFTA. This talk will review the state of DE, the relevant activities of the Cosmic Structure Interest Group (CoSSIG) of the PhyPAG, and detail the status and complementarity between Euclid, WFIRST and ot ambitious ground-based efforts.

  16. Bianchi Type-I Anisotropic Dark Energy Model with Constant Deceleration Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Amirhashchi, H.; Saha, Bijan

    2011-09-01

    A new dark energy model in anisotropic Bianchi type-I (B-I) space-time with time dependent equation of state (EoS) parameter and constant deceleration parameter has been investigated in the present paper. The Einstein's field equations have been solved by applying a variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter (Berman in Il Nuovo Cimento B 74:182, 1983) which generates two types of solutions, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential form. The existing range of the dark energy EoS parameter ω for derived model is found to be in good agreement with the three recent observations (i) SNe Ia data (Knop et al. in Astrophys. J. 598:102, 2003), (ii) SNe Ia data collaborated with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al. in Astrophys. J. 606:702, 2004) and (iii) a combination of cosmological datasets coming from CMB anisotropies, luminosity distances of high redshift type Ia supernovae and galaxy clustering (Hinshaw et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 180:225, 2009 and Komatsu et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 180:330, 2009). The cosmological constant Λ is found to be a decreasing function of time and it approaches a small positive value at the present epoch which is corroborated by results from recent supernovae Ia observations. It has also been suggested that the dark energy that explains the observed accelerating universe may arise due to the contribution to the vacuum energy of the EoS in a time dependent background. Geometric and kinematic properties of the model and the behaviour of the anisotropy of the dark energy have been carried out.

  17. The vacuum's dark particles behave like dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, John

    2015-04-01

    Building on the governing hypothesis that self-information is equal to action, I solve for the time step of the vacuum. The resulting equations (both quantum diffusion and Friedmann's equations) argue that a dark particle, or special black hole, exists at hbar or twice the reduced Planck mass where the Hawking temperature breaks down. It is hypothesized that if neutral hydrogen is nearby the dark particles are able to couple with the background field and thus have a density that looks like dark matter. If hydrogen is not around, the dark particles become frozen leading to a constant density of black body radiation similar to dark energy. If the Universe's dark particles (away from neutral hydrogen) became frozen during the re-ionization of the Universe's history, its BBR density is well within confidence ranges for the cosmological constant. This hypothesis can also explain the recent observations that dark matter decays into dark energy.

  18. Similarity dark energy models in Bianchi type-I space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmad T.; Kumar Yadav, Anil; Alzahrani, Abdulah K.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate some new similarity inhomogeneous solutions of anisotropic dark energy and perfect fluid in Bianchi type-I space-time. Three different equation-of-state (EoS) parameters along the spatial directions are introduced to quantify the deviation of pressure from isotropy. We consider the case when the dark energy is minimally coupled to the perfect fluid as well as the direct interaction with it. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the equation invariant are identified and we generate an optimal system of one-dimensional sub-algebras. Each element of the optimal system is used to reduce the partial differential equation to an ordinary differential equation which is further analyzed. We solve the Einstein field equations, described by a system of non-linear partial differential equations (NLPDEs), by using the Lie point symmetry analysis method. The geometrical and kinematic features of the models and the behavior of the anisotropy of dark energy are examined in detail.

  19. Physical evidence for dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Scranton, Ryan; Connolly, Andrew J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Stebbins, Albert; Szapudi, Istvan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Afshordi, Niayesh; Budavari, Tamas; Csabai, Istvan; Frieman, Joshua A.; Gunn, James E.; Johnston, David; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Lupton, Robert H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Sheldon, Erin Scott; Sheth, Ravi K.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Tegmark, Max; Xu, Yongzhong; Anderson, Scott F.; /Pittsburgh U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Fermilab /Inst. Astron., Honolulu /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /Eotvos U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /KICP, Chicago /Pennsylvania U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Apache Point Observ. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Tokyo U., ICRR /LLNL, Livermore /Sussex U., Astron. Ctr. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Michigan U. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2003-07-01

    The authors present measurements of the angular cross-correlation between luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the cosmic microwave background temperature maps from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. They find a statistically significant achromatic positive correlation between these two data sets, which is consistent with the expected signal from the late Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. they do not detect any anti-correlation on small angular scales as would be produced from a large Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, although they do see evidence for some SZ effect for their highest redshift samples. Assuming a flat universe, their preliminary detection of the ISW effect provides independent physical evidence for the existence of dark energy.

  20. A two measure model of dark energy and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Singleton, Douglas; Yongram, N. E-mail: dougs@csufresno.edu

    2012-11-01

    In this work we construct a unified model of dark energy and dark matter. This is done with the following three elements: a gravitating scalar field, φ with a non-conventional kinetic term, as in the string theory tachyon; an arbitrary potential, V(φ); two measures — a metric measure ((−g){sup 1/2}) and a non-metric measure (Φ). The model has two interesting features: (i) For potentials which are unstable and would give rise to tachyonic scalar field, this model can stabilize the scalar field. (ii) The form of the dark energy and dark matter that results from this model is fairly insensitive to the exact form of the scalar field potential.

  1. Dark energy and dark matter perturbations in singular universes

    SciTech Connect

    Denkiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the evolution of density perturbations of dark matter and dark energy in cosmological models which admit future singularities in a finite time. Up to now geometrical tests of the evolution of the universe do not differentiate between singular universes and ΛCDM scenario. We solve perturbation equations using the gauge invariant formalism. The analysis shows that the detailed reconstruction of the evolution of perturbations within singular cosmologies, in the dark sector, can exhibit important differences between the singular universes models and the ΛCDM cosmology. This is encouraging for further examination and gives hope for discriminating between those models with future galaxy weak lensing experiments like the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Euclid or CMB observations like PRISM and CoRE.

  2. Dark matter and dark energy from quark bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Brilenkov, Maxim; Eingorn, Maxim; Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Zhuk, Alexander E-mail: maxim.eingorn@gmail.com E-mail: ai.zhuk2@gmail.com

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the present expansion of our Universe endowed with relict colored objects — quarks and gluons — that survived hadronization either as isolated islands of quark-gluon ''nuggets'' or spread uniformly in the Universe. In the first scenario, the QNs can play the role of dark matter. In the second scenario, we demonstrate that uniform colored objects can play the role of dark energy providing the late-time accelerating expansion of the Universe.

  3. How clustering dark energy affects matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, A.; Basilakos, S.; Pace, F.

    2015-09-01

    The rate of structure formation in the Universe is different in homogeneous and clustered dark energy models. The degree of dark energy clustering depends on the magnitude of its effective sound speed c2_eff and for c2_eff=0 dark energy clusters in a similar fashion to dark matter while for c2_eff=1 it stays (approximately) homogeneous. In this paper we consider two distinct equations of state for the dark energy component, wd = const and w_d=w_0+w_1(z/1+z) with c2_eff as a free parameter and we try to constrain the dark energy effective sound speed using current available data including Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background shift parameter (Planck and WMAP), Hubble parameter, big bang nucleosynthesis and the growth rate of structures fσ8(z). At first we derive the most general form of the equations governing dark matter and dark energy clustering under the assumption that c2_eff=const. Finally, performing an overall likelihood analysis we find that the likelihood function peaks at c2_eff=0; however, the dark energy sound speed is degenerate with respect to the cosmological parameters, namely Ωm and wd.

  4. Cosmological constraints on superconducting dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Gergely, László Á.; Harko, Tiberiu; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2015-12-01

    We consider cosmological tests of a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy is included in the total action through a gauge-invariant, electromagnetic type contribution. The ground state of dark energy, corresponding to a constant potential V , is a Bose-Einstein type condensate with spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry. In other words, dark energy appears as a massive vector field emerging from a superposition of a massless vector and a scalar field, the latter corresponding to the Goldstone boson. Two particular cosmological models, corresponding to pure electric and pure magnetic type potentials, respectively, are confronted with type IA supernovae and Hubble parameter data. In the electric case, a good fit is obtained along a narrow inclined stripe in the Ωm-ΩV parameter plane, which includes the Λ cold dark matter limit as the best fit. The other points on this admissible region represent superconducting dark energy as a sum of a cosmological constant and a time-evolving contribution. In the magnetic case the cosmological test selects either (i) parameter ranges of the superconducting dark energy allowing for the standard baryonic sector plus dark matter or (ii) a unified superconducting dark matter and dark energy model, additionally including only the baryonic sector.

  5. Interacting Dark Energy Models and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, Hamed; Urioste, Jazmin

    2017-01-01

    Dark energy is one of the mysteries of the twenty first century. Although there are candidates resembling some features of dark energy, there is no single model describing all the properties of dark energy. Dark energy is believed to be the most dominant component of the cosmic inventory, but a lot of models do not consider any interaction between dark energy and other constituents of the cosmic inventory. Introducing an interaction will change the equation governing the behavior of dark energy and matter and creates new ways to explain cosmic coincidence problem. In this work we studied how the Hubble parameter and density parameters evolve with time in the presence of certain types of interaction. The interaction serves as a way to convert dark energy into matter to avoid a dark energy-dominated universe by creating new equilibrium points for the differential equations. Then we will use numerical analysis to predict the values of distance moduli at different redshifts and compare them to the values for the distance moduli obtained by WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe). Undergraduate Student

  6. Renewable Energy Requirement Guidance for EPACT 2005 and EO 13423

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Describes what counts toward the federal goals, the definition of "new" for renewable power/renewable energy certificate (REC) purchases, and what types of on-site projects will get double credit (Section 203 (C)).

  7. Description of dark energy and dark matter by vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    A simple Lagrangian (with squared covariant divergence of a vector field as a kinetic term) turned out an adequate tool for oscopic description of dark sector. The zero-mass field acts as the dark energy. Its energy-momentum tensor is a simple additive to the cosmological constant. Space-like and time-like massive vector fields describe two different forms of dark matter. The space-like field is attractive. It is responsible for the observed plateau in galaxy rotation curves. The time-like massive field displays repulsive elasticity. In balance with dark energy and ordinary matter it provides a four-parametric diversity of regular solutions of the Einstein equations describing different possible cosmological and oscillating non-singular scenarios of evolution of the Universe. In particular, the singular "big bang" turns into a regular inflation-like transition from contraction to expansion with accelerated expansion at late times. The fine-tuned Friedman-Robertson-Walker singular solution is a particular limiting case at the boundary of existence of regular oscillating solutions (in the absence of vector fields). The simplicity of the general covariant expression for the energy-momentum tensor allows analyzing the main properties of the dark sector analytically, avoiding unnecessary model assumptions.

  8. Bouncing Cosmologies with Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Marcianò, Antonino; Wang, Dong-Gang; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2017-01-01

    We review matter bounce scenarios where the matter content is dark matter and dark energy. These cosmologies predict a nearly scale-invariant power spectrum with a slightly red tilt for scalar perturbations and a small tensor-to-scalar ratio. Importantly, these models predict a positive running of the scalar index, contrary to the predictions of the simplest inflationary and ekpyrotic models, and hence could potentially be falsified by future observations. We also review how bouncing cosmological space-times can arise in theories where either the Einstein equations are modified or where matter fields that violate the null energy condition are included.

  9. [Dark matter and dark energy of the universe].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Peris, José

    2005-01-01

    At the turn of the 20th Century, the Universe was thought to consist of our solar system, the Sun, planets, satellites and comets, floating under the Milky Way. The astronomers were ignorant of the existence of galaxies, clusters, quasars and black holes. Over the last ten years the Cosmology has made remarkable progress in our understanding of the composition of the Universe: 23 per cent is in an unknown form called dark matter; 73 per cent in another form called dark energy; 3 per cent is made of free hydrogen and helium atoms; 0.5 per cent makes up all the light we see in the night including the stars, clusters and superclusters; 0.3 per cent is in free neutrino particles; and finally, 0.03 per cent is in the heavier nuclei of which the Sun, the Earth and ourselves are made. In this work we study specially the dark matter and the dark energy. The first one appears to be attached to galaxies, and astronomers agree that it is cold, meaning that the particles that make up that matter are not moving fast. Very recently astronomers discovered that a tremendous amount of the so-cahled dark energy exists and that it is pushing and accelerating the expansion of the Universe. Should this expansion continue for another 14,000 million years, the sky will darken with only a handful of galaxies remaining visible.

  10. Dark energy, inflation, and extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhardt, Paul J.; Wesley, Daniel

    2009-05-15

    We consider how accelerated expansion, whether due to inflation or dark energy, imposes strong constraints on fundamental theories obtained by compactification from higher dimensions. For theories that obey the null energy condition (NEC), we find that inflationary cosmology is impossible for a wide range of compactifications; and a dark energy phase consistent with observations is only possible if both Newton's gravitational constant and the dark energy equation of state vary with time. If the theory violates the NEC, inflation and dark energy are only possible if the NEC-violating elements are inhomogeneously distributed in the compact dimensions and vary with time in precise synchrony with the matter and energy density in the noncompact dimensions. Although our proofs are derived assuming general relativity applies in both four and higher dimensions and certain forms of metrics, we argue that similar constraints must apply for more general compactifications.

  11. A Modified Dark Energy Model and Quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Dehnavi, Naser; Fathi, Mohsen; Tavakoli, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The observational data indicate that about 70 % of the total energy density of the current state universe has been occupied by Dark Energy. This is said to be the cause of the accelerated expansion of universe. In this letter we shall use a curvature constant as a scalar field in the quintessence Dark Energy model, for an isotropic universe. Connected to the so-called model, we will specify a definite dynamical field equation from the initial action of the theory.

  12. Status of the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Dark Energy Science Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey is probing the origin of cosmic acceleration and the nature of dark energy by carrying out two interleaved, multi-band imaging surveys using the 570-megapixel Dark Energy Camera built by the collaboration for the NOAO Blanco 4-meter telescope at CTIO. The survey began in August 2013 and has completed two of its five 105-night observing seasons, including grizY imaging of several thousand square degrees and time-domain griz imaging of 30 sq. deg. with a 6-night cadence. I will describe the status of the survey and highlight some of the science results.

  13. Dark matter from dark energy in q-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Volovik, G. E.

    2017-01-01

    A constant (spacetime-independent) q-field may play a crucial role for the cancellation of Planck-scale contributions to the gravitating vacuum energy density. We now show that a small spacetime-dependent perturbation of the equilibrium q-field behaves gravitationally as a pressureless perfect fluid. This makes the fluctuating part of the q-field a candidate for the inferred dark-matter component of the present universe. For a Planck-scale oscillation frequency of the q-field perturbation, the implication would be that direct searches for dark-matter particles would remain unsuccessful in the foreseeable future.

  14. Effective equation of state for running vacuum: `mirage' quintessence and phantom dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Solà, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Past analyses of the equation of state (EoS) of the Dark Energy (DE) were not incompatible with a phantom phase near our time. This has been the case in the years of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, in combination with the remaining cosmological observables. Such situations did not completely disappear from the data collected from the Planck satellite mission. In it the EoS analysis may still be interpreted as suggesting ωD ≲ -1, and so a mildly evolving DE cannot be discarded. In our opinion, the usual ansatzs made on the structure of the EoS for dynamical DE models (e.g. quintessence and the like) is too simplified. In this work, we examine in detail some of these issues and suggest that a general class of models with a dynamical vacuum energy density could explain the persistent phantom anomaly, despite this there is no trace of real phantom behaviour in them. The spurious or `mirage' effect is caused by an attempt to describe them as if the DE would be caused by fundamental phantom scalar fields. Remarkably, the effective DE behaviour can also appear as quintessence in transit to phantom, or vice versa.

  15. Dark Matter and Dark Energy - Fact or Fantasy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip

    We show that the origin of the dark matter and dark energy problems originates in the assumption of standard Einstein gravity that Newton's constant is fundamental. We discuss an alternate, conformal invariant, metric theory of gravity in which Newton's constant is induced dynamically, with the global induced one which is effective for cosmology being altogether weaker than the local induced one needed for the solar system. We find that in the theory dark matter is no longer needed, and that the accelerating universe data can be fitted without fine-tuning using a cosmological constant as large as particle physics suggests. In the conformal theory then it is not the cosmological constant which is quenched but rather the amount of gravity that it produces.

  16. Embrace the Dark Side: Advancing the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyta, Eric

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is an ongoing cosmological survey intended to study the properties of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this dissertation, I present work of mine that has advanced the progress of DES. First is an introduction, which explores the physics of the cosmos, as well as how DES intends to probe it. Attention is given to developing the theoretical framework cosmologists use to describe the Universe, and to explaining observational evidence which has furnished our current conception of the cosmos. Emphasis is placed on the dark sector - dark matter and dark energy - the content of the Universe not explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. As its name suggests, the Dark Energy Survey has been specially designed to measure the properties of dark energy. DES will use a combination of galaxy cluster, weak gravitational lensing, angular clustering, and supernovae measurements to derive its state of the art constraints, each of which is discussed in the text. The work described in this dissertation includes science measurements directly related to the first three of these probes. The dissertation presents my contributions to the readout and control system of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam); the name of this software is SISPI. SISPI uses client-server and publish-subscribe communication patterns to coordinate and command actions among the many hardware components of DECam - the survey instrument for DES, a 570 megapixel CCD camera, mounted at prime focus of the Blanco 4-m Telescope. The SISPI work I discuss includes coding applications for DECam's filter changer mechanism and hexapod, as well as developing the Scripts Editor, a GUI application for DECam users to edit and export observing sequence SISPI can load and execute. Next, the dissertation describes the processing of early DES data, which I contributed. This furnished the data products used in the first-completed DES science analysis, and contributed to improving the

  17. Varying ghost dark energy and particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the models of dark energy is the ghost dark energy, which has a geometrical origin. Recently, a certain type of phenomenological modification of ghost dark energy has been suggested which motivated us for this work. The goal of this paper is twofold. First, we would like to study the cosmological scenario involving interacting varying ghost dark energy. A cosmographic analysis of a non-interacting model is also performed. Then, we study the particle creation following the straight analogy between quantization in Minkowski background and canonical quantization of a scalar field in curved dynamical backgrounds. Particular attention will be paid to massless-particle production from a radiation-dominated universe (according to our toy model) which evolves to our large-scale universe. Constraints on the parameters of the models obtained during the cosmographic analysis did allow to demonstrate the possibility of a massless-particle creation in a radiation-dominated universe.

  18. Effective theory of interacting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gleyzes, Jérôme; Mancarella, Michele; Vernizzi, Filippo; Langlois, David E-mail: langlois@apc.univ-paris7.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2015-08-01

    We present a unifying treatment of dark energy and modified gravity that allows distinct conformal-disformal couplings of matter species to the gravitational sector. In this very general approach, we derive the conditions to avoid ghost and gradient instabilities. We compute the equations of motion for background quantities and linear perturbations. We illustrate our formalism with two simple scenarios, where either cold dark matter or a relativistic fluid is nonminimally coupled. This extends previous studies of coupled dark energy to a much broader spectrum of gravitational theories.

  19. Dark Energy Research: A Space Odyssey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Dark energy, the name given to the cause of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, is one of the most tantalizing mystery in modern physics. Current cosmological models hold that dark energy is currently the dominant component of the Universe, but the exact nature of dark energy remains poorly understood. There are ambitious ground-based surveys underway that seek to understand dark energy and NASA is participating in the development of significantly more ambitious space-based surveys planned for the next decade. NASA has provided mission enabling technology to the European Space Agency's (ESA) Euclid mission in exchange for US scientists to participate in the Euclid mission. NASA is also developing the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset (WFIRST-AFTA) mission for possible launch in ?2023. WFIRST was the highest ranked space mission in the Astro2010 Decadal Survey. Understanding dark energy is one of the primary science goals of WFIRST-AFTA. This talk will review the state of Dark Energy science, the relevant activities of the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG), and detail the status and complementarity of Euclid and WFIRST.

  20. Examining the viability of phantom dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwick, Kevin J.

    2015-09-01

    In the standard cosmological framework of the 0th-order Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric and the use of perfect fluids in the stress-energy tensor, dark energy with an equation-of-state parameter w <-1 (known as phantom dark energy) implies negative kinetic energy and vacuum instability when modeled as a scalar field. However, the accepted values for present-day w from Planck and WMAP9 include a significant range of values less than -1 . We find that it is not as obvious as one might think that phantom dark energy has negative kinetic energy categorically. Analogously, we find that field models of quintessence dark energy (wϕ>-1 ) do not necessarily have positive kinetic energy categorically. Staying within the confines of observational constraints and general relativity, for which there is good experimental validation, we consider a few reasonable departures from the standard 0th-order framework in an attempt to see if negative kinetic energy can be avoided in these settings despite an apparent w <-1 . We consider a more accurate description of the universe through the perturbing of the isotropic and homogeneous FLRW metric and the components of the stress-energy tensor, and we consider dynamic w and primordial isocurvature and adiabatic perturbations. We find that phantom dark energy does not necessarily have negative kinetic energy for all relevant length scales at all times, and we also find that, by the same token, quintessence dark energy does not necessarily have positive kinetic energy for all relevant length scales at all times.

  1. Roles of dark energy perturbations in dynamical dark energy models: can we ignore them?

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Hwang, Jai-chan; Lee, Jae-heon; Noh, Hyerim

    2009-10-09

    We show the importance of properly including the perturbations of the dark energy component in the dynamical dark energy models based on a scalar field and modified gravity theories in order to meet with present and future observational precisions. Based on a simple scaling scalar field dark energy model, we show that observationally distinguishable substantial differences appear by ignoring the dark energy perturbation. By ignoring it the perturbed system of equations becomes inconsistent and deviations in (gauge-invariant) power spectra depend on the gauge choice.

  2. Report of the Dark Energy Task Force

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Albrecht, Andreas; Bernstein, Gary; Cahn, Robert; Freedman, Wendy L.; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Hu, Wayne; Huth, John; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kolb, Edward W.; Knox, Lloyd; Mather, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Dark energy appears to be the dominant component of the physical Universe, yet there is no persuasive theoretical explanation for its existence or magnitude. The acceleration of the Universe is, along with dark matter, the observed phenomenon that most directly demonstrates that our theories of fundamental particles and gravity are either incorrect or incomplete. Most experts believe that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of fundamental physics will be required to achieve a full understanding of the cosmic acceleration. For these reasons, the nature of dark energy ranks among the very most compelling of all outstanding problems in physical science. These circumstances demand an ambitious observational program to determine the dark energy properties as well as possible.

  3. Gravity resonance spectroscopy constrains dark energy and dark matter scenarios.

    PubMed

    Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Burgdörfer, J; Chizhova, L A; Geltenbort, P; Ivanov, A N; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Rotter, S; Saul, H; Schmidt, U; Abele, H

    2014-04-18

    We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate that Newton's inverse square law of gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of 10-14  eV. At this level of precision, we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravitylike interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant β>5.8×108 at 95% confidence level (C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axionlike spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength gsgp>3.7×10-16 (5.3×10-16) at a Yukawa length of λ=20  μm (95% C.L.).

  4. The symmetry energy at suprasaturation density and the ASY-EOS experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippo, E.; Russotto, P.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Basrak, Z.; Benlliure, J.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Caesar, C.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Cozma, M. D.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Kiš, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kupny, S.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q. F.; Lombardo, I.; Łukasik, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Marini, P.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pawłowski, P.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reviol, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Sarantites, D. G.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trautmann, W.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wang, Yongjia; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Winkelbauer, J.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2017-03-01

    The ASY-EOS experiment at GSI laboratory measured the direct and elliptic flow of neutrons and light charged particles in the reaction 197Au+197 Au at 400 A MeV incident energy. The ratio of elliptic flow of neutrons with respect to that of the light charged particles was used as main experimental observable to probe the density dependence of the symmetry energy term of the nuclear equation of state. Results, obtained by comparison of the experimental data with the UrQMD model predictions, strongly support a moderately soft to linear density dependence of the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities below 2ρ0.

  5. Dark Energy, Dark Matter and Science with Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann Hornschemeier

    2005-01-01

    Constellation-X, with more than 100 times the collecting area of any previous spectroscopic mission operating in the 0.25-40 keV bandpass, will enable highthroughput, high spectral resolution studies of sources ranging from the most luminous accreting supermassive black holes in the Universe to the disks around young stars where planets form. This talk will review the updated Constellation-X science case, released in booklet form during summer 2005. The science areas where Constellation-X will have major impact include the exploration of the space-time geometry of black holes spanning nine orders of magnitude in mass and the nature of the dark energy and dark matter which govern the expansion and ultimate fate of the Universe. Constellation-X will also explore processes referred to as "cosmic feedback" whereby mechanical energy, radiation, and chemical elements from star formation and black holes are returned to interstellar and intergalactic medium, profoundly affecting the development of structure in the Universe, and will also probe all the important life cycles of matter, from stellar and planetary birth to stellar death via supernova to stellar endpoints in the form of accreting binaries and supernova remnants. This talk will touch upon all these areas, with particular emphasis on Constellation-X's role in the study of Dark Energy.

  6. Probing gravitation, dark energy, and acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-02-20

    The acceleration of the expansion of the universe arises from unknown physical processes involving either new fields in high energy physics or modifications of gravitation theory. It is crucial for our understanding to characterize the properties of the dark energy or gravity through cosmological observations and compare and distinguish between them. In fact, close consistencies exist between a dark energy equation of state function w(z) and changes to the framework of the Friedmann cosmological equations as well as direct spacetime geometry quantities involving the acceleration, such as ''geometric dark energy'' from the Ricci scalar. We investigate these interrelationships, including for the case of super acceleration or phantom energy where the fate of the universe may be more gentle than the Big Rip.

  7. Falsification of dark energy by fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded for the discovery from observations of increased supernovae dimness interpreted as distance, so that the Universe expansion rate has changed from a rate decreasing since the big bang to one that is now increasing, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanical considerations falsify both the accelerating expansion and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in current stan- dard models of self-gravitational structure formation, which rely on cold dark matter CDM condensations and clusterings that are also falsified by fluid mechanics. Weakly collisional CDM particles do not condense but diffuse away. Photon viscosity predicts su- perclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the plasma fragments into Earth-mass gas planets in trillion planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). The hydrogen planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars. Dark energy is a systematic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by dark matter planets near hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Evaporated planet atmospheres may or may not scatter light from the events depending on the line of sight.

  8. "Dark energy" in the Local Void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villata, M.

    2012-05-01

    The unexpected discovery of the accelerated cosmic expansion in 1998 has filled the Universe with the embarrassing presence of an unidentified "dark energy", or cosmological constant, devoid of any physical meaning. While this standard cosmology seems to work well at the global level, improved knowledge of the kinematics and other properties of our extragalactic neighborhood indicates the need for a better theory. We investigate whether the recently suggested repulsive-gravity scenario can account for some of the features that are unexplained by the standard model. Through simple dynamical considerations, we find that the Local Void could host an amount of antimatter (˜5×1015 M ⊙) roughly equivalent to the mass of a typical supercluster, thus restoring the matter-antimatter symmetry. The antigravity field produced by this "dark repulsor" can explain the anomalous motion of the Local Sheet away from the Local Void, as well as several other properties of nearby galaxies that seem to require void evacuation and structure formation much faster than expected from the standard model. At the global cosmological level, gravitational repulsion from antimatter hidden in voids can provide more than enough potential energy to drive both the cosmic expansion and its acceleration, with no need for an initial "explosion" and dark energy. Moreover, the discrete distribution of these dark repulsors, in contrast to the uniformly permeating dark energy, can also explain dark flows and other recently observed excessive inhomogeneities and anisotropies of the Universe.

  9. Yang Mills condensate dark energy coupled with matter and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xia, T. Y.; Zhao, W.

    2007-07-01

    The coincidence problem is studied for the dark energy model of effective Yang Mills condensate (YMC) in a flat expanding universe during the matter-dominated stage. The YMC energy ρy(t) is taken to represent the dark energy, which is coupled either with the matter ρm(t), or with both the matter and the radiation components ρr(t). The effective YM Lagrangian is completely determined by the quantum field theory up to 1-loop order with an energy scale ~10-3 eV as a model parameter, and for each coupling, there is an extra model parameter. We have studied extensively the coupling models: the YMC decaying into the matter and the radiation; or vice versa the matter and radiation decaying into the YMC. It is found that, starting from the equality of radiation-matter ρmi = ρri, for a wide range of initial conditions of ρyi = (10-10, 10-2)ρmi, the models have a scaling solution during the early stages, and the YMC levels off and becomes dominant at late time, and the present state with Ωy sime 0.7, Ωm sime 0.3 and Ωr sime 10-5 is always achieved. If the YMC decays into a component, then this component also levels off later and approaches a constant value asymptotically, and the equation of state (EoS) of the YMC wy = ρy/py crosses over -1 and takes the value wy sime -1.1 at z = 0. If the matter and radiation decay into the YMC, then ρm(t) ~ a(t)-3 and ρr(t) ~ a(t)-4 approximately for all the time, and wy approaches -1 but does not cross over -1. We have also demonstrated that, at t → ∞, the coupled dynamics for (ρy(t), ρm(t), ρr(t)) is a stable attractor. Therefore, under generic circumstances, the existence of the scaling solution during the early stages and the subsequential exit from the scaling regime around z sime (0.3 0.5) are inevitable. Thus the coincidence problem can be naturally solved in the YMC dark energy models.

  10. Interacting dark energy: The role of microscopic feedback in the dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the impact on the classical dynamics of dark matter particles and dark energy of a nonminimal coupling in the dark sector, assuming that the mass of the dark matter particles is coupled to a dark energy scalar field. We show that standard results can be recovered only if the space-time variation of the dark energy scalar field is sufficiently smooth on the characteristic length scale of the dark matter particles, and we determine the associated constraint dependent on both the mass and radius of the dark matter particles and the coupling to the dark energy scalar field. We further show, using field theory numerical simulations, that a violation of such constraint results in a microscopic feedback effect strongly affecting the dynamics of dark matter particles, with a potential impact on structure formation and on the space-time evolution of the dark energy equation of state.

  11. Redshift drift constraints on holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test is a promising method for probing dark energy because it measures the redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman- α forest of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of 2 ≲ z ≲ 5, which is not covered by existing cosmological observations. Therefore, it could provide an important supplement to current cosmological observations. In this paper, we explore the impact of SL test on the precision of cosmological constraints for two typical holographic dark energy models, i.e., the original holographic dark energy (HDE) model and the Ricci holographic dark energy (RDE) model. To avoid data inconsistency, we use the best-fit models based on current combined observational data as the fiducial models to simulate 30 mock SL test data. The results show that SL test can effectively break the existing strong degeneracy between the present-day matter density Ωm0 and the Hubble constant H 0 in other cosmological observations. For the considered two typical dark energy models, not only can a 30-year observation of SL test improve the constraint precision of Ωm0 and h dramatically, but can also enhance the constraint precision of the model parameters c and α significantly.

  12. Dark Energy and the Hubble Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    The Big Bang predicted by Friedmann could not be empirically discovered in the 1920th, since global cosmological distances (more than 300-1000 Mpc) were not available for observations at that time. Lemaitre and Hubble studied receding motions of galaxies at local distances of less than 20-30 Mpc and found that the motions followed the (nearly) linear velocity-distance relation, known now as Hubble's law. For decades, the real nature of this phenomenon has remained a mystery, in Sandage's words. After the discovery of dark energy, it was suggested that the dynamics of local expansion flows is dominated by omnipresent dark energy, and it is the dark energy antigravity that is able to introduce the linear velocity-distance relation to the flows. It implies that Hubble's law observed at local distances was in fact the first observational manifestation of dark energy. If this is the case, the commonly accepted criteria of scientific discovery lead to the conclusion: In 1927, Lemaitre discovered dark energy and Hubble confirmed this in 1929.

  13. Polytropic dark matter flows illuminate dark energy and accelerated expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, K.; Spyrou, N. K.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, a large amount of data implies that the matter constituents of the cosmological dark sector might be collisional. An attractive feature of such a possibility is that, it can reconcile dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE) in terms of a single component, accommodated in the context of a polytropic-DM fluid. In fact, polytropic processes in a DM fluid have been most successfully used in modeling dark galactic haloes, thus significantly improving the velocity dispersion profiles of galaxies. Motivated by such results, we explore the time evolution and the dynamical characteristics of a spatially-flat cosmological model, in which, in principle, there is no DE at all. Instead, in this model, the DM itself possesses some sort of fluidlike properties, i.e., the fundamental units of the Universe matter-energy content are the volume elements of a DM fluid, performing polytropic flows. In this case, together with all the other physical characteristics, we also take the energy of this fluid's internal motions into account as a source of the universal gravitational field. This form of energy can compensate for the extra energy, needed to compromise spatial flatness, namely, to justify that, today, the total energy density parameter is exactly unity. The polytropic cosmological model, depends on only one free parameter, the corresponding (polytropic) exponent, Γ. We find this model particularly interesting, because for Γ ≤ 0.541, without the need for either any exotic DE or the cosmological constant, the conventional pressure becomes negative enough so that the Universe accelerates its expansion at cosmological redshifts below a transition value. In fact, several physical reasons, e.g., the cosmological requirement for cold DM (CDM) and a positive velocity-of-sound square, impose further constraints on the value of Γ, which is eventually settled down to the range -0.089 < Γ ≤ 0. This cosmological model does not suffer either from the age problem or from the

  14. Constraining Dark Matter and Dark Energy Models using Astrophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.

    This thesis addresses astrophysical probes to constrain dark matter (DM) and dark energy models. Primordial black holes (PBHs) remain one of the few DM candidates within the Standard Model of Particle Physics. This thesis presents a new probe of this PBH DM, using the microlensing of the source stars monitored by the already existing Kepler satellite. With its photometric precision and the large projected cross section of the nearby stars, it is found that previous constraints on PBH DM could theoretically be extended by two orders of magnitude. Correcting a well-known microlensing formula, a limb-darkening analysis is included, and a new approximation is calculated for future star selection. A preliminary prediction is calculated for the planned Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope. A preliminary study of the first two years of publicly available Kepler data is presented. The investigation yields many new sources of background error not predicted in the theoretical calculations, such as stellar flares and comets in the field of view. Since no PBH candidates are detected, an efficiency of detection is therefore calculated by running a Monte Carlo with fake limb-darkened finite-source microlensing events. It is found that with just the first 8 quarters of data, a full order of magnitude of the PBH mass range can be already constrained. Finally, one of the astrophysical probes of dark energy is also addressed - specifically, the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) measurement in the gas distribution, as detected in quasar absorption lines. This unique measurement of dark energy at intermediate redshifts is being measured by current telescope surveys. The last part of this thesis therefore focuses on understanding the systematic effects in such a detection. Since the bias between the underlying dark matter distribution and the measured gas flux distribution is based on gas physics, hydrodynamic simulations are used to understand the evolution of neutral hydrogen over

  15. Dark energy and dark matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    The dark sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the Universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent γ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general γ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with γ =constant in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like nonrelativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both dark energy and dark matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The Λ CDM model is included in this family of theories when γ =0 . We fit our model to supernovae Ia, H (z ) and baryonic acoustic oscillation data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early Universe and the growth of small perturbations in this model are also discussed.

  16. A novel teleparallel dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otalora, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Although equivalent to general relativity, teleparallel gravity (TG) is conceptually speaking a completely different theory. In this theory, the gravitational field is described by torsion, not by curvature. By working in this context, a new model is proposed in which the four-derivative of a canonical scalar field representing dark energy is nonminimally coupled to the “vector torsion”. This type of coupling is motivated by the fact that a scalar field couples to torsion through its four-derivative, which is consistent with local spacetime kinematics regulated by the de Sitter group SO(1, 4). It is found that the current state of accelerated expansion of the universe corresponds to a late-time attractor that can be (i) a dark energy-dominated de Sitter solution (ωϕ = -1), (ii) a quintessence-type solution with ωϕ ≥-1, or (iii) a phantom-type ωϕ < -1 dark energy.

  17. Challenges in Cosmology from the Big Bang to Dark Energy, Dark Matter and Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    I review the current status of Big Bang Cosmology, with emphasis on current issues in dark matter, dark energy, and galaxy formation. These topics motivate many of the current goals of experimental cosmology which range from targeting the nature of dark energy and dark matter to probing the epoch of the first stars and galaxies.

  18. Atomic interferometry test of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2016-11-01

    Atomic interferometry can be used to probe dark energy models coupled to matter. We consider the constraints coming from recent experimental results on models generalizing the inverse power law chameleons such as f (R ) gravity in the large curvature regime, the environmentally dependent dilaton and symmetrons. Using the tomographic description of these models, we find that only symmetrons with masses smaller than the dark energy scale can be efficiently tested. In this regime, the resulting constraints complement the bounds from the Eötwash experiment and exclude small values of the symmetron self-coupling.

  19. DESTINY, The Dark Energy Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasquale, Bert A.; Woodruff, Robert A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Lauer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed the development of a low-cost space telescope, Destiny, as a concept for the NASA/DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission. Destiny is a 1.65m space telescope, featuring a near-infrared (0.85-1.7m) survey camera/spectrometer with a moderate flat-field field of view (FOV). Destiny will probe the properties of dark energy by obtaining a Hubble diagram based on Type Ia supernovae and a large-scale mass power spectrum derived from weak lensing distortions of field galaxies as a function of redshift.

  20. Dark Energy: A Crisis for Fundamental Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Stubbs, Christopher [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    2016-07-12

    Astrophysical observations provide robust evidence that our current picture of fundamental physics is incomplete. The discovery in 1998 that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating (apparently due to gravitational repulsion between regions of empty space!) presents us with a profound challenge, at the interface between gravity and quantum mechanics. This "Dark Energy" problem is arguably the most pressing open question in modern fundamental physics. The first talk will describe why the Dark Energy problem constitutes a crisis, with wide-reaching ramifications. One consequence is that we should probe our understanding of gravity at all accessible scales, and the second talk will present experiments and observations that are exploring this issue.

  1. Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope (ADEPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles L. Bennett

    2009-03-26

    In 2006, we proposed to NASA a detailed concept study of ADEPT (the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope), a potential space mission to reliably measure the time-evolution of dark energy by conducting the largest effective volume survey of the universe ever done. A peer-review panel of scientific, management, and technical experts reported back the highest possible 'excellent' rating for ADEPT. We have since made substantial advances in the scientific and technical maturity of the mission design. With this Department of Energy (DOE) award we were granted supplemental funding to support specific extended research items that were not included in the NASA proposal, many of which were intended to broadly advance future dark energy research, as laid out by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF). The proposed work had three targets: (1) the adaptation of large-format infrared arrays to a 2 micron cut-off; (2) analytical research to improve the understanding of the dark energy figure-of- merit; and (3) extended studies of baryon acoustic oscillation systematic uncertainties. Since the actual award was only for {approx}10% of the proposed amount item (1) was dropped and item (2) work was severely restricted, consistent with the referee reviews of the proposal, although there was considerable contradictions between reviewer comments and several comments that displayed a lack of familiarity with the research. None the less, item (3) was the focus of the work. To characterize the nature of the dark energy, ADEPT is designed to observe baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in a large galaxy redshift survey and to obtain substantial numbers of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The 2003 Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) made a precise determination of the BAO 'standard ruler' scale, as it was imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at z {approx} 1090. The standard ruler was also imprinted on the pattern of galaxies, and was first detected in 2005 in Sloan

  2. Dark energy in systems of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.

    2013-11-01

    The precise observational data of the Hubble Space Telescope have been used to study nearby galaxy systems. The main result is the detection of dark energy in groups, clusters, and flows of galaxies on a spatial scale of about 1-10 Mpc. The local density of dark energy in these systems, which is determined by various methods, is close to the global value or even coincides with it. A theoretical model of the nearby Universe has been constructed, which describes the Local Group of galaxies with the flow of dwarf galaxies receding from this system. The key physical parameter of the group-flow system is zero gravity radius, which is the distance at which the gravity of dark matter is compensated by dark-energy antigravity. The model predicts the existence of local regions of space where Einstein antigravity is stronger than Newton gravity. Six such regions have been revealed in the data of the Hubble space telescope. The nearest of these regions is at a distance of 1-3 Mpc from the center of the Milky Way. Antigravity in this region is several times stronger than gravity. Quasiregular flows of receding galaxies, which are accelerated by the dark-energy antigravity, exist in these regions. The model of the nearby Universe at the scale of groups of galaxies (˜1 Mpc) can be extended to the scale of clusters (˜10 Mpc). The systems of galaxies with accelerated receding flows constitute a new and probably widespread class of metagalactic populations. Strong dynamic effects of local dark energy constitute the main characteristic feature of these systems.

  3. Viscous extended holographic Ricci dark energy in the framework of standard Eckart theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report a study on the viscous extended holographic Ricci dark energy (EHRDE) model under the assumption of existence of bulk viscosity in the linear barotropic fluid and the EHRDE in the framework of standard Eckart theory of relativistic irreversible thermodynamics and it has been observed that the non-equilibrium bulk viscous pressure is significantly smaller than the local equilibrium pressure. We have studied the equation of state (EoS) parameter and observed that the EoS behaves like “quintom” and is consistent with the constraints set by observational data sets from SNLS3, BAO and Planck + WMAP9 + WiggleZ measurements in [S. Kumar and L. Xu, Phys. Lett. B 737, 244 (2014)]. Analysis of statefinder parameters has shown the possibility of attainment of Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) phase under current model and at the same time it has been pointed out that the redshift z = 0, i.e. the current universe, the statefinder pair is different from that of ΛCDM and the ΛCDM can be attained in a later stage of the universe. An analysis of stability has shown that although the viscous EHRDE along with viscous barotropic is classically unstable in the present epoch, it can lead to a stable universe in very late stage. Considering an universe enveloped by event horizon, we have observed validity of generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics.

  4. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy: Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Heitmann, Katrin; Hirata, Chris; Honscheid, Klaus; Roodman, Aaron; Seljak, Uroš; Slosar, Anže; Trodden, Mark

    2016-04-26

    A strong instrumentation and detector R&D program has enabled the current generation of cosmic frontier surveys. A small investment in R&D will continue to pay dividends and enable new probes to investigate the accelerated expansion of the universe. Instrumentation and detector R&D provide critical training opportunities for future generations of experimentalists, skills that are important across the entire Department of Energy High Energy Physics program.

  5. New probes of dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Rae

    We use N -body simulations of a LCDM universe to study dark matter and dark energy. First, we examine the possibility of detecting the gravitational effect on the total redshift observed for galaxies. For clusters of mass M ~ 10 15 [Special characters omitted.] , the difference in gravitational redshift between the brightest galaxy and the rest of the cluster members is ~ 10 kms - 1 . The most efficient way to detect gravitational redshifts using information from galaxies only involves using the full gravitational redshift profile of clusters. Test on our simulated clusters show that we need at least ~ 2500 clusters/groups with M > 5 x 10 13 [Special characters omitted.] for a detection of gravitational redshifts at the 2s level. Secondly, we investigate the possibility of probing dark energy by measuring the isotropy of the galaxy cluster autocorrelation function (an Alcock-Paczynski test). We assume that the redshift distortion due to peculiar velocities can be removed by measuring kSZ effect. We use the hydrodynamic simulation results of Nagai et al. (2003) to simulate various kSZ surveys. We find by model fitting that a measurement of the correlation function distortion can be used to recover the cosmological parameters that have been used to generate the simulation. With the simulated SPT and ACT surveys, O L could be measured to within 0.1 and 0.2 respectively at one sigma, but only upper limits on the equation of state parameter w will be possible. Finally, using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations we measure the mean transmitted flux in the Lya forest for quasar sightlines that pass near a foreground quasar. We find that the trend of absorption with pixel- quasar separation distance can be fitted using a simple power law form including the usual correlation function parameters r 0 and g so that ([left angle bracket] F ( r )[right angle bracket] = SUMexp(-t eff (1 + [Special characters omitted.] ))). From the simulations we find the relation between r 0

  6. The Logotropic Dark Fluid as a unification of dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2016-07-01

    We propose a heuristic unification of dark matter and dark energy in terms of a single ;dark fluid; with a logotropic equation of state P = Aln ⁡ (ρ /ρP), where ρ is the rest-mass density, ρP = 5.16 ×1099gm-3 is the Planck density, and A is the logotropic temperature. The energy density ɛ is the sum of a rest-mass energy term ρc2 ∝a-3 mimicking dark matter and an internal energy term u (ρ) = - P (ρ) - A = 3 Aln ⁡ a + C mimicking dark energy (a is the scale factor). The logotropic temperature is approximately given by A ≃ρΛc2 / ln ⁡ (ρP /ρΛ) ≃ρΛc2 / [ 123 ln ⁡ (10) ], where ρΛ = 6.72 ×10-24gm-3 is the cosmological density and 123 is the famous number appearing in the ratio ρP /ρΛ ∼10123 between the Planck density and the cosmological density. More precisely, we obtain A = 2.13 ×10-9gm-1s-2 that we interpret as a fundamental constant. At the cosmological scale, our model fulfills the same observational constraints as the ΛCDM model (they will differ in about 25 Gyrs when the logotropic universe becomes phantom). However, the logotropic dark fluid has a nonzero speed of sound and a nonzero Jeans length which, at the beginning of the matter era, is about λJ = 40.4pc, in agreement with the minimum size of the dark matter halos observed in the universe. The existence of a nonzero Jeans length may solve the missing satellite problem. At the galactic scale, the logotropic pressure balances the gravitational attraction, providing halo cores instead of cusps. This may solve the cusp problem. The logotropic equation of state generates a universal rotation curve that agrees with the empirical Burkert profile of dark matter halos up to the halo radius. In addition, it implies that all the dark matter halos have the same surface density Σ0 =ρ0rh = 141M⊙ /pc2 and that the mass of dwarf galaxies enclosed within a sphere of fixed radius ru = 300pc has the same value M300 = 1.93 ×107M⊙, in remarkable agreement with the observations

  7. Stringy Model of Cosmological Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aref'eva, Irina Ya.

    2007-11-20

    A string field theory (SFT) nonlocal model of the cosmological dark energy providing w<-1 is briefly surveyed. We summarize recent developments and open problems, as well as point out some theoretical issues related with others applications of the SFT nonlocal models in cosmology, in particular, in inflation and cosmological singularity.

  8. On the determination of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Chris

    2010-06-23

    I consider some of the issues we face in trying to understand dark energy. Huge fluctuations in the unknown dark energy equation of state can be hidden in distance data, so I argue that model-independent tests which signal if the cosmological constant is wrong are valuable. These can be constructed to remove degeneracies with the cosmological parameters. Gravitational effects can play an important role. Even small inhomogeneity clouds our ability to say something definite about dark energy. I discuss how the averaging problem confuses our potential understanding of dark energy by considering the backreaction from density perturbations to second-order in the concordance model: this effect leads to at least a 10% increase in the dynamical value of the deceleration parameter, and could be significantly higher. Large Hubble-scale inhomogeneity has not been investigated in detail, and could conceivably be the cause of apparent cosmic acceleration. I discuss void models which defy the Copernican principle in our Hubble patch, and describe how we can potentially rule out these models.This article is a summary of two talks given at the Invisible Universe Conference, Paris, 2009.

  9. Falsification of Dark Energy by Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-03-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the discovery of accelerating super- novae dimness, suggesting a remarkable reversal in the expansion rate of the Universe from a decrease to an increase, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanics and Herschel- Planck-Spitzer-Hubble etc. space telescope observations falsify both the accelerating ex- pansion rate and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in models of self-gravitational structure formation. Large plasma photon viscosity predicts protosu- perclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the gas protogalaxies fragment into Earth-mass rogue plan- ets in highly persistent, trillion-planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). PGC planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars, giving the hydrogen triple-point (14 K) infrared emissions observed. Dark energy is a system- atic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by partially evaporated planets feeding hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Planet atmospheres may or may not dim light from SNe-Ia events depending on the line of sight.

  10. An introduction to the dark energy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobado, Antonio; Maroto, Antonio L.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we review briefly the origin and history of the cosmological constant and its recent reincarnation in the form of the dark energy component of the universe. We also comment on the fundamental problems associated to its existence and magnitude which require an urgent solution for the sake of the internal consistency of theoretical physics.

  11. Planck priors for dark energy surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David; Kunz, Martin; Wang Yun

    2008-10-15

    Although cosmic microwave background anisotropy data alone cannot constrain simultaneously the spatial curvature and the equation of state of dark energy, CMB data provide a valuable addition to other experimental results. However computing a full CMB power spectrum with a Boltzmann code is quite slow; for instance if we want to work with many dark energy and/or modified gravity models, or would like to optimize experiments where many different configurations need to be tested, it is possible to adopt a quicker and more efficient approach. In this paper we consider the compression of the projected Planck cosmic microwave background data into four parameters, R (scaled distance to last scattering surface), l{sub a} (angular scale of sound horizon at last scattering), {omega}{sub b}h{sup 2} (baryon density fraction) and n{sub s} (powerlaw index of primordial matter power spectrum), all of which can be computed quickly. We show that, although this compression loses information compared to the full likelihood, such information loss becomes negligible when more data is added. We also demonstrate that the method can be used for canonical scalar-field dark energy independently of the parametrization of the equation of state, and discuss how this method should be used for other kinds of dark energy models.

  12. Effects of the interaction between dark energy and dark matter on cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jian-Hua; Wang, Bin E-mail: wangb@fudan.edu.cn

    2008-06-15

    We examine the effects of possible phenomenological interactions between dark energy and dark matter on cosmological parameters and their efficiency in solving the coincidence problem. We work with two simple parameterizations of the dynamical dark energy equation of state and the constant dark energy equation of state. Using observational data coming from the new 182 Gold type Ia supernova samples, the shift parameter of the Cosmic Microwave Background given by the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations and the baryon acoustic oscillation measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we perform a statistical joint analysis of different forms of phenomenological interaction between dark energy and dark matter.

  13. Dark Energy Found Stifling Growth in Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    WASHINGTON -- For the first time, astronomers have clearly seen the effects of "dark energy" on the most massive collapsed objects in the universe using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By tracking how dark energy has stifled the growth of galaxy clusters and combining this with previous studies, scientists have obtained the best clues yet about what dark energy is and what the destiny of the universe could be. This work, which took years to complete, is separate from other methods of dark energy research such as supernovas. These new X-ray results provide a crucial independent test of dark energy, long sought by scientists, which depends on how gravity competes with accelerated expansion in the growth of cosmic structures. Techniques based on distance measurements, such as supernova work, do not have this special sensitivity. Scientists think dark energy is a form of repulsive gravity that now dominates the universe, although they have no clear picture of what it actually is. Understanding the nature of dark energy is one of the biggest problems in science. Possibilities include the cosmological constant, which is equivalent to the energy of empty space. Other possibilities include a modification in general relativity on the largest scales, or a more general physical field. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Ghostly Glow Reveals a Hidden Class of Long-Wavelength Radio Emitters Powerful Nearby Supernova Caught By Web Cassiopeia A Comes Alive Across Time and Space To help decide between these options, a new way of looking at dark energy is required. It is accomplished by observing how cosmic acceleration affects the growth of galaxy clusters over time. "This result could be described as 'arrested development of the universe'," said Alexey Vikhlinin of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., who led the research. "Whatever is forcing the expansion of the universe to speed up is also forcing its

  14. Supersymmetric cosmological FRW model and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, J. J.; Tkach, V. I.

    2010-11-15

    In this work we consider a flat cosmological model with a set of fluids in the framework of supersymmetric cosmology. The obtained supersymmetric algebra allowed us to take quantum solutions. It is shown that only in the case of a cosmological constant do we have a condition between the density of dark energy {rho}{sub {Lambda}} and density energy of matter {rho}{sub M}, {rho}{sub {Lambda}>}2{rho}{sub M}.

  15. Dark Energy and The Dark Matter Relic Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Francesca

    2004-11-17

    Two mechanisms by which the quintessence scalar could enhance the relic abundance of dark matter particles are discussed. These effects can have an impact on supersymmetric candidates for dark matter.

  16. Novel Probes of Gravity and Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; et al.

    2013-09-20

    The discovery of cosmic acceleration has stimulated theorists to consider dark energy or modifications to Einstein's General Relativity as possible explanations. The last decade has seen advances in theories that go beyond smooth dark energy -- modified gravity and interactions of dark energy. While the theoretical terrain is being actively explored, the generic presence of fifth forces and dark sector couplings suggests a set of distinct observational signatures. This report focuses on observations that differ from the conventional probes that map the expansion history or large-scale structure. Examples of such novel probes are: detection of scalar fields via lab experiments, tests of modified gravity using stars and galaxies in the nearby universe, comparison of lensing and dynamical masses of galaxies and clusters, and the measurements of fundamental constants at high redshift. The observational expertise involved is very broad as it spans laboratory experiments, high resolution astronomical imaging and spectroscopy and radio observations. In the coming decade, searches for these effects have the potential for discovering fundamental new physics. We discuss how the searches can be carried out using experiments that are already under way or with modest adaptations of existing telescopes or planned experiments. The accompanying paper on the Growth of Cosmic Structure describes complementary tests of gravity with observations of large-scale structure.

  17. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy:Science

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S.; Slosar, A.; Heitmann, K.; Hirata, C.; Honscheid, K.; Roodman, A.; Seljak, U.; Trodden, M.

    2016-04-26

    Cosmic surveys provide crucial information about high energy physics including strong evidence for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation. Ongoing and upcoming surveys will start to identify the underlying physics of these new phenomena, including tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, the viability of modified gravity, the existence of extra light species, the masses of the neutrinos, and the potential of the field that drove inflation. Even after the Stage IV experiments, DESI and LSST, complete their surveys, there will still be much information left in the sky. This additional information will enable us to understand the physics underlying the dark universe at an even deeper level and, in case Stage IV surveys find hints for physics beyond the current Standard Model of Cosmology, to revolutionize our current view of the universe. There are many ideas for how best to supplement and aid DESI and LSST in order to access some of this remaining information and how surveys beyond Stage IV can fully exploit this regime. These ideas flow to potential projects that could start construction in the 2020's.

  18. Symmetron dark energy in laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Upadhye, Amol

    2013-01-18

    The symmetron scalar field is a matter-coupled dark energy candidate which effectively decouples from matter in high-density regions through a symmetry restoration. We consider a previously unexplored regime, in which the vacuum mass μ~2.4×10(-3) eV of the symmetron is near the dark energy scale, and the matter coupling parameter M~1 TeV is just beyond standard model energies. Such a field will give rise to a fifth force at submillimeter distances which can be probed by short-range gravity experiments. We show that a torsion pendulum experiment such as Eöt-Wash can exclude symmetrons in this regime for all self-couplings λ is < or approximately equal to 7.5.

  19. Report from the Dark Energy Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    2006-04-01

    Understanding the observed cosmic acceleration is widely ranked among the very most compelling of all outstanding problems in physical science. Many believe that nothing short of a revolution will be required in order to integrate the cosmic acceleration (often attributed to ``dark energy'') with our understanding of fundamental physics. The DETF was formed at the request of DOE, NASA and NSF as a joint subcommittee of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC) and the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to give advice on optimizing our program of dark energy studies. To this end we have assessed a wide variety of possible techniques and strategies. I will present our main conclusions and discuss their implications.

  20. Deformed matter bounce with dark energy epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    We extend the loop quantum cosmology matter bounce scenario in order to include a dark energy era, which ends abruptly at a rip singularity where the scale factor and the Hubble rate diverge. In the "deformed matter bounce scenario," the Universe is contracting from an initial noncausal matter dominated era until it reaches a minimal radius. After that it expands in a decelerating way, until at late times, where it expands in an accelerating way, and thus the model is described by a dark energy era that follows the matter dominated era. Depending on the choice of the free parameters of the model, the dark energy era is quintessential as what follows the matter domination era, and eventually it crosses the phantom divide line and becomes phantom. At the end of the dark energy era, a rip singularity exists, where the scale factor and Hubble rate diverge; however, the physical system cannot reach the singularity, since the effective energy density and pressure become complex. This indicates two things, first that the ordinary loop quantum cosmology matter bounce evolution stops, thus ending the infinite repetition of the ordinary matter bounce scenario. Second, the fact that both the pressure and the density become complex probably indicates that the description of the cosmic evolution within the theoretical context of loop quantum cosmology ceases to describe the physics of the system and possibly a more fundamental theory of quantum gravity is needed near the would be rip singularity. We describe the qualitative features of the model, and we also investigate how this cosmology could be realized by a viscous fluid in the context of loop quantum cosmology. In addition to this, we show how this deformed model can be realized by a canonical scalar field filled Universe, in the context of loop quantum cosmology. Finally, we demonstrate how the model can be generated by a vacuum F (R ) gravity.

  1. Dark energy simulacrum in nonlinear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Labun, Lance; Rafelski, Johann

    2010-03-15

    Quasiconstant external fields in nonlinear electromagnetism generate a global contribution proportional to g{sup {mu}{nu}}in the energy-momentum tensor, thus a simulacrum of dark energy. To provide a thorough understanding of the origin and strength of its effects, we undertake a complete theoretical and numerical study of the energy-momentum tensor T{sup {mu}{nu}}for nonlinear electromagnetism. The Euler-Heisenberg nonlinearity due to quantum fluctuations of spinor and scalar matter fields is considered and contrasted with the properties of classical nonlinear Born-Infeld electromagnetism. We address modifications of charged particle kinematics by strong background fields.

  2. New Light on Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    observations show that the temperature changes with radius are much steeper than predicted by the currently favoured models, indicating that most of the near-infrared emission emerges from hot material located very close to the star, that is, within one or two times the Earth-Sun distance (1-2 AU). This also implies that dust cannot exist so close to the star, since the strong energy radiated by the star heats and ultimately destroys the dust grains. ESO PR Photo 03/08 ESO PR Photo 03b/08 The Region Around MWC 147 "We have performed detailed numerical simulations to understand these observations and reached the conclusion that we observe not only the outer dust disc, but also measure strong emission from a hot inner gaseous disc. This suggests that the disc is not a passive one, simply reprocessing the light from the star," explained Kraus. "Instead, the disc is active, and we see the material, which is just transported from the outer disc parts towards the forming star." ESO PR Photo 03/08 ESO PR Photo 03c/08 Close-up on MWC 147 The best-fit model is that of a disc extending out to 100 AU, with the star increasing in mass at a rate of seven millionths of a solar mass per year. "Our study demonstrates the power of ESO's VLTI to probe the inner structure of discs around young stars and to reveal how stars reach their final mass," said Stefan Kraus. More Information The authors report their results in a paper in the Astrophysical Journal ("Detection of an inner gaseous component in a Herbig Be star accretion disk: Near- and mid-infrared spectro-interferometry and radiative transfer modeling of MWC 147", by Stefan Kraus, Thomas Preibisch, Keichii Ohnaka").

  3. Simple implementation of general dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Pearson, Jonathan A. E-mail: jonathan.pearson@durham.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We present a formalism for the numerical implementation of general theories of dark energy, combining the computational simplicity of the equation of state for perturbations approach with the generality of the effective field theory approach. An effective fluid description is employed, based on a general action describing single-scalar field models. The formalism is developed from first principles, and constructed keeping the goal of a simple implementation into CAMB in mind. Benefits of this approach include its straightforward implementation, the generality of the underlying theory, the fact that the evolved variables are physical quantities, and that model-independent phenomenological descriptions may be straightforwardly investigated. We hope this formulation will provide a powerful tool for the comparison of theoretical models of dark energy with observational data.

  4. Dark energy from the string axiverse.

    PubMed

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Pradler, Josef; Walker, Devin G E

    2014-12-19

    String theories suggest the existence of a plethora of axionlike fields with masses spread over a huge number of decades. Here, we show that these ideas lend themselves to a model of quintessence with no super-Planckian field excursions and in which all dimensionless numbers are order unity. The scenario addresses the "Why now?" problem-i.e., Why has accelerated expansion begun only recently?-by suggesting that the onset of dark-energy domination occurs randomly with a slowly decreasing probability per unit logarithmic interval in cosmic time. The standard axion potential requires us to postulate a rapid decay of most of the axion fields that do not become dark energy. The need for these decays is averted, though, with the introduction of a slightly modified axion potential. In either case, a universe like ours arises in roughly 1 in 100 universes. The scenario may have a host of observable consequences.

  5. The Discovery of Dark Energy: Historical Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-09-01

    The discovery of dark energy by supernovae-culminating in Riess et al. Astron. J. 116, 1998, 1009, and Perlmutter et al. Astrophys. J. 511 1999 565-is likely to become a classic discovery story in the history of science. It exhibits at lease five features that attract the interest of historians: 1) the role of evolving techniques in making a discovery possible; 2) the existence of ambiguities in the discovery process; 3) the existence of ambiguities in discovery announcements; 4) different forms of competition and cooperation; and 5) the way discoveries can open new chapters in science. The dark-energy discovery provides dramatic examples of such features, even apart from the differing memories and judgments that may exist about the events. This article engages in a thought-experiment: what in this discovery story is likely to attract the interest of a science historian looking back on this discovery a hundred years from now?

  6. Interacting dark sector with variable vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimento, Luis P.; Richarte, Martín G.; García, Iván E. Sánchez

    2013-10-01

    We examine a cosmological scenario where dark matter is coupled to a variable vacuum energy while baryons and photons are two decoupled components for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. We apply the χ2 method to the updated observational Hubble data for constraining the cosmological parameters and analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era. We show that our model fulfills the severe bound of Ωx(z≃1100)<0.009 at the 2σ level, so it is consistent with the recent analysis that includes cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements from the Planck survey, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, and the South Pole Telescope along with the future constraints achievable by the Euclid and CMBPol experiments, and fulfills the stringent bound Ωx(z≃1010)<0.04 at the 2σ level in the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch.

  7. A dark energy view of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilic, Stephane; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /Chicago U.

    2010-02-01

    Traditionally, inflationary models are analyzed in terms of parameters such as the scalar spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor to scalar ratio r, while dark energy models are studied in terms of the equation of state parameter w. Motivated by the fact that both deal with periods of accelerated expansion, we study the evolution of w during inflation, in order to derive observational constraints on its value during an earlier epoch likely dominated by a dynamic form of dark energy. We find that the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure data is consistent with w{sub inflation} = -1 and provides an upper limit of 1 + w {le} 0.02. Nonetheless, an exact de Sitter expansion with a constant w = -1 is disfavored since this would result in n{sub s} = 1.

  8. Scale Dependence of Dark Energy Antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2002-09-01

    We investigate the effects of negative pressure induced by dark energy (cosmological constant or quintessence) on the dynamics at various astrophysical scales. Negative pressure induces a repulsive term (antigravity) in Newton's law which dominates on large scales. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data we determine the critical scale $r_c$ beyond which antigravity dominates the dynamics ($r_c \\sim 1Mpc $) and discuss some of the dynamical effects implied. We show that dynamically induced mass estimates on the scale of the Local Group and beyond are significantly modified due to negative pressure. We also briefly discuss possible dynamical tests (eg effects on local Hubble flow) that can be applied on relatively small scales (a few $Mpc$) to determine the density and equation of state of dark energy.

  9. Strong gravitational lensing and dark energy complementarity

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-01-21

    In the search for the nature of dark energy most cosmological probes measure simple functions of the expansion rate. While powerful, these all involve roughly the same dependence on the dark energy equation of state parameters, with anticorrelation between its present value w{sub 0} and time variation w{sub a}. Quantities that have instead positive correlation and so a sensitivity direction largely orthogonal to, e.g., distance probes offer the hope of achieving tight constraints through complementarity. Such quantities are found in strong gravitational lensing observations of image separations and time delays. While degeneracy between cosmological parameters prevents full complementarity, strong lensing measurements to 1 percent accuracy can improve equation of state characterization by 15-50 percent. Next generation surveys should provide data on roughly 105 lens systems, though systematic errors will remain challenging.

  10. Observational consequences of dark energy decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Zhang, Pengjie

    2014-03-01

    We consider the generic scenario of dark energy that arises through the latent heat of a hidden sector first-order cosmological phase transition. This field could account for the extra radiation degree of freedom suggested by the CMB. We present the bubble nucleation solution for the viscous limit. The decay rate of the field is constrained by published kSZ data. This model may provide an explanation of current excess ISW correlations. Cross correlation of current and future surveys can further constrain or test the parameter space. The decay model is plausibly in the observable range and avoids anthropic problems. This class of models is not well constrained by the popular dark energy figure of merit.

  11. Dark energy domination in the Virgocentric flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Nasonova, O. G.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The standard ΛCDM cosmological model implies that all celestial bodies are embedded in a perfectly uniform dark energy background, represented by Einstein's cosmological constant, and experience its repulsive antigravity action. Aims: Can dark energy have strong dynamical effects on small cosmic scales as well as globally? Continuing our efforts to clarify this question, we now focus on the Virgo Cluster and the flow of expansion around it. Methods: We interpret the Hubble diagram from a new database of velocities and distances of galaxies in the cluster and its environment, using a nonlinear analytical model, which incorporates the antigravity force in terms of Newtonian mechanics. The key parameter is the zero-gravity radius, the distance at which gravity and antigravity are in balance. Results: 1. The interplay between the gravity of the cluster and the antigravity of the dark energy background determines the kinematical structure of the system and controls its evolution. 2. The gravity dominates the quasi-stationary bound cluster, while the antigravity controls the Virgocentric flow, bringing order and regularity to the flow, which reaches linearity and the global Hubble rate at distances ⪆15 Mpc. 3. The cluster and the flow form a system similar to the Local Group and its outflow. In the velocity-distance diagram, the cluster-flow structure reproduces the group-flow structure with a scaling factor of about 10; the zero-gravity radius for the cluster system is also 10 times larger. Conclusions: The phase and dynamical similarity of the systems on the scales of 1-30 Mpc suggests that a two-component pattern may be universal for groups and clusters: a quasi-stationary bound central component and an expanding outflow around it, caused by the nonlinear gravity-antigravity interplay with the dark energy dominating in the flow component.

  12. Working Group Report: Dark Energy and CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S.; Honscheid, K.; Abazajian, K.; Carlstrom, J.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Kim, A.; Kirkby, D.; Lee, A.; Padmanabhan, N.; Rhodes, J.; Weinberg, D.

    2013-09-20

    The American Physical Society's Division of Particles and Fields initiated a long-term planning exercise over 2012-13, with the goal of developing the community's long term aspirations. The sub-group "Dark Energy and CMB" prepared a series of papers explaining and highlighting the physics that will be studied with large galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background experiments. This paper summarizes the findings of the other papers, all of which have been submitted jointly to the arXiv.

  13. The ASY-EOS experiment at GSI: investigating symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Chartier, M.; Cozma, M. D.; De Filippo, E.; Le Fèvre, A.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Kiš, M.; Kupny, S.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Marini, P.; Pawłowski, P.; Santoro, S.; Trautmann, W.; Veselsky, M.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Baran, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bassini, R.; Benlliure, J.; Boiano, C.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Greco, V.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Lombardo, I.; Lynch, W. G.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Pleskac, R.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reifarth, R.; Reisdorf, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2014-03-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of heavy-ions at pre-relativistic energies has been proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state at supra-saturation densities. The results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model simulations favoured a moderately soft symmetry term, but suffer from a considerable statistical uncertainty. These results have been confirmed by an independent analysis based on the Tübingen QMD simulations. In order to obtain an improved data set for Au+Au collisions and to extend the study to other systems, a new experiment was carried out at the GSI laboratory by the ASY-EOS collaboration. The present status of the data analysis is reported

  14. Study of some cosmological parameters for interacting new holographic dark energy model in f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, Chayan; Rudra, Prabir

    2016-10-01

    The present work is based on the idea of an interacting framework of new holographic dark energy (HDE) with cold dark matter in the background of f(T) gravity. Here, we have considered the flat modified Friedmann universe for f(T) gravity which is filled with new HDE and dark matter. We have derived some cosmological parameters like deceleration parameter, equation of state (EoS) parameter, state-finder parameters, cosmographic parameters, Om parameter and graphically investigated the nature of these parameters for the above mentioned interacting scenario. The results are found to be consistent with the accelerating universe. Also, we have graphically investigated the trajectories in ω-ω‧ plane for different values of the interacting parameter and explored the freezing region and thawing region in ω-ω‧ plane. Finally, we have analyzed the stability of this model.

  15. Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jia-Jia; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-08-01

    By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of the Lyman- forest of distant quasars, the Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the "redshift desert" of . Thus this method is definitely an important supplement to the other geometric measurements and will play a crucial role in cosmological constraints. In this paper, we quantify the ability of the SL test signal by a CODEX-like spectrograph for constraining interacting dark energy. Four typical interacting dark energy models are considered: (i) , (ii) , (iii) , and (iv) . The results show that for all the considered interacting dark energy models, relative to the current joint SN BAO CMB observations, the constraints on and would be improved by about 60 and 30-40 %, while the constraints on w and would be slightly improved, with a 30-year observation of the SL test. We also explore the impact of the SL test on future joint geometric observations. In this analysis, we take the model with as an example, and we simulate future SN and BAO data based on the space-based project WFIRST. We find that with the future geometric constraints, the redshift drift observations would help break the geometric degeneracies in a meaningful way, thus the measurement precisions of , , w, and could be substantially improved using future probes.

  16. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui; Li, Miao E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn E-mail: zhangzhh@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ω{sub hde} are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ{sup 2}{sub min}=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain −0.07<Ω{sub Λ0}<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ω{sub hde0}<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  17. Initial conditions for the Galileon dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germani, Cristiano

    2017-03-01

    Galileon models are among the most appealing candidates for Dark Energy. The reason is twofold: classically, they provide a tracking solution leading to an almost DeSitter space starting from very generic initial conditions in the deep radiation era. The second reason is the standard lore that Galileons are quantum mechanically stable. The latter property is certainly true in flat space-time, thanks to the non-renormalisation theorems of Galilean coupling constants. However, in a cosmological background, we show that quantum effects might dominate the classical trajectory. Assuming the radiation era to last at least up to the electroweak phase transition, the trajectory with initial conditions sitting on the tracker is ruled out. On the other hand, it is always possible to find a sub-space of initial conditions such that the dark energy solution approaches stably the tracker at late times. Fixing the value of initial conditions that best fit current data, and assuming that the Galileon effective theory is valid up to the beginning of the radiation epoch, we found that the reheating temperature of the universe cannot be larger than 108 GeV. Reversing the argument, if dark energy will turn out to be in form of Galileons, the bounds by EUCLID on the initial conditions for these models will also be a bound on the reheating temperature of our Universe.

  18. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Miao; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ωhde are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ2min=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain -0.07<ΩΛ0<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ωhde0<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  19. Using atom interferometry to detect dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.

    2016-04-01

    We review the tantalising prospect that the first evidence for the dark energy driving the observed acceleration of the universe on giga-parsec scales may be found through metre scale laboratory-based atom interferometry experiments. To do that, we first introduce the idea that scalar fields could be responsible for dark energy and show that in order to be compatible with fifth force constraints, these fields must have a screening mechanism which hides their effects from us within the solar system. Particular emphasis is placed on one such screening mechanism known as the chameleon effect where the field's mass becomes dependent on the environment. The way the field behaves in the presence of a spherical source is determined and we then go on to show how in the presence of the kind of high vacuum associated with atom interferometry experiments, and when the test particle is an atom, it is possible to use the associated interference pattern to place constraints on the acceleration due to the fifth force of the chameleon field - this has already been used to rule out large regions of the chameleon parameter space and maybe one day will be able to detect the force due to the dark energy field in the laboratory.

  20. Constraints on the coupling between dark energy and dark matter from CMB data

    SciTech Connect

    Murgia, R.; Gariazzo, S.; Fornengo, N. E-mail: gariazzo@to.infn.it

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a phenomenological non-gravitational coupling between dark energy and dark matter, where the interaction in the dark sector is parameterized as an energy transfer either from dark matter to dark energy or the opposite. The models are constrained by a whole host of updated cosmological data: cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies and polarization, high-redshift supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing. Both models are found to be compatible with all cosmological observables, but in the case where dark matter decays into dark energy, the tension with the independent determinations of H{sub 0} and σ{sub 8}, already present for standard cosmology, increases: this model in fact predicts lower H{sub 0} and higher σ{sub 8}, mostly as a consequence of the higher amount of dark matter at early times, leading to a stronger clustering during the evolution. Instead, when dark matter is fed by dark energy, the reconstructed values of H{sub 0} and σ{sub 8} nicely agree with their local determinations, with a full reconciliation between high- and low-redshift observations. A non-zero coupling between dark energy and dark matter, with an energy flow from the former to the latter, appears therefore to be in better agreement with cosmological data.

  1. Dark Energy from Violation of Energy Conservation.

    PubMed

    Josset, Thibaut; Perez, Alejandro; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2017-01-13

    In this Letter, we consider the possibility of reconciling metric theories of gravitation with a violation of the conservation of energy-momentum. Under some circumstances, this can be achieved in the context of unimodular gravity, and it leads to the emergence of an effective cosmological constant in Einstein's equation. We specifically investigate two potential sources of energy nonconservation-nonunitary modifications of quantum mechanics and phenomenological models motivated by quantum gravity theories with spacetime discreteness at the Planck scale-and show that such locally negligible phenomena can nevertheless become relevant at the cosmological scale.

  2. Dark Energy from Violation of Energy Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josset, Thibaut; Perez, Alejandro; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this Letter, we consider the possibility of reconciling metric theories of gravitation with a violation of the conservation of energy-momentum. Under some circumstances, this can be achieved in the context of unimodular gravity, and it leads to the emergence of an effective cosmological constant in Einstein's equation. We specifically investigate two potential sources of energy nonconservation—nonunitary modifications of quantum mechanics and phenomenological models motivated by quantum gravity theories with spacetime discreteness at the Planck scale—and show that such locally negligible phenomena can nevertheless become relevant at the cosmological scale.

  3. Sub-horizon evolution of cold dark matter perturbations through dark matter-dark energy equivalence epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Piattella, O.F.; Martins, D.L.A.; Casarini, L. E-mail: denilsonluizm@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We consider a cosmological model of the late universe constituted by standard cold dark matter plus a dark energy component with constant equation of state w and constant effective speed of sound. By neglecting fluctuations in the dark energy component, we obtain an equation describing the evolution of sub-horizon cold dark matter perturbations through the epoch of dark matter-dark energy equality. We explore its analytic solutions and calculate an exact w-dependent correction for the dark matter growth function, logarithmic growth function and growth index parameter through the epoch considered. We test our analytic approximation with the numerical solution and find that the discrepancy is less than 1% for 0k = during the cosmic evolution up to a = 100.

  4. Dark energy and the hierarchy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin

    2009-03-01

    The well-known hierarchy between the Planck scale (˜10GeV) and the TeV scale, namely a ratio of ˜10 between the two, is coincidentally repeated in a inverted order between the TeV scale and the dark energy scale at ˜10eV implied by the observations. We argue that this is not a numerical coincidence. The same brane-world setups to address the first hierarchy problem may also in principle address this second hierarchy issue. Specifically, we consider supersymmetry in the bulk and its breaking on the brane and resort to the Casimir energy induced by the bulk graviton-gravitino mass-shift on the brane as the dark energy. For the ADD model we found that our notion is sensible only if the number of extra dimension n=2. We extend our study to the Randall-Sundrum model. Invoking the chirality-flip on the boundaries for SUSY-breaking, the zero-mode gravitino contribution to the Casimir energy does give rise to the double hierarchy. Unfortunately since the higher Kaluza-Klein modes acquire relative mass-shifts at the TeV level, the zero-mode contribution to Casimir energy is overshadowed.

  5. Interacting vacuum energy in the dark sector

    SciTech Connect

    Chimento, L. P.; Carneiro, S.

    2015-03-26

    We analyse three cosmological scenarios with interaction in the dark sector, which are particular cases of a general expression for the energy flux from vacuum to matter. In the first case the interaction leads to a transition from an unstable de Sitter phase to a radiation dominated universe, avoiding in this way the initial singularity. In the second case the interaction gives rise to a slow-roll power-law inflation. Finally, the third scenario is a concordance model for the late-time universe, with the vacuum term decaying into cold dark matter. We identify the physics behind these forms of interaction and show that they can be described as particular types of the modified Chaplygin gas.

  6. Interacting vacuum energy in the dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimento, L. P.; Carneiro, S.

    2015-03-01

    We analyse three cosmological scenarios with interaction in the dark sector, which are particular cases of a general expression for the energy flux from vacuum to matter. In the first case the interaction leads to a transition from an unstable de Sitter phase to a radiation dominated universe, avoiding in this way the initial singularity. In the second case the interaction gives rise to a slow-roll power-law inflation. Finally, the third scenario is a concordance model for the late-time universe, with the vacuum term decaying into cold dark matter. We identify the physics behind these forms of interaction and show that they can be described as particular types of the modified Chaplygin gas.

  7. Atom-Interferometry Constraints on Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Holger

    2016-03-01

    If dark energy is a light scalar field, it might interact with normal matter. The interactions, however, are suppressed in some leading models, which are thus compatible with current cosmological observations as well as solar-system and laboratory studies. Such suppression typically relies on the scalar's interaction with macroscopic amounts of ordinary matter, but can be bypassed by studying the interaction with individual particles. Using an atom interferometer, we have placed tight constraints on so-called chameleon models, ruling out interaction parameters βM > 4 ×104 . This limit is improved by 2.5 orders of magnitude relative to previous experiments. We have already increased the sensitivity of our interferometer hundredfold and are expecting a new constraint soon. Purpose-built experiments in the lab or on the international space station will completely close the gap and rule out out chameleons and other theories, such as axions, dark photons, symmetrons or f (R) gravity.

  8. Cosmological explorations: From primordial non-Gaussianity to dynamical dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Devdeep

    Future-generation astronomical observations are expected to significantly improve our understanding of the nature of the constituents of the universe and the inherent mechanisms that led the universe to its current state. In this report I address the heart of some of these projects. I discuss the effect of gravitational lensing on the measurement of the CMB bispectrum, which is a well-known probe of the non-Gaussianity of primordial perturbations. In the context detecting gravity waves, which can open up a unique window to study the physics driving inflation, I discuss the possibility of such a detection through its effect on the cosmic shear. I then focus on the measurements of the Dark Energy Equation of State (EOS) from a combination of future-generation surveys. To this end, I first try to motivate a model-independent approach to constrain the EOS and emphasize the importance of a high-precision measurement of the Hubble constant in this context. I also discuss the consequences of the fact that the estimates of the EOS are intrinsically skewed toward the negative. Finally, I concentrate on two potential sources of uncertainties in the EOS: systematics incorporated due to the lensing of supernova (SN), and systematics based on the the existence of two different SN populations.

  9. A divergence-free parametrization of deceleration parameter for scalar field dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mamon, Abdulla; Das, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have considered a spatially flat FRW universe filled with pressureless matter and dark energy (DE). We have considered a phenomenological parametrization of the deceleration parameter q(z) and from this, we have reconstructed the equation-of-state (EoS) for DE ωϕ(z). This divergence-free parametrization of the deceleration parameter is inspired from one of the most popular parametrization of the DE EoS given by Barboza and Alcaniz [see E. M. Barboza and J. S. Alcaniz, Phys. Lett. B 666 (2008) 415]. Using the combination of datasets (Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) + Hubble + baryonic acoustic oscillations/cosmic microwave background (BAO/CMB)), we have constrained the transition redshift zt (at which the universe switches from a decelerating to an accelerating phase) and have found the best fit value of zt. We have also compared the reconstructed results of q(z) and ωϕ(z) and have found that the results are compatible with a ΛCDM universe if we consider SN Ia + Hubble data, but inclusion of BAO/CMB data makes q(z) and ωϕ(z) incompatible with ΛCDM model. The potential term for the present toy model is found to be functionally similar to a Higgs potential.

  10. Evidence for interacting dark energy from BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Elisa G. M.; Quintin, Jerome; Costa, André A.; Abdalla, E.; Wang, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The result presented by the BOSS-SDSS Collaboration measuring the baryon acoustic oscillations of the Lyman-alpha forest from high-redshift quasars indicates a 2.5 σ departure from the standard Λ -cold-dark-matter model. This is the first time that the evolution of dark energy at high redshifts has been measured, and the current results cannot be explained by simple generalizations of the cosmological constant. We show here that a simple phenomenological interaction in the dark sector provides a good explanation for this deviation, naturally accommodating the Hubble parameter obtained by BOSS, H (z =2.34 )=222 ±7 km s-1 Mpc-1 . By performing a global fit of the parameters with the inclusion of this new data set together with the Planck data for the interacting model, we are able to show that some interacting models have constraints for H (2.34 ) and DA(2.34 ) that are compatible with the ones obtained by the BOSS Collaboration, showing a better concordance than Λ CDM . We also show that the interacting models that have a small positive coupling constant, which helps alleviate the coincidence problem, are compatible with the cosmological observations. Adding the likelihood of these new baryon acoustic oscillations data shows an improvement in the global fit, although it is not statistically significant. The coupling constant could not be fully constrained by the data sets used, but the dark energy equation of state shows a slight preference for a value different from a cosmological constant.

  11. Present and future evidence for evolving dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David; Wang Yun

    2006-12-15

    We compute the Bayesian evidences for one- and two-parameter models of evolving dark energy, and compare them to the evidence for a cosmological constant, using current data from Type Ia supernova, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the cosmic microwave background. We use only distance information, ignoring dark energy perturbations. We find that, under various priors on the dark energy parameters, {lambda}CDM is currently favored as compared to the dark energy models. We consider the parameter constraints that arise under Bayesian model averaging, and discuss the implication of our results for future dark energy projects seeking to detect dark energy evolution. The model selection approach complements and extends the figure-of-merit approach of the Dark Energy Task Force in assessing future experiments, and suggests a significantly-modified interpretation of that statistic.

  12. Relation Between the Dark Energy Density and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we investigate the relation between the temperature and density of the dark energy. We find that the temperature of the dark universe is proportional to the inverse of dark energy density. Also we discuss some values of the important parameters of the theory.

  13. Dark Energy and Key Physical Parameters of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.

    We discuss the physics of clusters of galaxies embedded in the cosmic dark energy background and show that 1) the halo cut-off radius of a cluster like the Virgo cluster is practically, if not exactly, equal to the zero-gravity radius at which the dark matter gravity is balanced by the dark energy antigravity; 2) the halo averaged density is equal to two densities of dark energy; 3) the halo edge (cut-off) density is the dark energy density with a numerical factor of the unity order slightly depending on the halo profile.

  14. Geometrical Constraints on Dark Energy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazkoz, Ruth

    2007-11-01

    This contribution intends to give a pedagogical introduction to the topic of dark energy (the mysterious agent supposed to drive the observed late time acceleration of the Universe) and to various observational tests which require only assumptions on the geometry of the Universe. Those tests are the supernovae luminosity, the CMB shift, the direct Hubble data, and the baryon acoustic oscillations test. An historical overview of Cosmology is followed by some generalities on FRW spacetimes (the best large-scale description of the Universe), and then the test themselves are discussed. A convenient section on statistical inference is included as well.

  15. The Dark Energy Survey CCD imager design

    SciTech Connect

    Cease, H.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Guarino, V.; Kuk, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schultz, K.; Schmitt, R.L.; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Argonne

    2008-06-01

    The Dark Energy Survey is planning to use a 3 sq. deg. camera that houses a {approx} 0.5m diameter focal plane of 62 2kx4k CCDs. The camera vessel including the optical window cell, focal plate, focal plate mounts, cooling system and thermal controls is described. As part of the development of the mechanical and cooling design, a full scale prototype camera vessel has been constructed and is now being used for multi-CCD readout tests. Results from this prototype camera are described.

  16. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  17. Matter sourced anisotropic stress for dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Baorong; Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin

    2014-11-01

    Usually a dark energy as a perfect fluid is characterized by the ratio of pressure to energy density (w =p /ρ ) and the ratio of their perturbations in its rest frame (cs2=δ p /δ ρ ). However, a dark energy would have other characteristics beyond its equation of state and the effective speed of sound. Here the extra property is the anisotropic stress sourced by matter as a simple extension to the perfect fluid model. At the background level, this anisotropic stress is zero with respect to the cosmological principle, but not at the first-order perturbation. We tested the viability of the existence of this kind of anisotropic stress by using the currently available cosmic observations through the geometrical and dynamical measurements. Using the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method, we found that the upper bounds on the anisotropic stress which enters into the summation of the Newtonian potentials should be of the order O (1 0-3)Δm . We did not find any strong evidence for the existence of this matter-sourced anisotropic stress, even in the 1 σ region.

  18. Imperfect dark energy from kinetic gravity braiding

    SciTech Connect

    Deffayet, Cédric; Pujolàs, Oriol; Sawicki, Ignacy; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: oriol.pujolas@cern.ch E-mail: alexander.vikman@nyu.edu

    2010-10-01

    We introduce a large class of scalar-tensor models with interactions containing the second derivatives of the scalar field but not leading to additional degrees of freedom. These models exhibit peculiar features, such as an essential mixing of scalar and tensor kinetic terms, which we have named kinetic braiding. This braiding causes the scalar stress tensor to deviate from the perfect-fluid form. Cosmology in these models possesses a rich phenomenology, even in the limit where the scalar is an exact Goldstone boson. Generically, there are attractor solutions where the scalar monitors the behaviour of external matter. Because of the kinetic braiding, the position of the attractor depends both on the form of the Lagrangian and on the external energy density. The late-time asymptotic of these cosmologies is a de Sitter state. The scalar can exhibit phantom behaviour and is able to cross the phantom divide with neither ghosts nor gradient instabilities. These features provide a new class of models for Dark Energy. As an example, we study in detail a simple one-parameter model. The possible observational signatures of this model include a sizeable Early Dark Energy and a specific equation of state evolving into the final de-Sitter state from a healthy phantom regime.

  19. Results of the ASY-EOS experiment at GSI: The symmetry energy at suprasaturation density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Gannon, S.; Kupny, S.; Lasko, P.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Basrak, Z.; Benlliure, J.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Caesar, C.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Cozma, M. D.; Czech, B.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Gašparić, I.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Kiš, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q. F.; Lombardo, I.; Łukasik, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Marini, P.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pawłowski, P.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reviol, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Sarantites, D. G.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trautmann, W.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wang, Yongjia; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Winkelbauer, J.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2016-09-01

    Directed and elliptic flows of neutrons and light-charged particles were measured for the reaction 197Au+197Au at 400 MeV/nucleon incident energy within the ASY-EOS experimental campaign at the GSI laboratory. The detection system consisted of the Large Area Neutron Detector (LAND), combined with parts of the CHIMERA multidetector, the ALADIN Time-of-flight Wall, and the Washington University Microball detector. The latter three arrays were used for the event characterization and reaction-plane reconstruction. In addition, an array of triple telescopes, KRATTA was used for complementary measurements of the isotopic composition and flows of light-charged particles. From the comparison of the elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to charged particles with UrQMD predictions, a value γ =0.72 ±0.19 is obtained for the power-law coefficient describing the density dependence of the potential part in the parametrization of the symmetry energy. It represents a new and more stringent constraint for the regime of suprasaturation density and confirms, with a considerably smaller uncertainty, the moderately soft to linear density dependence deduced from the earlier FOPI-LAND data. The densities probed are shown to reach beyond twice saturation.

  20. Dark energy from primordial inflationary quantum fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2010-09-17

    We show that current cosmic acceleration can be explained by an almost massless scalar field experiencing quantum fluctuations during primordial inflation. Provided its mass does not exceed the Hubble parameter today, this field has been frozen during the cosmological ages to start dominating the Universe only recently. By using supernovae data, completed with baryonic acoustic oscillations from galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background anisotropies, we infer the energy scale of primordial inflation to be around a few TeV, which implies a negligible tensor-to-scalar ratio of the primordial fluctuations. Moreover, our model suggests that inflation lasted for an extremely long period. Dark energy could therefore be a natural consequence of cosmic inflation close to the electroweak energy scale.

  1. Dark energy and key physical parameters of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Chernin, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    We study physics of clusters of galaxies embedded in the cosmic dark energy background. Under the assumption that dark energy is described by the cosmological constant, we show that the dynamical effects of dark energy are strong in clusters like the Virgo cluster. Specifically, the key physical parameters of the dark mater halos in clusters are determined by dark energy: (1) the halo cut-off radius is practically, if not exactly, equal to the zero-gravity radius at which the dark matter gravity is balanced by the dark energy antigravity; (2) the halo averaged density is equal to two densities of dark energy; (3) the halo edge (cut-off) density is the dark energy density with a numerical factor of the unity order slightly depending on the halo profile. The cluster gravitational potential well in which the particles of the dark halo (as well as galaxies and intracluster plasma) move is strongly affected by dark energy: the maximum of the potential is located at the zero-gravity radius of the cluster.

  2. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  3. Dark Fluid: A Unified Framework for Modified Newtonian Dynamics, Dark Matter, and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, HongSheng; Li, Baojiu

    2010-03-01

    Empirical theories of dark matter (DM) like modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) gravity and of dark energy (DE) like f(R) gravity were motivated by astronomical data. But could these theories be branches rooted from a more general and hence generic framework? Here we propose a very generic Lagrangian of such a framework based on simple dimensional analysis and covariant symmetry requirements, and explore various outcomes in a top-down fashion. The desired effects of quintessence plus cold DM particle fields or MOND-like scalar field(s) are shown to be largely achievable by one vector field only. Our framework preserves the covariant formulation of general relativity, but allows the expanding physical metric to be bent by a single new species of dark fluid flowing in spacetime. Its non-uniform stress tensor and current vector are simple functions of a vector field with variable norm, not coupled with the baryonic fluid and the four-vector potential of the photon fluid. The dark fluid framework generically branches into a continuous spectrum of theories with DE and DM effects, including the f(R) gravity, tensor-vector-scalar-like theories, Einstein-Aether, and νΛ theories as limiting cases. When the vector field degenerates into a pure scalar field, we obtain the physics for quintessence. Choices of parameters can be made to pass Big Bang nucleosynthesis, parameterized post-Newtonian, and causality constraints. In this broad setting we emphasize the non-constant dynamical field behind the cosmological constant effect, and highlight plausible corrections beyond the classical MOND predictions.

  4. DARK FLUID: A UNIFIED FRAMEWORK FOR MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS, DARK MATTER, AND DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Hongsheng; Li Baojiu E-mail: b.li@damtp.cam.ac.u

    2010-03-20

    Empirical theories of dark matter (DM) like modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) gravity and of dark energy (DE) like f(R) gravity were motivated by astronomical data. But could these theories be branches rooted from a more general and hence generic framework? Here we propose a very generic Lagrangian of such a framework based on simple dimensional analysis and covariant symmetry requirements, and explore various outcomes in a top-down fashion. The desired effects of quintessence plus cold DM particle fields or MOND-like scalar field(s) are shown to be largely achievable by one vector field only. Our framework preserves the covariant formulation of general relativity, but allows the expanding physical metric to be bent by a single new species of dark fluid flowing in spacetime. Its non-uniform stress tensor and current vector are simple functions of a vector field with variable norm, not coupled with the baryonic fluid and the four-vector potential of the photon fluid. The dark fluid framework generically branches into a continuous spectrum of theories with DE and DM effects, including the f(R) gravity, tensor-vector-scalar-like theories, Einstein-Aether, and nuLAMBDA theories as limiting cases. When the vector field degenerates into a pure scalar field, we obtain the physics for quintessence. Choices of parameters can be made to pass Big Bang nucleosynthesis, parameterized post-Newtonian, and causality constraints. In this broad setting we emphasize the non-constant dynamical field behind the cosmological constant effect, and highlight plausible corrections beyond the classical MOND predictions.

  5. Structure formation in inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, R.C.; Pace, F. E-mail: francesco.pace@port.ac.uk

    2013-06-01

    We study the impact of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the linear and non-linear regimes of structure formation. In these models the energy density of dark energy is non-negligible at high redshifts and the fluctuations in the dark energy component can have the same order of magnitude of dark matter fluctuations. Since two basic approximations usually taken in the standard scenario of quintessence models, that both dark energy density during the matter dominated period and dark energy fluctuations on small scales are negligible, are not valid in such models, we first study approximate analytical solutions for dark matter and dark energy perturbations in the linear regime. This study is helpful to find consistent initial conditions for the system of equations and to analytically understand the effects of Early Dark Energy and its fluctuations, which are also verified numerically. In the linear regime we compute the matter growth and variation of the gravitational potential associated with the Integrated Sachs-Wolf effect, showing that these observables present important modifications due to Early Dark Energy fluctuations, though making them more similar to the ΛCDM model. We also make use of the Spherical Collapse model to study the influence of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the nonlinear regime of structure formation, especially on δ{sub c} parameter, and their contribution to the halo mass, which we show can be of the order of 10%. We finally compute how the number density of halos is modified in comparison to the ΛCDM model and address the problem of how to correct the mass function in order to take into account the contribution of clustered dark energy. We conclude that the inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models are more similar to the ΛCDM model than its homogeneous counterparts.

  6. HUBBLE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Farooq, Omer; Mania, Data; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: mania@phys.ksu.edu

    2013-02-20

    We use 21 Hubble parameter versus redshift data points from Simon et al., Gaztanaga et al., Stern et al., and Moresco et al. to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmologies. The inclusion of the eight new measurements results in H(z) constraints more restrictive than those derived by Chen and Ratra. These constraints are now almost as restrictive as those that follow from current Type Ia supernova (SNIa) apparent magnitude versus redshift data, which now more carefully account for systematic uncertainties. This is a remarkable result. We emphasize, however, that SNIa data have been studied for a longer time than the H(z) data, possibly resulting in a better estimate of potential systematic errors in the SNIa case. A joint analysis of the H(z), baryon acoustic oscillation peak length scale, and SNIa data favors a spatially flat cosmological model currently dominated by a time-independent cosmological constant but does not exclude slowly evolving dark energy.

  7. A unifying description of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyzes, Jérôme; Langlois, David; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    We review and extend a novel approach that we recently introduced, to describe general dark energy or scalar-tensor models. Our approach relies on an Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formulation based on the hypersurfaces where the underlying scalar field is uniform. The advantage of this approach is that it can describe in the same language and in a minimal way a vast number of existing models, such as quintessence, F(R) theories, scalar tensor theories, their Horndeski extensions and beyond. It also naturally includes Horava-Lifshitz theories. As summarized in this review, our approach provides a unified treatment of the linear cosmological perturbations about a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe, obtained by a systematic expansion of our general action up to quadratic order. This shows that the behavior of these linear perturbations is generically characterized by five time-dependent functions. We derive the full equations of motion in the Newtonian gauge. In the Horndeski case, we obtain the equation of state for dark energy perturbations in terms of these functions. Our unifying description thus provides the simplest and most systematic way to confront theoretical models with current and future cosmological observations.

  8. The effective field theory of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Vernizzi, Filippo; Piazza, Federico E-mail: fpiazza@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-02-01

    We propose a universal description of dark energy and modified gravity that includes all single-field models. By extending a formalism previously applied to inflation, we consider the metric universally coupled to matter fields and we write in terms of it the most general unitary gauge action consistent with the residual unbroken symmetries of spatial diffeomorphisms. Our action is particularly suited for cosmological perturbation theory: the background evolution depends on only three operators. All other operators start at least at quadratic order in the perturbations and their effects can be studied independently and systematically. In particular, we focus on the properties of a few operators which appear in non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor gravity and galileon theories. In this context, we study the mixing between gravity and the scalar degree of freedom. We assess the quantum and classical stability, derive the speed of sound of fluctuations and the renormalization of the Newton constant. The scalar can always be de-mixed from gravity at quadratic order in the perturbations, but not necessarily through a conformal rescaling of the metric. We show how to express covariant field-operators in our formalism and give several explicit examples of dark energy and modified gravity models in our language. Finally, we discuss the relation with the covariant EFT methods recently appeared in the literature.

  9. Probing Dark Energy with Constellation-X

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-09-08

    Constellation-X (Con-X) will carry out two powerful and independent sets of tests of dark energy based on X-ray observations of galaxy clusters, providing comparable accuracy to other leading dark energy probes. The first group of tests will measure the absolute distances to clusters, primarily using measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction in the largest, dynamically relaxed clusters, but with additional constraining power provided by follow-up observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. As with supernovae studies, such data determine the transformation between redshift and true distance, d(z), allowing cosmic acceleration to be measured directly. The second, independent group of tests will use the exquisite spectroscopic capabilities of Con-X to determine scaling relations between X-ray observables and mass. Together with forthcoming X-ray and SZ cluster surveys, these data will help to constrain the growth of structure, which is also a strong function of cosmological parameters.

  10. Examining the evidence for dynamical dark energy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Crittenden, Robert G; Pogosian, Levon; Zhang, Xinmin

    2012-10-26

    We apply a new nonparametric Bayesian method for reconstructing the evolution history of the equation of state w of dark energy, based on applying a correlated prior for w(z), to a collection of cosmological data. We combine the latest supernova (SNLS 3 year or Union 2.1), cosmic microwave background, redshift space distortion, and the baryonic acoustic oscillation measurements (including BOSS, WiggleZ, and 6dF) and find that the cosmological constant appears consistent with current data, but that a dynamical dark energy model which evolves from w<-1 at z~0.25 to w>-1 at higher redshift is mildly favored. Estimates of the Bayesian evidence show little preference between the cosmological constant model and the dynamical model for a range of correlated prior choices. Looking towards future data, we find that the best fit models for current data could be well distinguished from the ΛCDM model by observations such as Planck and Euclid-like surveys.

  11. The Dark Energy Survey instrument design

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    We describe a new project, the Dark Energy Survey (DES), aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, to a statistical precision of {approx}5%, with four complementary techniques. The survey will use a new 3 sq. deg. mosaic camera (DECam) mounted at the prime focus of the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro-Tololo International Observatory (CTIO). DECam includes a large mosaic camera, a five element optical corrector, four filters (g,r,i,z), and the associated infrastructure for operation in the prime focus cage. The focal plane consists of 62 2K x 4K CCD modules (0.27''/pixel) arranged in a hexagon inscribed within the 2.2 deg. diameter field of view. We plan to use the 250 micron thick fully-depleted CCDs that have been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). At Fermilab, we will establish a packaging factory to produce four-side buttable modules for the LBNL devices, as well as to test and grade the CCDs. R&D is underway and delivery of DECam to CTIO is scheduled for 2009.

  12. Nonparametric dark energy reconstruction from supernova data.

    PubMed

    Holsclaw, Tracy; Alam, Ujjaini; Sansó, Bruno; Lee, Herbert; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2010-12-10

    Understanding the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe poses one of the greatest challenges in physics today. Lacking a compelling fundamental theory to test, observational efforts are targeted at a better characterization of the underlying cause. If a new form of mass-energy, dark energy, is driving the acceleration, the redshift evolution of the equation of state parameter w(z) will hold essential clues as to its origin. To best exploit data from observations it is necessary to develop a robust and accurate reconstruction approach, with controlled errors, for w(z). We introduce a new, nonparametric method for solving the associated statistical inverse problem based on Gaussian process modeling and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. Applying this method to recent supernova measurements, we reconstruct the continuous history of w out to redshift z=1.5.

  13. Probing Dark Energy with High Redshift Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlmutter, S.

    2003-05-01

    The Hubble diagram of Type Ia Supernovae provides the most direct current measurement of the expansion history of the universe, including the present acceleration and the transition to matter-dominated deceleration. Recent measurements already yield statistical uncertainties small enough that we are close to being limited by systematics. I will review the anticipated improvement in systematics attainable by the next generations of experiments from ground and space that promise a systematics-controlled prize: a detailed expansion history of the universe that can teach us about the nature of the mysterious "dark energy" that accelerates the universe. This work is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  14. Cosmic Gauge-Field Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devulder, Christopher; Caldwell, Robert

    2017-01-01

    We present a cosmological model in which dark energy consists of a cosmic gauge field. At early times it behaves like radiation; at late times it drives cosmic acceleration. By varying the number of fields, their coupling strength and handedness, a wide range of behavior is shown to emerge. Joint constraints on the model from SNe, BAO and CMB data are presented. We discuss the possibility that the gauge field may seed a spectrum of primordial gravitational waves with a distinct imprint on the power spectrum, as well as act like a dissipative medium for high frequency gravitational waves. We show that this model could have an impact on the B-mode polarization pattern in the CMB, as well as future probes that use standard sirens to constrain the energy budget of the Universe.

  15. Variable deceleration parameter and dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishi, Binaya K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the Bianchi type-III dark energy model and equation of state parameter in a first class of f(R,T) gravity. Here, R and T represents the Ricci scalar and trace of the energy momentum tensor, respectively. The exact solutions of the modified field equations are obtained by using (i) linear relation between expansion scalar and shear scalar, (ii) linear relation between state parameter and skewness parameter and (iii) variable deceleration parameter. To obtain the physically plausible cosmological models, the variable deceleration parameter with the suitable substitution leads to the scale factor of the form a(t) = [sinh(αt)] 1 n, where α and n > 0 are arbitrary constants. It is observed that our models are accelerating for 0 < n < 1 and for n > 1, transition phase from deceleration to acceleration. Further, we have discussed physical properties of the models.

  16. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS: Dark energy: myths and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukash, V. N.; Rubakov, V. A.

    2008-03-01

    We discuss the questions related to dark energy in the Universe. We note that in spite of the effect of dark energy, large-scale structure is still being generated in the Universe and this will continue for about ten billion years. We also comment on some statements in the paper "Dark energy and universal antigravitation" by A D Chernin, Physics Uspekhi 51 (3) (2008).

  17. The growth of structure in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte E-mail: roy.maartens@port.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    If dark energy interacts with dark matter, there is a change in the background evolution of the universe, since the dark matter density no longer evolves as a{sup −3}. In addition, the non-gravitational interaction affects the growth of structure. In principle, these changes allow us to detect and constrain an interaction in the dark sector. Here we investigate the growth factor and the weak lensing signal for a new class of interacting dark energy models. In these models, the interaction generalises the simple cases where one dark fluid decays into the other. In order to calculate the effect on structure formation, we perform a careful analysis of the perturbed interaction and its effect on peculiar velocities. Assuming a normalization to today's values of dark matter density and overdensity, the signal of the interaction is an enhancement (suppression) of both the growth factor and the lensing power, when the energy transfer in the background is from dark matter to dark energy (dark energy to dark matter)

  18. Chameleon dark energy models with characteristic signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gannouji, Radouane; Moraes, Bruno; Polarski, David; Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A.; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-12-15

    In chameleon dark energy models, local gravity constraints tend to rule out parameters in which observable cosmological signatures can be found. We study viable chameleon potentials consistent with a number of recent observational and experimental bounds. A novel chameleon field potential, motivated by f(R) gravity, is constructed where observable cosmological signatures are present both at the background evolution and in the growth rate of the perturbations. We study the evolution of matter density perturbations on low redshifts for this potential and show that the growth index today {gamma}{sub 0} can have significant dispersion on scales relevant for large scale structures. The values of {gamma}{sub 0} can be even smaller than 0.2 with large variations of {gamma} on very low redshifts for the model parameters constrained by local gravity tests. This gives a possibility to clearly distinguish these chameleon models from the {Lambda}-cold-dark-matter ({Lambda}CDM) model in future high-precision observations.

  19. Dissipative or conservative cosmology with dark energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydlowski, M.; Hrycyna, O.

    2007-12-01

    All evolutional paths for all admissible initial conditions of FRW cosmological models with dissipative dust fluid (described by dark matter, baryonic matter and dark energy) are analyzed using dynamical system approach. With that approach, one is able to see how generic the class of solutions leading to the desired property -- acceleration -- is. The theory of dynamical systems also offers a possibility of investigating all possible solutions and their stability with tools of Newtonian mechanics of a particle moving in a 1-dimensional potential which is parameterized by the cosmological scale factor. We demonstrate that flat cosmology with bulk viscosity can be treated as a conservative system with a potential function of the Chaplygin gas type. We also confront viscous models with SNIa observations. The best fitted models are obtained by minimizing the $\\chi^{2}$ function which is illustrated by residuals and $\\chi^{2}$ levels in the space of model independent parameters. The general conclusion is that SNIa data supports the viscous model without the cosmological constant. The obtained values of $\\chi^{2}$ statistic are comparable for both the viscous model and LCDM model. The Bayesian information criteria are used to compare the models with different power law parameterization of viscous effects. Our result of this analysis shows that SNIa data supports viscous cosmology more than the LCDM model if the coefficient in viscosity parameterization is fixed. The Bayes factor is also used to obtain the posterior probability of the model.

  20. (m, n)-TYPE Holographic Dark Energy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yi; Pan, Wen-Jian

    2013-09-01

    We construct (m, n)-type holographic dark energy models at a phenomenological level, which can be viewed as a generalization of agegraphic models with the conformal-like age as the holographic characteristic size. For some values of (m, n) the holographic dark energy can automatically evolve across ω = -1 into a phantom phase even without introducing an interaction between the dark energy and background matter. Our construction is also applicable to the holographic dark energy with generalized future event horizon as the characteristic size. Finally, we address the issue on the stability of our model and show that they are generally stable under the scalar perturbation.

  1. Statefinder Diagnostic for the Yang-Mills Dark Energy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wen

    We study the statefinder parameters in the Yang-Mills condensate dark energy models, and find that the evolving trajectories of these models are different from those of other dark energy models. We also define two eigenfunctions of the Yang-Mills condensate dark energy models. The values of these eigenfunctions are quite close to zero if the equation of state of the Yang-Mills condensate is not far from -1, which can be used to simply differentiate between the Yang-Mills condensate models and other dark energy models.

  2. BOOK REVIEW Dark Energy: Theory and Observations Dark Energy: Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2011-02-01

    The 1998 discovery of what seems an acceleration of the cosmic expansion was made using type Ia supernovae and was later confirmed by other cosmological observations. It has made a huge impact on cosmology, prompting theoreticians to explain the observations and introducing the concept of dark energy into modern physics. A vast literature on dark energy and its alternatives has appeared since then, and this is the first comprehensive book devoted to the subject. This book is addressed to an advanced audience comprising graduate students and researchers in cosmology. Although it contains forty four fully solved problems and the first three chapters are rather introductory, they do not constitute a self-consistent course in cosmology and this book assumes graduate level knowledge of cosmology and general relativity. The fourth chapter focuses on observations, while the rest of this book addresses various classes of models proposed, including the cosmological constant, quintessence, k-essence, phantom energy, coupled dark energy, etc. The title of this book should not induce the reader into believing that only dark energy models are addressed—the authors devote two chapters to discussing conceptually very different approaches alternative to dark energy, including ƒ(R) and Gauss-Bonnet gravity, braneworld and void models, and the backreaction of inhomogeneities on the cosmic dynamics. Two chapters contain a general discussion of non-linear cosmological perturbations and statistical methods widely applicable in cosmology. The final chapter outlines future perspectives and the most likely lines of observational research on dark energy in the future. Overall, this book is carefully drafted, well presented, and does a good job of organizing the information available in the vast literature. The reader is pointed to the essential references and guided in a balanced way through the various proposals aimied at explaining the cosmological observations. Not all classes of

  3. Observational effects of the early episodically dominating dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Lee, Jae-heon; Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the observational consequences of the early episodically dominating dark energy on the evolution of cosmological structures. For this aim, we introduce the minimally coupled scalar-field dark energy model with the Albrecht-Skordis potential, which allows a sudden ephemeral domination of a dark energy component during the radiation or early matter era. The conventional cosmological parameters in the presence of such an early dark energy are constrained with WMAP and Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data including other external data sets. It is shown that in the presence of such an early dark energy, the estimated cosmological parameters can deviate substantially from the currently known Λ cold dark matter (Λ CDM )-based parameters, with best-fit values differing by several percent for WMAP and by a percent level for Planck data. For the latter case, only a limited amount of dark energy with episodic nature is allowed since the Planck data strongly favor the Λ CDM model. Compared with the conventional dark energy model, the early dark energy dominating near the radiation-matter equality or at the early matter era results in the shorter cosmic age or the presence of tensor-type perturbation, respectively. Our analysis demonstrates that the alternative cosmological parameter estimation is allowed based on the same observations even in Einstein's gravity.

  4. On cosmic acceleration without dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Matarrese, S.; Riotto, A.; /INFN, Padua

    2005-06-01

    We elaborate on the proposal that the observed acceleration of the Universe is the result of the backreaction of cosmological perturbations, rather than the effect of a negative-pressure dark energy fluid or a modification of general relativity. Through the effective Friedmann equations describing an inhomogeneous Universe after smoothing, we demonstrate that acceleration in our local Hubble patch is possible even if fluid elements do not individually undergo accelerated expansion. This invalidates the no-go theorem that there can be no acceleration in our local Hubble patch if the Universe only contains irrotational dust. We then study perturbatively the time behavior of general-relativistic cosmological perturbations, applying, where possible, the renormalization group to regularize the dynamics. We show that an instability occurs in the perturbative expansion involving sub-Hubble modes, which indicates that acceleration in our Hubble patch may originate from the backreaction of cosmological perturbations on observable scales.

  5. Calibration Monitor for Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, M. E.

    2009-11-23

    The goal of this program was to design, build, test, and characterize a flight qualified calibration source and monitor for a Dark Energy related experiment: ACCESS - 'Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars'. This calibration source, the On-board Calibration Monitor (OCM), is a key component of our ACCESS spectrophotometric calibration program. The OCM will be flown as part of the ACCESS sub-orbital rocket payload in addition to monitoring instrument sensitivity on the ground. The objective of the OCM is to minimize systematic errors associated with any potential changes in the ACCESS instrument sensitivity. Importantly, the OCM will be used to monitor instrument sensitivity immediately after astronomical observations while the instrument payload is parachuting to the ground. Through monitoring, we can detect, track, characterize, and thus correct for any changes in instrument senstivity over the proposed 5-year duration of the assembled and calibrated instrument.

  6. Neutrino dark energy in grand unified theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Gu, Pei-Hong; Sarkar, Utpal; Singh, Santosh K.

    2009-10-01

    We studied a left-right symmetric model that can accommodate the neutrino dark energy (νDE) proposal. The type-III seesaw mechanism is implemented to give masses to the neutrinos. After explaining the model, we study the consistency of the model by minimizing the scalar potential and obtaining the conditions for the required vacuum expectation values of the different scalar fields. This model is then embedded in an SO(10) grand unified theory and the allowed symmetry breaking scales are determined by the condition of the gauge coupling unification. Although SU(2)R breaking is required to be high, its Abelian subgroup U(1)R is broken in the TeV range, which can then give the required neutrino masses and predicts new gauge bosons that could be detected at LHC. The neutrino masses are studied in detail in this model, which shows that at least 3 singlet fermions are required.

  7. Neutrino dark energy in grand unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Sarkar, Utpal; Singh, Santosh K.; Gu, P.-H.

    2009-10-01

    We studied a left-right symmetric model that can accommodate the neutrino dark energy ({nu}DE) proposal. The type-III seesaw mechanism is implemented to give masses to the neutrinos. After explaining the model, we study the consistency of the model by minimizing the scalar potential and obtaining the conditions for the required vacuum expectation values of the different scalar fields. This model is then embedded in an SO(10) grand unified theory and the allowed symmetry breaking scales are determined by the condition of the gauge coupling unification. Although SU(2){sub R} breaking is required to be high, its Abelian subgroup U(1){sub R} is broken in the TeV range, which can then give the required neutrino masses and predicts new gauge bosons that could be detected at LHC. The neutrino masses are studied in detail in this model, which shows that at least 3 singlet fermions are required.

  8. Does Cometary Panspermia Falsify Dark Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2011-10-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Brian P. Schmidt, and Adam G. Riess "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae", judged to be the "most important discovery or invention within the field of physics" (Excerpt from the will of Alfred Nobel). Are we forced by this claimed discovery to believe the universe is dominated by anti- gravitational dark energy? Can the discovery be falsified? Because life as we observe it on Earth is virtually impossible by the standard ΛCDMHC model, extraterrestrial life and cometary panspermia may provide the first definitive falsification of a Nobel Prize in Physics since its first award in 1901 to Wilhelm Röntgen for his discovery of X-rays.

  9. Supernovae and Dark Energy -- What's Next?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2003-04-01

    The existing supernova measurements of the universe's (accelerating) expansion history have pointed the way to the next generation of experiments. This next generation of supernova measurements must be made with a dramatic step forward in constraints on systematic uncertainties, since the previous measurements already have statistical uncertainties that are close to the current systematics limits. I will show how some recent results set the stage for these advances, and describe a series of ground- and space-based projects and a new satellite experiment (the SuperNova / Acceleration Probe, "SNAP") that promise a systematics-controlled prize: a detailed expansion history of the universe that can teach us about the nature of the mysterious "dark energy" that accelerates the universe.

  10. Generalized dark energy interactions with multiple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Mifsud, Jurgen; Mimoso, José P.; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2016-11-01

    In the search for an explanation for the current acceleration of the Universe, scalar fields are the most simple and useful tools to build models of dark energy. This field, however, must in principle couple with the rest of the world and not necessarily in the same way to different particles or fluids. We provide the most complete dynamical system analysis to date, consisting of a canonical scalar field conformally and disformally coupled to both dust and radiation. We perform a detailed study of the existence and stability conditions of the systems and comment on constraints imposed on the disformal coupling from Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and given current limits on the variation of the fine-structure constant.

  11. Triple unification of inflation, dark matter, and dark energy using a single field

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Pahud, Cedric; Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo

    2008-06-15

    We construct an explicit scenario whereby the same material driving inflation in the early universe can comprise dark matter in the present universe, using a simple quadratic potential. Following inflation and preheating, the density of inflaton/dark matter particles is reduced to the observed level by a period of thermal inflation, of a duration already invoked in the literature for other reasons. Within the context of the string landscape, one can further argue for a nonzero vacuum energy of this field, thus unifying inflation, dark matter, and dark energy into a single fundamental field.

  12. New perspective on the relation between dark energy perturbations and the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Sourish; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2009-01-15

    The effect of quintessence perturbations on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is studied for a mixed dynamical scalar field dark energy (DDE) and pressureless perfect fluid dark matter. A new and general methodology is developed to track the growth of the perturbations, which uses only the equation of state (EoS) parameter w{sub DDE}(z){identical_to}p{sub DDE}/{rho}{sub DDE} of the scalar field DDE, and the initial values of the relative entropy perturbation (between the matter and DDE) and the intrinsic entropy perturbation of the scalar field DDE as inputs. We also derive a relation between the rest-frame sound speed c-circumflex{sub s,DDE}{sup 2} of an arbitrary scalar field DDE component and its EoS w{sub DDE}(z). We show that the ISW signal differs from that expected in a {lambda}CDM cosmology by as much as +20% to -80% for parametrizations of w{sub DDE} consistent with SNIa data, and about {+-}20% for parametrizations of w{sub DDE} consistent with SNIa+CMB+BAO data, at 95% confidence. Our results indicate that, at least in principle, the ISW effect can be used to phenomenologically distinguish a cosmological constant from DDE.

  13. Interacting agegraphic dark energy models in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Lemets, O.A.; Yerokhin, D.A.; Zazunov, L.G. E-mail: denyerokhin@gmail.com

    2011-01-01

    Agegraphic dark energy, has been recently proposed, based on the so-called Karolyhazy uncertainty relation, which arises from quantum mechanics together with general relativity. In the first part of the article we study the original agegraphic dark energy model by including the interaction between agegraphic dark energy and pressureless (dark) matter. The phase space analysis was made and the critical points were found, one of which is the attractor corresponding to an accelerated expanding Universe. Recent observations of near supernova show that the acceleration of Universe decreases. This phenomenon is called the transient acceleration. In the second part of Article we consider the 3-component Universe composed of a scalar field, interacting with the dark matter on the agegraphic dark energy background. We show that the transient acceleration appears in frame of such a model. The obtained results agree with the observations.

  14. Fingerprinting dark energy. II. Weak lensing and galaxy clustering tests

    SciTech Connect

    Sapone, Domenico; Amendola, Luca

    2010-11-15

    The characterization of dark energy is a central task of cosmology. To go beyond a cosmological constant, we need to introduce at least an equation of state and a sound speed and consider observational tests that involve perturbations. If dark energy is not completely homogeneous on observable scales, then the Poisson equation is modified and dark matter clustering is directly affected. One can then search for observational effects of dark energy clustering using dark matter as a probe. In this paper we exploit an analytical approximate solution of the perturbation equations in a general dark energy cosmology to analyze the performance of next-decade large-scale surveys in constraining equation of state and sound speed. We find that tomographic weak lensing and galaxy redshift surveys can constrain the sound speed of the dark energy only if the latter is small, of the order of c{sub s} < or approx. 0.01 (in units of c). For larger sound speeds the error grows to 100% and more. We conclude that large-scale structure observations contain very little information about the perturbations in canonical scalar field models with a sound speed of unity. Nevertheless, they are able to detect the presence of cold dark energy, i.e. a dark energy with nonrelativistic speed of sound.

  15. The traces of anisotropic dark energy in light of Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona, Wilmar; Kunz, Martin; Hollenstein, Lukas E-mail: lukas.hollenstein@zhaw.ch

    2014-07-01

    We study a dark energy model with non-zero anisotropic stress, either linked to the dark energy density or to the dark matter density. We compute approximate solutions that allow to characterise the behaviour of the dark energy model and to assess the stability of the perturbations. We also determine the current limits on such an anisotropic stress from the cosmic microwave background data by the Planck satellite, and derive the corresponding constraints on the modified growth parameters like the growth index, the effective Newton's constant and the gravitational slip.

  16. Cosmological future singularities in interacting dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Rubiera-Garcia, Diego; Sáez-Gómez, Diego; Salzano, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    The existence of interactions between dark matter and dark energy has been widely studied, since they can fit well the observational data and may provide new physics through such an interaction. In this work, we analyze these models and investigate their potential relation with future cosmological singularities. We find that every future singularity found in the literature can be mapped into a singularity of the interaction term, that we call the Q singularity, where the energy flow between the dark components diverges. Furthermore, this framework allows us to identify a new type of future singularity induced by the divergence of the first derivative of the dark energy equation of state parameter.

  17. Hubble Expansion Parameter in a New Model of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we consider new model of dark energy based on Taylor expansion of its density and calculate the Hubble expansion parameter for various parameterizations of equation of state. This model is useful to probe a possible evolving of dark energy component in comparison with current observational data.

  18. Heavy ion reaction measurements with the EOS TPC (looking for central collisions with missing energy)

    SciTech Connect

    Wieman, H.H.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    The EOS TPC was constructed for complete event measurement of heavy ion collisions at the Bevalac. We report here on the TPC design and some preliminary measurements of conserved event quantities such as total invariant mass, total momentum, total A and Z.

  19. Cosmological anisotropy from non-comoving dark matter and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N. E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2013-07-01

    We consider a cosmological model in which the two major fluid components of the Universe, dark energy and dark matter, flow with distinct four-velocities. This cosmological configuration is equivalent to a single anisotropic fluid, expanding with a four-velocity that is an appropriate combination of the two fluid four-velocities. The energy density of the single cosmological fluid is larger than the sum of the energy densities of the two perfect fluids, i.e., dark energy and dark matter, respectively, and contains a correction term due to the anisotropy generated by the differences in the four-velocities. Furthermore, the gravitational field equations of the two-fluid anisotropic cosmological model are obtained for a Bianchi type I geometry. By assuming that the non-comoving motion of the dark energy and dark matter induces small perturbations in the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker type cosmological background, and that the anisotropy parameter is small, the equations of the cosmological perturbations due to the non-comoving nature of the two major components are obtained. The time evolution of the metric perturbations is explicitly obtained for the cases of the exponential and power law background cosmological expansion. The imprints of a non-comoving dark energy - dark matter on the Cosmic Microwave Background and on the luminosity distance are briefly discussed, and the temperature anisotropies and the quadrupole are explicitly obtained in terms of the metric perturbations of the flat background metric. Therefore, if there is a slight difference between the four-velocities of the dark energy and dark matter, the Universe would acquire some anisotropic characteristics, and its geometry will deviate from the standard FLRW one. In fact, the recent Planck results show that the presence of an intrinsic large scale anisotropy in the Universe cannot be excluded a priori, so that the model presented in this work can be considered as a

  20. EOS standards

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W

    2011-01-12

    An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

  1. Baryon acoustic oscillation intensity mapping of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-07

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called "dark energy." To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 10(9) individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  2. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called “dark energy.” To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 109 individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  3. The CHASE laboratory search for chameleon dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    A scalar field is a favorite candidate for the particle responsible for dark energy. However, few theoretical means exist that can simultaneously explain the observed acceleration of the Universe and evade tests of gravity. The chameleon mechanism, whereby the properties of a particle depend upon the local environment, is one possible avenue. We present the results of the Chameleon Afterglow Search (CHASE) experiment, a laboratory probe for chameleon dark energy. CHASE marks a significant improvement other searches for chameleons both in terms of its sensitivity to the photon/chameleon coupling as well as its sensitivity to the classes of chameleon dark energy models and standard power-law models. Since chameleon dark energy is virtually indistinguishable from a cosmological constant, CHASE tests dark energy models in a manner not accessible to astronomical surveys.

  4. Planck constraints on holographic dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Miao; Zhang, Zhenhui; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Zhang, Xin E-mail: xiaodongli@kias.re.kr E-mail: zhangxin@mail.neu.edu.cn

    2013-09-01

    We perform a detailed investigation on the cosmological constraints on the holographic dark energy (HDE) model by using the Plank data. We find that HDE can provide a good fit to the Plank high-l (l ∼> 40) temperature power spectrum, while the discrepancy at l ≅ 20-40 found in the ΛCDM model remains unsolved in the HDE model. The Plank data alone can lead to strong and reliable constraint on the HDE parameter c. At the 68% confidence level (CL), we obtain c = 0.508 ± 0.207 with Plank+WP+lensing, favoring the present phantom behavior of HDE at the more than 2σ CL. By combining Plank+WP with the external astrophysical data sets, i.e. the BAO measurements from 6dFGS+SDSS DR7(R)+BOSS DR9, the direct Hubble constant measurement result (H{sub 0} = 73.8 ± 2.4 kms{sup −1}Mpc{sup −1}) from the HST, the SNLS3 supernovae data set, and Union2.1 supernovae data set, we get the 68% CL constraint results c = 0.484 ± 0.070, 0.474 ± 0.049, 0.594 ± 0.051, and 0.642 ± 0.066, respectively. The constraints can be improved by 2%-15% if we further add the Plank lensing data into the analysis. Compared with the WMAP-9 results, the Plank results reduce the error by 30%-60%, and prefer a phantom-like HDE at higher significant level. We also investigate the tension between different data sets. We find no evident tension when we combine Plank data with BAO and HST. Especially, we find that the strong correlation between Ω{sub m}h{sup 3} and dark energy parameters is helpful in relieving the tension between the Plank and HST measurements. The residual value of χ{sup 2}{sub Plank+WP+HST}−χ{sup 2}{sub Plank+WP} is 7.8 in the ΛCDM model, and is reduced to 1.0 or 0.3 if we switch the dark energy to w model or the holographic model. When we introduce supernovae data sets into the analysis, some tension appears. We find that the SNLS3 data set is in tension with all other data sets; for example, for the Plank+WP, WMAP-9 and BAO+HST, the corresponding Δχ{sup 2} is equal to 6

  5. Planck constraints on holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhenhui

    2013-09-01

    We perform a detailed investigation on the cosmological constraints on the holographic dark energy (HDE) model by using the Plank data. We find that HDE can provide a good fit to the Plank high-l (l gtrsim 40) temperature power spectrum, while the discrepancy at l simeq 20-40 found in the ΛCDM model remains unsolved in the HDE model. The Plank data alone can lead to strong and reliable constraint on the HDE parameter c. At the 68% confidence level (CL), we obtain c = 0.508 ± 0.207 with Plank+WP+lensing, favoring the present phantom behavior of HDE at the more than 2σ CL. By combining Plank+WP with the external astrophysical data sets, i.e. the BAO measurements from 6dFGS+SDSS DR7(R)+BOSS DR9, the direct Hubble constant measurement result (H0 = 73.8 ± 2.4 kms-1Mpc-1) from the HST, the SNLS3 supernovae data set, and Union2.1 supernovae data set, we get the 68% CL constraint results c = 0.484 ± 0.070, 0.474 ± 0.049, 0.594 ± 0.051, and 0.642 ± 0.066, respectively. The constraints can be improved by 2%-15% if we further add the Plank lensing data into the analysis. Compared with the WMAP-9 results, the Plank results reduce the error by 30%-60%, and prefer a phantom-like HDE at higher significant level. We also investigate the tension between different data sets. We find no evident tension when we combine Plank data with BAO and HST. Especially, we find that the strong correlation between Ωmh3 and dark energy parameters is helpful in relieving the tension between the Plank and HST measurements. The residual value of χ2Plank+WP+HST-χ2Plank+WP is 7.8 in the ΛCDM model, and is reduced to 1.0 or 0.3 if we switch the dark energy to w model or the holographic model. When we introduce supernovae data sets into the analysis, some tension appears. We find that the SNLS3 data set is in tension with all other data sets; for example, for the Plank+WP, WMAP-9 and BAO+HST, the corresponding Δχ2 is equal to 6.4, 3.5 and 4.1, respectively. As a comparison, the Union2

  6. Effects of tidal gravitational fields in clustering dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Francesco; Reischke, Robert; Meyer, Sven; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-04-01

    We extend a previous work by Reischke et al. by studying the effects of tidal shear on clustering dark energy models within the framework of the extended spherical collapse model and using the Zel'dovich approximation. As in previous works on clustering dark energy, we assumed a vanishing effective sound speed describing the perturbations in dark energy models. To be self-consistent, our treatment is valid only on linear scales since we do not intend to introduce any heuristic models. This approach makes the linear overdensity δc mass dependent and similarly to the case of smooth dark energy, its effects are predominant at small masses and redshifts. Tidal shear has effects of the order of per cent or less, regardless of the model and preserves a well-known feature of clustering dark energy: When dark energy perturbations are included, the models resemble better the Lambda cold dark matter evolution of perturbations. We also showed that effects on the comoving number density of haloes are small and qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with what were previously found for smooth dark energy models.

  7. Fingerprinting dark energy. III. Distinctive marks of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapone, Domenico; Majerotto, Elisabetta

    2012-06-01

    The characterization of dark energy is one of the primary goals in cosmology especially now that many new experiments are being planned with the aim of reaching a high sensitivity on cosmological parameters. It is known that if we move away from the simple cosmological constant model then we need to consider perturbations in the dark energy fluid. This means that dark energy has two extra degrees of freedom: the sound speed cs2 and the anisotropic stress σ. If dark energy is inhomogenous at the scales of interest then the gravitational potentials are modified and the evolution of the dark matter perturbations is also directly affected. In this paper we add an anisotropic component to the dark energy perturbations. Following the idea introduced in D. Sapone and M. Kunz, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 80, 083519 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.80.083519, we solve analytically the equations of perturbations in the dark sector, finding simple and accurate approximated solutions. We also find that the evolution of the density perturbations is governed by an effective sound speed that depends on both the sound speed and the anisotropic stress parameter. We then use these solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background.

  8. Graviweak Unification, Invisible Universe and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.; Tureanu, A.

    2013-07-01

    We consider a graviweak unification model with the assumption of the existence of a hidden (invisible) sector of our Universe, parallel to the visible world. This Hidden World (HW) is assumed to be a Mirror World (MW) with broken mirror parity. We start with a diffeomorphism invariant theory of a gauge field valued in a Lie algebra g, which is broken spontaneously to the direct sum of the space-time Lorentz algebra and the Yang-Mills algebra: ˜ {g} = {{su}}(2) (grav)L ⊕ {{su}}(2)L — in the ordinary world, and ˜ {g}' = {{su}}(2){' (grav)}R ⊕ {{su}}(2)'R — in the hidden world. Using an extension of the Plebanski action for general relativity, we recover the actions for gravity, SU(2) Yang-Mills and Higgs fields in both (visible and invisible) sectors of the Universe, and also the total action. After symmetry breaking, all physical constants, including the Newton's constants, cosmological constants, Yang-Mills couplings, and other parameters, are determined by a single parameter g present in the initial action, and by the Higgs VEVs. The dark energy problem of this model predicts a too large supersymmetric breaking scale (MSUSY 1010GeV), which is not within the reach of the LHC experiments.

  9. Cooling the dark energy camera instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.L.; Cease, H.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Kuhlmann, S.; Onal, Birce; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    DECam, camera for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is undergoing general design and component testing. For an overview see DePoy, et al in these proceedings. For a description of the imager, see Cease, et al in these proceedings. The CCD instrument will be mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope. The instrument temperature will be 173K with a heat load of 113W. In similar applications, cooling CCD instruments at the prime focus has been accomplished by three general methods. Liquid nitrogen reservoirs have been constructed to operate in any orientation, pulse tube cryocoolers have been used when tilt angles are limited and Joule-Thompson or Stirling cryocoolers have been used with smaller heat loads. Gifford-MacMahon cooling has been used at the Cassegrain but not at the prime focus. For DES, the combined requirements of high heat load, temperature stability, low vibration, operation in any orientation, liquid nitrogen cost and limited space available led to the design of a pumped, closed loop, circulating nitrogen system. At zenith the instrument will be twelve meters above the pump/cryocooler station. This cooling system expected to have a 10,000 hour maintenance interval. This paper will describe the engineering basis including the thermal model, unbalanced forces, cooldown time, the single and two-phase flow model.

  10. Quantum Yang-Mills Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasechnik, Roman

    2016-02-01

    In this short review, I discuss basic qualitative characteristics of quantum non-Abelian gauge dynamics in the non-stationary background of the expanding Universe in the framework of the standard Einstein--Yang--Mills formulation. A brief outlook of existing studies of cosmological Yang--Mills fields and their properties will be given. Quantum effects have a profound impact on the gauge field-driven cosmological evolution. In particular, a dynamical formation of the spatially-homogeneous and isotropic gauge field condensate may be responsible for both early and late-time acceleration, as well as for dynamical compensation of non-perturbative quantum vacua contributions to the ground state of the Universe. The main properties of such a condensate in the effective QCD theory at the flat Friedmann--Lema\\'itre--Robertson--Walker (FLRW) background will be discussed within and beyond perturbation theory. Finally, a phenomenologically consistent dark energy can be induced dynamically as a remnant of the QCD vacua compensation arising from leading-order graviton-mediated corrections to the QCD ground state.

  11. Essential building blocks of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyzes, Jerome; Langlois, David; Piazza, Federico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2013-08-01

    We propose a minimal description of single field dark energy/modified gravity within the effective field theory formalism for cosmological perturbations, which encompasses most existing models. We start from a generic Lagrangian given as an arbitrary function of the lapse and of the extrinsic and intrinsic curvature tensors of the time hypersurfaces in unitary gauge, i.e. choosing as time slicing the uniform scalar field hypersurfaces. Focusing on linear perturbations, we identify seven Lagrangian operators that lead to equations of motion containing at most two (space or time) derivatives, the background evolution being determined by the time-dependent coefficients of only three of these operators. We then establish a dictionary that translates any existing or future model whose Lagrangian can be written in the above form into our parametrized framework. As an illustration, we study Horndeski's — or generalized Galileon — theories and show that they can be described, up to linear order, by only six of the seven operators mentioned above. This implies, remarkably, that the dynamics of linear perturbations can be more general than that of Horndeski while remaining second order. Finally, in order to make the link with observations, we provide the entire set of linear perturbation equations in Newtonian gauge, the effective Newton constant in the quasi-static approximation and the ratio of the two gravitational potentials, in terms of the time-dependent coefficients of our Lagrangian.

  12. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Comparat, Johan; Coupon, Jean; Cheu, Elliott; Cunha, Carlos E.; de la Macorra, Alex; Dell’Antonio, Ian P.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Menard, Brice; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Park, Changbom; Rhodes, Jason; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large sets of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce scatter

  13. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; ...

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large setsmore » of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce

  14. Dark Energy Domination In The Virgocentric Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Gene; Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    2011-04-01

    Dark energy (DE) was first observationally detected at large Gpc distances. If it is a vacuum energy formulated as Einstein's cosmological constant, Λ, DE should also have dynamical effects at much smaller scales. Previously, we found its effects on much smaller Mpc scales in our Local Group (LG) as well as in other nearby groups. We used new HST observations of member 3D distances from the group centers and Doppler shifts. We find each group's gravity dominates a bound central system of galaxies but DE antigravity results in a radial recession increasing with distance from the group center of the outer members. Here we focus on the much larger (but still cosmologically local) Virgo Cluster and systems around it using new observations of velocities and distances. We propose an analytic model whose key parameter is the zero-gravity radius (ZGR) from the cluster center where gravity and DE antigravity balance. DE brings regularity to the Virgocentric flow. Beyond Virgo's 10 Mpc ZGR, the flow curves to approach a linear global Hubble law at larger distances. The Virgo cluster and its outer flow are similar to the Local Group and its local outflow with a scaling factor of about 10; the ZGR for Virgo is 10 times larger than that of the LG. The similarity of the two systems on the scales of 1 to 30 Mpc suggests that a quasi-stationary bound central component and an expanding outflow applies to a wide range of groups and clusters due to small scale action of DE as well as gravity. Chernin, et al 2009 Astronomy and Astrophysics 507, 1271 http://arxiv.org/abs/1006.0066 http://arxiv.org/abs/1006.0555

  15. Scalar perturbations in cosmological models with dark energy-dark matter interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Eingorn, Maxim; Kiefer, Claus E-mail: kiefer@thp.uni-koeln.de

    2015-07-01

    Scalar cosmological perturbations are investigated in the framework of a model with interacting dark energy and dark matter. In addition to these constituents, the inhomogeneous Universe is supposed to be filled with the standard noninteracting constituents corresponding to the conventional ΛCDM model. The interaction term is chosen in the form of a linear combination of dark sector energy densities with evolving coefficients. The methods of discrete cosmology are applied, and strong theoretical constraints on the parameters of the model are derived. A brief comparison with observational data is performed.

  16. Time-Dependent Dark Energy Density and Holographic DE Model with Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, H.; Saadat, A. M.

    2011-05-01

    In this article we consider holographic dark energy model with interaction and space curvature. We calculate cosmic scale factor by using the time-dependent dark energy density. Then we obtain phenomenological interaction between holographic dark energy and matter.

  17. Studies of dark energy with X-ray observatories.

    PubMed

    Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2010-04-20

    I review the contribution of Chandra X-ray Observatory to studies of dark energy. There are two broad classes of observable effects of dark energy: evolution of the expansion rate of the Universe, and slow down in the rate of growth of cosmic structures. Chandra has detected and measured both of these effects through observations of galaxy clusters. A combination of the Chandra results with other cosmological datasets leads to 5% constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, and limits possible deviations of gravity on large scales from general relativity.

  18. Inflation via logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, F.; Felegary, F.; Setare, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the inflation in terms of the logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy (LECHDE) model with future event horizon, particle horizon, and Hubble horizon cut-offs, and we compare the results with those obtained in the study of inflation by the holographic dark energy HDE model. In comparison, the spectrum of primordial scalar power spectrum in the LECHDE model becomes redder than the spectrum in the HDE model. Moreover, the consistency with the observational data in the LECHDE model of inflation constrains the reheating temperature and Hubble parameter by one parameter of holographic dark energy and two new parameters of logarithmic corrections.

  19. Dark energy and the quietness of the local Hubble flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axenides, M.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2002-06-01

    The linearity and quietness of the local (<10 Mpc) Hubble flow (LHF) in view of the very clumpy local universe is a long standing puzzle in standard and in open CDM (cold dark matter) cosmogony. The question addressed in this paper is whether the antigravity component of the recently discovered dark energy can cool the velocity flow enough to provide a solution to this puzzle. We calculate the growth of matter fluctuations in a flat universe containing a fraction ΩX(t0) of dark energy obeying the time independent equation of state pX=wρX. We find that dark energy can indeed cool the LHF. However the dark energy parameter values required to make the predicted velocity dispersion consistent with the observed value vrms~=40 km/s have been ruled out by other observational tests constraining the dark energy parameters w and ΩX. Therefore despite the claims of recent qualitative studies, dark energy with time independent equation of state cannot by itself explain the quietness and linearity of the local Hubble flow.

  20. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Beldica, Cristina; Bertin, Emmanuel; Dora Cai, Y.; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; Darnell, J.Anthony; Daues, Gregory E.; Jarvis, Michael; Gower, Michelle; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

    2008-07-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  1. EOS Directory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This Earth Observing System (EOS) directory is divided into two main sections: white and yellow pages. The white pages list alphabetically the names and addresses -- including e-mail, phone, and fax when available -- of all individuals involved with EOS, from graduate students to panel members to program management and more. The yellow pages list the names, affiliation, and phone number of participants divided by project management, program management, individual project participants, interdisciplinary investigations (listed alphabetically by PI), the Science Executive Committee, various panels, platforms, working groups, fellowships, and contractors.

  2. Dark matter and dark energy accretion on to intermediate-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, C.; Pellizza, L. J.; Romero, G. E.

    2012-03-01

    In this work we investigate the accretion of cosmological fluids on to an intermediate-mass black hole at the centre of a globular cluster, focusing on the influence of the parent stellar system on the accretion flow. We show that the accretion of cosmic background radiation and the so-called dark energy on to an intermediate-mass black hole is negligible. On the other hand, if cold dark matter has a non-vanishing pressure, the accretion of dark matter is large enough to increase the black hole mass well beyond the present observed upper limits. We conclude that either intermediate-mass black holes do not exist, or dark matter does not exist, or it is not strictly collisionless. In the latter case, we set a lower limit for the parameter of the cold dark matter equation of state.

  3. Observational Constraints of Red-shift Parametrization Parameters of Dark Energy in Horava-Lifshitz Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ritabrata; Debnath, Ujjal

    2015-02-01

    We have assumed that the FRW universe filled with baryonic matter, radiation and dark matter along with dark energy in the frame-work of Horava-Lifshitz gravity. Here three parameterizations like Linear, CPL and JBP for the dark energy have been assumed for the variations of EOS parameter w( z). The observational data analysis by χ 2 minimum test have been analyzed for our models. From Stern, Stern+BAO and Stern+BAO+CMB joint data analysis, we have obtained the bounds of the arbitrary parameters w 0 and w 1. The best fit values of the parameters w 0 and w 1 for these three models and the minimum values of χ 2 have been obtained by observational data analysis. Also the bounds of the parameters w 0 and w 1 are obtained by 66 %, 90 % and 99 % confidence levels for linear, CPL and JBP models. Next red shift-magnitude observational data points from type Ia supernovae have been considered and which contains 557 data points. From this observation, the distance modulus μ( z) against red shift z has been investigated for our predicted theoretical model (three DE models) for the best fit values of the parameters and the observed SNe Ia Union2 data sample. Finally, we have investigated that our predicted theoretical three models permitted the observational data sets.

  4. Evolution of density and velocity profiles of dark matter and dark energy in spherical voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Tsizh, Maksym; Kulinich, Yurij

    2017-02-01

    We analyse the evolution of cosmological perturbations which leads to the formation of large isolated voids in the Universe. We assume that initial perturbations are spherical and all components of the Universe (radiation, matter and dark energy) are continuous media with ideal fluid energy-momentum tensors, which interact only gravitationally. Equations of the evolution of perturbations for every component in the comoving to cosmological background reference frame are obtained from equations of energy and momentum conservation and Einstein's ones and are integrated numerically. Initial conditions are set at the early stage of evolution in the radiation-dominated epoch, when the scale of perturbation is much larger than the particle horizon. Results show how the profiles of density and velocity of matter and dark energy are formed and how they depend on parameters of dark energy and initial conditions. In particular, it is shown that final matter density and velocity amplitudes change within range ˜4-7 per cent when the value of equation-of-state parameter of dark energy w vary in the range from -0.8 to -1.2, and change within ˜1 per cent only when the value of effective sound speed of dark energy vary over all allowable range of its values.

  5. Searching for dark energy with matter wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The nature of dark energy, which makes up 70% of the mass-energy of the universe, remains completely unknown. Chameleons are a simple scalar model for dark energy that mediate a force which is screened by bulk matter. However we can now probe these scalar fields using atoms as nearly ideal test masses in the vacuum of our cavity-based matter wave interferometer. Our first measurements ruled out a range of chameleons that would reproduce the observed cosmic acceleration. Since then we have improved sensitivity by a factor of 100. With a similar future improvement, we will be sensitive to any possible chameleon field and other exotic models for dark energy and dark matter, such as symmetrons or f(R) gravity.

  6. Model selection as a science driver for dark energy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano; Liddle, Andrew R.; Kunz, Martin

    2006-07-01

    A key science goal of upcoming dark energy surveys is to seek time-evolution of the dark energy. This problem is one of model selection, where the aim is to differentiate between cosmological models with different numbers of parameters. However, the power of these surveys is traditionally assessed by estimating their ability to constrain parameters, which is a different statistical problem. In this paper, we use Bayesian model selection techniques, specifically forecasting of the Bayes factors, to compare the abilities of different proposed surveys in discovering dark energy evolution. We consider six experiments - supernova luminosity measurements by the Supernova Legacy Survey, SNAP, JEDI and ALPACA, and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements by WFMOS and JEDI - and use Bayes factor plots to compare their statistical constraining power. The concept of Bayes factor forecasting has much broader applicability than dark energy surveys.

  7. Dark Energy Drives Vibrating Atoms, Chain reactions, Etc.:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sven, Charles

    2010-03-01

    The 14 billion year old atom - destroyed Hiroshima, vibrates at a 100 trillion times/sec, emanates photons at the speed of light, contains atom sized proton force field that attracts electrons, all driven by ``Dark Energy.'' This ageless atom's superpowerful requirements, must be supplied from a huge, external, super high-frequency, super-cooled, ``Dark Energy field,'' undetected by current technology, existing for 14+ billion years without degradation. Demonstrating this age-old atom's ``dark energy'' power source requires the synthesis of a number of elements, forces, observations and experiments, many of which are combined in novel but only in replicable venues. Solution includes ``Dark Energy'' participation in celestial observations. Expanded excerpt from my presentation at: the American Physical Society's April meeting in Denver 2009 Section T8: Cosmology

  8. Consequences of dark matter-dark energy interaction on cosmological parameters derived from type Ia supernova data

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, Luca; Campos, Gabriela Camargo; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2007-04-15

    Models where the dark matter component of the Universe interacts with the dark energy field have been proposed as a solution to the cosmic coincidence problem, since in the attractor regime both dark energy and dark matter scale in the same way. In these models the mass of the cold dark matter particles is a function of the dark energy field responsible for the present acceleration of the Universe, and different scenarios can be parametrized by how the mass of the cold dark matter particles evolves with time. In this article we study the impact of a constant coupling {delta} between dark energy and dark matter on the determination of a redshift dependent dark energy equation of state w{sub DE}(z) and on the dark matter density today from SNIa data. We derive an analytical expression for the luminosity distance in this case. In particular, we show that the presence of such a coupling increases the tension between the cosmic microwave background data from the analysis of the shift parameter in models with constant w{sub DE} and SNIa data for realistic values of the present dark matter density fraction. Thus, an independent measurement of the present dark matter density can place constraints on models with interacting dark energy.

  9. Dark matter and dark energy interactions: theoretical challenges, cosmological implications and observational signatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Abdalla, E; Atrio-Barandela, F; Pavón, D

    2016-09-01

    Models where dark matter and dark energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector.

  10. Dark matter and dark energy interactions: theoretical challenges, cosmological implications and observational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Abdalla, E.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Pavón, D.

    2016-09-01

    Models where dark matter and dark energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector.

  11. What do we really know about dark energy?

    PubMed

    Durrer, Ruth

    2011-12-28

    In this paper, we discuss what we truly know about dark energy. I shall argue that, to date, our single indication for the existence of dark energy comes from distance measurements and their relation to redshift. Supernovae, cosmic microwave background anisotropies and observations of baryon acoustic oscillations simply tell us that the observed distance to a given redshift z is larger than the one expected from a Friedmann-Lemaître universe with matter only and the locally measured Hubble parameter.

  12. Cosmological degeneracy versus cosmography: A cosmographic dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Orlando; Pisani, Giovanni Battista; Troisi, Antonio

    In this work, we use cosmography to alleviate the degeneracy among cosmological models, proposing a way to parametrize matter and dark energy in terms of cosmokinematics quantities. The recipe of using cosmography allows to expand observable quantities in Taylor series and to directly compare those expansions with data. The strategy involves the expansions of q and j, up to the second-order around a(t) = 1. This includes additional cosmographic parameters which are fixed by current values of q0 and j0. We therefore propose a fully self-consistent parametrization of the total energy density driving the late-time universe speed up. This stratagem does not remove all the degeneracy but enables one to pass from the model-dependent couple of coefficients, ω0 and Ωm,0, to model-independent quantities determined from cosmography. Afterwards, we describe a feasible cosmographic dark energy model, in which matter is fixed whereas dark energy evolves by means of the cosmographic series. Our technique provides robust constraints on cosmokinematic parameters, permitting one to separately bound matter from dark energy densities. Our cosmographic dark energy model turns out to be one parameter only, but differently from the lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) paradigm, it does not contain ansatz on the dark energy form. In addition, we even determine the free parameter of our model in suitable 1σ intervals through Monte Carlo analyses based on the Metropolis algorithm. We compare our results with the standard concordance model and we find that our treatment seems to indicate that dark energy slightly evolves in time, reducing to a pure cosmological constant only as z → 0.

  13. Cosmology with massive neutrinos coupled to dark energy.

    PubMed

    Brookfield, A W; van de Bruck, C; Mota, D F; Tocchini-Valentini, D

    2006-02-17

    Cosmological consequences of a coupling between massive neutrinos and dark energy are investigated. In such models, the neutrino mass is a function of a scalar field, which plays the role of dark energy. The evolution of the background and cosmological perturbations are discussed. We find that mass-varying neutrinos can leave a significant imprint on the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background and even lead to a reduction of power on large angular scales.

  14. New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

    2016-07-12

    A panel of Lab scientists — including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering — along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

  15. New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

    2011-04-25

    A panel of Lab scientists — including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering — along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

  16. Interacting warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo E-mail: guillermo.palma@usach.cl E-mail: avelino@fisica.ugto.mx

    2013-05-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ{sub m}{sup α}ρ{sub e}{sup β} form, where ρ{sub m} and ρ{sub e} are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w{sub m} and w{sub e} of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used.

  17. Reconstruction of dark energy and expansion dynamics using Gaussian processes

    SciTech Connect

    Seikel, Marina; Clarkson, Chris; Smith, Mathew E-mail: chris.clarkson@uct.ac.za

    2012-06-01

    An important issue in cosmology is reconstructing the effective dark energy equation of state directly from observations. With few physically motivated models, future dark energy studies cannot only be based on constraining a dark energy parameter space, as the errors found depend strongly on the parametrisation considered. We present a new non-parametric approach to reconstructing the history of the expansion rate and dark energy using Gaussian Processes, which is a fully Bayesian approach for smoothing data. We present a pedagogical introduction to Gaussian Processes, and discuss how it can be used to robustly differentiate data in a suitable way. Using this method we show that the Dark Energy Survey - Supernova Survey (DES) can accurately recover a slowly evolving equation of state to σ{sub w} = ±0.05 (95% CL) at z = 0 and ±0.25 at z = 0.7, with a minimum error of ±0.025 at the sweet-spot at z ∼ 0.16, provided the other parameters of the model are known. Errors on the expansion history are an order of magnitude smaller, yet make no assumptions about dark energy whatsoever. A code for calculating functions and their first three derivatives using Gaussian processes has been developed and is available for download.

  18. Comparison of dark energy models after Planck 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue-Yao; Zhang, Xin

    2016-11-01

    We make a comparison for ten typical, popular dark energy models according to their capabilities of fitting the current observational data. The observational data we use in this work include the JLA sample of type Ia supernovae observation, the Planck 2015 distance priors of cosmic microwave background observation, the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, and the direct measurement of the Hubble constant. Since the models have different numbers of parameters, in order to make a fair comparison, we employ the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria to assess the worth of the models. The analysis results show that, according to the capability of explaining observations, the cosmological constant model is still the best one among all the dark energy models. The generalized Chaplygin gas model, the constant w model, and the α dark energy model are worse than the cosmological constant model, but still are good models compared to others. The holographic dark energy model, the new generalized Chaplygin gas model, and the Chevalliear-Polarski-Linder model can still fit the current observations well, but from an economically feasible perspective, they are not so good. The new agegraphic dark energy model, the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model, and the Ricci dark energy model are excluded by the current observations.

  19. Coupled dark matter-dark energy in light of near universe observations

    SciTech Connect

    Honorez, Laura Lopez; Mena, Olga E-mail: beth.ann.reid@gmail.com E-mail: liciaverde@gmail.com

    2010-09-01

    Cosmological analysis based on currently available observations are unable to rule out a sizeable coupling among the dark energy and dark matter fluids. We explore a variety of coupled dark matter-dark energy models, which satisfy cosmic microwave background constraints, in light of low redshift and near universe observations. We illustrate the phenomenology of different classes of dark coupling models, paying particular attention in distinguishing between effects that appear only on the expansion history and those that appear in the growth of structure. We find that while a broad class of dark coupling models are effectively models where general relativity (GR) is modified — and thus can be probed by a combination of tests for the expansion history and the growth of structure —, there is a class of dark coupling models where gravity is still GR, but the growth of perturbations is, in principle modified. While this effect is small in the specific models we have considered, one should bear in mind that an inconsistency between reconstructed expansion history and growth may not uniquely indicate deviations from GR. Our low redshift constraints arise from cosmic velocities, redshift space distortions and dark matter abundance in galaxy voids. We find that current data constrain the dimensionless coupling to be |ξ| < 0.2, but prospects from forthcoming data are for a significant improvement. Future, precise measurements of the Hubble constant, combined with high-precision constraints on the growth of structure, could provide the key to rule out dark coupling models which survive other tests. We shall exploit as well weak equivalence principle violation arguments, which have the potential to highly disfavour a broad family of coupled models.

  20. The abnormally weighting energy hypothesis: the missing link between dark matter and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Alimi, J-M; Fuezfa, A E-mail: andre.fuzfa@fundp.ac.be

    2008-09-15

    We generalize tensor-scalar theories of gravitation by the introduction of an 'abnormally weighting' type of energy. This theory of tensor-scalar anomalous gravity is based on a relaxation of the weak equivalence principle that is currently restricted to ordinary visible matter only. As a consequence, the mechanism of convergence toward general relativity is modified and produces cosmic acceleration naturally as an inescapable gravitational feedback induced by the mass variation of some invisible sector. The cosmological implications of this new theoretical framework are studied. From the Hubble diagram cosmological test alone, this theory provides estimates of the amount of baryons and dark matter in the Universe that are consistent with the independent cosmological tests of the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. Cosmic coincidence is naturally achieved from an equally natural assumption on the amplitude of the scalar coupling strength. Finally, from the adequacy for supernovae data, we derive a new intriguing relation between the space-time dependences of the gravitational coupling and the dark matter mass, providing an example of a crucial constraint on microphysics from cosmology. This provides glimpses of an enticing new symmetry between the visible and invisible sectors, namely that the scalar charges of visible and invisible matter are exactly opposite.

  1. Ghost Dark Energy with Non-Linear Interaction Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, E.

    2016-06-01

    Here we investigate ghost dark energy (GDE) in the presence of a non-linear interaction term between dark matter and dark energy. To this end we take into account a general form for the interaction term. Then we discuss about different features of three choices of the non-linear interacting GDE. In all cases we obtain equation of state parameter, w D = p/ ρ, the deceleration parameter and evolution equation of the dark energy density parameter (Ω D ). We find that in one case, w D cross the phantom line ( w D < -1). However in two other classes w D can not cross the phantom divide. The coincidence problem can be solved in these models completely and there exist good agreement between the models and observational values of w D , q. We study squared sound speed {vs2}, and find that for one case of non-linear interaction term {vs2} can achieves positive values at late time of evolution.

  2. Interacting quintom dark energy with Nonminimal Derivative Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrouz, Noushin; Nozari, Kourosh; Rashidi, Narges

    2017-03-01

    Following our recent work on interacting dark energy models (Nozari and Behrouz, 2016), we study cosmological dynamics of an extended dark energy model in which gravity is non-minimally coupled to the derivatives of a quintessence and a phantom field in a quintom model. There is also a phenomenological interaction between the dark energy and dark matter components. By considering an exponential potential as a self-interaction potential for quintom model, we obtain a scaling solution to alleviate the coincidence problem. The existence and stability of the critical points are discussed in details and it has been shown that in this setup the universe experiences a phantom divide crossing. We compare the model with recent observational data and find some constraints on the model's parameters. We investigate also perturbations around the homogeneous and isotropic background in our Nonminimal Derivative Coupling (NMDC) quintom model.

  3. Interacting ghost dark energy models with variable G and Λ

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J.; Farahani, H.; Khurshudyan, M.; Movsisyan, A. E-mail: martiros.khurshudyan@nano.cnr.it E-mail: h.farahani@umz.ac.ir

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we consider several phenomenological models of variable Λ. Model of a flat Universe with variable Λ and G is accepted. It is well known, that varying G and Λ gives rise to modified field equations and modified conservation laws, which gives rise to many different manipulations and assumptions in literature. We will consider two component fluid, which parameters will enter to Λ. Interaction between fluids with energy densities ρ{sub 1} and ρ{sub 2} assumed as Q = 3Hb(ρ{sub 1}+ρ{sub 2}). We have numerical analyze of important cosmological parameters like EoS parameter of the composed fluid and deceleration parameter q of the model.

  4. Agegraphic dark energy: growth index and cosmological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekjani, M.; Basilakos, S.; Mehrabi, A.; Davari, Z.; Rezaei, M.

    2017-01-01

    We study the main cosmological properties of the agegraphic dark energy model at the expansion and perturbation levels. Initially, using the latest cosmological data, we implement a joint likelihood analysis in order to constrain the cosmological parameters. Then, we test the performance of the agegraphic dark energy model at the perturbation level and we define its difference from the usual Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. Within this context, we verify that the growth index of matter fluctuations depends on the choice of the considered agegraphic dark energy (homogeneous or clustered). In particular, assuming a homogeneous agegraphic dark energy, we find, for the first time, that the asymptotic value of the growth index is γ ≈ 5/9, which is close to that of the usual Λ cosmology, γ(Λ) ≈ 6/11. Finally, if the distribution of dark energy is clustered, then we obtain γ ≈ 1/2 which is ˜8 per cent smaller than that of the ΛCDM model.

  5. Testing the interaction between dark energy and dark matter with H(z) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pan; Li, Li; Shuo, Cao; Na-na, Pan; Yi, Zhang; Zi-xuan, Hu

    2016-04-01

    With the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we constrain an interactive dark energy model by combing the up-to-date observational data of Hubble parameter H(z) with the 7-year baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data observed by the Planck satellite. Under the joint constraint of the three kinds of data, the best-fit values of the model parameters and their 1-σ errors are obtained as follows: the energy density Ωm =0.266-0.028+0.028 (1 σ) , the interaction factor γ =0.090-0.098+0.100 (1 σ) , the parameter of state equation of dark matter wX = -1.307-0.269+0.263 (1 σ) , and the Hubble Constant H0 =7420-4.56+4.66 (1 σ) , where the coupling parameter γ > 0 means that the energy is transferred from dark matter to dark energy, and the coincidence problem in the Lambda-Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) model is slightly alleviated in the 1σ range. For comparisons, we constrain the same model with the BAO+CMB observations and H(z) data separately. The results are as follows: (1) The H(z) data could put stricter constraint on the parameter γ than the BAO+CMB observations. (2) The ΛCDM model is best fitted, and the coupling parameter γ is correlated with parameters Ωm and H0. (3) The inconsistency of the constraint results of H0 between the local distance ladder measurements and the Planck observations can be alleviated after taking account of the interaction between dark energy and dark matter.

  6. Precessing supermassive black hole binaries and dark energy measurements with LISA

    SciTech Connect

    Stavridis, Adamantios; Arun, K. G.; Will, Clifford M.

    2009-09-15

    Spin induced precessional modulations of gravitational wave signals from supermassive black hole binaries can improve the estimation of luminosity distance to the source by space based gravitational wave missions like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). We study how this impacts the ability of LISA to do cosmology, specifically, to measure the dark energy equation of state (EOS) parameter w. Using the {lambda}CDM model of cosmology, we show that observations of precessing binaries with mass ratio 10 ratio 1 by LISA, combined with a redshift measurement, can improve the determination of w up to an order of magnitude with respect to the nonprecessing case depending on the total mass and the redshift.

  7. EOS workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, Franz; Karspeck, Milan; Millot, Michel; Maurice, Kelly; Jackson, Matt

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work done from mid-1989 until January 1992 to develop a prototype set of tools for the analysis of EOS-type images. Such images are characterized by great multiplicity and quantity. A single 'snapshot' of EOS-type imagery may contain several hundred component images so that on a particular pixel, one finds multiple gray values. A prototype EOS-sensor, AVIRIS, has 224 gray values at each pixel. The work focused on the ability to utilize very large images and continuously roam through those images, zoom and be able to hold more than one black and white or color image, for example for stereo viewing or for image comparisons. A second focus was the utilization of so-called 'image cubes', where multiple images need to be co-registered and then jointly analyzed, viewed, and manipulated. The target computer platform that was selected was a high-performance graphics superworkstation, Stardent 3000. This particular platform offered many particular graphics tools such as the Application Visualization System (AVS) or Dore, but it missed availability of commercial third-party software for relational data bases, image processing, etc. The project was able to cope with these limitations and a phase-3 activity is currently being negotiated to port the software and enhance it for use with a novel graphics superworkstation to be introduced into the market in the Spring of 1993.

  8. A Possible Connection Between Dark Energy And the Hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin; Gu, Je-An; /NCTS, Hsinchu

    2007-11-16

    Recently it was suggested that the dark energy maybe related to the well-known hierarchy between the Planck scale ({approx} 10{sup 19} GeV) and the TeV scale. The same brane-world setup to address this hierarchy problem may also in principle address the smallness problem of dark energy. Specifically, the Planck-SM hierarchy ratio was viewed as a quantum gravity-related, dimensionless fine structure constant where various physical energy scales in the system are associated with the Planck mass through different powers of the 'gravity fine structure constant'. In this paper we provide a toy model based on the Randall-Sundrum geometry where SUSY-breaking is induced by the coupling between a SUSY-breaking Higgs field on the brane and the KK gravitinos. We show that the associated Casimir energy density indeed conforms with the dark energy scale.

  9. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS: Dark energy and universal antigravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.

    2008-03-01

    Universal antigravitation, a new physical phenomenon discovered astronomically at distances of 5 to 8 billion light years, manifests itself as cosmic repulsion that acts between distant galaxies and overcomes their gravitational attraction, resulting in the accelerating expansion of the Universe. The source of the antigravitation is not galaxies or any other bodies of nature but a previously unknown form of mass/energy that has been termed dark energy. Dark energy accounts for 70 to 80% of the total mass and energy of the Universe and, in macroscopic terms, is a kind of continuous medium that fills the entire space of the Universe and is characterized by positive density and negative pressure. With its physical nature and microscopic structure unknown, dark energy is among the most critical challenges fundamental science faces in the twenty-first century.

  10. Differentiating dark energy and modified gravity with galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun

    2008-05-01

    The observed cosmic acceleration today could be due to an unknown energy component (dark energy), or a modification to general relativity (modified gravity). If dark energy models and modified gravity models are required to predict the same cosmic expansion history H(z), they will predict different growth rates for cosmic large scale structure, fg(z). If gravity is not modified, the measured H(z) leads to a unique prediction for fg(z), fgH(z), if dark energy and dark matter are separate. Comparing fgH(z) with the measured fg(z) provides a transparent and straightforward test of gravity. We show that a simple χ2 test provides a general figure of merit for our ability to distinguish between dark energy and modified gravity given the measured H(z) and fg(z). We find that a magnitude-limited NIR galaxy redshift survey covering >10 000 (deg)2 and a redshift range of 0.5dark energy model that predict the same H(z), a survey area of 11 931 (deg)2 is required to rule out the DGP gravity model at the 99.99% confidence level. It is feasible for such a galaxy redshift survey to be carried out by the next generation space missions from NASA and ESA, and it will revolutionize our understanding of the universe by differentiating between dark energy and modified gravity.

  11. Testing coupled dark energy models with their cosmological background evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Mifsud, Jurgen; Morrice, Jack

    2017-02-01

    We consider a cosmology in which dark matter and a quintessence scalar field responsible for the acceleration of the Universe are allowed to interact. Allowing for both conformal and disformal couplings, we perform a global analysis of the constraints on our model using Hubble parameter measurements, baryon acoustic oscillation distance measurements, and a Supernovae Type Ia data set. We find that the additional disformal coupling relaxes the conformal coupling constraints. Moreover, we show that, at the background level, a disformal interaction within the dark sector is preferred to both Λ CDM and uncoupled quintessence, hence favoring interacting dark energy.

  12. Inflation, Bifurcations of Nonlinear Curvature Lagrangians and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.; Kusmartsev, Fjodor V.; Schunck, Franz E.

    2008-09-01

    A possible equivalence of scalar dark matter, the inflaton, and modified gravity is analyzed. After a conformal mapping, the dependence of the effective Lagrangian on the curvature is not only singular but also bifurcates into several almost Einsteinian spaces, distinguished only by a different effective gravitational strength and cosmological constant. A swallow tail catastrophe in the bifurcation set indicates the possibility for the coexistence of different Einsteinian domains in our Universe. This 'triple unification' may shed new light on the nature and large scale distribution not only of dark matter but also on 'dark energy', regarded as an effective cosmological constant, and inflation.

  13. Exacerbating the Cosmological Constant Problem with Interacting Dark Energy Models.

    PubMed

    Marsh, M C David

    2017-01-06

    Future cosmological surveys will probe the expansion history of the Universe and constrain phenomenological models of dark energy. Such models do not address the fine-tuning problem of the vacuum energy, i.e., the cosmological constant problem (CCP), but can make it spectacularly worse. We show that this is the case for "interacting dark energy" models in which the masses of the dark matter states depend on the dark energy sector. If realized in nature, these models have far-reaching implications for proposed solutions to the CCP that require the number of vacua to exceed the fine-tuning of the vacuum energy density. We show that current estimates of the number of flux vacua in string theory, N_{vac}∼O(10^{272 000}), are far too small to realize certain simple models of interacting dark energy and solve the cosmological constant problem anthropically. These models admit distinctive observational signatures that can be targeted by future gamma-ray observatories, hence making it possible to observationally rule out the anthropic solution to the cosmological constant problem in theories with a finite number of vacua.

  14. Phenomenology of hybrid scenarios of neutrino dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Dutta, Koushik; Das, Subinoy E-mail: subinoy@nyu.edu

    2008-10-15

    We study the phenomenology of hybrid scenarios of neutrino dark energy, where in addition to a so-called mass-varying neutrino (MaVaN) sector a cosmological constant (from a false vacuum) is driving the accelerated expansion of the universe today. For general power law potentials we calculate the effective equation of state parameter w{sub eff}(z) in terms of the neutrino mass scale. Due to the interaction of the dark energy field ('acceleron') with the neutrino sector, w{sub eff}(z) is predicted to become smaller than -1 for z>0, which could be tested in future cosmological observations. For the scenarios considered, the neutrino mass scale additionally determines which fraction of the dark energy is dynamical, and which originates from the 'cosmological-constant-like' vacuum energy of the false vacuum. On the other hand, the field value of the 'acceleron' field today as well as the masses of the right-handed neutrinos, which appear in the seesaw-type mechanism for small neutrino masses, are not fixed. This, in principle, allows us to realize hybrid scenarios of neutrino dark energy with a 'high-scale' seesaw where the right-handed neutrino masses are close to the GUT scale. We also comment on how MaVaN hybrid scenarios with 'high-scale' seesaw might help to resolve stability problems of dark energy models with non-relativistic neutrinos.

  15. Exacerbating the Cosmological Constant Problem with Interacting Dark Energy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, M. C. David

    2017-01-01

    Future cosmological surveys will probe the expansion history of the Universe and constrain phenomenological models of dark energy. Such models do not address the fine-tuning problem of the vacuum energy, i.e., the cosmological constant problem (CCP), but can make it spectacularly worse. We show that this is the case for "interacting dark energy" models in which the masses of the dark matter states depend on the dark energy sector. If realized in nature, these models have far-reaching implications for proposed solutions to the CCP that require the number of vacua to exceed the fine-tuning of the vacuum energy density. We show that current estimates of the number of flux vacua in string theory, Nvac˜O (1 0272 000) , are far too small to realize certain simple models of interacting dark energy and solve the cosmological constant problem anthropically. These models admit distinctive observational signatures that can be targeted by future gamma-ray observatories, hence making it possible to observationally rule out the anthropic solution to the cosmological constant problem in theories with a finite number of vacua.

  16. Unified dark energy and dark matter from a scalar field different from quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David

    2010-02-15

    We explore unification of dark matter and dark energy in a theory containing a scalar field of non-Lagrangian type, obtained by direct insertion of a kinetic term into the energy-momentum tensor. This scalar is different from quintessence, having an equation of state between -1 and 0 and a zero sound speed in its rest frame. We solve the equations of motion for an exponential potential via a rewriting as an autonomous system, and demonstrate the observational viability of the scenario, for sufficiently small exponential potential parameter {lambda}, by comparison to a compilation of kinematical cosmological data.

  17. Chandra Opens New Line of Investigation on Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    Astronomers have detected and probed dark energy by applying a powerful, new method that uses images of galaxy clusters made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The results trace the transition of the expansion of the Universe from a decelerating to an accelerating phase several billion years ago, and give intriguing clues about the nature of dark energy and the fate of the Universe. "Dark energy is perhaps the biggest mystery in physics," said Steve Allen of the Institute of Astronomy (IoA) at the University of Cambridge in England, and leader of the study. "As such, it is extremely important to make an independent test of its existence and properties." Abell 2029 Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 2029 Allen and his colleagues used Chandra to study 26 clusters of galaxies at distances corresponding to light travel times of between one and eight billion years. These data span the time when the Universe slowed from its original expansion, before speeding up again because of the repulsive effect of dark energy. "We're directly seeing that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating by measuring the distances to these galaxy clusters," said Andy Fabian also of the IoA, a co-author on the study. The new Chandra results suggest that the dark energy density does not change quickly with time and may even be constant, consistent with the "cosmological constant" concept first introduced by Albert Einstein. If so, the Universe is expected to continue expanding forever, so that in many billions of years only a tiny fraction of the known galaxies will be observable. More Animations Animation of the "Big Rip" If the dark energy density is constant, more dramatic fates for the Universe would be avoided. These include the "Big Rip," where dark energy increases until galaxies, stars, planets and eventually atoms are eventually torn apart. The "Big Crunch," where the Universe eventually collapses on itself, would also be ruled out. Chandra's probe of dark energy relies on the unique

  18. Holographic Ricci dark energy: Current observational constraints, quintom feature, and the reconstruction of scalar-field dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xin

    2009-05-15

    In this work, we consider the cosmological constraints on the holographic Ricci dark energy proposed by Gao et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 043511 (2009)], by using the observational data currently available. The main characteristic of holographic Ricci dark energy is governed by a positive numerical parameter {alpha} in the model. When {alpha}<1/2, the holographic Ricci dark energy will exhibit a quintomlike behavior; i.e., its equation of state will evolve across the cosmological-constant boundary w=-1. The parameter {alpha} can be determined only by observations. Thus, in order to characterize the evolving feature of dark energy and to predict the fate of the Universe, it is of extraordinary importance to constrain the parameter {alpha} by using the observational data. In this paper, we derive constraints on the holographic Ricci dark energy model from the latest observational data including the Union sample of 307 type Ia supernovae, the shift parameter of the cosmic microwave background given by the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, and the baryon acoustic oscillation measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The joint analysis gives the best-fit results (with 1{sigma} uncertainty): {alpha}=0.359{sub -0.025}{sup +0.024} and {omega}{sub m0}=0.318{sub -0.024}{sup +0.026}. That is to say, according to the observations, the holographic Ricci dark energy takes on the quintom feature. Finally, in light of the results of the cosmological constraints, we discuss the issue of the scalar-field dark energy reconstruction, based on the scenario of the holographic Ricci vacuum energy.

  19. Higgs seesaw mechanism as a source for dark energy.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Lawrence M; Dent, James B

    2013-08-09

    Motivated by the seesaw mechanism for neutrinos which naturally generates small neutrino masses, we explore how a small grand-unified-theory-scale mixing between the standard model Higgs boson and an otherwise massless hidden sector scalar can naturally generate a small mass and vacuum expectation value for the new scalar which produces a false vacuum energy density contribution comparable to that of the observed dark energy dominating the current expansion of the Universe. This provides a simple and natural mechanism for producing the correct scale for dark energy, even if it does not address the long-standing question of why much larger dark energy contributions are not produced from the visible sector. The new scalar produces no discernible signatures in existing terrestrial experiments so that one may have to rely on other cosmological tests of this idea.

  20. Higgs Seesaw Mechanism as a Source for Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Lawrence M.; Dent, James B.

    2013-08-01

    Motivated by the seesaw mechanism for neutrinos which naturally generates small neutrino masses, we explore how a small grand-unified-theory-scale mixing between the standard model Higgs boson and an otherwise massless hidden sector scalar can naturally generate a small mass and vacuum expectation value for the new scalar which produces a false vacuum energy density contribution comparable to that of the observed dark energy dominating the current expansion of the Universe. This provides a simple and natural mechanism for producing the correct scale for dark energy, even if it does not address the long-standing question of why much larger dark energy contributions are not produced from the visible sector. The new scalar produces no discernible signatures in existing terrestrial experiments so that one may have to rely on other cosmological tests of this idea.

  1. Fundamentalist physics: why Dark Energy is bad for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Simon D. M.

    2007-06-01

    Astronomers carry out observations to explore the diverse processes and objects which populate our Universe. High-energy physicists carry out experiments to approach the Fundamental Theory underlying space, time and matter. Dark Energy is a unique link between them, reflecting deep aspects of the Fundamental Theory, yet apparently accessible only through astronomical observation. Large sections of the two communities have therefore converged in support of astronomical projects to constrain Dark Energy. In this essay I argue that this convergence can be damaging for astronomy. The two communities have different methodologies and different scientific cultures. By uncritically adopting the values of an alien system, astronomers risk undermining the foundations of their own current success and endangering the future vitality of their field. Dark Energy is undeniably an interesting problem to tackle through astronomical observation, but it is one of many and not necessarily the one where significant progress is most likely to follow a major investment of resources.

  2. Coincidence problem in YM field dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Yang

    2006-09-01

    The coincidence problem is studied in the effective Yang Mills condensate dark energy model. As the effective YM Lagrangian is completely determined by quantum field theory, there is no adjustable parameter in this model except the energy scale, and the cosmic evolution only depends on the initial conditions. For generic initial conditions with the YM condensate subdominant to the radiation and matter, the model always has a tracking solution, the Universe transits from matter-dominated into the dark energy dominated stage only recently z˜0.3, and evolve to the present state with Ω˜0.73 and Ω˜0.27.

  3. A possible connection between massive fermions and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Terrance; Stephenson, G J; Alsing, P M; Mckellar, B H J

    2009-01-01

    In a dense cloud of massive fermions interacting by exchange of a light scalar field, the effective mass of the fermion can become negligibly small. As the cloud expands, the effective mass and the total energy density eventually increase with decreasing density. In this regime, the pressure-density relation can approximate that required for dark energy. They apply this phenomenon to the expansion of the Universe with a very light scalar field and infer relations between the parameters available and cosmological observations. Majorana neutrinos at a mass that may have been recently determined, and fermions such as the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) may both be consistent with current observations of dark energy.

  4. In Theory: Dark Energy as a Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Russell, David; Tangmatitham, Matipon

    2017-01-01

    In theory, it is possible to use the dark energy of the universe as a power source. In practice, the amount of energy that could be liberated in a local setting is many orders of magnitude too small to be useful or even detectable. Nevertheless, in the interests of education and amusement, simple machines that could, in theory, extract local power from the gravitationally repulsive cosmological constant are discussed. The gravitational neutral buoyancy distance -- the distance where local Newtonian gravity balances cosmological dark energy in a concordance cosmology -- is computed between two point objects of low mass.

  5. Nonparametric reconstruction of the dark energy equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Heitmann, Katrin; Holsclaw, Tracy; Alam, Ujjaini; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David; Sanso, Bruno; Lee, Herbie

    2009-01-01

    The major aim of ongoing and upcoming cosmological surveys is to unravel the nature of dark energy. In the absence of a compelling theory to test, a natural approach is to first attempt to characterize the nature of dark energy in detail, the hope being that this will lead to clues about the underlying fundamental theory. A major target in this characterization is the determination of the dynamical properties of the dark energy equation of state w. The discovery of a time variation in w(z) could then lead to insights about the dynamical origin of dark energy. This approach requires a robust and bias-free method for reconstructing w(z) from data, which does not rely on restrictive expansion schemes or assumed functional forms for w(z). We present a new non parametric reconstruction method for the dark energy equation of state based on Gaussian Process models. This method reliably captures nontrivial behavior of w(z) and provides controlled error bounds. We demollstrate the power of the method on different sets of simulated supernova data. The GP model approach is very easily extended to include diverse cosmological probes.

  6. Interacting Generalized Ghost Dark Energy in Non-isotropic Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the generalized Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) ghost model of dark energy in the framework of Einstein gravity is investigated. At first, the non-interacting generalized ghost dark energy in a Bianchi type I (BI) background is discussed. Then the equation of state parameter, ω D = p D / ρ D , the deceleration parameter, and the evolution equation of the generalized ghost dark energy are obtained. It was found that, in this case, ω D cannot cross the phantom line (ω D >-1) and eventually the universe approaches a de-Sitter phase of expansion (ω D →-1). Then, this investigation was extended to the interacting ghost dark energy in a non-isotropic universe. It was found that the equation of state parameter of the interacting generalized ghost dark energy can cross the phantom line (ω D <-1) provided the parameters of the model are chosen suitably. It was considered a specific model which permits the standard continuity equation in this theory. Besides ΩΛ and Ω m in standard Einstein cosmology, another density parameter, Ω σ , is expected by the anisotropy. The anisotropy of the universe decreases and the universe transits to an isotropic flat FRW universe accommodating the present acceleration.

  7. Thermodynamics of Interacting new Agegraphic Dark Energy and Dark Matter Due to Bianchi Type I Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossienkhani, Hossien

    2016-11-01

    We study a thermodynamical description of the interaction between new agegraphic dark energy (NADE) and dark matter (DM) in an anisotropic universe. We find expressions for the entropy changes of these dark energy (DE) candidates. In addition, considering thermal fluctuations, thermodynamics of the DE component interacting with a DM sector is addressed. We also show that if one wants to solve the coincidence problem by using this mutual interaction, then the coupling constants of the interaction will be constrained. Finally, we obtain a physical expression for the interaction which is consistent with phenomenological descriptions and passes reasonably well the observational tests. Our study shows that, with the local equilibrium assumption, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

  8. Matter power spectra in dynamical dark energy cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedeli, C.; Dolag, K.; Moscardini, L.

    2012-01-01

    We used a suite of numerical cosmological simulations in order to investigate the effect of gas cooling and star formation on the large-scale matter distribution. The simulations follow the formation of cosmic structures in five different dark energy models: the fiducial Λcold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology and four models where the dark energy density is allowed to have a non-trivial redshift evolution. Each simulation includes a variety of gas physics, ranging from radiative cooling to UV heating and supernova feedback [although the active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback is not incorporated]. Moreover, for each cosmology we have a control run with dark matter only, in order to allow a direct assessment of the effect of baryonic processes. We found that the power spectra of gas and stars, as well as the total matter power spectrum, are in qualitative agreement with the results of previous works not including the AGN effects in the framework of the fiducial model, although several quantitative differences exist. We used the physically motivated halo model in order to investigate the backreaction of gas and stars on the dark matter distribution, finding that it is very well reproduced by simply increasing the average dark matter halo concentration by 17 per cent, irrespective of the mass. This is in agreement with the cooling of gas dragging dark matter in the very centre of haloes, as well as adiabatic contraction steepening the relative potential wells. Moving to model universes dominated by dynamical dark energy, it turns out that they introduce a specific signature on the power spectra of the various matter components, which is qualitatively independent of the exact cosmology considered. This generic shape is well captured by the halo model if we blindly consider the cosmology dependences of the halo mass function, bias and concentration. However, the details of the dark matter power spectrum can be precisely captured only at the cost of a few slight

  9. Precision Photometry to Study the Nature of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Schubnell, Michael

    2011-01-30

    Over the past decade scientists have collected convincing evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, leading to the conclusion that the content of our universe is dominated by a mysterious 'dark energy'. The fact that present theory cannot account for the dark energy has made the determination of the nature of dark energy central to the field of high energy physics. It is expected that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics is required to fully understand the accelerating universe. Discovering the nature of dark energy is a very difficult task, and requires experiments that employ a combination of different observational techniques, such as type-Ia supernovae, gravitational weak lensing surveys, galaxy and galaxy cluster surveys, and baryon acoustic oscillations. A critical component of any approach to understanding the nature of dark energy is precision photometry. This report addresses just that. Most dark energy missions will require photometric calibration over a wide range of intensities using standardized stars and internal reference sources. All of the techniques proposed for these missions rely on a complete understanding of the linearity of the detectors. The technical report focuses on the investigation and characterization of 'reciprocity failure', a newly discovered count-rate dependent nonlinearity in the NICMOS cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope. In order to quantify reciprocity failure for modern astronomical detectors, we built a dedicated reciprocity test setup that produced a known amount of light on a detector, and to measured its response as a function of light intensity and wavelength.

  10. Constraining the Runaway Dilaton and Quintessential Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Ishwaree P.; Trowland, Holly

    Dark energy is some of the weirdest and most mysterious stuff in the universe that tends to increase the rate of expansion of the universe. Two commonly known forms of dark energy are the cosmological constant, a constant energy density filling space homogeneously, and scalar fields such as quintessence or moduli whose energy density can vary with time. We explore one particular model for dynamic dark energy: quintessence driven by a scalar dilaton field. We propose an ansatz for the form of the dilaton field, |ϕ(a)|mP ≡ α1 ln t + α2tn = α ln a + βa2ζ, where a is the scale factor and α and ζ are parameters of the model. This phenomenological ansatz for ϕ can be motivated by generic solutions of a scalar dilaton field in many effective string theory and string-inspired gravity models in four dimensions. Most of the earlier discussions in the literature correspond to the choice that ζ = 0 so that ϕ(t) ∝ ln t or ϕ(t) ∝ ln a(t). Using a compilation of current data including type Ia supernovae, we impose observational constraints on the slope parameters like α and ζ and then discuss the relation of our results to analytical constraints on various cosmological parameters, including the dark energy equation of state. Some useful constraints are imposed on model parameters like α and ζ as well as on the dark energy/dark matter couplings using results from structure formation. The constraints of this model are shown to encompass the cosmological constant limit within 1σ error bars.

  11. Reconstruction of interaction rate in holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ankan

    2016-11-01

    The present work is based on the holographic dark energy model with Hubble horizon as the infrared cut-off. The interaction rate between dark energy and dark matter has been reconstructed for three different parameterizations of the deceleration parameter. Observational constraints on the model parameters have been obtained by maximum likelihood analysis using the observational Hubble parameter data (OHD), type Ia supernovab data (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillation data (BAO) and the distance prior of cosmic microwave background (CMB) namely the CMB shift parameter data (CMBShift). The interaction rate obtained in the present work remains always positive and increases with expansion. It is very similar to the result obtained by Sen and Pavon [1] where the interaction rate has been reconstructed for a parametrization of the dark energy equation of state. Tighter constraints on the interaction rate have been obtained in the present work as it is based on larger data sets. The nature of the dark energy equation of state parameter has also been studied for the present models. Though the reconstruction is done from different parametrizations, the overall nature of the interaction rate is very similar in all the cases. Different information criteria and the Bayesian evidence, which have been invoked in the context of model selection, show that the these models are at close proximity of each other.

  12. Energy weighted x-ray dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Georg; Zang, Andrea; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Kraus, Manuel; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, Andre; Wandner, Johannes; Weber, Thomas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Wong, Winnie S; Campbell, Michael; Meiser, Jan; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo

    2014-10-06

    The dark-field image obtained in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide information about the objects' microstructures on a scale smaller than the pixel size even with low geometric magnification. In this publication we demonstrate that the dark-field image quality can be enhanced with an energy-resolving pixel detector. Energy-resolved x-ray dark-field images were acquired with a 16-energy-channel photon-counting pixel detector with a 1 mm thick CdTe sensor in a Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometer. A method for contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) enhancement is proposed and validated experimentally. In measurements, a CNR improvement by a factor of 1.14 was obtained. This is equivalent to a possible radiation dose reduction of 23%.

  13. Voids as a precision probe of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rahul; Alizadeh, Esfandiar; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2010-07-15

    The shapes of cosmic voids, as measured in spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys, constitute a promising new probe of dark energy (DE). We forecast constraints on the DE equation of state and its variation from current and future surveys and find that the promise of void shape measurements compares favorably to that of standard methods such as supernovae and cluster counts even for currently available data. Owing to the complementary nature of the constraints, void shape measurements improve the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by 2 orders of magnitude for a future large scale experiment such as EUCLID when combined with other probes of dark energy available on a similar time scale. Modeling several observational and theoretical systematics has only moderate effects on these forecasts. We discuss additional systematics which will require further study using simulations.

  14. Status of the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, Brenna L.; Abbott, Timothy M.C.; Angstadt, Robert; Annis, Jim; Antonik, Michelle, L.; Bailey, Jim; Ballester, Otger.; Bernstein, Joseph P.; Bernstein, Rebbeca; Bonati, Marco; Bremer, Gale; /Fermilab /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /ANL /Texas A-M /Michigan U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Ohio State U. /University Coll. London /LBNL /SLAC /IFAE

    2012-06-29

    The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration has completed construction of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square degree, 570 Megapixel CCD camera which will be mounted on the Blanco 4-meter telescope at CTIO. DECam will be used to perform the 5000 sq. deg. Dark Energy Survey with 30% of the telescope time over a 5 year period. During the remainder of the time, and after the survey, DECam will be available as a community instrument. All components of DECam have been shipped to Chile and post-shipping checkout finished in Jan. 2012. Installation is in progress. A summary of lessons learned and an update of the performance of DECam and the status of the DECam installation and commissioning will be presented.

  15. A divergence-free parametrization for dynamical dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Akarsu, Özgür; Dereli, Tekin; Vazquez, J. Alberto E-mail: tdereli@ku.edu.tr

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a new parametrization for the dark energy, led by the same idea to the linear expansion of the equation of state in scale factor a and in redshift z, which diverges neither in the past nor future and contains the same number of degrees of freedom with the former two. We present constraints of the cosmological parameters using the most updated baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements along with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. This new parametrization allowed us to carry out successive observational analyses by decreasing its degrees of freedom systematically until ending up with a dynamical dark energy model that has the same number of parameters with ΛCDM . We found that the dark energy source with a dynamical equation of state parameter equal −2/3 at the early universe and −1 today fits the data slightly better than Λ.

  16. Dark energy cosmology with the alternative cosmic microwave background data

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Hao

    2011-04-01

    Recently, in a series of works by Liu and Li (L and L), they claimed that there exists a timing asynchrony of -25.6 ms between the spacecraft attitude and radiometer output timestamps in the original raw WMAP time-ordered data (TOD). L and L reprocessed the WMAP data while the aforementioned timing asynchrony has been corrected, and they obtained an alternative CMB map in which the quadrupole dropped to nearly zero. In the present work, we try to see the implications to dark energy cosmology if L and L are right. While L and L claimed that there is a bug in the WMAP pipeline which leads to significantly different cosmological parameters, an interesting question naturally arises, namely, how robust is the current dark energy cosmology with respect to systematic errors and bugs? So, in this work, we adopt the alternative CMB data of L and L as a strawman to study the robustness of dark energy predictions.

  17. Finding possibility of dynamical dark energy with Hubble parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaxin; Meng, Xinhe

    2014-10-01

    The Hubble parameter is a critical measurement in cosmology, which contains the most direct information of the cosmic expansion history. Since discrepancy is found between low redshift and high redshift estimations of Hubble constant, we are interested in whether that tension indicates dynamical dark energy. In this paper, we emphasize that the observed Hubble parameters at various redshifts, along with observed Hubble constant, can help us in probing the evolutional behavior of the mysterious dark energy. Null hypothesis tests are carried out with two diagnostic approaches. We find out that, according to the present measurements of Hubble parameters, rejection of constant dark energy is captured at 1σ level from null tests with and without the observed value of Hubble constant.

  18. What We Know About Dark Energy From Supernovae

    ScienceCinema

    Filippenko, Alex [University of California, Berkeley, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The measured distances of type Ia (white dwarf) supernovae as a function of redshift (z) have shown that the expansion of the Universe is currently accelerating, probably due to the presence of dark energy (X) having a negative pressure. Combining all of the data with existing results from large-scale structure surveys, we find a best fit for Omega M and Omega X of 0.28 and 0.72 (respectively), in excellent agreement with the values derived independently from WMAP measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation. Thus far, the best-fit value for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter is -1, and its first derivative is consistent with zero, suggesting that the dark energy may indeed be Einstein's cosmological constant.

  19. LSST Dark Energy Science Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S

    2007-02-15

    Three decadal surveys recommend a large-aperture synoptic survey telescope (LSST) to allow time-domain and cosmological studies of distant objects. LLNL designed the optical system and also is expected to play a significant role in the engineering associated with the camera. Precision cosmology from ground-based instruments is in a sense terra incognita. Numerous systematic effects occur that would be minimal or absent in their space-based counterparts. We proposed developing some basic tools and techniques for investigating ''dark sector'' cosmological science with such next-generation, large-aperture, real-time telescopes. The critical research involved determining whether systematic effects might dominate the extremely small distortions (''shears'') in images of faint background galaxies. To address these issues we carried out a comprehensive data campaign and developed detailed computer simulations.

  20. Analytic study of the effect of dark energy-dark matter interaction on the growth of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Rafael J. F.; Landim, Ricardo C. G.; Costa, André A.; Wang, Bin; Abdalla, Elcio

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale structure has been shown as a promising cosmic probe for distinguishing and constraining dark energy models. Using the growth index parametrization, we obtain an analytic formula for the growth rate of structures in a coupled dark energy model in which the exchange of energy-momentum is proportional to the dark energy density. We find that the evolution of fσ8 can be determined analytically once we know the coupling, the dark energy equation of state, the present value of the dark energy density parameter and the current mean amplitude of dark matter fluctuations. After correcting the growth function for the correspondence with the velocity field through the continuity equation in the interacting model, we use our analytic result to compare the model's predictions with large-scale structure observations.

  1. Time arrow is influenced by the dark energy.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Gurzadyan, V G

    2016-05-01

    The arrow of time and the accelerated expansion are two fundamental empirical facts of the universe. We advance the viewpoint that the dark energy (positive cosmological constant) accelerating the expansion of the universe also supports the time asymmetry. It is related to the decay of metastable states under generic perturbations, as we show on example of a microcanonical ensemble. These states will not be metastable without dark energy. The latter also ensures a hyperbolic motion leading to dynamic entropy production with the rate determined by the cosmological constant.

  2. Holographic dark energy model from Ricci scalar curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun; Wu Fengquan; Chen Xuelei; Shen Yougen

    2009-02-15

    Motivated by the holographic principle, it has been suggested that the dark energy density may be inversely proportional to the area of the event horizon of the Universe. However, such a model would have a causality problem. In this paper, we propose to replace the future event horizon area with the inverse of the Ricci scalar curvature. We show that this model does not only avoid the causality problem and is phenomenologically viable, but also naturally solves the coincidence problem of dark energy. Our analysis of the evolution of density perturbations show that the matter power spectra and cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy is only slightly affected by such modification.

  3. Dark Energy Studies with LSST Image Simulations, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, John Russell

    2016-07-26

    This grant funded the development and dissemination of the Photon Simulator (PhoSim) for the purpose of studying dark energy at high precision with the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) astronomical survey. The work was in collaboration with the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC). Several detailed physics improvements were made in the optics, atmosphere, and sensor, a number of validation studies were performed, and a significant number of usability features were implemented. Future work in DESC will use PhoSim as the image simulation tool for data challenges used by the analysis groups.

  4. Dark energy cosmology with tachyon field in teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motavalli, H.; Akbarieh, A. Rezaei; Nasiry, M.

    2016-07-01

    We construct a tachyon teleparallel dark energy model for a homogeneous and isotropic flat universe in which a tachyon as a non-canonical scalar field is non-minimally coupled to gravity in the framework of teleparallel gravity. The explicit form of potential and coupling functions are obtained under the assumption that the Lagrangian admits the Noether symmetry approach. The dynamical behavior of the basic cosmological observables is compared to recent observational data, which implies that the tachyon field may serve as a candidate for dark energy.

  5. First SN Discoveries from the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F.; Achitouv, I.; Ahn, E.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Alonso, D.; Amara, A.; Annis, J.; Antonik, M.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashall, C.; Asorey, J.; Bacon, D.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Barbary, K.; Barkhouse, W.; Baruah, L.; Bauer, A.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M.; Bender, R.; Benoist, C.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernardi, M.; Bernstein, G.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R.; Bertin, E.; Beynon, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Biswas, R.; Blake, C.; Bloom, J. S.; Bocquet, S.; Brandt, C.; Bridle, S.; Brooks, D.; Brown, P. J.; Brunner, R.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.; Burkert, A.; Busha, M.; Campa, J.; Campbell, H.; Cane, R.; Capozzi, D.; Carlstrom, J.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carollo, M.; Carrasco-Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Carter, M.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Chen, Y.; Chiu, I.; Chue, C.; Clampitt, J.; Clerkin, L.; Cohn, J.; Colless, M.; Copeland, E.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Crittenden, R.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C.; Costa, L. da; D, C.; #39; Andrea; Das, S.; Das, R.; Davis, T. M.; Deb, S.; DePoy, D.; Derylo, G.; Desai, S.; de Simoni, F.; Devlin, M.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Dolag, K.; Efstathiou, G.; Eifler, T.; Erickson, B.; Eriksen, M.; Estrada, J.; Etherington, J.; Evrard, A.; Farrens, S.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Ferreira, P. C.; Finley, D.; Fischer, J. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Furlanetto, C.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gelman, M.; Gerdes, D.; Giannantonio, T.; Gilhool, S.; Gill, M.; Gladders, M.; Gladney, L.; Glazebrook, K.; Gray, M.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R.; Gupta, R.; Gutierrez, G.; Habib, S.; Hall, E.; Hansen, S.; Hao, J.; Heitmann, K.; Helsby, J.; Henderson, R.; Hennig, C.; High, W.; Hirsch, M.; Hoffmann, K.; Holhjem, K.; Honscheid, K.; Host, O.; Hoyle, B.; Hu, W.; Huff, E.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D.; Jarvis, M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M.; Jouvel, S.; Kacprzak, T.; Karliner, I.; Katsaros, J.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A.; Kim-Vy, T.; King, L.; Kirk, D.; Kochanek, C.; Kopp, M.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Kovacs, E.; Krause, E.; Kravtsov, A.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuemmel, M.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kunder, A.; Kuropatkin, N.; Kwan, J.; Lahav, O.; Leistedt, B.; Levi, M.; Lewis, P.; Liddle, A.; Lidman, C.; Lilly, S.; Lin, H.; Liu, J.; Lopez-Arenillas, C.; Lorenzon, W.; LoVerde, M.; Ma, Z.; Maartens, R.; Maccrann, N.; Macri, L.; Maia, M.; Makler, M.; Manera, M.; Maraston, C.; March, M.; Markovic, K.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J.; Marshall, S.; Martini, P.; Sanahuja, P. Marti; Mayers, J.; McKay, T.; McMahon, R.; Melchior, P.; Merritt, K. W.; Merson, A.; Miller, C.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Moore, T.; Mortonson, M.; Mosher, J.; Mould, J.; Mukherjee, P.; Neilsen, E.; Ngeow, C.; Nichol, R.; Nidever, D.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Old, L.; Olsen, J.; Ostrovski, F.; Paech, K.; Papadopoulos, A.; Papovich, C.; Patton, K.; Peacock, J.; Pellegrini, P. S. S.; Peoples, J.; Percival, W.; Perlmutter, S.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A.; Ponce, R.; Poole, G.; Pope, A.; Refregier, A.; Reyes, R.; Ricker, P.; Roe, N.; Romer, K.; Roodman, A.; Rooney, P.; Ross, A.; Rowe, B.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sabiu, C.; Saglia, R.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, A.; Sanchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Santiago, B.; Saro, A.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schmidt, B. P.; Schmitt, R. L.; Schubnell, M.; Seitz, S.; Senger, R.; Sevilla, I.; Sharp, R.; Sheldon, E.; Sheth, R.; Smith, R. C.; Smith, M.; Snigula, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Song, J.; Soumagnac, M.; Spinka, H.; Stebbins, A.; Stoughton, C.; Suchyta, E.; Suhada, R.; Sullivan, M.; Sun, F.; Suntzeff, N.; Sutherland, W.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Szepietowski, R.; Talaga, R.; Tarle, G.; Tarrant, E.; Balan, S. Thaithara; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D.; Uddin, S. A.; Ural, S.; Vikram, V.; Voigt, L.; Walker, A. R.; Walker, T.; Wechsler, R.; Weinberg, D.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Wetzstein, M.; White, M.; Wilcox, H.; Wilman, D.; Yanny, B.; Young, J.; Zablocki, A.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) report the discovery of the first set of supernovae (SN) from the project. Images were observed as part of the DES Science Verification phase using the newly-installed 570-Megapixel Dark Energy Camera on the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope by observers J. Annis, E. Buckley-Geer, and H. Lin. SN observations are planned throughout the observing campaign on a regular cadence of 4-6 days in each of the ten 3-deg2 fields in the DES griz filters.

  6. Search for Kilonovae in Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Zoheyr; DES-GW Team; DES-SN Team

    2016-03-01

    The Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4-m Telescope is an ideal instrument for identifying rapid optical transients with its large field of view and four optical filters. We utilize two seasons of data from the Dark Energy Survey to search for kilonovae, an optical counterpart to gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers. Kilonova lightcurves from Barnes and Kasen inform our analysis for removing background signals such as supernovae. We simulate DES observations of kilonovae with the SNANA software package to estimate our search efficiency and optimize cuts. Finally, we report rate limits for binary neutron star mergers and compare to existing rate estimates.

  7. Restoring New Agegraphic Dark Energy in RS II Braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Karami, K.; Sheykhi, A.

    2011-10-01

    Motivated by recent works (Saridakis in Phys. Lett. B 660:138, 2008; Sheykhi in Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 19(3):305, 2010), we investigate the new agegraphic model of dark energy in the framework of RS II braneworld. We also include the case of variable gravitational constant G in our model. Moreover, we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the new agegraphic dark energy model in RS II braneworld cosmology including varying G.

  8. Quantisation of the holographic Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Albarran, Imanol; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam E-mail: mbl@ubi.pt

    2015-08-01

    While general relativity is an extremely robust theory to describe the gravitational interaction in our Universe, it is expected to fail close to singularities like the cosmological ones. On the other hand, it is well known that some dark energy models might induce future singularities; this can be the case for example within the setup of the Holographic Ricci Dark Energy model (HRDE). On this work, we perform a cosmological quantisation of the HRDE model and obtain under which conditions a cosmic doomsday can be avoided within the quantum realm. We show as well that this quantum model not only avoid future singularities but also the past Big Bang.

  9. Dark energy properties from large future galaxy surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Basse, Tobias; Bjælde, Ole Eggers; Hannestad, Steen; Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: oeb@phys.au.dk E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2014-05-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a Euclid-like survey will be able to constrain dark energy and neutrino parameters from a combination of its cosmic shear power spectrum, galaxy power spectrum, and cluster mass function measurements. We find that the combination of these three probes vastly improves the survey's potential to measure the time evolution of dark energy. In terms of a dark energy figure-of-merit defined as (σ(w{sub p})σ(w{sub a})){sup −1}, we find a value of 690 for Euclid-like data combined with Planck-like measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in a 10-dimensional cosmological parameter space, assuming a ΛCDM fiducial cosmology. For the more commonly used 7-parameter model, we find a figure-of-merit of 1900 for the same data combination. We consider also the survey's potential to measure dark energy perturbations in models wherein the dark energy is parameterised as a fluid with a nonstandard non-adiabatic sound speed, and find that in an optimistic scenario in which w{sub 0} deviates from -1 by as much as is currently observationally allowed, models with c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 10{sup −6} and c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 1 can be distinguished from one another at more than 2σ significance. We emphasise that constraints on the dark energy sound speed from cluster measurements are strongly dependent on the modelling of the cluster mass function; significantly weaker sensitivities ensue if we modify our model to include fewer features of nonlinear dark energy clustering. Finally, we find that the sum of neutrino masses can be measured with a 1σ precision of 0.015 eV, even in complex cosmological models in which the dark energy equation of state varies with time. The 1σ sensitivity to the effective number of relativistic species N{sub eff}{sup ml} is approximately 0.03, meaning that the small deviation of 0.046 from 3 in the standard value of N{sub eff}{sup ml} due to non-instantaneous decoupling and

  10. Dark energy properties from large future galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, Tobias; Eggers Bjælde, Ole; Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2014-05-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a Euclid-like survey will be able to constrain dark energy and neutrino parameters from a combination of its cosmic shear power spectrum, galaxy power spectrum, and cluster mass function measurements. We find that the combination of these three probes vastly improves the survey's potential to measure the time evolution of dark energy. In terms of a dark energy figure-of-merit defined as (σ(wp)σ(wa))-1, we find a value of 690 for Euclid-like data combined with Planck-like measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in a 10-dimensional cosmological parameter space, assuming a ΛCDM fiducial cosmology. For the more commonly used 7-parameter model, we find a figure-of-merit of 1900 for the same data combination. We consider also the survey's potential to measure dark energy perturbations in models wherein the dark energy is parameterised as a fluid with a nonstandard non-adiabatic sound speed, and find that in an optimistic scenario in which w0 deviates from -1 by as much as is currently observationally allowed, models with hat cs2 = 10-6 and hat cs2 = 1 can be distinguished from one another at more than 2σ significance. We emphasise that constraints on the dark energy sound speed from cluster measurements are strongly dependent on the modelling of the cluster mass function; significantly weaker sensitivities ensue if we modify our model to include fewer features of nonlinear dark energy clustering. Finally, we find that the sum of neutrino masses can be measured with a 1σ precision of 0.015 eV, even in complex cosmological models in which the dark energy equation of state varies with time. The 1σ sensitivity to the effective number of relativistic species Neffml is approximately 0.03, meaning that the small deviation of 0.046 from 3 in the standard value of Neffml due to non-instantaneous decoupling and finite temperature effects can be probed with 1σ precision for the first time.

  11. Reducing Zero-point Systematics in Dark Energy Supernova Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, Lorenzo; Kim, Alex G; Miquel, Ramon; Bernstein, Gary; Bonissent, Alain; Brown, Matthew; Carithers, William; Christiansen, Jodi; Connolly, Natalia; Deustua, Susana; Gerdes, David; Gladney, Larry; Kushner, Gary; Linder, Eric; McKee, Shawn; Mostek, Nick; Shukla, Hemant; Stebbins, Albert; Stoughton, Chris; Tucker, David

    2011-04-01

    We study the effect of filter zero-point uncertainties on future supernova dark energy missions. Fitting for calibration parameters using simultaneous analysis of all Type Ia supernova standard candles achieves a significant improvement over more traditional fit methods. This conclusion is robust under diverse experimental configurations (number of observed supernovae, maximum survey redshift, inclusion of additional systematics). This approach to supernova fitting considerably eases otherwise stringent mission cali- bration requirements. As an example we simulate a space-based mission based on the proposed JDEM satellite; however the method and conclusions are general and valid for any future supernova dark energy mission, ground or space-based.

  12. Dark energy in thermal equilibrium with the cosmological horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitras, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    According to a generalization of black hole thermodynamics to a cosmological framework, it is possible to define a temperature for the cosmological horizon. The hypothesis of thermal equilibrium between the dark energy and the horizon has been considered by many authors. We find the restrictions imposed by this hypothesis on the energy transfer rate (Qi) between the cosmological fluids, assuming that the temperature of the horizon has the form T =b/2πR, where R is the radius of the horizon. We more specifically consider two types of dark energy: Chaplygin gas (CG) and dark energy with a constant equation of state parameter (wDE). In each case, we show that for a given radius R, there is a unique term Qde that is consistent with thermal equilibrium. We also consider the situation where, in addition to dark energy, other fluids (cold matter, radiation) are in thermal equilibrium with the horizon. We find that the interaction terms required for this will generally violate energy conservation (∑iQi=0).

  13. Dark Energy and Dark Matter as w = -1 Virtual Particles and the World Hologram Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfatti, Jack

    2011-04-01

    The elementary physics battle-tested principles of Lorentz invariance, Einstein equivalence principle and the boson commutation and fermion anti-commutation rules of quantum field theory explain gravitationally repulsive dark energy as virtual bosons and gravitationally attractive dark matter as virtual fermion-antifermion pairs. The small dark energy density in our past light cone is the reciprocal entropy-area of our future light cone's 2D future event horizon in a Novikov consistent loop in time in our accelerating universe. Yakir Aharonov's "back-from-the-future" post-selected final boundary condition is set at our observer-dependent future horizon that also explains why the irreversible thermodynamic arrow of time of is aligned with the accelerating dark energy expansion of the bulk 3D space interior to our future 2D horizon surrounding it as the hologram screen. Seth Lloyd has argued that all 2D horizon surrounding surfaces are pixelated quantum computers projecting interior bulk 3D quanta of volume (Planck area)Sqrt(area of future horizon) as their hologram images in 1-1 correspondence.

  14. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-27

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ≲160 keV), iodine at PICO (when 160≲δ≲300 keV), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ≳300 keV). Amusingly, once δ≳200 keV, weak scale (and larger) dark matter–nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20–500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45–100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ~200 keV and an

  15. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    DOE PAGES

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; ...

    2016-12-27

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelasticmore » dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ≲160 keV), iodine at PICO (when 160≲δ≲300 keV), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ≳300 keV). Amusingly, once δ≳200 keV, weak scale (and larger) dark matter–nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20–500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45–100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ~200 keV and an

  16. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-01

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ ≲160 keV ), iodine at PICO (when 160 ≲δ ≲300 keV ), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ ≳300 keV ). Amusingly, once δ ≳200 keV , weak scale (and larger) dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20-500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45-100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ ˜200 keV and an

  17. Instability in interacting dark sector: an appropriate holographic Ricci dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Ramón; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Videla, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the consequences of phantom crossing considering the perturbative dynamics in models with interaction in their dark sector. By mean of a general study of gauge-invariant variables in comoving gauge, we relate the sources of instabilities in the structure formation process with the phantom crossing. In order to illustrate these relations and its consequences in more detail, we consider a specific case of an holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter. We find that in spite of the model is in excellent agreement with observational data at background level, however it is plagued of instabilities in its perturbative dynamics. We reconstruct the model in order to avoid these undesirable instabilities, and we show that this implies a modification of the concordance model at background. Also we find drastic changes on the parameters space in our model when instabilities are avoided.

  18. Non-virialized clusters for detection of dark energy-dark matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Delliou, M.; Marcondes, R. J. F.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Abdalla, E.

    2015-10-01

    The observation of galaxy and gas distributions, as well as cosmological simulations in a ΛCDM cold dark matter universe, suggests that clusters of galaxies are still accreting mass and are not expected to be in equilibrium. In this work, we investigate the possibility to evaluate the departure from virial equilibrium in order to detect, in that balance, effects from a dark matter-dark energy interaction. We continue, from previous works, using a simple model of interacting dark sector, the Layzer-Irvine equation for dynamical virial evolution, and employ optical observations in order to obtain the mass profiles through weak-lensing and X-ray observations giving the intracluster gas temperatures. Through a Monte Carlo method, we generate, for a set of clusters, measurements of observed virial ratios, interaction strength, rest virial ratio and departure from equilibrium factors. We found a compounded interaction strength of -1.99^{+2.56}_{-16.00}, compatible with no interaction, but also a compounded rest virial ratio of -0.79 ± 0.13, which would entail a 2σ detection. We confirm quantitatively that clusters of galaxies are out of equilibrium but further investigation is needed to constrain a possible interaction in the dark sector.

  19. Fatal error of the relativity and the research for dark matter-;dark energy -the physical "dark world"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zhengrong

    2014-07-01

    1. The hard facts we given in text prove that, relativity theory is the fallacy from mathematical errors and experimental perjuries. 2. Conclusion of the study show that one called "fundamental gravitino" (the theoretical mass-energy value given at mw = 3.636 x 10-45 kg) is the Material composition of dark matter in the universe and also it's the material composition of all the elementary particles too. This is the root cause that the gravitation has universality. In-depth research, the results show that the fundamental gravitino" in all space is the material foundation of the electromagnetic interaction and propagation of light and other physical phenomena. Furthermore it shows that Stable elementary particles are the "droplets" under the strong gravitino pressure (strength calculated are consistent with the strong interaction) in the entire universe, similar to the droplets in the saturated gas. There are steady-state solutions in Mathematical models corresponding to the proton, the electron and the neutron.The theory for topics such as the dark matter, the dark energy, and the Higgs particle has the perfect explanation and reasonable conclusion... It seems, Chinese began to keep up with the world's physical trend, started a new physics era of fundamental gravitino the mass energy source of the universe.

  20. Thermodynamics of Viscous Dark Energy in AN Rsii Braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Sheykhi, A.

    We show that for an RSII braneworld filled with interacting viscous dark energy and dark matter, one can always rewrite the Friedmann equation in the form of the first law of thermodynamics, dE = ThdSh + WdV, at the apparent horizon. In addition, the generalized second law of thermodynamics can be fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon on the brane for both constant and time-variable five-dimensional Newton's constant G5. These results hold regardless of the specific form of the dark energy. Our study further supports the belief that in an accelerating universe with spatial curvature, the apparent horizon is a physical boundary from the thermodynamical point of view.

  1. Varying constants and dark energy with the E-ELT .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielzeuf, P. E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    The observational possibilities enabled by an ultra-stable CODEX-like spectrograph at the E-ELT will open new doors in the characterisation of the nature of Dark Energy. Indeed, it will provide measurements of a so far unexplored redshift-range (2

  2. Inflation, Dark Energy, and the Fate of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, Andrei

    2003-11-12

    Inflationary theory, which describes an accelerated expansion of the early universe, gradually becomes a standard cosmological paradigm. It solves many complicated problems of the usual big bang theory, explains the origin of galaxies, and makes several predictions, which, so far, are in a good agreement with cosmological observations. Recently we learned that few billion years ago the universe entered the second stage of acceleration, driven by mysterious 'dark energy'. According to the simplest version of inflationary theory, the universe is an eternally existing self-reproducing fractal consisting of different balloons of exponentially large size. The universe as a whole can be immortal, but the fate of each of these balloons, including the one in which we live now, depends on the properties of dark energy. According to some of the theories of dark energy, our part of the universe will continue its accelerated expansion forever. Other theories predict that eventually our part of the universe will become ten-dimensional and stop accelerating. Still another possibility is that our part of the universe will collapse. I will describe recent developments in inflationary theory and the theory of dark energy, and discuss the possibility to find our fate by cosmological observations.

  3. Evolution of dark energy perturbations in scalar-tensor cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno Sanchez, J. C.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2010-05-15

    We solve analytically and numerically the generalized Einstein equations in scalar-tensor cosmologies to obtain the evolution of dark energy and matter linear perturbations. We compare our results with the corresponding results for minimally coupled quintessence perturbations. We find that scalar-tensor dark energy density perturbations are amplified by a factor of about 10{sup 4} compared to minimally coupled quintessence perturbations on scales less than about 1000 h{sup -1} Mpc (sub-Hubble scales). On these scales dark energy perturbations constitute a fraction of about 10% compared to matter density perturbations. Scalar-tensor dark energy density perturbations are anticorrelated with matter linear perturbations on sub-Hubble scales. This anticorrelation of matter with negative pressure perturbations induces a mild amplification of matter perturbations by about 10% on sub-Hubble scales. The evolution of scalar field perturbations on sub-Hubble scales is scale independent and therefore corresponds to a vanishing effective speed of sound (c{sub s{Phi}=}0). We briefly discuss the observational implications of our results, which may include predictions for galaxy and cluster halo profiles that are modified compared to {Lambda}CDM. The observed properties of these profiles are known to be in some tension with the predictions of {Lambda}CDM.

  4. Stability of Dark Energy Models on the Brane Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2013-08-01

    In this paper the equation of state formalism for the dark energy models on the brane considered and stability of theory investigated. We consider four different cases of the Little Rip, Asymptotic de Sitter, Asymptotic breakdown, and Big Freeze singularity models and find that the only stable model is Asymptotic de Sitter case. In other cases we get negative value of squared sound speed.

  5. Decoherent neutrino mixing, dark energy, and matter-antimatter asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2004-11-01

    A CPT violating decoherence scenario can easily account for all the experimental evidence in the neutrino sector including Liquid Scincillator Neutrino Detector. In this work it is argued that this framework can also accommodate the dark energy content of the Universe, as well as the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry.

  6. Dark Energy and the Cosmological Constant: A Brief Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The recently observed acceleration of the expansion of the universe is a topic of intense interest. The favoured causes are the "cosmological constant" or "dark energy". The former, which appears in the Einstein equations as the term [lambda]g[subscript [mu]v], provides an extremely simple, well-defined mechanism for the acceleration. However,…

  7. Dark energy oscillations in mimetic F (R ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we address the problem of dark energy oscillations in the context of mimetic F (R ) gravity with potential. The issue of dark energy oscillations can be a problem in some models of ordinary F (R ) gravity, and a remedy that can make the oscillations milder is to introduce additional modifications in the functional form of the F (R ) gravity. As we demonstrate, the power-law modifications are not necessary in the mimetic F (R ) case, and by appropriately choosing the mimetic potential and the Lagrange multiplier, it is possible to make the oscillations almost vanish at the end of the matter domination era and during the late-time acceleration era. We examine the behavior of the dark energy equation of state parameter and of the total effective equation of state parameter as functions of the redshift, and we compare the resulting picture with the ordinary F (R ) gravity case. As we also show that the present day values of the dark energy equation of state parameter and of the total effective equation of state parameter are in better agreement with the observational data, in comparison to the ordinary F (R ) gravity case. Finally, we study the evolution of the growth factor as a function of the redshift for all the mimetic models we use.

  8. Swiss cheese model with the superstring dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Kološ, Martin

    2005-12-01

    The Swiss cheese model of the Universe with the superstring dark energy is constructed. The junction conditions are shown to be fulfilled and time evolution of the matching hypersurface of the internal Schwarzschild spacetime and homogeneous external Friedman Universe is studied.

  9. Accretions of dark matter and dark energy onto (n+2)-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Ujjal

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have studied accretion of the dark matter and dark energy onto of (n+2)-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole. The mass and the rate of change of mass for (n+2)-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole have been found. We have assumed some candidates of dark energy like holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon, DBI-essence, etc. The black hole mass and the wormhole mass have been calculated in term of redshift when dark matter and above types of dark energies accrete onto them separately. We have shown that the black hole mass increases and wormhole mass decreases for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon accretion and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass sensitively depends on the dimension. But for DBI-essence accretion, the black hole mass first increases and then decreases and the wormhole mass first decreases and then increases and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass not sensitively depends on the dimension.

  10. Distance measurements from supernovae and dark energy constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yun

    2009-12-15

    Constraints on dark energy from current observational data are sensitive to how distances are measured from Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data. We find that flux averaging of SNe Ia can be used to test the presence of unknown systematic uncertainties, and yield more robust distance measurements from SNe Ia. We have applied this approach to the nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST set of 288 SNe Ia, and the 'Constitution' set of 397 SNe Ia. Combining the SN Ia data with cosmic microwave background anisotropy data from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5 yr observations, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, the data of 69 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) , and the Hubble constant measurement from the Hubble Space Telescope project SHOES, we measure the dark energy density function X(z){identical_to}{rho}{sub X}(z)/{rho}{sub X}(0) as a free function of redshift (assumed to be a constant at z>1 or z>1.5). Without the flux averaging of SNe Ia, the combined data using the Constitution set of SNe Ia seem to indicate a deviation from a cosmological constant at {approx}95% confidence level at 0 < or apporx. z < or approx. 0.8; they are consistent with a cosmological constant at {approx}68% confidence level when SNe Ia are flux averaged. The combined data using the nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST data set of SNe Ia are consistent with a cosmological constant at 68% confidence level with or without flux averaging of SNe Ia, and give dark energy constraints that are significantly more stringent than that using the Constitution set of SNe Ia. Assuming a flat Universe, dark energy is detected at >98% confidence level for z{<=}0.75 using the combined data with 288 SNe Ia from nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST, independent of the assumptions about X(z{>=}1). We quantify dark energy constraints without assuming a flat Universe using the dark energy figure of merit for both X(z) and a dark energy equation-of-state linear in the cosmic scale factor.

  11. Topology and dark energy: testing gravity in voids.

    PubMed

    Spolyar, Douglas; Sahlén, Martin; Silk, Joe

    2013-12-13

    Modified gravity has garnered interest as a backstop against dark matter and dark energy (DE). As one possible modification, the graviton can become massive, which introduces a new scalar field--here with a Galileon-type symmetry. The field can lead to a nontrivial equation of state of DE which is density and scale dependent. Tension between type Ia supernovae and Planck could be reduced. In voids, the scalar field dramatically alters the equation of state of DE, induces a soon-observable gravitational slip between the two metric potentials, and develops a topological defect (domain wall) due to a nontrivial vacuum structure for the field.

  12. Probing dark energy beyond z=2 with CODEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielzeuf, P. E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2012-04-01

    Precision measurements of nature’s fundamental couplings and a first measurement of the cosmological redshift drift are two of the key targets for future high-resolution ultrastable spectrographs such as CODEX. Being able to do both gives CODEX a unique advantage, allowing it to probe dynamical dark energy models (by measuring the behavior of their equation of state) deep in the matter era and thereby testing classes of models that would otherwise be difficult to distinguish from the standard lambda-cold dark matter paradigm. We illustrate this point with two simple case studies.

  13. Resource Letter DEAU-1: Dark energy and the accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Eric V.

    2008-03-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on dark energy and the accelerating universe. It is intended to be of use to researchers, teachers, and students at several levels. Journal articles, books, and websites are cited for the following topics: Einstein's cosmological constant, quintessence or dynamical scalar fields, modified cosmic gravity, relations to high-energy physics, cosmological probes and observations, terrestrial probes, calculational tools and parameter estimation, teaching strategies and educational resources, and the fate of the universe.

  14. Encircling the dark: constraining dark energy via cosmic density in spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codis, S.; Pichon, C.; Bernardeau, F.; Uhlemann, C.; Prunet, S.

    2016-08-01

    The recently published analytic probability density function for the mildly non-linear cosmic density field within spherical cells is used to build a simple but accurate maximum likelihood estimate for the redshift evolution of the variance of the density, which, as expected, is shown to have smaller relative error than the sample variance. This estimator provides a competitive probe for the equation of state of dark energy, reaching a few per cent accuracy on wp and wa for a Euclid-like survey. The corresponding likelihood function can take into account the configuration of the cells via their relative separations. A code to compute one-cell-density probability density functions for arbitrary initial power spectrum, top-hat smoothing and various spherical-collapse dynamics is made available online, so as to provide straightforward means of testing the effect of alternative dark energy models and initial power spectra on the low-redshift matter distribution.

  15. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, German; Pavon, Diego; Atrio-Barandela, Fernando

    2008-05-15

    Models with dark energy decaying into dark matter have been proposed in cosmology to solve the coincidence problem. We study the effect of such coupling on the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. The interaction changes the rate of evolution of the metric potentials and the growth rate of matter density perturbations and modifies the integrated Sachs-Wolfe component of cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies, enhancing the effect. Cross correlation of galaxy catalogs with cosmic microwave background maps provides a model-independent test to constrain the interaction. We particularize our analysis for a specific interacting model and show that galaxy catalogs with median redshifts z{sub m}=0.1-0.9 can rule out models with an interaction parameter strength of c{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.1 better than 99.95% confidence level. Values of c{sup 2}{<=}0.01 are compatible with the data and may account for the possible discrepancy between the fraction of dark energy derived from Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe 3 yr data and the fraction obtained from the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Measuring the fraction of dark energy by these two methods could provide evidence of an interaction.

  16. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    DOE PAGES

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; ...

    2014-03-15

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansionmore » such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.« less

  17. Growth of cosmic structure: Probing dark energy beyond expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anže; van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2015-03-01

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.

  18. Constraining dark energy from the abundance of weak gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Nevin N.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2003-05-01

    We examine the prospect of using the observed abundance of weak gravitational lenses to constrain the equation-of-state parameter w=p/ρ of dark energy. Dark energy modifies the distance-redshift relation, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum, and the rate of structure growth. As a result, it affects the efficiency with which dark-matter concentrations produce detectable weak-lensing signals. Here we solve the spherical-collapse model with dark energy, clarifying some ambiguities found in the literature. We also provide fitting formulae for the non-linear overdensity at virialization and the linear-theory overdensity at collapse. We then compute the variation in the predicted weak-lens abundance with w. We find that the predicted redshift distribution and number count of weak lenses are highly degenerate in w and the present matter density Ω0. If we fix Ω0 the number count of weak lenses for w=-2/3 is a factor of ~2 smaller than for the Λ cold dark matter (CDM) model w=-1. However, if we allow Ω0 to vary with w such that the amplitude of the matter power spectrum as measured by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) matches that obtained from the X-ray cluster abundance, the decrease in the predicted lens abundance is less than 25 per cent for -1 <=w< -0.4. We show that a more promising method for constraining dark energy - one that is largely unaffected by the Ω0-w degeneracy as well as uncertainties in observational noise - is to compare the relative abundance of virialized X-ray lensing clusters with the abundance of non-virialized, X-ray underluminous, lensing haloes. For aperture sizes of ~15 arcmin, the predicted ratio of the non-virialized to virialized lenses is greater than 40 per cent and varies by ~20 per cent between w=-1 and -0.6. Overall, we find that, if all other weak-lensing parameters are fixed, a survey must cover at least ~40 deg2 in order for the weak-lens number count to differentiate a ΛCDM cosmology from a dark-energy model with w

  19. Do stochastic inhomogeneities affect dark-energy precision measurements?

    PubMed

    Ben-Dayan, I; Gasperini, M; Marozzi, G; Nugier, F; Veneziano, G

    2013-01-11

    The effect of a stochastic background of cosmological perturbations on the luminosity-redshift relation is computed to second order through a recently proposed covariant and gauge-invariant light-cone averaging procedure. The resulting expressions are free from both ultraviolet and infrared divergences, implying that such perturbations cannot mimic a sizable fraction of dark energy. Different averages are estimated and depend on the particular function of the luminosity distance being averaged. The energy flux being minimally affected by perturbations at large z is proposed as the best choice for precision estimates of dark-energy parameters. Nonetheless, its irreducible (stochastic) variance induces statistical errors on Ω(Λ)(z) typically lying in the few-percent range.

  20. Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Kavic, Michael; Minic, Djordje

    2007-01-01

    Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, for which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss observational consequences of such a picture of darkmore » energy and constrain the distribution function.« less

  1. Testing the cosmological constant as a candidate for dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, Jan; Linde, Andrei; Linder, Eric V.; Shmakova, Marina

    2003-12-03

    It may be difficult to single out the best model of dark energy on the basis of the existing and planned cosmological observations, because many different models can lead to similar observational consequences. However, each particular model can be studied and either found consistent with observations or ruled out. In this paper, we concentrate on the possibility to test and rule out the simplest and by far the most popular of the models of dark energy, the theory described by general relativity with positive vacuum energy (the cosmological constant). We evaluate the conditions under which this model could be ruled out by the future observations made by the Supernova/Acceleration Probe SNAP (both for supernovae and weak lensing) and by the Planck Surveyor cosmic microwave background satellite.

  2. Strategies for Learning the Nature of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the observed cosmic acceleration is widely ranked among the very most compelling of all outstanding problems in physical science. Many believe that nothing short of a revolution will be required in order to integrate the cosmic acceleration (often attributed to "dark energy") with our understanding of fundamental physics. The DETF was formed at the request of DOE, NASA and NSF as a joint subcommittee of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC) and the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to give advice on optimizing our program of dark energy studies. To this end we have assessed a wide variety of possible techniques and strategies. I will present our main conclusions and discuss their implications.

  3. Wormhole supported by dark energy admitting conformal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali; Rahaman, Farook; Manna, Tuhina; Banerjee, Ayan

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we study the possibility of sustaining static and spherically symmetric traversable wormhole geometries admitting conformal motion in Einstein gravity, which presents a more systematic approach to search a relation between matter and geometry. In wormhole physics, the presence of exotic matter is a fundamental ingredient and we show that this exotic source can be dark energy type which support the existence of wormhole spacetimes. In this work we model a wormhole supported by dark energy which admits conformal motion. We also discuss the possibility of the detection of wormholes in the outer regions of galactic halos by means of gravitational lensing. Studies of the total gravitational energy for the exotic matter inside a static wormhole configuration are also performed.

  4. Higgs production as a probe of chameleon dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare; Davis, Anne-Christine; Seery, David; Weltman, Amanda

    2010-05-15

    In this paper we study various particle physics effects of a light, scalar dark energy field with chameleonlike couplings to matter. We show that a chameleon model with only matter couplings will induce a coupling to photons. In doing so, we derive the first microphysical realization of a chameleonic dark energy model coupled to the electromagnetic field strength. This analysis provides additional motivation for current and near-future tests of axionlike and chameleon particles. We find a new bound on the coupling strength of chameleons in uniformly coupled models. We also study the effect of chameleon fields on Higgs production, which is relevant for hadron colliders. These are expected to manufacture Higgs particles through weak boson fusion, or associated production with a Z or W{sup {+-}.} We show that, like the Tevatron, the LHC will not be able to rule out or observe chameleons through this mechanism, because gauge invariance of the low energy Lagrangian suppresses the corrections that may arise.

  5. Quintessence in a quandary: Prior dependence in dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, David J. E.; Bull, Philip; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    The archetypal theory of dark energy is quintessence: a minimally coupled scalar field with a canonical kinetic energy and potential. By studying random potentials, we show that quintessence imposes a restricted set of priors on the equation of state of dark energy. Focusing on the commonly used parametrization, w (a )≈w0+wa(1 -a ) , we show that there is a natural scale and direction in the (w0,wa) plane that distinguishes quintessence as a general framework. We calculate the expected information gain for a given survey and show that, because of the nontrivial prior information, it is a function of more than just the figure of merit. This allows us to make a quantitative case for novel survey strategies. We show that the scale of the prior sets target observational requirements for gaining significant information. This corresponds to a figure of merit FOM ≳200 , a requirement that future galaxy redshift surveys will meet.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope Studies of Dark Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Mather, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has contributed significantly to studies of dark energy. It was used to find the first evidence of deceleration at z=1.8 (Riess et al. 2001) through the serendipitous discovery of a type 1a supernova (SN1a) in the Hubble Deep Field. The discovery of deceleration at z greater than 1 was confirmation that the apparent acceleration at low redshift (Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999) was due to dark energy rather than observational or astrophysical effects such as systematic errors, evolution in the SN1a population or intergalactic dust. The GOODS project and associated follow-up discovered 21 SN1a, expanding on this result (Riess et al. 2007). HST has also been used to constrain cosmological parameters and dark energy through weak lensing measurements in the COSMOS survey (Massey et al 2007; Schrabback et al 2009) and strong gravitational lensing with measured time delays (Suyu et al 2010). Constraints on dark energy are often parameterized as the equation of state, w = P/p. For the cosmological constant model, w = -1 at all times; other models predict a change with time, sometimes parameterized generally as w(a) or approximated as w(sub 0)+(1-a)w(sub a), where a = (1+z)(sup -1) is the scale factor of the universe relative to its current scale. Dark energy can be constrained through several measurements. Standard candles, such as SN1a, provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance as a function of redshift, which can be converted to H(z), the change in the Hubble constant with redshift. An analysis of weak lensing in a galaxy field can be used to derive the angular-diameter distance from the weak-lensing equation and to measure the power spectrum of dark-matter halos, which constrains the growth of structure in the Universe. Baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), imprinted on the distribution of matter at recombination, provide a standard rod for measuring the cosmological geometry. Strong gravitational lensing of a

  7. Testing coupled dark energy with large scale structure observation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Weiqiang; Xu, Lixin E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn

    2014-08-01

    The coupling between the dark components provides a new approach to mitigate the coincidence problem of cosmological standard model. In this paper, dark energy is treated as a fluid with a constant equation of state, whose coupling with dark matter is Q-bar =3Hξ{sub x}ρ-bar {sub x}. In the frame of dark energy, we derive the evolution equations for the density and velocity perturbations. According to the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we constrain the model by currently available cosmic observations which include cosmic microwave background radiation, baryon acoustic oscillation, type Ia supernovae, and fσ{sub 8}(z) data points from redshift-space distortion. The results show the interaction rate in σ regions: ξ{sub x} = 0.00328{sub -0.00328-0.00328-0.00328}{sup +0.000736+0.00549+0.00816}, which means that the recently cosmic observations favor a small interaction rate which is up to the order of 10{sup -2}, meanwhile, the measurement of redshift-space distortion could rule out the large interaction rate in the σ region.

  8. The evaluation of electrical energy per order (E(Eo)) for photooxidative decolorization of four textile dye solutions by the kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, N; Aleboyeh, A; Khataee, A R

    2005-05-01

    Photooxidative decolorization of four textile dyestuffs, C.I. Acid Orange 7 (AO7), C.I. Acid Orange 8 (AO8), C.I. Acid Orange 52 (AO52) and C.I. Acid Blue 74 (AB74), by UV/H2O2 was investigated in a laboratory scale photoreactor equipped with a 15 W low pressure mercury vapour lamp. The decolorization of the dyes was found to follow pseudo-first-order kinetics, and hence the figure-of-merit electrical energy per order (E(Eo)) is appropriate for estimating the electrical energy efficiency. The E(Eo) values were found to depend on the concentration of H2O2, concentration and basic structure of the dye. This study shows that these textile dyes can be treated easily and effectively with the UV/H2O2 process with E(Eo) values between 0.4 and 5 kW h m-3 order-1, depending on the initial concentrations of dyes and H2O2. The kinetic model, based on the initial rates of degradation, provided good prediction of the E(Eo) values for a variety of conditions.

  9. New Approaches To Off-Shore Wind Energy Management Exploiting Satellite EO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Marco; Masini, Andrea; Venafra, Sara; Potenza, Marco Alberto Carlo

    2013-12-01

    Wind as an energy resource has been increasingly in focus over the past decades, starting with the global oil crisis in the 1970s. The possibility of expanding wind power production to off-shore locations is attractive, especially in sites where wind levels tend to be higher and more constant. Off-shore high-potential sites for wind energy plants are currently being looked up by means of wind atlases, which are essentially based on NWP (Numerical Weather Prediction) archive data and that supply information with low spatial resolution and very low accuracy. Moreover, real-time monitoring of active off- shore wind plants is being carried out using in-situ installed anemometers, that are not very reliable (especially on long time periods) and that should be periodically substituted when malfunctions or damages occur. These activities could be greatly supported exploiting archived and near real-time satellite imagery, that could provide accurate, global coverage and high spatial resolution information about both averaged and near real-time off-shore windiness. In this work we present new methodologies aimed to support both planning and near-real-time monitoring of off-shore wind energy plants using satellite SAR(Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery. Such methodologies are currently being developed in the scope of SATENERG, a research project funded by ASI (Italian Space Agency). SAR wind data are derived from radar backscattering using empirical geophysical model functions, thus achieving greater accuracy and greater resolution with respect to other wind measurement methods. In detail, we calculate wind speed from X-band and C- band satellite SAR data, such as Cosmo-SkyMed (XMOD2) and ERS and ENVISAT (CMOD4) respectively. Then, using also detailed models of each part of the wind plant, we are able to calculate the AC power yield expected behavior, which can be used to support either the design of potential plants (using historical series of satellite images) or the

  10. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  11. Constraints on interacting dark energy models from Planck 2015 and redshift-space distortion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, André A.; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Bin; Abdalla, E.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate phenomenological interactions between dark matter and dark energy and constrain these models by employing the most recent cosmological data including the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies from Planck 2015, Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, the Hubble constant and redshift-space distortions. We find that the interaction in the dark sector parameterized as an energy transfer from dark matter to dark energy is strongly suppressed by the whole updated cosmological data. On the other hand, an interaction between dark sectors with the energy flow from dark energy to dark matter is proved in better agreement with the available cosmological observations. This coupling between dark sectors is needed to alleviate the coincidence problem.

  12. ASTROPHYSICS. Atom-interferometry constraints on dark energy.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, P; Jaffe, M; Haslinger, P; Simmons, Q; Müller, H; Khoury, J

    2015-08-21

    If dark energy, which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe, consists of a light scalar field, it might be detectable as a "fifth force" between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. Chameleon fields and other theories with screening mechanisms, however, can evade these tests by suppressing the forces in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. Using a cesium matter-wave interferometer near a spherical mass in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber, we reduced the screening mechanism by probing the field with individual atoms rather than with bulk matter. We thereby constrained a wide class of dark energy theories, including a range of chameleon and other theories that reproduce the observed cosmic acceleration.

  13. System Architecture of the Dark Energy Survey Camera Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Theresa; Ballester, Otger; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castilla, Javier; Chappa, Steve; de Vicente, Juan; Holm, Scott; Huffman, Dave; Kozlovsky, Mark; Martinez, Gustavo; Moore, Todd; /Madrid, CIEMAT /Fermilab /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2010-05-27

    The Dark Energy Survey makes use of a new camera, the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). DECam will be installed in the Blanco 4M telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). DECam is presently under construction and is expected to be ready for observations in the fall of 2011. The focal plane will make use of 62 2Kx4K and 12 2kx2k fully depleted Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) for guiding, alignment and focus. This paper will describe design considerations of the system; including, the entire signal path used to read out the CCDs, the development of a custom crate and backplane, the overall grounding scheme and early results of system tests.

  14. Dark energy and the return of the phoenix universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2009-03-15

    In cyclic universe models based on a single scalar field (e.g., the radion determining the distance between branes in M theory), virtually the entire Universe makes it through the ekpyrotic smoothing and flattening phase, bounces, and enters a new epoch of expansion and cooling. This stable evolution cannot occur, however, if scale-invariant curvature perturbations are produced by the entropic mechanism because it requires two scalar fields (e.g., the radion and the Calabi-Yau dilaton) evolving along an unstable classical trajectory. In fact, we show here that an overwhelming fraction of the Universe fails to make it through the ekpyrotic phase; nevertheless, a sufficient volume survives and cycling continues forever provided the dark energy phase of the cycle lasts long enough, of order a trillion years. Two consequences are a new role for dark energy and a global structure of the Universe radically different from that of eternal inflation.

  15. Covariant extrinsic gravity and the geometric origin of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalzadeh, S.; Rostami, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we construct the covariant or model independent induced Einstein-Yang-Mills field equations on a four-dimensional brane embedded isometrically in an D-dimensional bulk space, assuming the matter fields are confined to the brane. Applying this formalism to cosmology, we derive the generalized Friedmann equations. We derive the density parameter of dark energy in terms of width of the brane, normal curvature radii and the number of extra large dimensions. We show that dark energy could actually be the manifestation of the local extrinsic shape of the brane. It is shown that the predictions of this model are in good agreement with observation if we consider an 11-dimensional bulk space.

  16. Dark energy from Gauss-Bonnet and nonminimal couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda, L. N.; Jimenez, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    We consider a scalar-tensor model of dark energy with Gauss-Bonnet and nonminimal couplings. Exact cosmological solutions were found in the absence of potential that give equations of state of dark energy consistent with current observational constraints, but with different asymptotic behaviors depending on the couplings of the model. A detailed reconstruction procedure is given for the scalar potential and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling for any given cosmological scenario. In particular we consider conditions for the existence of a variety of cosmological solutions with accelerated expansion, including quintessence, phantom, de Sitter, and Little Rip. For the case of quintessence and phantom we have found a scalar potential of the Albrecht-Skordis type, where the potential is an exponential with a polynomial factor.

  17. Holographic Dark Energy Model with Interaction and Cosmological Constant in the Flat Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we consider holographic dark energy model with interaction in the flat space-time with non-zero cosmological constant. We calculate cosmic scale factor and Hubble expansion parameter by using the time-dependent dark energy density. Then, we obtain phenomenological interaction between holographic dark energy and matter. We fixed our solution by using the observational data.

  18. Growth rate in the dynamical dark energy models.

    PubMed

    Avsajanishvili, Olga; Arkhipova, Natalia A; Samushia, Lado; Kahniashvili, Tina

    Dark energy models with a slowly rolling cosmological scalar field provide a popular alternative to the standard, time-independent cosmological constant model. We study the simultaneous evolution of background expansion and growth in the scalar field model with the Ratra-Peebles self-interaction potential. We use recent measurements of the linear growth rate and the baryon acoustic oscillation peak positions to constrain the model parameter [Formula: see text] that describes the steepness of the scalar field potential.

  19. COnstrain Dark Energy with X-ray (CODEX) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finoguenov, Alexis; SDSS Team; Cfht Team; Carma Team

    2012-09-01

    We describe the construction and follow-up observations of the most massive clusters in the Universe, selected in the SDSS-III survey using RASS data down to an unprecedented flux limit of -13 dex. In application to the cosmology studies, we demonstrate that we will achieve a 3% constraint on the dark energy equation of state, and in a combination with BOSS BAO measurement reach a FoM of 160.

  20. Constraining dark energy through the stability of cosmic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlidou, V.; Tetradis, N.; Tomaras, T.N. E-mail: ntetrad@phys.uoa.gr

    2014-05-01

    For a general dark-energy equation of state, we estimate the maximum possible radius of massive structures that are not destabilized by the acceleration of the cosmological expansion. A comparison with known stable structures constrains the equation of state. The robustness of the constraint can be enhanced through the accumulation of additional astrophysical data and a better understanding of the dynamics of bound cosmic structures.

  1. Separating Dark Physics from Physical Darkness: Minimalist Modified Gravity vs. Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Huterer, Dragan; Linder, Eric V.

    2007-01-31

    The acceleration of the cosmic expansion may be due to a new component of physical energy density or a modification of physics itself. Mapping the expansion of cosmic scales and the growth of large scale structure in tandem can provide insights to distinguish between the two origins. Using Minimal Modified Gravity (MMG) - a single parameter gravitational growth index formalism to parameterize modified gravity theories - we examine the constraints that cosmological data can place on the nature of the new physics. For next generation measurements combining weak lensing, supernovae distances, and the cosmic microwave background we can extend the reach of physics to allow for fitting gravity simultaneously with the expansion equation of state, diluting the equation of state estimation by less than 25percent relative to when general relativity is assumed, and determining the growth index to 8percent. For weak lensing we examine the level of understanding needed of quasi- and nonlinear structure formation in modified gravity theories, and the trade off between stronger precision but greater susceptibility to bias as progressively more nonlinear information is used.

  2. An Intimate Relationship between Higgs Forces, Dark Matter, and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Our universe's 8 permanent matter particles were: up quark, down quark, electron, electron-neutrino, muon-neutrino, tau-neutrino, zino, and photino. Zino and photino were dark matter particles. Each permanent matter particle had an associated supersymmetric Higgs force. Sum of the 8 Higgs force energies was dark energy. Amplifications of Higgs theory included: 16 SM matter/force particles, 16 superpartners, 32 anti-particles, and 64 associated supersymmetric Higgs particles; 17 Higgs forces and 15 Higgsinos; Higgs force was a residual super force; Matter particles and associated Higgs forces were one and inseparable and modeled as underweight porcupine with overgrown spines; Mass given to a matter particle via associated Higgs force and gravitational force messenger particles; Super force condensed into 17 matter/Higgs forces at 17 extremely high temperatures; 9 transient matter particles/Higgs forces evaporated to super force and condensed to 8 permanent matter particles/Higgs forces (decay); Spontaneous symmetry breaking was bidirectional; Matter/Higgs force creation was time synchronous with inflation and one to seven Planck cubes energy to matter expansion; 128 matter/force particles required for Conservation of Energy/Mass accountability at t = 100s.

  3. Nonparametric reconstruction of the dark energy equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Holsclaw, Tracy; Sanso, Bruno; Lee, Herbert; Alam, Ujjaini; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2010-11-15

    A basic aim of ongoing and upcoming cosmological surveys is to unravel the mystery of dark energy. In the absence of a compelling theory to test, a natural approach is to better characterize the properties of dark energy in search of clues that can lead to a more fundamental understanding. One way to view this characterization is the improved determination of the redshift-dependence of the dark energy equation of state parameter, w(z). To do this requires a robust and bias-free method for reconstructing w(z) from data that does not rely on restrictive expansion schemes or assumed functional forms for w(z). We present a new nonparametric reconstruction method that solves for w(z) as a statistical inverse problem, based on a Gaussian process representation. This method reliably captures nontrivial behavior of w(z) and provides controlled error bounds. We demonstrate the power of the method on different sets of simulated supernova data; the approach can be easily extended to include diverse cosmological probes.

  4. The readout and control system of the Dark Energy Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honscheid, Klaus; Elliott, Ann; Annis, James; Bonati, Marco; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Castander, Francisco; daCosta, Luiz; Fausti, Angelo; Karliner, Inga; Kuhlmann, Steve; Neilsen, Eric; Patton, Kenneth; Reil, Kevin; Roodman, Aaron; Thaler, Jon; Serrano, Santiago; Soares Santos, Marcelle; Suchyta, Eric

    2012-09-01

    The Dark Energy Camera (DECam) is a new 520 Mega Pixel CCD camera with a 3 square degree field of view designed for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). DES is a high precision, multi-bandpass, photometric survey of 5000 square degrees of the southern sky. DECam is currently being installed at the prime focus of the Blanco 4-m telescope at the Cerro- Tololo International Observatory (CTIO). In this paper we describe SISPI, the data acquisition and control system of the Dark Energy Camera. SISPI is implemented as a distributed multi-processor system with a software architecture based on the Client-Server and Publish-Subscribe design patterns. The underlying message passing protocol is based on PYRO, a powerful distributed object technology system written entirely in Python. A distributed shared variable system was added to support exchange of telemetry data and other information between different components of the system. We discuss the SISPI infrastructure software, the image pipeline, the observer console and user interface architecture, image quality monitoring, the instrument control system, and the observation strategy tool.

  5. Effective field theory of dark energy: a dynamical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frusciante, Noemi; Raveri, Marco; Silvestri, Alessandra E-mail: mraveri@sissa.it

    2014-02-01

    The effective field theory (EFT) of dark energy relies on three functions of time to describe the dynamics of background cosmology. The viability of these functions is investigated here by means of a thorough dynamical analysis. While the system is underdetermined, and one can always find a set of functions reproducing any expansion history, we are able to determine general compatibility conditions for these functions by requiring a viable background cosmology. In particular, we identify a set of variables that allows us to transform the non-autonomous system of equations into an infinite-dimensional one characterized by a significant recursive structure. We then analyze several autonomous sub-systems, obtained truncating the original one at increasingly higher dimension, that correspond to increasingly general models of dark energy and modified gravity. Furthermore, we exploit the recursive nature of the system to draw some general conclusions on the different cosmologies that can be recovered within the EFT formalism and the corresponding compatibility requirements for the EFT functions. The machinery that we set up serves different purposes. It offers a general scheme for performing dynamical analysis of dark energy and modified gravity models within the model independent framework of EFT; the general results, obtained with this technique, can be projected into specific models, as we show in one example. It also can be used to determine appropriate ansätze for the three EFT background functions when studying the dynamics of cosmological perturbations in the context of large scale structure tests of gravity.

  6. In search of the dark matter dark energy interaction: a kinematic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ankan; Banerjee, Narayan

    2017-02-01

    The present work deals with a kinematic approach to modelling the late time dynamics of the universe. This approach is based upon the assumption of constant value of cosmological jerk parameter, which is the dimensionless representation of the third order time derivative of the scale factor. For the Λ CDM model, the value of jerk parameter is  ‑1 throughout the evolution history. Now any model dependent estimation of the value of the jerk parameter would indicate the deviation of the model from the cosmological constant. In the present work, it has also been shown that for a constant jerk parameter model, any deviation of its value from  ‑1 would not allow the dark matter to have an independent conservation, thus indicating an interaction between dark matter and dark energy. Statistical analysis with different observational data sets (namely the observational Hubble parameter data (OHD), the type Ia supernova data (SNe), and the baryon acoustic oscillation data (BAO)) lead to well constrained values of the jerk parameter and the model remains at a very close proximity of the Λ CDM. The possibility of interaction is found to be more likely at high redshift rather than at the present epoch.

  7. Growth of cosmic structure: Probing dark energy beyond expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anže; van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2015-03-01

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. One way to explain the acceleration of the Universe is invoke dark energy parameterized by an equation of state w. Distance measurements provide one set of constraints on w, but dark energy also affects how rapidly structure grows; the greater the acceleration, the more suppressed the growth of structure. Upcoming surveys are therefore designed to probe w with direct observations of the distance scale and the growth of structure, each complementing the other on systematic errors and constraints on dark energy. A consistent set of results will greatly increase the reliability of the final answer. Another possibility is that there is no dark energy, but that General Relativity does not describe the laws of physics accurately on large scales. While the properties of gravity have been measured with exquisite precision at stellar system scales and densities, within our solar system and by binary pulsar systems, its properties in different environments are poorly constrained. To fully understand if General Relativity is the complete theory of gravity we must test gravity across a spectrum of scales and densities. Rapid developments in gravitational wave astronomy and numerical relativity are directed at testing gravity in the high

  8. High-Energy Neutron Backgrounds for Underground Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Direct dark matter detection experiments usually have excellent capability to distinguish nuclear recoils, expected interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter, and electronic recoils, so that they can efficiently reject background events such as gamma-rays and charged particles. However, both WIMPs and neutrons can induce nuclear recoils. Neutrons are then the most crucial background for direct dark matter detection. It is important to understand and account for all sources of neutron backgrounds when claiming a discovery of dark matter detection or reporting limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. One type of neutron background that is not well understood is the cosmogenic neutrons from muons interacting with the underground cavern rock and materials surrounding a dark matter detector. The Neutron Multiplicity Meter (NMM) is a water Cherenkov detector capable of measuring the cosmogenic neutron flux at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, which has an overburden of 2090 meters water equivalent. The NMM consists of two 2.2-tonne gadolinium-doped water tanks situated atop a 20-tonne lead target. It detects a high-energy (>~ 50 MeV) neutron via moderation and capture of the multiple secondary neutrons released when the former interacts in the lead target. The multiplicity of secondary neutrons for the high-energy neutron provides a benchmark for comparison to the current Monte Carlo predictions. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced high-energy neutron flux above 50 MeV is measured to be (1.3 ± 0.2) ~ 10-9 cm-2s-1, in reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The measured multiplicity spectrum agrees well with that of Monte Carlo simulation for multiplicity below 10, but shows an excess of approximately a factor of three over Monte Carlo prediction for multiplicities ~ 10 - 20. In an effort to reduce neutron backgrounds for the dark matter experiment SuperCDMS SNO- LAB, an active neutron veto was developed

  9. Singularities and Entropy in Bulk Viscosity Dark Energy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xin-He; Dou, Xu

    2011-11-01

    In this paper bulk viscosity is introduced to describe the effects of cosmic non-perfect fluid on the cosmos evolution and to build the unified dark energy (DE) with (dark) matter models. Also we derive a general relation between the bulk viscosity form and Hubble parameter that can provide a procedure for the viscosity DE model building. Especially, a redshift dependent viscosity parameter ζ ∝ λ0 + λ1(1 + z)n proposed in the previous work [X.H. Meng and X. Dou, Commun. Theor. Phys. 52 (2009) 377] is investigated extensively in this present work. Further more we use the recently released supernova dataset (the Constitution dataset) to constrain the model parameters. In order to differentiate the proposed concrete dark energy models from the well known ΛCDM model, statefinder diagnostic method is applied to this bulk viscosity model, as a complementary to the Om parameter diagnostic and the deceleration parameter analysis performed by us before. The DE model evolution behavior and tendency are shown in the plane of the statefinder diagnostic parameter pair {r, s} as axes where the fixed point represents the ΛCDM model. The possible singularity property in this bulk viscosity cosmology is also discussed to which we can conclude that in the different parameter regions chosen properly, this concrete viscosity DE model can have various late evolution behaviors and the late time singularity could be avoided. We also calculate the cosmic entropy in the bulk viscosity dark energy frame, and find that the total entropy in the viscosity DE model increases monotonously with respect to the scale factor evolution, thus this monotonous increasing property can indicate an arrow of time in the universe evolution, though the quantum version of the arrow of time is still very puzzling.

  10. Mirror world and superstring-inspired hidden sector of the Universe, dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.; Nielsen, H. B.; Tureanu, A.

    2011-09-01

    We develop a concept of parallel existence of the ordinary (O) and hidden (H) worlds. We compare two cases: (1) when the hidden sector of the Universe is a mirror counterpart of the ordinary world, and (2) when it is a superstring-inspired shadow world described, in contrast to the mirror world, by a symmetry group (or by a chain of groups), which does not coincide with the ordinary world symmetry group. We construct a cosmological model assuming the existence of the superstring-inspired E6 unification, broken at the early stage of the Universe to SO(10)×U(1)Z—in the O-world, and to SU(6)'×SU(2)θ'—in the H-world. As a result, we obtain the low-energy symmetry group GSM'×SU(2)θ' in the shadow world, instead of the standard model group GSM existing in the O-world. The additional non-Abelian SU(2)θ' group with massless gauge fields, ”thetons,” is responsible for dark energy. Considering a quintessence model of cosmology with an inflaton σ and an axion aθ, which is a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson induced by the SU(2)θ'-group anomaly, we explain the origin of dark energy, dark matter and ordinary matter. In the present model we review all cosmological epochs (inflation, reheating, recombination and nucleosynthesis), and give our version of the baryogenesis. The cosmological constant problem is also briefly discussed.

  11. Parameter splitting in dark energy: is dark energy the same in the background and in the cosmic structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, J. L.; Verde, L.; Cuesta, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    We perform an empirical consistency test of General Relativity/dark energy by disentangling expansion history and growth of structure constraints. We replace each late-universe parameter that describes the behavior of dark energy with two meta-parameters: one describing geometrical information in cosmological probes, and the other controlling the growth of structure. If the underlying model is correct, that is under the null hypothesis, the two meta-parameters coincide. We present a global analysis using state-of-the-art cosmological data sets which points in the direction that cosmic structures prefer a weaker growth than that inferred by background probes. This result could signify inconsistencies of the model, the necessity of extensions to it or the presence of systematic errors in the data. We examine all these possibilities. The fact that the result is mostly driven by a specific sub-set of galaxy clusters abundance data, points to the need of a better understanding of this probe

  12. Galactic cluster winds in presence of a dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Merafina, M.

    2013-10-01

    We obtain a solution for the hydrodynamic outflow of the polytropic gas from the gravitating centre, in the presence of the uniform dark energy (DE). The antigravity of DE is enlightening the outflow and makes the outflow possible at smaller initial temperature, at the same density. The main property of the wind in the presence of DE is its unlimited acceleration after passing the critical point. In application of this solution to the winds from galaxy clusters, we suggest that collision of the strongly accelerated wind with another galaxy cluster, or with another galactic cluster wind, could lead to the formation of a highest energy cosmic rays.

  13. Inflation and dark energy from the Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect

    Artymowski, Michał; Lalak, Zygmunt; Lewicki, Marek

    2015-06-17

    We consider the Brans-Dicke theory motivated by the f(R)=R+αR{sup n}−βR{sup 2−n} model to obtain a stable minimum of the Einstein frame scalar potential of the Brans-Dicke field. As a result we have obtained an inflationary scalar potential with non-zero value of residual vacuum energy, which may be a source of dark energy. In addition we discuss the probability of quantum tunnelling from the minimum of the potential. Our results can be easily consistent with PLANCK or BICEP2 data for appropriate choices of the value of n and ω.

  14. Light bending as a probe of the nature of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Finelli, F.; Galaverni, M.; Gruppuso, A.

    2007-02-15

    We study the bending of light for static spherically symmetric (SSS) space-times which include a dark energy contribution. Geometric dark energy models generically predict a correction to the Einstein angle written in terms of the distance to the closest approach, whereas a cosmological constant {lambda} does not. While dark energy is associated with a repulsive force in cosmological context, its effect on null geodesics in SSS space-times can be attractive as for the Newtonian term. This dark energy contribution may not be negligible with respect to the Einstein prediction in lensing involving clusters of galaxies. Strong lensing may therefore be useful to distinguish {lambda} from other dark energy models.

  15. Constraints on interacting dark energy from time delay lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu; Cao, Shuo; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    We use the time delay measurements between multiple images of lensed sources in 18 strongly gravitationally lensed (SGL) systems to put additional constraints on three phenomenological interaction models for dark energy (DE) and dark matter (DM). The compatibility among the fits on the three models seems to imply that the coupling between DE and DM is a small value close to zero, which is compatible with the previous results for constraining interacting DE parameters. We find that, among the three interacting DE models, the γmIDE model with the interaction term Q proportional to the energy density of DM provides relatively better fits to recent observations. However, the coincidence problem is still very severe in the framework of three interacting DE models, since the fitting results do not show any preference for a nonzero coupling between DE and DM. More importantly, we have studied the significance of the current strong lensing data in deriving the interacting information between dark sectors, which highlights the importance of strong lensing time delay measurements to provide additional observational fits on alternative cosmological models.

  16. A geometric measure of dark energy with pairs of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, Christian; Buzzi, Adeline

    2010-11-25

    Observations indicate that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, which is attributed to a ‘dark energy’ component that opposes gravity. There is a purely geometric test of the expansion of the Universe (the Alcock–Paczynski test), which would provide an independent way of investigating the abundance (Ω(X)) and equation of state (W(X)) of dark energy. It is based on an analysis of the geometrical distortions expected from comparing the real-space and redshift-space shape of distant cosmic structures, but it has proved difficult to implement. Here we report an analysis of the symmetry properties of distant pairs of galaxies from archival data. This allows us to determine that the Universe is flat. By alternately fixing its spatial geometry at Ω(k)≡0 and the dark energy equation-of-state parameter at W(X)≡-1, and using the results of baryon acoustic oscillations, we can establish at the 68.3% confidence level that and -0.85>W(X)>-1.12 and 0.60<Ω(X)<0.80.

  17. Can We Hope To Detect Dark Energy Perturbations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, R.; Doré, O.

    2005-08-01

    We review the implications of having a non-trivial matter component in the Universe and the potential for detecting such a component through the matter power spectrum and ISW effect. We adopt a phenomenological approach and consider the mysterious dark energy to be a cosmic fluid. It is thus fully characterized, up to linear order, by its equation of state and its speed of sound. Whereas the equation of state has been widely studied in the literature, less interest has been devoted to the speed of sound. Its observational consequences come predominantly from very large-scale modes of dark matter perturbations (k < 0.01 h Mpc-1). Because these modes have hardly been probed so far by large scale galaxy surveys, we investigate whether joint constraints can be placed on those two quantities using the recent CMB fluctuations measurements by WMAP and the recently measured CMB large-scale structure cross-correlation.

  18. A scalar field dark energy model: Noether symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sourav; Panja, Madan Mohan; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2016-04-01

    Scalar field dark energy cosmology has been investigated in the present paper in the frame work of Einstein gravity. In the context of Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space time minimally coupled scalar field with self interacting potential and non-interacting perfect fluid with barotropic equation of state (dark matter) is chosen as the matter context. By imposing Noether symmetry on the Lagrangian of the system the symmetry vector is obtained and the self interacting potential for the scalar field is determined. Then we choose a point transformation (a, φ )→ (u, v) such that one of the transformation variable (say u) is cyclic for the Lagrangian. Subsequently, using conserved charge (corresponding to the cyclic co-ordinate) and the constant of motion, solutions are obtained. Finally, the cosmological implication of the solutions in the perspective of recent observation has been examined.

  19. Restrained dark U (1 )d at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Fagner C.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a spontaneously broken U (1 )d gauge symmetry with a muon-specific dark Higgs. Our first goal is to verify how the presence of a new dark Higgs, ϕ , and a dark gauge boson, V , can simultaneously face the anomalies from the muon magnetic moment and the proton charge radius. Second, by assuming that V must decay to an electron-positron pair, we explore the corresponding parameter space determined with the low-energy constraints coming from K →μ X , electron (g -2 )e, K →μ νμe+e-, K →μ νμμ+μ-, and τ →ντμ νμe+e-. We focus on the scenario where the V mass is below ˜2 mμ and the ϕ mass runs from few MeV to 250 MeV, with V -photon mixing of the order ˜O (10-3). Among weak process at low energies, we check the influence of the new light vector on kaon decays as well as on the scattering e+e-→μ+μ-e+e- and discuss the impact of the dark Higgs on e+e-→μ+μ-μ+μ-. Finally, we consider contributions of the V -photon mixing in the decays π0→γ e+e-, η →γ e+e-, ρ →π e+e-, K*→K e+e-, and ϕ (1020 )→η e+e-.

  20. Cosmological aspects of a unified dark energy and dust dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicova, Denitsa; Stoilov, Michail

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a model of modified gravity plus single scalar field was proposed, in which the scalar couples both to the standard Riemannian volume form given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume form given in terms of an auxiliary maximal rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. This model provides an exact unified description of both dark energy (via dynamically generated cosmological constant) and dark matter (as a “dust” fluid due to a hidden nonlinear Noether symmetry). In this paper, we test the model against Supernovae type Ia experimental data and investigate the future Universe evolution which follows from it. Our results show that this model has very interesting features allowing various scenarios of Universe evolution and in the same time perfectly fits contemporary observational data. It can describe exponentially expanding or finite expanding Universe and moreover, a Universe with phase transition of first kind. The phase transition occurs to a new, emerging at some time ground state with lower energy density, which affects significantly the Universe evolution.

  1. Dissipation of 'dark energy' by cortex in knowledge retrieval.

    PubMed

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrode arrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli.

  2. Traversable geometric dark energy wormholes constrained by astrophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deng; Meng, Xin-he

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the astrophysical observations into the wormhole research. We investigate the evolution behavior of the dark energy equation of state parameter ω by constraining the dark energy model, so that we can determine in which stage of the universe wormholes can exist by using the condition ω <-1. As a concrete instance, we study the Ricci dark energy (RDE) traversable wormholes constrained by astrophysical observations. Particularly, we find from Fig. 5 of this work, when the effective equation of state parameter ω _X<-1 (or z<0.109), i.e., the null energy condition (NEC) is violated clearly, the wormholes will exist (open). Subsequently, six specific solutions of statically and spherically symmetric traversable wormhole supported by the RDE fluids are obtained. Except for the case of a constant redshift function, where the solution is not only asymptotically flat but also traversable, the five remaining solutions are all non-asymptotically flat, therefore, the exotic matter from the RDE fluids is spatially distributed in the vicinity of the throat. Furthermore, we analyze the physical characteristics and properties of the RDE traversable wormholes. It is worth noting that, using the astrophysical observations, we obtain the constraints on the parameters of the RDE model, explore the types of exotic RDE fluids in different stages of the universe, limit the number of available models for wormhole research, reduce theoretically the number of the wormholes corresponding to different parameters for the RDE model, and provide a clearer picture for wormhole investigations from the new perspective of observational cosmology.

  3. Local dark matter and dark energy as estimated on a scale of ~1 Mpc in a self-consistent way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Dark energy was first detected from large distances on gigaparsec scales. If it is vacuum energy (or Einstein's Λ), it should also exist in very local space. Here we discuss its measurement on megaparsec scales of the Local Group. Aims: We combine the modified Kahn-Woltjer method for the Milky Way-M 31 binary and the HST observations of the expansion flow around the Local Group in order to study in a self-consistent way and simultaneously the local density of dark energy and the dark matter mass contained within the Local Group. Methods: A theoretical model is used that accounts for the dynamical effects of dark energy on a scale of ~1 Mpc. Results: The local dark energy density is put into the range 0.8-3.7ρv (ρv is the globally measured density), and the Local Group mass lies within 3.1-5.8×1012 M⊙. The lower limit of the local dark energy density, about 4/5× the global value, is determined by the natural binding condition for the group binary and the maximal zero-gravity radius. The near coincidence of two values measured with independent methods on scales differing by ~1000 times is remarkable. The mass ~4×1012 M⊙ and the local dark energy density ~ρv are also consistent with the expansion flow close to the Local Group, within the standard cosmological model. Conclusions: One should take into account the dark energy in dynamical mass estimation methods for galaxy groups, including the virial theorem. Our analysis gives new strong evidence in favor of Einstein's idea of the universal antigravity described by the cosmological constant.

  4. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, J.A.S.; Graef, L.L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons–Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current 'quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  5. Instability of Interacting Ghost Dark Energy Model in an Anisotropic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, N.; Barati, F.

    2016-07-01

    A new dark energy model called "ghost dark energy" was recently suggested to explain the observed accelerating expansion of the universe. This model originates from the Veneziano ghost of QCD. The dark energy density is proportional to Hubble parameter, ρ Λ = α H, where α is a constant of order {Λ }3_{QCD} and Λ Q C D ˜ 100 M e V is QCD mass scale. In this paper, we investigate about the stability of generalized QCD ghost dark energy model against perturbations in the anisotropic background. At first, the ghost dark energy model of the universe with spatial BI model with/without the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is discussed. In particular, the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and a differential equation governing the evolution of this dark energy model are obtained. Then, we use the squared sound speed {vs2} the sign of which determines the stability of the model. We explore the stability of this model in the presence/absence of interaction between dark energy and dark matter in both flat and non-isotropic geometry. In conclusion, we find evidence that the ghost dark energy might can not lead to a stable universe favored by observations at the present time in BI universe.

  6. Confronting dark energy models using galaxy cluster number counts

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, S.; Plionis, M.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2010-10-15

    The mass function of cluster-size halos and their redshift distribution are computed for 12 distinct accelerating cosmological scenarios and confronted to the predictions of the conventional flat {Lambda}CDM model. The comparison with {Lambda}CDM is performed by a two-step process. First, we determine the free parameters of all models through a joint analysis involving the latest cosmological data, using supernovae type Ia, the cosmic microwave background shift parameter, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Apart from a braneworld inspired cosmology, it is found that the derived Hubble relation of the remaining models reproduces the {Lambda}CDM results approximately with the same degree of statistical confidence. Second, in order to attempt to distinguish the different dark energy models from the expectations of {Lambda}CDM, we analyze the predicted cluster-size halo redshift distribution on the basis of two future cluster surveys: (i) an X-ray survey based on the eROSITA satellite, and (ii) a Sunayev-Zeldovich survey based on the South Pole Telescope. As a result, we find that the predictions of 8 out of 12 dark energy models can be clearly distinguished from the {Lambda}CDM cosmology, while the predictions of 4 models are statistically equivalent to those of the {Lambda}CDM model, as far as the expected cluster mass function and redshift distribution are concerned. The present analysis suggests that such a technique appears to be very competitive to independent tests probing the late time evolution of the Universe and the associated dark energy effects.

  7. HIRAX: a probe of dark energy and radio transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, L. B.; Bandura, K.; Bucher, M. A.; Chang, T.-C.; Chiang, H. C.; Cliche, J. F.; Davé, R.; Dobbs, M.; Clarkson, C.; Ganga, K. M.; Gogo, T.; Gumba, A.; Gupta, N.; Hilton, M.; Johnstone, B.; Karastergiou, A.; Kunz, M.; Lokhorst, D.; Maartens, R.; Macpherson, S.; Mdlalose, M.; Moodley, K.; Ngwenya, L.; Parra, J. M.; Peterson, J.; Recnik, O.; Saliwanchik, B.; Santos, M. G.; Sievers, J. L.; Smirnov, O.; Stronkhorst, P.; Taylor, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Van Vuuren, G.; Weltman, A.; Witzemann, A.

    2016-08-01

    The Hydrogen Intensity and Real-time Analysis eXperiment (HIRAX) is a new 400{800MHz radio interferometer under development for deployment in South Africa. HIRAX will comprise 1024 six meter parabolic dishes on a compact grid and will map most of the southern sky over the course of four years. HIRAX has two primary science goals: to constrain Dark Energy and measure structure at high redshift, and to study radio transients and pulsars. HIRAX will observe unresolved sources of neutral hydrogen via their redshifted 21-cm emission line (`hydrogen intensity mapping'). The resulting maps of large-scale structure at redshifts 0.8{2.5 will be used to measure Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). BAO are a preferential length scale in the matter distribution that can be used to characterize the expansion history of the Universe and thus understand the properties of Dark Energy. HIRAX will improve upon current BAO measurements from galaxy surveys by observing a larger cosmological volume (larger in both survey area and redshift range) and by measuring BAO at higher redshift when the expansion of the universe transitioned to Dark Energy domination. HIRAX will complement CHIME, a hydrogen intensity mapping experiment in the Northern Hemisphere, by completing the sky coverage in the same redshift range. HIRAX's location in the Southern Hemisphere also allows a variety of cross-correlation measurements with large-scale structure surveys at many wavelengths. Daily maps of a few thousand square degrees of the Southern Hemisphere, encompassing much of the Milky Way galaxy, will also open new opportunities for discovering and monitoring radio transients. The HIRAX correlator will have the ability to rapidly and efficiently detect transient events. This new data will shed light on the poorly understood nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs), enable pulsar monitoring to enhance long-wavelength gravitational wave searches, and provide a rich data set for new radio transient phenomena

  8. Forecasts for dark energy measurements with future HI surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Filipe B.; Blake, Chris; Rawlings, Steve

    2010-01-01

    We use two independent methods to forecast the dark energy measurements achievable by combining future galaxy redshift surveys based on the radio HI emission line with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from the Planck satellite. In the first method, we focus on the `standard ruler' provided by the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) length-scale. In the second method, we utilize additional information encoded in the galaxy power spectrum including galaxy bias from velocity-space distortions and the growth of cosmic structure. We find that a radio synthesis array with about 10 per cent of the collecting area of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), equipped with a wide (10-100 deg2) field of view, would have the capacity to perform a 20000 deg2 redshift survey to a maximum redshift zmax ~ 0.8 and thereby produce dark energy measurements that are competitive with surveys likely to be undertaken by optical telescopes around 2015. There would then be powerful arguments for adding collecting area to such a `Phase 1' SKA because of the square-law scaling of survey speed with telescope sensitivity for HI surveys, compared to the linear scaling for optical redshift surveys. The full SKA telescope should, by performing a 20000 deg2 HI redshift survey to zmax ~ 2 around 2020, yield an accurate measurement of cosmological parameters independent of CMB data sets. Combining CMB (Planck) and galaxy power spectrum (SKA) measurements will drive errors in the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w well below the 1 per cent level. The major systematic uncertainty in these forecasts is the lack of direct information about the mass function of high-redshift HI-emitting galaxies. `Stacking experiments' with SKA pathfinders will play an important role in resolving this uncertainty.

  9. Linear perturbation constraints on multi-coupled dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piloyan, Arpine; Marra, Valerio; Baldi, Marco; Amendola, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The Multi-coupled Dark Energy (McDE) scenario has been recently proposed as a specific example of a cosmological model characterized by a non-standard physics of the dark sector of the universe that nevertheless gives an expansion history which does not significantly differ from the one of the standard ΛCDM model. Thanks to a dynamical screening mechanism, in fact, the interaction between the Dark Energy field and the Dark Matter sector is effectively suppressed at the background level during matter domination. As a consequence, background observables cannot discriminate a McDE cosmology from ΛCDM for a wide range of model parameters. On the other hand, linear perturbations are expected to provide tighter bounds due to the existence of attractive and repulsive fifth-forces associated with the dark interactions. In this work, we present the first constraints on the McDE scenario obtained by comparing the predicted evolution of linear density perturbations with a large compilation of recent data sets for the growth rate fσ8, including 6dFGS, LRG, BOSS, WiggleZ and VIPERS. Confirming qualitative expectations, growth rate data provide much tighter bounds on the model parameters as compared to the extremely loose bounds that can be obtained when only the background expansion history is considered. In particular, the 95% confidence level on the coupling strength |β| is reduced from |β| <= 83 (background constraints only) to |β| <= 0.88 (background and linear perturbation constraints). We also investigate how these constraints further improve when using data from future wide-field surveys such as supernova data from LSST and growth rate data from Euclid-type missions. In this case the 95% confidence level on the coupling further reduce to |β| <= 0.85. Such constraints are in any case still consistent with a scalar fifth-force of gravitational strength, and we foresee that tighter bounds might be possibly obtained from the investigation of nonlinear structure

  10. Linear perturbation constraints on multi-coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Piloyan, Arpine; Marra, Valerio; Amendola, Luca; Baldi, Marco E-mail: valerio.marra@me.com E-mail: l.amendola@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-02-01

    The Multi-coupled Dark Energy (McDE) scenario has been recently proposed as a specific example of a cosmological model characterized by a non-standard physics of the dark sector of the universe that nevertheless gives an expansion history which does not significantly differ from the one of the standard ΛCDM model. Thanks to a dynamical screening mechanism, in fact, the interaction between the Dark Energy field and the Dark Matter sector is effectively suppressed at the background level during matter domination. As a consequence, background observables cannot discriminate a McDE cosmology from ΛCDM for a wide range of model parameters. On the other hand, linear perturbations are expected to provide tighter bounds due to the existence of attractive and repulsive fifth-forces associated with the dark interactions. In this work, we present the first constraints on the McDE scenario obtained by comparing the predicted evolution of linear density perturbations with a large compilation of recent data sets for the growth rate fσ{sub 8}, including 6dFGS, LRG, BOSS, WiggleZ and VIPERS. Confirming qualitative expectations, growth rate data provide much tighter bounds on the model parameters as compared to the extremely loose bounds that can be obtained when only the background expansion history is considered. In particular, the 95% confidence level on the coupling strength |β| is reduced from |β| ≤ 83 (background constraints only) to |β| ≤ 0.88 (background and linear perturbation constraints). We also investigate how these constraints further improve when using data from future wide-field surveys such as supernova data from LSST and growth rate data from Euclid-type missions. In this case the 95% confidence level on the coupling further reduce to |β| ≤ 0.85. Such constraints are in any case still consistent with a scalar fifth-force of gravitational strength, and we foresee that tighter bounds might be possibly obtained from the investigation of nonlinear

  11. The Dark Energy Survey: Prospects for resolved stellar populations

    SciTech Connect

    Rossetto, Bruno M.; Santiago, Basílio X.; Girardi, Léo; Camargo, Julio I. B.; Balbinot, Eduardo; da Costa, Luiz N.; Yanny, Brian; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Makler, Martin; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Pellegrini, Paulo S.; Ramos, Beatriz; de Simoni, Fernando; Armstrong, R.; Bertin, E.; Desai, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lin, H.; Mohr, J. J.; Tucker, D. L.

    2011-05-06

    Wide angle and deep surveys, regardless of their primary purpose, always sample a large number of stars in the Galaxy and in its satellite system. We here make a forecast of the expected stellar sample resulting from the Dark Energy Survey and the perspectives that it will open for studies of Galactic structure and resolved stellar populations in general. An estimated 1.2 x 108 stars will be sampled in DES grizY filters in the southern equatorial hemisphere. This roughly corresponds to 20% of all DES sources. Most of these stars belong to the stellar thick disk and halo of the Galaxy.

  12. General Astrophysics with TPF: Not Just Dark Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Besides searching for Earth-LIke Planets, TPF can study Jupiters, Neptunes, and all sorts of exotic planets. It can image debris-disks, YSO disks, AGN disks, maybe even AGB disks. And you are probably aware that a large optical space telescope like TPF-C or TPF-O can be a fantastic tool for studying the equation of state of the Dark Energy. I will review some of the future science of TPF-C, TPF-I and TPF-O, focusing on the applications of TPF to the study of objects in our Galaxy: especially circumstellar disks and planets other than exo-Earths.

  13. Fiber system design for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppett, Claire; Sharples, Ray; Edelstein, Jerry; Schmoll, Jürgen; Bramall, David; Fagrelius, Parker

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We will describe the Fiber Systems design with specific emphasis on novel approaches and essential elements that lead to exceptional performance.

  14. DES exposure checker: Dark Energy Survey image quality control crowdsourcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, Peter; Sheldon, Erin; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Rykoff, Eli S.

    2015-11-01

    DES exposure checker renders science-grade images directly to a web browser and allows users to mark problematic features from a set of predefined classes, thus allowing image quality control for the Dark Energy Survey to be crowdsourced through its web application. Users can also generate custom labels to help identify previously unknown problem classes; generated reports are fed back to hardware and software experts to help mitigate and eliminate recognized issues. These problem reports allow rapid correction of artifacts that otherwise may be too subtle or infrequent to be recognized.

  15. Dark Energy: Anatomy of a Paradigm Shift in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocutt, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    Science is defined by its ability to shift its paradigm on the basis of observation and data. Throughout history, the worldviews of the scientific community have been drastically changed to fit that which was scientifically determined to be fact. One of the latest paradigm shifts happened over the shape and fate of the universe. This research details the progression from the early paradigm of a decelerating expanding universe to the discovery of dark energy and the movement to the current paradigm of a universe that is not only expanding but is also accelerating. Advisor: Dr. Kristine Larsen.

  16. Probing dark energy with lensing magnification in photometric surveys.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Michael D

    2014-02-14

    I present an estimator for the angular cross correlation of two tracers of the cosmological large-scale structure that utilizes redshift information to isolate separate physical contributions. The estimator is derived by solving the Limber equation for a reweighting of the foreground tracer that nulls either clustering or lensing contributions to the cross correlation function. Applied to future photometric surveys, the estimator can enhance the measurement of gravitational lensing magnification effects to provide a competitive independent constraint on the dark energy equation of state.

  17. Attaining the Photometric Precision Required by Future Dark Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Christopher

    2013-01-21

    This report outlines our progress towards achieving the high-precision astronomical measurements needed to derive improved constraints on the nature of the Dark Energy. Our approach to obtaining higher precision flux measurements has two basic components: 1) determination of the optical transmission of the atmosphere, and 2) mapping out the instrumental photon sensitivity function vs. wavelength, calibrated by referencing the measurements to the known sensitivity curve of a high precision silicon photodiode, and 3) using the self-consistency of the spectrum of stars to achieve precise color calibrations.

  18. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a separate White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties leads to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. With early R&D funding, we have achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction. Pre-JDEM AO R&D support will further reduce technical and cost risk. Specific details on the SNAP mission can be found in Aldering et al. (2004, 2005). The primary goal of the SNAP supernova program is to provide a dataset which gives tight constraints on parameters which characterize the dark-energy, e.g. w{sub 0} and w{sub a} where w(a) = w{sub 0} + w{sub a}(1-a). SNAP data can also be used to directly test and discriminate among specific dark energy models. We will do so by building the Hubble diagram of high-redshift supernovae, the same methodology used in the original discovery of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe that established the existence of dark energy (Perlmutter et al. 1998; Garnavich et al. 1998; Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999). The SNAP SN Ia program focuses on minimizing the systematic floor of the supernova method through the use of characterized supernovae that can be sorted into subsets based on subtle signatures of heterogeneity. Subsets may be defined based on host-galaxy morphology, spectral-feature strength and velocity, early-time behavior, inter alia. Independent cosmological analysis of each subset of ''like'' supernovae can be

  19. Modified GBIG scenario as an alternative for dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Kourosh; Rashidi, Narges E-mail: n.rashidi@umz.ac.ir

    2009-09-01

    We construct a DGP-inspired braneworld model where induced gravity on the brane is modified in the spirit of f(R) gravity and stringy effects are taken into account by incorporation of the Gauss–Bonnet term in the bulk action. We explore cosmological dynamics of this model and we show that this scenario is a successful alternative for dark energy proposal. Interestingly, it realizes the phantom-like behavior without introduction of any phantom field on the brane and the effective equation of state parameter crosses the cosmological constant line naturally in the same way as observational data suggest.

  20. Big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background anisotropies and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signore, Monique; Puy, Denis

    2002-05-01

    Over the last decade, cosmological observations have attained a level of precision which allows for very detailed comparison with theoretical predictions. We are beginning to learn the answers to some fundamental questions, using information contained in Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy (CMBA) data. In this talk, we briefly review some studies of the current and prospected constraints imposed by CMBA measurements on the neutrino physics and on the dark energy. As it was already announced by Scott [1], we present some possible new physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). .

  1. On the nature of dark energy: the lattice Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villata, M.

    2013-05-01

    There is something unknown in the cosmos. Something big. Which causes the acceleration of the Universe expansion, that is perhaps the most surprising and unexpected discovery of the last decades, and thus represents one of the most pressing mysteries of the Universe. The current standard ΛCDM model uses two unknown entities to make everything fit: dark energy and dark matter, which together would constitute more than 95 % of the energy density of the Universe. A bit like saying that we have understood almost nothing, but without openly admitting it. Here we start from the recent theoretical results that come from the extension of general relativity to antimatter, through CPT symmetry. This theory predicts a mutual gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter. Our basic assumption is that the Universe contains equal amounts of matter and antimatter, with antimatter possibly located in cosmic voids, as discussed in previous works. From this scenario we develop a simple cosmological model, from whose equations we derive the first results. While the existence of the elusive dark energy is completely replaced by gravitational repulsion, the presence of dark matter is not excluded, but not strictly required, as most of the related phenomena can also be ascribed to repulsive-gravity effects. With a matter energy density ranging from ˜5 % (baryonic matter alone, and as much antimatter) to ˜25 % of the so-called critical density, the present age of the Universe varies between about 13 and 15 Gyr. The SN Ia test is successfully passed, with residuals comparable with those of the ΛCDM model in the observed redshift range, but with a clear prediction for fainter SNe at higher z. Moreover, this model has neither horizon nor coincidence problems, and no initial singularity is requested. In conclusion, we have replaced all the tough problems of the current standard cosmology (including the matter-antimatter asymmetry) with only one question: is the gravitational

  2. Calibrating CHIME: a new radio interferometer to probe dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Laura B.; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Bandura, Kevin; Bond, J. Richard; Connor, Liam; Cliche, Jean-François; Davis, Greg; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Fong, Heather; Gibbs, Kenneth; Gilbert, Adam; Griffin, Elizabeth; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Höfer, Carolin; Klages, Peter; Landecker, Tom; Masui, Kiyoshi; Parra, Juan Mena; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeff; Recnik, Andre; Shaw, J. Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Micheal; Smecher, Graeme; Smegal, Rick; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Don

    2014-07-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a transit interferometer currently being built at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC, Canada. We will use CHIME to map neutral hydrogen in the frequency range 400 { 800MHz over half of the sky, producing a measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) at redshifts between 0.8 { 2.5 to probe dark energy. We have deployed a pathfinder version of CHIME that will yield constraints on the BAO power spectrum and provide a test-bed for our calibration scheme. I will discuss the CHIME calibration requirements and describe instrumentation we are developing to meet these requirements.

  3. Dark energy as a modification of the Friedmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dvali, Gia; Turner, Michael S.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI /Fermilab

    2003-01-01

    Dark energy could actually be the manifestation of a modification to the Friendmann equation arising from new physics (e.g., extra dimensions). Writing the correction as (1 - {Omega}{sub M})H{sup {alpha}}/H{sub 0}{sup {alpha}-2}, they explore the phenomenology and detectability of such. They show that: (1) {alpha} must be {approx}< 1; (2) such a correction behaves like dark energy with equation-of-state w{sub eff} = -1 + {alpha}/2 in the recent past (10{sup 4} > z >> 1) and w = -1 in the distant future and can mimic w < -1 without violating the weak-energy condition; (3) w{sub eff} changes, dz/dw|{sub z {approx} 0.5} {approx} {Omicron}(0.2), which is likely detectable; and (4) a future supernova experiment like SNAP that can determine w with precision {sigma}{sub w}, could determine {alpha} to precision {sigma}{sub {alpha}} {approx} 2{sigma}{sub w}.

  4. Electromagnetic energy transport in nanoparticle chains via dark plasmon modes.

    PubMed

    Solis, David; Willingham, Britain; Nauert, Scott L; Slaughter, Liane S; Olson, Jana; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Paul, Aniruddha; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2012-03-14

    Using light to exchange information offers large bandwidths and high speeds, but the miniaturization of optical components is limited by diffraction. Converting light into electron waves in metals allows one to overcome this problem. However, metals are lossy at optical frequencies and large-area fabrication of nanometer-sized structures by conventional top-down methods can be cost-prohibitive. We show electromagnetic energy transport with gold nanoparticles that were assembled into close-packed linear chains. The small interparticle distances enabled strong electromagnetic coupling causing the formation of low-loss subradiant plasmons, which facilitated energy propagation over many micrometers. Electrodynamic calculations confirmed the dark nature of the propagating mode and showed that disorder in the nanoparticle arrangement enhances energy transport, demonstrating the viability of using bottom-up nanoparticle assemblies for ultracompact opto-electronic devices.

  5. Unification of dark energy and dark matter based on the Petrov classification and space-time symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The Petrov classification of stress-energy tensors provides a model-independent definition of a vacuum by the algebraic structure of its stress-energy tensor and implies the existence of vacua whose symmetry is reduced as compared with the maximally symmetric de Sitter vacuum associated with the Einstein cosmological term. This allows to describe a vacuum in general setting by dynamical vacuum dark fluid, presented by a variable cosmological term with the reduced symmetry which makes vacuum dark fluid essentially anisotropic and allows it to be evolving and clustering. The relevant regular solutions to the Einstein equations describe regular cosmological models with time-evolving and spatially inhomogeneous vacuum dark energy, and compact vacuum objects generically related to a dark energy through the de Sitter vacuum interior: regular black holes, their remnants and self-gravitating vacuum solitons — which can be responsible for observational effects typically related to a dark matter. The mass of objects with de Sitter interior is generically related to vacuum dark energy and to breaking of space-time symmetry.

  6. A Terrestrial Search for Dark Contents of the Vacuum, Such as Dark Energy, Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, Ronald J.; Muller, Holger; Perl, Martin L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    We describe the theory and first experimental work on our concept for searching on earth for the presence of dark contents of the vacuum (DCV) using atom interferometry. Specifically, we have in mind any DCV that has not yet been detected on a laboratory scale, but which might manifest itself as dark energy on the cosmological scale. The experimental method uses two atom interferometers to cancel the effect of earth's gravity and diverse noise sources. It depends upon two assumptions: first, that the DCV possesses some space inhomogeneity in density, and second that it exerts a sufficiently strong nongravitational force on matter. The motion of the apparatus through the DCV should then lead to an irregular variation in the detected matter-wave phase shift. We discuss the nature of this signal and note the problem of distinguishing it from instrumental noise. We also discuss the relation of our experiment to what might be learned by studying the noise in gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO. The paper concludes with a projection that a future search of this nature might be carried out using an atom interferometer in an orbiting satellite. The laboratory apparatus is now being constructed.

  7. Correspondence between Yang—Mills Condensate Dark Energy with Various Kinds of Scalar Field Models of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Pameli; Debnath, Ujjal

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study a new kind of dark energy (DE), which is named as “Yang—Mills condensate” (YMC). We study the stability and wde — w'de analysis of YMC DE model. Then we correspond it with quintessence, k-essence, tachyon, phantom, dilaton, DBI-essence and hessence scalar field models of DE in FRW spacetime to reconstruct potentials as well as the dynamics for these scalar fields for describing the acceleration of the universe. We also analyze the models in graphically to interpret the nature of the scalar fields and corresponding potentials.

  8. Semi-dynamical perturbations of unified dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lombriser, Lucas; Taylor, Andy E-mail: ant@roe.ac.uk

    2015-11-01

    Linear cosmological perturbations of a large class of modified gravity and dark energy models can be unified in the effective field theory of cosmic acceleration, encompassing Horndeski scalar-tensor theories and beyond. The fully available model space inherent to this formalism cannot be constrained by measurements in the quasistatic small-scale regime alone. To facilitate the analysis of modifications from the concordance model beyond this limit, we introduce a semi-dynamical treatment extrapolated from the evolution of perturbations at a pivot scale of choice. At small scales, and for Horndeski theories, the resulting modifications recover a quasistatic approximation but account for corrections to it near the Hubble scale. For models beyond Horndeski gravity, we find that the velocity field and time derivative of the spatial metric potential can generally not be neglected, even in the small-scale limit. We test the semi-dynamical approximation against the linear perturbations of a range of dark energy and modified gravity models, finding good agreement between the two.

  9. The dark energy survey and operations: years 1 to 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, H. T.; Neilsen, E.; Gruendl, R.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Aleksić, J.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Balbinot, E.; Baumer, M.; Beaufore, L.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G.; Birrer, S.; Bonnett, C.; Brout, D.; Bruderer, C.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Clerkin, L.; Covarrubias, R.; Cuhna, C.; D'Andrea, C.; da Costa, L.; Das, R.; Davis, C.; Dietrich, J.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Elliott, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Etherington, J.; Flaugher, B. L.; Frieman, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernández, M. G.; Furlanetto, C.; Gangkofner, D.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Grabowski, K.; Gupta, R. R.; Hamilton, S.; Head, H.; Helsby, J.; Hollowood, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Jouvel, S.; Kacprzac, T.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A.; Krause, E.; Krawiec, C. I.; Kremin, A.; Kron, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lasker, J.; Li, T. S.; Luque, E.; Maccrann, N.; March, M.; Marshall, J.; Mondrik, N. P.; Morganson, E. P.; Mudd, D.; Nadolski, A.; Nugent, P.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Nagasawa, D. Q.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Old, L.; Palmese, A.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Pujol, A.; Queiroz, A. B. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Rosenfeld, R.; Roodman, A.; Rooney, P.; Sako, M.; Salvador, A. I.; Sánchez, C.; Sánchez Álvaro, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schooneveld, A.; Schubnell, M.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Soumagnac, M.; Spinka, H.; Tie, S. S.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; Vivas, K.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Wiesner, M.; Wilcox, H.; Williams, P.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is an operating optical survey aimed at understanding the accelerating expansion of the universe using four complementary methods: weak gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster counts, baryon acoustic oscillations, and Type Ia supernovae. To perform the 5000 sq-degree wide field and 30 sq-degree supernova surveys, the DES Collaboration built the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square-degree, 570-Megapixel CCD camera that was installed at the prime focus of the Blanco 4-meter telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). DES has completed its third observing season out of a nominal five. This paper describes DES "Year 1" (Y1) to "Year 3" (Y3), the strategy, an outline of the survey operations procedures, the efficiency of operations and the causes of lost observing time. It provides details about the quality of the first three season's data, and describes how we are adjusting the survey strategy in the face of the El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  10. An Astrophysical Peek into Einstein's Static Universe: No Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    It is shown that in order that the fluid pressure and acceleration are uniform and finite in Einstein's Static Universe (ESU), , the cosmological constant, is zero. being a fundamental constant, should be same everywhere including the Friedman model. Independent proofs show that it must be so. Accordingly, the supposed acceleration of the universe and the attendant concept of "Dark Energy"(DE) could be an illusion; an artifact of explaining cosmological observations in terms of an oversimplified model which is fundamentally inappropriate. Indeed observations show that the actual universe is lumpy and inhomogeneous at the largest scales. Further in order that there is no preferred centre, such inhomogeneity might be expressed in terms of infinite hierarchial fractals. Also, the recent finding that the Friedman model intrinsically corresponds to zero pressure (and hence zero temperature) in accordance with the fact that an ideal Hubble flow implies no collision, no randomness (Mitra, Astrophys. Sp. Sc., 333,351, 2011) too shows that the Friedman model cannot represent the real universe having pressure, temperature and radiation. Dark Energy might also be an artifact of the neglect of dust absorption of distant Type 1a supernovae coupled with likely evolution of supernovae luminosities or imprecise calibration of cosmic distance ladders or other systemetic errors (White, Rep. Prog. Phys., 70, 883, 2007).

  11. The Dark Energy Survey and operations: Year 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, H. T.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Baruah, L.; Bermeo, A.; Bernstein, G.; Beynon, E.; Bruderer, C.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Campbell, H.; Capozzi, D.; Carter, M.; Casas, R.; Clerkin, L.; Covarrubias, R.; Cuhna, C.; D'Andrea, C.; da Costa, L.; Das, R.; DePoy, D. L.; Dietrich, J.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Elliott, A.; Eifler, T.; Estrada, J.; Etherington, J.; Flaugher, B. L.; Frieman, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Gelman, M.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R.; Hao, J.; Head, H.; Helsby, J.; Hoffman, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Johnson, M.; Kacprzac, T.; Katsaros, J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kunder, A.; Li, T.; Lin, H.; Maccrann, N.; March, M.; Marshall, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nugent, P.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Old, L.; Papadopoulos, A.; Patton, K.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Poulton, R.; Pujol, A.; Reil, K.; Rigby, T.; Romer, A.; Roodman, A.; Rooney, P.; Sanchez Alvaro, E.; Serrano, S.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Soumagnac, M.; Spinka, H.; Suchyta, E.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Wiesner, M.; Wilcox, H.; Williams, R.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.-.

    2014-08-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a next generation optical survey aimed at understanding the accelerating expansion of the universe using four complementary methods: weak gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster counts, baryon acoustic oscillations, and Type Ia supernovae. To perform the 5000 sq-degree wide field and 30 sq-degree supernova surveys, the DES Collaboration built the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square-degree, 570-Megapixel CCD camera that was installed at the prime focus of the Blanco 4-meter telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). DES started its first observing season on August 31, 2013 and observed for 105 nights through mid-February 2014. This paper describes DES "Year 1" (Y1), the strategy and goals for the first year's data, provides an outline of the operations procedures, lists the efficiency of survey operations and the causes of lost observing time, provides details about the quality of the first year's data, and hints at the "Year 2" plan and outlook.

  12. Dark energy or modified gravity? An effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, Jolyon; Flanagan, Éanna É.; Park, Minjoon; Watson, Scott E-mail: eef3@cornell.edu E-mail: gswatson@syr.edu

    2013-08-01

    We take an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach to unifying existing proposals for the origin of cosmic acceleration and its connection to cosmological observations. Building on earlier work where EFT methods were used with observations to constrain the background evolution, we extend this program to the level of the EFT of the cosmological perturbations — following the example from the EFT of Inflation. Within this framework, we construct the general theory around an assumed background which will typically be chosen to mimic ΛCDM, and identify the parameters of interest for constraining dark energy and modified gravity models with observations. We discuss the similarities to the EFT of Inflation, but we also identify a number of subtleties including the relationship between the scalar perturbations and the Goldstone boson of the spontaneously broken time translations. We present formulae that relate the parameters of the fundamental Lagrangian to the speed of sound, anisotropic shear stress, effective Newtonian constant, and Caldwell's varpi parameter, emphasizing the connection to observations. It is anticipated that this framework will be of use in constraining individual models, as well as for placing model-independent constraints on dark energy and modified gravity model building.

  13. Is the effective field theory of dark energy effective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Eric V.; Sengör, Gizem; Watson, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The effective field theory of cosmic acceleration systematizes possible contributions to the action, accounting for both dark energy and modifications of gravity. Rather than making model dependent assumptions, it includes all terms, subject to the required symmetries, with four (seven) functions of time for the coefficients. These correspond respectively to the Horndeski and general beyond Horndeski class of theories. We address the question of whether this general systematization is actually effective, i.e. useful in revealing the nature of cosmic acceleration when compared with cosmological data. The answer is no and yes: there is no simple time dependence of the free functions—assumed forms in the literature are poor fits, but one can derive some general characteristics in early and late time limits. For example, we prove that the gravitational slip must restore to general relativity in the de Sitter limit of Horndeski theories, and why it doesn't more generally. We also clarify the relation between the tensor and scalar sectors, and its important relation to observations; in a real sense the expansion history H(z) or dark energy equation of state w(z) is 1/5 or less of the functional information! In addition we discuss the de Sitter, Horndeski, and decoupling limits of the theory utilizing Goldstone techniques.

  14. The Dark Energy Survey and Operations: Years 1 to 3

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is an operating optical survey aimed at understanding the accelerating expansion of the universe using four complementary methods: weak gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster counts, baryon acoustic oscillations, and Type Ia supernovae. To perform the 5000 sq-degree wide field and 30 sq-degree supernova surveys, the DES Collaboration built the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square-degree, 570-Megapixel CCD camera that was installed at the prime focus of the Blanco 4-meter telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). DES has completed its third observing season out of a nominal five. This paper describes DES “Year 1” (Y1) to “Year 3” (Y3), the strategy, an outline of the survey operations procedures, the efficiency of operations and the causes of lost observing time. It provides details about the quality of the first three season's data, and describes how we are adjusting the survey strategy in the face of the El Niño Southern Oscillation

  15. Interacting varying ghost dark energy models in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, Martiros; Khurshudyan, Amalya; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by recent developments in Cosmology we would like to consider an extension of the Ghost DE which we will name as varying Ghost DE. Ghost DE like other models was introduced recently as a possible way to explain accelerated expansion of the Universe. For the phenomenological origin of the varying Ghost dark energy in our Universe we can suggest an existence of some unknown dynamics between the Ghost Dark energy and a fluid which evaporated completely making sense of the proposed effect. Moreover, we assume that this was in the epochs and scales which are unreachable by present-day experiments, like in very early Universe. In this study we will investigate the model for cosmological validity. We will apply observational and causality constraints to illuminate physically correct behavior of the model from the phenomenological one. We saw that an interaction between the varying Ghost DE and cold DM (CDM) also provides a solution to the cosmological coincidence problem. And we found that the Ghost DE behaves as a fluid-like matter in early Universe.

  16. Analysis of dark energy models in DGP braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we reconsider the accelerated expansion phenomenon in the DGP braneworld scenario which leads to an accelerated universe without cosmological constant or other form of dark energy for the positive branch (ɛ= +1) which is not more attractive model. Thus, we assume the DGP braneworld scenario with (ɛ= -1) and also interacting Hubble and event horizons pilgrim dark energy models. We extract various cosmological parameters in this scenario and displayed our results with respect to redshift parameter. It is found that the ranges of Hubble parameter are coincided with observational results. The equation of state parameter lies within the suggested ranges of different observational schemes. The squared speed of sound shows stability for all present models in DGP braneworld scenario. The ω_{\\vartheta}-ω'_{\\vartheta} planes lie in the range (ω_{\\vartheta}=-1.13^{+0.24}_{-0.25},ω'_{\\vartheta}<1.32) which has been obtained through different observational schemes. It is remarked that our results of various cosmological parameters shows consistency with different observational data like Planck, WP, BAO, H0 and SNLS.

  17. DARK ENERGY FROM THE LOG-TRANSFORMED CONVERGENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Hee-Jong; Sato, Masanori; Takada, Masahiro; Dodelson, Scott

    2012-03-20

    A logarithmic transform of the convergence field improves 'the information content', i.e., the overall precision associated with the measurement of the amplitude of the convergence power spectrum, by improving the covariance matrix properties. The translation of this improvement in the information content to that in cosmological parameters, such as those associated with dark energy, requires knowing the sensitivity of the log-transformed field to those cosmological parameters. In this paper, we use N-body simulations with ray tracing to generate convergence fields at multiple source redshifts as a function of cosmology. The gain in information associated with the log-transformed field does lead to tighter constraints on dark energy parameters, but only if shape noise is neglected. The presence of shape noise quickly diminishes the advantage of the log-mapping, more quickly than we would expect based on the information content. With or without shape noise, using a larger pixel size allows for a more efficient log-transformation.

  18. Cosmological properties and reconstruction of scalar field models of the Holographic Dark Energy model with Granda-Oliveros cut-off in Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqua, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Assaf, Khudhair A.; Salako, Ines G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the properties of the Holographic Dark Energy (HDE) model in the context of Kaluza-Klein (KK) cosmology with infrared cut-off given by the recently proposed by Granda-Oliveros cut-off, which contains a term proportional to the time derivative of the Hubble parameter and one proportional to the Hubble parameter squared. Moreover, this cut-off is characterized by two free parameters which are the proportional constants of the two terms of the cut-off. We derive the expression of the Equation of State (EoS) parameter ωD and of the deceleration parameter q for both non-interacting and interacting Dark Sectors and in the limiting case of a flat Dark Dominated Universe. Moreover, we study the squared speed of the sound vs2 and the statefinder diagnostic \\{r,s\\} in order to understand the cosmological properties of the model considered. We also develop a correspondence between the model considered and three scalar field models: the tachyon, the k-essence and the quintessence ones.

  19. Dark-energy cosmological models in f( G) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, M. F.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss dark-energy cosmological models in f( G) gravity. For this purpose, a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I cosmological model is considered. First, exact solutions with a well-known form of the f( G) model are explored. One general solution is discussed using a power-law f( G) gravity model and physical quantities are calculated. In particular, Kasner's universe is recovered and the corresponding f( G) gravity models are reported. Second, the energy conditions for the model under consideration are discussed using graphical analysis. It is concluded that solutions with f( G) = G 5/6 support expansion of universe while those with f( G) = G 1/2 do not favor the current expansion.

  20. Inflation and dark energy from the Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect

    Artymowski, Michał; Lalak, Zygmunt; Lewicki, Marek E-mail: Zygmunt.Lalak@fuw.edu.pl

    2015-06-01

    We consider the Brans-Dicke theory motivated by the f(R) = R + α R{sup n} − β R{sup 2−n} model to obtain a stable minimum of the Einstein frame scalar potential of the Brans-Dicke field. As a result we have obtained an inflationary scalar potential with non-zero value of residual vacuum energy, which may be a source of dark energy. In addition we discuss the probability of quantum tunnelling from the minimum of the potential. Our results can be easily consistent with PLANCK or BICEP2 data for appropriate choices of the value of n and ω.

  1. Dark Energy and Dark Matter as Components of Cosmological Term Stand for Vorticity and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgaliev, Ildus S.

    2015-01-01

    This report brings attention to the ignored components of the kinetic energy related to vorticity and shear in the standard cosmological dynamics. It is concluded that averaged term of squared vorticity is term attributed as an accelerated expansion caused by negative energy of an enigmatic repulsive factor. Cosmological singularity has been a consequence of the unrealistically excessive cosmological principle (too detailed symmetry of flow) such as "Hubble law". Appropriate realistic one is suggested, which is also linear function of space coordinates (because of homogeneity principle) but has tensor character. Cosmological principle is applied to irregularities - they are homogeneous and isotropic in average to some extend within the corresponding Megagalactic scales. The "Big Bang" is nothing but the local bounce of the Meta-galaxy which is typical among myriads others. Exact solutions are presented (dynamic, steady and static) of the cosmologic dynamics. "Negative radiation" equation of state p =∈/3 with p≤0, ∈≤0 is generated by vorticity which is dynamic carrier of the dark energy. This fact dismisses the need in any other artificial cosmologic term, the need in any other modifications of the gravity theory or in an exotic matter as a cause for cosmological accelerated expansion. New conception of material point established. Social and educational aspects of the findings touched slightly.

  2. Indirect dark matter signatures in the cosmic dark ages. II. Ionization, heating, and photon production from arbitrary energy injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-01-01

    Any injection of electromagnetically interacting particles during the cosmic dark ages will lead to increased ionization, heating, production of Lyman-α photons and distortions to the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, with potentially observable consequences. In this paper we describe numerical results for the low-energy electrons and photons produced by the cooling of particles injected at energies from keV to multi-TeV scales, at arbitrary injection redshifts (but focusing on the post-recombination epoch). We use these data, combined with existing calculations modeling the cooling of these low-energy particles, to estimate the resulting contributions to ionization, excitation and heating of the gas, and production of low-energy photons below the threshold for excitation and ionization. We compute corrected deposition-efficiency curves for annihilating dark matter, and demonstrate how to compute equivalent curves for arbitrary energy-injection histories. These calculations provide the necessary inputs for the limits on dark matter annihilation presented in the accompanying paper I, but also have potential applications in the context of dark matter decay or deexcitation, decay of other metastable species, or similar energy injections from new physics. We make our full results publicly available at http://nebel.rc.fas.harvard.edu/epsilon, to facilitate further independent studies. In particular, we provide the full low-energy electron and photon spectra, to allow matching onto more detailed codes that describe the cooling of such particles at low energies.

  3. Supernova constraints on multi-coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Piloyan, Arpine; Marra, Valerio; Amendola, Luca; Baldi, Marco E-mail: valerio.marra@me.com E-mail: l.amendola@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2013-07-01

    The persisting consistency of ever more accurate observational data with the predictions of the standard ΛCDM cosmological model puts severe constraints on possible alternative scenarios, but still does not shed any light on the fundamental nature of the cosmic dark sector. As large deviations from a ΛCDM cosmology are ruled out by data, the path to detect possible features of alternative models goes necessarily through the definition of cosmological scenarios that leave almost unaffected the background and — to a lesser extent — the linear perturbations evolution of the universe. In this context, the Multi-coupled DE (McDE) model was proposed by Baldi [9] as a particular realization of an interacting Dark Energy field characterized by an effective screening mechanism capable of suppressing the effects of the coupling at the background and linear perturbation level. In the present paper, for the first time, we challenge the McDE scenario through a direct comparison with real data, in particular with the luminosity distance of Type Ia supernovae. By studying the existence and stability conditions of the critical points of the associated background dynamical system, we select only the cosmologically consistent solutions, and confront their background expansion history with data. Confirming previous qualitative results, the McDE scenario appears to be fully consistent with the adopted sample of Type Ia supernovae, even for coupling values corresponding to an associated scalar fifth-force about four orders of magnitude stronger than standard gravity. Our analysis demonstrates the effectiveness of the McDE background screening, and shows some new non-trivial asymptotic solutions for the future evolution of the universe. Clearly, linear perturbation data and, even more, nonlinear structure formation properties are expected to put much tighter constraints on the allowed coupling range. Nonetheless, our results show how the background expansion history might be

  4. Parameter splitting in dark energy: is dark energy the same in the background and in the cosmic structures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, José Luis; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Verde, Licia E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu

    2016-02-01

    We perform an empirical consistency test of General Relativity/dark energy by disentangling expansion history and growth of structure constraints. We replace each late-universe parameter that describes the behavior of dark energy with two meta-parameters: one describing geometrical information in cosmological probes, and the other controlling the growth of structure. If the underlying model (a standard wCDM cosmology with General Relativity) is correct, that is under the null hypothesis, the two meta-parameters coincide. If they do not, it could indicate a failure of the model or systematics in the data. We present a global analysis using state-of-the-art cosmological data sets which points in the direction that cosmic structures prefer a weaker growth than that inferred by background probes. This result could signify inconsistencies of the model, the necessity of extensions to it or the presence of systematic errors in the data. We examine all these possibilities. The fact that the result is mostly driven by a specific sub-set of galaxy clusters abundance data, points to the need of a better understanding of this probe.

  5. Radio Astronomers Develop New Technique for Studying Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Pioneering observations with the National Science Foundation's giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have given astronomers a new tool for mapping large cosmic structures. The new tool promises to provide valuable clues about the nature of the mysterious "dark energy" believed to constitute nearly three-fourths of the mass and energy of the Universe. Dark energy is the label scientists have given to what is causing the Universe to expand at an accelerating rate. While the acceleration was discovered in 1998, its cause remains unknown. Physicists have advanced competing theories to explain the acceleration, and believe the best way to test those theories is to precisely measure large-scale cosmic structures. Sound waves in the matter-energy soup of the extremely early Universe are thought to have left detectable imprints on the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the Universe. The researchers developed a way to measure such imprints by observing the radio emission of hydrogen gas. Their technique, called intensity mapping, when applied to greater areas of the Universe, could reveal how such large-scale structure has changed over the last few billion years, giving insight into which theory of dark energy is the most accurate. "Our project mapped hydrogen gas to greater cosmic distances than ever before, and shows that the techniques we developed can be used to map huge volumes of the Universe in three dimensions and to test the competing theories of dark energy," said Tzu-Ching Chang, of the Academia Sinica in Taiwan and the University of Toronto. To get their results, the researchers used the GBT to study a region of sky that previously had been surveyed in detail in visible light by the Keck II telescope in Hawaii. This optical survey used spectroscopy to map the locations of thousands of galaxies in three dimensions. With the GBT, instead of looking for hydrogen gas in these individual, distant galaxies -- a daunting challenge beyond the technical

  6. Dark Energy and Dark Matter Phenomena and the Universe with Variable Gravitational Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2005-12-01

    Generation of high-frequency gravitational waves near the singularity is a crucial factor for understanding the origin and dynamics of the Universe. Emission of gravitational waves increases with a decreasing radius of collapsed object much faster than a gravitational force itself. Gravitationally unstable matter of the Universe will be completely converted into gravitational radiation during the Big Crunch. According to Misner, Thorne & Wheeler (Gravitation, 1977, p.959) plane gravitational waves have not gravitational mass or spacetime is flat everywhere outside the pulse. We can propose that the gravitational mass of the Universe is vanished after converting matter into gravitational waves. This hypothesis in the framework of Einstein's theory of gravitation can solve the problem of singularity without contradiction with theorems by Penrose-Hawking; explain the acceleration of our Universe as the effect of a retarded gravitational potential (Gorkavyi, BAAS, 2003, 35, #3) and the low quadrupole in fluctuations in CMB as result of blue-shift effect in a gravitational field. Proposed solution of dark energy problem free from coincidence problems. The hypothesis keeps best parts of Big Bang theory and inflation model without any unknown physical fields or new dimensions. According to this hypothesis a relic sea of high-frequency gravitational radiation in our Universe can be very dense. Interaction of relic gravitational waves with gravitational fields of galaxies and stars can create an additional dynamical effects like pressure of relic radiation that proportional to gravitational potential GM/(Rc2). This effect can be responsible for dark matter phenomena in galaxies and the Pioneer acceleration in the solar system (Gorkavyi, BAAS, 2005, 37, #2).

  7. Free-energy minimization and the dark-room problem.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl; Thornton, Christopher; Clark, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of an important new fundamental theory of brain function. This theory brings information-theoretic, Bayesian, neuroscientific, and machine learning approaches into a single framework whose overarching principle is the minimization of surprise (or, equivalently, the maximization of expectation). The most comprehensive such treatment is the "free-energy minimization" formulation due to Karl Friston (see e.g., Friston and Stephan, 2007; Friston, 2010a,b - see also Fiorillo, 2010; Thornton, 2010). A recurrent puzzle raised by critics of these models is that biological systems do not seem to avoid surprises. We do not simply seek a dark, unchanging chamber, and stay there. This is the "Dark-Room Problem." Here, we describe the problem and further unpack the issues to which it speaks. Using the same format as the prolog of Eddington's Space, Time, and Gravitation (Eddington, 1920) we present our discussion as a conversation between: an information theorist (Thornton), a physicist (Friston), and a philosopher (Clark).

  8. Role of Entropy-Corrected New Agegraphic Dark Energy in Hořava-Lifshitz Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi Khatua, Piyali; Chakraborty, Shuvendu; Debnath, Ujjal

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we have considered the entropy-corrected new agegraphic dark energy (ECNADE) model in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity in FRW universe. We have discussed the correspondence between ECNADE and other dark energy models such as DBI-essence, Yang-Mills dark energy, Chameleon field, Non-linear electrodynamics field and hessence dark energy in the context of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity and reconstructed the potentials and the dynamics of the scalar field theory which describe the ECNADE.

  9. The South Pole Telescope: Unraveling the Mystery of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Christian L.; de Haan, Tijmen; Bleem, Lindsey E.

    2016-07-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10-meter telescope designed to survey the millimeter-wave sky, taking advantage of the exceptional observing conditions at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. The telescope and its ground-breaking 960-element bolometric camera finished surveying 2500 square degrees at 95. 150, and 220 GHz in November 2011. We have discovered hundreds of galaxy clusters in the SPT-SZ survey through the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) effect. The formation of galaxy clusters the largest bound objects in the universe is highly sensitive to dark energy and the history of structure formation. I will discuss the cosmological constraints from the SPT-SZ galaxy cluster sample as well as future prospects with the soon to-be-installed SPT-3G camera.

  10. Structure of Ensemble of Cosmological Models with Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydłowski, Marek; Krawiec, Adam

    2006-06-01

    We show that all cosmological models which offer the explanation of the present acceleration of the Universe can be represented in terms of a fictitious particle moving in a one-dimensional potential parameterized by the scale factor or redshift. On the other hand this potential function can be reconstructed from SNIa data. From the potential function we can reconstruct the phase portraits and find that only models which are topologically equivalent to the ΛCDM model seems to be realistic models of the accelerating universe. We define the ensemble of dark energy models as a subspace of planar dynamical systems. We demonstrate that the ensemble can be structuralized by introducing the Sobolev metric. Then we obtain the Banach space structure of the ensemble. We investigate this ensemble in the context of the generic universe.

  11. Cosmological and astrophysical constraints on tachyon dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Moucherek, F. M. O.

    2016-06-01

    Rolling tachyon field models are among the candidates suggested as explanations for the recent acceleration of the Universe. In these models the field is expected to interact with gauge fields and lead to variations of the fine-structure constant α . Here we take advantage of recent observational progress and use a combination of background cosmological observations of type Ia supernovas and astrophysical and local measurements of α to improve constraints on this class of models. We show that the constraints on α imply that the field dynamics must be extremely slow, leading to a constraint of the present-day dark energy equation of state (1 +w0)<2.4 ×10-7 at the 99.7% confidence level. Therefore current and forthcoming standard background cosmology observational probes cannot distinguish this class of models from a cosmological constant, while detections of α variations could possibly do so since they would have a characteristic redshift dependence.

  12. Cosmic slowing down of acceleration for several dark energy parametrizations

    SciTech Connect

    Magaña, Juan; Cárdenas, Víctor H.; Motta, Verónica E-mail: victor.cardenas@uv.cl

    2014-10-01

    We further investigate slowing down of acceleration of the universe scenario for five parametrizations of the equation of state of dark energy using four sets of Type Ia supernovae data. In a maximal probability analysis we also use the baryon acoustic oscillation and cosmic microwave background observations. We found the low redshift transition of the deceleration parameter appears, independently of the parametrization, using supernovae data alone except for the Union 2.1 sample. This feature disappears once we combine the Type Ia supernovae data with high redshift data. We conclude that the rapid variation of the deceleration parameter is independent of the parametrization. We also found more evidence for a tension among the supernovae samples, as well as for the low and high redshift data.

  13. Do primordial lithium abundances imply there's no dark energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regis, Marco; Clarkson, Chris

    2012-03-01

    Explaining the well established observation that the expansion rate of the universe is apparently accelerating is one of the defining scientific problems of our age. Within the standard model of cosmology, the repulsive `dark energy' supposedly responsible has no explanation at a fundamental level, despite many varied attempts. A further important dilemma in the standard model is the lithium problem, which is the substantial mismatch between the theoretical prediction for 7Li from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and the value that we observe today. This observation is one of the very few we have from along our past worldline as opposed to our past lightcone. By releasing the untested assumption that the universe is homogeneous on very large scales, both apparent acceleration and the lithium problem can be easily accounted for as different aspects of cosmic inhomogeneity, without causing problems for other cosmological phenomena such as the cosmic microwave background. We illustrate this in the context of a void model.

  14. Clouds at CTIO and the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Jr., Eric

    2015-08-01

    An understanding of the weather patters at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American (CTIO) Observatory, the observing site for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is important for assessing the efciency of DES operations in using observing time and for planning future operations. CTIO has maintained records of cloud-cover by quarters of nights since 1975. A comparison between these cloud records in the 2013-2014 DES observing season (DES year 1) and achieved observing efciency and exposure quality allows the DES collaboration to make better use of the historical records in survey planning. Plots and tables here relate human recorded cloud-cover to collection of good DES data, show the variation of typical cloud-cover by month, and evaluate the relationship between the El Niño weather pattern and cloud-cover at CTIO.

  15. Reconstructing the dark energy equation of state with varying couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P. P.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Nunes, N. J.; Olive, K. A.

    2006-10-15

    We revisit the idea of using varying couplings to probe the nature of dark energy, in particular, by reconstructing its equation of state. We show that for the class of models studied this method can be far superior to the standard methods (using type Ia supernovae or weak lensing). We also show that the simultaneous use of measurements of the fine-structure constant {alpha} and the electron-to-proton mass ratio {mu} allows a direct probe of grand unification scenarios. We present forecasts for the sensitivity of this method, both for the near future and for the next generation of spectrographs--for the latter we focus on the planned CODEX instrument for ESO's Extremely Large Telescope (formerly known as OWL). A high-accuracy reconstruction of the equation of state may be possible all the way up to redshift z{approx}4.

  16. Dynamical dark energy: Scalar fields and running vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solà, Joan; Gómez-Valent, Adrià; de Cruz Pérez, Javier

    2017-03-01

    Recent analyses in the literature suggest that the concordance ΛCDM model with rigid cosmological term, Λ = const. may not be the best description of the cosmic acceleration. The class of “running vacuum models”, in which Λ = Λ(H) evolves with the Hubble rate, has been shown to fit the string of SNIa + BAO + H(z) + LSS + CMB data significantly better than the ΛCDM. Here, we provide further evidence on the time-evolving nature of the dark energy (DE) by fitting the same cosmological data in terms of scalar fields. As a representative model, we use the original Peebles and Ratra potential, V ∝ ϕ‑α. We find clear signs of dynamical DE at ˜ 4σ c.l., thus reconfirming through a nontrivial scalar field approach the strong hints formerly found with other models and parametrizations.

  17. Casimir, gravitational, and neutron tests of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2015-03-01

    We investigate laboratory tests of dark energy theories which modify gravity in a way generalizing the inverse power law chameleon models. We make use of the tomographic description of such theories which captures f (R ) models in the large curvature limit, the dilaton and the symmetron. We consider their effects in various experiments where the presence of a new scalar interaction may be uncovered. More precisely, we focus on the Casimir, Eötvös-Washington and neutron experiments. We show that dilatons, symmetrons and generalized chameleon models are efficiently testable in the laboratory. For generalized chameleons, we revise their status in the light of forthcoming Casimir experiments like CANNEX in Amsterdam and show that they are within reach of detection.

  18. Mega-masers, Dark Energy and the Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Fred K. Y.

    2007-10-15

    Powerful water maser emission (water mega-masers) can be found in accretion disks in the nuclei of some galaxies. Besides providing a measure of the mass at the nucleus, such mega-masers can be used to determine the distance to the host galaxy, based on a kinematic model. We will explain the importance of determining the Hubble Constant to high accuracy for constraining the equation of state of Dark Energy and describe the Mega-maser Cosmology Project that has the goal of determining the Hubble Constant to better than 3%. Time permitting, we will also present the scientific capabilities of the current and future NRAO facilities: ALMA, EVLA, VLBA and GBT, for addressing key astrophysical problems

  19. Gravitational wave sirens as a triple probe of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V

    2008-03-15

    Gravitational wave standard sirens have been considered as precision distance indicators of high redshift; however, at high redshift standard sirens or standard candles such as supernovae suffer from lensing noise. We investigate lensing noise as a signal instead and show how measurements of the maximum demagnification (minimum convergence) probe cosmology in a manner highly complementary to the distance itself. Revisiting the original form for minimum convergence we quantify the bias arising from the commonly used approximation. Furthermore, after presenting a new lensing probability function we discuss how the width of the lensed standard siren amplitude distribution also probes growth of structure. Thus standard sirens and candles can serve as triple probes of dark energy, measuring both the cosmic expansion history and growth history.

  20. Gravitational wave sirens as a triple probe of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Eric V.

    2008-03-01

    Gravitational wave standard sirens have been considered as precision distance indicators of high redshift; however, at high redshift standard sirens or standard candles such as supernovae suffer from lensing noise. We investigate lensing noise as a signal instead and show how measurements of the maximum demagnification (minimum convergence) probe cosmology in a manner highly complementary to the distance itself. Revisiting the original form for minimum convergence we quantify the bias arising from the commonly used approximation. Furthermore, after presenting a new lensing probability function we discuss how the width of the lensed standard siren amplitude distribution also probes growth of structure. Thus standard sirens and candles can serve as triple probes of dark energy, measuring both the cosmic expansion history and growth history.

  1. Constraining Dark Energy in Table-Top Quantum Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Holger

    If dark energy is a light scalar field, it might interact with normal matter. The interactions, however, are suppressed in the leading models, which are thus compatible with current cosmological observations as well as solar-system and laboratory studies. Such suppression typically relies on the scalar's interaction with macroscopic amounts of ordinary matter but can be bypassed by studying the interaction with individual particles. Using an atom interferometer, we have placed tight constraints on so-called chameleon models, ruling out interaction parameters smaller than 2 . 3 ×10-5 , while M ~ 1 or larger would lead to conflict with macroscopic experiments. In order to close this gap, we have already increased the sensitivity hundredfold and are expecting a new constraint soon. Purpose-built experiments in the lab or on the international space station will completely close the gap and rule out chameleons and other theories such as symmetrons or f (R) gravity.

  2. Detecting dark energy in orbit: The cosmological chameleon

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Khoury, Justin; Weltman, Amanda

    2004-12-15

    We show that the chameleon scalar field can drive the current phase of cosmic acceleration for a large class of scalar potentials that are also consistent with local tests of gravity. These provide explicit realizations of a quintessence model where the quintessence scalar field couples directly to baryons and dark matter with gravitational strength. We analyze the cosmological evolution of the chameleon field and show the existence of an attractor solution with the chameleon following the minimum of its effective potential. For a wide range of initial conditions, spanning many orders of magnitude in initial chameleon energy density, the attractor is reached before nucleosynthesis. Surprisingly, the range of allowed initial conditions leading to a successful cosmology is wider than in normal quintessence. We discuss applications to the cyclic model of the universe and show how the chameleon mechanism weakens some of the constraints on cyclic potentials.

  3. CMB lensing constraints on dark energy and modified gravity scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Erminia; Cooray, Asantha; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Slosar, Anze; Smoot, George F.

    2009-11-15

    Weak gravitational lensing leaves a characteristic imprint on the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization angular power spectra. Here, we investigate the possible constraints on the integrated lensing potential from future cosmic microwave background angular spectra measurements expected from Planck and EPIC. We find that Planck and EPIC will constrain the amplitude of the integrated projected potential responsible for lensing at 6% and 1% level, respectively, with very little sensitivity to the shape of the lensing potential. We discuss the implications of such a measurement in constraining dark energy and modified gravity scalar-tensor theories. We then discuss the impact of a wrong assumption on the weak lensing potential amplitude on cosmological parameter inference.

  4. Revisiting dark energy models using differential ages of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Nisha; Jain, Deepak; Mahajan, Shobhit; Mukherjee, Amitabha; Biesiada, Marek

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we use a test based on the differential ages of galaxies for distinguishing the dark energy models. As proposed by Jimenez and Loeb in [1], relative ages of galaxies can be used to put constraints on various cosmological parameters. In the same vein, we reconstruct H0dt/dz and its derivative (H0d2t/dz2) using a model independent technique called non-parametric smoothing. Basically, dt/dz is the change in the age of the object as a function of redshift which is directly linked with the Hubble parameter. Hence for reconstruction of this quantity, we use the most recent H(z) data. Further, we calculate H0dt/dz and its derivative for several models like Phantom, Einstein de Sitter (EdS), ΛCDM, Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parametrization, Jassal-Bagla-Padmanabhan (JBP) parametrization and Feng-Shen-Li-Li (FSLL) parametrization. We check the consistency of these models with the results of reconstruction obtained in a model independent way from the data. It is observed that H0dt/dz as a tool is not able to distinguish between the ΛCDM, CPL, JBP and FSLL parametrizations but, as expected, EdS and Phantom models show noticeable deviation from the reconstructed results. Further, the derivative of H0dt/dz for various dark energy models is more sensitive at low redshift. It is found that the FSLL model is not consistent with the reconstructed results, however, the ΛCDM model is in concordance with the 3σ region of the reconstruction at redshift z>= 0.3.

  5. Yang-Mills condensate as dark energy: A nonperturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donà, Pietro; Marcianò, Antonino; Zhang, Yang; Antolini, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Models based on the Yang-Mills condensate (YMC) have been advocated for in the literature and claimed as successful candidates for explaining dark energy. Several variations on this simple idea have been considered, the most promising of which are reviewed here. Nevertheless, the previously attained results relied heavily on the perturbative approach to the analysis of the effective Yang-Mills action, which is only adequate in the asymptotically free limit, and were extended into a regime, the infrared limit, in which confinement is expected. We show that if a minimum of the effective Lagrangian in θ =-Fμν aFa μ ν/2 exists, a YMC forms that drives the Universe toward an accelerated de Sitter phase. The details of the models depend weakly on the specific form of the effective Yang-Mills Lagrangian. Using nonperturbative techniques mutated from the functional renormalization-group procedure, we finally show that the minimum in θ of the effective Lagrangian exists. Thus, a YMC can actually take place. The nonperturbative model has properties similar to the ones in the perturbative model. In the early stage of the Universe, the YMC equation of state has an evolution that resembles the radiation component, i.e., wy→1 /3 . However, in the late stage, wy naturally runs to the critical state with wy=-1 , and the Universe transitions from a matter-dominated into a dark energy dominated stage only at latest time, at a redshift whose value depends on the initial conditions that are chosen while solving the dynamical system.

  6. Reconstructing the properties of dark energy using standard sirens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Sahni, Varun; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2013-04-01

    Future space-based gravity wave (GW) experiments such as the Big Bang Observatory (BBO), with their excellent projected, one sigma angular resolution, will measure the luminosity distance to a large number of GW sources to high precision, and the redshift of the single galaxies in the narrow solid angles towards the sources will provide the redshifts of the gravity wave sources. One sigma BBO beams contain the actual source in only 68% of the cases; the beams that do not contain the source may contain a spurious single galaxy, leading to misidentification. To increase the probability of the source falling within the beam, larger beams have to be considered, decreasing the chances of finding single galaxies in the beams. Saini et al. [T. D. Saini, S. K. Sethi, and V. Sahni, Phys. Rev. D 81, 103009 (2010)PRVDAQ1550-7998] argued, largely analytically, that identifying even a small number of GW source galaxies furnishes a rough distance-redshift relation, which could be used to further resolve sources that have multiple objects in the angular beam. In this work we further develop this idea by introducing a self-calibrating iterative scheme which works in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulations to determine the luminosity distance to GW sources with progressively greater accuracy. This iterative scheme allows one to determine the equation of state of dark energy to within an accuracy of a few percent for a gravity wave experiment possessing a beam width an order of magnitude larger than BBO (and therefore having a far poorer angular resolution). This is achieved with no prior information about the nature of dark energy from other data sets such as type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic microwave background, etc.

  7. Probing dark energy perturbations: The dark energy equation of state and speed of sound as measured by WMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Rachel; Doré, Olivier

    2004-04-01

    We review the implications of having a nontrivial matter component in the Universe and the potential for detecting such a component through the matter power spectrum and integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We adopt a phenomenological approach and consider the mysterious dark energy to be a cosmic fluid. It is thus fully characterized, up to linear order, by its equation of state and its speed of sound. Whereas the equation of state has been widely studied in the literature, less interest has been devoted to the speed of sound. Its observational consequences come predominantly from very large scale modes of dark matter perturbations (k<0.01h Mpc-1). Since these modes have hardly been probed so far by large scale galaxy surveys, we investigate whether joint constraints can be placed on those two quantities using the recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations measurements by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe as well as the recently measured CMB large scale structure cross correlation. We find only a tentative 1 sigma detection of the speed of sound, from CMB alone, c2s<0.04 at this low significance level. Furthermore, the current uncertainties in bias in the matter power spectrum preclude any constraints being placed using the cross correlation of CMB with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey radio survey.

  8. Unification of Dark Matter and Dark Energy in a Modified Entropic Force Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhe; Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Xin

    2011-07-01

    In Verlinde's entropic force scenario of gravity, Newton's laws and Einstein equations can be obtained from the first principles and general assumptions. However, the equipartition law of energy is invalid at very low temperatures. We show clearly that the threshold of the equipartition law of energy is related with horizon of the universe. Thus, a one-dimensional Debye (ODD) model in the direction of radius of the modified entropic force (MEF) may be suitable in description of the accelerated expanding universe. We present a Friedmann cosmic dynamical model in the ODD-MEF framework. We examine carefully constraints on the ODD-MEF model from the Union2 compilation of the Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) collaboration, the data from the observation of the large-scale structure (LSS) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB), i.e. SNe Ia+LSS+CMB. The combined numerical analysis gives the best-fit value of the model parameters ζ ≃ 10-9 and Ωm0 = 0.224, with χ2min = 591.156. The corresponding age of the universe agrees with the result of D. Spergel et al. [J.M. Bardeen, B. Carter, and S.W. Hawking, Commun. Math. Phys. 31 (1973) 161] at 95% confidence level. The numerical result also yields an accelerated expanding universe without invoking any kind of dark energy. Taking ζ(≡ 2πωD/H0) as a running parameter associated with the structure scale r, we obtain a possible unified scenario of the asymptotic flatness of the radial velocity dispersion of spiral galaxies, the accelerated expanding universe and the Pioneer 10/11 anomaly in the entropic force framework of Verlinde.

  9. ESTIMATING THE ''DARK'' ENERGY CONTENT OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2012-12-20

    The discovery of ubiquitous low-frequency (3-5 mHz) Alfvenic waves in the solar chromosphere (with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope) and corona (with CoMP and SDO) has provided some insight into the non-thermal energy content of the outer solar atmosphere. However, many questions remain about the true magnitude of the energy flux carried by these waves. Here we explore the apparent discrepancy in the resolved coronal Alfvenic wave amplitude ({approx}0.5 km s{sup -1}) measured by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) compared to those of the Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) near the limb ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). We use a blend of observational data and a simple forward model of Alfvenic wave propagation to resolve this discrepancy and determine the Alfvenic wave energy content of the corona. Our results indicate that enormous line-of-sight superposition within the coarse spatio-temporal sampling of CoMP hides the strong wave flux observed by Hinode and SDO and leads to the large non-thermal line broadening observed. While this scenario has been assumed in the past, our observations with CoMP of a strong correlation between the non-thermal line broadening with the low-amplitude, low-frequency Alfvenic waves observed in the corona provide the first direct evidence of a wave-related non-thermal line broadening. By reconciling the diverse measurements of Alfvenic waves, we establish large coronal non-thermal line widths as direct signatures of the hidden, or ''dark'', energy content in the corona and provide preliminary constraints on the energy content of the wave motions observed.

  10. Flavor condensates in brane models and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sarkar, Sarben; Tarantino, Walter

    2009-10-15

    In the context of a microscopic model of string-inspired foam, in which foamy structures are provided by brany pointlike defects (D-particles) in space-time, we discuss flavor mixing as a result of flavor nonpreserving interactions of (low-energy) fermionic stringy matter excitations with the defects. Such interactions involve splitting and capture of the matter string state by the defect, and subsequent re-emission. As a result of charge conservation, only electrically neutral matter can interact with the D-particles. Quantum fluctuations of the D-particles induce a nontrivial space-time background; in some circumstances, this could be akin to a cosmological Friedman-Robertson-Walker expanding-universe, with weak (but nonzero) particle production. Furthermore, the D-particle medium can induce an Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein-type effect. We have argued previously, in the context of bosons, that the so-called flavor vacuum is the appropriate state to be used, at least for low-energy excitations, with energies/momenta up to a dynamically determined cutoff scale. Given the intriguing mass scale provided by neutrino flavor mass differences from the point of view of dark energy, we evaluate the flavor-vacuum expectation value (condensate) of the stress-energy tensor of the 1/2-spin fields with mixing in an effective-low-energy quantum field theory in this foam-induced curved space-time. We demonstrate, at late epochs of the Universe, that the fermionic vacuum condensate behaves as a fluid with negative pressure and positive energy; however, the equation of state has w{sub fermion}>-1/3 and so the contribution of the fermion-fluid flavor vacuum alone could not yield accelerating universes. Such contributions to the vacuum energy should be considered as (algebraically) additive to the flavored boson contributions, evaluated in our previous works; this should be considered as natural from (broken) target-space supersymmetry that characterizes realistic superstring

  11. Dark Energy Rules the Universe (and why the dinosaurs do not!) (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric

    2008-11-28

    The revolutionary discovery that the expansion of the universe is speeding up, not slowing down from gravity, means that 75 percent of our universe consists of mysterious dark energy. Berkeley Lab theoretical physicist Eric Linder delves into the mystery of dark energy as part of the Science in the Theatre lecture series on Nov. 24, 2008.

  12. Holographic Ricci Dark Energy Model with Non-constant c 2 Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we study holographic Ricci dark energy model with non-constant c 2 term in dark energy density formula. We consider FRW metric in flat space-time and calculate density. Also we find scale factor and Hubble expansion parameter.

  13. Dark Energy Rules the Universe (and why the dinosaurs do not!) (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Linder, Eric

    2016-07-12

    The revolutionary discovery that the expansion of the universe is speeding up, not slowing down from gravity, means that 75 percent of our universe consists of mysterious dark energy. Berkeley Lab theoretical physicist Eric Linder delves into the mystery of dark energy as part of the Science in the Theatre lecture series on Nov. 24, 2008.

  14. The EOS polar platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald; Hobish, Mitchell K.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is presented. The EOS will be part of the Mission to Planet Earth that will include a series of flight and scientific experiments. The initial polar-orbiting platform, EOS-A, will carry a suite of instruments designed to examine earth system processes at and near the planet's surface, and the interactions between various subsystems. Some of the instruments that will provide specialized data for geologists, meteorologists, biochemists, biologists, and physicists are described. Thus, EOS will provide an opportunity for technologists and scientists to examine the earth to a level of detail not previously attainable.

  15. Using energy peaks to count dark matter particles in decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; Wardlow, Kyle

    2013-06-01

    We study the determination of the symmetry that stabilizes a dark matter (DM) candidate produced at colliders. Our question is motivated per se, and by several alternative symmetries that appear in models that provide a DM particle. To this end, we devise a strategy to determine whether a heavy mother particle decays into one visible massless particle and one or two DM particles. The counting of DM particles in these decays is relevant to distinguish the minimal choice of Z2 from a Z3 stabilization symmetry, under which the heavy particle and the DM are charged and the visible particle is not. Our method is novel in that it chiefly uses the peak of the energy spectrum of the visible particle and only secondarily uses the MT2 endpoint of events in which the heavy mother particles are pair-produced. We present new theoretical results concerning the energy distribution of the decay products of a three-body decay, which are crucial for our method. To demonstrate the feasibility of our method in investigating the stabilization symmetry, we apply it in distinguishing the decay of a bottom quark partner into a b quark and one or two DM particles. The method can be applied generally to distinguish two- and three-body decays, irrespective of DM.

  16. Quantum Information, Entropy, ALPHA, Hubble Time, and Dark Energy, Linked?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-03-01

    The postulation of fundamental constants by Newton, Einstein and Planck gave us natural units at Planck scale. Additional postulates may explain coupling constants. About sixty orders of magnitude of Planck times equal Hubble time (W). Substitution of W in Boltzmann's entropy equation (S=k ln W; with Boltzmann constant k = 1 in natural units, and using the natural logarithm to probe nature) equates the statistical entropy (S) of the universe to about 137, the reciprocal of the fine-structure constant (α). Thermodynamic entropy (dS = δQ/T), a consequence of statistical entropy, implies that the fine-structure constant generates heat out of vacuum energy or dark energy. We draw support from the insights of Maxwell's demon (1867), Gamow (1967) and Eddington (1949). In information theory, entropy is linked to a measure of uncertainty, indicating that the fine-structure constant is greater than or equal to the reciprocal of the natural logarithm of the age of the universe: α>=1 / 1 lnW . - lnW. The postulation in [1] (a draft of a 2008 planned review paper) will address further issues. [1] S. Goradia, What is Fine Structure Constant? http://www.arxiv.org/abs/physics/0210040v3 (revised 1/6/2007)

  17. Distributed SUSY breaking: dark energy, Newton's law and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; van Nierop, L.; Williams, M.

    2014-07-01

    We identify the underlying symmetry mechanism that suppresses the low-energy effective 4D cosmological constant within some 6D supergravity models, generically leading to results suppressed by powers of the KK scale, m {/K K 2}, relative to the much larger size, m 4, associated with mass- m particles localized in these models on codimension-2 branes. These models are examples for which the local conditions for unbroken supersymmetry can be satisfied locally everywhere within the extra dimensions, but are obstructed only by global conditions like flux quantization or by the mutual inconsistency of the boundary conditions required at the various branes. Consequently quantities (like vacuum energies) forbidden by supersymmetry cannot become nonzero until wavelengths of order the KK scale are integrated out, since only such long wavelength modes can see the entire space and so `know' that supersymmetry has broken. We verify these arguments by extending earlier rugby-ball calculations of one-loop vacuum energies within these models to more general pairs of branes within two warped extra dimensions. For the Standard Model confined to one of two otherwise identical branes, the predicted effective 4D vacuum energy density is of order ρ vac ⋍ C( mM g /4 πM p )4 = C(5 .6 × 10-5 eV)4, where M g ≳ 10 TeV (corresponding to extra-dimensional size r ≲ 1 μm) and M p = 2 .44 × 1018 GeV are the 6D and 4D rationalized Planck scales, and m is the heaviest brane-localized particle. (For numerical purposes we take m to be the top-quark mass and take M g as small as possible, consistent with energy-loss bounds from supernovae.) C is a constant depending on the details of the bulk spectrum, which could easily be of order 500 for each of hundreds of fields in the bulk. The value C ˜ 6 × 106 would give the observed Dark Energy density.

  18. EOS mapping accuracy study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, R. B.; Eppes, T. A.; Ouellette, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were performed to evaluate various image positioning methods for possible use in the earth observatory satellite (EOS) program and other earth resource imaging satellite programs. The primary goal is the generation of geometrically corrected and registered images, positioned with respect to the earth's surface. The EOS sensors which were considered were the thematic mapper, the return beam vidicon camera, and the high resolution pointable imager. The image positioning methods evaluated consisted of various combinations of satellite data and ground control points. It was concluded that EOS attitude control system design must be considered as a part of the image positioning problem for EOS, along with image sensor design and ground image processing system design. Study results show that, with suitable efficiency for ground control point selection and matching activities during data processing, extensive reliance should be placed on use of ground control points for positioning the images obtained from EOS and similar programs.

  19. Crowdsourcing quality control for Dark Energy Survey images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, P.; Sheldon, E.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a crowdsourcing web application for image quality control employed by the Dark Energy Survey. Dubbed the "DES exposure checker", it renders science-grade images directly to a web browser and allows users to mark problematic features from a set of predefined classes. Users can also generate custom labels and thus help identify previously unknown problem classes. User reports are fed back to hardware and software experts to help mitigate and eliminate recognized issues. We report on the implementation of the application and our experience with its over 100 users, the majority of which are professional or prospective astronomers but not data management experts. We discuss aspects of user training and engagement, and demonstrate how problem reports have been pivotal to rapidly correct artifacts which would likely have been too subtle or infrequent to be recognized otherwise. We conclude with a number of important lessons learned, suggest possible improvements, and recommend this collective exploratory approach for future astronomical surveys or other extensive data sets with a sufficiently large user base. We also release open-source code of the web application and host an online demo version at http://des-exp-checker.pmelchior.net.

  20. Dark energy parametrization motivated by scalar field dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Macorra, Axel

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new dark energy (DE) parametrization motivated by the dynamics of a scalar field ϕ. We use an equation of state w parametrized in terms of two functions L and y, closely related to the dynamics of scalar fields, which is exact and has no approximation. By choosing an appropriate ansatz for L we obtain a wide class of behavior for the evolution of DE without the need to specify the scalar potential V. We parametrize L and y in terms of only four parameters, giving w a rich structure and allowing for a wide class of DE dynamics. Our w can either grow and later decrease, or it can happen the other way around; the steepness of the transition is not fixed and it contains the ansatz w={w}o+{w}a(1-a). Our parametrization follows closely the dynamics of a scalar field, and the function L allows us to connect it with the scalar potential V(φ ). While the Universe is accelerating and the slow roll approximation is valid, we get L≃ {({V}\\prime /V)}2. To determine the dynamics of DE we also calculate the background evolution and its perturbations, since they are important to discriminate between different DE models.

  1. Cosmic shear measurements with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M. R.; Troxel, M. A.; MacCrann, N.; Krause, E.; Eifler, T. F.; Friedrich, O.; Nicola, A.; Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Busha, M. T.; Chang, C.; Dodelson, S.; Erickson, B.; Evrard, A. E.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Kravtsov, A.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sabiu, C.; Sánchez, C.; Seo, H.; Sheldon, E.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We furthermore use a large suite of simulations to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7 σ . Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper [DES et al., Phys. Rev. D 94, 022001 (2016).].

  2. Crowdsourcing quality control for Dark Energy Survey images

    DOE PAGES

    Melchior, P.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a crowdsourcing web application for image quality control employed by the Dark Energy Survey. Dubbed the "DES exposure checker", it renders science-grade images directly to a web browser and allows users to mark problematic features from a set of predefined classes. Users can also generate custom labels and thus help identify previously unknown problem classes. User reports are fed back to hardware and software experts to help mitigate and eliminate recognized issues. We report on the implementation of the application and our experience with its over 100 users, the majority of which are professional or prospective astronomersmore » but not data management experts. We discuss aspects of user training and engagement, and demonstrate how problem reports have been pivotal to rapidly correct artifacts which would likely have been too subtle or infrequent to be recognized otherwise. We conclude with a number of important lessons learned, suggest possible improvements, and recommend this collective exploratory approach for future astronomical surveys or other extensive data sets with a sufficiently large user base. We also release open-source code of the web application and host an online demo versionat http://des-exp-checker.pmelchior.net« less

  3. Crowdsourcing quality control for Dark Energy Survey images

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, P.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a crowdsourcing web application for image quality control employed by the Dark Energy Survey. Dubbed the "DES exposure checker", it renders science-grade images directly to a web browser and allows users to mark problematic features from a set of predefined classes. Users can also generate custom labels and thus help identify previously unknown problem classes. User reports are fed back to hardware and software experts to help mitigate and eliminate recognized issues. We report on the implementation of the application and our experience with its over 100 users, the majority of which are professional or prospective astronomers but not data management experts. We discuss aspects of user training and engagement, and demonstrate how problem reports have been pivotal to rapidly correct artifacts which would likely have been too subtle or infrequent to be recognized otherwise. We conclude with a number of important lessons learned, suggest possible improvements, and recommend this collective exploratory approach for future astronomical surveys or other extensive data sets with a sufficiently large user base. We also release open-source code of the web application and host an online demo versionat http://des-exp-checker.pmelchior.net

  4. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) instrument mechanism control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Carl T.; Pappalardo, Daniel; Pogge, Richard; Martini, Paul; Derwent, Mark; O'Brien, Thomas P.; Honscheid, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14,000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5,000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We present the design details of the instrument mechanism control systems for the spectrographs. Each spectrograph has a stand-alone mechanism control box that operates the unit's four remotely-operated mechanisms (two shutters and two Hartmannn doors), and provides a suite of temperature and humidity sensors. Each control box is highly modular, and is operated by a dedicated on-board Linux computer to provide all of the control and monitoring functions. We describe our solution for integrating a number of network-connected devices within each unit spectrograph, and describe the basic software architecture.

  5. Topological structure of the vacuum, cosmological constant and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidharth, B. G.; Das, A.; Das, C. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we present a theory of cosmological constant and dark energy (DE), based on the topological structure of the vacuum. The multiple point principle (MPP) is reviewed. It demonstrates the existence of the two vacua into the SM. The Froggatt-Nielsen’s prediction of the top-quark and Higgs masses is given in the assumption that there exist two degenerate vacua in the SM. This prediction was improved by the next-order calculations. We also considered Sidharth’s theory of cosmological constant based on the noncommutative geometry of the Planck scale space-time, what gives an extremely small DE density providing the accelerating expansion of the Universe. Theory of two degenerate vacua — the Planck scale phase and electroweak (EW) phase — is also reviewed, topological defects in these vacua are investigated, also the Compton wavelength phase suggested by Sidharth is discussed. A general theory of the phase transition and the problem of the vacuum stability in the SM is reviewed. Assuming the existence of a new scalar S bound state 6t + 6t¯, earlier predicted by Froggatt, Nielsen and Laperashvili, we try to provide the vacuum stability in the SM and exact accuracy of the MPP.

  6. Cosmic shear measurements with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M. R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, we present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulations to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper.

  7. AUTOMATED TRANSIENT IDENTIFICATION IN THE DARK ENERGY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D. A.; Nugent, P. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Nichol, R. C.; Papadopoulos, A.; Fischer, J. A.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Foley, R. J.; Gupta, R. R.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Wester, W.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Banerji, M.; Bertin, E.; and others

    2015-09-15

    We describe an algorithm for identifying point-source transients and moving objects on reference-subtracted optical images containing artifacts of processing and instrumentation. The algorithm makes use of the supervised machine learning technique known as Random Forest. We present results from its use in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova program (DES-SN), where it was trained using a sample of 898,963 signal and background events generated by the transient detection pipeline. After reprocessing the data collected during the first DES-SN observing season (2013 September through 2014 February) using the algorithm, the number of transient candidates eligible for human scanning decreased by a factor of 13.4, while only 1.0% of the artificial Type Ia supernovae (SNe) injected into search images to monitor survey efficiency were lost, most of which were very faint events. Here we characterize the algorithm’s performance in detail, and we discuss how it can inform pipeline design decisions for future time-domain imaging surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Zwicky Transient Facility. An implementation of the algorithm and the training data used in this paper are available at at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/dessn/autoscan.

  8. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with themore » corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.« less

  9. A topological extension of GR: Black holes induce dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaans, M.

    2013-02-01

    A topological extension of general relativity is presented. The superposition principle of quantum mechanics, as formulated by the Feynman path integral, is taken as a starting point. It is argued that the trajectories that enter this path integral are distinct and thus that space-time topology is multiply connected. Specifically, space-time at the Planck scale consists of a lattice of three-tori that facilitates many distinct paths for particles to travel along. To add gravity, mini black holes are attached to this lattice. These mini black holes represent Wheeler's quantum foam and result from the fact that GR is not conformally invariant. The number of such mini black holes in any time-slice through four-space is found to be equal to the number of macroscopic (so long-lived) black holes in the entire universe. This connection, by which macroscopic black holes induce mini black holes, is a topological expression of Mach's principle. The proposed topological extension of GR can be tested because, if correct, the dark energy density of the universe should be proportional the total number of macroscopic black holes in the universe at any time. This prediction, although strange, agrees with current astrophysical observations.

  10. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with the corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.

  11. CALIBRATED ULTRA FAST IMAGE SIMULATIONS FOR THE DARK ENERGY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruderer, Claudio; Chang, Chihway; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Bergé, Joel; Gamper, Lukas

    2016-01-20

    Image simulations are becoming increasingly important in understanding the measurement process of the shapes of galaxies for weak lensing and the associated systematic effects. For this purpose we present the first implementation of the Monte Carlo Control Loops (MCCL), a coherent framework for studying systematic effects in weak lensing. It allows us to model and calibrate the shear measurement process using image simulations from the Ultra Fast Image Generator (UFig) and the image analysis software SExtractor. We apply this framework to a subset of the data taken during the Science Verification period (SV) of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We calibrate the UFig simulations to be statistically consistent with one of the SV images, which covers ∼0.5 square degrees. We then perform tolerance analyses by perturbing six simulation parameters and study their impact on the shear measurement at the one-point level. This allows us to determine the relative importance of different parameters. For spatially constant systematic errors and point-spread function, the calibration of the simulation reaches the weak lensing precision needed for the DES SV survey area. Furthermore, we find a sensitivity of the shear measurement to the intrinsic ellipticity distribution, and an interplay between the magnitude-size and the pixel value diagnostics in constraining the noise model. This work is the first application of the MCCL framework to data and shows how it can be used to methodically study the impact of systematics on the cosmic shear measurement.

  12. Automated transient identification in the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Goldstein, D. A.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Fischer, J. A.; ...

    2015-09-01

    We describe an algorithm for identifying point-source transients and moving objects on reference-subtracted optical images containing artifacts of processing and instrumentation. The algorithm makes use of the supervised machine learning technique known as Random Forest. We present results from its use in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova program (DES-SN), where it was trained using a sample of 898,963 signal and background events generated by the transient detection pipeline. After reprocessing the data collected during the first DES-SN observing season (2013 September through 2014 February) using the algorithm, the number of transient candidates eligible for human scanning decreased by a factormore » of 13.4, while only 1.0% of the artificial Type Ia supernovae (SNe) injected into search images to monitor survey efficiency were lost, most of which were very faint events. Furthermore, we characterize the algorithm's performance in detail, and we discuss how it can inform pipeline design decisions for future time-domain imaging surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Zwicky Transient Facility.« less

  13. Automated transient identification in the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D. A.

    2015-08-20

    We describe an algorithm for identifying point-source transients and moving objects on reference-subtracted optical images containing artifacts of processing and instrumentation. The algorithm makes use of the supervised machine learning technique known as Random Forest. We present results from its use in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova program (DES-SN), where it was trained using a sample of 898,963 signal and background events generated by the transient detection pipeline. After reprocessing the data collected during the first DES-SN observing season (2013 September through 2014 February) using the algorithm, the number of transient candidates eligible for human scanning decreased by a factor of 13.4, while only 1.0 percent of the artificial Type Ia supernovae (SNe) injected into search images to monitor survey efficiency were lost, most of which were very faint events. Here we characterize the algorithm's performance in detail, and we discuss how it can inform pipeline design decisions for future time-domain imaging surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Zwicky Transient Facility.

  14. Automated transient identification in the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D. A.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Fischer, J. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gupta, R. R.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Nichol, R. C.; Nungent, P.; Papadopoulos, A.; Sako, M.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Thomas, R. C.; Wester, W.; Wolf, R. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Banjeri, M.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Covarrubias, R.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Neto, A. Fausti; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Merritt, K. W.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Walker, A. R.

    2015-09-01

    We describe an algorithm for identifying point-source transients and moving objects on reference-subtracted optical images containing artifacts of processing and instrumentation. The algorithm makes use of the supervised machine learning technique known as Random Forest. We present results from its use in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova program (DES-SN), where it was trained using a sample of 898,963 signal and background events generated by the transient detection pipeline. After reprocessing the data collected during the first DES-SN observing season (2013 September through 2014 February) using the algorithm, the number of transient candidates eligible for human scanning decreased by a factor of 13.4, while only 1.0% of the artificial Type Ia supernovae (SNe) injected into search images to monitor survey efficiency were lost, most of which were very faint events. Furthermore, we characterize the algorithm's performance in detail, and we discuss how it can inform pipeline design decisions for future time-domain imaging surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Zwicky Transient Facility.

  15. Cosmic shear measurements with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    DOE PAGES

    Becker, M. R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, we present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulationsmore » to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper.« less

  16. If Gravity is Geometry, is Dark Energy just Arithmetic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czachor, Marek

    2017-02-01

    Arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division), as well as the calculus they imply, are non-unique. The examples of four-dimensional spaces, R+4 and (-L/2,L/2)4, are considered where different types of arithmetic and calculus coexist simultaneously. In all the examples there exists a non-Diophantine arithmetic that makes the space globally Minkowskian, and thus the laws of physics are formulated in terms of the corresponding calculus. However, when one switches to the `natural' Diophantine arithmetic and calculus, the Minkowskian character of the space is lost and what one effectively obtains is a Lorentzian manifold. I discuss in more detail the problem of electromagnetic fields produced by a pointlike charge. The solution has the standard form when expressed in terms of the non-Diophantine formalism. When the `natural' formalsm is used, the same solution looks as if the fields were created by a charge located in an expanding universe, with nontrivially accelerating expansion. The effect is clearly visible also in solutions of the Friedman equation with vanishing cosmological constant. All of this suggests that phenomena attributed to dark energy may be a manifestation of a miss-match between the arithmetic employed in mathematical modeling, and the one occurring at the level of natural laws. Arithmetic is as physical as geometry.

  17. The prime focus corrector for dark energy spectroscopic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doel, Peter; Besuner, Robert; Brooks, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Gallo, Giuseppe; Gutierrez, Gaston; Kent, Stephen; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Liang, Ming; Miller, Timothy; Sprayberry, David

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), currently under construction, is designed to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. This paper describes the overall design and construction status of the prime focus corrector. The size and complexity of the system poses significant design and production challenges. The optics of the corrector consists of six lenses, ranging from 0.8 - 1.14m in diameter, two of which can be rotated to act as an atmospheric dispersion corrector. These lenses are mounted in custom cells that themselves are mounted in a barrel assembly the alignment of which can be actively controlled by a hexapod system to micrometer precision. The whole assembly will be mounted at the prime focus of the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak observatory and will be one of the largest lens systems ever built for an optical telescope. Construction of the corrector began in 2014 and is well advanced. The system is due to be delivered to the telescope for installation in early 2018.

  18. If Gravity is Geometry, is Dark Energy just Arithmetic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czachor, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division), as well as the calculus they imply, are non-unique. The examples of four-dimensional spaces, R+4 and (- L/2, L/2)4, are considered where different types of arithmetic and calculus coexist simultaneously. In all the examples there exists a non-Diophantine arithmetic that makes the space globally Minkowskian, and thus the laws of physics are formulated in terms of the corresponding calculus. However, when one switches to the `natural' Diophantine arithmetic and calculus, the Minkowskian character of the space is lost and what one effectively obtains is a Lorentzian manifold. I discuss in more detail the problem of electromagnetic fields produced by a pointlike charge. The solution has the standard form when expressed in terms of the non-Diophantine formalism. When the `natural' formalsm is used, the same solution looks as if the fields were created by a charge located in an expanding universe, with nontrivially accelerating expansion. The effect is clearly visible also in solutions of the Friedman equation with vanishing cosmological constant. All of this suggests that phenomena attributed to dark energy may be a manifestation of a miss-match between the arithmetic employed in mathematical modeling, and the one occurring at the level of natural laws. Arithmetic is as physical as geometry.

  19. Probing interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Miao; Li, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xin E-mail: renzhe@mail.ustc.edu.cn E-mail: wangyi@hep.physics.mcgill.ca

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we place observational constraints on the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model. We consider three kinds of phenomenological interactions between holographic dark energy and matter, i.e., the interaction term Q is proportional to the energy densities of dark energy (ρ{sub Λ}), matter (ρ{sub m}), and matter plus dark energy (ρ{sub m}+ρ{sub Λ}). For probing the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model, we use the latest observational data including the type Ia supernovae (SNIa) Constitution data, the shift parameter of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) given by the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP5) observations, and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our results show that the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model are both rather small. Besides, it is interesting to find that there exists significant degeneracy between the phenomenological interaction and the spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model.

  20. Variable modified Chaplygin gas in the holographic dark energy scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Debnath, Ujjal

    2012-07-01

    The holographic principle emerged in the context of black-holes, where it was noted that a local quantum field theory can not fully describe the black holes [1]. Some long standing debates regarding the time evolution of a system, where a black hole forms and then evaporates, played the key role in the development of the holographic principle [2,3,4]. The Chaplygin gas is characterized by an exotic equation of state p=-B/ρ. where B is a positive constant. Role of Chaplygin gas in the accelerated universe has been studied by several authors. The above mentioned equation of state has been modified to p=-B/ρ^{α}, where α lies between 0 and 1. This equation has been further modified to p=-A+B/ρ^{α}. This is called the modified Chaplygin gas. Debnath [5] introduced a variable modified Chaplygin gas by considering B as a function of scale factor a. In this work, we have considered that the universe is filled with normal matter and variable modified Chaplygin gas. Also we have considered the interaction between normal matter and variable modified Chaplygin gas in FRW universe. Then we have considered a correspondence between the holographic dark energy density and interacting variable modified Chaplygin gas energy density. Then we have reconstructed the potential of the scalar field which describes the variable modified Chaplygin cosmology References: [1] K. Enqvist, S. Hannested and M. S. Sloth, JCAP 2, 004 (2005). [2] L. Thorlocius, hep-th/0404098. [3] G. T. Hooft, gr-qc/9310026. [4] L. Susskind, J. Math. Phys. 36, 6377 (1995). [5] U. Debnath, Astrophys. Space Sci. 312, 295 (2007).

  1. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in a quintessence cosmological model: Including anisotropic stress of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. T.; Xu, L. X.; Gui, Y. X.

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the quintessence cold dark matter model with constant equation of state and constant speed of sound in dark energy rest frame, including dark energy perturbation and its anisotropic stress. Comparing with the {Lambda}CDM model, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW)-power spectrums are affected by different background evolutions and dark energy perturbation. As we change the speed of sound from 1 to 0 in the quintessence cold dark matter model with given state parameters, it is found that the inclusion of dark energy anisotropic stress makes the variation of magnitude of the ISW source uncertain due to the anticorrelation between the speed of sound and the ratio of dark energy density perturbation contrast to dark matter density perturbation contrast in the ISW-source term. Thus, the magnitude of the ISW-source term is governed by the competition between the alterant multiple of (1+3/2xc-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}) and that of {delta}{sub de}/{delta}{sub m} with the variation of c-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}.

  2. Structure Formation in a Variable Dark Energy Model and Observational Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabi-Bidgoli, S.; Movahed, M. S.

    The interpretation of a vast number of cosmological observations in the framework of FRW models suggests that the major part of the energy density of the universe is in form of dark energy with still unknown physical nature. In some models for dark energy, which are motivated by particle physics theory, the equation of state and the contribution of dark energy to the energy density of the universe can be variable. Here we study structure formation in a parameterized dark energy model, and compare its predictions with recent observational data, from the Supernova Ia gold sample and the parameters of large scale structure determined by the 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), and put some constraints on the free parameters of this model.

  3. Ten scenarios from early radiation to late time acceleration with a minimally coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, Stéphane

    2013-09-01

    We consider General Relativity with matter, radiation and a minimally coupled dark energy defined by an equation of state w. Using dynamical system method, we find the equilibrium points of such a theory assuming an expanding Universe and a positive dark energy density. Two of these points correspond to classical radiation and matter dominated epochs for the Universe. For the other points, dark energy mimics matter, radiation or accelerates Universe expansion. We then look for possible sequences of epochs describing a Universe starting with some radiation dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy), then matter dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy) and ending with an accelerated expansion. We find ten sequences able to follow this Universe history without singular behaviour of w at some saddle points. Most of them are new in dark energy literature. To get more than these ten sequences, w has to be singular at some specific saddle equilibrium points. This is an unusual mathematical property of the equation of state in dark energy literature, whose physical consequences tend to be discarded by observations. This thus distinguishes the ten above sequences from an infinity of ways to describe Universe expansion.

  4. Conceptual problems in detecting the evolution of dark energy when using distance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolejko, K.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Dark energy is now one of the most important and topical problems in cosmology. The first step to reveal its nature is to detect the evolution of dark energy or to prove beyond doubt that the cosmological constant is indeed constant. However, in the standard approach to cosmology, the Universe is described by the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann models. Aims: We aim to show that in the perturbed universe (even if perturbations vanish if averaged over sufficiently large scales) the distance-redshift relation is not the same as in the unperturbed universe. This has a serious consequence when studying the nature of dark energy and, as shown here, can impair the analysis and studies of dark energy. Methods: The analysis is based on two methods: the linear lensing approximation and the non-linear Szekeres Swiss-Cheese model. The inhomogeneity scale is ~50 Mpc, and both models have the same density fluctuations along the line of sight. Results: The comparison between linear and non-linear methods shows that non-linear corrections are not negligible. When inhomogeneities are present the distance changes by several percent. To show how this change influences the measurements of dark energy, ten future observations with 2% uncertainties are generated. It is shown the using the standard methods (i.e. under the assumption of homogeneity) the systematics due to inhomogeneities can distort our analysis, and may lead to a conclusion that dark energy evolves when in fact it is constant (or vice versa). Conclusions: Therefore, if future observations are analysed only within the homogeneous framework then the impact of inhomogeneities (such as voids and superclusters) can be mistaken for evolving dark energy. Since the robust distinction between the evolution and non-evolution of dark energy is the first step to understanding the nature of dark energy a proper handling of inhomogeneities is essential.

  5. Early-matter-like dark energy and the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Aurich, R.; Lustig, S. E-mail: sven.lustig@uni-ulm.de

    2016-01-01

    Early-matter-like dark energy is defined as a dark energy component whose equation of state approaches that of cold dark matter (CDM) at early times. Such a component is an ingredient of unified dark matter (UDM) models, which unify the cold dark matter and the cosmological constant of the ΛCDM concordance model into a single dark fluid. Power series expansions in conformal time of the perturbations of the various components for a model with early-matter-like dark energy are provided. They allow the calculation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from the primordial initial values of the perturbations. For a phenomenological UDM model, which agrees with the observations of the local Universe, the CMB anisotropy is computed and compared with the CMB data. It is found that a match to the CMB observations is possible if the so-called effective velocity of sound c{sub eff} of the early-matter-like dark energy component is very close to zero. The modifications on the CMB temperature and polarization power spectra caused by varying the effective velocity of sound are studied.

  6. Local dark energy: HST evidence from the vicinity of the M81/M82 galaxy group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Kashibadze, O. G.; Makarov, D. I.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    2007-10-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope observations of the nearby galaxy group M81/M82 and its vicinity indicate that the dynamics of the expansion outflow around the group is dominated by the antigravity of the dark energy background. The local density of dark energy in the area is estimated to be near the global dark energy density or perhaps exactly equal to it. This conclusion agrees well with our previous results for the Local Group vicinity and the vicinity of the Cen A/M83 group.

  7. Probing the stability of superheavy dark matter particles with high-energy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, Arman; Peres, Orlando L.G.; Ibarra, Alejandro E-mail: ibarra@tum.de

    2012-11-01

    Two of the most fundamental properties of the dark matter particle, the mass and the lifetime, are only weakly constrained by the astronomical and cosmological evidence of dark matter. We derive in this paper lower limits on the lifetime of dark matter particles with masses in the range 10TeV−10{sup 15}TeV from the non-observation of ultrahigh energy neutrinos in the AMANDA, IceCube, Auger and ANITA experiments. For dark matter particles which produce neutrinos in a two body or a three body leptonic decay, we find that the dark matter lifetime must be longer than O(10{sup 26}−10{sup 28})s for masses between 10 TeV and the Grand Unification scale. Finally, we also calculate, for concrete particle physics scenarios, the limits on the strength of the interactions that induce the dark matter decay.

  8. A Search for Kilonovae in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Z.; Kessler, R.; Chen, H. Y.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Foley, R. J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Holz, D. E.; Kim, A. G.; Morganson, E.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Spinka, H.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; DES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The coalescence of a binary neutron star pair is expected to produce gravitational waves (GW) and electromagnetic radiation, both of which may be detectable with currently available instruments. We describe a search for a predicted r-process optical transient from these mergers, dubbed the “kilonova” (KN), using griz broadband data from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN). Some models predict KNe to be redder, shorter-lived, and dimmer than supernovae (SNe), but the event rate of KNe is poorly constrained. We simulate KN and SN light curves with the Monte-Carlo simulation code SNANA to optimize selection requirements, determine search efficiency, and predict SN backgrounds. Our analysis of the first two seasons of DES-SN data results in 0 events, and is consistent with our prediction of 1.1 ± 0.2 background events based on simulations of SNe. From our prediction, there is a 33% chance of finding 0 events in the data. Assuming no underlying galaxy flux, our search sets 90% upper limits on the KN volumetric rate of 1.0 × {10}7 Gpc‑3 yr‑1 for the dimmest KN model we consider (peak i-band absolute magnitude {M}i=-11.4 mag) and 2.4 × {10}4 Gpc‑3 yr‑1 for the brightest ({M}i=-16.2 mag). Accounting for anomalous subtraction artifacts on bright galaxies, these limits are ∼3 times higher. This analysis is the first untriggered optical KN search and informs selection requirements and strategies for future KN searches. Our upper limits on the KN rate are consistent with those measured by GW and gamma-ray burst searches.

  9. A Search for Kilonovae in the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Doctor, Z.; Kessler, R.; Chen, H. Y.; ...

    2017-03-02

    The coalescence of a binary neutron star pair is expected to produce gravitational waves (GW) and electromagnetic radiation, both of which may be detectable with currently available instruments. In this paper, we describe a search for a predicted r-process optical transient from these mergers, dubbed the “kilonova” (KN), using griz broadband data from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN). Some models predict KNe to be redder, shorter-lived, and dimmer than supernovae (SNe), but the event rate of KNe is poorly constrained. We simulate KN and SN light curves with the Monte-Carlo simulation code SNANA to optimize selection requirements, determine search efficiency, and predict SN backgrounds. Our analysis of the first two seasons of DES-SN data results in 0 events, and is consistent with our prediction of 1.1 ± 0.2 background events based on simulations of SNe. From our prediction, there is a 33% chance of finding 0 events in the data. Assuming no underlying galaxy flux, our search sets 90% upper limits on the KN volumetric rate of 1.0 x10more » $$^{7}$$ Gpc$-$3 yr$-$1 for the dimmest KN model we consider (peak i-band absolute magnitude $${M}_{i}=-11.4$$ mag) and 2.4x10$$^{4}$$ Gpc$-$3 yr$-$1 for the brightest ($${M}_{i}=-16.2$$ mag). Accounting for anomalous subtraction artifacts on bright galaxies, these limits are ~3 times higher. This analysis is the first untriggered optical KN search and informs selection requirements and strategies for future KN searches. Finally, our upper limits on the KN rate are consistent with those measured by GW and gamma-ray burst searches.« less

  10. A new perspective on dark energy modeling via genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesseris, Savvas; García-Bellido, Juan

    2012-11-01

    We use Genetic Algorithms to extract information from several cosmological probes, such as the type Ia supernovae (SnIa), the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and the growth rate of matter perturbations. This is done by implementing a model independent and bias-free reconstruction of the various scales and distances that characterize the data, like the luminosity dL(z) and the angular diameter distance dA(z) in the SnIa and BAO data, respectively, or the dependence with redshift of the matter density Ωm(a) in the growth rate data, fσ8(z). These quantities can then be used to reconstruct the expansion history of the Universe, and the resulting Dark Energy (DE) equation of state w(z) in the context of FRW models, or the mass radial function ΩM(r) in LTB models. In this way, the reconstruction is completely independent of our prior bias. Furthermore, we use this method to test the Etherington relation, ie the well-known relation between the luminosity and the angular diameter distance, η≡dL(z)/(1+z)2dA(z), which is equal to 1 in metric theories of gravity. We find that the present data seem to suggest a 3-σ deviation from one at redshifts z ~ 0.5. Finally, we present a novel way, within the Genetic Algorithm paradigm, to analytically estimate the errors on the reconstructed quantities by calculating a Path Integral over all possible functions that may contribute to the likelihood. We show that this can be done regardless of the data being correlated or uncorrelated with each other and we also explicitly demonstrate that our approach is in good agreement with other error estimation techniques like the Fisher Matrix approach and the Bootstrap Monte Carlo.

  11. Contact term, its holographic description in QCD and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2012-08-01

    In this work we study the well-known contact term, which is the key element in resolving the so-called U(1)A problem in QCD. We study this term using the dual holographic description. We argue that in the dual picture the contact term is saturated by the D2-branes which can be interpreted as the tunneling events in Minkowski space-time. We quote a number of direct lattice results supporting this identification. We also argue that the contact term receives a Casimir-like correction ˜(ΛQCDR)-1 rather than the naively expected exp⁡(-ΛQCDR) when the Minkowski space-time R3,1 is replaced by a large but finite manifold with a size R. Such a behavior is consistent with other quantum field theory (QFT)-based computations when powerlike corrections are due to nontrivial properties of topological sectors of the theory. In holographic description, such a behavior is due to a massless Ramond-Ramond (RR) field living in the bulk of multidimensional space when powerlike corrections is a natural outcome of a massless RR field. In many respects, the phenomenon is similar to the Aharonov-Casher effect when the “modular electric field” can penetrate into a superconductor where the electric field is exponentially screened. The role of “modular operator” from the Aharonov-Casher effect is played by a large-gauge transformation operator T in four-dimensional QCD, resulting in the transparency of the system to topologically nontrivial pure gauge configurations. We discuss some profound consequences of our findings. In particular, we speculate that a slow variation of the contact term in expanding universe might be the main source of the observed dark energy.

  12. On the determination of curvature and dynamical dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Virey, J-M; Taxil, P; Talon-Esmieu, D; Ealet, A; Tilquin, A E-mail: talon@cppm.in2p3.fr E-mail: taxil@cpt.univ-mrs.fr

    2008-12-15

    Constraining simultaneously the dark energy (DE) equation of state and the curvature of the universe is difficult due to strong degeneracies. To circumvent this problem when analyzing data it is usual to assume flatness to constrain the DE or, conversely, to assume that the DE is a cosmological constant to constrain the curvature. In this paper, we quantify the impact of such assumptions with an eye to future large surveys. We simulate future data for type Ia supernovae, the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations for a large range of fiducial cosmologies allowing a small spatial curvature. We take into account a possible time evolution of DE through a parameterized equation of state: w(a) = w{sub 0}+(1-a)w{sub a}. We then fit the simulated data with a wrong assumption on the curvature or on the DE parameters. For a fiducial {Lambda}CDM cosmology, if flatness is incorrectly assumed in the fit and if the true curvature is within the ranges 0.01<{Omega}{sub k}<0.03 and -0.07<{Omega}{sub k}<-0.01, one will be led to conclude erroneously that an evolving DE is present, even with high statistics. On the other hand, models with curvature and dynamical DE can be confused with a flat {Lambda}CDM model when the fit ignores a possible DE evolution. We find that, in the future, with high statistics, such risks of confusion should be limited, but they are still possible, and biases in the cosmological parameters might be important. We conclude by recalling that, in the future, it will be mandatory to perform some complete multi-probe analyses, leaving the DE parameters as well as the curvature as free parameters.

  13. Observational constraints on cosmic neutrinos and dark energy revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Meng, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Shan, HuanYuan; Tao, Charling; Gong, Yan; Chen, Xuelei; Huang, Y.F. E-mail: mlwx@mail.bnu.edu.cn E-mail: shanhuany@gmail.com E-mail: tao@cppm.in2p3.fr E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn

    2012-11-01

    Using several cosmological observations, i.e. the cosmic microwave background anisotropies (WMAP), the weak gravitational lensing (CFHTLS), the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations (SDSS+WiggleZ), the most recent observational Hubble parameter data, the Union2.1 compilation of type Ia supernovae, and the HST prior, we impose constraints on the sum of neutrino masses (m{sub ν}), the effective number of neutrino species (N{sub eff}) and dark energy equation of state (w), individually and collectively. We find that a tight upper limit on m{sub ν} can be extracted from the full data combination, if N{sub eff} and w are fixed. However this upper bound is severely weakened if N{sub eff} and w are allowed to vary. This result naturally raises questions on the robustness of previous strict upper bounds on m{sub ν}, ever reported in the literature. The best-fit values from our most generalized constraint read m{sub ν} = 0.556{sup +0.231}{sub −0.288} eV, N{sub eff} = 3.839±0.452, and w = −1.058±0.088 at 68% confidence level, which shows a firm lower limit on total neutrino mass, favors an extra light degree of freedom, and supports the cosmological constant model. The current weak lensing data are already helpful in constraining cosmological model parameters for fixed w. The dataset of Hubble parameter gains numerous advantages over supernovae when w = −1, particularly its illuminating power in constraining N{sub eff}. As long as w is included as a free parameter, it is still the standardizable candles of type Ia supernovae that play the most dominant role in the parameter constraints.

  14. SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS AND STRATEGIES FOR THE DARK ENERGY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J. P.; Kuhlmann, S.; Biswas, R.; Kovacs, E.; Crane, I.; Hufford, T.; Kessler, R.; Frieman, J. A.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Nugent, P.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Nichol, R. C.; Finley, D. A.; Marriner, J.; Reis, R. R. R.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mukherjee, P.; Parkinson, D.; Sako, M.; and others

    2012-07-10

    We present an analysis of supernova light curves simulated for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova search. The simulations employ a code suite that generates and fits realistic light curves in order to obtain distance modulus/redshift pairs that are passed to a cosmology fitter. We investigated several different survey strategies including field selection, supernova selection biases, and photometric redshift measurements. Using the results of this study, we chose a 30 deg{sup 2} search area in the griz filter set. We forecast (1) that this survey will provide a homogeneous sample of up to 4000 Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range 0.05

  15. Einstein's Gravitational Field Approach to Dark Matter and Dark Energy-Geometric Particle Decay into the Vacuum Energy Generating Higgs Boson and Heavy Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Walter James

    2015-08-01

    During an interview at the Niels Bohr Institute David Bohm stated, "according to Einstein, particles should eventually emerge as singularities, or very strong regions of stable pulses of (the gravitational) field" [1]. Starting from this premise, we show spacetime, indeed, manifests stable pulses (n-valued gravitons) that decay into the vacuum energy to generate all three boson masses (including Higgs), as well as heavy-quark mass; and all in precise agreement with the 2010 CODATA report on fundamental constants. Furthermore, our relativized quantum physics approach (RQP) answers to the mystery surrounding dark energy, dark matter, accelerated spacetime, and why ordinary matter dominates over antimatter.

  16. Low-energy recoils and energy scale in liquid xenon detector for direct dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Liquid xenon has been proven to be a great detector medium for the direct search of dark matter. However, in the energy region of below 10 keV, the light yield and charge production are not fully understood due to the convolution of excitation, recombination and quenching. We have already studied a recombination model to explain the physics processes involved in liquid xenon. Work is continued on the average energy expended per electron-ion pair as a function of energy based on the cross sections for different type of scattering processes. In this paper, the results will be discussed in comparison with available experimental data using Birk's Law to understand how scintillation quenching contributes to the non-linear light yield for electron recoils with energy below 10 keV in liquid xenon. This work is supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota.

  17. The EOS Aura Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Douglass, A. R.; Hilsenrath, E.; Luce, M.; Barnett, J.; Beer, R.; Waters, J.; Gille, J.; Levelt, P. F.; DeCola, P.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The EOS Aura Mission is designed to make comprehensive chemical measurements of the troposphere and stratosphere. In addition the mission will make measurements of important climate variables such as aerosols, and upper tropospheric water vapor and ozone. Aura will launch in late 2003 and will fly 15 minutes behind EOS Aqua in a polar sun synchronous ascending node orbit with a 1:30 pm equator crossing time.

  18. Inference for the dark energy equation of state using Type IA supernova data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Christopher; Freeman, Peter; Wasserman, Larry; Nichol, Robert; Miller, Christopher

    The surprising discovery of an accelerating universe led cosmologists to posit the existence of "dark energy" - a mysterious energy field that permeates the universe. Understanding dark energy has become the central problem of modern cosmology. After describing the scientific background in depth, we formulate the task as a nonlinear inverse problem that expresses the comoving distance function in terms of the dark-energy equation of state. We present two classes of methods for making sharp statistical inferences about the equation of state from observations of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe). First, we derive a technique for testing hypotheses about the equation of state that requires no assumptions about its form and can distinguish among competing theories. Second, we present a framework for computing parametric and nonparametric estimators of the equation of state, with an associated assessment of uncertainty. Using our approach, we evaluate the strength of statistical evidence for various competing models of dark energy. Consistent with current studies, we find that with the available Type Ia SNe data, it is not possible to distinguish statistically among popular dark-energy models, and that, in particular, there is no support in the data for rejecting a cosmological constant. With much more supernova data likely to be available in coming years (e.g., from the DOE/NASA Joint Dark Energy Mission), we address the more interesting question of whether future data sets will have sufficient resolution to distinguish among competing theories.

  19. Spectroscopic Reductions of White Dwarf Stars to Support Dark Energy Survey Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulledge, Deborah Jean; Robertson, Jacob M.; Tucker, Douglas Lee; Smith, J. Allyn; Wester, William; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Fix, Mees B.

    2017-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey is an imaging survey that covers 5000 square degrees in the Southern hemisphere to map galaxies and gather information on dark energy. Science requirements for the survey require a 0.5% uncertainty in color, driven by supernova science. The Dark Energy Survey relies a calibration technique that uses white dwarf stars to set zero points. These white dwarf spectra are fit to models which are used to generate synthetic photometry. These values are compared to the measured values from the survey to verify that the zero points are correct. We present results to date of the spectroscopic reductions of these white dwarf stars in support of the calibrations for the Dark Energy Survey.

  20. Exploring parameter constraints on quintessential dark energy: The Albrecht-Skordis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Michael; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Bozek, Brandon; Yashar, Mark

    2008-05-01

    We consider the effect of future dark energy experiments on “Albrecht-Skordis” (AS) models of scalar field dark energy using the Monte Carlo Markov chain method. We deal with the issues of parametrization of these models, and have included spatial curvature as a parameter, finding it to be important. We use the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) simulated data to represent future experiments and report our results in the form of likelihood contours in the chosen parameter space. Simulated data is produced for cases where the background cosmology has a cosmological constant, as well as cases where the dark energy is provided by the AS model. The latter helps us demonstrate the power of DETF Stage 4 data in the context of this specific model. Though the AS model can produce equations of state functions very different from what is possible with the w0-wa parametrization used by the DETF, our results are consistent with those reported by the DETF.